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Sample records for fully assembled capsid

  1. Dynamic pathways for viral capsid assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Hagan, Michael F.; Chandler, David

    2006-01-01

    We develop a class of models with which we simulate the assembly of particles into T1 capsid-like objects using Newtonian dynamics. By simulating assembly for many different values of system parameters, we vary the forces that drive assembly. For some ranges of parameters, assembly is facile, while for others, assembly is dynamically frustrated by kinetic traps corresponding to malformed or incompletely formed capsids. Our simulations sample many independent trajectories at various capsomer c...

  2. Dynamic pathways for viral capsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, Michael F.; Chandler, David

    2006-02-09

    We develop a class of models with which we simulate the assembly of particles into T1 capsid-like objects using Newtonian dynamics. By simulating assembly for many different values of system parameters, we vary the forces that drive assembly. For some ranges of parameters, assembly is facile, while for others, assembly is dynamically frustrated by kinetic traps corresponding to malformed or incompletely formed capsids. Our simulations sample many independent trajectories at various capsomer concentrations, allowing for statistically meaningful conclusions. Depending on subunit (i.e., capsomer) geometries, successful assembly proceeds by several mechanisms involving binding of intermediates of various sizes. We discuss the relationship between these mechanisms and experimental evaluations of capsid assembly processes.

  3. The hepatitis B virus core protein intradimer interface modulates capsid assembly and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Lisa; Katen, Sarah P; Zlotnick, Adam

    2014-09-02

    During the hepatitis B virus (HBV) life cycle, capsid assembly and disassembly must ensure correct packaging and release of the viral genome. Here we show that changes in the dynamics of the core protein play an important role in regulating these processes. The HBV capsid assembles from 120 copies of the core protein homodimer. Each monomer contains a conserved cysteine at position 61 that can form an intradimer disulfide that we use as a marker for dimer conformational states. We show that dimers in the context of capsids form intradimer disulfides relatively rapidly. Surprisingly, compared to reduced dimers, fully oxidized dimers assembled slower and into capsids that were morphologically similar but less stable. We hypothesize that oxidized protein adopts a geometry (or constellation of geometries) that is unfavorable for capsid assembly, resulting in weaker dimer-dimer interactions as well as slower assembly kinetics. Our results suggest that structural flexibility at the core protein intradimer interface is essential for regulating capsid assembly and stability. We further suggest that capsid destabilization by the C61-C61 disulfide has a regulatory function to support capsid disassembly and release of the viral genome.

  4. Quantum dot-induced viral capsid assembling in dissociation buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ding; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Li, Feng; Men, Dong; Deng, Jiao-Yu; Wei, Hong-Ping; Zhang, Xian-En; Cui, Zong-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Viruses encapsulating inorganic nanoparticles are a novel type of nanostructure with applications in biomedicine and biosensors. However, the encapsulation and assembly mechanisms of these hybridized virus-based nanoparticles (VNPs) are still unknown. In this article, it was found that quantum dots (QDs) can induce simian virus 40 (SV40) capsid assembly in dissociation buffer, where viral capsids should be disassembled. The analysis of the transmission electron microscope, dynamic light scattering, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstruction experimental results showed that the SV40 major capsid protein 1 (VP1) can be assembled into ≈25 nm capsids in the dissociation buffer when QDs are present and that the QDs are encapsulated in the SV40 capsids. Moreover, it was determined that there is a strong affinity between QDs and the SV40 VP1 proteins (KD=2.19E-10 M), which should play an important role in QD encapsulation in the SV40 viral capsids. This study provides a new understanding of the assembly mechanism of SV40 virus-based nanoparticles with QDs, which may help in the design and construction of other similar virus-based nanoparticles.

  5. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  6. Quantum dot-induced viral capsid assembling in dissociation buffer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao D

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ding Gao,1,2 Zhi-Ping Zhang,1 Feng Li,3 Dong Men,1 Jiao-Yu Deng,1 Hong-Ping Wei,1 Xian-En Zhang,1 Zong-Qiang Cui1 1State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 2Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 3Division of Nanobiomedicine and i-Lab, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: Viruses encapsulating inorganic nanoparticles are a novel type of nanostructure with applications in biomedicine and biosensors. However, the encapsulation and assembly mechanisms of these hybridized virus-based nanoparticles (VNPs are still unknown. In this article, it was found that quantum dots (QDs can induce simian virus 40 (SV40 capsid assembly in dissociation buffer, where viral capsids should be disassembled. The analysis of the transmission electron microscope, dynamic light scattering, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstruction experimental results showed that the SV40 major capsid protein 1 (VP1 can be assembled into ≈25 nm capsids in the dissociation buffer when QDs are present and that the QDs are encapsulated in the SV40 capsids. Moreover, it was determined that there is a strong affinity between QDs and the SV40 VP1 proteins (KD = 2.19E-10 M, which should play an important role in QD encapsulation in the SV40 viral capsids. This study provides a new understanding of the assembly mechanism of SV40 virus-based nanoparticles with QDs, which may help in the design and construction of other similar virus-based nanoparticles. Keywords: quantum dots, simian virus 40, self-assembly, encapsulation, virus-based nanoparticles

  7. Integrated Nanosystems Templated by Self-assembled Virus Capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and modeling of multicomponent nanosystems templated by self-assembled virus capsids. The design principles, synthesis, analysis, and future directions for these capsid-based materials are presented. Chapter 1 gives an overview of the literature on the application of virus capsids in constructing nanomaterials. The uses of capsids in three main areas are considered: (1) as templates for inorganic materials or nanoparticles; (2) as vehicles for biological applications like medical imaging and treatment; and (3) as scaffolds for catalytic materials. In light of this introduction, an overview of the material in this dissertation is described. Chapters 2-4 all describe integrated nanosystems templated by bacteriophage MS2, a spherical icosahedral virus capsid. MS2 possesses an interior and exterior surface that can be modified orthogonally using bioconjugation chemistry to create multivalent, multicomponent constructs with precise localization of components attached to the capsid proteins. Chapter 2 describes the use of MS2 to synthesize a photocatalytic construct by modifying the internal surface with sensitizing chromophores and the external surface with a photocatalytic porphyrin. The chromophores absorbed energy that the porphyrin could not, and transferred it to the porphyrin via FRET through the protein shell. The porphyrin was then able to utilize the energy to carry out photocatalysis at new wavelengths. In Chapter 3, porphyrins were installed on the interior surface of MS2 and DNA aptamers specific for Jurkat leukemia T cells on the exterior surface. The dual-modified capsids were able to bind to Jurkat cells, and upon illumination the porphyrins generated singlet oxygen to kill them selectively over non-targeted cells. Chapter 4 explores integrating MS2 with DNA origami in order to arrange the capsids at larger length scales. Capsids modified with fluorescent dyes inside and single-stranded DNA outside were able to

  8. Coarse-grained simulation reveals key features of HIV-1 capsid self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grime, John M. A.; Dama, James F.; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Woodward, Cora L.; Jensen, Grant J.; Yeager, Mark; Voth, Gregory A.

    2016-05-01

    The maturation of HIV-1 viral particles is essential for viral infectivity. During maturation, many copies of the capsid protein (CA) self-assemble into a capsid shell to enclose the viral RNA. The mechanistic details of the initiation and early stages of capsid assembly remain to be delineated. We present coarse-grained simulations of capsid assembly under various conditions, considering not only capsid lattice self-assembly but also the potential disassembly of capsid upon delivery to the cytoplasm of a target cell. The effects of CA concentration, molecular crowding, and the conformational variability of CA are described, with results indicating that capsid nucleation and growth is a multi-stage process requiring well-defined metastable intermediates. Generation of the mature capsid lattice is sensitive to local conditions, with relatively subtle changes in CA concentration and molecular crowding influencing self-assembly and the ensemble of structural morphologies.

  9. Assembly of recombinant Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus capsids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyuan Ren

    Full Text Available The dicistrovirus Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV has been implicated in the worldwide decline of honey bees. Studies of IAPV and many other bee viruses in pure culture are restricted by available isolates and permissive cell culture. Here we show that coupling the IAPV major structural precursor protein ORF2 to its cognate 3C-like processing enzyme results in processing of the precursor to the individual structural proteins in a number of insect cell lines following expression by a recombinant baculovirus. The efficiency of expression is influenced by the level of IAPV 3C protein and moderation of its activity is required for optimal expression. The mature IAPV structural proteins assembled into empty capsids that migrated as particles on sucrose velocity gradients and showed typical dicistrovirus like morphology when examined by electron microscopy. Monoclonal antibodies raised to recombinant capsids were configured into a diagnostic test specific for the presence of IAPV. Recombinant capsids for each of the many bee viruses within the picornavirus family may provide virus specific reagents for the on-going investigation of the causes of honeybee loss.

  10. Role of electrostatic interactions in the assembly of empty spherical viral capsids

    CERN Document Server

    Siber, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    We examine the role of electrostatic interactions in the assembly of empty spherical viral capsids. The charges on the protein subunits that make the viral capsid mutually interact and are expected to yield electrostatic repulsion acting against the assembly of capsids. Thus, attractive protein-protein interactions of non-electrostatic origin must act to enable the capsid formation. We investigate whether the interplay of repulsive electrostatic and attractive interactions between the protein subunits can result in the formation of spherical viral capsids of a preferred radius. For this to be the case, we find that the attractive interactions must depend on the angle between the neighboring protein subunits (i.e. on the mean curvature of the viral capsid) so that a particular angle(s) is (are) preferred energywise. Our results for the electrostatic contributions to energetics of viral capsids nicely correlate with recent experimental determinations of the energetics of protein-protein contacts in Hepatitis B ...

  11. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon Sik, E-mail: yumshak@naver.com; Seo, Hyun Wook, E-mail: suruk@naver.com; Jung, Guhung, E-mail: drjung@snu.ac.kr

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  12. The delta domain of the HK97 major capsid protein is essential for assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Bonnie; Moyer, Crystal L; Hendrix, Roger W; Duda, Robert L

    2014-05-01

    The 102 residue N-terminal extension of the HK97 major capsid protein, the delta domain, is normally present during the assembly of immature HK97 procapsids, but it is removed during maturation like well-known internal scaffolding proteins of other tailed phages and herpesviruses. The delta domain also shares other unusual properties usually found in other viral and phage scaffolding proteins, including its location on the inside of the capsid, a high predicted and measured α-helical content, and an additional prediction for the ability to form parallel coiled-coils. Viral scaffolding proteins are essential for capsid assembly and phage viability, so we tested whether the HK97 delta domain was essential for capsid assembly. We studied the effects of deleting all or parts of the delta domain on capsid assembly and on complementation of capsid-protein-defective phage, and our results demonstrate that the delta domain is required for HK97 capsid assembly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Critical role of conserved hydrophobic residues within the major homology region in mature retroviral capsid assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, John G; Flanagan, John M; Ropson, Ira J; Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E; Craven, Rebecca C

    2008-06-01

    During retroviral maturation, the CA protein undergoes dramatic structural changes and establishes unique intermolecular interfaces in the mature capsid shell that are different from those that existed in the immature precursor. The most conserved region of CA, the major homology region (MHR), has been implicated in both immature and mature assembly, although the precise contribution of the MHR residues to each event has been largely undefined. To test the roles of specific MHR residues in mature capsid assembly, an in vitro system was developed that allowed for the first-time formation of Rous sarcoma virus CA into structures resembling authentic capsids. The ability of CA to assemble organized structures was destroyed by substitutions of two conserved hydrophobic MHR residues and restored by second-site suppressors, demonstrating that these MHR residues are required for the proper assembly of mature capsids in addition to any role that these amino acids may play in immature particle assembly. The defect caused by the MHR mutations was identified as an early step in the capsid assembly process. The results provide strong evidence for a model in which the hydrophobic residues of the MHR control a conformational reorganization of CA that is needed to initiate capsid assembly and suggest that the formation of an interdomain interaction occurs early during maturation.

  14. Structural rigidity in the capsid assembly of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespenheide, B. M.; Jacobs, D. J.; Thorpe, M. F.

    2004-11-01

    The cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) has a protein cage, or capsid, which encloses its genetic material. The structure of the capsid consists of 180 copies of a single protein that self-assemble inside a cell to form a complete capsid with icosahedral symmetry. The icosahedral surface can be naturally divided into pentagonal and hexagonal faces, and the formation of either of these faces has been proposed to be the first step in the capsid assembly process. We have used the software FIRST to analyse the rigidity of pentameric and hexameric substructures of the complete capsid to explore the viability of certain capsid assembly pathways. FIRST uses the 3D pebble game to determine structural rigidity, and a brief description of this algorithm, as applied to body-bar networks, is given here. We find that the pentameric substructure, which corresponds to a pentagonal face on the icosahedral surface, provides the best structural properties for nucleating the capsid assembly process, consistent with experimental observations.

  15. Structural rigidity in the capsid assembly of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespenheide, B M [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, PO Box 871504, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Jacobs, D J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330-8268 (United States); Thorpe, M F [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, PO Box 871504, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

    2004-11-10

    The cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) has a protein cage, or capsid, which encloses its genetic material. The structure of the capsid consists of 180 copies of a single protein that self-assemble inside a cell to form a complete capsid with icosahedral symmetry. The icosahedral surface can be naturally divided into pentagonal and hexagonal faces, and the formation of either of these faces has been proposed to be the first step in the capsid assembly process. We have used the software FIRST to analyse the rigidity of pentameric and hexameric substructures of the complete capsid to explore the viability of certain capsid assembly pathways. FIRST uses the 3D pebble game to determine structural rigidity, and a brief description of this algorithm, as applied to body-bar networks, is given here. We find that the pentameric substructure, which corresponds to a pentagonal face on the icosahedral surface, provides the best structural properties for nucleating the capsid assembly process, consistent with experimental observations.

  16. Role of dynamic capsomere supply for viral capsid self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Marvin A.; Klein, Heinrich C. R.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2015-02-01

    Many viruses rely on the self-assembly of their capsids to protect and transport their genomic material. For many viral systems, in particular for human viruses like hepatitis B, adeno or human immunodeficiency virus, that lead to persistent infections, capsomeres are continuously produced in the cytoplasm of the host cell while completed capsids exit the cell for a new round of infection. Here we use coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations of a generic patchy particle model to elucidate the role of the dynamic supply of capsomeres for the reversible self-assembly of empty T1 icosahedral virus capsids. We find that for high rates of capsomere influx only a narrow range of bond strengths exists for which a steady state of continuous capsid production is possible. For bond strengths smaller and larger than this optimal value, the reaction volume becomes crowded by small and large intermediates, respectively. For lower rates of capsomere influx a broader range of bond strengths exists for which a steady state of continuous capsid production is established, although now the production rate of capsids is smaller. Thus our simulations suggest that the importance of an optimal bond strength for viral capsid assembly typical for in vitro conditions can be reduced by the dynamic influx of capsomeres in a cellular environment.

  17. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the Cafeteria roenbergensis virus capsid suggests novel assembly pathway for giant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chuan; Fischer, Matthias G; Bolotaulo, Duer M; Ulloa-Rondeau, Nancy; Avila, Gustavo A; Suttle, Curtis A

    2017-07-14

    Whereas the protein composition and overall shape of several giant virus capsids have been described, the mechanism by which these large capsids assemble remains enigmatic. Here, we present a reconstruction of the capsid of Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV), one of the largest viruses analyzed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to date. The CroV capsid has a diameter of 3,000 Å and a Triangulation number of 499. Unlike related mimiviruses, the CroV capsid is not decorated with glycosylated surface fibers, but features 30 Å-long surface protrusions that are formed by loops of the major capsid protein. Based on the orientation of capsomers in the cryo-EM reconstruction, we propose that the capsids of CroV and related giant viruses are assembled by a newly conceived assembly pathway that initiates at a five-fold vertex and continuously proceeds outwards in a spiraling fashion.

  18. Solid-State NMR Studies of HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    HAN, YUN; Ahn, Jinwoo; Concel, Jason; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; YANG, Jun; Polenova, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    In mature HIV-1 virions, a 26.6 kDa CA protein is assembled into a characteristic cone shaped core (capsid) that encloses the RNA viral genome. The assembled capsid structure is best described by a fullerene cone model that is made up from a hexameric lattice containing a variable number of CA pentamers, thus allowing for closure of tubular or conical structures. In this report, we present a solid-state NMR analysis of the wild type HIV-1 CA protein, prepared as conical and spherical assembli...

  19. Structural Model of the Tubular Assembly of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Capsid Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jaekyun; Qiao, Xin; Hung, Ivan; Mitra, Alok K; Desfosses, Ambroise; Huang, Daniel; Gor'kov, Peter L; Craven, Rebecca C; Kingston, Richard L; Gan, Zhehong; Zhu, Fangqiang; Chen, Bo

    2017-02-08

    The orthoretroviral capsid protein (CA) assembles into polymorphic capsids, whose architecture, assembly, and stability are still being investigated. The N-terminal and C-terminal domains of CA (NTD and CTD, respectively) engage in both homotypic and heterotypic interactions to create the capsid. Hexameric turrets formed by the NTD decorate the majority of the capsid surface. We report nearly complete solid-state NMR (ssNMR) resonance assignments of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) CA, assembled into hexamer tubes that mimic the authentic capsid. The ssNMR assignments show that, upon assembly, large conformational changes occur in loops connecting helices, as well as the short 310 helix initiating the CTD. The interdomain linker becomes statically disordered. Combining constraints from ssNMR and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), we establish an atomic resolution model of the RSV CA tubular assembly using molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) simulations. On the basis of comparison of this MDFF model with an earlier-derived crystallographic model for the planar assembly, the induction of curvature into the RSV CA hexamer lattice arises predominantly from reconfiguration of the NTD-CTD and CTD trimer interfaces. The CTD dimer and CTD trimer interfaces are also intrinsically variable. Hence, deformation of the CA hexamer lattice results from the variable displacement of the CTDs that surround each hexameric turret. Pervasive H-bonding is found at all interdomain interfaces, which may contribute to their malleability. Finally, we find helices at the interfaces of HIV and RSV CA assemblies have very different contact angles, which may reflect differences in the capsid assembly pathway for these viruses.

  20. An alphavirus temperature-sensitive capsid mutant reveals stages of nucleocapsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yan, E-mail: yzheng15@students.kgi.edu; Kielian, Margaret, E-mail: margaret.kielian@einstein.yu.edu

    2015-10-15

    Alphaviruses have a nucleocapsid core composed of the RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral lattice of capsid protein. An insertion after position 186 in the capsid protein produced a strongly temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Even when the structural proteins were synthesized at the permissive temperature (28 °C), subsequent incubation of the cells at the non-permissive temperature (37 °C) dramatically decreased mutant capsid protein stability and particle assembly. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids in mutant-infected cells cultured at the permissive temperature, but these nucleocapsids were not stable to sucrose gradient separation. In contrast, nucleocapsids isolated from mutant virus particles had similar stability to that of wildtype virus. Our data support a model in which cytoplasmic nucleocapsids go through a maturation step during packaging into virus particles. The insertion site lies in the interface between capsid proteins in the assembled nucleocapsid, suggesting the region where such a stabilizing transition occurs. - Highlights: • We characterize an alphavirus capsid insertion mutation. • These capsid mutants are highly temperature sensitive for growth. • The insertion affects nucleocapsid stability. • Results suggest that the nucleocapsid is stabilized during virus budding.

  1. Critical Role of Conserved Hydrophobic Residues within the Major Homology Region in Mature Retroviral Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, John G.; Flanagan, John M.; Ropson, Ira J.; Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E.; Craven, Rebecca C.

    2008-01-01

    During retroviral maturation, the CA protein undergoes dramatic structural changes and establishes unique intermolecular interfaces in the mature capsid shell that are different from those that existed in the immature precursor. The most conserved region of CA, the major homology region (MHR), has been implicated in both immature and mature assembly, although the precise contribution of the MHR residues to each event has been largely undefined. To test the roles of specific MHR residues in mature capsid assembly, an in vitro system was developed that allowed for the first-time formation of Rous sarcoma virus CA into structures resembling authentic capsids. The ability of CA to assemble organized structures was destroyed by substitutions of two conserved hydrophobic MHR residues and restored by second-site suppressors, demonstrating that these MHR residues are required for the proper assembly of mature capsids in addition to any role that these amino acids may play in immature particle assembly. The defect caused by the MHR mutations was identified as an early step in the capsid assembly process. The results provide strong evidence for a model in which the hydrophobic residues of the MHR control a conformational reorganization of CA that is needed to initiate capsid assembly and suggest that the formation of an interdomain interaction occurs early during maturation. PMID:18400856

  2. Rationally Designed Interfacial Peptides Are Efficient In Vitro Inhibitors of HIV-1 Capsid Assembly with Antiviral Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Rebeca Bocanegra; María Nevot; Rosa Doménech; Inmaculada López; Olga Abián; Alicia Rodríguez-Huete; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Adrián Velázquez-Campoy; Javier Gómez; Miguel Ángel Martínez; José Luis Neira; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2011-01-01

    Virus capsid assembly constitutes an attractive target for the development of antiviral therapies; a few experimental inhibitors of this process for HIV-1 and other viruses have been identified by screening compounds or by selection from chemical libraries. As a different, novel approach we have undertaken the rational design of peptides that could act as competitive assembly inhibitors by mimicking capsid structural elements involved in intersubunit interfaces. Several discrete interfaces in...

  3. Assembly of the small outer capsid protein, Soc, on bacteriophage T4: a novel system for high density display of multiple large anthrax toxins and foreign proteins on phage capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Shivachandra, Sathish B; Zhang, Zhihong; Rao, Venigalla B

    2007-07-27

    Bacteriophage T4 capsid is a prolate icosahedron composed of the major capsid protein gp23*, the vertex protein gp24*, and the portal protein gp20. Assembled on its surface are 810 molecules of the non-essential small outer capsid protein, Soc (10 kDa), and 155 molecules of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc (39 kDa). In this study Soc, a "triplex" protein that stabilizes T4 capsid, is targeted for molecular engineering of T4 particle surface. Using a defined in vitro assembly system, anthrax toxins, protective antigen, lethal factor and their domains, fused to Soc were efficiently displayed on the capsid. Both the N and C termini of the 80 amino acid Soc polypeptide can be simultaneously used to display antigens. Proteins as large as 93 kDa can be stably anchored on the capsid through Soc-capsid interactions. Using both Soc and Hoc, up to 1662 anthrax toxin molecules are assembled on the phage T4 capsid under controlled conditions. We infer from the binding data that a relatively high affinity capsid binding site is located in the middle of the rod-shaped Soc, with the N and C termini facing the 2- and 3-fold symmetry axes of the capsid, respectively. Soc subunits interact at these interfaces, gluing the adjacent capsid protein hexamers and generating a cage-like outer scaffold. Antigen fusion does interfere with the inter-subunit interactions, but these interactions are not essential for capsid binding and antigen display. These features make the T4-Soc platform the most robust phage display system reported to date. The study offers insights into the architectural design of bacteriophage T4 virion, one of the most stable viruses known, and how its capsid surface can be engineered for novel applications in basic molecular biology and biotechnology.

  4. An atomic model of HIV-1 capsid-SP1 reveals structures regulating assembly and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, Florian K M; Obr, Martin; Hagen, Wim J H; Wan, William; Jakobi, Arjen J; Kirkpatrick, Joanna M; Sachse, Carsten; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A G

    2016-07-29

    Immature HIV-1 assembles at and buds from the plasma membrane before proteolytic cleavage of the viral Gag polyprotein induces structural maturation. Maturation can be blocked by maturation inhibitors (MIs), thereby abolishing infectivity. The CA (capsid) and SP1 (spacer peptide 1) region of Gag is the key regulator of assembly and maturation and is the target of MIs. We applied optimized cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging to resolve this region within assembled immature HIV-1 particles at 3.9 angstrom resolution and built an atomic model. The structure reveals a network of intra- and intermolecular interactions mediating immature HIV-1 assembly. The proteolytic cleavage site between CA and SP1 is inaccessible to protease. We suggest that MIs prevent CA-SP1 cleavage by stabilizing the structure, and MI resistance develops by destabilizing CA-SP1.

  5. Cell-Free Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Assembly Dependent on the Core Protein C-Terminal Domain and Regulated by Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludgate, Laurie; Liu, Kuancheng; Luckenbaugh, Laurie; Streck, Nicholas; Eng, Stacey; Voitenleitner, Christian; Delaney, William E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multiple subunits of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (HBc) assemble into an icosahedral capsid that packages the viral pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). The N-terminal domain (NTD) of HBc is sufficient for capsid assembly, in the absence of pgRNA or any other viral or host factors, under conditions of high HBc and/or salt concentrations. The C-terminal domain (CTD) is deemed dispensable for capsid assembly although it is essential for pgRNA packaging. We report here that HBc expressed in a mammalian cell lysate, rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL), was able to assemble into capsids when (low-nanomolar) HBc concentrations mimicked those achieved under conditions of viral replication in vivo and were far below those used previously for capsid assembly in vitro. Furthermore, at physiologically low HBc concentrations in RRL, the NTD was insufficient for capsid assembly and the CTD was also required. The CTD likely facilitated assembly under these conditions via RNA binding and protein-protein interactions. Moreover, the CTD underwent phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events in RRL similar to those seen in vivo which regulated capsid assembly. Importantly, the NTD alone also failed to accumulate in mammalian cells, likely resulting from its failure to assemble efficiently. Coexpression of the full-length HBc rescued NTD assembly in RRL as well as NTD expression and assembly in mammalian cells, resulting in the formation of mosaic capsids containing both full-length HBc and the NTD. These results have important implications for HBV assembly during replication and provide a facile cell-free system to study capsid assembly under physiologically relevant conditions, including its modulation by host factors. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important global human pathogen and the main cause of liver cancer worldwide. An essential component of HBV is the spherical capsid composed of multiple copies of a single protein, the core protein (HBc). We have

  6. Understanding the Concentration Dependence of Viral Capsid Assembly Kinetics—the Origin of the Lag Time and Identifying the Critical Nucleus Size

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hagan, Michael F; Elrad, Oren M

    2010-01-01

    ... )), but extracting mechanistic information such as the critical nucleus size or the time to assemble an individual capsid has been challenging. In this article, we theoretically examine two models for capsid assembly kinetics to show that these properties can be determined from the concentration dependence of median assembly times and the la...

  7. Hierarchical Assembly of Plasmonic Nanostructures using Virus Capsid Scaffolds on DNA Origami Tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Debin; Capehart, Stacy L.; Pal, Suchetan; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Lei; Schuck, P. J.; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao; Francis, Matthew B.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2014-07-07

    Plasmonic nanoarchitectures using biological scaffolds have shown the potential to attain controllable plasmonic fluorescence via precise spatial arrangement of fluorophores and plasmonic antennae. However, previous studies report a predominance of fluorescence quenching for small metal nanoparticles (less than ~60 nm) due to their small scattering cross-sections. In this work, we report the design and performance of fluorescent plasmonic structures composed of fluorophore-modified virus capsids and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) assembled on DNA origami tiles. The virus capsid creates a scaffold for control over the three dimensional arrangement of the fluorophores, whereas the DNA origami tile provides precise control over the distance between the capsid and the AuNP. Using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulations and multimodal single-particle imaging measurements, we show that the judicial design of these structures places the dye molecules near the hot spot of the AuNP. This effectively increases the fluorescence intensity in the quenching regime of the AuNP, with an enhancement factor that increases with increasing AuNP size. This strategy of using biological scaffolds to control fluorescence paves the way for exploring the parameters that determine plasmonic fluorescence. It may lead to a better understanding of the antenna effects of photon absorption and emission, enabling the construction of multicomponent plasmonic systems.

  8. Crystal Structures of a Piscine Betanodavirus: Mechanisms of Capsid Assembly and Viral Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Chi Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Betanodaviruses cause massive mortality in marine fish species with viral nervous necrosis. The structure of a T = 3 Grouper nervous necrosis virus-like particle (GNNV-LP is determined by the ab initio method with non-crystallographic symmetry averaging at 3.6 Å resolution. Each capsid protein (CP shows three major domains: (i the N-terminal arm, an inter-subunit extension at the inner surface; (ii the shell domain (S-domain, a jelly-roll structure; and (iii the protrusion domain (P-domain formed by three-fold trimeric protrusions. In addition, we have determined structures of the T = 1 subviral particles (SVPs of (i the delta-P-domain mutant (residues 35-217 at 3.1 Å resolution; and (ii the N-ARM deletion mutant (residues 35-338 at 7 Å resolution; and (iii the structure of the individual P-domain (residues 214-338 at 1.2 Å resolution. The P-domain reveals a novel DxD motif asymmetrically coordinating two Ca2+ ions, and seems to play a prominent role in the calcium-mediated trimerization of the GNNV CPs during the initial capsid assembly process. The flexible N-ARM (N-terminal arginine-rich motif appears to serve as a molecular switch for T = 1 or T = 3 assembly. Finally, we find that polyethylene glycol, which is incorporated into the P-domain during the crystallization process, enhances GNNV infection. The present structural studies together with the biological assays enhance our understanding of the role of the P-domain of GNNV in the capsid assembly and viral infection by this betanodavirus.

  9. Rationally designed interfacial peptides are efficient in vitro inhibitors of HIV-1 capsid assembly with antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Bocanegra

    Full Text Available Virus capsid assembly constitutes an attractive target for the development of antiviral therapies; a few experimental inhibitors of this process for HIV-1 and other viruses have been identified by screening compounds or by selection from chemical libraries. As a different, novel approach we have undertaken the rational design of peptides that could act as competitive assembly inhibitors by mimicking capsid structural elements involved in intersubunit interfaces. Several discrete interfaces involved in formation of the mature HIV-1 capsid through polymerization of the capsid protein CA were targeted. We had previously designed a peptide, CAC1, that represents CA helix 9 (a major part of the dimerization interface and binds the CA C-terminal domain in solution. Here we have mapped the binding site of CAC1, and shown that it substantially overlaps with the CA dimerization interface. We have also rationally modified CAC1 to increase its solubility and CA-binding affinity, and designed four additional peptides that represent CA helical segments involved in other CA interfaces. We found that peptides CAC1, its derivative CAC1M, and H8 (representing CA helix 8 were able to efficiently inhibit the in vitro assembly of the mature HIV-1 capsid. Cocktails of several peptides, including CAC1 or CAC1M plus H8 or CAI (a previously discovered inhibitor of CA polymerization, or CAC1M+H8+CAI, also abolished capsid assembly, even when every peptide was used at lower, sub-inhibitory doses. To provide a preliminary proof that these designed capsid assembly inhibitors could eventually serve as lead compounds for development of anti-HIV-1 agents, they were transported into cultured cells using a cell-penetrating peptide, and tested for antiviral activity. Peptide cocktails that drastically inhibited capsid assembly in vitro were also able to efficiently inhibit HIV-1 infection ex vivo. This study validates a novel, entirely rational approach for the design of capsid

  10. Capsid protein expression and adeno-associated virus like particles assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backovic Ana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae supports replication of many different RNA or DNA viruses (e.g. Tombusviruses or Papillomaviruses and has provided means for up-scalable, cost- and time-effective production of various virus-like particles (e.g. Human Parvovirus B19 or Rotavirus. We have recently demonstrated that S. cerevisiae can form single stranded DNA AAV2 genomes starting from a circular plasmid. In this work, we have investigated the possibility to assemble AAV capsids in yeast. Results To do this, at least two out of three AAV structural proteins, VP1 and VP3, have to be simultaneously expressed in yeast cells and their intracellular stoichiometry has to resemble the one found in the particles derived from mammalian or insect cells. This was achieved by stable co-transformation of yeast cells with two plasmids, one expressing VP3 from its natural p40 promoter and the other one primarily expressing VP1 from a modified AAV2 Cap gene under the control of the inducible yeast promoter Gal1. Among various induction strategies we tested, the best one to yield the appropriate VP1:VP3 ratio was 4.5 hour induction in the medium containing 0.5% glucose and 5% galactose. Following such induction, AAV virus like particles (VLPs were isolated from yeast by two step ultracentrifugation procedure. The transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that their morphology is similar to the empty capsids produced in human cells. Conclusions Taken together, the results show for the first time that yeast can be used to assemble AAV capsid and, therefore, as a genetic system to identify novel cellular factors involved in AAV biology.

  11. Purification of recombinant budgerigar fledgling disease virus VP1 capsid protein and its ability for in vitro capsid assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, R. E.; Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A recombinant system for the major capsid VP1 protein of budgerigar fledgling disease virus has been established. The VP1 gene was inserted into a truncated form of the pFlag-1 vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. The budgerigar fledgling disease virus VP1 protein was purified to near homogeneity by immunoaffinity chromatography. Fractions containing highly purified VP1 were pooled and found to constitute 3.3% of the original E. coli-expressed VP1 protein. Electron microscopy revealed that the VP1 protein was isolated as pentameric capsomeres. Electron microscopy also revealed that capsid-like particles were formed in vitro from purified VP1 capsomeres with the addition of Ca2+ ions and the removal of chelating and reducing agents.

  12. Self-assembly of nanoparticles into biomimetic capsid-like nanoshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Chan, Henry; Zhao, Gongpu; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Zhang, Peijun; Král, Petr; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2017-03-01

    Nanoscale compartments are one of the foundational elements of living systems. Capsids, carboxysomes, exosomes, vacuoles and other nanoshells easily self-assemble from biomolecules such as lipids or proteins, but not from inorganic nanomaterials because of difficulties with the replication of spherical tiling. Here we show that stabilizer-free polydispersed inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) can spontaneously organize into porous nanoshells. The association of water-soluble CdS NPs into self-limited spherical capsules is the result of scale-modified electrostatic, dispersion and other colloidal forces. They cannot be accurately described by the Derjaguin-Landau-Vervey-Overbeek theory, whereas molecular-dynamics simulations with combined atomistic and coarse-grained description of NPs reveal the emergence of nanoshells and some of their stabilization mechanisms. Morphology of the simulated assemblies formed under different conditions matched nearly perfectly the transmission electron microscopy tomography data. This study bridges the gap between biological and inorganic self-assembling nanosystems and conceptualizes a new pathway to spontaneous compartmentalization for a wide range of inorganic NPs including those existing on prebiotic Earth.

  13. Maize rayado fino virus capsid proteins assemble into virus-like particles in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Rosemarie W; Hammond, John

    2010-02-01

    Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV; genus Marafivirus; family Tymoviridae) is an isometric plant virus of 30 nm containing two components: empty shells and complete virus particles (encapsidating the 6.3 kb genomic RNA). Both particles are composed of two serologically related, carboxy co-terminal, coat proteins (CP) of apparent molecular mass 21-22 kDa (CP2) and 24-28 kDa (CP1) in a molar ratio of 3:1, respectively; CP1 contains a 37 amino acid amino terminal extension of CP2. In our study, expression of CP1 or CP2 in Escherichia coli resulted in assembly of each capsid protein into virus-like particles (VLPs), appearing in electron microscopy as stain-permeable (CP2) or stain-impermeable particles (CP1). CP1 VLPs encapsidated bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA, but not CP mRNA, while CP2 VLPs encapsidated neither CP mRNA nor 16S ribosomal RNA. Expression of CP1 and CP2 in E. coli using a co-expression vector resulted in the assembly of VLPs which were stain-impermeable and encapsidated CP mRNA. These results suggest that the N-terminal 37 amino acid residues of CP1, although not required for particle formation, may be involved in the assembly of complete virions and that the presence of both CP1 and CP2 in the particle is required for specific encapsidation of MRFV CP mRNA.

  14. Mechanical and assembly units of viral capsids identified via quasi-rigid domain decomposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Polles

    Full Text Available Key steps in a viral life-cycle, such as self-assembly of a protective protein container or in some cases also subsequent maturation events, are governed by the interplay of physico-chemical mechanisms involving various spatial and temporal scales. These salient aspects of a viral life cycle are hence well described and rationalised from a mesoscopic perspective. Accordingly, various experimental and computational efforts have been directed towards identifying the fundamental building blocks that are instrumental for the mechanical response, or constitute the assembly units, of a few specific viral shells. Motivated by these earlier studies we introduce and apply a general and efficient computational scheme for identifying the stable domains of a given viral capsid. The method is based on elastic network models and quasi-rigid domain decomposition. It is first applied to a heterogeneous set of well-characterized viruses (CCMV, MS2, STNV, STMV for which the known mechanical or assembly domains are correctly identified. The validated method is next applied to other viral particles such as L-A, Pariacoto and polyoma viruses, whose fundamental functional domains are still unknown or debated and for which we formulate verifiable predictions. The numerical code implementing the domain decomposition strategy is made freely available.

  15. Exploiting the yeast L-A viral capsid for the in vivo assembly of chimeric VLPs as platform in vaccine development and foreign protein expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Powilleit

    Full Text Available A novel expression system based on engineered variants of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae dsRNA virus L-A was developed allowing the in vivo assembly of chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs as a unique platform for a wide range of applications. We show that polypeptides fused to the viral capsid protein Gag self-assemble into isometric VLP chimeras carrying their cargo inside the capsid, thereby not only effectively preventing proteolytic degradation in the host cell cytosol, but also allowing the expression of a per se cytotoxic protein. Carboxyterminal extension of Gag by T cell epitopes from human cytomegalovirus pp65 resulted in the formation of hybrid VLPs that strongly activated antigen-specific CD8(+ memory T cells ex vivo. Besides being a carrier for polypeptides inducing antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, VLP chimeras were also shown to be effective in the expression and purification of (i a heterologous model protein (GFP, (ii a per se toxic protein (K28 alpha-subunit, and (iii a particle-associated and fully recyclable biotechnologically relevant enzyme (esterase A. Thus, yeast viral Gag represents a unique platform for the in vivo assembly of chimeric VLPs, equally attractive and useful in vaccine development and recombinant protein production.

  16. Foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins; analysis of protein processing, assembly and utility as vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham

    precursor enhances the yield of processed capsid proteins and their assembly into empty capsid particles within mammalian cells. Such particles can potentially form the basis of a vaccine but they may only have the same properties as the current inactivated vaccines. We have expressed the FMDV P1-2A alone...... or with FMDV 3Cpro using a “single cycle” alphavirus vector based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Cattle vaccinated with these rSFV-FMDV vectors alone, produced anti-FMDV antibodies but the immune response was insufficient to give protection against FMDV challenge. However, vaccination with these vectors primed...... a much stronger immune response against FMDV post-challenge. In subsequent experiments, cattle were sequentially vaccinated with a rSFV-FMDV followed by recombinant FMDV empty capsid particles, or vice versa, prior to challenge. Animals given a primary vaccination with the rSFV-FMDV vector...

  17. pH shift assembly of adenoviral serotype 5 capsid protein nanosystems for enhanced delivery of nanoparticles, proteins and nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vidhya R; Upadhyay, Arun K; Kompella, Uday B

    2013-11-28

    Empty adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) capsids devoid of viral genome were developed as a novel delivery system for nanoparticles, proteins, and nucleic acids. Ad5 capsids of 110 nm diameter undergo an increase in particle size to 1637 nm in 1mM acetic acid at pH4.0 and then shrink to 60 nm, following pH reversal to 7.4. These pH shifts induced reversible changes in capsid zeta potential and secondary structure and irreversible changes in tertiary structure of capsid proteins. Using pH shift dependent changes in capsid size and structure, 20 nm fluorescent nanoparticles, FITC-BSA, and Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugated siRNA were encapsulated with high efficiency in Ad5 capsids, as confirmed by electron microscopy and/or flow cytometry. HEK cell uptake with capsid delivery system was 7.8-, 7.4-, and 2.9-fold greater for nanoparticles, FITC-BSA, and Alexa-siRNA, respectively, when compared to plain solutes. Physical mixtures of capsids and fluorescent solutes exhibited less capsid associated fluorescence intensity and cell uptake. Further, unlike physical mixture, pH shift assembled Ad5 capsids protected siRNA from RNase degradation. Ad5 capsids before and after pH shift exhibited endolysosomal escape. Thus, empty Ad5 capsids can encapsulate a variety of solutes based on pH shift assembly, resulting in enhanced cellular delivery. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A minimal representation of the self-assembly of virus capsids

    CERN Document Server

    Llorente, J M Gomez; Breton, J

    2013-01-01

    Viruses are biological nanosystems with a capsid of protein-made capsomer units that encloses and protects the genetic material responsible for their replication. Here we show how the geometrical constraints of the capsomer-capsomer interaction in icosahedral capsids fix the form of the shortest and universal truncated multipolar expansion of the two-body interaction between capsomers. The structures of many of the icosahedral and related virus capsids are located as single lowest energy states of this potential energy surface. Our approach unveils relevant features of the natural design of the capsids and can be of interest in fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology where similar hollow convex structures are relevant.

  19. Assembly of bacteriophage T7. Dimensions of the bacteriophage and its capsids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroud, R.M.; Serwer, P.; Ross, M.J.

    1981-12-01

    The dimensions of bacteriophage T7 and T7 capsids have been investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering. Phage T7 behaves like a sphere of uniform density with an outer radius of 301 +/- 2 A (excluding the phage tail) and a calculated volume for protein plus nucleic acid of 1.14 +/- 0.05 x 10/sup -16/ ml. The outer radius determined of T7 phage in solution is approx.30% greater than the radius measured from electron micrographs, which indicates that considerable shrinkage occurs during preparation for electron microscopy. Capsids that have a phagelike envelope and do not contain DNA were obtained from lysates of T7-infected Escherichia coli (capsid II) and by separating the capsid component of T7 phage from the phage DNA by means of temperature shock (capsid IV). In both cases the peak protein density is at a radius of 275 A; the outer radius is 286 +/- 4 A, approx.5% smaller than the envelope of T7 phage. The thickness of the envelope of capsid II is 22 +/- 4 A, consistent with the thickness of protein estimated to be 23 +/- 5 A in whole T7 phage, as seen on electron micrographs in which the internal DNA is positively stained. The volume in T7 phage available to package DNA is estimated to be 9.2 +/- 0.4 x 10/sup -17/ ml. The packaged DNA adopts a regular packing with 23.6 A interplanar spacing between DNA strands. The angular width of the 23.6 A reflection shows that the mean DNA-DNA spacing throughout the phage head is 27.5 +/- <2.2 A. A T7 precursor capsid (capsid I) expands when pelleted for x-ray scattering in the ultracentrifuge to essentially the same outer dimensions as for capsids II and IV. This expansion of capsid I can be prevented by fixing with glutaraldehyde; fixed capsid I has peak density at a radius of 247 A, 10% less than capsid II or IV.

  20. Characterization of the invariable residue 51 mutations of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 capsid protein on in vitro CA assembly and infectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höglund Stefan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mature HIV-1 conical core formation proceeds through highly regulated protease cleavage of the Gag precursor, which ultimately leads to substantial rearrangements of the capsid (CAp24 molecule involving both inter- and intra-molecular contacts of the CAp24 molecules. In this aspect, Asp51 which is located in the N-terminal domain of HIV-1 CAp24 plays an important role by forming a salt-bridge with the free imino terminus Pro1 following proteolytic cleavage and liberation of the CAp24 protein from the Pr55Gag precursor. Thus, previous substitution mutation of Asp51 to alanine (D51A has shown to be lethal and that this invariable residue was found essential for tube formation in vitro, virus replication and virus capsid formation. Results We extended the above investigation by introducing three different D51 substitution mutations (D51N, D51E, and D51Q into both prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems and studied their effects on in vitro capsid assembly and virus infectivity. Two substitution mutations (D51E and D51N had no substantial effect on in vitro capsid assembly, yet they impaired viral infectivity and particle production. In contrast, the D51Q mutant was defective both for in vitro capsid assembly and for virus replication in cell culture. Conclusion These results show that substitutions of D51 with glutamate, glutamine, or asparagine, three amino acid residues that are structurally related to aspartate, could partially rescue both in vitro capsid assembly and intra-cellular CAp24 production but not replication of the virus in cultured cells.

  1. Construction of a novel coarse grain model for simulations of HIV capsid assembly to capture the backbone structure and inter-domain motions in solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Qiao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We show the construction of a novel coarse grain model for simulations of HIV capsid assembly based on four structural models of HIV capsid proteins: isolated hexamer 3H47.pdb, tubular assembly 3J34.pdb, isolated pentamer 3P05.pdb and C-terminus dimer 2KOD.pdb. The data demonstrates the derivation of inter-domain motions from all atom Molecular Dynamics simulations and comparison with the motions derived from the analysis of solution NMR results defined in 2M8L.pdb. Snapshots from a representative Monte Carlo simulation with 128 dimeric subunit proteins based on 3J34.pdb are shown in addition to the quantitative analysis of its assembly pathway. Movies of the assembly process are compiled with snapshots of representative simulations of four structural models. The methods and data in this article were utilized in Qiao et al. (in press [1] to probe the mechanism of polymorphism and curvature control of HIV capsid assembly.

  2. Solution scattering studies on a virus capsid protein as a building block for nanoscale assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comellas Aragones, M.; Comellas-Aragones, Marta; Sikkema, Friso D.; Delaittre, Guillaume; Terry, Ann E.; King, Stephen M.; Visser, Dirk; Heenan, Richard K.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Feiters, Martin C.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled protein cages are versatile building blocks in the construction of biomolecular nanostructures. Because of the defined assembly behaviour the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) protein is often used for such applications. Here we report a detailed solution scattering study of the

  3. Quantification and modification of the equilibrium dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice self-assembled as a protein nanocoating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, Alejandro; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2015-09-01

    Self-assembling, protein-based bidimensional lattices are being developed as functionalizable, highly ordered biocoatings for multiple applications in nanotechnology and nanomedicine. Unfortunately, protein assemblies are soft materials that may be too sensitive to mechanical disruption, and their intrinsic conformational dynamism may also influence their applicability. Thus, it may be critically important to characterize, understand and manipulate the mechanical features and dynamic behavior of protein assemblies in order to improve their suitability as nanomaterials. In this study, the capsid protein of the human immunodeficiency virus was induced to self-assemble as a continuous, single layered, ordered nanocoating onto an inorganic substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to quantify the mechanical behavior and the equilibrium dynamics (``breathing'') of this virus-based, self-assembled protein lattice in close to physiological conditions. The results uniquely provided: (i) evidence that AFM can be used to directly visualize in real time and quantify slow breathing motions leading to dynamic disorder in protein nanocoatings and viral capsid lattices; (ii) characterization of the dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice and protein-based nanocoating, including flexibility, mechanical strength and remarkable self-repair capacity after mechanical damage; (iii) proof of principle that chemical additives can modify the dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice or protein-based nanocoating, and improve their applied potential by increasing their mechanical strength and elasticity. We discuss the implications for the development of mechanically resistant and compliant biocoatings precisely organized at the nanoscale, and of novel antiviral agents acting on fundamental physical properties of viruses.Self-assembling, protein-based bidimensional lattices are being developed as functionalizable, highly ordered biocoatings for multiple applications

  4. Quantification and modification of the equilibrium dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice self-assembled as a protein nanocoating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, Alejandro; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2015-09-28

    Self-assembling, protein-based bidimensional lattices are being developed as functionalizable, highly ordered biocoatings for multiple applications in nanotechnology and nanomedicine. Unfortunately, protein assemblies are soft materials that may be too sensitive to mechanical disruption, and their intrinsic conformational dynamism may also influence their applicability. Thus, it may be critically important to characterize, understand and manipulate the mechanical features and dynamic behavior of protein assemblies in order to improve their suitability as nanomaterials. In this study, the capsid protein of the human immunodeficiency virus was induced to self-assemble as a continuous, single layered, ordered nanocoating onto an inorganic substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to quantify the mechanical behavior and the equilibrium dynamics ("breathing") of this virus-based, self-assembled protein lattice in close to physiological conditions. The results uniquely provided: (i) evidence that AFM can be used to directly visualize in real time and quantify slow breathing motions leading to dynamic disorder in protein nanocoatings and viral capsid lattices; (ii) characterization of the dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice and protein-based nanocoating, including flexibility, mechanical strength and remarkable self-repair capacity after mechanical damage; (iii) proof of principle that chemical additives can modify the dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice or protein-based nanocoating, and improve their applied potential by increasing their mechanical strength and elasticity. We discuss the implications for the development of mechanically resistant and compliant biocoatings precisely organized at the nanoscale, and of novel antiviral agents acting on fundamental physical properties of viruses.

  5. Phylogenetic Diversity of Marine Cyanophage Isolates and Natural Virus Communities as Revealed by Sequences of Viral Capsid Assembly Protein Gene g20†

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Yan; Chen, Feng; Wilhelm, Steven W.; Poorvin, Leo; Hodson, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    In order to characterize the genetic diversity and phylogenetic affiliations of marine cyanophage isolates and natural cyanophage assemblages, oligonucleotide primers CPS1 and CPS8 were designed to specifically amplify ca. 592-bp fragments of the gene for viral capsid assembly protein g20. Phylogenetic analysis of isolated cyanophages revealed that the marine cyanophages were highly diverse yet more closely related to each other than to enteric coliphage T4. Genetically related marine cyanoph...

  6. Synergic Investigation Of The Self-Assembly Structure And Mechanism Of Retroviral Capsid Proteins By Solid State NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy And Multiscale simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-29

    the ideal platform to study retrovirus. The RSV capsid enclosing the viral genome materials is assembled from ~ 1500 copies of the 237-residue RSV...Distribution approved for public release. Final accomplishments Abstract: The Rous Sarcoma Virus (RSV) is the ideal platform to study retrovirus. The... definitive labeling patter by glycerol expression. For example, Arg, Lys, Gln and Leu exhibit similar resonance patterns, as shown in Table 1. There are a

  7. Assembly and characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus empty capsid particles expressed within mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, Maria; Muszynski, Bartosz; Organtini, Lindsey J.;

    2013-01-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) structural protein precursor, P1-2A, is cleaved by the virus-encoded 3C protease (3Cpro) into the capsid proteins VP0, VP1 and VP3 (and 2A). In some systems, it is difficult to produce large amounts of these processed capsid proteins since 3Cpro can be toxic...

  8. Identification of a major intermediate along the self-assembly pathway of an icosahedral viral capsid by using an analytical model of a spherical patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law-Hine, Didier; Zeghal, Mehdi; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Constantin, Doru; Tresset, Guillaume

    2016-08-10

    Viruses are astonishing edifices in which hundreds of molecular building blocks fit into the final structure with pinpoint accuracy. We established a robust kinetic model accounting for the in vitro self-assembly of a capsid shell derived from an icosahedral plant virus by using time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (TR-SAXS) data at high spatiotemporal resolution. By implementing an analytical model of a spherical patch into a global fitting algorithm, we managed to identify a major intermediate species along the self-assembly pathway. With a series of data collected at different protein concentrations, we showed that free dimers self-assembled into a capsid through an intermediate resembling a half-capsid. The typical lifetime of the intermediate was a few seconds and yet the presence of so large an oligomer was not reported before. The progress in instrumental detection along with the development of powerful algorithms for data processing contribute to shedding light on nonequilibrium processes in highly complex systems such as viruses.

  9. Phylogenetic distribution of the capsid assembly protein gene (g20 of cyanophages in paddy floodwaters in Northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiyong Jing

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have revealed the high diversity of cyanophages in marine and freshwater environments, but little is currently known about the diversity of cyanophages in paddy fields, particularly in Northeast (NE China. To elucidate the genetic diversity of cyanophages in paddy floodwaters in NE China, viral capsid assembly protein gene (g20 sequences from five floodwater samples were amplified with the primers CPS1 and CPS8. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE was applied to distinguish different g20 clones. In total, 54 clones differing in g20 nucleotide sequences were obtained in this study. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the distribution of g20 sequences in this study was different from that in Japanese paddy fields, and all the sequences were grouped into Clusters α, β, γ and ε. Within Clusters α and β, three new small clusters (PFW-VII∼-IX were identified. UniFrac analysis of g20 clone assemblages demonstrated that the community compositions of cyanophage varied among marine, lake and paddy field environments. In paddy floodwater, community compositions of cyanophage were also different between NE China and Japan.

  10. [Genetic diversity of capsid assembly protein genes (g20) of cyanophage in different natural environment--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ruiyong; Kimura, Makoto; Wang, Guanghua

    2013-11-04

    With the development of molecular biological techniques and progress of sequencing virus genome, scientists pay great attentions to the genetic diversity of viruses, which are ubiquitous and abundant in natural environments. So far, no universal genetic marker, analogous to 16S rDNA and 18S rDNA used for microbial communities exists throughout all viruses. However, some family-specific genes encoding conserved amino acids have been proposed for the evaluation of phage diversity and a series of breakthrough achievements were obtained. In this paper, we targeted the capsid assembly protein genes (g20) of cyanophages and reviewed the recent progress on their genetic diversity in natural environments of marines, lakes and paddy fields and discussed the relationship between distribution of g20 gene of cyanophages and its environments. Those studies showed that the distribution of g20 gene varied with environments and many unique clusters were found in different natural environment. In final, several research issues and the future research tendencies for the study of environmental g20 gene were also addressed in this paper.

  11. Parvovirus Capsid Structures Required for Infection: Mutations Controlling Receptor Recognition and Protease Cleavages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Heather M; Feng, Kurtis H; Lee, Donald W; Allison, Andrew B; Pinard, Melissa; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Hafenstein, Susan; Parrish, Colin R

    2017-01-15

    Parvovirus capsids are small but complex molecular machines responsible for undertaking many of the steps of cell infection, genome packing, and cell-to-cell as well as host-to-host transfer. The details of parvovirus infection of cells are still not fully understood, but the processes must involve small changes in the capsid structure that allow the endocytosed virus to escape from the endosome, pass through the cell cytoplasm, and deliver the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) genome to the nucleus, where viral replication occurs. Here, we examine capsid substitutions that eliminate canine parvovirus (CPV) infectivity and identify how those mutations changed the capsid structure or altered interactions with the infectious pathway. Amino acid substitutions on the exterior surface of the capsid (Gly299Lys/Ala300Lys) altered the binding of the capsid to transferrin receptor type 1 (TfR), particularly during virus dissociation from the receptor, but still allowed efficient entry into both feline and canine cells without successful infection. These substitutions likely control specific capsid structural changes resulting from TfR binding required for infection. A second set of changes on the interior surface of the capsid reduced viral infectivity by >100-fold and included two cysteine residues and neighboring residues. One of these substitutions, Cys270Ser, modulates a VP2 cleavage event found in ∼10% of the capsid proteins that also was shown to alter capsid stability. A neighboring substitution, Pro272Lys, significantly reduced capsid assembly, while a Cys273Ser change appeared to alter capsid transport from the nucleus. These mutants reveal additional structural details that explain cell infection processes of parvovirus capsids. Parvoviruses are commonly found in both vertebrate and invertebrate animals and cause widespread disease. They are also being developed as oncolytic therapeutics and as gene therapy vectors. Most functions involved in infection or transduction

  12. Microplate-based assay for identifying small molecules that bind a specific intersubunit interface within the assembled HIV-1 capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halambage, Upul D; Wong, Jason P; Melancon, Bruce J; Lindsley, Craig W; Aiken, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Despite the availability of >30 effective drugs for managing HIV-1 infection, no current therapy is curative, and long-term management is challenging owing to the emergence and spread of drug-resistant mutants. Identification of drugs against novel HIV-1 targets would expand the current treatment options and help to control resistance. The highly conserved HIV-1 capsid protein represents an attractive target because of its multiple roles in replication of the virus. However, the low antiviral potencies of the reported HIV-1 capsid-targeting inhibitors render them unattractive for therapeutic development. To facilitate the identification of more-potent HIV-1 capsid inhibitors, we developed a scintillation proximity assay to screen for small molecules that target a biologically active and specific intersubunit interface in the HIV-1 capsid. The assay, which is based on competitive displacement of a known capsid-binding small-molecule inhibitor, exhibited a signal-to-noise ratio of >9 and a Z factor of >0.8. In a pilot screen of a chemical library containing 2,400 druglike compounds, we obtained a hit rate of 1.8%. This assay has properties that are suitable for screening large compound libraries to identify novel HIV-1 capsid ligands with antiviral activity.

  13. Combined Antiviral Therapy Using Designed Molecular Scaffolds Targeting Two Distinct Viral Functions, HIV-1 Genome Integration and Capsid Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamaikawin, Wannisa; Saoin, Somphot; Nangola, Sawitree; Chupradit, Koollawat; Sakkhachornphop, Supachai; Hadpech, Sudarat; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Ansari, Aftab A; Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Boulanger, Pierre; Hong, Saw-See; Torbett, Bruce E; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2015-08-25

    Designed molecular scaffolds have been proposed as alternative therapeutic agents against HIV-1. The ankyrin repeat protein (Ank(GAG)1D4) and the zinc finger protein (2LTRZFP) have recently been characterized as intracellular antivirals, but these molecules, used individually, do not completely block HIV-1 replication and propagation. The capsid-binder Ank(GAG)1D4, which inhibits HIV-1 assembly, does not prevent the genome integration of newly incoming viruses. 2LTRZFP, designed to target the 2-LTR-circle junction of HIV-1 cDNA and block HIV-1 integration, would have no antiviral effect on HIV-1-infected cells. However, simultaneous expression of these two molecules should combine the advantage of preventive and curative treatments. To test this hypothesis, the genes encoding the N-myristoylated Myr(+)Ank(GAG)1D4 protein and the 2LTRZFP were introduced into human T-cells, using a third-generation lentiviral vector. SupT1 cells stably expressing 2LTRZFP alone or with Myr(+)Ank(GAG)1D4 showed a complete resistance to HIV-1 in viral challenge. Administration of the Myr(+)Ank(GAG)1D4 vector to HIV-1-preinfected SupT1 cells resulted in a significant antiviral effect. Resistance to viral infection was also observed in primary human CD4+ T-cells stably expressing Myr(+)Ank(GAG)1D4, and challenged with HIV-1, SIVmac, or SHIV. Our data suggest that our two anti-HIV-1 molecular scaffold prototypes are promising antiviral agents for anti-HIV-1 gene therapy.

  14. Highly conserved serine residue 40 in HIV-1 p6 regulates capsid processing and virus core assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solbak Sara MØ

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 p6 Gag protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of two late assembly (L- domains. Although p6 is located within one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene, the 52 amino acid peptide binds at least to two cellular budding factors (Tsg101 and ALIX, is a substrate for phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, and mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into viral particles. As expected, known functional domains mostly overlap with several conserved residues in p6. In this study, we investigated the importance of the highly conserved serine residue at position 40, which until now has not been assigned to any known function of p6. Results Consistently with previous data, we found that mutation of Ser-40 has no effect on ALIX mediated rescue of HIV-1 L-domain mutants. However, the only feasible S40F mutation that preserves the overlapping pol open reading frame (ORF reduces virus replication in T-cell lines and in human lymphocyte tissue cultivated ex vivo. Most intriguingly, L-domain mediated virus release is not dependent on the integrity of Ser-40. However, the S40F mutation significantly reduces the specific infectivity of released virions. Further, it was observed that mutation of Ser-40 selectively interferes with the cleavage between capsid (CA and the spacer peptide SP1 in Gag, without affecting cleavage of other Gag products. This deficiency in processing of CA, in consequence, led to an irregular morphology of the virus core and the formation of an electron dense extra core structure. Moreover, the defects induced by the S40F mutation in p6 can be rescued by the A1V mutation in SP1 that generally enhances processing of the CA-SP1 cleavage site. Conclusions Overall, these data support a so far unrecognized function of p6 mediated by Ser-40 that occurs independently of the L-domain function, but selectively

  15. Expanding the horizons for structural analysis of fully protonated protein assemblies by NMR spectroscopy at MAS frequencies above 100 kHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struppe, Jochem; Quinn, Caitlin M; Lu, Manman; Wang, Mingzhang; Hou, Guangjin; Lu, Xingyu; Kraus, Jodi; Andreas, Loren B; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido; Maas, Werner; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2017-07-03

    The recent breakthroughs in NMR probe technologies resulted in the development of MAS NMR probes with rotation frequencies exceeding 100 kHz. Herein, we explore dramatic increases in sensitivity and resolution observed at MAS frequencies of 110-111 kHz in a novel 0.7 mm HCND probe that enable structural analysis of fully protonated biological systems. Proton- detected 2D and 3D correlation spectroscopy under such conditions requires only 0.1-0.5 mg of sample and a fraction of time compared to conventional (13)C-detected experiments. We discuss the performance of several proton- and heteronuclear- ((13)C-,(15)N-) based correlation experiments in terms of sensitivity and resolution, using a model microcrystalline fMLF tripeptide. We demonstrate the applications of ultrafast MAS to a large, fully protonated protein assembly of the 231-residue HIV-1 CA capsid protein. Resonance assignments of protons and heteronuclei, as well as (1)H-(15)N dipolar and (1)H(N) CSA tensors are readily obtained from the high sensitivity and resolution proton-detected 3D experiments. The approach demonstrated here is expected to enable the determination of atomic-resolution structures of large protein assemblies, inaccessible by current methodologies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Optimization of a 1,5-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]diazepine-2,4-dione series of HIV capsid assembly inhibitors 1: addressing configurational instability through scaffold modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Lee D; Landry, Serge; Morin, Sébastien; Kawai, Stephen H; Bousquet, Yves; Hucke, Oliver; Goudreau, Nathalie; Lemke, Christopher T; Bonneau, Pierre; Titolo, Steve; Mason, Stephen; Simoneau, Bruno

    2013-06-01

    The optimization of a 1,5-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]diazepine-2,4-dione series of inhibitors of HIV-1 capsid assembly that possess a labile stereocenter at C3 is described. Quaternization of the C3 position of compound 1 in order to prevent racemization gave compound 2, which was inactive in our capsid disassembly assay. A likely explanation for this finding was revealed by in silico analysis predicting a dramatic increase in energy of the bioactive conformation upon quaternization of the C3 position. Replacement of the C3 of the diazepine ring with a nitrogen atom to give the 1,5-dihydro-benzo[f][1,3,5]triazepine-2,4-dione analog 4 was well tolerated. Introduction of a rigid spirocyclic system at the C3 position gave configurationally stable 1,5-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]diazepine-2,4-dione analog 5, which was able to access the bioactive conformation without a severe energetic penalty and inhibit capsid assembly. Preliminary structure-activity relationships (SAR) and X-ray crystallographic data show that knowledge from the 1,5-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]diazepine-2,4-dione series of inhibitors of HIV-1 capsid assembly can be transferred to these new scaffolds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Self-assembly of virus-like particles of canine parvovirus capsid protein expressed from Escherichia coli and application as virus-like particle vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Guo, Hui-Chen; Wei, Yan-Quan; Dong, Hu; Han, Shi-Chong; Ao, Da; Sun, De-Hui; Wang, Hai-Ming; Cao, Sui-Zhong; Sun, Shi-Qi

    2014-04-01

    Canine parvovirus disease is an acute infectious disease caused by canine parvovirus (CPV). Current commercial vaccines are mainly attenuated and inactivated; as such, problems concerning safety may occur. To resolve this problem, researchers developed virus-like particles (VLPs) as biological nanoparticles resembling natural virions and showing high bio-safety. This property allows the use of VLPs for vaccine development and mechanism studies of viral infections. Tissue-specific drug delivery also employs VLPs as biological nanomaterials. Therefore, VLPs derived from CPV have a great potential in medicine and diagnostics. In this study, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) fusion motif was utilized to express a whole, naturalVP2 protein of CPV in Escherichia coli. After the cleavage of the fusion motif, the CPV VP2 protein has self-assembled into VLPs. The VLPs had a size and shape that resembled the authentic virus capsid. However, the self-assembly efficiency of VLPs can be affected by different pH levels and ionic strengths. The mice vaccinated subcutaneously with CPV VLPs and CPV-specific immune responses were compared with those immunized with the natural virus. This result showed that VLPs can effectively induce anti-CPV specific antibody and lymphocyte proliferation as a whole virus. This result further suggested that the antigen epitope of CPV was correctly present on VLPs, thereby showing the potential application of a VLP-based CPV vaccine.

  18. Fully-compliant statically-balanced mechanisms without prestressing assembly: concepts and case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present new concepts for designing fully-compliant statically-balanced mechanisms without prestressing assembly. A statically-balanced compliant mechanism can ideally provide zero stiffness and energy free motion like a traditional rigid-body mechanism. These characteristics are important in design of compliant mechanisms where low actuation force, accurate force transmission or high-fidelity force feedback are primary concerns. Typically, static balancing of compliant mechanisms has been achieved by means of prestressing assembly. However, this can often lead to creep and stress relaxation arising in the flexible members. In this paper two concepts are presented which eliminate the need for prestressing assembly of compliant mechanisms: (1 a weight compensator which employs a constant-force compliant mechanism, (2 a near-zero-stiffness mechanism which combines two multistable mechanisms. In addition to the advantages provided by statically-balanced compliant mechanisms, two other notable features of these statically-balanced mechanisms are their ability to be monolithically fabricated and to return to their as-fabricated position without any disassembly when not in use.

  19. Lentiviral Gag assembly analyzed through the functional characterization of chimeric simian immunodeficiency viruses expressing different domains of the feline immunodeficiency virus capsid protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J Esteva

    Full Text Available To gain insight into the functional relationship between the capsid (CA domains of the Gag polyproteins of simian and feline immunodeficiency viruses (SIV and FIV, respectively, we constructed chimeric SIVs in which the CA-coding region was partially or totally replaced by the equivalent region of the FIV CA. The phenotypic characterization of the chimeras allowed us to group them into three categories: the chimeric viruses that, while being assembly-competent, exhibit a virion-associated unstable FIV CA; a second group represented only by the chimeric SIV carrying the N-terminal domain (NTD of the FIV CA which proved to be assembly-defective; and a third group constituted by the chimeric viruses that produce virions exhibiting a mature and stable FIV CA protein, and which incorporate the envelope glycoprotein and contain wild-type levels of viral genome RNA and reverse transcriptase. Further analysis of the latter group of chimeric SIVs demonstrated that they are non-infectious due to a post-entry impairment, such as uncoating of the viral core, reverse transcription or nuclear import of the preintegration complex. Furthermore, we show here that the carboxyl-terminus domain (CTD of the FIV CA has an intrinsic ability to dimerize in vitro and form high-molecular-weight oligomers, which, together with our finding that the FIV CA-CTD is sufficient to confer assembly competence to the resulting chimeric SIV Gag polyprotein, provides evidence that the CA-CTD exhibits more functional plasticity than the CA-NTD. Taken together, our results provide relevant information on the biological relationship between the CA proteins of primate and nonprimate lentiviruses.

  20. SnO2-microtube-assembled cloth for fully flexible self-powered photodetector nanosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaojuan; Liu, Bin; Wang, Xianfu; Wang, Zhuoran; Wang, Qiufan; Chen, Di; Shen, Guozhen

    2013-09-01

    Integrating an energy conversion or storage device with photodetectors into a self-powered system provides a promising route to future devices aimed at reduced size, low weight and high flexibility. We reported here the fabrication of a fully flexible self-powered photodetector nanosystem by integrating a flexible SnO2-cloth-based ultraviolet photodetector with a flexible SnO2-cloth-based lithium-ion battery. The flexible SnO2-cloth-based ultraviolet photodetectors showed fast response to ultraviolet light with excellent flexibility and stability. Using SnO2-on-carbon-cloth as the binder-free anode and commercial LiCoO2/Al foil as the cathode, a flexible full lithium-ion battery was assembled, exhibiting a reversible capacity of 550 mA h g(-1) even after 60 cycles at a current density of 200 mA g(-1) in a potential window of 2-3.8 V. When integrated with and driven by the flexible full battery, the fully flexible self-powered photodetector nanosystem exhibits comparable performance with an analogous externally powered device. Such an integrated nanosystem could serve as a wireless detecting system in large areas, as required in applications such as environmental sensing and biosensing.

  1. Spatial and temporal changes of cyanophage communities in paddy field soils as revealed by the capsid assembly protein gene g20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanghua; Asakawa, Susumu; Kimura, Makoto

    2011-05-01

    Bacteriophages are ubiquitous in various environments. Our previous study revealed the diversity of the cyanophage community in paddy floodwater. In this study, the phylogeny and genetic diversity of cyanophage communities in paddy field soils were reported. The viral capsid assembly protein gene (g20) of cyanophage was amplified with the primers CPS1 and CPS8 from soil DNA extracted during two different sampling times at three sampling sites in Japan. The sequencing results indicated that about 93% of the clones were g20 genes. In total, 70 clones of g20 genes were obtained in this study, of which 69 clones were of cyanophage origin. As evaluated by g20 sequence assemblages in paddy field soils, the unifrac analyses results indicated that cyanophage communities changed among the sampling sites and times and differed from those communities detected in paddy floodwater. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the g20 sequences in paddy field soils were very diverse and distributed into Clusters α, β and ɛ, as well as four newly formed clusters. Within Clusters β and ɛ, four unique subclusters were formed from the g20 clones that were only observed in this study. These findings suggested that the cyanophage communities in paddy field soils are different from those found in freshwater, marine water and paddy floodwater.

  2. Phylogenetic diversity of marine cyanophage isolates and natural virus communities as revealed by sequences of viral capsid assembly protein gene g20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yan; Chen, Feng; Wilhelm, Steven W; Poorvin, Leo; Hodson, Robert E

    2002-04-01

    In order to characterize the genetic diversity and phylogenetic affiliations of marine cyanophage isolates and natural cyanophage assemblages, oligonucleotide primers CPS1 and CPS8 were designed to specifically amplify ca. 592-bp fragments of the gene for viral capsid assembly protein g20. Phylogenetic analysis of isolated cyanophages revealed that the marine cyanophages were highly diverse yet more closely related to each other than to enteric coliphage T4. Genetically related marine cyanophage isolates were widely distributed without significant geographic segregation (i.e., no correlation between genetic variation and geographic distance). Cloning and sequencing analysis of six natural virus concentrates from estuarine and oligotrophic offshore environments revealed nine phylogenetic groups in a total of 114 different g20 homologs, with up to six clusters and 29 genotypes encountered in a single sample. The composition and structure of natural cyanophage communities in the estuary and open-ocean samples were different from each other, with unique phylogenetic clusters found for each environment. Changes in clonal diversity were also observed from the surface waters to the deep chlorophyll maximum layer in the open ocean. Only three clusters contained known cyanophage isolates, while the identities of the other six clusters remain unknown. Whether or not these unidentified groups are composed of bacteriophages that infect different Synechococcus groups or other closely related cyanobacteria remains to be determined. The high genetic diversity of marine cyanophage assemblages revealed by the g20 sequences suggests that marine viruses can potentially play important roles in regulating microbial genetic diversity.

  3. Self-assembly of virus-like particles of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli and their immunogenicity in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huimin; Zhu, Jie; Tan, Yonggui; Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Sun, Shiqi; Liu, Guangqing

    2016-07-01

    In this study, virus-like particles (VLPs) derived from rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) were evaluated for the development of a vaccine against RHDV infection. The VP60 gene was cloned and inserted into a pSMK expression vector containing a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) tag that can promote the soluble expression of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli cells. After expression and purification of His-SUMO-VP60 and cleavage of the SUMO tag, we found that the RHDV VP60 protein had self-assembled into VLPs with a similar shape and smaller size compared with authentic RHDV capsid. Next, the antigenicity and immunogenicity of the VLPs were examined. The results showed that RHDV-specific responses were clearly induced in rabbits and that all rabbits in the VLP group survived while those in the negative control group died within 72 h post-infection. These results suggest that VLP-based RHDV could be a promising RHDV vaccine candidate.

  4. Assembly and Immunogenicity of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Major Capsid Protein ( HPV16 L1 ) in Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a recombinant Pichia pastoris expression system was developed to express HPV16 L1 protein that was driven by a strong AOX1 promoter. HPV16L1 gene was cloned into vector pPICZαB. HPV16 L1 protein expression induced by methanol was screened by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ( SDSPAGE) and Western blotting. The results indicate that the HPV16 L1 protein is secreted by the recombinant P. pastotis, and the purified HPV16 L1 protein can self-assemble into virus-like particles(VLPs), which show a good immunogenicity and induces high-titer antibody in mice.

  5. Photochemical-chemiluminometric determination of aldicarb in a fully automated multicommutation based flow-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomeque, M.; Garcia Bautista, J.A.; Catala Icardo, M.; Garcia Mateo, J.V.; Martinez Calatayud, J

    2004-06-04

    A sensitive and fully automated method for determination of aldicarb in technical formulations (Temik) and mineral waters is proposed. The automation of the flow-assembly is based on the multicommutation approach, which uses a set of solenoid valves acting as independent switchers. The operating cycle for obtaining a typical analytical transient signal can be easily programmed by means of a home-made software running in the Windows environment. The manifold is provided with a photoreactor consisting of a 150 cm long x 0.8 mm i.d. piece of PTFE tubing coiled around a 20 W low-pressure mercury lamp. The determination of aldicarb is performed on the basis of the iron(III) catalytic mineralization of the pesticide by UV irradiation (150 s), and the chemiluminescent (CL) behavior of the photodegradated pesticide in presence of potassium permanganate and quinine sulphate as sensitizer. UV irradiation of aldicarb turns the very week chemiluminescent pesticide into a strongly chemiluminescent photoproduct. The method is linear over the range 2.2-100.0 {mu}g l{sup -1} of aldicarb; the limit of detection is 0.069 {mu}g l{sup -1}; the reproducibility (as the R.S.D. of 20 peaks of a 24 {mu}g l{sup -1} solution) is 3.7% and the sample throughput is 17 h{sup -1}.

  6. Expression and Assembly Mechanism of the Capsid Proteins of a Satellite Virus (XSV) Associated with Macrobrachium rosenbergii Nodavirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-min WANG; Hua-jun ZHANG; Zheng-li SHI

    2008-01-01

    The extra small virus (XSV) is a satellite virus associated with Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) and its genome consists of two overlapping ORFs, CP17 and CP16. Here we demonstrate that CP16 is expressed from the second AUG of the CP17 gene and is not a proteinase cleavage result of CP17. We further expressed CP17 and several truncated CP17s (in which the N- or C-terminus or both was deleted), respectively, in Escherichia coli. Except for the recombinant plasmid CP17ΔC10, all recombinant plasmids expressed soluble protein which assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs), suggesting that the C-terminus is important for VLP formation.

  7. Structure of a novel shoulder-to-shoulder p24 dimer in complex with the broad-spectrum antibody A10F9 and its implication in capsid assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Gu

    Full Text Available Mature HIV-1 viral particles assemble as a fullerene configuration comprising p24 capsid hexamers, pentamers and dimers. In this paper, we report the X-ray crystal structures of the p24 protein from natural HIV-1 strain (BMJ4 in complex with Fab A10F9, which recognizes a conserved epitope in the C-terminal domain of the BMJ4 p24 protein. Our structures reveal a novel shoulder-to-shoulder p24 dimerization mode that is mediated by an S-S bridge at C177. Consistent with these structures, the shoulder-to-shoulder dimer that was obtained from the BMJ4 strain was also observed in p24 proteins from other strains by the introduction of a cysteine residue at position 177. The potential biological significance was further validated by the introduction of a C177A mutation in the BMJ4 strain, which then displays a low infectivity. Our data suggest that this novel shoulder-to-shoulder dimer interface trapped by this unique S-S bridge could represent a physiologically relevant mode of HIV-1 capsid assembly during virus maturation, although Cys residue itself may not be critical for HIV-I replication.

  8. Large-scale functional purification of recombinant HIV-1 capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdeleine Hung

    Full Text Available During human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 virion maturation, capsid proteins undergo a major rearrangement to form a conical core that protects the viral nucleoprotein complexes. Mutations in the capsid sequence that alter the stability of the capsid core are deleterious to viral infectivity and replication. Recently, capsid assembly has become an attractive target for the development of a new generation of anti-retroviral agents. Drug screening efforts and subsequent structural and mechanistic studies require gram quantities of active, homogeneous and pure protein. Conventional means of laboratory purification of Escherichia coli expressed recombinant capsid protein rely on column chromatography steps that are not amenable to large-scale production. Here we present a function-based purification of wild-type and quadruple mutant capsid proteins, which relies on the inherent propensity of capsid protein to polymerize and depolymerize. This method does not require the packing of sizable chromatography columns and can generate double-digit gram quantities of functionally and biochemically well-behaved proteins with greater than 98% purity. We have used the purified capsid protein to characterize two known assembly inhibitors in our in-house developed polymerization assay and to measure their binding affinities. Our capsid purification procedure provides a robust method for purifying large quantities of a key protein in the HIV-1 life cycle, facilitating identification of the next generation anti-HIV agents.

  9. Fully automated hybrid diode laser assembly using high precision active alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, Gunnar; Weber, Daniel; Scholz, Friedemann; Schröder, Henning; Schneider-Ramelow, Martin; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Fraunhofer IZM, Technische Universität Berlin and eagleyard Photonics present various implementations of current micro-optical assemblies for high quality free space laser beam forming and efficient fiber coupling. The laser modules shown are optimized for fast and automated assembly in small form factor packages via state-of-the-art active alignment machinery, using alignment and joining processes that have been developed and established in various industrial research projects. Operational wavelengths and optical powers ranging from 600 to 1600 nm and from 1 mW to several W respectively are addressed, for application in high-resolution laser spectroscopy, telecom and optical sensors, up to the optical powers needed in industrial and medical laser treatment.

  10. Neutronics characterization of an erbia fully poisoned PWR assembly by means of the APOLLO2 code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pergreffi Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing demands on the reduction of fuel cycle costs have led to higher burnup fuel designs. According to the erbia-credit super high burnup fuel concept, developed by mixing low content of erbia to UO2 powder directly after reconversion process so that all fuel pins in a given fuel assembly are homogeneously doped, the present study aims to characterize, from a neutronic point of view, a 17 × 17 pressurized water reactor assembly enriched to 10.27 wt.% in 235U with an erbia content of 1 at.% (i.e. 0.7 wt.% by means of the deterministic neutronic code APOLLO2. For this purpose, a simplified thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed in order to evaluate the effects on fuel thermal conductivity of adding erbia to uranium oxide. The results obtained allow to conclude that an Er-doped assembly enriched to >5 wt.% in 235U represents an advantageous solution for very long fuel cycles, and it is so suited for very high burnups.

  11. Essential role of the unordered VP2 n-terminal domain of the parvovirus MVM capsid in nuclear assembly and endosomal enlargement of the virion fivefold channel for cell entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Martinez, Cristina; Grueso, Esther [Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Carroll, Miles [Health Protection Agency, Centre for Emergency Preparedness and Response, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 OJG, Wilts (United Kingdom); Rommelaere, Jean [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Division F010, Im Neuenheimer Feld 242, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Almendral, Jose M., E-mail: jmalmendral@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-10

    The unordered N-termini of parvovirus capsid proteins (Nt) are translocated through a channel at the icosahedral five-fold axis to serve for virus traffick. Heterologous peptides were genetically inserted at the Nt of MVM to study their functional tolerance to manipulations. Insertion of a 5T4-single-chain antibody at VP2-Nt (2Nt) yielded chimeric capsid subunits failing to enter the nucleus. The VEGFR2-binding peptide (V1) inserted at both 2Nt and VP1-Nt efficiently assembled in virions, but V1 disrupted VP1 and VP2 entry functions. The VP2 defect correlated with restricted externalization of V1-2Nt out of the coat. The specific infectivity of MVM and wtVP-pseudotyped mosaic MVM-V1 virions, upon heating and/or partial 2Nt cleavage, demonstrated that some 2Nt domains become intracellularly translocated out of the virus shell and cleaved to initiate entry. The V1 insertion defines a VP2-driven endosomal enlargement of the channel as an essential structural rearrangement performed by the MVM virion to infect.

  12. Self-assembly of fully addressable DNA nanostructures from double crossover tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Lin, Tong; Zhang, Suoyu; Bai, Tanxi; Mi, Yongli; Wei, Bryan

    2016-09-19

    DNA origami and single-stranded tile (SST) are two proven approaches to self-assemble finite-size complex DNA nanostructures. The construction elements appeared in structures from these two methods can also be found in multi-stranded DNA tiles such as double crossover tiles. Here we report the design and observation of four types of finite-size lattices with four different double crossover tiles, respectively, which, we believe, in terms of both complexity and robustness, will be rival to DNA origami and SST structures.

  13. Cimlib: A Fully Parallel Application For Numerical Simulations Based On Components Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digonnet, Hugues; Silva, Luisa; Coupez, Thierry

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents CIMLIB with its two main characteristics: an Object Oriented Program and a fully parallel code. CIMLIB aims at providing a set of components that can be organized to build numerical simulation of a certain process. We describe two components: one treats the complex task of parallel remeshing, the other puts the focus on the Finite Element modeling. In a second part, we present some parallel performances and an example of a very large simulation (over a mesh of 25 millions nodes) that begins with the mesh generation and ends up writing results files, all done using 88 processors.

  14. Imaging of the alphavirus capsid protein during virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Kielian, Margaret

    2013-09-01

    Alphaviruses are enveloped viruses with highly organized structures. The nucleocapsid (NC) core contains a capsid protein lattice enclosing the plus-sense RNA genome, and it is surrounded by a lipid bilayer containing a lattice of the E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins. Capsid protein is synthesized in the cytoplasm and particle budding occurs at the plasma membrane (PM), but the traffic and assembly of viral components and the exit of virions from host cells are not well understood. To visualize the dynamics of capsid protein during infection, we developed a Sindbis virus infectious clone tagged with a tetracysteine motif. Tagged capsid protein could be fluorescently labeled with biarsenical dyes in living cells without effects on virus growth, morphology, or protein distribution. Live cell imaging and colocalization experiments defined distinct groups of capsid foci in infected cells. We observed highly motile internal puncta that colocalized with E2 protein, which may represent the transport machinery that capsid protein uses to reach the PM. Capsid was also found in larger nonmotile internal structures that colocalized with cellular G3BP and viral nsP3. Thus, capsid may play an unforeseen role in these previously observed G3BP-positive foci, such as regulation of cellular stress granules. Capsid puncta were also observed at the PM. These puncta colocalized with E2 and recruited newly synthesized capsid protein; thus, they may be sites of virus assembly and egress. Together, our studies provide the first dynamic views of the alphavirus capsid protein in living cells and a system to define detailed mechanisms during alphavirus infection.

  15. Crosslinking in viral capsids via tiling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarock, R; Hendrix, R W

    2006-06-07

    A vital part of a virus is its protein shell, called the viral capsid, that encapsulates and hence protects the viral genome. It has been shown in Twarock [2004. A tiling approach to vius capsids assembly explaining a structural puzzle in virology. J. Theor. Biol. 226, 477-482] that the surface structures of viruses with icosahedrally symmetric capsids can be modelled in terms of tilings that encode the locations of the protein subunits. This theory is extended here to multi-level tilings in order to model crosslinking structures. The new framework is demonstrated for the case of bacteriophage HK97, and it is shown, how the theory can be used in general to decide if crosslinking, and what type of crosslinking, is compatible from a mathematical point of view with the geometrical surface structure of a virus.

  16. Kinetics versus Thermodynamics in Virus Capsid Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerman, Pepijn; van der Schoot, Paul; Kegel, Willem

    2016-07-07

    Virus coat proteins spontaneously self-assemble into empty shells in aqueous solution under the appropriate physicochemical conditions, driven by an interaction free energy per bond on the order of 2-5 times the thermal energy kBT. For this seemingly modest interaction strength, each protein building block nonetheless gains a very large binding free energy, between 10 and 20 kBT. Because of this, there is debate about whether the assembly process is reversible or irreversible. Here we discuss capsid polymorphism observed in in vitro experiments from the perspective of nucleation theory and of the thermodynamics of mass action. We specifically consider the potential contribution of a curvature free energy term to the effective interaction potential between the proteins. From these models, we propose experiments that may conclusively reveal whether virus capsid assembly into a mixture of polymorphs is a reversible or an irreversible process.

  17. The Oligomerization Domain of VP3, the Scaffolding Protein of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus, Plays a Critical Role in Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraver, Antonio; Oña, Ana; Abaitua, Fernando; González, Dolores; Clemente, Roberto; Ruiz-Díaz, Jose A.; Castón, Jose R.; Pazos, Florencio; Rodriguez, Jose F.

    2003-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) capsids are formed by a single protein layer containing three polypeptides, pVP2, VP2, and VP3. Here, we show that the VP3 protein synthesized in insect cells, either after expression of the complete polyprotein or from a VP3 gene construct, is proteolytically degraded, leading to the accumulation of product lacking the 13 C-terminal residues. This finding led to identification of the VP3 oligomerization domain within a 24-amino-acid stretch near the C-terminal end of the polypeptide, partially overlapping the VP1 binding domain. Inactivation of the VP3 oligomerization domain, by either proteolysis or deletion of the polyprotein gene, abolishes viruslike particle formation. Formation of VP3-VP1 complexes in cells infected with a dual recombinant baculovirus simultaneously expressing the polyprotein and VP1 prevented VP3 proteolysis and led to efficient virus-like particle formation in insect cells. PMID:12743301

  18. Silica nanoparticles for the layer-by-layer assembly of fully electro-active cytochrome c multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifel Sven C

    2011-12-01

    influence of particle size are discussed. Conclusions This study demonstrates the ability to construct fully electro-active cyt c multilayer assemblies by using carboxy-modified silica nanoparticles. Thus it can be shown that functional, artificial systems can be build up following natural examples of protein arrangements. The absence of any conductive properties in the second building block clearly demonstrates that mechanisms for electron transfer through such protein multilayer assemblies is based on interprotein electron exchange, rather than on wiring of the protein to the electrode. The construction strategy of this multilayer system provides a new controllable route to immobilize proteins in multiple layers featuring direct electrochemistry without mediating shuttle molecules and controlling the electro-active amount by the number of deposition steps.

  19. Fully-3D PET image reconstruction using scanner-independent, adaptive projection data and highly rotation-symmetric voxel assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheins, J J; Herzog, H; Shah, N J

    2011-03-01

    For iterative, fully 3D positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction intrinsic symmetries can be used to significantly reduce the size of the system matrix. The precalculation and beneficial memory-resident storage of all nonzero system matrix elements is possible where sufficient compression exists. Thus, reconstruction times can be minimized independently of the used projector and more elaborate weighting schemes, e.g., volume-of-intersection (VOI), are applicable. A novel organization of scanner-independent, adaptive 3D projection data is presented which can be advantageously combined with highly rotation-symmetric voxel assemblies. In this way, significant system matrix compression is achieved. Applications taking into account all physical lines-of-response (LORs) with individual VOI projectors are presented for the Siemens ECAT HR+ whole-body scanner and the Siemens BrainPET, the PET component of a novel hybrid-MR/PET imaging system. Measured and simulated data were reconstructed using the new method with ordered-subset-expectation-maximization (OSEM). Results are compared to those obtained by the sinogram-based OSEM reconstruction provided by the manufacturer. The higher computational effort due to the more accurate image space sampling provides significantly improved images in terms of resolution and noise.

  20. Periodic table of virus capsids: implications for natural selection and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannige, Ranjan V; Brooks, Charles L

    2010-03-04

    For survival, most natural viruses depend upon the existence of spherical capsids: protective shells of various sizes composed of protein subunits. So far, general evolutionary pressures shaping capsid design have remained elusive, even though an understanding of such properties may help in rationally impeding the virus life cycle and designing efficient nano-assemblies. This report uncovers an unprecedented and species-independent evolutionary pressure on virus capsids, based on the the notion that the simplest capsid designs (or those capsids with the lowest "hexamer complexity", C(h)) are the fittest, which was shown to be true for all available virus capsids. The theories result in a physically meaningful periodic table of virus capsids that uncovers strong and overarching evolutionary pressures, while also offering geometric explanations to other capsid properties (rigidity, pleomorphy, auxiliary requirements, etc.) that were previously considered to be unrelatable properties of the individual virus. Apart from describing a universal rule for virus capsid evolution, our work (especially the periodic table) provides a language with which highly diverse virus capsids, unified only by geometry, may be described and related to each other. Finally, the available virus structure databases and other published data reiterate the predicted geometry-derived rules, reinforcing the role of geometry in the natural selection and design of virus capsids.

  1. Primate TRIM5 proteins form hexagonal nets on HIV-1 capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yen-Li; Chandrasekaran, Viswanathan; Carter, Stephen D; Woodward, Cora L; Christensen, Devin E; Dryden, Kelly A; Pornillos, Owen; Yeager, Mark; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K; Jensen, Grant J; Sundquist, Wesley I

    2016-01-01

    TRIM5 proteins are restriction factors that block retroviral infections by binding viral capsids and preventing reverse transcription. Capsid recognition is mediated by C-terminal domains on TRIM5α (SPRY) or TRIMCyp (cyclophilin A), which interact weakly with capsids. Efficient capsid recognition also requires the conserved N-terminal tripartite motifs (TRIM), which mediate oligomerization and create avidity effects. To characterize how TRIM5 proteins recognize viral capsids, we developed methods for isolating native recombinant TRIM5 proteins and purifying stable HIV-1 capsids. Biochemical and EM analyses revealed that TRIM5 proteins assembled into hexagonal nets, both alone and on capsid surfaces. These nets comprised open hexameric rings, with the SPRY domains centered on the edges and the B-box and RING domains at the vertices. Thus, the principles of hexagonal TRIM5 assembly and capsid pattern recognition are conserved across primates, allowing TRIM5 assemblies to maintain the conformational plasticity necessary to recognize divergent and pleomorphic retroviral capsids. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16269.001 PMID:27253068

  2. The Astrovirus Capsid: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Carlos F.; DuBois, Rebecca M.

    2017-01-01

    Astroviruses are enterically transmitted viruses that cause infections in mammalian and avian species. Astroviruses are nonenveloped, icosahedral viruses comprised of a capsid protein shell and a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome. The capsid protein undergoes dramatic proteolytic processing both inside and outside of the host cell, resulting in a coordinated maturation process that affects cellular localization, virus structure, and infectivity. After maturation, the capsid protein controls the initial phases of virus infection, including virus attachment, endocytosis, and genome release into the host cell. The astrovirus capsid is the target of host antibodies including virus-neutralizing antibodies. The capsid protein also mediates the binding of host complement proteins and inhibits complement activation. Here, we will review our knowledge on the astrovirus capsid protein (CP), with particular attention to the recent structural, biochemical, and virological studies that have advanced our understanding of the astrovirus life cycle. PMID:28106836

  3. L2, the minor capsid protein of papillomavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Joshua W. [Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Roden, Richard B.S., E-mail: roden@jhmi.edu [Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The capsid protein L2 plays major roles in both papillomavirus assembly and the infectious process. While L1 forms the majority of the capsid and can self-assemble into empty virus-like particles (VLPs), L2 is a minor capsid component and lacks the capacity to form VLPs. However, L2 co-assembles with L1 into VLPs, enhancing their assembly. L2 also facilitates encapsidation of the ∼8 kbp circular and nucleosome-bound viral genome during assembly of the non-enveloped T=7d virions in the nucleus of terminally differentiated epithelial cells, although, like L1, L2 is not detectably expressed in infected basal cells. With respect to infection, L2 is not required for particles to bind to and enter cells. However L2 must be cleaved by furin for endosome escape. L2 then travels with the viral genome to the nucleus, wherein it accumulates at ND-10 domains. Here, we provide an overview of the biology of L2. - Highlights: • L2 is the minor antigen of the non-enveloped T=7d icosahedral Papillomavirus capsid. • L2 is a nuclear protein that can traffic to ND-10 and facilitate genome encapsidation. • L2 is critical for infection and must be cleaved by furin. • L2 is a broadly protective vaccine antigen recognized by neutralizing antibodies.

  4. RNA-binding region of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Zee Hong; Mohd, Nur Azmina Syakirin; Tan, Soon Guan; Bhassu, Subha; Tan, Wen Siang

    2014-09-01

    White tail disease (WTD) kills prawn larvae and causes drastic losses to the freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) industry. The main causative agent of WTD is Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV). The N-terminal end of the MrNV capsid protein is very rich in positively charged amino acids and is postulated to interact with RNA molecules. N-terminal and internal deletion mutagenesis revealed that the RNA-binding region is located at positions 20-29, where 80 % of amino acids are positively charged. Substitution of all these positively charged residues with alanine abolished the RNA binding. Mutants without the RNA-binding region still assembled into virus-like particles, suggesting that this region is not a part of the capsid assembly domain. This paper is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to report the specific RNA-binding region of MrNV capsid protein.

  5. Varicella-zoster virus induces the formation of dynamic nuclear capsid aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, Marielle [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Thelen, Nicolas; Thiry, Marc [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Neurosciences, Laboratory of Cellular and Tissular Biology, Liege (Belgium); Riva, Laura; Ote, Isabelle; Condé, Claude; Vandevenne, Patricia [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Di Valentin, Emmanuel [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Viral Vectors Platform, Liege (Belgium); Bontems, Sébastien [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine, E-mail: csadzot@ulg.ac.be [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    The first step of herpesviruses virion assembly occurs in the nucleus. However, the exact site where nucleocapsids are assembled, where the genome and the inner tegument are acquired, remains controversial. We created a recombinant VZV expressing ORF23 (homologous to HSV-1 VP26) fused to the eGFP and dually fluorescent viruses with a tegument protein additionally fused to a red tag (ORF9, ORF21 and ORF22 corresponding to HSV-1 UL49, UL37 and UL36). We identified nuclear dense structures containing the major capsid protein, the scaffold protein and maturing protease, as well as ORF21 and ORF22. Correlative microscopy demonstrated that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates and time-lapse video imaging showed that they appear prior to the accumulation of cytoplasmic capsids, presumably undergoing the secondary egress, and are highly dynamic. Our observations suggest that these structures might represent a nuclear area important for capsid assembly and/or maturation before the budding at the inner nuclear membrane. - Highlights: • We created a recombinant VZV expressing the small capsid protein fused to the eGFP. • We identified nuclear dense structures containing capsid and procapsid proteins. • Correlative microscopy showed that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates. • Procapsids and partial capsids are found within the aggregates of WT and eGFP-23 VZV. • FRAP and FLIP experiments demonstrated that they are dynamic structures.

  6. SCHEMA computational design of virus capsid chimeras: calibrating how genome packaging, protection, and transduction correlate with calculated structural disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Michelle L; Adler, Benjamin A; Torre, Michael L; Silberg, Jonathan J; Suh, Junghae

    2013-12-20

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) recombination can result in chimeric capsid protein subunits whose ability to assemble into an oligomeric capsid, package a genome, and transduce cells depends on the inheritance of sequence from different AAV parents. To develop quantitative design principles for guiding site-directed recombination of AAV capsids, we have examined how capsid structural perturbations predicted by the SCHEMA algorithm correlate with experimental measurements of disruption in seventeen chimeric capsid proteins. In our small chimera population, created by recombining AAV serotypes 2 and 4, we found that protection of viral genomes and cellular transduction were inversely related to calculated disruption of the capsid structure. Interestingly, however, we did not observe a correlation between genome packaging and calculated structural disruption; a majority of the chimeric capsid proteins formed at least partially assembled capsids and more than half packaged genomes, including those with the highest SCHEMA disruption. These results suggest that the sequence space accessed by recombination of divergent AAV serotypes is rich in capsid chimeras that assemble into 60-mer capsids and package viral genomes. Overall, the SCHEMA algorithm may be useful for delineating quantitative design principles to guide the creation of libraries enriched in genome-protecting virus nanoparticles that can effectively transduce cells. Such improvements to the virus design process may help advance not only gene therapy applications but also other bionanotechnologies dependent upon the development of viruses with new sequences and functions.

  7. L2, the minor capsid protein of papillomavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joshua W.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2013-01-01

    The capsid protein L2 plays major roles in both papillomavirus assembly and the infectious process. While L1 forms the majority of the capsid and can self-assemble into empty virus-like particles (VLPs), L2 is a minor capsid component and lacks the capacity to form VLPs. However, L2 co-assembles with L1 into VLPs, enhancing their assembly. L2 also facilitates encapsidation of the ~8kbp circular and nucleosome-bound viral genome during assembly of the non-enveloped T=7d virions in the nucleus of terminally differentiated epithelial cells, although, like L1, L2 is not detectably expressed in infected basal cells. With respect to infection, L2 is not required for particles to bind to and enter cells. However L2 must be cleaved by furin for endosome escape. L2 then travels with the viral genome to the nucleus, wherein it accumulates at ND-10 domains. Here, we provide an overview of the biology of L2. PMID:23689062

  8. Structural Transitions and Energy Landscape for Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Capsid Mechanics from Nanomanipulation in Vitro and in Silico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Brasch, Melanie; Cornelissen, Jeroen; Dima, Ruxandra I.; Marx, Kenneth A.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.; Barsegov, Valeri

    2013-01-01

    Physical properties of capsids of plant and animal viruses are important factors in capsid self-assembly, survival of viruses in the extracellular environment, and their cell infectivity. Combined AFM experiments and computational modeling on subsecond timescales of the indentation nanomechanics of

  9. Crystal Structure of the Human Astrovirus Capsid Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Yukimatsu; Harper, Justin; Dryden, Kelly A.; Yeager, Mark; Méndez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human astrovirus (HAstV) is a leading cause of viral diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. HAstV is a nonenveloped virus with a T=3 capsid and a positive-sense RNA genome. The capsid protein (CP) of HAstV is synthesized as a 90-kDa precursor (VP90) that can be divided into three linear domains: a conserved N-terminal domain, a hypervariable domain, and an acidic C-terminal domain. Maturation of HAstV requires proteolytic processing of the astrovirus CP both inside and outside the host cell, resulting in the removal of the C-terminal domain and the breakdown of the rest of the CP into three predominant protein species with molecular masses of ∼34, 27/29, and 25/26 kDa, respectively. We have now solved the crystal structure of VP9071–415 (amino acids [aa] 71 to 415 of VP90) of human astrovirus serotype 8 at a 2.15-Å resolution. VP9071–415 encompasses the conserved N-terminal domain of VP90 but lacks the hypervariable domain, which forms the capsid surface spikes. The structure of VP9071–415 is comprised of two domains: an S domain, which adopts the typical jelly-roll β-barrel fold, and a P1 domain, which forms a squashed β-barrel consisting of six antiparallel β-strands similar to what was observed in the hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid structure. Fitting of the VP9071–415 structure into the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) maps of HAstV produced an atomic model for a continuous, T=3 icosahedral capsid shell. Our pseudoatomic model of the human HAstV capsid shell provides valuable insights into intermolecular interactions required for capsid assembly and trypsin-mediated proteolytic maturation needed for virus infectivity. Such information has potential applications in the development of a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine as well as small-molecule drugs targeting astrovirus assembly/maturation. IMPORTANCE Human astrovirus (HAstV) is a leading cause of viral diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. As a nonenveloped virus

  10. Flexible hybrid circuit fully inkjet-printed: Surface mount devices assembled by silver nanoparticles-based inkjet ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrese, J.; Vescio, G.; Xuriguera, E.; Medina-Rodriguez, B.; Cornet, A.; Cirera, A.

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, inkjet-printed devices such as transistors are still unstable in air and have poor performances. Moreover, the present electronics applications require a high degree of reliability and quality of their properties. In order to accomplish these application requirements, hybrid electronics is fulfilled by combining the advantages of the printing technologies with the surface-mount technology. In this work, silver nanoparticle-based inkjet ink (AgNP ink) is used as a novel approach to connect surface-mount devices (SMDs) onto inkjet-printed pads, conducted by inkjet printing technology. Excellent quality AgNP ink-junctions are ensured with high resolution picoliter drop jetting at low temperature (˜150 °C). Electrical, mechanical, and morphological characterizations are carried out to assess the performance of the AgNP ink junction. Moreover, AgNP ink is compared with common benchmark materials (i.e., silver epoxy and solder). Electrical contact resistance characterization shows a similar performance between the AgNP ink and the usual ones. Mechanical characterization shows comparable shear strength for AgNP ink and silver epoxy, and both present higher adhesion than solder. Morphological inspections by field-emission scanning electron microscopy confirm a high quality interface of the silver nanoparticle interconnection. Finally, a flexible hybrid circuit on paper controlled by an Arduino board is manufactured, demonstrating the viability and scalability of the AgNP ink assembling technique.

  11. The Papillomavirus Major Capsid Protein L1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher B.; Day, Patricia M.; Trus, Benes L.

    2013-01-01

    The elegant icosahedral surface of the papillomavirus virion is formed by a single protein called L1. Recombinant L1 proteins can spontaneously self-assemble into a highly immunogenic structure that closely mimics the natural surface of native papillomavirus virions. This has served as the basis for two highly successful vaccines against cancer-causing human papillomaviruses (HPVs). During the viral life cycle, the capsid must undergo a variety of conformational changes, allowing key functions including the encapsidation of the ~8 kb viral genomic DNA, maturation into a more stable state to survive transit between hosts, mediating attachment to new host cells, and finally releasing the viral DNA into the newly infected host cell. This brief review focuses on conserved sequence and structural features that underlie the functions of this remarkable protein. PMID:23800545

  12. Immobilization and One-Dimensional Arrangement of Virus Capsids with Nanoscale Precision Using DNA Origami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Liu, Minghui [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Tong, Gary J [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Zhe [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Liu, Yan [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Yan, Hao [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Francis, Matthew B [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-06-24

    DNA origami was used as a scaffold to arrange spherical virus capsids into one-dimensional arrays with precise nanoscale positioning. To do this, we first modified the interior surface of bacteriophage MS2 capsids with fluorescent dyes as a model cargo. An unnatural amino acid on the external surface was then coupled to DNA strands that were complementary to those extending from origami tiles. Two different geometries of DNA tiles (rectangular and triangular) were used. The capsids associated with tiles of both geometries with virtually 100% efficiency under mild annealing conditions, and the location of capsid immobilization on the tile could be controlled by the position of the probe strands. The rectangular tiles and capsids could then be arranged into one-dimensional arrays by adding DNA strands linking the corners of the tiles. The resulting structures consisted of multiple capsids with even spacing (~100 nm). We also used a second set of tiles that had probe strands at both ends, resulting in a one-dimensional array of alternating capsids and tiles. This hierarchical self-assembly allows us to position the virus particles with unprecedented control and allows the future construction of integrated multicomponent systems from biological scaffolds using the power of rationally engineered DNA nanostructures.

  13. Magic-angle spinning NMR of intact bacteriophages: Insights into the capsid, DNA and their interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Gili; Morag, Omry; Goldbourt, Amir

    2015-04-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. They are complex macromolecular assemblies, which are composed of multiple protein subunits that protect genomic material and deliver it to specific hosts. Various biophysical techniques have been used to characterize their structure in order to unravel phage morphogenesis. Yet, most bacteriophages are non-crystalline and have very high molecular weights, in the order of tens of MegaDaltons. Therefore, complete atomic-resolution characterization on such systems that encompass both capsid and DNA is scarce. In this perspective article we demonstrate how magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR has and is used to characterize in detail bacteriophage viruses, including filamentous and icosahedral phage. We discuss the process of sample preparation, spectral assignment of both capsid and DNA and the use of chemical shifts and dipolar couplings to probe the capsid-DNA interface, describe capsid structure and dynamics and extract structural differences between viruses.

  14. Remodeling nuclear architecture allows efficient transport of herpesvirus capsids by diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Jens B; Hogue, Ian B; Feric, Marina; Thiberge, Stephan Y; Sodeik, Beate; Brangwynne, Clifford P; Enquist, Lynn W

    2015-10-20

    The nuclear chromatin structure confines the movement of large macromolecular complexes to interchromatin corrals. Herpesvirus capsids of approximately 125 nm assemble in the nucleoplasm and must reach the nuclear membranes for egress. Previous studies concluded that nuclear herpesvirus capsid motility is active, directed, and based on nuclear filamentous actin, suggesting that large nuclear complexes need metabolic energy to escape nuclear entrapment. However, this hypothesis has recently been challenged. Commonly used microscopy techniques do not allow the imaging of rapid nuclear particle motility with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we use a rotating, oblique light sheet, which we dubbed a ring-sheet, to image and track viral capsids with high temporal and spatial resolution. We do not find any evidence for directed transport. Instead, infection with different herpesviruses induced an enlargement of interchromatin domains and allowed particles to diffuse unrestricted over longer distances, thereby facilitating nuclear egress for a larger fraction of capsids.

  15. Structure of Hepatitis E Virion-Sized Particle Reveals an RNA-Dependent Viral Assembly Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, L.; Wall, J.; Li, T.-C.; Mayazaki, N.; Simon, M. N.; Moore, M.; Wang, C.-Y.; Takeda, N.; Wakita, T.; Miyamura, T.; Cheng, R. H.

    2010-10-22

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) induces acute hepatitis in humans with a high fatality rate in pregnant women. There is a need for anti-HEV research to understand the assembly process of HEV native capsid. Here, we produced a large virion-sized and a small T=1 capsid by expressing the HEV capsid protein in insect cells with and without the N-terminal 111 residues, respectively, for comparative structural analysis. The virion-sized capsid demonstrates a T=3 icosahedral lattice and contains RNA fragment in contrast to the RNA-free T=1 capsid. However, both capsids shared common decameric organization. The in vitro assembly further demonstrated that HEV capsid protein had the intrinsic ability to form decameric intermediate. Our data suggest that RNA binding is the extrinsic factor essential for the assembly of HEV native capsids.

  16. A fully spray-coated fuel cell membrane electrode assembly using Aquivion ionomer with a graphene oxide/cerium oxide interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitwieser, Matthias; Bayer, Thomas; Büchler, Andreas; Zengerle, Roland; Lyth, Stephen M.; Thiele, Simon

    2017-05-01

    A novel multilayer membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is fabricated in this work, within a single spray-coating device. For the first time, direct membrane deposition is used to fabricate a PEMFC by spraying the short-side-chain ionomer Aquivion directly onto the gas diffusion electrodes. The fully sprayed MEA, with an Aquivion membrane 10 μm in thickness, achieved a high power density of 1.6 W/cm2 for H2/air operation at 300 kPaabs. This is one of the highest reported values for thin composite membranes operated in H2/air atmosphere. By the means of confocal laser scanning microscopy, individual carbon fibers from the gas diffusion layer are identified to penetrate through the micro porous layer (MPL), likely causing a low electrical cell resistance in the range of 150 Ω cm2 through the thin sprayed membranes. By spraying a 200 nm graphene oxide/cerium oxide (GO/CeO2) interlayer between two layers of Aquivion ionomer, the impact of the electrical short is eliminated and the hydrogen crossover current density is reduced to about 1 mA/cm2. The peak power density of the interlayer-containing MEA drops only by 10% compared to a pure Aquivion membrane of similar thickness.

  17. X-Ray Structures of the Hexameric Building Block of the HIV Capsid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pornillos, Owen; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Kelly, Brian N.; Hua, Yuanzi; Whitby, Frank G.; Stout, C. David; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hill, Christopher P.; Yeager, Mark; (Scripps); (Utah)

    2009-09-11

    The mature capsids of HIV and other retroviruses organize and package the viral genome and its associated enzymes for delivery into host cells. The HIV capsid is a fullerene cone: a variably curved, closed shell composed of approximately 250 hexamers and exactly 12 pentamers of the viral CA protein. We devised methods for isolating soluble, assembly-competent CA hexamers and derived four crystallographically independent models that define the structure of this capsid assembly unit at atomic resolution. A ring of six CA N-terminal domains form an apparently rigid core, surrounded by an outer ring of C-terminal domains. Mobility of the outer ring appears to be an underlying mechanism for generating the variably curved lattice in authentic capsids. Hexamer-stabilizing interfaces are highly hydrated, and this property may be key to the formation of quasi-equivalent interactions within hexamers and pentamers. The structures also clarify the molecular basis for capsid assembly inhibition and should facilitate structure-based drug design strategies.

  18. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Structural Transitions and Energy Landscape for Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Capsid Mechanics from Nanomanipulation in Vitro and in Silico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Brasch, Melanie; Cornelissen, Jeroen; Dima, Ruxandra I.; Marx, Kenneth A.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.; Barsegov, Valeri

    2013-10-01

    Physical properties of capsids of plant and animal viruses are important factors in capsid self-assembly, survival of viruses in the extracellular environment, and their cell infectivity. Virus shells can have applications as nanocontainers and delivery vehicles in biotechnology and medicine. Combined AFM experiments and computational modeling on sub-second timescales of the indentation nanomechanics of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsid show that the capsid's physical properties are dynamic and local characteristics of the structure, which depend on the magnitude and geometry of mechanical input. Surprisingly, under large deformations the CCMV capsid transitions to the collapsed state without substantial local structural alterations. The enthalpy change in this deformation state dH = 11.5 - 12.8 MJ/mol is mostly due to large-amplitude out-of-plane excitations, which contribute to the capsid bending, and the entropy change TdS = 5.1 - 5.8 MJ/mol is mostly due to coherent in-plane rearrangements of protein chains, which result in the capsid stiffening. Dynamic coupling of these modes defines the extent of elasticity and reversibility of capsid mechanical deformation. This emerging picture illuminates how unique physico-chemical properties of protein nanoshells help define their structure and morphology, and determine their viruses' biological function.

  20. Inhibition of HIV-1 Maturation via Small-Molecule Targeting of the Amino-Terminal Domain in the Viral Capsid Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weifeng; Zhou, Jing; Halambage, Upul D; Jurado, Kellie A; Jamin, Augusta V; Wang, Yujie; Engelman, Alan N; Aiken, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid protein is an attractive therapeutic target, owing to its multifunctionality in virus replication and the high fitness cost of amino acid substitutions in capsids to HIV-1 infectivity. To date, small-molecule inhibitors have been identified that inhibit HIV-1 capsid assembly and/or impair its function in target cells. Here, we describe the mechanism of action of the previously reported capsid-targeting HIV-1 inhibitor, Boehringer-Ingelheim compound 1 (C1). We show that C1 acts during HIV-1 maturation to prevent assembly of a mature viral capsid. However, unlike the maturation inhibitor bevirimat, C1 did not significantly affect the kinetics or fidelity of Gag processing. HIV-1 particles produced in the presence of C1 contained unstable capsids that lacked associated electron density and exhibited impairments in early postentry stages of infection, most notably reverse transcription. C1 inhibited assembly of recombinant HIV-1 CA in vitro and induced aberrant cross-links in mutant HIV-1 particles capable of spontaneous intersubunit disulfide bonds at the interhexamer interface in the capsid lattice. Resistance to C1 was conferred by a single amino acid substitution within the compound-binding site in the N-terminal domain of the CA protein. Our results demonstrate that the binding site for C1 represents a new pharmacological vulnerability in the capsid assembly stage of the HIV-1 life cycle.IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 capsid protein is an attractive but unexploited target for clinical drug development. Prior studies have identified HIV-1 capsid-targeting compounds that display different mechanisms of action, which in part reflects the requirement for capsid function at both the efferent and afferent phases of viral replication. Here, we show that one such compound, compound 1, interferes with assembly of the conical viral capsid during virion maturation and results in perturbations at a specific protein

  1. Immobilization and One-Dimensional Arrangement of Virus Capsids With Nanoscale Precision Using DNA Origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Liu, Minghui; Tong, Gary J.; Li, Zhe; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao; Francis, Matthew B.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembly has proven to be one of the most effective ways to arrange matter at the nanometer level. Biology, in particular, makes extensive use of self-assembly to position molecules over several length scales with a high degree of spatial control over structure. In recent years, one promising approach that takes advantage of biological self-assembly in order to build synthetic materials employs virus capsids, the protein shells that encapsulate the genetic material of viruses.1 Capsids are composed of multiple protein subunits that can assemble (either spontaneously or under an external stimulus) into a monodisperse structure with different geometries depending on the virus. By appropriately functionalizing the proteins that comprise the capsid, multiple copies of a molecule or other entity can be positioned with a predictable arrangement. A wide variety of components have been attached to and arranged by virus capsids, including chromophores,2 catalysts,3 nanoparticles and quantum dots,4 polymers,5 drug molecules,6 and imaging agents.7 PMID:20575574

  2. Internal Proteins of the Procapsid and Mature Capsids of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Mapped by Bubblegram Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weimin; Newcomb, William W.; Cheng, Naiqian; Aksyuk, Anastasia; Winkler, Dennis C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) capsid is a huge assembly, ∼1,250 Å in diameter, and is composed of thousands of protein subunits with a combined mass of ∼200 MDa, housing a 100-MDa genome. First, a procapsid is formed through coassembly of the surface shell with an inner scaffolding shell; then the procapsid matures via a major structural transformation, triggered by limited proteolysis of the scaffolding proteins. Three mature capsids are found in the nuclei of infected cells. A capsids are empty, B capsids retain a shrunken scaffolding shell, and C capsids—which develop into infectious virions—are filled with DNA and ostensibly have expelled the scaffolding shell. The possible presence of other internal proteins in C capsids has been moot as, in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), they would be camouflaged by the surrounding DNA. We have used bubblegram imaging to map internal proteins in all four capsids, aided by the discovery that the scaffolding protein is exceptionally prone to radiation-induced bubbling. We confirmed that this protein forms thick-walled inner shells in the procapsid and the B capsid. C capsids generate two classes of bubbles: one occupies positions beneath the vertices of the icosahedral surface shell, and the other is distributed throughout its interior. A likely candidate is the viral protease. A subpopulation of C capsids bubbles particularly profusely and may represent particles in which expulsion of scaffold and DNA packaging are incomplete. Based on the procapsid structure, we propose that the axial channels of hexameric capsomers afford the pathway via which the scaffolding protein is expelled. IMPORTANCE In addition to DNA, capsids of tailed bacteriophages and their distant relatives, herpesviruses, contain internal proteins. These proteins are often essential for infectivity but are difficult to locate within the virion. A novel adaptation of cryo-EM based on detecting gas bubbles generated by radiation

  3. Bacteriophage P23-77 capsid protein structures reveal the archetype of an ancient branch from a major virus lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Ilona; Grimes, Jonathan M; Pawlowski, Alice; Mäntynen, Sari; Harlos, Karl; Bamford, Jaana K H; Stuart, David I

    2013-05-07

    It has proved difficult to classify viruses unless they are closely related since their rapid evolution hinders detection of remote evolutionary relationships in their genetic sequences. However, structure varies more slowly than sequence, allowing deeper evolutionary relationships to be detected. Bacteriophage P23-77 is an example of a newly identified viral lineage, with members inhabiting extreme environments. We have solved multiple crystal structures of the major capsid proteins VP16 and VP17 of bacteriophage P23-77. They fit the 14 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the entire virus exquisitely well, allowing us to propose a model for both the capsid architecture and viral assembly, quite different from previously published models. The structures of the capsid proteins and their mode of association to form the viral capsid suggest that the P23-77-like and adeno-PRD1 lineages of viruses share an extremely ancient common ancestor.

  4. Protease cleavage leads to formation of mature trimer interface in HIV-1 capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Meng

    Full Text Available During retrovirus particle maturation, the assembled Gag polyprotein is cleaved by the viral protease into matrix (MA, capsid (CA, and nucleocapsid (NC proteins. To form the mature viral capsid, CA rearranges, resulting in a lattice composed of hexameric and pentameric CA units. Recent structural studies of assembled HIV-1 CA revealed several inter-subunit interfaces in the capsid lattice, including a three-fold interhexamer interface that is critical for proper capsid stability. Although a general architecture of immature particles has been provided by cryo-electron tomographic studies, the structural details of the immature particle and the maturation pathway remain unknown. Here, we used cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM to determine the structure of tubular assemblies of the HIV-1 CA-SP1-NC protein. Relative to the mature assembled CA structure, we observed a marked conformational difference in the position of the CA-CTD relative to the NTD in the CA-SP1-NC assembly, involving the flexible hinge connecting the two domains. This difference was verified via engineered disulfide crosslinking, revealing that inter-hexamer contacts, in particular those at the pseudo three-fold axis, are altered in the CA-SP1-NC assemblies compared to the CA assemblies. Results from crosslinking analyses of mature and immature HIV-1 particles containing the same Cys substitutions in the Gag protein are consistent with these findings. We further show that cleavage of preassembled CA-SP1-NC by HIV-1 protease in vitro leads to release of SP1 and NC without disassembly of the lattice. Collectively, our results indicate that the proteolytic cleavage of Gag leads to a structural reorganization of the polypeptide and creates the three-fold interhexamer interface, important for the formation of infectious HIV-1 particles.

  5. Cyclophilin A stabilizes the HIV-1 capsid through a novel non-canonical binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuang; Perilla, Juan R.; Ning, Jiying; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Ramalho, Ruben; Himes, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongpu; Bedwell, Gregory J.; Byeon, In-Ja; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Prevelige, Peter E.; Rousso, Itay; Aiken, Christopher; Polenova, Tatyana; Schulten, Klaus; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-03-01

    The host cell factor cyclophilin A (CypA) interacts directly with the HIV-1 capsid and regulates viral infectivity. Although the crystal structure of CypA in complex with the N-terminal domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) has been known for nearly two decades, how CypA interacts with the viral capsid and modulates HIV-1 infectivity remains unclear. We determined the cryoEM structure of CypA in complex with the assembled HIV-1 capsid at 8-Å resolution. The structure exhibits a distinct CypA-binding pattern in which CypA selectively bridges the two CA hexamers along the direction of highest curvature. EM-guided all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and solid-state NMR further reveal that the CypA-binding pattern is achieved by single-CypA molecules simultaneously interacting with two CA subunits, in different hexamers, through a previously uncharacterized non-canonical interface. These results provide new insights into how CypA stabilizes the HIV-1 capsid and is recruited to facilitate HIV-1 infection.

  6. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong, E-mail: jwu@engr.ucr.edu [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2014-06-21

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  7. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-01

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  8. Breaking a virus: Identifying molecular level failure modes of a viral capsid by multiscale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamani, V.; Globisch, C.; Peter, C.; Deserno, M.

    2016-07-01

    We use coarse-grained (CG) simulations to study the deformation of empty Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsids under uniaxial compression, from the initial elastic response up to capsid breakage. Our CG model is based on the MARTINI force field and has been amended by a stabilizing elastic network, acting only within individual proteins, that was tuned to capture the fluctuation spectrum of capsid protein dimers, obtained from all atom simulations. We have previously shown that this model predicts force-compression curves that match AFM indentation experiments on empty CCMV capsids. Here we investigate details of the actual breaking events when the CCMV capsid finally fails. We present a symmetry classification of all relevant protein contacts and show that they differ significantly in terms of stability. Specifically, we show that interfaces which break readily are precisely those which are believed to form last during assembly, even though some of them might share the same contacts as other non-breaking interfaces. In particular, the interfaces that form pentamers of dimers never break, while the virtually identical interfaces within hexamers of dimers readily do. Since these units differ in the large-scale geometry and, most noticeably, the cone-angle at the center of the 5- or 6-fold vertex, we propose that the hexameric unit fails because it is pre-stressed. This not only suggests that hexamers of dimers form less frequently during the early stages of assembly; it also offers a natural explanation for the well-known β-barrel motif at the hexameric center as a post-aggregation stabilization mechanism. Finally, we identify those amino acid contacts within all key protein interfaces that are most persistent during compressive deformation of the capsid, thereby providing potential targets for mutation studies aiming to elucidate the key contacts upon which overall stability rests.

  9. Breaking a virus: Identifying molecular level failure modes of a viral capsid by multiscale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamani, V.; Globisch, C.; Peter, C.; Deserno, M.

    2016-10-01

    We use coarse-grained (CG) simulations to study the deformation of empty Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsids under uniaxial compression, from the initial elastic response up to capsid breakage. Our CG model is based on the MARTINI force field and has been amended by a stabilizing elastic network, acting only within individual proteins, that was tuned to capture the fluctuation spectrum of capsid protein dimers, obtained from all atom simulations. We have previously shown that this model predicts force-compression curves that match AFM indentation experiments on empty CCMV capsids. Here we investigate details of the actual breaking events when the CCMV capsid finally fails. We present a symmetry classification of all relevant protein contacts and show that they differ significantly in terms of stability. Specifically, we show that interfaces which break readily are precisely those which are believed to form last during assembly, even though some of them might share the same contacts as other non-breaking interfaces. In particular, the interfaces that form pentamers of dimers never break, while the virtually identical interfaces within hexamers of dimers readily do. Since these units differ in the large-scale geometry and, most noticeably, the cone-angle at the center of the 5- or 6-fold vertex, we propose that the hexameric unit fails because it is pre-stressed. This not only suggests that hexamers of dimers form less frequently during the early stages of assembly; it also offers a natural explanation for the well-known β-barrel motif at the hexameric center as a post-aggregation stabilization mechanism. Finally, we identify those amino acid contacts within all key protein interfaces that are most persistent during compressive deformation of the capsid, thereby providing potential targets for mutation studies aiming to elucidate the key contacts upon which overall stability rests.

  10. Stabilising the Herpes Simplex Virus capsid by DNA packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuite, Gijs; Radtke, Kerstin; Sodeik, Beate; Roos, Wouter

    2009-03-01

    Three different types of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) nuclear capsids can be distinguished, A, B and C capsids. These capsids types are, respectively, empty, contain scaffold proteins, or hold DNA. We investigate the physical properties of these three capsids by combining biochemical and nanoindentation techniques. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments show that A and C capsids are mechanically indistinguishable whereas B capsids already break at much lower forces. By extracting the pentamers with 2.0 M GuHCl or 6.0 M Urea we demonstrate an increased flexibility of all three capsid types. Remarkably, the breaking force of the B capsids without pentamers does not change, while the modified A and C capsids show a large drop in their breaking force to approximately the value of the B capsids. This result indicates that upon DNA packaging a structural change at or near the pentamers occurs which mechanically reinforces the capsids structure. The reported binding of proteins UL17/UL25 to the pentamers of the A and C capsids seems the most likely candidate for such capsids strengthening. Finally, the data supports the view that initiation of DNA packaging triggers the maturation of HSV-1 capsids.

  11. Structural polymorphism of the major capsid protein of a double-stranded RNA virus: an amphipathic alpha helix as a molecular switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugar, Irene; Luque, Daniel; Oña, Ana; Rodríguez, José F; Carrascosa, José L; Trus, Benes L; Castón, José R

    2005-07-01

    The infectious bursal disease virus T=13 viral particle is composed of two major proteins, VP2 and VP3. Here, we show that the molecular basis of the conformational flexibility of the major capsid protein precursor, pVP2, is an amphipatic alpha helix formed by the sequence GFKDIIRAIR. VP2 containing this alpha helix is able to assemble into the T=13 capsid only when expressed as a chimeric protein with an N-terminal His tag. An amphiphilic alpha helix, which acts as a conformational switch, is thus responsible for the inherent structural polymorphism of VP2. The His tag mimics the VP3 C-terminal region closely and acts as a molecular triggering factor. Using cryo-electron microscopy difference imaging, both polypeptide elements were detected on the capsid inner surface. We propose that electrostatic interactions between these two morphogenic elements are transmitted to VP2 to acquire the competent conformations for capsid assembly.

  12. In vitro protease cleavage and computer simulations reveal the HIV-1 capsid maturation pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jiying; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Yufenyuy, Ernest L.; Wagner, Jef; Himes, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongpu; Aiken, Christopher; Zandi, Roya; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 virions assemble as immature particles containing Gag polyproteins that are processed by the viral protease into individual components, resulting in the formation of mature infectious particles. There are two competing models for the process of forming the mature HIV-1 core: the disassembly and de novo reassembly model and the non-diffusional displacive model. To study the maturation pathway, we simulate HIV-1 maturation in vitro by digesting immature particles and assembled virus-like particles with recombinant HIV-1 protease and monitor the process with biochemical assays and cryoEM structural analysis in parallel. Processing of Gag in vitro is accurate and efficient and results in both soluble capsid protein and conical or tubular capsid assemblies, seemingly converted from immature Gag particles. Computer simulations further reveal probable assembly pathways of HIV-1 capsid formation. Combining the experimental data and computer simulations, our results suggest a sequential combination of both displacive and disassembly/reassembly processes for HIV-1 maturation.

  13. Structural transitions and energy landscape for Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus capsid mechanics from nanomanipulation in vitro and in silico

    CERN Document Server

    Kononova, Olga; Brasch, Melanie; Cornelissen, Jeroen; Dima, Ruxandra I; Marx, Kenneth A; Wuite, Gijs J L; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    Physical properties of capsids of plant and animal viruses are important factors in capsid self-assembly, survival of viruses in the extracellular environment, and their cell infectivity. Virus shells can have applications as nanocontainers and delivery vehicles in biotechnology and medicine. Combined AFM experiments and computational modeling on sub-second timescales of the indentation nanomechanics of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsid show that the capsid's physical properties are dynamic and local characteristics of the structure, which depend on the magnitude and geometry of mechanical input. Surprisingly, under large deformations the CCMV capsid transitions to the collapsed state without substantial local structural alterations. The enthalpy change in this deformation state dH = 11.5 - 12.8 MJ/mol is mostly due to large-amplitude out-of-plane excitations, which contribute to the capsid bending, and the entropy change TdS = 5.1 - 5.8 MJ/mol is mostly due to coherent in-plane rearrangements of pr...

  14. Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) Compounds Alter New World Alphavirus Capsid Localization and Reduce Viral Replication in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Lindsay; Pinkham, Chelsea; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Brahms, Ashwini; Shafagati, Nazly; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A; Tamir, Sharon; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-11-01

    The capsid structural protein of the New World alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), interacts with the host nuclear transport proteins importin α/β1 and CRM1. Novel selective inhibitor of nuclear export (SINE) compounds, KPT-185, KPT-335 (verdinexor), and KPT-350, target the host's primary nuclear export protein, CRM1, in a manner similar to the archetypical inhibitor Leptomycin B. One major limitation of Leptomycin B is its irreversible binding to CRM1; which SINE compounds alleviate because they are slowly reversible. Chemically inhibiting CRM1 with these compounds enhanced capsid localization to the nucleus compared to the inactive compound KPT-301, as indicated by immunofluorescent confocal microscopy. Differences in extracellular versus intracellular viral RNA, as well as decreased capsid in cell free supernatants, indicated the inhibitors affected viral assembly, which led to a decrease in viral titers. The decrease in viral replication was confirmed using a luciferase-tagged virus and through plaque assays. SINE compounds had no effect on VEEV TC83_Cm, which encodes a mutated form of capsid that is unable to enter the nucleus. Serially passaging VEEV in the presence of KPT-185 resulted in mutations within the nuclear localization and nuclear export signals of capsid. Finally, SINE compound treatment also reduced the viral titers of the related eastern and western equine encephalitis viruses, suggesting that CRM1 maintains a common interaction with capsid proteins across the New World alphavirus genus.

  15. Structural, Mechanistic, and Antigenic Characterization of the Human Astrovirus Capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Royce L.; Yousefi, Payam A.; Bogdanoff, Walter; Haile, Sara; Tripathi, Sarvind

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are nonenveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses that are a leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. HAstV particles display T=3 icosahedral symmetry formed by 180 copies of the capsid protein (CP), which undergoes proteolytic maturation to generate infectious HAstV particles. Little is known about the molecular features that govern HAstV particle assembly, maturation, infectivity, and immunogenicity. Here we report the crystal structures of the two main structural domains of the HAstV CP: the core domain at 2.60-Å resolution and the spike domain at 0.95-Å resolution. Fitting of these structures into the previously determined 25-Å-resolution electron cryomicroscopy density maps of HAstV allowed us to characterize the molecular features on the surfaces of immature and mature T=3 HAstV particles. The highly electropositive inner surface of HAstV supports a model in which interaction of the HAstV CP core with viral RNA is a driving force in T=3 HAstV particle formation. Additionally, mapping of conserved residues onto the HAstV CP core and spike domains in the context of the immature and mature HAstV particles revealed dramatic changes to the exposure of conserved residues during virus maturation. Indeed, we show that antibodies raised against mature HAstV have reactivity to both the HAstV CP core and spike domains, revealing for the first time that the CP core domain is antigenic. Together, these data provide new molecular insights into HAstV that have practical applications for the development of vaccines and antiviral therapies. IMPORTANCE Astroviruses are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, immunocompromised individuals, and the elderly. Despite the prevalence of astroviruses, little is known at the molecular level about how the astrovirus particle assembles and is converted into an infectious, mature virus. In this paper, we describe the high-resolution structures of the two main astrovirus

  16. Mechanical oscillations of a viral capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Daryn; Sankey, Otto; Dykeman, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Viruses are sub-microscopic infectious agents that infect almost every living creature on Earth. They are unable to grow or reproduce outside of a host cell and are therefore parasitic in nature. A virus' internal genetic material is protected by an external protein coat (capsid). We developed a theoretical model which uses the interaction of light with a viral capsid to create large amplitude motions within the capsid. This work displays the results of the model on the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) with attached RNA genome. The development of this model was motivated by the experimental work of Tsen et. al. [1] who used ultra-short laser pulses to inactivate viruses. [1] K-T. Tsen et al., J. of Physics -- Cond. Mat. 19, 472201 (2007).

  17. Viral capsids: Mechanical characteristics, genome packaging and delivery mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, W.H.; Ivanovska, I.L.; Evilevitch, A.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2007-01-01

    The main functions of viral capsids are to protect, transport and deliver their genome. The mechanical properties of capsids are supposed to be adapted to these tasks. Bacteriophage capsids also need to withstand the high pressures the DNA is exerting onto it as a result of the DNA packaging and its

  18. X-Ray Structures of Native HIV-1 Capsid Protein Reveal Conformational Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gres, Anna T.; Kirby, Karen A.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; Tanner, John J.; Pornillos, Owen; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2015-01-01

    The detailed molecular interactions between Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid protein (CA) hexamers have been elusive in the context of a native protein. We report crystal structures describing novel interactions between CA monomers related by 6-fold symmetry within a hexamer (intra-hexamer) and by 3-fold and 2-fold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (inter-hexamer). These structures help elucidate how CA builds a hexagonal lattice, the foundation of the mature capsid. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer that modulates interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer by crystal dehydration treatment alters inter-hexamer interfaces and condenses CA packing, highlighting an inherent structural variability. Capsid stability changes imparted by high concentrations of CA-targeting antiviral PF74 can be explained by variations at inter-hexamer interfaces remote to the ligand binding site. Inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector molecule binding may perturb capsid uncoating or assembly and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle. PMID:26044298

  19. Structural Transitions and Energy Landscape for Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Capsid Mechanics from Nanomanipulation in Vitro and in Silico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Brasch, Melanie; Cornelissen, Jeroen; Dima, Ruxandra I.; Marx, Kenneth A.; Wuite, Gijs J.L.; Roos, Wouter H.; Barsegov, Valeri

    2013-01-01

    Physical properties of capsids of plant and animal viruses are important factors in capsid self-assembly, survival of viruses in the extracellular environment, and their cell infectivity. Combined AFM experiments and computational modeling on subsecond timescales of the indentation nanomechanics of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus capsid show that the capsid’s physical properties are dynamic and local characteristics of the structure, which change with the depth of indentation and depend on the magnitude and geometry of mechanical input. Under large deformations, the Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus capsid transitions to the collapsed state without substantial local structural alterations. The enthalpy change in this deformation state ΔHind = 11.5–12.8 MJ/mol is mostly due to large-amplitude out-of-plane excitations, which contribute to the capsid bending; the entropy change TΔSind = 5.1–5.8 MJ/mol is due to coherent in-plane rearrangements of protein chains, which mediate the capsid stiffening. Direct coupling of these modes defines the extent of (ir)reversibility of capsid indentation dynamics correlated with its (in)elastic mechanical response to the compressive force. This emerging picture illuminates how unique physico-chemical properties of protein nanoshells help define their structure and morphology, and determine their viruses’ biological function. PMID:24138865

  20. Location of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein C-terminus provides opportunities for the design of capsid-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servid, Amy; Jordan, Paul; O'Neil, Alison; Prevelige, Peter; Douglas, Trevor

    2013-09-01

    Rational design of modifications to the interior and exterior surfaces of virus-like particles (VLPs) for future therapeutic and materials applications is based on structural information about the capsid. Existing cryo-electron microscopy-based models suggest that the C-terminus of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein (CP) extends toward the capsid exterior. Our biochemical analysis through genetic manipulations of the C-terminus supports the model where the CP C-terminus is exposed on the exterior of the P22 capsid. Capsids displaying a 6xHis tag appended to the CP C-terminus bind to a Ni affinity column, and the addition of positively or negatively charged coiled coil peptides to the capsid results in association of these capsids upon mixing. Additionally, a single cysteine appended to the CP C-terminus results in the formation of intercapsid disulfide bonds and can serve as a site for chemical modifications. Thus, the C-terminus is a powerful location for multivalent display of peptides that facilitate nanoscale assembly and capsid modification.

  1. Virus capsid dissolution studied by microsecond molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Daniel S D; Liljas, Lars; van der Spoel, David

    2012-01-01

    Dissolution of many plant viruses is thought to start with swelling of the capsid caused by calcium removal following infection, but no high-resolution structures of swollen capsids exist. Here we have used microsecond all-atom molecular simulations to describe the dynamics of the capsid of satellite tobacco necrosis virus with and without the 92 structural calcium ions. The capsid expanded 2.5% upon removal of the calcium, in good agreement with experimental estimates. The water permeability of the native capsid was similar to that of a phospholipid membrane, but the permeability increased 10-fold after removing the calcium, predominantly between the 2-fold and 3-fold related subunits. The two calcium binding sites close to the icosahedral 3-fold symmetry axis were pivotal in the expansion and capsid-opening process, while the binding site on the 5-fold axis changed little structurally. These findings suggest that the dissociation of the capsid is initiated at the 3-fold axis.

  2. Quantum dot-induced viral capsid assembling in dissociation buffer

    OpenAIRE

    Gao D; Zhang ZP; Li F.; Men D; Deng JY; Wei HP; Zhang XE; Cui ZQ

    2013-01-01

    Ding Gao,1,2 Zhi-Ping Zhang,1 Feng Li,3 Dong Men,1 Jiao-Yu Deng,1 Hong-Ping Wei,1 Xian-En Zhang,1 Zong-Qiang Cui1 1State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 2Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 3Division of Nanobiomedicine and i-Lab, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: Viruses encapsulating inorganic nanoparticles are ...

  3. Impact of capsid conformation and Rep-capsid interactions on adeno-associated virus type 2 genome packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleker, Svenja; Pawlita, Michael; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A

    2006-01-01

    Single-stranded genomes of adeno-associated virus (AAV) are packaged into preformed capsids. It has been proposed that packaging is initiated by interaction of genome-bound Rep proteins to the capsid, thereby targeting the genome to the portal of encapsidation. Here we describe a panel of mutants with amino acid exchanges in the pores at the fivefold axes of symmetry on AAV2 capsids with reduced packaging and reduced Rep-capsid interaction. Mutation of two threonines at the rim of the fivefold pore nearly completely abolished Rep-capsid interaction and packaging. This suggests a Rep-binding site at the highly conserved amino acids at or close to the pores formed by the capsid protein pentamers. A different mutant (P. Wu, W. Xiao, T. Conlon, J. Hughes, M. Agbandje-McKenna, T. Ferkol, T. Flotte, and N. Muzyczka, J. Virol. 74:8635-8647, 2000) with an amino acid exchange at the interface of capsid protein pentamers led to a complete block of DNA encapsidation. Analysis of the capsid conformation of this mutant revealed that the pores at the fivefold axes were occupied by VP1/VP2 N termini, thereby preventing DNA introduction into the capsid. Nevertheless, the corresponding capsids had more Rep proteins bound than wild-type AAV, showing that correct Rep interaction with the capsid depends on a defined capsid conformation. Both mutant types together support the conclusion that the pores at the fivefold symmetry axes are involved in genome packaging and that capsid conformation-dependent Rep-capsid interactions play an essential role in the packaging process.

  4. A pseudo-atomic model for the capsid shell of bacteriophage lambda using chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pragya; Nakatani, Eri; Goodlett, David R; Catalano, Carlos Enrique

    2013-09-23

    Bacteriophage lambda is one of the most exhaustively studied of the double-stranded DNA viruses. Its assembly pathway is highly conserved among the herpesviruses and many of the bacteriophages, making it an excellent model system. Despite extensive genetic and biophysical characterization of many of the lambda proteins and the assembly pathways in which they are implicated, there is a relative dearth of structural information on many of the most critical proteins involved in lambda assembly and maturation, including that of the lambda major capsid protein. Toward this end, we have utilized a combination of chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry and computational modeling to construct a pseudo-atomic model of the lambda major capsid protein as a monomer, as well as in the context of the assembled procapsid shell. The approach described here is generalizable and can be used to provide structural models for any biological complex of interest. The procapsid structural model is in good agreement with published biochemical data indicating that procapsid expansion exposes hydrophobic surface area and that this serves to nucleate assembly of capsid decoration protein, gpD. The model further implicates additional molecular interactions that may be critical to the assembly of the capsid shell and for the stabilization of the structure by the gpD decoration protein.

  5. Structure of the immature HIV-1 capsid in intact virus particles at 8.8 Å resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, Florian K. M.; Hagen, Wim J. H.; Rumlová, Michaela; Ruml, Tomáš; Müller, Barbara; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) assembly proceeds in two stages. First, the 55 kilodalton viral Gag polyprotein assembles into a hexameric protein lattice at the plasma membrane of the infected cell, inducing budding and release of an immature particle. Second, Gag is cleaved by the viral protease, leading to internal rearrangement of the virus into the mature, infectious form. Immature and mature HIV-1 particles are heterogeneous in size and morphology, preventing high-resolution analysis of their protein arrangement in situ by conventional structural biology methods. Here we apply cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging methods to resolve the structure of the capsid lattice within intact immature HIV-1 particles at subnanometre resolution, allowing unambiguous positioning of all α-helices. The resulting model reveals tertiary and quaternary structural interactions that mediate HIV-1 assembly. Strikingly, these interactions differ from those predicted by the current model based on in vitro-assembled arrays of Gag-derived proteins from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. To validate this difference, we solve the structure of the capsid lattice within intact immature Mason-Pfizer monkey virus particles. Comparison with the immature HIV-1 structure reveals that retroviral capsid proteins, while having conserved tertiary structures, adopt different quaternary arrangements during virus assembly. The approach demonstrated here should be applicable to determine structures of other proteins at subnanometre resolution within heterogeneous environments.

  6. Expression and subcellular targeting of canine parvovirus capsid proteins in baculovirus-transduced NLFK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Leona; Välilehto, Outi; Kirjavainen, Sanna; Tikka, Päivi J; Mellett, Mark; Käpylä, Pirjo; Oker-Blom, Christian; Vuento, Matti

    2005-01-17

    A mammalian baculovirus delivery system was developed to study targeting in Norden Laboratories feline kidney (NLFK) cells of the capsid proteins of canine parvovirus (CPV), VP1 and VP2, or corresponding counterparts fused to EGFP. VP1 and VP2, when expressed alone, both had equal nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution. However, assembled form of VP2 had a predominantly cytoplasmic localization. When VP1 and VP2 were simultaneously present in cells, their nuclear localization increased. Thus, confocal immunofluorescence analysis of cells transduced with the different baculovirus constructs or combinations thereof in the absence or presence of infecting CPV revealed that the VP1 protein is a prerequisite for efficient targeting of VP2 to the nucleus. The baculovirus vectors were functional and the genes of interest efficiently introduced to this CPV susceptible mammalian cell line. Thus, we show evidence that the system could be utilized to study targeting of the CPV capsid proteins.

  7. Two-Dimensional Phase Transition of Viral Capsid Gives Insights into Subunit Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresset, Guillaume; Chen, Jingzhi; Chevreuil, Maelenn; Nhiri, Naïma; Jacquet, Eric; Lansac, Yves

    2017-01-01

    We show that the thermal dissociation of icosahedral viral capsids can be interpreted in terms of a two-dimensional phase transition. The approach provides a useful framework to get direct insights into the interactions at work between viral components. We devise a mean-field lattice model that relates the melting temperature to subunit attractive energy, effective charge, and chemical potential. Through fluorescence thermal shift assay on a plant viral system, we illustrate how the model gives access to the interaction parameters for empty and loaded viral capsids in various ionic conditions. This work should help construct physical models accounting for the assembly and disassembly mechanisms of viruses, with possible fallout in the development of therapeutic inhibitors.

  8. Parvovirus capsid disorders cholesterol-rich membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Kirjavainen, Sanna; Mäkelä, Anna R; Rintanen, Nina; Oker-Blom, Christian; Jalonen, Tuula O; Vuento, Matti

    2009-02-06

    In this study canine parvovirus, CPV, was found to induce disorder in DPPC:cholesterol membranes in acidic conditions. This acidicity-induced fluidizing effect is suggested to originate from the N-terminus of the viral capsid protein VP1. In accordance with the model membrane studies, a fluidizing effect was seen also in the endosomal membranes during CPV infection implying an important functional role of the fluidization in the endocytic entry of the virus.

  9. Hexagonal organization of Moloney murine leukemia virus capsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Keith; McDermott, Jason; Barklis, Eric

    2002-06-20

    To help elucidate the mechanisms by which retrovirus structural proteins associate to form virus particles, we have examined membrane-bound assemblies of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) capsid (CA) proteins. Electron microscopy and image reconstruction techniques showed that CA dimers appear to function as organizational subunits of the cage-like, membrane-bound protein arrays. However, new three-dimensional (3D) data also were consistent with hexagonal (p6) assembly models. The p6 3D reconstructions of membrane-bound M-MuLV CA proteins gave unit cells of a = b = 80.3 A, c = 110 A, gamma = 120 degrees, in which six dimer units formed a cage lattice. Neighbor cage hole-to-hole distances were 45 A, while distances between hexagonal cage holes corresponded to unit cell lengths (80.3 A). The hexagonal model predicts two types of cage holes (trimer and hexamer holes), uses symmetric head-to-head dimer building blocks, and permits the introduction of lattice curvature by conversion of hexamer to pentamer units. The M-MuLV CA lattice is similar to those formed in helical tubes by HIV CA in that hexamer units surround cage holes of 25-30 A, but differs in that M-MuLV hexamer units appear to be CA dimers, whereas HIV CA units appear to be monomers. These results suggest that while general assembly principles apply to different retroviruses, clear assembly distinctions exist between these virus types. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  10. Mechanostability of Proteins and Virus Capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2013-03-01

    Molecular dynamics of proteins within coarse grained models have become a useful tool in studies of large scale systems. The talk will discuss two applications of such modeling. The first is a theoretical survey of proteins' resistance to constant speed stretching as performed for a set of 17134 simple and 318 multidomain proteins. The survey has uncovered new potent force clamps. They involve formation of cysteine slipknots or dragging of a cystine plug through the cystine ring and lead to characteristic forces that are significantly larger than the common shear-based clamp such as observed in titin. The second application involves studies of nanoindentation processes in virus capsids and elucidates their molecular aspects by showing deviations in behavior compared to the continuum shell model. Across the 35 capsids studied, both the collapse force and the elastic stiffness are observed to vary by a factor of 20. The changes in mechanical properties do not correlate simply with virus size or symmetry. There is a strong connection to the mean coordination number , defined as the mean number of interactions to neighboring amino acids. The Young's modulus for thin shell capsids rises roughly quadratically with - 6, where 6 is the minimum coordination for elastic stability in three dimensions. Supported by European Regional Development Fund, through Innovative Economy grant Nanobiom (POIG.01.01.02-00-008/08)

  11. Classification and Evolutionary Trends of Icosahedral Viral Capsids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kerner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A classification of icosahedral viral capsids is proposed. We show how the self-organization of capsids during their formation implies a definite composition of their elementary building blocks. The exact number of hexamers with three different admissible symmetries is related to capsids' sizes, labelled by their T-numbers. Simple rules determining these numbers for each value of T are deduced and certain consequences concerning the probabilities of mutations and evolution of viruses are discussed.

  12. Structure of recombinant capsids formed by the beta-annulus deletion mutant -- rCP (Delta48-59) of Sesbania mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappachan, Anju; Subashchandrabose, Chinnathambi; Satheshkumar, P S; Savithri, H S; Murthy, M R N

    2008-05-25

    A unique feature of several T=3 icosahedral viruses is the presence of a structure called the beta-annulus formed by extensive hydrogen bonding between protein subunits related by icosahedral three-fold axis of symmetry. This unique structure has been suggested as a molecular switch that determines the T=3 capsid assembly. In order to examine the importance of the beta-annulus, a deletion mutant of Sesbania mosaic virus coat protein in which residues 48-59 involved in the formation of the beta-annulus were deleted retaining the rest of the residues in the amino terminal segment (rCP (Delta48-59)) was constructed. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the mutant protein assembled into virus like particles of sizes close to that of the wild type virus particles. The purified capsids were crystallized and their three dimensional structure was determined at 3.6 A resolution by X-ray crystallography. The mutant capsid structure closely resembled that of the native virus particles. However, surprisingly, the structure revealed that the assembly of the particles has proceeded without the formation of the beta-annulus. Therefore, the beta-annulus is not essential for T=3 capsid assembly as speculated earlier and may be formed as a consequence of the particle assembly. This is the first structural demonstration that the virus particle morphology with and without the beta-annulus could be closely similar.

  13. Impact of Capsid Conformation and Rep-Capsid Interactions on Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Genome Packaging

    OpenAIRE

    Bleker, Svenja; Pawlita, Michael; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A.

    2006-01-01

    Single-stranded genomes of adeno-associated virus (AAV) are packaged into preformed capsids. It has been proposed that packaging is initiated by interaction of genome-bound Rep proteins to the capsid, thereby targeting the genome to the portal of encapsidation. Here we describe a panel of mutants with amino acid exchanges in the pores at the fivefold axes of symmetry on AAV2 capsids with reduced packaging and reduced Rep-capsid interaction. Mutation of two threonines at the rim of the fivefol...

  14. Structure of the small outer capsid protein, Soc: a clamp for stabilizing capsids of T4-like phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Fokine, Andrei; O'Donnell, Erin; Rao, Venigalla B; Rossmann, Michael G

    2010-01-29

    Many viruses need to stabilize their capsid structure against DNA pressure and for survival in hostile environments. The 9-kDa outer capsid protein (Soc) of bacteriophage T4, which stabilizes the virus, attaches to the capsid during the final stage of maturation. There are 870 Soc molecules that act as a "glue" between neighboring hexameric capsomers, forming a "cage" that stabilizes the T4 capsid against extremes of pH and temperature. Here we report a 1.9 A resolution crystal structure of Soc from the bacteriophage RB69, a close relative of T4. The RB69 crystal structure and a homology model of T4 Soc were fitted into the cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 capsid. This established the region of Soc that interacts with the major capsid protein and suggested a mechanism, verified by extensive mutational and biochemical studies, for stabilization of the capsid in which the Soc trimers act as clamps between neighboring capsomers. The results demonstrate the factors involved in stabilizing not only the capsids of T4-like bacteriophages but also many other virus capsids.

  15. Molecular interactions of Epstein-Barr virus capsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Hung; Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2011-02-01

    The capsids of herpesviruses, which comprise major and minor capsid proteins, have a common icosahedral structure with 162 capsomers. An electron microscopic study shows that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) capsids in the nucleus are immunolabeled by anti-BDLF1 and anti-BORF1 antibodies, indicating that BDLF1 and BORF1 are the minor capsid proteins of EBV. Cross-linking and electrophoresis studies of purified BDLF1 and BORF1 revealed that these two proteins form a triplex that is similar to that formed by the minor capsid proteins, VP19C and VP23, of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Although the interaction between VP23, a homolog of BDLF1, and the major capsid protein VP5 could not be verified biochemically in earlier studies, the interaction between BDLF1 and the EBV major capsid protein, viral capsid antigen (VCA), can be confirmed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assay and coimmunoprecipitation. Additionally, in HSV-1, VP5 interacts with only the middle region of VP19C; in EBV, VCA interacts with both the N-terminal and middle regions of BORF1, a homolog of VP19C, revealing that the proteins in the EBV triplex interact with the major capsid protein differently from those in HSV-1. A GST pulldown study also identifies the oligomerization domains in VCA and the dimerization domain in BDLF1. The results presented herein reveal how the EBV capsid proteins interact and thereby improve our understanding of the capsid structure of the virus.

  16. Transient Bluetongue virus serotype 8 capsid protein expression in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertha R. van Zyl

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bluetongue virus (BTV causes severe disease in domestic and wild ruminants, and has recently caused several outbreaks in Europe. Current vaccines include live-attenuated and inactivated viruses; while these are effective, there is risk of reversion to virulence by mutation or reassortment with wild type viruses. Subunit or virus-like particle (VLP vaccines are safer options: VLP vaccines produced in insect cells by expression of the four BTV capsid proteins are protective against challenge; however, this is a costly production method. We investigated production of BTV VLPs in plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression, an inexpensive production system very well suited to developing country use. Leaves infiltrated with recombinant pEAQ-HT vectors separately encoding the four BTV-8 capsid proteins produced more proteins than recombinant pTRA vectors. Plant expression using the pEAQ-HT vector resulted in both BTV-8 core-like particles (CLPs and VLPs; differentially controlling the concentration of infiltrated bacteria significantly influenced yield of the VLPs. In situ localisation of assembled particles was investigated by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and it was shown that a mixed population of core-like particles (CLPs, consisting of VP3 and VP7 and VLPs were present as paracrystalline arrays in the cytoplasm of plant cells co-expressing all four capsid proteins.

  17. A Mason-Pfizer Monkey virus Gag-GFP fusion vector allows visualization of capsid transport in live cells and demonstrates a role for microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Clark

    Full Text Available Immature capsids of the Betaretrovirus, Mason-Pfizer Monkey virus (M-PMV, are assembled in the pericentriolar region of the cell, and are then transported to the plasma membrane for budding. Although several studies, utilizing mutagenesis, biochemistry, and immunofluorescence, have defined the role of some viral and host cells factors involved in these processes, they have the disadvantage of population analysis, rather than analyzing individual capsid movement in real time. In this study, we created an M-PMV vector in which the enhanced green fluorescent protein, eGFP, was fused to the carboxyl-terminus of the M-PMV Gag polyprotein, to create a Gag-GFP fusion that could be visualized in live cells. In order to express this fusion protein in the context of an M-PMV proviral backbone, it was necessary to codon-optimize gag, optimize the Kozak sequence preceding the initiating methionine, and mutate an internal methionine codon to one for alanine (M100A to prevent internal initiation of translation. Co-expression of this pSARM-Gag-GFP-M100A vector with a WT M-PMV provirus resulted in efficient assembly and release of capsids. Results from fixed-cell immunofluorescence and pulse-chase analyses of wild type and mutant Gag-GFP constructs demonstrated comparable intracellular localization and release of capsids to untagged counterparts. Real-time, live-cell visualization and analysis of the GFP-tagged capsids provided strong evidence for a role for microtubules in the intracellular transport of M-PMV capsids. Thus, this M-PMV Gag-GFP vector is a useful tool for identifying novel virus-cell interactions involved in intracellular M-PMV capsid transport in a dynamic, real-time system.

  18. Cooperative role of the MHR and the CA dimerization helix in the maturation of the functional retrovirus capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhandwala, Parvez M; Nguyen, Tam-Linh N; Bowzard, J Bradford; Craven, Rebecca C

    2008-06-20

    The second helix in the C-terminal domain of retroviral capsid (CA) protein functions as the site of dimerization between subunits in capsid assembly and is believed to participate in a unique interface between Gag molecules in immature particles. This study reports isolation of two substitutions in the dimerization helix of Rous sarcoma virus CA protein that have the ability to suppress lethal defects in core maturation imposed by alterations to the major homology region (MHR) motif just upstream. Together with two previously published suppressors, these define an extended region of the dimerization helix that is unlikely to contribute directly to CA-CA contacts but whose assembly-competence may be strongly affected by conformation. The broad-spectrum suppression and temperature-sensitivity exhibited by some mutants argues that they act through modulation of protein conformation. These findings provide important biological evidence in support of a significant conformational change involving the dimerization helix and the MHR during maturation.

  19. Cooperative role of MHR and the CA dimerization helix in the maturation of the functional retrovirus capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhandwala, Parvez M.; Nguyen, Tam-Linh N.; Bowzard, J. Bradford; Craven, Rebecca C.

    2008-01-01

    The second helix in the C-terminal domain of retroviral capsid (CA) protein functions as the site of dimerization between subunits in capsid assembly and is believed to participate in a unique interface between Gag molecules in immature particles. This study reports isolation of two substitutions in the dimerization helix of Rous sarcoma virus CA protein that have the ability to suppress lethal defects in core maturation imposed by alterations to the major homology region (MHR) motif just upstream. Together with two previously published suppressors, these define an extended region of the dimerization helix that is unlikely to contribute directly to CA-CA contacts but whose assembly-competence may be strongly affected by conformation. The broad-spectrum suppression and temperature-sensitivity exhibited by some mutants argues that they act through modulation of protein conformation. These findings provide important biological evidence in support of a significant conformational change involving the dimerization helix and MHR during maturation. PMID:18433823

  20. 全装配式混凝土框架结构施工技术的应用%The application of fully assembled concrete frame structure construction technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑树云

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduced the development course,characteristics and functions of prefabricated fully assembled concrete frame structure, from the installation process,prefabricated pile caps fabrication,precast beams and precast column installation and other aspects,discussed the construction technology of the structure,pointed out this technology had simple construction technology,low labor intensity,high construction ef-ficiency,broad development prospects.%介绍了预制全装配式混凝土框架结构的发展历程、特点及作用,从安装流程、预制承台制作、预制梁和预制柱安装等方面,论述了该结构的施工技术,指出该技术施工工艺简便、劳动强度低、施工效率高,具有广阔的发展前景。

  1. Expression of fully assembled TCR-CD3 complex on double positive thymocytes: synergistic role for the PRS and ER retention motifs in the intra-cytoplasmic tail of CD3epsilon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur, Jean-Francois; Li, Samantha; Damlaj, Ousama; Dave, Vibhuti P

    2009-12-01

    TCR expression on double-positive (DP) thymocytes is a prerequisite for thymic selection that results in the generation of mature CD4(+) and CD8(+) single-positive T cells. TCR is expressed at very low level on preselection DP thymocytes and is dramatically up-regulated on positively selected thymocytes. However, mechanism governing TCR expression on developing thymocytes is not understood. In the present report, we demonstrate that the intra-cytoplasmic (IC) domain of CD3epsilon plays a critical role in regulating TCR expression on DP thymocytes. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence to show that the CD3epsilon IC domain mutations result in elevated expression of fully assembled TCR on DP thymocytes. We also demonstrate that TCR up-regulation on DP thymocytes in these transgenic mice occurs in a ligand-independent manner. Further, we show that the proline-rich sequence and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention motifs in the IC domain of CD3epsilon play synergistic role in regulating TCR surface expression on DP thymocytes.

  2. Multivalent viral capsids with internal cargo for fibrin imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allie C Obermeyer

    Full Text Available Thrombosis is the cause of many cardiovascular syndromes and is a significant contributor to life-threatening diseases, such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Thrombus targeted imaging agents have the capability to provide molecular information about pathological clots, potentially improving detection, risk stratification, and therapy of thrombosis-related diseases. Nanocarriers are a promising platform for the development of molecular imaging agents as they can be modified to have external targeting ligands and internal functional cargo. In this work, we report the synthesis and use of chemically functionalized bacteriophage MS2 capsids as biomolecule-based nanoparticles for fibrin imaging. The capsids were modified using an oxidative coupling reaction, conjugating ∼90 copies of a fibrin targeting peptide to the exterior of each protein shell. The ability of the multivalent, targeted capsids to bind fibrin was first demonstrated by determining the impact on thrombin-mediated clot formation. The modified capsids out-performed the free peptides and were shown to inhibit clot formation at effective concentrations over ten-fold lower than the monomeric peptide alone. The installation of near-infrared fluorophores on the interior surface of the capsids enabled optical detection of binding to fibrin clots. The targeted capsids bound to fibrin, exhibiting higher signal-to-background than control, non-targeted MS2-based nanoagents. The in vitro assessment of the capsids suggests that fibrin-targeted MS2 capsids could be used as delivery agents to thrombi for diagnostic or therapeutic applications.

  3. Studies towards the sex pheromone of the green capsid bug

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, F.P.

    2001-01-01

    The green capsid bug, Lygocoris pabulinus (L.) (Heteroptera: Miridae) is a serious pest in fruit orchards, which is difficult to control. Because it is difficult to determine the actual population density, fruit growers apply insecticides against the green capsid bug on

  4. Conserved Tryptophan Motifs in the Large Tegument Protein pUL36 Are Required for Efficient Secondary Envelopment of Herpes Simplex Virus Capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Lyudmila; Buch, Anna; Döhner, Katinka; Pohlmann, Anja; Binz, Anne; Prank, Ute; Sandbaumhüter, Malte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus (HSV) replicates in the skin and mucous membranes, and initiates lytic or latent infections in sensory neurons. Assembly of progeny virions depends on the essential large tegument protein pUL36 of 3,164 amino acid residues that links the capsids to the tegument proteins pUL37 and VP16. Of the 32 tryptophans of HSV-1-pUL36, the tryptophan-acidic motifs 1766WD1767 and 1862WE1863 are conserved in all HSV-1 and HSV-2 isolates. Here, we characterized the role of these motifs in the HSV life cycle since the rare tryptophans often have unique roles in protein function due to their large hydrophobic surface. The infectivity of the mutants HSV-1(17+)Lox-pUL36-WD/AA-WE/AA and HSV-1(17+)Lox-CheVP26-pUL36-WD/AA-WE/AA, in which the capsid has been tagged with the fluorescent protein Cherry, was significantly reduced. Quantitative electron microscopy shows that there were a larger number of cytosolic capsids and fewer enveloped virions compared to their respective parental strains, indicating a severe impairment in secondary capsid envelopment. The capsids of the mutant viruses accumulated in the perinuclear region around the microtubule-organizing center and were not dispersed to the cell periphery but still acquired the inner tegument proteins pUL36 and pUL37. Furthermore, cytoplasmic capsids colocalized with tegument protein VP16 and, to some extent, with tegument protein VP22 but not with the envelope glycoprotein gD. These results indicate that the unique conserved tryptophan-acidic motifs in the central region of pUL36 are required for efficient targeting of progeny capsids to the membranes of secondary capsid envelopment and for efficient virion assembly. IMPORTANCE Herpesvirus infections give rise to severe animal and human diseases, especially in young, immunocompromised, and elderly individuals. The structural hallmark of herpesvirus virions is the tegument, which contains evolutionarily conserved proteins that are essential for several

  5. Inhibition of protein kinase C phosphorylation of hepatitis B virus capsids inhibits virion formation and causes intracellular capsid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkop, Linda; Schwarz, Alexandra; Cassany, Aurelia; Grün-Bernhard, Stefanie; Delaleau, Mildred; Rabe, Birgit; Cazenave, Christian; Gerlich, Wolfram; Glebe, Dieter; Kann, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Capsids of hepatitis B virus and other hepadnaviruses contain a cellular protein kinase, which phosphorylates the capsid protein. Some phosphorylation sites are shown to be essential for distinct steps of viral replication as pregenome packaging or plus strand DNA synthesis. Although different protein kinases have been reported to phosphorylate the capsid protein, varying experimental approaches do not allow direct comparison. Furthermore, the activity of a specific protein kinase has not yet been correlated to steps in the hepadnaviral life cycle. In this study we show that capsids from various sources encapsidate active protein kinase Calpha, irrespective of hepatitis B virus genotype and host cell. Treatment of a virion expressing cell line with a pseudosubstrate inhibitor showed that inhibition of protein kinase C phosphorylation did not affect genome maturation but resulted in capsid accumulation and inhibited virion release to the medium. Our results imply that different protein kinases have distinct functions within the hepadnaviral life cycle.

  6. Virus capsid dissolution studied by microsecond molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S D Larsson

    Full Text Available Dissolution of many plant viruses is thought to start with swelling of the capsid caused by calcium removal following infection, but no high-resolution structures of swollen capsids exist. Here we have used microsecond all-atom molecular simulations to describe the dynamics of the capsid of satellite tobacco necrosis virus with and without the 92 structural calcium ions. The capsid expanded 2.5% upon removal of the calcium, in good agreement with experimental estimates. The water permeability of the native capsid was similar to that of a phospholipid membrane, but the permeability increased 10-fold after removing the calcium, predominantly between the 2-fold and 3-fold related subunits. The two calcium binding sites close to the icosahedral 3-fold symmetry axis were pivotal in the expansion and capsid-opening process, while the binding site on the 5-fold axis changed little structurally. These findings suggest that the dissociation of the capsid is initiated at the 3-fold axis.

  7. Tegument Assembly and Secondary Envelopment of Alphaherpesviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle J. Owen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alphaherpesviruses like herpes simplex virus are large DNA viruses characterized by their ability to establish lifelong latent infection in neurons. As for all herpesviruses, alphaherpesvirus virions contain a protein-rich layer called “tegument” that links the DNA-containing capsid to the glycoprotein-studded membrane envelope. Tegument proteins mediate a diverse range of functions during the virus lifecycle, including modulation of the host-cell environment immediately after entry, transport of virus capsids to the nucleus during infection, and wrapping of cytoplasmic capsids with membranes (secondary envelopment during virion assembly. Eleven tegument proteins that are conserved across alphaherpesviruses have been implicated in the formation of the tegument layer or in secondary envelopment. Tegument is assembled via a dense network of interactions between tegument proteins, with the redundancy of these interactions making it challenging to determine the precise function of any specific tegument protein. However, recent studies have made great headway in defining the interactions between tegument proteins, conserved across alphaherpesviruses, which facilitate tegument assembly and secondary envelopment. We summarize these recent advances and review what remains to be learned about the molecular interactions required to assemble mature alphaherpesvirus virions following the release of capsids from infected cell nuclei.

  8. Structure of the Triatoma virus capsid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squires, Gaëlle; Pous, Joan [Laboratoire de Virologie Moléculaire et Structurale, CNRS, 1 Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX (France); Agirre, Jon [Fundación Biofísica Bizkaia, Barrio Sarriena S/N, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (FBB) (Spain); Unidad de Biofísica (UBF, CSIC, UPV/EHU), PO Box 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Rozas-Dennis, Gabriela S. [U.N.S., San Juan 670 (8000) Bahía Blanca (Argentina); U.N.S., Avenida Alem 1253 (8000) Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Costabel, Marcelo D. [U.N.S., Avenida Alem 1253 (8000) Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Marti, Gerardo A. [Centro de Estudios Parasitológicos y de Vectores (CEPAVE-CCT, La Plata, CONICET-UNLP), Calle 2 No. 584 (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Navaza, Jorge; Bressanelli, Stéphane [Laboratoire de Virologie Moléculaire et Structurale, CNRS, 1 Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX (France); Guérin, Diego M. A., E-mail: diego.guerin@ehu.es [Fundación Biofísica Bizkaia, Barrio Sarriena S/N, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (FBB) (Spain); Unidad de Biofísica (UBF, CSIC, UPV/EHU), PO Box 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Rey, Felix A., E-mail: diego.guerin@ehu.es [Laboratoire de Virologie Moléculaire et Structurale, CNRS, 1 Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX (France)

    2013-06-01

    The crystallographic structure of TrV shows specific morphological and functional features that clearly distinguish it from the type species of the Cripavirus genus, CrPV. The members of the Dicistroviridae family are non-enveloped positive-sense single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA) viruses pathogenic to beneficial arthropods as well as insect pests of medical importance. Triatoma virus (TrV), a member of this family, infects several species of triatomine insects (popularly named kissing bugs), which are vectors for human trypanosomiasis, more commonly known as Chagas disease. The potential use of dicistroviruses as biological control agents has drawn considerable attention in the past decade, and several viruses of this family have been identified, with their targets covering honey bees, aphids and field crickets, among others. Here, the crystal structure of the TrV capsid at 2.5 Å resolution is reported, showing that as expected it is very similar to that of Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV). Nevertheless, a number of distinguishing structural features support the introduction of a new genus (Triatovirus; type species TrV) under the Dicistroviridae family. The most striking differences are the absence of icosahedrally ordered VP4 within the infectious particle and the presence of prominent projections that surround the fivefold axis. Furthermore, the structure identifies a second putative autoproteolytic DDF motif in protein VP3, in addition to the conserved one in VP1 which is believed to be responsible for VP0 cleavage during capsid maturation. The potential meaning of these new findings is discussed.

  9. Structure of the Three N-Terminal Immunoglobulin Domains of the Highly Immunogenic Outer Capsid Protein from a T4-Like Bacteriophage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokine, Andrei; Islam, Mohammad Z.; Zhang, Zhihong; Bowman, Valorie D.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G. (CUA); (Purdue)

    2011-09-16

    The head of bacteriophage T4 is decorated with 155 copies of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc). One Hoc molecule binds near the center of each hexameric capsomer. Hoc is dispensable for capsid assembly and has been used to display pathogenic antigens on the surface of T4. Here we report the crystal structure of a protein containing the first three of four domains of Hoc from bacteriophage RB49, a close relative of T4. The structure shows an approximately linear arrangement of the protein domains. Each of these domains has an immunoglobulin-like fold, frequently found in cell attachment molecules. In addition, we report biochemical data suggesting that Hoc can bind to Escherichia coli, supporting the hypothesis that Hoc could attach the phage capsids to bacterial surfaces and perhaps also to other organisms. The capacity for such reversible adhesion probably provides survival advantages to the bacteriophage.

  10. Processing of the VP1/2A Junction Is Not Necessary for Production of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Empty Capsids and Infectious Viruses: Characterization of “Self-Tagged” Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, Maria; Polacek, Charlotta; Bøtner, Anette

    2013-01-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid protein precursor, P1-2A, is cleaved by 3Cpro to generate VP0, VP3, VP1, and the peptide 2A. The capsid proteins self-assemble into empty capsid particles or viruses which do not contain 2A. In a cell culture-adapted strain of FMDV (O1 Manisa [Lindholm......]), three different amino acid substitutions (E83K, S134C, and K210E) were identified within the VP1 region of the P1-2A precursor compared to the field strain (wild type [wt]). Expression of the O1 Manisa P1-2A (wt or with the S134C substitution in VP1) plus 3Cpro, using a transient expression system...... is not essential for virus viability. The production of such engineered self-tagged empty capsid particles may facilitate their purification for use as diagnostic reagents and vaccines....

  11. RNase P Ribozymes Inhibit the Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus by Targeting Essential Viral Capsid Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Ye, Jun; Trang, Phong; Zhu, Li; Sheng, Jingxue; Wang, Yu; Zen, Ke; Wu, Jianguo; Liu, Fenyong

    2015-06-24

    An engineered RNase P-based ribozyme variant, which was generated using the in vitro selection procedure, was used to target the overlapping mRNA region of two proteins essential for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication: capsid assembly protein (AP) and protease (PR). In vitro studies showed that the generated variant, V718-A, cleaved the target AP mRNA sequence efficiently and its activity was about 60-fold higher than that of wild type ribozyme M1-A. Furthermore, we observed a reduction of 98%-99% in AP/PR expression and an inhibition of 50,000 fold in viral growth in cells with V718-A, while a 75% reduction in AP/PR expression and a 500-fold inhibition in viral growth was found in cells with M1-A. Examination of the antiviral effects of the generated ribozyme on the HCMV replication cycle suggested that viral DNA encapsidation was inhibited and as a consequence, viral capsid assembly was blocked when the expression of AP and PR was inhibited by the ribozyme. Thus, our study indicates that the generated ribozyme variant is highly effective in inhibiting HCMV gene expression and blocking viral replication, and suggests that engineered RNase P ribozyme can be potentially developed as a promising gene-targeting agent for anti-HCMV therapy.

  12. Specific interaction between hnRNP H and HPV16 L1 proteins: Implications for late gene auto-regulation enabling rapid viral capsid protein production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Min; Huang, Hui [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Miao, Ji, E-mail: jmiao@xmu.edu.cn [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhao, Qinjian, E-mail: qinjian_zhao@xmu.edu.cn [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► The RNA-binding hnRNP H regulates late viral gene expression. ► hnRNP H activity was inhibited by a late viral protein. ► Specific interaction between HPV L1 and hnRNP H was demonstrated. ► Co-localization of HPV L1 and hnRNP H inside cells was observed. ► Viral capsid protein production, enabling rapid capsid assembly, was implicated. -- Abstract: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), including hnRNP H, are RNA-binding proteins that function as splicing factors and are involved in downstream gene regulation. hnRNP H, which binds to G triplet regions in RNA, has been shown to play an important role in regulating the staged expression of late proteins in viral systems. Here, we report that the specific association between hnRNP H and a late viral capsid protein, human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 protein, leads to the suppressed function of hnRNP H in the presence of the L1 protein. The direct interaction between the L1 protein and hnRNP H was demonstrated by complex formation in solution and intracellularly using a variety of biochemical and immunochemical methods, including peptide mapping, specific co-immunoprecipitation and confocal fluorescence microscopy. These results support a working hypothesis that a late viral protein HPV16 L1, which is down regulated by hnRNP H early in the viral life cycle may provide an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop that allows the rapid production of HPV capsid proteins through suppression of the function of hnRNP H at the late stage of the viral life cycle. In this positive feedback loop, the late viral gene products that were down regulated earlier themselves disable their suppressors, and this feedback mechanism could facilitate the rapid production of capsid proteins, allowing staged and efficient viral capsid assembly.

  13. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Nanoindentation of Viral Capsids

    CERN Document Server

    Gibbons, M M; Gibbons, Melissa M.; Klug, William S.

    2006-01-01

    Recent Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) nanoindentation experiments measuring mechanical response of the protein shells of viruses have provided a quantitative description of their strength and elasticity. To better understand and interpret these measurements, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms, this paper adopts a course-grained modeling approach within the framework of three-dimensional nonlinear continuum elasticity. Homogeneous, isotropic, elastic, thick shell models are proposed for two capsids: the spherical Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV), and the ellipsocylindrical bacteriophage $\\phi 29$. As analyzed by the finite element method, these models enable parametric characterization of the effects of AFM tip geometry, capsid dimensions, and capsid constitutive descriptions. The generally nonlinear force response of capsids to indentation is shown to be insensitive to constitutive details, and greatly influenced by geometry. Nonlinear stiffening and softening of the force response is dependent on ...

  14. Polymorphism of DNA conformation inside the bacteriophage capsid

    OpenAIRE

    Leforestier, Amélie

    2013-01-01

    Double-stranded DNA bacteriophage genomes are packaged into their icosahedral capsids at the highest densities known so far (about 50 % w:v). How the molecule is folded at such density and how its conformation changes upon ejection or packaging are fascinating questions still largely open. We review cryo-TEM analyses of DNA conformation inside partially filled capsids as a function of the physico-chemical environment (ions, osmotic pressure, temperature). We show that there exists a wide vari...

  15. Simulations of curved assemblies in soft matter and biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Cong

    Viruses are small infectious agents that replicate only inside living cells of other organisms. In the viral life cycle, the self-assembly of the outer protein shell (capsid) is an essential step. We study this process in the hope of shedding light on development of antiviral drugs, gene therapy and other virus-related technologies that can benefit the humankind. More fundamentally, learning about the process of viral capsid assembly can elucidate the assembly mechanisms of a wide range of complex structures. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations and coarse-grained computational models to study viral capsid assembly in several situations where geometric constraints play a role in dictating assembly outcomes. We first focus on icosahedral viruses with single-stranded RNA genomes, in which case the capsid usually assembles around the genomic RNA. It is consistently observed in experiments that such viral particles are ''overcharged'', meaning the net negative charge on the viral genome is greater than the net positive charge on the viral capsid. We computationally investigate the mechanisms that lead to ``overcharging'', and more broadly, how the encapsidated genome length is influenced by the capsid. We perform both dynamical simulations of the assembly process and equilibrium calculations to determine the optimal genome length (meaning that which maximizes the assembly yield and/or minimizes the free energy of the assembled virus). We find that the optimal genome length is determined by the interplay between capsid size, net capsid charge, distribution of capsid charge and nucleic acid structures. Our simulations demonstrate that overcharging results from a combination of electrostatic screening and the geometric constraints associated with encapsulating a nucleic acid inside of a spherical virus. We then study the assembly of the immature HIV. In contrast to icosahedral viruses, the immature HIV forms an asymmetric particle, consisting of continuous

  16. Capsid structure and dynamics of a human rhinovirus probed by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lintao; Smith, David L

    2005-06-01

    Viral capsids are dynamic protein assemblies surrounding viral genomes. Despite the high-resolution structures determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, their in-solution structure and dynamics can be probed by hydrogen exchange. We report here using hydrogen exchange combined with protein enzymatic fragmentation and mass spectrometry to determine the capsid structure and dynamics of a human rhinovirus, HRV14. Capsid proteins (VP1-4) were labeled with deuterium by incubating intact virus in D(2)O buffer at neutral pH. The labeled proteins were digested by immobilized pepsin to give peptides analyzed by capillary reverse-phase HPLC coupled with nano-electrospray mass spectrometry. Deuterium levels incorporated at amide linkages in peptic fragments were measured for different exchange times from 12 sec to 30 h to assess the amide hydrogen exchange rates along each of the four protein backbones. Exchange results generally agree with the crystal structure of VP1-4,with extended, flexible terminal and surface-loop regions in fast exchange and folded helical and sheet structures in slow exchange. In addition, three alpha-helices, one from each of VP1-3, exhibited very slow exchange, indicating high stability of the protomeric interface. The beta-strands at VP3 N terminus also had very slow exchange, suggesting stable pentamer contacts. It was noted, however, that the interface around the fivefold axis had fast and intermediate exchange, indicating relatively more flexibility. Even faster exchange rates were found in the N terminus of VP1 and most segments of VP4, suggesting high flexibilities, which may correspond to their potential roles in virus uncoating.

  17. Mutational Analysis and Allosteric Effects in the HIV-1 Capsid Protein Carboxyl-Terminal Dimerization Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD, residues 146−231) of the HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein plays an important role in the CA−CA dimerization and viral assembly of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Disrupting the native conformation of the CA is essential for blocking viral capsid formation and viral replication. Thus, it is important to identify the exact nature of the structural changes and driving forces of the CTD dimerization that take place in mutant forms. Here, we compare the structural stability, conformational dynamics, and association force of the CTD dimers for both wild-type and mutated sequences using all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD). The simulations show that Q155N and E159D at the major homology region (MHR) and W184A and M185A at the helix 2 region are energetically less favorable than the wild-type, imposing profound negative effects on intermolecular CA−CA dimerization. Detailed structural analysis shows that three mutants (Q155N, E159D, and W184A) display much more flexible local structures and weaker CA−CA association than the wild-type, primarily due to the loss of interactions (hydrogen bonds, side chain hydrophobic contacts, and π-stacking) with their neighboring residues. Most interestingly, the MHR that is far from the interacting dimeric interface is more sensitive to the mutations than the helix 2 region that is located at the CA−CA dimeric interface, indicating that structural changes in the distinct motif of the CA could similarly allosterically prevent the CA capsid formation. In addition, the structural and free energy comparison of the five residues shorter CA (151−231) dimer with the CA (146−231) dimer further indicates that hydrophobic interactions, side chain packing, and hydrogen bonds are the major, dominant driving forces in stabilizing the CA interface. PMID:19199580

  18. Interaction between Bluetongue virus outer capsid protein VP2 and vimentin is necessary for virus egress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Polly

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The VP2 outer capsid protein Bluetongue Virus (BTV is responsible for receptor binding, haemagglutination and eliciting host-specific immunity. However, the assembly of this outer capsid protein on the transcriptionally active viral core would block transcription of the virus. Thus assembly of the outer capsid on the core particle must be a tightly controlled process during virus maturation. Earlier studies have detected mature virus particles associated with intermediate filaments in virus infected cells but the viral determinant for this association and the effect of disrupting intermediate filaments on virus assembly and release are unknown. Results In this study it is demonstrated that BTV VP2 associates with vimentin in both virus infected cells and in the absence of other viral proteins. Further, the determinants of vimentin localisation are mapped to the N-terminus of the protein and deletions of aminio acids between residues 65 and 114 are shown to disrupt VP2-vimentin association. Site directed mutation also reveals that amino acid residues Gly 70 and Val 72 are important in the VP2-vimentin association. Mutation of these amino acids resulted in a soluble VP2 capable of forming trimeric structures similar to unmodified protein that no longer associated with vimentin. Furthermore, pharmacological disruption of intermediate filaments, either directly or indirectly through the disruption of the microtubule network, inhibited virus release from BTV infected cells. Conclusion The principal findings of the research are that the association of mature BTV particles with intermediate filaments are driven by the interaction of VP2 with vimentin and that this interaction contributes to virus egress. Furthermore, i the N-terminal 118 amino acids of VP2 are sufficient to confer vimentin interaction. ii Deletion of amino acids 65–114 or mutation of amino acids 70–72 to DVD abrogates vimentin association. iii Finally

  19. Diminished reovirus capsid stability alters disease pathogenesis and littermate transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Doyle

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Reovirus is a nonenveloped mammalian virus that provides a useful model system for studies of viral infections in the young. Following internalization into host cells, the outermost capsid of reovirus virions is removed by endosomal cathepsin proteases. Determinants of capsid disassembly kinetics reside in the viral σ3 protein. However, the contribution of capsid stability to reovirus-induced disease is unknown. In this study, we found that mice inoculated intramuscularly with a serotype 3 reovirus containing σ3-Y354H, a mutation that reduces viral capsid stability, succumbed at a higher rate than those infected with wild-type virus. At early times after inoculation, σ3-Y354H virus reached higher titers than wild-type virus at several sites within the host. Animals inoculated perorally with a serotype 1 reassortant reovirus containing σ3-Y354H developed exaggerated myocarditis accompanied by elaboration of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Surprisingly, unchallenged littermates of mice infected with σ3-Y354H virus displayed higher titers in the intestine, heart, and brain than littermates of mice inoculated with wild-type virus. Together, these findings suggest that diminished capsid stability enhances reovirus replication, dissemination, lethality, and host-to-host spread, establishing a new virulence determinant for nonenveloped viruses.

  20. Human papillomavirus major capsid protein L1 remains associated with the incoming viral genome throughout the entry process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Guion, Lucile G M; Keiffer, Timothy R; Sapp, Martin

    2017-05-31

    During infectious entry, acidification within the endosome triggers uncoating of the HPV capsid whereupon host cyclophilins facilitate the release of most of the major capsid protein, L1, from the minor capsid protein L2 and the viral genome. The L2/DNA complex traffics to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Following the onset of mitosis, HPV-harboring transport vesicles bud from the TGN followed by association with mitotic chromosomes. During this time, the HPV genome remains in a vesicular compartment until the nucleus has completely reformed. Recent data suggests that while most of L1 protein dissociates and is degraded in the endosome, some L1 protein remains associated with the viral genome. The L1 protein has DNA binding activity and L2 protein has multiple domains capable of interacting with L1 capsomeres. In this study, we report that some L1 protein traffics with L2 and viral genome to the nucleus. The accompanying L1 protein is mostly full-length and retains conformation-dependent epitopes, which are recognized by neutralizing antibodies. Since more than one L1 molecule contributes to these epitopes and require assembly into capsomeres, we propose that L1 protein is present in form of pentamers. Furthermore, we provide evidence that L1 protein interacts directly with viral DNA within the capsid. Based on our findings, we propose that the L1 protein, likely arranged as capsomeres, stabilizes the viral genome within the subviral complex during intracellular trafficking.IMPORTANCE After internalization, the non-enveloped human papillomavirus virion uncoats in the endosome whereupon conformational changes result in a dissociation of a subset of the major capsid protein L1 from the minor capsid protein L2, which remains in complex with the viral DNA. Recent data suggests that some L1 protein may accompany the viral genome beyond the endosomal compartment. Herein, we demonstrate that conformationally intact L1 protein, likely still arranged as capsomeres, remains

  1. 3D reconstruction and capsid protein characterization of grass carp reovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG; Qin; Shah; Sanket; LIANG; Yuyao; Z.; H.; ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Grass carp reovirus (GCRV) is a relatively new virus first isolated in China and is a member of the Aquareovirus genus of the Reoviridae family. Recent report of genomic sequencing showed that GCRV shared high degree of homology with mammalian reovirus (MRV). As a step of our effort to understand the structural basis of GCRV pathogenesis, we determined the three-dimensional (3D) structure of GCRV capsid at 17 (A) resolution by electron cryomicroscopy. Each GCRV capsid has a multilayered organization, consisting of an RNA core, an inner, middle and outer protein layer. The outer layer is made up of 200 trimers that are arranged on an incomplete T=13 icosahedral lattice. A characteristic feature of this layer is the depression resulting from the absence of trimers around the peripentonal positions, revealing the underlying trimers on the middle layer. There are 120 subunits in the inner layer arranged with T=1 symmetry. These structural features are common to other members of the Reoviridae. Moreover, SDS-PAGE analysis showed that GCRV virions contain seven structural proteins (VP1-VP7). These structural proteins have a high degree of sequence homology to MRV, consistent with the structural similarities observed in our study. The high structural similarities of isolated GCRV and MRV suggest that future structural studies focusing on GCRV entering into and replicating within its host cell are necessary in order to fully understand the structural basis of GCRV pathogenesis.

  2. Multiple capsid-stabilizing interactions revealed in a high-resolution structure of an emerging picornavirus causing neonatal sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Shabih; Westerhuis, Brenda M.; Domanska, Ausra; Koning, Roman I.; Matadeen, Rishi; Koster, Abraham J.; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Beaumont, Tim; Wolthers, Katja C.; Butcher, Sarah J.

    2016-07-01

    The poorly studied picornavirus, human parechovirus 3 (HPeV3) causes neonatal sepsis with no therapies available. Our 4.3-Å resolution structure of HPeV3 on its own and at 15 Å resolution in complex with human monoclonal antibody Fabs demonstrates the expected picornavirus capsid structure with three distinct features. First, 25% of the HPeV3 RNA genome in 60 sites is highly ordered as confirmed by asymmetric reconstruction, and interacts with conserved regions of the capsid proteins VP1 and VP3. Second, the VP0 N terminus stabilizes the capsid inner surface, in contrast to other picornaviruses where on expulsion as VP4, it forms an RNA translocation channel. Last, VP1's hydrophobic pocket, the binding site for the antipicornaviral drug, pleconaril, is blocked and thus inappropriate for antiviral development. Together, these results suggest a direction for development of neutralizing antibodies, antiviral drugs based on targeting the RNA-protein interactions and dissection of virus assembly on the basis of RNA nucleation.

  3. Specificity of an anti-capsid antibody associated with Hepatitis B Virus-related acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weimin; Chen, Zhaochun; Cheng, Naiqian; Watts, Norman R; Stahl, Stephen J; Farci, Patrizia; Purcell, Robert H; Wingfield, Paul T; Steven, Alasdair C

    2013-01-01

    Previously, the livers of patients suffering from acute liver failure (ALF), a potentially fatal syndrome arising from infection by Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), were found to contain massive amounts of an antibody specific for the core antigen (HBcAg) capsid. We have used cryo-electron microscopy and molecular modeling to define its epitope. HBV capsids are icosahedral shells with 25Å-long dimeric spikes, each a 4-helix bundle, protruding from the contiguous "floor". Of the anti-HBcAg antibodies previously characterized, most bind around the spike tip while one binds to the floor. The ALF-associated antibody binds tangentially to a novel site on the side of the spike. This epitope is conformational. The Fab binds with high affinity to its principal determinants but has lower affinities for quasi-equivalent variants. The highest occupancy site is on one side of a spike, with no detectable binding to the corresponding site on the other side. Binding of one Fab per dimer was also observed by analytical ultracentrifugation. The Fab did not bind to the e-antigen dimer, a non-assembling variant of capsid protein. These findings support the propositions that antibodies with particular specificities may correlate with different clinical expressions of HBV infection and that antibodies directed to particular HBcAg epitopes may be involved in ALF pathogenesis.

  4. Testing fully depleted CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Ricard; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castander, Francisco J.; Jiménez, Jorge; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-08-01

    The focal plane of the PAU camera is composed of eighteen 2K x 4K CCDs. These devices, plus four spares, were provided by the Japanese company Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. with type no. S10892-04(X). These detectors are 200 μm thick fully depleted and back illuminated with an n-type silicon base. They have been built with a specific coating to be sensitive in the range from 300 to 1,100 nm. Their square pixel size is 15 μm. The read-out system consists of a Monsoon controller (NOAO) and the panVIEW software package. The deafualt CCD read-out speed is 133 kpixel/s. This is the value used in the calibration process. Before installing these devices in the camera focal plane, they were characterized using the facilities of the ICE (CSIC- IEEC) and IFAE in the UAB Campus in Bellaterra (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain). The basic tests performed for all CCDs were to obtain the photon transfer curve (PTC), the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) using X-rays and the EPER method, linearity, read-out noise, dark current, persistence, cosmetics and quantum efficiency. The X-rays images were also used for the analysis of the charge diffusion for different substrate voltages (VSUB). Regarding the cosmetics, and in addition to white and dark pixels, some patterns were also found. The first one, which appears in all devices, is the presence of half circles in the external edges. The origin of this pattern can be related to the assembly process. A second one appears in the dark images, and shows bright arcs connecting corners along the vertical axis of the CCD. This feature appears in all CCDs exactly in the same position so our guess is that the pattern is due to electrical fields. Finally, and just in two devices, there is a spot with wavelength dependence whose origin could be the result of a defectous coating process.

  5. Second-site suppressors of HIV-1 capsid mutations: restoration of intracellular activities without correction of intrinsic capsid stability defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ruifeng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disassembly of the viral capsid following penetration into the cytoplasm, or uncoating, is a poorly understood stage of retrovirus infection. Based on previous studies of HIV-1 CA mutants exhibiting altered capsid stability, we concluded that formation of a capsid of optimal intrinsic stability is crucial for HIV-1 infection. Results To further examine the connection between HIV-1 capsid stability and infectivity, we isolated second-site suppressors of HIV-1 mutants exhibiting unstable (P38A or hyperstable (E45A capsids. We identified the respective suppressor mutations, T216I and R132T, which restored virus replication in a human T cell line and markedly enhanced the fitness of the original mutants as revealed in single-cycle infection assays. Analysis of the corresponding purified N-terminal domain CA proteins by NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the E45A and R132T mutations induced structural changes that are localized to the regions of the mutations, while the P38A mutation resulted in changes extending to neighboring regions in space. Unexpectedly, neither suppressor mutation corrected the intrinsic viral capsid stability defect associated with the respective original mutation. Nonetheless, the R132T mutation rescued the selective infectivity impairment exhibited by the E45A mutant in aphidicolin-arrested cells, and the double mutant regained sensitivity to the small molecule inhibitor PF74. The T216I mutation rescued the impaired ability of the P38A mutant virus to abrogate restriction by TRIMCyp and TRIM5α. Conclusions The second-site suppressor mutations in CA that we have identified rescue virus infection without correcting the intrinsic capsid stability defects associated with the P38A and E45A mutations. The suppressors also restored wild type virus function in several cell-based assays. We propose that while proper HIV-1 uncoating in target cells is dependent on the intrinsic stability of the viral capsid, the

  6. Synthesis of viruslike particles by expression of the putative capsid protein of Leishmania RNA virus in a recombinant baculovirus expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadd, T L; Patterson, J L

    1994-01-01

    The putative capsid open reading frame (ORF2) of the Leishmania RNA virus LRV1-4 was expressed in a baculovirus expression system. The expressed protein was identified by Western immunoblot analysis with polyclonal antiserum raised to purified LRV1-4 virus. Electron microscopy and sedimentation analysis indicated that the expressed protein self-assembles into empty viruslike particles of similar size and shape to authentic virus particles, thus confirming that ORF2 encodes the viral capsid. The expressed particles are present exclusively in the cytoplasm of infected SF9 cells and are able to assemble in the absence of LRV1-4 RNA, viral polymerase, or any Leishmania host factors. Images PMID:8254748

  7. Polymorphism of DNA conformation inside the bacteriophage capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leforestier, Amélie

    2013-03-01

    Double-stranded DNA bacteriophage genomes are packaged into their icosahedral capsids at the highest densities known so far (about 50 % w:v). How the molecule is folded at such density and how its conformation changes upon ejection or packaging are fascinating questions still largely open. We review cryo-TEM analyses of DNA conformation inside partially filled capsids as a function of the physico-chemical environment (ions, osmotic pressure, temperature). We show that there exists a wide variety of DNA conformations. Strikingly, the different observed structures can be described by some of the different models proposed over the years for DNA organisation inside bacteriophage capsids: either spool-like structures with axial or concentric symmetries, or liquid crystalline structures characterised by a DNA homogeneous density. The relevance of these conformations for the understanding of DNA folding and unfolding upon ejection and packaging in vivo is discussed.

  8. P22 coat protein structures reveal a novel mechanism for capsid maturation: stability without auxiliary proteins or chemical crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Kristin N; Khayat, Reza; Tu, Long H; Suhanovsky, Margaret M; Cortines, Juliana R; Teschke, Carolyn M; Johnson, John E; Baker, Timothy S

    2010-03-10

    Viral capsid assembly and stability in tailed, dsDNA phage and Herpesviridae are achieved by various means including chemical crosslinks (unique to HK97), or auxiliary proteins (lambda, T4, phi29, and herpesviruses). All these viruses have coat proteins (CP) with a conserved, HK97-like core structure. We used a combination of trypsin digestion, gold labeling, cryo-electron microscopy, 3D image reconstruction, and comparative modeling to derive two independent, pseudoatomic models of bacteriophage P22 CP: before and after maturation. P22 capsid stabilization results from intersubunit interactions among N-terminal helices and an extensive "P loop," which obviate the need for crosslinks or auxiliary proteins. P22 CP also has a telokin-like Ig domain that likely stabilizes the monomer fold so that assembly may proceed via individual subunit addition rather than via preformed capsomers as occurs in HK97. Hence, the P22 CP structure may be a paradigm for understanding how monomers assemble in viruses like phi29 and HSV-1.

  9. Biophysical and Structural Studies on the Capsid Protein of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1: A New Drug Target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Neira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AIDS affects 30 million people worldwide and is one of the deadliest epidemics in human history. It is caused by a retrovirus, HIV, whose mature capsid (enclosing the RNA with other proteins is formed by the assembly of several hundred copies of a protein, CA*. The C-terminal domain of such protein, CAC, is a driving force in virus assembly and the connections in the mature capsid lattice indicate that CAC joins through homodimerization of the CA hexamers. In the first part of this work, I shall review the biophysical studies carried out with the dimeric wild-type CAC protein and a mutant monomeric variant. The results open new venues for the development of drugs able to interact either with the dimeric species, hampering its assembly, or with the monomeric species, obstructing its folding. In the second part of this review, I shall describe the structures of complexes of CAC with small molecules able to weaken its dimerization. Furthermore, interactions with other proteins and lipids are also described. The whole set of results suggests that much of the surface of CAC does not accommodate binding per se, but rather binding sites in the protein are predefined, i.e., there are “hot” spots for binding in CAC (whatever be the molecule to bind. These “hot” residues involve most of the dimerization interface (an α-helix of the CAC wild-type protein, but also polypeptide patches at the other helices.

  10. Sphingomyelin induces structural alteration in canine parvovirus capsid

    OpenAIRE

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Karttunen, Jenni; Virtanen, Salla; Vuento, Matti

    2008-01-01

    One of the essential steps in canine parvovirus (CPV) infection, the release from endosomal vesicles, is dominated by interactions between the virus capsid and the endosomal membranes. In this study, the effect of sphingomyelin and phosphatidyl serine on canine parvovirus capsid and on the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity of CPV VP1 unique N-terminus was analyzed. Accordingly, a significant (P ≤ 0.05) shift of tryptophan fluorescence emission peak was detected at pH 5.5 in the presen...

  11. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Fujimoto, K.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2014-10-01

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 106 all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  12. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Okazaki, S., E-mail: okazaki@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Fujimoto, K. [Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Nakagawa, A. [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nomoto, A. [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0021 (Japan)

    2014-10-28

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 10{sup 6} all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  13. 人乳头瘤病毒衣壳蛋白与宫颈病变%Human Papillomavirus′ Capsid Proteins and Cervical Lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄成琳; 张淑兰

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer seriously endangers women′s health,and human papillomavirus (HPV) is considered to be the primary cause. Doctors have been striving to find an effective diagnostic method for judging cervical lesions level and predicting its prognosis. HPV capsid proteins comprise the major capsid protein (L1 capsid protein) and the minor capsid protein (L2 capsid protein),and these two proteins play an important role in assembling into virus particles,trafficking HPV to the cell,and causing the host′s immune reactions. In recent years,studies have shown that the L1 capsid protein can be used to predict the progress and subsidence of cervical lesions. HPV prophylactic vaccines ,which are exploited on the basis of the L1 and L2 capsid protein,are proved to get a good preventive effect in clinical trials. This paper reviews the biological characteristics of HPV and researches progress on HPV capsid protein in cervical lesions in recent years.%宫颈癌严重危害妇女健康,人乳头瘤病毒(HPV)感染是其首要病因。临床医师一直致力于寻找一种能有效判断宫颈病变级别及预测预后的诊断方法。 HPV衣壳蛋白包括主要衣壳蛋白(L1壳蛋白)和次要衣壳蛋白(L2壳蛋白),这两种蛋白在组装成病毒颗粒、协助病毒入胞及引起机体免疫反应等多个方面发挥重要作用。近年研究表明, L1壳蛋白可用于预测宫颈病变的进展与消退。以L1及L2壳蛋白为基础研发的HPV预防性疫苗在临床试验中得到了很好的预防效果。综述HPV生物学特点及近年来有关HPV衣壳蛋白在宫颈病变的研究进展。

  14. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  15. Codon optimization of the rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) capsid gene leads to increased gene expression in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 (Sf9) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jingpeng; Meng, Chunchun; Chen, Zongyan; Li, Chuanfeng; Liu, Guangqing

    2013-01-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD) is contagious and highly lethal. Commercial vaccines against RHD are produced from the livers of experimentally infected rabbits. Although several groups have reported that recombinant subunit vaccines against rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) are promising, application of the vaccines has been restricted due to high production costs or low yield. In the present study, we performed codon optimization of the capsid gene to increase the number of preference codons and eliminate rare codons in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 (Sf9) cells. The capsid gene was then subcloned into the pFastBac plasmid, and the recombinant baculoviruses were identified with a plaque assay. As expected, expression of the optimized capsid protein was markedly increased in the Sf9 cells, and the recombinant capsid proteins self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) that were released into the cell supernatant. Rabbits inoculated with the supernatant and the purified VLPs were protected against RHDV challenge. A rapid, specific antibody response against RHDV was detected by an ELISA in all of the experimental groups. In conclusion, this strategy of producing a recombinant subunit vaccine antigen can be used to develop a low-cost, insect cell-derived recombinant subunit vaccine against RHDV.

  16. Simple rules for efficient assembly predict the layout of a packaged viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykeman, E C; Grayson, N E; Toropova, K; Ranson, N A; Stockley, P G; Twarock, R

    2011-05-06

    Single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses, which include major human pathogens, package their genomes as they assemble their capsids. We show here that the organization of the viral genomes within the capsids provides intriguing insights into the highly cooperative nature of the assembly process. A recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of bacteriophage MS2, determined with only 5-fold symmetry averaging, has revealed the asymmetric distribution of its encapsidated genome. Here we show that this RNA distribution is consistent with an assembly mechanism that follows two simple rules derived from experiment: (1) the binding of the MS2 maturation protein to the RNA constrains its conformation into a loop, and (2) the capsid must be built in an energetically favorable way. These results provide a new level of insight into the factors that drive efficient assembly of ssRNA viruses in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Extending reference assembly models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Church, Deanna M.; Schneider, Valerie A.; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz

    2015-01-01

    The human genome reference assembly is crucial for aligning and analyzing sequence data, and for genome annotation, among other roles. However, the models and analysis assumptions that underlie the current assembly need revising to fully represent human sequence diversity. Improved analysis tools...

  18. Extending reference assembly models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Church, Deanna M.; Schneider, Valerie A.; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz;

    2015-01-01

    The human genome reference assembly is crucial for aligning and analyzing sequence data, and for genome annotation, among other roles. However, the models and analysis assumptions that underlie the current assembly need revising to fully represent human sequence diversity. Improved analysis tools...

  19. Sphingomyelin induces structural alteration in canine parvovirus capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Karttunen, Jenni; Virtanen, Salla; Vuento, Matti

    2008-03-01

    One of the essential steps in canine parvovirus (CPV) infection, the release from endosomal vesicles, is dominated by interactions between the virus capsid and the endosomal membranes. In this study, the effect of sphingomyelin and phosphatidyl serine on canine parvovirus capsid and on the phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) activity of CPV VP1 unique N-terminus was analyzed. Accordingly, a significant (P< or =0.05) shift of tryptophan fluorescence emission peak was detected at pH 5.5 in the presence of sphingomyelin, whereas at pH 7.4 a similar but minor shift was observed. This effect may relate to the exposure of VP1 N-terminus in acidic pH as well as to interactions between sphingomyelin and CPV. When the phenomenon was further characterized using circular dichroism spectroscopy, differences in CPV capsid CD spectra with and without sphingomyelin and phosphatidyl serine were detected, corresponding to data obtained with tryptophan fluorescence. However, when the enzymatic activity of CPV PLA(2) was tested in the presence of sphingomyelin, no significant effect in the function of the enzyme was detected. Thus, the structural changes observed with spectroscopic techniques appear not to manipulate the activity of CPV PLA(2), and may therefore implicate alternative interactions between CPV capsid and sphingomyelin.

  20. Orthogonal Functionalization of Ferritin via Supramolecular Re-Assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spa, Silvia J.; Bunschoten, Anton; Rood, Marcus T.M.; Peters, R.J.B.; Koster, Abraham J.; Leeuwen, Van F.W.B.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate if the degree of functionalization of ferritin could be controlled using a supramolecular self-assembly process, two photophysical separable batches of ferritin were created by functionalizing ferritin capsids with either Cy3- or Cy5-dye (loading rate of about 50 %). After dis-asse

  1. Antigenic properties of avian hepatitis E virus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qin; Syed, Shahid Faraz; Zhou, En-Min

    2015-10-22

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the main causative agent of big liver and spleen disease and hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens, and is genetically and antigenically related to mammalian HEVs. HEV capsid protein contains immunodominant epitopes and induces a protective humoral immune response. A better understanding of the antigenic composition of this protein is critically important for the development of effective vaccine and sensitive and specific serological assays. To date, six linear antigenic domains (I-VI) have been characterized in avian HEV capsid protein and analyzed for their applications in the serological diagnosis and vaccine design. Domains I and V induce strong immune response in chickens and are common to avian, human, and swine HEVs, indicating that the shared epitopes hampering differential diagnosis of avian HEV infection. Domains III and IV are not immunodominant and elicit a weak immune response. Domain VI, located in the N-terminal region of the capsid protein, can also trigger an intense immune response, but the anti-domain VI antibodies are transient. The protection analysis showed that the truncated capsid protein containing the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues expressed by the bacterial system can provide protective immunity against avian HEV infection in chickens. However, the synthetic peptides incorporating the different linear antigenic domains (I-VI) and epitopes are non-protective. The antigenic composition of avian HEV capsid protein is altogether complex. To develop an effective vaccine and accurate serological diagnostic methods, more conformational antigenic domains or epitopes are to be characterized in detail.

  2. Physical properties of the HIV-1 capsid from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilla, Juan R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly dependent on its capsid. The capsid is a large container, made of ~1,300 proteins with altogether 4 million atoms. Although the capsid proteins are all identical, they nevertheless arrange themselves into a largely asymmetric structure made of hexamers and pentamers. The large number of degrees of freedom and lack of symmetry pose a challenge to studying the chemical details of the HIV capsid. Simulations of over 64 million atoms for over 1 μs allow us to conduct a comprehensive study of the chemical-physical properties of an empty HIV-1 capsid, including its electrostatics, vibrational and acoustic properties, and the effects of solvent (ions and water) on the capsid. The simulations reveal critical details about the capsid with implications to biological function.

  3. CapsidMaps: protein-protein interaction pattern discovery platform for the structural analysis of virus capsids using Google Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Montiel-García, Daniel Jorge; Brooks, Charles L; Reddy, Vijay S

    2015-04-01

    Structural analysis and visualization of protein-protein interactions is a challenging task since it is difficult to appreciate easily the extent of all contacts made by the residues forming the interfaces. In the case of viruses, structural analysis becomes even more demanding because several interfaces coexist and, in most cases, these are formed by hundreds of contacting residues that belong to multiple interacting coat proteins. CapsidMaps is an interactive analysis and visualization tool that is designed to benefit the structural virology community. Developed as an improved extension of the φ-ψ Explorer, here we describe the details of its design and implementation. We present results of analysis of a spherical virus to showcase the features and utility of the new tool. CapsidMaps also facilitates the comparison of quaternary interactions between two spherical virus particles by computing a similarity (S)-score. The tool can also be used to identify residues that are solvent exposed and in the process of locating antigenic epitope regions as well as residues forming the inside surface of the capsid that interact with the nucleic acid genome. CapsidMaps is part of the VIPERdb Science Gateway, and is freely available as a web-based and cross-browser compliant application at http://viperdb.scripps.edu.

  4. Mutational Analysis of the Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 (AAV2) Capsid Gene and Construction of AAV2 Vectors with Altered Tropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei; Xiao, Wu; Conlon, Thomas; Hughes, Jeffrey; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Ferkol, Thomas; Flotte, Terence; Muzyczka, Nicholas

    2000-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) has proven to be a valuable vector for gene therapy. Characterization of the functional domains of the AAV capsid proteins can facilitate our understanding of viral tissue tropism, immunoreactivity, viral entry, and DNA packaging, all of which are important issues for generating improved vectors. To obtain a comprehensive genetic map of the AAV capsid gene, we have constructed 93 mutants at 59 different positions in the AAV capsid gene by site-directed mutagenesis. Several types of mutants were studied, including epitope tag or ligand insertion mutants, alanine scanning mutants, and epitope substitution mutants. Analysis of these mutants revealed eight separate phenotypes. Infectious titers of the mutants revealed four classes. Class 1 mutants were viable, class 2 mutants were partially defective, class 3 mutants were temperature sensitive, and class 4 mutants were noninfectious. Further analysis revealed some of the defects in the class 2, 3, and 4 mutants. Among the class 4 mutants, a subset completely abolished capsid formation. These mutants were located predominantly, but not exclusively, in what are likely to be β-barrel structures in the capsid protein VP3. Two of these mutants were insertions at the N and C termini of VP3, suggesting that both ends of VP3 play a role that is important for capsid assembly or stability. Several class 2 and 3 mutants produced capsids that were unstable during purification of viral particles. One mutant, R432A, made only empty capsids, presumably due to a defect in packaging viral DNA. Additionally, five mutants were defective in heparan binding, a step that is believed to be essential for viral entry. These were distributed into two amino acid clusters in what is likely to be a cell surface loop in the capsid protein VP3. The first cluster spanned amino acids 509 to 522; the second was between amino acids 561 and 591. In addition to the heparan binding clusters, hemagglutinin epitope tag

  5. Structure and assembly of the essential RNA ring component of a viral DNA packaging motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Fang; Lu, Changrui; Zhao, Wei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Jardine, Paul J.; Grimes, Shelley; Ke, Ailong (Cornell); (UMM)

    2011-07-25

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component in the assembly and operation of the powerful bacteriophage {psi}29 DNA packaging motor. The pRNA forms a multimeric ring via intermolecular base-pairing interactions between protomers that serves to guide the assembly of the ring ATPase that drives DNA packaging. Here we report the quaternary structure of this rare multimeric RNA at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution, crystallized as tetrameric rings. Strong quaternary interactions and the inherent flexibility helped rationalize how free pRNA is able to adopt multiple oligomerization states in solution. These characteristics also allowed excellent fitting of the crystallographic pRNA protomers into previous prohead/pRNA cryo-EM reconstructions, supporting the presence of a pentameric, but not hexameric, pRNA ring in the context of the DNA packaging motor. The pentameric pRNA ring anchors itself directly to the phage prohead by interacting specifically with the fivefold symmetric capsid structures that surround the head-tail connector portal. From these contacts, five RNA superhelices project from the pRNA ring, where they serve as scaffolds for binding and assembly of the ring ATPase, and possibly mediate communication between motor components. Construction of structure-based designer pRNAs with little sequence similarity to the wild-type pRNA were shown to fully support the packaging of {psi}29 DNA.

  6. Tabulation as a high-resolution alternative to coarse-graining protein interactions: Initial application to virus capsid subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiriti, Justin; Zuckerman, Daniel M.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional coarse-graining based on a reduced number of interaction sites often entails a significant sacrifice of chemical accuracy. As an alternative, we present a method for simulating large systems composed of interacting macromolecules using an energy tabulation strategy previously devised for small rigid molecules or molecular fragments [S. Lettieri and D. M. Zuckerman, J. Comput. Chem. 33, 268-275 (2012); J. Spiriti and D. M. Zuckerman, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 5161-5177 (2014)]. We treat proteins as rigid and construct distance and orientation-dependent tables of the interaction energy between them. Arbitrarily detailed interactions may be incorporated into the tables, but as a proof-of-principle, we tabulate a simple α-carbon Gō-like model for interactions between dimeric subunits of the hepatitis B viral capsid. This model is significantly more structurally realistic than previous models used in capsid assembly studies. We are able to increase the speed of Monte Carlo simulations by a factor of up to 6700 compared to simulations without tables, with only minimal further loss in accuracy. To obtain further enhancement of sampling, we combine tabulation with the weighted ensemble (WE) method, in which multiple parallel simulations are occasionally replicated or pruned in order to sample targeted regions of a reaction coordinate space. In the initial study reported here, WE is able to yield pathways of the final ˜25% of the assembly process.

  7. Illuminating the Reaction Pathways of Viromimetic Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The coassembly of well-defined biological nanostructures relies on a delicate balance between attractive and repulsive interactions between biomolecular building blocks. Viral capsids are a prototypical example, where coat proteins exhibit not only self-interactions but also interact with the cargo they encapsulate. In nature, the balance between antagonistic and synergistic interactions has evolved to avoid kinetic trapping and polymorphism. To date, it has remained a major challenge to experimentally disentangle the complex kinetic reaction pathways that underlie successful coassembly of biomolecular building blocks in a noninvasive approach with high temporal resolution. Here we show how macromolecular force sensors, acting as a genome proxy, allow us to probe the pathways through which a viromimetic protein forms capsids. We uncover the complex multistage process of capsid assembly, which involves recruitment and complexation, followed by allosteric growth of the proteinaceous coat. Under certain conditions, the single-genome particles condense into capsids containing multiple copies of the template. Finally, we derive a theoretical model that quantitatively describes the kinetics of recruitment and growth. These results shed new light on the origins of the pathway complexity in biomolecular coassembly.

  8. Increasing Type 1 Poliovirus Capsid Stability by Thermal Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Oluwapelumi O.; Nicol, Clare

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease caused by poliovirus (PV). It can result in paralysis and may be fatal. Integrated global immunization programs using live-attenuated oral (OPV) and/or inactivated (IPV) PV vaccines have systematically reduced its spread and paved the way for eradication. Immunization will continue posteradication to ensure against reintroduction of the disease, but there are biosafety concerns for both OPV and IPV. They could be addressed by the production and use of virus-free virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines that mimic the “empty” capsids (ECs) normally produced in viral infection. Although ECs are antigenically indistinguishable from mature virus particles, they are less stable and readily convert into an alternative conformation unsuitable for vaccine purposes. Stabilized ECs, expressed recombinantly as VLPs, could be ideal candidate vaccines for a polio-free world. However, although genome-free PV ECs have been expressed as VLPs in a variety of systems, their inherent antigenic instability has proved a barrier to further development. In this study, we selected thermally stable ECs of type 1 PV (PV-1). The ECs are antigenically stable at temperatures above the conversion temperature of wild-type (wt) virions. We have identified mutations on the capsid surface and in internal networks that are responsible for EC stability. With reference to the capsid structure, we speculate on the roles of these residues in capsid stability and postulate that such stabilized VLPs could be used as novel vaccines. IMPORTANCE Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease caused by PV and is on the verge of eradication. There are biosafety concerns about reintroduction of the disease from current vaccines that require live virus for production. Recombinantly expressed virus-like particles (VLPs) could address these inherent problems. However, the genome-free capsids (ECs) of wt PV are unstable and readily change antigenicity to a form not

  9. Capsid protein: evidences about the partial protective role of neutralizing antibody-independent immunity against dengue in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Lázaro; Izquierdo, Alienys; Lazo, Laura; Valdés, Iris; Ambala, Peris; Ochola, Lucy; Marcos, Ernesto; Suzarte, Edith; Kariuki, Thomas; Guzmán, Guadalupe; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2014-05-01

    The role of cellular immune response in dengue virus infection is not yet fully understood. Only few studies in murine models propose that CD8(+) T-cells are associated with protection from infection and disease. At the light of recent reports about the protective role of CD8(+) T-cells in humans and the no correlation between neutralizing antibodies and protection observed in several studies, a vaccine based on cell-mediated immunity constitute an attractive approach. Our group has developed a capsid-based vaccine as nucleocpasid-like particles from dengue-2 virus, which induced a protective CD4(+) and CD8(+) cell-mediated immunity in mice, without the contribution of neutralizing antibodies. Herein we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this molecule in monkeys. Neither IgG antibodies against the whole virus nor neutralizing antibodies were elicited after the antigen inoculation. However, animals developed a cell-mediated immunity, measured by gamma interferon secretion and cytotoxic capacity. Although only one out of three vaccinated animals was fully protected against viral challenge, a viral load reduction was observed in this group compared with the placebo one, suggesting that capsid could be the base on an attractive vaccine against dengue.

  10. Characterization of neutralizing epitopes within the major capsid protein of human papillomavirus type 33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapp Martin

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections with papillomaviruses induce type-specific immune responses, mainly directed against the major capsid protein, L1. Based on the propensity of the L1 protein to self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs, type-specific vaccines have already been developed. In order to generate vaccines that target a broader spectrum of HPV types, extended knowledge of neutralizing epitopes is required. Despite the association of human papillomavirus type 33 (HPV33 with cervical carcinomas, fine mapping of neutralizing conformational epitopes on HPV33 has not been reported yet. By loop swapping between HPV33 and HPV16 capsid proteins, we have identified amino acid sequences critical for the binding of conformation-dependent type-specific neutralizing antibodies to surface-exposed hyper variable loops of HPV33 capsid protein L1. Results Reactivities of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs H33.B6, H33.E12, H33.J3 and H16.56E with HPV16:33 and HPV33:16 hybrid L1 VLPs revealed the complex structures of their conformational epitopes as well as the major residues contributing to their binding sites. Whereas the epitope of mAb H33.J3 was determined by amino acids (aa 51–58 in the BC loop of HPV33 L1, sequences of at least two hyper variable loops, DE (aa 132–140 and FGb (aa 282–291, were found to be essential for binding of H33.B6. The epitope of H33.E12 was even more complex, requiring sequences of the FGa loop (aa 260–270, in addition to loops DE and FGb. Conclusion These data demonstrate that neutralizing epitopes in HPV33 L1 are mainly located on the tip of the capsomere and that several hyper variable loops contribute to form these conformational epitopes. Knowledge of the antigenic structure of HPV is crucial for designing hybrid particles as a basis for intertypic HPV vaccines.

  11. High affinity anchoring of the decoration protein pb10 onto the bacteriophage T5 capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernhes, Emeline; Renouard, Madalena; Gilquin, Bernard; Cuniasse, Philippe; Durand, Dominique; England, Patrick; Hoos, Sylviane; Huet, Alexis; Conway, James F.; Glukhov, Anatoly; Ksenzenko, Vladimir; Jacquet, Eric; Nhiri, Naïma; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Boulanger, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophage capsids constitute icosahedral shells of exceptional stability that protect the viral genome. Many capsids display on their surface decoration proteins whose structure and function remain largely unknown. The decoration protein pb10 of phage T5 binds at the centre of the 120 hexamers formed by the major capsid protein. Here we determined the 3D structure of pb10 and investigated its capsid-binding properties using NMR, SAXS, cryoEM and SPR. Pb10 consists of an α-helical capsid-binding domain and an Ig-like domain exposed to the solvent. It binds to the T5 capsid with a remarkably high affinity and its binding kinetics is characterized by a very slow dissociation rate. We propose that the conformational exchange events observed in the capsid-binding domain enable rearrangements upon binding that contribute to the quasi-irreversibility of the pb10-capsid interaction. Moreover we show that pb10 binding is a highly cooperative process, which favours immediate rebinding of newly dissociated pb10 to the 120 hexamers of the capsid protein. In extreme conditions, pb10 protects the phage from releasing its genome. We conclude that pb10 may function to reinforce the capsid thus favouring phage survival in harsh environments. PMID:28165000

  12. High capsid-genome correlation facilitates creation of AAV libraries for directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonnenmacher, Mathieu; van Bakel, Harm; Hajjar, Roger J; Weber, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Directed evolution of adeno-associated virus (AAV) through successive rounds of phenotypic selection is a powerful method to isolate variants with improved properties from large libraries of capsid mutants. Importantly, AAV libraries used for directed evolution are based on the "natural" AAV genome organization where the capsid proteins are encoded in cis from replicating genomes. This is necessary to allow the recovery of the capsid DNA after each step of phenotypic selection. For directed evolution to be used successfully, it is essential to minimize the random mixing of capsomers and the encapsidation of nonmatching viral genomes during the production of the viral libraries. Here, we demonstrate that multiple AAV capsid variants expressed from Rep/Cap containing viral genomes result in near-homogeneous capsids that display an unexpectedly high capsid-DNA correlation. Next-generation sequencing of AAV progeny generated by bulk transfection of a semi-random peptide library showed a strong counter-selection of capsid variants encoding premature stop codons, which further supports a strong capsid-genome identity correlation. Overall, our observations demonstrate that production of "natural" AAVs results in low capsid mosaicism and high capsid-genome correlation. These unique properties allow the production of highly diverse AAV libraries in a one-step procedure with a minimal loss in phenotype-genotype correlation.

  13. Useful scars: Physics of the capsids of archaeal viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, L. E.; Dharmavaram, S.; Klug, W. S.; Marian, J.; Rudnick, J.; Bruinsma, R. F.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a physical model for the capsids of tailed archaeal viruses as viscoelastic membranes under tension. The fluidity is generated by thermal motion of scarlike structures that are an intrinsic feature of the ground state of large particle arrays covering surfaces with nonzero Gauss curvature. The tension is generated by a combination of the osmotic pressure of the enclosed genome and an extension force generated by filamentous structure formation that drives the formation of the tails. In continuum theory, the capsid has the shape of a surface of constant mean curvature: an unduloid. Particle arrays covering unduloids are shown to exhibit pronounced subdiffusive and diffusive single-particle transport at temperatures that are well below the melting temperature of defect-free particle arrays on a surface with zero Gauss curvature.

  14. Refinement of herpesvirus B-capsid structure on parallel supercomputers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z H; Chiu, W; Haskell, K; Spears, H; Jakana, J; Rixon, F J; Scott, L R

    1998-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy and icosahedral reconstruction are used to obtain the three-dimensional structure of the 1250-A-diameter herpesvirus B-capsid. The centers and orientations of particles in focal pairs of 400-kV, spot-scan micrographs are determined and iteratively refined by common-lines-based local and global refinement procedures. We describe the rationale behind choosing shared-memory multiprocessor computers for executing the global refinement, which is the most computationally intensive step in the reconstruction procedure. This refinement has been implemented on three different shared-memory supercomputers. The speedup and efficiency are evaluated by using test data sets with different numbers of particles and processors. Using this parallel refinement program, we refine the herpesvirus B-capsid from 355-particle images to 13-A resolution. The map shows new structural features and interactions of the protein subunits in the three distinct morphological units: penton, hexon, and triplex of this T = 16 icosahedral particle.

  15. The Pseudorabies Virus VP1/2 Tegument Protein Is Required for Intracellular Capsid Transport†

    OpenAIRE

    Luxton, G.W. Gant; Lee, Joy I-Hsuan; Haverlock-Moyns, Sarah; Schober, Joseph Martin; Smith, Gregory Allan

    2006-01-01

    Transport of capsids in cells is critical to alphaherpesvirus infection and pathogenesis; however, viral factors required for transport have yet to be identified. Here we provide a detailed examination of capsid dynamics during the egress phase of infection in Vero cells infected with pseudorabies virus. We demonstrate that the VP1/2 tegument protein is required for processive microtubule-based transport of capsids in the cytoplasm. A second tegument protein that binds to VP1/2, UL37, was nec...

  16. Three-dimensional structure determination of capsid of Aedes albopicus C6/36 cell densovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Lingpeng; CHEN Senxiong; Jenifer M.Brannan; Joanita Jakana; ZHANG Qinfen; Z.H.Zhou; ZHANG Jingqiang

    2004-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of capsid of Aedes albopictus C6/36 densovirus was determined to 14-(A) resolution by electron cryomicroscopy and computer reconstruction. The triangulation number of the capsid is 1. There are 12 holes in each triangular face and a spike on each 5-fold vertex. The validity of the capsid and nucleic acid densities in the reconstructions was discussed.

  17. Fluctuation-dissipation ratios in the dynamics of self-assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Jack, Robert L.; Hagan, Michael F.; Chandler, David

    2007-01-01

    We consider two seemingly very different self-assembly processes: formation of viral capsids, and crystallization of sticky discs. At low temperatures, assembly is ineffective, since there are many metastable disordered states, which are a source of kinetic frustration. We use fluctuation-dissipation ratios to extract information about the degree of this frustration. We show that our analysis is a useful indicator of the long term fate of the system, based on the early stages of assembly.

  18. Android Fully Loaded

    CERN Document Server

    Huddleston, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Fully loaded with the latest tricks and tips on your new Android! Android smartphones are so hot, they're soaring past iPhones on the sales charts. And the second edition of this muscular little book is equally impressive--it's packed with tips and tricks for getting the very most out of your latest-generation Android device. Start Facebooking and tweeting with your Android mobile, scan barcodes to get pricing and product reviews, download your favorite TV shows--the book is positively bursting with practical and fun how-tos. Topics run the gamut from using speech recognition, location-based m

  19. On Fully Homomorphic Encryption

    OpenAIRE

    Fauzi, Prastudy

    2012-01-01

    Fully homomorphic encryption is an encryption scheme where a party can receive encrypted data and perform arbitrary operations on this data efficiently.The data remains encrypted throughout, but the operations can be done regardless, without having to know the decryption key.Such a scheme would be very advantageous, for example in ensuring the privacy of data that is sent to a third-party service.This is in contrast with schemes like Paillier where you can not perform a multiplication of encr...

  20. Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) capsid-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes eliminate only vector-transduced cells coexpressing the AAV2 capsid in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengwen; Hirsch, Matthew; Asokan, Aravind; Zeithaml, Brian; Ma, Hong; Kafri, Tal; Samulski, R Jude

    2007-07-01

    A recent clinical trial has suggested that recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector transduction in humans induces a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response against the AAV2 capsid. To directly address the ability of AAV capsid-specific CTLs to eliminate rAAV-transduced cells in vitro and in vivo in mice, we first demonstrated that AAV2 capsid-specific CTLs could be induced by dendritic cells with endogenous AAV2 capsid expression or pulsed with AAV2 vectors. These CTLs were able to kill a cell line stable for capsid expression in vitro and also in a mouse tumor xenograft model in vivo. Parent colon carcinoma (CT26) cells transduced with a large amount of AAV2 vectors in vitro were also destroyed by these CTLs. To determine the effect of CTLs on the elimination of target cells transduced by AAV2 vectors in vivo, we carried out adoptive transfer experiments. CTLs eliminated liver cells with endogenous AAV2 capsid expression but not liver cells transduced by AAV2 vectors, regardless of the reporter genes. Similar results were obtained for rAAV2 transduction in muscle. Our data strongly suggest that AAV vector-transduced cells are rarely eliminated by AAV2 capsid-specific CTLs in vivo, even though the AAV capsid can induce a CTL response. In conclusion, AAV capsid-specific CTLs do not appear to play a role in elimination of rAAV-transduced cells in a mouse model. In addition, our data suggest that the mouse model may not mimic the immune response noted in humans and additional modification to AAV vectors may be required for further study in order to elicit a similar cellular immune response.

  1. Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 (AAV2) Capsid-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Eliminate Only Vector-Transduced Cells Coexpressing the AAV2 Capsid In Vivo▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengwen; Hirsch, Matthew; Asokan, Aravind; Zeithaml, Brian; Ma, Hong; Kafri, Tal; Samulski, R. Jude

    2007-01-01

    A recent clinical trial has suggested that recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector transduction in humans induces a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response against the AAV2 capsid. To directly address the ability of AAV capsid-specific CTLs to eliminate rAAV-transduced cells in vitro and in vivo in mice, we first demonstrated that AAV2 capsid-specific CTLs could be induced by dendritic cells with endogenous AAV2 capsid expression or pulsed with AAV2 vectors. These CTLs were able to kill a cell line stable for capsid expression in vitro and also in a mouse tumor xenograft model in vivo. Parent colon carcinoma (CT26) cells transduced with a large amount of AAV2 vectors in vitro were also destroyed by these CTLs. To determine the effect of CTLs on the elimination of target cells transduced by AAV2 vectors in vivo, we carried out adoptive transfer experiments. CTLs eliminated liver cells with endogenous AAV2 capsid expression but not liver cells transduced by AAV2 vectors, regardless of the reporter genes. Similar results were obtained for rAAV2 transduction in muscle. Our data strongly suggest that AAV vector-transduced cells are rarely eliminated by AAV2 capsid-specific CTLs in vivo, even though the AAV capsid can induce a CTL response. In conclusion, AAV capsid-specific CTLs do not appear to play a role in elimination of rAAV-transduced cells in a mouse model. In addition, our data suggest that the mouse model may not mimic the immune response noted in humans and additional modification to AAV vectors may be required for further study in order to elicit a similar cellular immune response. PMID:17475652

  2. A Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Physical-Chemical Properties of Calicivirus Capsid Protein Adsorption to Fomites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, David; Matysiak, Silvina

    2013-03-01

    Any inanimate object with an exposed surface bears the possibility of hosting a virus and may therefore be labeled a fomite. This research hopes to distinguish which chemical-physical differences in fomite surface and virus capsid protein characteristics cause variations in virus adsorption through an alignment of in silico molecular dynamics simulations with in vitro measurements. The impact of surface chemistry on the adsorption of the human norovirus (HNV)-surrogate calicivirus capsid protein 2MS2 has been simulated for monomer and trimer structures and is reported in terms of protein-self assembled monolayer (SAM) binding free energy. The coarse-grained MARTINI forcefield was used to maximize spatial and temporal resolution while minimizing computational load. Future work will investigate the FCVF5 and SMSVS4 calicivirus trimers and will extend beyond hydrophobic and hydrophilic SAM surface chemistry to charged SAM surfaces in varying ionic concentrations. These results will be confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance experiments conducted by Dr. Wigginton at the University of Michigan. This should provide a novel method for predicting the transferability of viruses that cannot be studied in vitro such as dangerous foodborne and nosocomially-acquired viruses like HNV.

  3. Antiviral activity of α-helical stapled peptides designed from the HIV-1 capsid dimerization domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowburn David

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C-terminal domain (CTD of HIV-1 capsid (CA, like full-length CA, forms dimers in solution and CTD dimerization is a major driving force in Gag assembly and maturation. Mutations of the residues at the CTD dimer interface impair virus assembly and render the virus non-infectious. Therefore, the CTD represents a potential target for designing anti-HIV-1 drugs. Results Due to the pivotal role of the dimer interface, we reasoned that peptides from the α-helical region of the dimer interface might be effective as decoys to prevent CTD dimer formation. However, these small peptides do not have any structure in solution and they do not penetrate cells. Therefore, we used the hydrocarbon stapling technique to stabilize the α-helical structure and confirmed by confocal microscopy that this modification also made these peptides cell-penetrating. We also confirmed by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, sedimentation equilibrium and NMR that these peptides indeed disrupt dimer formation. In in vitro assembly assays, the peptides inhibited mature-like virus particle formation and specifically inhibited HIV-1 production in cell-based assays. These peptides also showed potent antiviral activity against a large panel of laboratory-adapted and primary isolates, including viral strains resistant to inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and protease. Conclusions These preliminary data serve as the foundation for designing small, stable, α-helical peptides and small-molecule inhibitors targeted against the CTD dimer interface. The observation that relatively weak CA binders, such as NYAD-201 and NYAD-202, showed specificity and are able to disrupt the CTD dimer is encouraging for further exploration of a much broader class of antiviral compounds targeting CA. We cannot exclude the possibility that the CA-based peptides described here could elicit additional effects on virus replication not directly linked to their ability to bind

  4. Structure of the HIV-1 Full-Length Capsid Protein in a Conformationally Trapped Unassembled State Induced by Small-Molecule Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Shoucheng; Betts, Laurie; Yang, Ruifeng; Shi, Haibin; Concel, Jason; Ahn, Jinwoo; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Yeh, Joanne I. (Pitt); (Vanderbilt); (UNC)

    2012-11-26

    The capsid (CA) protein plays crucial roles in HIV infection and replication, essential to viral maturation. The absence of high-resolution structural data on unassembled CA hinders the development of antivirals effective in inhibiting assembly. Unlike enzymes that have targetable, functional substrate-binding sites, the CA does not have a known site that affects catalytic or other innate activity, which can be more readily targeted in drug development efforts. We report the crystal structure of the HIV-1 CA, revealing the domain organization in the context of the wild-type full-length (FL) unassembled CA. The FL CA adopts an antiparallel dimer configuration, exhibiting a domain organization sterically incompatible with capsid assembly. A small compound, generated in situ during crystallization, is bound tightly at a hinge site ('H site'), indicating that binding at this interdomain region stabilizes the ADP conformation. Electron microscopy studies on nascent crystals reveal both dimeric and hexameric lattices coexisting within a single condition, in agreement with the interconvertibility of oligomeric forms and supporting the feasibility of promoting assembly-incompetent dimeric states. Solution characterization in the presence of the H-site ligand shows predominantly unassembled dimeric CA, even under conditions that promote assembly. Our structure elucidation of the HIV-1 FL CA and characterization of a potential allosteric binding site provides three-dimensional views of an assembly-defective conformation, a state targeted in, and thus directly relevant to, inhibitor development. Based on our findings, we propose an unprecedented means of preventing CA assembly, by 'conformationally trapping' CA in assembly-incompetent conformational states induced by H-site binding.

  5. Fully Awake Breast Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filson, Simon A; Yarhi, Danielle; Ramon, Yitzhak

    2016-11-01

    The authors present 25 cases and an in-depth 4-minute video of fully awake aesthetic breast reduction, which was made possible by thoracic epidural anesthesia. There are obvious and important advantages to this technique. Not only does this allow for intraoperative patient cooperation (i.e., patient self-positioning and opinion for comparison of breasts), meaning a shorter and more efficient intraoperative time, there also is a reduction in postoperative pain, complications, recovery, and discharge times. The authors have also enjoyed great success and no complications with this technique in over 150 awake abdominoplasty/total body lift patients. The authors feel that the elimination of the need for general anesthesia by thoracic epidural sensorial-only anesthesia is a highly effective and efficient technique, with very few disadvantages/complications, providing advantages to both patients and surgeons. Therapeutic, IV.

  6. Production, purification, and capsid stability of rhinovirus C types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Theodor F; Bochkov, Yury A; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Palmenberg, Ann C; Gern, James E

    2015-06-01

    The rhinovirus C (RV-C) were discovered in 2006 and these agents are an important cause of respiratory morbidity. Little is known about their biology. RV-C15 (C15) can be produced by transfection of recombinant viral RNA into cells and subsequent purification over a 30% sucrose cushion, even though yields and infectivity of other RV-C genotypes with this protocol are low. The goal of this study was to determine whether poor RV-C yields were due to capsid instability, and moreover, to develop a robust protocol suitable for the purification of many RV-C types. Capsid stability assays indicated that virions of RV-C41 (refractory to purification) have similar tolerance for osmotic and temperature stress as RV-A16 (purified readily), although C41 is more sensitive to low pH. Modification to the purification protocol by removing detergent increased the yield of RV-C. Addition of nonfat dry milk to the sucrose cushion increased the virus yield but sacrificed purity of the viral suspension. Analysis of virus distribution following centrifugation indicated that the majority of detectable viral RNA (vRNA) was found in pellets refractory to resuspension. Reduction of the centrifugal force with commiserate increase in spin-time improved the recovery of RV-C for both C41 and C2. Transfection of primary lung fibroblasts (WisL cells) followed by the modified purification protocol further improved yields of infectious C41 and C2. Described herein is a higher yield purification protocol suitable for RV-C types refractory to the standard purification procedure. The findings suggest that aggregation-adhesion problems rather than capsid instability influence RV-C yield during purification.

  7. A Non-Symmetric Reconstruction Technique for Transcriptionally-Active Viral Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Amina; Varano, A Cameron; Demmert, Andrew C; Melanson, Linda A; McDonald, Sarah M; Kelly, Deborah F

    2015-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which RNA viruses coordinate their transcriptional activities are not fully understood. For rotavirus, an important pediatric gastroenteric pathogen, transcription occurs within a double-layered particle that encloses the viral genome. To date, there remains very little structural information available for actively-transcribing rotavirus double-layered particles, which could provide new insights for antiviral development. To improve our vision of these viral assemblies, we developed a new combinatorial strategy that utilizes currently available high-resolution image processing tools. First, we employed a 3D classification routine that allowed us to sort transcriptionally-active rotavirus assemblies on the basis of their internal density. Next, we implemented an additional 3D refinement procedure using the most active class of DLPs. For comparison, the refined structures were computed in parallel by (1) enforcing icosahedral symmetry, and by (2) using no symmetry operators. Comparing the resulting structures, we were able to visualize the continuum that exists between viral capsid proteins and the viral RNA for the first time.

  8. Human sapovirus classification based on complete capsid nucleotide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tomoichiro; Mori, Kohji; Iritani, Nobuhiro; Harada, Seiya; Ueki, You; Iizuka, Setsuko; Mise, Keiji; Murakami, Kosuke; Wakita, Takaji; Katayama, Kazuhiko

    2012-02-01

    The genetically diverse sapoviruses (SaVs) are a significant cause of acute human gastroenteritis. Human SaV surveillance is becoming more critical, and a better understanding of the diversity and distribution of the viral genotypes is needed. In this study, we analyzed 106 complete human SaV capsid nucleotide sequences to provide a better understanding of their diversity. Based on those results, we propose a novel standardized classification scheme that meets the requirements of the International Calicivirus Scientific Committee. We believe the classification scheme and strains described here will be of value for the molecular characterization and classification of newly detected SaV genotypes and for comparing data worldwide.

  9. Structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black Lindsay W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The bacteriophage T4 capsid is an elongated icosahedron, 120 nm long and 86 nm wide, and is built with three essential proteins; gp23*, which forms the hexagonal capsid lattice, gp24*, which forms pentamers at eleven of the twelve vertices, and gp20, which forms the unique dodecameric portal vertex through which DNA enters during packaging and exits during infection. The past twenty years of research has greatly elevated the understanding of phage T4 head assembly and DNA packaging. The atomic structure of gp24 has been determined. A structural model built for gp23 using its similarity to gp24 showed that the phage T4 major capsid protein has the same fold as that found in phage HK97 and several other icosahedral bacteriophages. Folding of gp23 requires the assistance of two chaperones, the E. coli chaperone GroEL and the phage coded gp23-specific chaperone, gp31. The capsid also contains two non-essential outer capsid proteins, Hoc and Soc, which decorate the capsid surface. The structure of Soc shows two capsid binding sites which, through binding to adjacent gp23 subunits, reinforce the capsid structure. Hoc and Soc have been extensively used in bipartite peptide display libraries and to display pathogen antigens including those from HIV, Neisseria meningitides, Bacillus anthracis, and FMDV. The structure of Ip1*, one of the components of the core, has been determined, which provided insights on how IPs protect T4 genome against the E. coli nucleases that degrade hydroxymethylated and glycosylated T4 DNA. Extensive mutagenesis combined with the atomic structures of the DNA packaging/terminase proteins gp16 and gp17 elucidated the ATPase and nuclease functional motifs involved in DNA translocation and headful DNA cutting. Cryo-EM structure of the T4 packaging machine showed a pentameric motor assembled with gp17 subunits on the portal vertex. Single molecule optical tweezers and fluorescence studies showed that the T4 motor packages

  10. Functional and Structural Characterization of Novel Type of Linker Connecting Capsid and Nucleocapsid Protein Domains in Murine Leukemia Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doležal, Michal; Hadravová, Romana; Kožíšek, Milan; Bednárová, Lucie; Langerová, Hana; Ruml, Tomáš; Rumlová, Michaela

    2016-09-23

    The assembly of immature retroviral particles is initiated in the cytoplasm by the binding of the structural polyprotein precursor Gag with viral genomic RNA. The protein interactions necessary for assembly are mediated predominantly by the capsid (CA) and nucleocapsid (NC) domains, which have conserved structures. In contrast, the structural arrangement of the CA-NC connecting region differs between retroviral species. In HIV-1 and Rous sarcoma virus, this region forms a rod-like structure that separates the CA and NC domains, whereas in Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, this region is densely packed, thus holding the CA and NC domains in close proximity. Interestingly, the sequence connecting the CA and NC domains in gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), is unique. The sequence is called a charged assembly helix (CAH) due to a high number of positively and negatively charged residues. Although both computational and deletion analyses suggested that the MLV CAH forms a helical conformation, no structural or biochemical data supporting this hypothesis have been published. Using an in vitro assembly assay, alanine scanning mutagenesis, and biophysical techniques (circular dichroism, NMR, microcalorimetry, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay), we have characterized the structure and function of the MLV CAH. We provide experimental evidence that the MLV CAH belongs to a group of charged, E(R/K)-rich, single α-helices. This is the first single α-helix motif identified in viral proteins.

  11. Exploiting Fluorescent Polymers To Probe the Self-Assembly of Virus-like Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caden-Nava, Ruben D.; Hu, Yufang; Garmann, Rees F.

    2011-01-01

    The inside surfaces of the protein shells of many viruses are positively charged, thereby enhancing the self-assembly of capsid proteins around their (oppositely charged) RNA genome. These proteins have been shown to organize similarly around a variety of nonbiological, negatively charged, polymers......), and that the total charge on the PSS exceeds that of the capsid protein by as much as a factor of 9. Here, we extend studies of this kind to PSS molecules that are sufficiently small that two or more can be packaged into VLPs. The use of 38 kDa PSS polymers that have been fluorescently labeled with Rhodamine B...... than that of the capsid protein by as much as a factor of 2. VLPs of this kind provide a versatile model system for determining the principles underlying self-assembly of controlled numbers of cargo molecules in nanocontainers of increasing size....

  12. Antigenic structure of the capsid protein of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Cortes, Elena; Vela, Carmen;

    1998-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) causes an important disease in rabbits. The virus capsid is composed of a single 60 kDa protein. The capsid protein gene was cloned in Escherichia coli using the pET3 system, and the antigenic structure of RHDV VP60 was dissected using 11 monoclonal...

  13. Evaluation of engineered AAV capsids for hepatic factor IX gene transfer in murine and canine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markusic, David M; Nichols, Timothy C; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Palaschak, Brett; Zolotukhin, Irene; Marsic, Damien; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Srivastava, Arun; Herzog, Roland W

    2017-05-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy vectors have shown the best outcomes in human clinical studies for the treatment of genetic diseases such as hemophilia. However, these pivotal investigations have also identified several challenges. For example, high vector doses are often used for hepatic gene transfer, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses against viral capsid may occur. Therefore, achieving therapy at reduced vector doses and other strategies to reduce capsid antigen presentation are desirable. We tested several engineered AAV capsids for factor IX (FIX) expression for the treatment of hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer. These capsids lack potential phosphorylation or ubiquitination sites, or had been generated through molecular evolution. AAV2 capsids lacking either a single lysine residue or 3 tyrosine residues directed substantially higher coagulation FIX expression in mice compared to wild-type sequence or other mutations. In hemophilia B dogs, however, expression from the tyrosine-mutant vector was merely comparable to historical data on AAV2. Evolved AAV2-LiC capsid was highly efficient in hemophilia B mice but lacked efficacy in a hemophilia B dog. Several alternative strategies for capsid modification improve the in vivo performance of AAV vectors in hepatic gene transfer for correction of hemophilia. However, capsid optimization solely in mouse liver may not predict efficacy in other species and thus is of limited translational utility.

  14. Epitope-distal effects accompany the binding of two distinct antibodies to hepatitis B virus capsids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bereszczak, J.Z.; Rose, R.J.; Duijn, E. van; Watts, N.R.; Wingfield, P.T.; Steven, A.C.; Heck, A.J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of humans by hepatitis B virus (HBV) induces the copious production of antibodies directed against the capsid protein (Cp). A large variety of anticapsid antibodies have been identified that differ in their epitopes. These data, and the status of the capsid as a major clinical antigen, mot

  15. A mutation deleting sequences encoding the amino terminus of human cytomegalovirus UL84 impairs interaction with UL44 and capsid localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Blair L; Bender, Brian J; Sharma, Mayuri; Pesola, Jean M; Sanders, Rebecca L; Spector, Deborah H; Coen, Donald M

    2012-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions are required for many biological functions. Previous work has demonstrated an interaction between the human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase subunit UL44 and the viral replication factor UL84. In this study, glutathione S-transferase pulldown assays indicated that residues 1 to 68 of UL84 are both necessary and sufficient for efficient interaction of UL84 with UL44 in vitro. We created a mutant virus in which sequences encoding these residues were deleted. This mutant displayed decreased virus replication compared to wild-type virus. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that the mutation decreased but did not abrogate association of UL84 with UL44 in infected cell lysate, suggesting that the association in the infected cell can involve other protein-protein interactions. Further immunoprecipitation assays indicated that IRS1, TRS1, and nucleolin are candidates for such interactions in infected cells. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of viral DNA indicated that the absence of the UL84 amino terminus does not notably affect viral DNA synthesis. Western blotting experiments and pulse labeling of infected cells with [(35)S]methionine demonstrated a rather modest downregulation of levels of multiple proteins and particularly decreased levels of the minor capsid protein UL85. Electron microscopy demonstrated that viral capsids assemble but are mislocalized in nuclei of cells infected with the mutant virus, with fewer cytoplasmic capsids detected. In sum, deletion of the sequences encoding the amino terminus of UL84 affects interaction with UL44 and virus replication unexpectedly, not viral DNA synthesis. Mislocalization of viral capsids in infected cell nuclei likely contributes to the observed decrease in virus replication.

  16. A triclinic crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal domain of HIV-1 capsid protein with four molecules in the asymmetric unit reveals a novel packing interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampel, Ayala; Yaniv, Oren; Berger, Or; Bacharach, Eran; Gazit, Ehud; Frolow, Felix

    2013-01-01

    The Gag precursor is the major structural protein of the virion of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Capsid protein (CA), a cleavage product of Gag, plays an essential role in virus assembly both in Gag-precursor multimerization and in capsid core formation. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of CA contains 20 residues that are highly conserved across retroviruses and constitute the major homology region (MHR). Genetic evidence implies a role for the MHR in interactions between Gag precursors during the assembly of the virus, but the structural basis for this role remains elusive. This paper describes a novel triclinic structure of the HIV-1 CA CTD at 1.6 Å resolution with two canonical dimers of CA CTD in the asymmetric unit. The canonical dimers form a newly identified packing interface where interactions of four conserved MHR residues take place. This is the first structural indication that these MHR residues participate in the putative CTD–CTD interactions. These findings suggest that the molecules forming this novel interface resemble an intermediate structure that participates in the early steps of HIV-1 assembly. This interface may therefore provide a novel target for antiviral drugs. PMID:23722834

  17. Single hepatitis-B virus core capsid binding to individual nuclear pore complexes in Hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, Yoriko; Lill, Markus A; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Schwarz-Herion, Kyrill; Paulillo, Sara; Aebi, Ueli; Hecht, Bert

    2006-10-15

    We investigate the interaction of hepatitis B virus capsids lacking a nuclear localization signal with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in permeabilized HeLa cells. Confocal and wide-field optical images of the nuclear envelope show well-spaced individual NPCs. Specific interactions of capsids with single NPCs are characterized by extended residence times of capsids in the focal volume which are characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. In addition, single-capsid-tracking experiments using fast wide-field fluorescence microscopy at 50 frames/s allow us to directly observe specific binding via a dual-color colocalization of capsids and NPCs. We find that binding occurs with high probability on the nuclear-pore ring moiety, at 44 +/- 9 nm radial distance from the central axis.

  18. Capsid modification of adeno-associated virus and tumor targeting gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU ZengHu; ZHOU XiuMei; SHI WenFang; QIAN QiJun

    2008-01-01

    Targeting is critical for successful tumor gene therapy. The adeno-associated virus (AAV) has aroused wide concern due to its excellent advantages over other viral vectors in gene therapy. AAV has a broad infection spectrum, which also results in poor specificity towards tissues or cells and low transduction efficiency. Therefore, it is imperative to improve target and transduction efficiency in AAV-mediated gene therapy. Up to now, researchers have developed many strategies to modify AAV capsids for improving targeting or retargeting only desired cells. These strategies include not only traditional chemical modification, phage display technology, modification of AAV capsid genome, chimeric vectors and so on, but also many novel strategies involved in marker rescue strategy, direct evolution of capsid proteins, direct display random peptides on AAV capsid, AAVP (AAV-Phage), and etc. This review will summarize the advances of researches on the capsid modification of AAV to target malignant cells.

  19. Modeling of the rotavirus group C capsid predicts a surface topology distinct from other rotavirus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Elif; Zamuda, Kimberly; Patton, John T

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus C (RVC) causes sporadic gastroenteritis in adults and is an established enteric pathogen of swine. Because RVC strains grow poorly in cell culture, which hinders generation of virion-derived RVC triple-layered-particle (TLP) structures, we used the known Rotavirus A (RVA) capsid structure to model the human RVC (Bristol) capsid. Comparative analysis of RVA and RVC capsid proteins showed major differences at the VP7 layer, an important target region for vaccine development due to its antigenic properties. Our model predicted the presence of a surface extended loop in RVC, which could form a major antigenic site on the capsid. We analyzed variations in the glycosylation patterns among RV capsids and identified group specific conserved sites. In addition, our results showed a smaller RVC VP4 foot, which protrudes toward the intermediate VP6 layer, in comparison to that of RVA. Finally, our results showed major structural differences at the VP8* glycan recognition sites.

  20. Fully electric waste collection

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    Since 15 June, Transvoirie, which provides waste collection services throughout French-speaking Switzerland, has been using a fully electric lorry for its collections on the CERN site – a first for the region!   Featuring a motor powered by electric batteries that charge up when the brakes are used, the new lorry that roams the CERN site is as green as can be. And it’s not only the motor that’s electric: its waste compactor and lifting mechanism are also electrically powered*, making it the first 100% electric waste collection vehicle in French-speaking Switzerland. Considering that a total of 15.5 tonnes of household waste and paper/cardboard are collected each week from the Meyrin and Prévessin sites, the benefits for the environment are clear. This improvement comes as part of CERN’s contract with Transvoirie, which stipulates that the firm must propose ways of becoming more environmentally friendly (at no extra cost to CERN). *The was...

  1. Revised Mimivirus major capsid protein sequence reveals intron-containing gene structure and extra domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan-Monti Marie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus (APM is the largest known dsDNA virus. The viral particle has a nearly icosahedral structure with an internal capsid shell surrounded with a dense layer of fibrils. A Capsid protein sequence, D13L, was deduced from the APM L425 coding gene and was shown to be the most abundant protein found within the viral particle. However this protein remained poorly characterised until now. A revised protein sequence deposited in a database suggested an additional N-terminal stretch of 142 amino acids missing from the original deduced sequence. This result led us to investigate the L425 gene structure and the biochemical properties of the complete APM major Capsid protein. Results This study describes the full length 3430 bp Capsid coding gene and characterises the 593 amino acids long corresponding Capsid protein 1. The recombinant full length protein allowed the production of a specific monoclonal antibody able to detect the Capsid protein 1 within the viral particle. This protein appeared to be post-translationnally modified by glycosylation and phosphorylation. We proposed a secondary structure prediction of APM Capsid protein 1 compared to the Capsid protein structure of Paramecium Bursaria Chlorella Virus 1, another member of the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA virus family. Conclusion The characterisation of the full length L425 Capsid coding gene of Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus provides new insights into the structure of the main Capsid protein. The production of a full length recombinant protein will be useful for further structural studies.

  2. Development of chitosan nanoparticles as drug delivery system for a prototype capsid inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Meiyan; Hu, Steven; Lu, Yifei; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Xutao; An, Sai; Guo, Yubo; Zhou, Xue; Hou, Huimin; Jiang, Chen

    2015-11-30

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceutics drug disposition classification system (BDDCS) Class II or IV drugs with poor aqueous solubility and poor enzymatic and/or metabolic stability is very challenging. Bay41-4109, a member of the heteroaryldihydropyrimidine (HAP) family, inhibits HBV replication by destabilizing capsid assembly. It pertains to class II of the BDDCS which has a practically insoluble solubility which is 38 μg/mL (LYSA) and the oral delivery resulted in low bioavailability. The purpose of the current research work was to develop and evaluate Bay41-4109 loaded chitosan nanoparticles to increase the solubility and bioavailability for treatment of HBV. The Bay41-4109 nanoparticles were prepared by gelation of chitosan with tripolyphosphate (TPP) through ionic cross-linking. A three-factor three-level central composite design (CCD) was introduced to perform the experiments. A quadratic polynomial model was generated to predict and evaluate the independent variables with respect to the dependent variables. Bay41-4109 was encapsulated in the chitosan nanoparticles were demonstrated by PLM, FTIR, DSC, XRD and TEM etc. The in vivo results suggest that Bay41-4109 nanoparticles have better bioavailability and would be a promising approach for oral delivery of Bay41-4109 for the treatment of HBV.

  3. Subcellular localization and rearrangement of endoplasmic reticulum by Brome mosaic virus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamunusinghe, Devinka; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Rao, A L N

    2011-03-01

    Genome packaging in the plant-infecting Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a member of the alphavirus-like superfamily, as well as in other positive-strand RNA viruses pathogenic to humans (e.g., poliovirus) and animals (e.g., Flock House virus), is functionally coupled to replication. Although the subcellular localization site of BMV replication has been identified, that of the capsid protein (CP) has remained elusive. In this study, the application of immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to Nicotiana benthamiana leaves expressing replication-derived BMV CP as a green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion, in conjunction with antibodies to the CP and double-stranded RNA, a presumed marker of RNA replication, revealed that the subcellular localization sites of replication and CP overlap. Our temporal analysis by transmission electron microscopy of ultrastructural modifications induced in BMV-infected N. benthamiana leaves revealed a reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) incorporating large assemblies of vesicles derived from ER accumulated in the cytoplasm during BMV infection. Additionally, for the first time, we have found by ectopic expression experiments that BMV CP itself has the intrinsic property of modifying ER to induce vesicles similar to those present in BMV infections. The significance of CP-induced vesicles in relation to CP-organized viral functions that are linked to replication-coupled packaging is discussed.

  4. HIV capsid is a tractable target for small molecule therapeutic intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade S Blair

    Full Text Available Despite a high current standard of care in antiretroviral therapy for HIV, multidrug-resistant strains continue to emerge, underscoring the need for additional novel mechanism inhibitors that will offer expanded therapeutic options in the clinic. We report a new class of small molecule antiretroviral compounds that directly target HIV-1 capsid (CA via a novel mechanism of action. The compounds exhibit potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 laboratory strains, clinical isolates, and HIV-2, and inhibit both early and late events in the viral replication cycle. We present mechanistic studies indicating that these early and late activities result from the compound affecting viral uncoating and assembly, respectively. We show that amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal domain of HIV-1 CA are sufficient to confer resistance to this class of compounds, identifying CA as the target in infected cells. A high-resolution co-crystal structure of the compound bound to HIV-1 CA reveals a novel binding pocket in the N-terminal domain of the protein. Our data demonstrate that broad-spectrum antiviral activity can be achieved by targeting this new binding site and reveal HIV CA as a tractable drug target for HIV therapy.

  5. Structure of the pseudorabies virus capsid: comparison with herpes simplex virus type 1 and differential binding of essential minor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, F L; Huffman, J B; Toropova, K; Lopez, H R; Makhov, A M; Conway, J F

    2013-09-23

    The structure of pseudorabies virus (PRV) capsids isolated from the nucleus of infected cells and from PRV virions was determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and compared to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsids. PRV capsid structures closely resemble those of HSV-1, including distribution of the capsid vertex specific component (CVSC) of HSV-1, which is a heterodimer of the pUL17 and pUL25 proteins. Occupancy of CVSC on all PRV capsids is near 100%, compared to ~50% reported for HSV-1 C-capsids and 25% or less that we measure for HSV-1 A- and B-capsids. A PRV mutant lacking pUL25 does not produce C-capsids and lacks visible CVSC density in the cryo-EM-based reconstruction. A reconstruction of PRV capsids in which green fluorescent protein was fused within the N-terminus of pUL25 confirmed previous studies with a similar HSV-1 capsid mutant localizing pUL25 to the CVSC density region that is distal to the penton. However, comparison of the CVSC density in a 9-Å-resolution PRV C-capsid map with the available crystal structure of HSV-1 pUL25 failed to find a satisfactory fit, suggesting either a different fold for PRV pUL25 or a capsid-bound conformation for pUL25 that does not match the X-ray model determined from protein crystallized in solution. The PRV capsid imaged within virions closely resembles C-capsids with the addition of weak but significant density shrouding the pentons that we attribute to tegument proteins. Our results demonstrate significant structure conservation between the PRV and HSV capsids. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA-templated assembly of viral protein hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Tao, Ailin; Xu, Yun

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogels are a promising class of biomaterials that can be easily tailored to produce a native extracellular matrix that exhibits desirable mechanical and chemical properties. Here we report the construction of a hydrogel via the assembly of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) capsid protein and Y-shaped and cross-shaped DNAs.Hydrogels are a promising class of biomaterials that can be easily tailored to produce a native extracellular matrix that exhibits desirable mechanical and chemical properties. Here we report the construction of a hydrogel via the assembly of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) capsid protein and Y-shaped and cross-shaped DNAs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02414a

  7. Self-assembly of virus particles: The role of genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Wagner, Jef; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2013-03-01

    A virus is an infectious agent that inserts its genetic material into the cell and hijacks the cell's machinery to reproduce. The simplest viruses are made of a protein shell (capsid) that protects its genome (DNA or RNA). Many plant and animal viruses can be assembled spontaneously from a solution of proteins and genetic material in different capsid shapes and sizes. This work focuses on the role of genome in the assembly of spherical RNA viruses. The RNA, a highly flexible polymer, is modeled by mean field approximations. Two RNA models are discussed: (i) A linear polymer model including a pairing affinity between RNA base pairs, and (ii) a branched polymer model. Polymer density and electrostatic potential profiles are obtained, and the relevant free energies are calculated from these profiles. The optimal length of the encapsidated chain is examined as a function of the model parameters. The osmotic pressure of the system is also discussed.

  8. Residues of the UL25 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus That Are Required for Its Stable Interaction with Capsids

    OpenAIRE

    Cockrell, Shelley K.; Huffman, Jamie B.; Toropova, Katerina; James F Conway; Homa, Fred L.

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated reco...

  9. Structure of the capsid of Kilham rat virus from small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wobbe, C.R.; Mitra, S.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    1984-12-18

    The structure of empty capsids of Kilham rat virus, an autonomous parvovirus with icosahedral symmetry, was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. From the forward scatter, the molecular weight was determined to be 4.0 x 10(6), and from the Guinier region, the radius of gyration was found to be 105 A in D2O and 104 A in H/sub 2/O. On the basis of the capsid molecular weight and the molecular weights and relative abundances of the capsid proteins, the authors propose that the capsid has a triangulation number of 1. Extended scattering curves and mathematical modeling revealed that the capsid consists of two shells of protein, the inner shell extending from 58 to 91 A in D2O and from 50 to 91 A in H/sub 2/O and containing 11% of the capsid scattering mass, and the outer shell extending to 121 A in H/sub 2/O and D2O. The inner shell appears to have a higher content of basic amino acids than the outer shell, based on its lower scattering density in D2O than in H/sub 2/O. The authors propose that all three capsid proteins contribute to the inner shell and that this basic region serves DNA binding and partial charge neutralization functions.

  10. Controlling AAV Tropism in the Nervous System with Natural and Engineered Capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Michael J.; Turunen, Heikki T.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Wolfe, John H.

    2016-01-01

    More than one hundred naturally occurring variants of adeno-associated virus (AAV) have been identified, and this library has been further expanded by an array of techniques for modification of the viral capsid. AAV capsid variants possess unique antigenic profiles and demonstrate distinct cellular tropisms driven by differences in receptor binding. AAV capsids can be chemically modified to alter tropism, can be produced as hybrid vectors that combine the properties of multiple serotypes, and can carry peptide insertions that introduce novel receptor-binding activity. Furthermore, directed evolution of shuffled genome libraries can identify engineered variants with unique properties, and rational modification of the viral capsid can alter tropism, reduce blockage by neutralizing antibodies, or enhance transduction efficiency. This large number of AAV variants and engineered capsids provides a varied toolkit for gene delivery to the CNS and retina, with specialized vectors available for many applications, but selecting a capsid variant from the array of available vectors can be difficult. This chapter describes the unique properties of a range of AAV variants and engineered capsids, and provides a guide for selecting the appropriate vector for specific applications in the CNS and retina. PMID:26611584

  11. On the geometry of regular icosahedral capsids containing disymmetrons

    CERN Document Server

    Ang, Kai-Siang

    2016-01-01

    Icosahedral virus capsids are composed of symmetrons, organized arrangements of capsomers. There are three types of symmetrons: disymmetrons, trisymmetrons, and pentasymmetrons, which have different shapes and are centered on the icosahedral 2-fold, 3-fold and 5-fold axes of symmetry, respectively. In 2010 [Sinkovits & Baker] gave a classification of all possible ways of building an icosahedral structure solely from trisymmetrons and pentasymmetrons, which requires the triangulation number T to be odd. In the present paper we incorporate disymmetrons to obtain a geometric classification of icosahedral viruses formed by regular penta-, tri-, and disymmetrons. For every class of solutions, we further provide formulas for symmetron sizes and parity restrictions on h, k, and T numbers. We also present several methods in which invariants may be used to classify a given configuration.

  12. AAV8 capsid variable regions at the two-fold symmetry axis contribute to high liver transduction by mediating nuclear entry and capsid uncoating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenney, Rebeca M.; Bell, Christie L.; Wilson, James M., E-mail: wilsonjm@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2014-04-15

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) is a promising vector for liver-directed gene therapy. Although efficient uncoating of viral capsids has been implicated in AAV8's robust liver transduction, much about the biology of AAV8 hepatotropism remains unclear. Our study investigated the structural basis of AAV8 liver transduction efficiency by constructing chimeric vector capsids containing sequences derived from AAV8 and AAV2 – a highly homologous yet poorly hepatotropic serotype. Engineered vectors containing capsid variable regions (VR) VII and IX from AAV8 in an AAV2 backbone mediated near AAV8-like transduction in mouse liver, with higher numbers of chimeric genomes detected in whole liver cells and isolated nuclei. Interestingly, chimeric capsids within liver nuclei also uncoated similarly to AAV8 by 6 weeks after administration, in contrast with AAV2, of which a significantly smaller proportion were uncoated. This study links specific AAV capsid regions to the transduction ability of a clinically relevant AAV serotype. - Highlights: • We construct chimeric vectors to identify determinants of AAV8 liver transduction. • An AAV2-based vector with 17 AAV8 residues exhibited high liver transduction in mice. • This vector also surpassed AAV2 in cell entry, nuclear entry and onset of expression. • Most chimeric vector particles were uncoated at 6 weeks, like AAV8 and unlike AAV2. • Chimera retained heparin binding and was antigenically distinct from AAV2 and AAV8.

  13. Membrane assembly during the infection cycle of the giant Mimivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutsafi, Yael; Shimoni, Eyal; Shimon, Amir; Minsky, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Although extensively studied, the structure, cellular origin and assembly mechanism of internal membranes during viral infection remain unclear. By combining diverse imaging techniques, including the novel Scanning-Transmission Electron Microscopy tomography, we elucidate the structural stages of membrane biogenesis during the assembly of the giant DNA virus Mimivirus. We show that this elaborate multistage process occurs at a well-defined zone localized at the periphery of large viral factories that are generated in the host cytoplasm. Membrane biogenesis is initiated by fusion of multiple vesicles, ~70 nm in diameter, that apparently derive from the host ER network and enable continuous supply of lipid components to the membrane-assembly zone. The resulting multivesicular bodies subsequently rupture to form large open single-layered membrane sheets from which viral membranes are generated. Membrane generation is accompanied by the assembly of icosahedral viral capsids in a process involving the hypothetical major capsid protein L425 that acts as a scaffolding protein. The assembly model proposed here reveals how multiple Mimivirus progeny can be continuously and efficiently generated and underscores the similarity between the infection cycles of Mimivirus and Vaccinia virus. Moreover, the membrane biogenesis process indicated by our findings provides new insights into the pathways that might mediate assembly of internal viral membranes in general.

  14. Membrane assembly during the infection cycle of the giant Mimivirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Mutsafi

    Full Text Available Although extensively studied, the structure, cellular origin and assembly mechanism of internal membranes during viral infection remain unclear. By combining diverse imaging techniques, including the novel Scanning-Transmission Electron Microscopy tomography, we elucidate the structural stages of membrane biogenesis during the assembly of the giant DNA virus Mimivirus. We show that this elaborate multistage process occurs at a well-defined zone localized at the periphery of large viral factories that are generated in the host cytoplasm. Membrane biogenesis is initiated by fusion of multiple vesicles, ~70 nm in diameter, that apparently derive from the host ER network and enable continuous supply of lipid components to the membrane-assembly zone. The resulting multivesicular bodies subsequently rupture to form large open single-layered membrane sheets from which viral membranes are generated. Membrane generation is accompanied by the assembly of icosahedral viral capsids in a process involving the hypothetical major capsid protein L425 that acts as a scaffolding protein. The assembly model proposed here reveals how multiple Mimivirus progeny can be continuously and efficiently generated and underscores the similarity between the infection cycles of Mimivirus and Vaccinia virus. Moreover, the membrane biogenesis process indicated by our findings provides new insights into the pathways that might mediate assembly of internal viral membranes in general.

  15. STRUCTURAL VIROLOGY. X-ray crystal structures of native HIV-1 capsid protein reveal conformational variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gres, Anna T; Kirby, Karen A; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Tanner, John J; Pornillos, Owen; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2015-07-03

    The detailed molecular interactions between native HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) hexamers that shield the viral genome and proteins have been elusive. We report crystal structures describing interactions between CA monomers related by sixfold symmetry within hexamers (intrahexamer) and threefold and twofold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (interhexamer). The structures describe how CA builds hexagonal lattices, the foundation of mature capsids. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer modulating interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer alters interhexamer interfaces, highlighting an inherent structural variability. A CA-targeting antiviral affects capsid stability by binding across CA molecules and subtly altering interhexamer interfaces remote to the ligand-binding site. Inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector binding affect capsid stability and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Residues of the UL25 protein of herpes simplex virus that are required for its stable interaction with capsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Shelley K; Huffman, Jamie B; Toropova, Katerina; Conway, James F; Homa, Fred L

    2011-05-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated recombinant viruses with either small truncations or amino acid substitutions in the UL25 N terminus. Studies of these mutants demonstrated that there are two important regions within the capsid binding domain. The first 27 amino acids are essential for capsid binding of UL25, while residues 26 to 39, which are highly conserved in the UL25 homologues of other alphaherpesviruses, were found to be critical for stable capsid binding. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of capsids containing either a small tag on the N terminus of UL25 or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused between amino acids 50 and 51 of UL25 demonstrate that residues 1 to 27 of UL25 contact the hexon adjacent to the penton. A second region, most likely centered on amino acids 26 to 39, contacts the triplex that is one removed from the penton. Importantly, both of these UL25 capsid binding regions are essential for the stable packaging of full-length viral genomes.

  17. Residues of the UL25 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus That Are Required for Its Stable Interaction with Capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Shelley K.; Huffman, Jamie B.; Toropova, Katerina; Conway, James F.; Homa, Fred L.

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated recombinant viruses with either small truncations or amino acid substitutions in the UL25 N terminus. Studies of these mutants demonstrated that there are two important regions within the capsid binding domain. The first 27 amino acids are essential for capsid binding of UL25, while residues 26 to 39, which are highly conserved in the UL25 homologues of other alphaherpesviruses, were found to be critical for stable capsid binding. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of capsids containing either a small tag on the N terminus of UL25 or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused between amino acids 50 and 51 of UL25 demonstrate that residues 1 to 27 of UL25 contact the hexon adjacent to the penton. A second region, most likely centered on amino acids 26 to 39, contacts the triplex that is one removed from the penton. Importantly, both of these UL25 capsid binding regions are essential for the stable packaging of full-length viral genomes. PMID:21411517

  18. Conformational Changes in the Capsid of a Calicivirus upon Interaction with Its Functional Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossiboff, Robert J.; Zhou, Yi; Lightfoot, Patrick J.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram; Parker, John S.L. (Baylor); (Cornell)

    2010-07-19

    Nonenveloped viral capsids are metastable structures that undergo conformational changes during virus entry that lead to interactions of the capsid or capsid fragments with the cell membrane. For members of the Caliciviridae, neither the nature of these structural changes in the capsid nor the factor(s) responsible for inducing these changes is known. Feline functional adhesion molecule A (fJAM-A) mediates the attachment and infectious viral entry of feline calicivirus (FCV). Here, we show that the infectivity of some FCV isolates is neutralized following incubation with the soluble receptor at 37 C. We used this property to select mutants resistant to preincubation with the soluble receptor. We isolated and sequenced 24 soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants and characterized the growth properties and receptor-binding activities of eight mutants. The location of the mutations within the capsid structure of FCV was mapped using a new 3.6-{angstrom} structure of native FCV. The srr mutations mapped to the surface of the P2 domain were buried at the protruding domain dimer interface or were present in inaccessible regions of the capsid protein. Coupled with data showing that both the parental FCV and the srr mutants underwent increases in hydrophobicity upon incubation with the soluble receptor at 37 C, these findings indicate that FCV likely undergoes conformational change upon interaction with its receptor. Changes in FCV capsid conformation following its interaction with fJAM-A may be important for subsequent interactions of the capsid with cellular membranes, membrane penetration, and genome delivery.

  19. Packaging Double-Helical DNA into Viral Capsids: Structures, Forces, and Energetics

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, Anton S.; Harvey, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Small, icosahedral double-stranded DNA bacteriophage pack their genomes tightly into preformed protein capsids using an ATP-driven motor. Coarse-grain molecular-mechanics models provide a detailed picture of DNA packaging in bacteriophage, revealing how conformation depends on capsid size and shape, and the presence or absence of a protein core. The forces that oppose packaging have large contributions from both electrostatic repulsions and the entropic penalty of confining the DNA into the c...

  20. Oral Administration of Astrovirus Capsid Protein Is Sufficient To Induce Acute Diarrhea In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria A. Meliopoulos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The disease mechanisms associated with the onset of astrovirus diarrhea are unknown. Unlike other enteric virus infections, astrovirus infection is not associated with an inflammatory response or cellular damage. In vitro studies in differentiated Caco-2 cells demonstrated that human astrovirus serotype 1 (HAstV-1 capsid protein alone disrupts the actin cytoskeleton and tight junction complex, leading to increased epithelial barrier permeability. In this study, we show that oral administration of purified recombinant turkey astrovirus 2 (TAstV-2 capsid protein results in acute diarrhea in a dose- and time-dependent manner in turkey poults. Similarly to that induced by infectious virus, TAstV-2 capsid-induced diarrhea was independent of inflammation or histological changes but was associated with increased intestinal barrier permeability, as well as redistribution of sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 (NHE3 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of the intestinal epithelium. Unlike other viral enterotoxins that have been identified, astrovirus capsid induces diarrhea after oral administration, reproducing the natural route of infection and demonstrating that ingestion of intact noninfectious capsid protein may be sufficient to provoke acute diarrhea. Based on these data, we hypothesize that the astrovirus capsid acts like an enterotoxin and induces intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction.

  1. High Relaxivity Gadolinium Hydroxypyridonate-Viral Capsid Conjugates: Nano-sized MRI Contrast Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meux, Susan C.; Datta, Ankona; Hooker, Jacob M.; Botta, Mauro; Francis, Matthew B.; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-08-29

    High relaxivity macromolecular contrast agents based on the conjugation of gadolinium chelates to the interior and exterior surfaces of MS2 viral capsids are assessed. The proton nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles of the conjugates show up to a five-fold increase in relaxivity, leading to a peak relaxivity (per Gd{sup 3+} ion) of 41.6 mM{sup -1}s{sup -1} at 30 MHz for the internally modified capsids. Modification of the exterior was achieved through conjugation to flexible lysines, while internal modification was accomplished by conjugation to relatively rigid tyrosines. Higher relaxivities were obtained for the internally modified capsids, showing that (1) there is facile diffusion of water to the interior of capsids and (2) the rigidity of the linker attaching the complex to the macromolecule is important for obtaining high relaxivity enhancements. The viral capsid conjugated gadolinium hydroxypyridonate complexes appear to possess two inner-sphere water molecules (q = 2) and the NMRD fittings highlight the differences in the local motion for the internal ({tau}{sub RI} = 440 ps) and external ({tau}{sub RI} = 310 ps) conjugates. These results indicate that there are significant advantages of using the internal surface of the capsids for contrast agent attachment, leaving the exterior surface available for the installation of tissue targeting groups.

  2. Assembly pathway of avian infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, P; Scholz, E; Turek, J; Nodgreen, R; Maloney, B

    1993-12-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) is the causative agent of a highly contagious upper respiratory tract infection in chickens. At present, ILTV vaccines are not satisfactory because of development of a latent carrier status in vaccinated birds. Development of recombinant virus vaccines has been hampered by the limited information available on the molecular level and organization of this virus. We isolated 3 assembly intermediates, designated A, B, and C from ILTV-infected cells. Analysis of [3H]thymidine-and [35S]methionine-labeled particles, and electron microscopic studies indicated that particle A was the empty capsid, particle B was the procapsid containing scaffolding protein, and particle C was the DNA-filled capsid. The ILTV procapsids could only be found in the nucleus, which indicated that procapsids could not translocate through the nuclear membrane until they packaged the DNA. The DNA-filled capsids migrated through the nuclear membrane and obtained an envelope from the inner membrane of the nucleus. The enveloped particles then migrated through the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum into vacuoles in the cytoplasm. Infective virions were isolated from within the infected cells, indicating that budding through the cytoplasmic membrane is not a necessary step in ILTV maturation. Abundant arrays composed of tubules about 45 to 50 nm wide were found in the cytoplasm of chicken embryonic liver cells about 30 to 38 hours after infection. Comparison of the assembly intermediates and the DNA packaging pathway of ILTV with that of bacteriophage pi 29 indicates that similarity exists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor; Afonine, Pavel V.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Parent, Kristin N.; Cingolani, Gino (Rutgers); (LBNL); (Connecticut); (TJU); (MSU)

    2017-01-30

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ‘procapsid’) built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: an asymmetric assembly in the procapsid (PC-portal) that is competent for high affinity binding to the large terminase packaging protein, and a symmetric ring in the mature virion (MV-portal) that has negligible affinity for the packaging motor. Modelling studies indicate the structure of PC-portal is incompatible with DNA coaxially spooled around the portal vertex, suggesting that newly packaged DNA triggers the switch from PC- to MV-conformation. Thus, we propose the signal for termination of ‘Headful Packaging’ is a DNA-dependent symmetrization of portal protein.

  4. Purification of recombinant virus-like particles of porcine circovirus type 2 capsid protein using ion-exchange monolith chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaveckas, Mindaugas; Snipaitis, Simas; Pesliakas, Henrikas; Nainys, Juozas; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2015-06-01

    Diseases associated with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection are having a severe economic impact on swine-producing countries. The PCV2 capsid (Cap) protein expressed in eukaryotic systems self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) which can serve as antigens for diagnostics or/and as vaccine candidates. In this work, conventional adsorbents as well as a monolithic support with large pore sizes were examined for the chromatographic purification of PCV2 Cap VLPs from clarified yeast lysate. Q Sepharose XL was used for the initial separation of VLPs from residual host nucleic acids and some host cell proteins. For the further purification of PCV2 Cap VLPs, SP Sepharose XL, Heparin Sepharose CL-6B and CIMmultus SO3 monolith were tested. VLPs were not retained on SP Sepharose XL. The purity of VLPs after chromatography on Heparin Sepharose CL-6B was only 4-7% and the recovery of VLPs was 5-7%. Using ion-exchange chromatography on the CIMmultus SO3 monolith, PCV2 Cap VLPs with the purity of about 40% were obtained. The recovery of VLPs after chromatography on the CIMmultus SO3 monolith was 15-18%. The self-assembly of purified PCV2 Cap protein into VLPs was confirmed by electron microscopy. Two-step chromatographic purification procedure of PCV2 Cap VLPs from yeast lysate was developed using Q Sepharose XL and cation-exchange CIMmultus SO3 monolith.

  5. Plate tectonics of virus shell assembly and reorganization in phage φ8, a distant relative of mammalian reoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Omari, Kamel; Sutton, Geoff; Ravantti, Janne J; Zhang, Hanwen; Walter, Thomas S; Grimes, Jonathan M; Bamford, Dennis H; Stuart, David I; Mancini, Erika J

    2013-08-06

    The hallmark of a virus is its capsid, which harbors the viral genome and is formed from protein subunits, which assemble following precise geometric rules. dsRNA viruses use an unusual protein multiplicity (120 copies) to form their closed capsids. We have determined the atomic structure of the capsid protein (P1) from the dsRNA cystovirus Φ8. In the crystal P1 forms pentamers, very similar in shape to facets of empty procapsids, suggesting an unexpected assembly pathway that proceeds via a pentameric intermediate. Unlike the elongated proteins used by dsRNA mammalian reoviruses, P1 has a compact trapezoid-like shape and a distinct arrangement in the shell, with two near-identical conformers in nonequivalent structural environments. Nevertheless, structural similarity with the analogous protein from the mammalian viruses suggests a common ancestor. The unusual shape of the molecule may facilitate dramatic capsid expansion during phage maturation, allowing P1 to switch interaction interfaces to provide capsid plasticity. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Limited cross-reactivity of mouse monoclonal antibodies against Dengue virus capsid protein among four serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noda M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Megumi Noda,1 Promsin Masrinoul,1 Chaweewan Punkum,1 Chonlatip Pipattanaboon,2,3 Pongrama Ramasoota,2,4 Chayanee Setthapramote,2,3 Tadahiro Sasaki,6 Mikiko Sasayama,1 Akifumi Yamashita,1,5 Takeshi Kurosu,6 Kazuyoshi Ikuta,6 Tamaki Okabayashi11Mahidol-Osaka Center for Infectious Diseases, 2Center of Excellence for Antibody Research, 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 4Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Ratchathewi, Bangkok, Thailand; 5Graduate School of Life Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi, 6Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, JapanBackground: Dengue illness is one of the important mosquito-borne viral diseases in tropical and subtropical regions. Four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4 are classified in the Flavivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae. We prepared monoclonal antibodies against DENV capsid protein from mice immunized with DENV-2 and determined the cross-reactivity with each serotype of DENV and Japanese encephalitis virus.Methods and results: To clarify the relationship between the cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies and the diversity of these viruses, we examined the situations of flaviviruses by analyses of phylogenetic trees. Among a total of 60 prepared monoclonal antibodies specific for DENV, five monoclonal antibodies stained the nuclei of infected cells and were found to be specific to the capsid protein. Three were specific to DENV-2, while the other two were cross-reactive with DENV-2 and DENV-4. No monoclonal antibodies were cross-reactive with all four serotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV amino acid sequences of the capsid protein revealed that DENV-2 and DENV-4 were clustered in the same branch, while DENV-1 and DENV-3 were clustered in the other branch. However, these classifications of the capsid protein were different from those of the

  7. Baculovirus capsid display potentiates OVA cytotoxic and innate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Molinari

    Full Text Available Baculoviruses (BV are DNA viruses that are pathogenic for insects. Although BV infect a range of mammalian cell types, they do not replicate in these cells. Indeed, the potential effects of these insect viruses on the immune responses of mammals are only just beginning to be studied. We show in this paper that a recombinant Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus carrying a fragment of ovalbumin (OVA on the VP39 capsid protein (BV-OVA has the capacity to act as an adjuvant and vector of antigens in mice, thereby promoting specific CD4 and cytotoxic T cell responses against OVA. BV also induced in vivo maturation of dendritic cells and the production of inflammatory cytokines, thus promoting innate and adaptive immune responses. The OVA-specific response induced by BV-OVA was strong enough to reject a challenge with OVA-expressing melanoma cells (MO5 cells and effectively prolonged survival of MO5 bearing mice. All these findings, together with the absence of pre-existing immunity to BV in humans and the lack of viral gene expression in mammalian cells, make BV a candidate for vaccination.

  8. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  9. Coat as a Dagger: The Use of Capsid Proteins to Perforate Membranes during Non-Enveloped DNA Viruses Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilkova, Eva; Forstova, Jitka; Abrahamyan, Levon

    2014-01-01

    To get access to the replication site, small non-enveloped DNA viruses have to cross the cell membrane using a limited number of capsid proteins, which also protect the viral genome in the extracellular environment. Most of DNA viruses have to reach the nucleus to replicate. The capsid proteins involved in transmembrane penetration are exposed or released during endosomal trafficking of the virus. Subsequently, the conserved domains of capsid proteins interact with cellular membranes and ensure their efficient permeabilization. This review summarizes our current knowledge concerning the role of capsid proteins of small non-enveloped DNA viruses in intracellular membrane perturbation in the early stages of infection. PMID:25055856

  10. Structural Characterization of H-1 Parvovirus: Comparison of Infectious Virions to Empty Capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Sujata; Nam, Hyun-Joo; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Vogel, Michèle; Dinsart, Christiane; Salomé, Nathalie; McKenna, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The structure of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) packaging H-1 parvovirus (H-1PV), which is being developed as an antitumor gene delivery vector, has been determined for wild-type (wt) virions and noninfectious (empty) capsids to 2.7- and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, using X-ray crystallography. The capsid viral protein (VP) structure consists of an α-helix and an eight-stranded anti-parallel β-barrel with large loop regions between the strands. The β-barrel and loops form the capsid core and surface, respectively. In the wt structure, 600 nucleotides are ordered in an interior DNA binding pocket of the capsid. This accounts for ∼12% of the H-1PV genome. The wt structure is identical to the empty capsid structure, except for side chain conformation variations at the nucleotide binding pocket. Comparison of the H-1PV nucleotides to those observed in canine parvovirus and minute virus of mice, two members of the genus Parvovirus, showed both similarity in structure and analogous interactions. This observation suggests a functional role, such as in capsid stability and/or ssDNA genome recognition for encapsulation. The VP structure differs from those of other parvoviruses in surface loop regions that control receptor binding, tissue tropism, pathogenicity, and antibody recognition, including VP sequences reported to determine tumor cell tropism for oncotropic rodent parvoviruses. These structures of H-1PV provide insight into structural features that dictate capsid stabilization following genome packaging and three-dimensional information applicable for rational design of tumor-targeted recombinant gene delivery vectors. PMID:23449783

  11. Structural Studies of Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 8 Capsid Transitions Associated with Endosomal Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Hyun-Joo; Gurda, Brittney L.; McKenna, Robert; Potter, Mark; Byrne, Barry; Salganik, Maxim; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis (Florida)

    2012-09-17

    The single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) parvoviruses enter host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis, and infection depends on processing in the early to late endosome as well as in the lysosome prior to nuclear entry for replication. However, the mechanisms of capsid endosomal processing, including the effects of low pH, are poorly understood. To gain insight into the structural transitions required for this essential step in infection, the crystal structures of empty and green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene-packaged adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) have been determined at pH values of 6.0, 5.5, and 4.0 and then at pH 7.5 after incubation at pH 4.0, mimicking the conditions encountered during endocytic trafficking. While the capsid viral protein (VP) topologies of all the structures were similar, significant amino acid side chain conformational rearrangements were observed on (i) the interior surface of the capsid under the icosahedral 3-fold axis near ordered nucleic acid density that was lost concomitant with the conformational change as pH was reduced and (ii) the exterior capsid surface close to the icosahedral 2-fold depression. The 3-fold change is consistent with DNA release from an ordering interaction on the inside surface of the capsid at low pH values and suggests transitions that likely trigger the capsid for genome uncoating. The surface change results in disruption of VP-VP interface interactions and a decrease in buried surface area between VP monomers. This disruption points to capsid destabilization which may (i) release VP1 amino acids for its phospholipase A2 function for endosomal escape and nuclear localization signals for nuclear targeting and (ii) trigger genome uncoating.

  12. Structural studies of adeno-associated virus serotype 8 capsid transitions associated with endosomal trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyun-Joo; Gurda, Brittney L; McKenna, Robert; Potter, Mark; Byrne, Barry; Salganik, Maxim; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2011-11-01

    The single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) parvoviruses enter host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis, and infection depends on processing in the early to late endosome as well as in the lysosome prior to nuclear entry for replication. However, the mechanisms of capsid endosomal processing, including the effects of low pH, are poorly understood. To gain insight into the structural transitions required for this essential step in infection, the crystal structures of empty and green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene-packaged adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) have been determined at pH values of 6.0, 5.5, and 4.0 and then at pH 7.5 after incubation at pH 4.0, mimicking the conditions encountered during endocytic trafficking. While the capsid viral protein (VP) topologies of all the structures were similar, significant amino acid side chain conformational rearrangements were observed on (i) the interior surface of the capsid under the icosahedral 3-fold axis near ordered nucleic acid density that was lost concomitant with the conformational change as pH was reduced and (ii) the exterior capsid surface close to the icosahedral 2-fold depression. The 3-fold change is consistent with DNA release from an ordering interaction on the inside surface of the capsid at low pH values and suggests transitions that likely trigger the capsid for genome uncoating. The surface change results in disruption of VP-VP interface interactions and a decrease in buried surface area between VP monomers. This disruption points to capsid destabilization which may (i) release VP1 amino acids for its phospholipase A2 function for endosomal escape and nuclear localization signals for nuclear targeting and (ii) trigger genome uncoating.

  13. Structure of a Human Astrovirus Capsid-Antibody Complex and Mechanistic Insights into Virus Neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanoff, Walter A.; Campos, Jocelyn; Perez, Edmundo I.; Yin, Lu; Alexander, David L.; DuBois, Rebecca M. (UCSC)

    2016-11-02

    ABSTRACT

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, the immunocompromised, and the elderly. There are no vaccines or antiviral therapies against HAstV disease. Several lines of evidence point to the presence of protective antibodies in healthy adults as a mechanism governing protection against reinfection by HAstV. However, development of anti-HAstV therapies is hampered by the gap in knowledge of protective antibody epitopes on the HAstV capsid surface. Here, we report the structure of the HAstV capsid spike domain bound to the neutralizing monoclonal antibody PL-2. The antibody uses all six complementarity-determining regions to bind to a quaternary epitope on each side of the dimeric capsid spike. We provide evidence that the HAstV capsid spike is a receptor-binding domain and that the antibody neutralizes HAstV by blocking virus attachment to cells. We identify patches of conserved amino acids that overlap the antibody epitope and may comprise a receptor-binding site. Our studies provide a foundation for the development of therapies to prevent and treat HAstV diarrheal disease.

    IMPORTANCEHuman astroviruses (HAstVs) infect nearly every person in the world during childhood and cause diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. Despite the prevalence of this virus, little is known about how antibodies in healthy adults protect them against reinfection. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a complex of the HAstV capsid protein and a virus-neutralizing antibody. We show that the antibody binds to the outermost spike domain of the capsid, and we provide evidence that the antibody blocks virus attachment to human cells. Importantly, our findings suggest that a subunit-based vaccine focusing the immune system on the HAstV capsid spike domain could be effective in protecting children against HAstV disease.

  14. Antigenic and Cryo-Electron Microscopy Structure Analysis of a Chimeric Sapovirus Capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Taylor, David W; Hansman, Grant S; Murata, Kazuyoshi

    2015-12-23

    The capsid protein (VP1) of all caliciviruses forms an icosahedral particle with two principal domains, shell (S) and protruding (P) domains, which are connected via a flexible hinge region. The S domain forms a scaffold surrounding the nucleic acid, while the P domains form a homodimer that interacts with receptors. The P domain is further subdivided into two subdomains, termed P1 and P2. The P2 subdomain is likely an insertion in the P1 subdomain; consequently, the P domain is divided into the P1-1, P2, and P1-2 subdomains. In order to investigate capsid antigenicity, N-terminal (N-term)/S/P1-1 and P2/P1-2 were switched between two sapovirus genotypes GI.1 and GI.5. The chimeric VP1 constructs were expressed in insect cells and were shown to self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) morphologically similar to the parental VLPs. Interestingly, the chimeric VLPs had higher levels of cross-reactivities to heterogeneous antisera than the parental VLPs. In order to better understand the antigenicity from a structural perspective, we determined an intermediate-resolution (8.5-Å) cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of a chimeric VLP and developed a VP1 homology model. The cryo-EM structure revealed that the P domain dimers were raised slightly (∼5 Å) above the S domain. The VP1 homology model allowed us predict the S domain (67-229) and P1-1 (229-280), P2 (281-447), and P1-2 (448-567) subdomains. Our results suggested that the raised P dimers might expose immunoreactive S/P1-1 subdomain epitopes. Consequently, the higher levels of cross-reactivities with the chimeric VLPs resulted from a combination of GI.1 and GI.5 epitopes. We developed sapovirus chimeric VP1 constructs and produced the chimeric VLPs in insect cells. We found that both chimeric VLPs had a higher level of cross-reactivity against heterogeneous VLP antisera than the parental VLPs. The cryo-EM structure of one chimeric VLP (Yokote/Mc114) was solved to 8.5-Å resolution. A homology model

  15. Efficient production of HIV-1 virus-like particles from a mammalian expression vector requires the N-terminal capsid domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Jalaguier

    Full Text Available It is now well accepted that the structural protein Pr55(Gag is sufficient by itself to produce HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs. This polyprotein precursor contains different domains including matrix, capsid, SP1, nucleocapsid, SP2 and p6. In the present study, we wanted to determine by mutagenesis which region(s is essential to the production of VLPs when Pr55(Gag is inserted in a mammalian expression vector, which allows studying the protein of interest in the absence of other viral proteins. To do so, we first studied a minimal Pr55(Gag sequence called Gag min that was used previously. We found that Gag min fails to produce VLPs when expressed in an expression vector instead of within a molecular clone. This failure occurs early in the cell at the assembly of viral proteins. We then generated a series of deletion and substitution mutants, and examined their ability to produce VLPs by combining biochemical and microscopic approaches. We demonstrate that the matrix region is not necessary, but that the efficiency of VLP production depends strongly on the presence of its basic region. Moreover, the presence of the N-terminal domain of capsid is required for VLP production when Gag is expressed alone. These findings, combined with previous observations indicating that HIV-1 Pr55(Gag-derived VLPs act as potent stimulators of innate and acquired immunity, make the use of this strategy worth considering for vaccine development.

  16. High level expression of the capsid protein of hepatitis E virus in diverse eukaryotic cells using the Semliki Forest virus replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, J; Meanger, J; Lambert, P; Li, F; Locarnini, S A; Anderson, D A

    1997-12-01

    The capsid protein of hepatitis E virus (HEV) is encoded by open reading frame 2 (ORF 2) and exhibits variable processing when expressed in insect and COS cells, but nothing is known of its processing in cells relevant to its replication. The full-length ORF 2 protein was expressed at high levels in mammalian cells by insertion of ORF 2 in the Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon to generate rSFV/HEV ORF 2K. Expression of the capsid protein was detected readily by metabolic labelling and indirect immunofluorescence in BHK-21 cells transfected with RNA transcripts derived from rSFV/HEV ORF 2K. ORF 2 protein was also expressed at high levels in cells of diverse origin, including liver-derived cell lines Huh7 and HepG2, following infection with recombinant virus derived from cotransfection of BHK-21 cells with the rSFV/HEV ORF 2K and helper SFV replicon RNAs. The addition of hypertonic KCl during metabolic labelling reduced the level of host cell protein synthesis and enhanced the detection of intermediates in ORF 2 protein processing. The wide host range and high level expression directed by SFV replicon particles has particular utility in the analysis of cell-specific factors in the protein processing and assembly of non-cultivable viruses such as HEV.

  17. CaPSID: A bioinformatics platform for computational pathogen sequence identification in human genomes and transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borozan Ivan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is now well established that nearly 20% of human cancers are caused by infectious agents, and the list of human oncogenic pathogens will grow in the future for a variety of cancer types. Whole tumor transcriptome and genome sequencing by next-generation sequencing technologies presents an unparalleled opportunity for pathogen detection and discovery in human tissues but requires development of new genome-wide bioinformatics tools. Results Here we present CaPSID (Computational Pathogen Sequence IDentification, a comprehensive bioinformatics platform for identifying, querying and visualizing both exogenous and endogenous pathogen nucleotide sequences in tumor genomes and transcriptomes. CaPSID includes a scalable, high performance database for data storage and a web application that integrates the genome browser JBrowse. CaPSID also provides useful metrics for sequence analysis of pre-aligned BAM files, such as gene and genome coverage, and is optimized to run efficiently on multiprocessor computers with low memory usage. Conclusions To demonstrate the usefulness and efficiency of CaPSID, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of both a simulated dataset and transcriptome samples from ovarian cancer. CaPSID correctly identified all of the human and pathogen sequences in the simulated dataset, while in the ovarian dataset CaPSID’s predictions were successfully validated in vitro.

  18. Sequence analysis and structural implications of rotavirus capsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parbhoo, N; Dewar, J B; Gildenhuys, S

    Rotavirus is the major cause of severe virus-associated gastroenteritis worldwide in children aged 5 and younger. Many children lose their lives annually due to this infection and the impact is particularly pronounced in developing countries. The mature rotavirus is a non-enveloped triple-layered nucleocapsid containing 11 double stranded RNA segments. Here a global view on the sequence and structure of the three main capsid proteins, VP2, VP6 and VP7 is shown by generating a consensus sequence for each of these rotavirus proteins, for each species obtained from published data of representative rotavirus genotypes from across the world and across species. Degree of conservation between species was represented on homology models for each of the proteins. VP7 shows the highest level of variation with 14-45 amino acids showing conservation of less than 60%. These changes are localised to the outer surface alluding to a possible mechanism in evading the immune system. The middle layer, VP6 shows lower variability with only 14-32 sites having lower than 70% conservation. The inner structural layer made up of VP2 showed the lowest variability with only 1-16 sites having less than 70% conservation across species. The results correlate with each protein's multiple structural roles in the infection cycle. Thus, although the nucleotide sequences vary due to the error-prone nature of replication and lack of proof reading, the corresponding amino acid sequence of VP2, 6 and 7 remain relatively conserved. Benefits of this knowledge about the conservation include the ability to target proteins at sites that cannot undergo mutational changes without influencing viral fitness; as well as possibility to study systems that are highly evolved for structure and function in order to determine how to generate and manipulate such systems for use in various biotechnological applications.

  19. Chordal Graphs are Fully Orientable

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Hsin-Hao

    2012-01-01

    Suppose that D is an acyclic orientation of a graph G. An arc of D is called dependent if its reversal creates a directed cycle. Let m and M denote the minimum and the maximum of the number of dependent arcs over all acyclic orientations of G. We call G fully orientable if G has an acyclic orientation with exactly d dependent arcs for every d satisfying m <= d <= M. A graph G is called chordal if every cycle in G of length at least four has a chord. We show that all chordal graphs are fully orientable.

  20. A Ginzburg-Landau model for the expansion of a dodecahedral viral capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, E.; Indelicato, G.; Albano, A.; Cermelli, P.

    2013-11-01

    We propose a Ginzburg-Landau model for the expansion of a dodecahedral viral capsid during infection or maturation. The capsid is described as a dodecahedron whose faces, meant to model rigid capsomers, are free to move independent of each other, and has therefore twelve degrees of freedom. We assume that the energy of the system is a function of the twelve variables with icosahedral symmetry. Using techniques of the theory of invariants, we expand the energy as the sum of invariant polynomials up to fourth order, and classify its minima in dependence of the coefficients of the Ginzburg-Landau expansion. Possible conformational changes of the capsid correspond to symmetry breaking of the equilibrium closed form. The results suggest that the only generic transition from the closed state leads to icosahedral expanded form. Our approach does not allow to study the expansion pathway, which is likely to be non-icosahedral.

  1. Isolation of capsid proteins of foot-and-mouth disease virus by chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, A D; Doel, T R; Spier, R E

    1983-10-01

    A method for the isolation of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid proteins was developed. The FMDV capsid proteins VP1, VP2, VP3 and VP0 were isolated from sucrose gradient purified virus by chromatofocusing in a pH 7.4-4.0 gradient on Polybuffer exchanger PBE 94. Under the conditions used the proteins eluted in the sequence VP1, VP2, VP0 (when present) and VP3. Capsid protein VP4 did not elute and could not be isolated by this method. Protein concentration in the eluate was monitored by the use of a radiolabelled marker and recoveries of approximately 50% of the input marker could be achieved when using up to 15 mg of virus and a 30-ml column. The high capacity and relative simplicity of chromatofocusing make it a useful alternative to other methods of purifying proteins.

  2. The three-dimensional structure of Infectious flacherie virus capsid determined by cryo-electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction were used to determine the three-dimensional structure of Infectious flacherie virus (IFV). 5047 particles were selected for the final reconstruction. The FSC curve showed that the resolution of this capsid structure was 18 ·. The structure is a psuedo T=3 (P=3) icosahedral capsid with a diameter of 302.4 · and a single shell thickness of 15 ·. The density map showed that IFV has a smooth surface without any prominent protrude or depression. Comparison of the IFV structure with those of the insect picorna-like virus-Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV)and human picornavirus-Human rhinovirus 14 (HRV 14) revealed that the IFV structure resembles the CrPV structure. The "Rossmann canyon" is absent in both IFV and CrPV particles. The polypeptide topology of IFV VP2, IFV VP3 was predicted and the subunit location at the capsid surface was further analyzed.

  3. Poliovirus-associated protein kinase: Destabilization of the virus capsid and stimulation of the phosphorylation reaction by Zn sup 2+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratka, M.; Lackmann, M.; Ueckermann, C.; Karlins, U.; Koch, G. (Univ. of Hamburg (West Germany))

    1989-09-01

    The previously described poliovirus-associated protein kinase activity phosphorylates viral proteins VP0 and VP2 as well as exogenous proteins in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. In this paper, the effect of Zn{sup 2+} on the phosphorylation reaction and the stability of the poliovirus capsid has been studied in detail and compared to that of Mg{sup 2+}. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, phosphorylation of capsid proteins VP2 and VP4 is significantly higher while phosphorylation of VP0 and exogenous phosphate acceptor proteins is not detected. The results indicate the activation of more than one virus-associated protein kinase by Zn{sup 2+}. The ion-dependent behavior of the enzyme activities is observed independently of whether the virus was obtained from HeLa or green monkey kidney cells. The poliovirus capsid is destabilized by Zn{sup 2+}. This alteration of the poliovirus capsid structure is a prerequisite for effective phosphorylation of viral capsid proteins. The increased level of phosphorylation of viral capsid proteins results in further destabilization of the viral capsid. As a result of the conformational changes, poliovirus-associated protein kinase activities dissociate from the virus particle. The authors suggest that the destabilizing effect of phosphorylation on the viral capsid plays a role in uncoating of poliovirus.

  4. Rethinking the capsid proteins of enveloped viruses: multifunctionality from genome packaging to genome transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, João M; Santos, Nuno C; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Da Poian, Andrea T; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2015-06-01

    Regardless of the debate on whether there is a place for viruses in the tree of life, it is consensual that they co-evolve with their hosts under the pressure of genome minimization. The abundance of multifunctional viral structural proteins is a consequence of this pressure. The molecular key to multifunctionality is the existence of intrinsically disordered domains together with ordered domains in the same protein. Capsid proteins, the hallmark of viruses, are not exceptions because they have coexisting ordered and disordered domains that are crucial for multifunctionality. It is also frequent to find supercharged proteins (i.e. proteins for which the net charge per unit molecular mass is > +0.75/kDa) among viral capsid proteins. All flaviviruses having annotated proteins in the ExPASy Viralzone database have supercharged capsid proteins. Moreover, cell-penetrating sequences/domains are frequent in viral proteins, even when they are not supercharged. Altogether, the findings strongly suggest that the ability to translocate membranes was acquired, conserved and optimized throughout the evolution of some viral proteins as part of their multifunctionality. The fitness of capsid proteins to translocate membranes carrying genomes was experimentally demonstrated with dengue virus capsid protein. This protein is potentially able to help the fusion process and translocate the RNA genome across the hemifused membrane formed by the viral envelope and the endosomal membrane. In addition, one of the cell-penetrating domains of the capsid protein also has antibacterial activity. This may be reminiscent of parasitic bacteria-bacteria competition for the same host and shed light on the origins of enveloped viruses. © 2015 FEBS.

  5. Identification, expression, and immunogenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded small viral capsid antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Gradoville, L; Shedd, D; Haglund, K; Rigsby, M; Miller, G.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a recombinant antigen for use in serologic tests for antibodies to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). The cDNA for a small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) was identified by immunoscreening of a library prepared from the BC-1 body cavity lymphoma cell line induced into KSHV lytic gene expression by sodium butyrate. The cDNA specified a 170-amino-acid peptide with homology to small viral capsid proteins encoded by the BFRF3 gene of Epstein-Barr virus and the ORF65 gene...

  6. Virus Capsids as Targeted Nanoscale Delivery Vessels of Photoactive Compounds for Site-Specific Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Brian A.

    The research presented in this work details the use of a viral capsid as an addressable delivery vessel of photoactive compounds for use in photodynamic therapy. Photodynamic therapy is a treatment that involves the interaction of light with a photosensitizing molecule to create singlet oxygen, a reactive oxygen species. Overproduction of singlet oxygen in cells can cause oxidative damage leading to cytotoxicity and eventually cell death. Challenges with the current generation of FDA-approved photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy primarily stem from their lack of tissue specificity. This work describes the packaging of photoactive cationic porphyrins inside the MS2 bacteriophage capsid, followed by external modification of the capsid with cancer cell-targeting G-quadruplex DNA aptamers to generate a tumor-specific photosensitizing agent. First, a cationic porphyrin is loaded into the capsids via nucleotide-driven packaging, a process that involves charge interaction between the porphyrin and the RNA inside the capsid. Results show that over 250 porphyrin molecules associate with the RNA within each MS2 capsid. Removal of RNA from the capsid severely inhibits the packaging of the cationic porphyrins. Porphyrin-virus constructs were then shown to photogenerate singlet oxygen, and cytotoxicity in non-targeted photodynamic treatment experiments. Next, each porphyrin-loaded capsid is externally modified with approximately 60 targeting DNA aptamers by employing a heterobifunctional crosslinking agent. The targeting aptamer is known to bind the protein nucleolin, a ubiquitous protein that is overexpressed on the cell surface by many cancer cell types. MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells and MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cells were selected as an in vitro model for breast cancer and normal tissue, respectively. Fluorescently tagged virus-aptamer constructs are shown to selectively target MCF-7 cells versus MCF-10A cells. Finally, results are shown in which porphyrin

  7. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies...

  8. Simulations of HIV capsid protein dimerization reveal the effect of chemistry and topography on the mechanism of hydrophobic protein association

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Naiyin

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the hydrophobic protein surfaces in aqueous solution sit near a drying transition. The tendency for these surfaces to expel water from their vicinity leads to self assembly of macromolecular complexes. In this article we show with a realistic model for a biologically pertinent system how this phenomenon appears at the molecular level. We focus on the association of the C-terminal domain (CA-C) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) capsid protein. By combining all-atom simulations with specialized sampling techniques we measure the water density distribution during the approach of two CA-C proteins as a function of separation and amino acid sequence in the interfacial region. The simulations demonstrate that CA-C protein-protein interactions sit at the edge of a dewetting transition and that this mesoscopic manifestation of the underlying liquid-vapor phase transition can be readily manipulated by biology or protein engineering to significantly affect association behavior. While ...

  9. Synthesis and characterization of different immunogenic viral nanoconstructs from rotavirus VP6 inner capsid protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugli F

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Bugli,1 Valeria Caprettini,2 Margherita Cacaci,1 Cecilia Martini,1 Francesco Paroni Sterbini,1 Riccardo Torelli,1 Stefano Della Longa,3 Massimiliano Papi,4 Valentina Palmieri,4 Bruno Giardina,5 Brunella Posteraro,1 Maurizio Sanguinetti,1 Alessandro Arcovito5 1Istituto di Microbiologia, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 2Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, 3Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica, Sanità Pubblica, Scienze della Vita e dell’Ambiente, Università dell’Aquila, L’Aquila, 4Istituto di Fisica, 5Istituto di Biochimica e Biochimica Clinica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy Abstract: In order to deliver low-cost viral capsomeres from a large amount of soluble viral VP6 protein from human rotavirus, we developed and optimized a biotechnological platform in Escherichia coli. Specifically, three different expression protocols were compared, differing in their genetic constructs, ie, a simple native histidine-tagged VP6 sequence, VP6 fused to thioredoxin, and VP6 obtained with the newly described small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO fusion system. Our results demonstrate that the histidine-tagged protein does not escape the accumulation in the inclusion bodies, and that SUMO is largely superior to the thioredoxin-fusion tag in enhancing the expression and solubility of VP6 protein. Moreover, the VP6 protein produced according to the SUMO fusion tag displays well-known assembly properties, as observed in both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images, giving rise to either VP6 trimers, 60 nm spherical virus-like particles, or nanotubes a few micron long. This different quaternary organization of VP6 shows a higher level of immunogenicity for the elongated structures with respect to the spheres or the protein trimers. Therefore, the expression and purification strategy presented here – providing a large amount of the viral capsid protein in the native

  10. Sinorhizobium meliloti Phage ΦM9 Defines a New Group of T4 Superfamily Phages with Unusual Genomic Features but a Common T=16 Capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Tatum, Kelsey B.; Lynn, Jason S.; Brewer, Tess E.; Lu, Stephen; Washburn, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Relatively little is known about the phages that infect agriculturally important nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. Here we report the genome and cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-infecting T4 superfamily phage ΦM9. This phage and its close relative Rhizobium phage vB_RleM_P10VF define a new group of T4 superfamily phages. These phages are distinctly different from the recently characterized cyanophage-like S. meliloti phages of the ΦM12 group. Structurally, ΦM9 has a T=16 capsid formed from repeating units of an extended gp23-like subunit that assemble through interactions between one subunit and the adjacent E-loop insertion domain. Though genetically very distant from the cyanophages, the ΦM9 capsid closely resembles that of the T4 superfamily cyanophage Syn9. ΦM9 also has the same T=16 capsid architecture as the very distant phage SPO1 and the herpesviruses. Despite their overall lack of similarity at the genomic and structural levels, ΦM9 and S. meliloti phage ΦM12 have a small number of open reading frames in common that appear to encode structural proteins involved in interaction with the host and which may have been acquired by horizontal transfer. These proteins are predicted to encode tail baseplate proteins, tail fibers, tail fiber assembly proteins, and glycanases that cleave host exopolysaccharide. IMPORTANCE Despite recent advances in the phylogenetic and structural characterization of bacteriophages, only a small number of phages of plant-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria have been studied at the molecular level. The effects of phage predation upon beneficial bacteria that promote plant growth remain poorly characterized. First steps in understanding these soil bacterium-phage dynamics are genetic, molecular, and structural characterizations of these groups of phages. The T4 superfamily phages are among the most complex phages; they have large genomes packaged within an icosahedral head and a long

  11. Structural mimics of viruses through peptide/DNA co-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Rong; Chau, Ying

    2014-12-31

    A synthetic mimic of viral structure has been constructed by the synergistic co-assembly of a 16-amino acid peptide and plasmid DNA. The rational design of this short peptide, including segments for binding DNA and forming β-sheet, is inspired by viral capsid protein. The resulting nanostructures, which we term nanococoons, appear as ellipsoids of virus-like dimension (65 × 47 nm) and display repeating stripes of ∼4 nm wide. We propose that the co-assembly process involves DNA as a template to assist the organization of peptide strands by electrostatic interaction, while the bilayer β-sheets and their lateral association stabilize the peptide "capsid" and organize the DNA within. The hierarchy affords an extremely stable structure, protecting peptide and DNA against enzymatic digestion. It opens a new and facile avenue to fabricate viral alternatives with diverse functions.

  12. Assembled viral-like nanoparticles from elastic capsomers and polyion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelescu, Daniel G.

    2017-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out on a coarse-grained model to describe the polyion driven co-assembly of elastic capsomers as viral-like aggregates. The kinetics and structural properties of the complexes are examined using cationic capsomers, an anionic polyion, both modelled using beads connected by springs, and counterions neutralizing separately the two charged species. Polyion overcharging the capsid is encapsulated owing to combined effects of the capsomer-capsomer short-range interactions, the polyion ability to follow a Hamiltonian path, and Donnan equilibrium. Conditions leading to a high yield of viral-like nanoparticles are found, and the simulations demonstrate that the capsomer elasticity provides mechanisms that improve the reliability toward correctly formed capsids. These mechanisms are related to a highly irregular capsomer cluster growth followed by the appearance of two stable capsomer clusters with the polyion acting as a tether between them. Elevated capsomeric flexibility provides an additional pathway to anneal the kinetically trapped structures by the ejection of a capsomeric monomer from a malformed complex followed by a rebinding step to form a correct capsid.

  13. Disassociation of the SV40 genome from capsid proteins prior to nuclear entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksin, Dmitry; Norkin, Leonard C

    2012-08-10

    Previously, we demonstrated that input SV40 particles undergo a partial disassembly in the endoplasmic reticulum, which exposes internal capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 to immunostaining. Then, in the cytoplasm, disassembly progresses further to also make the genomic DNA accessible to immune detection, as well as to detection by an ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU)-based chemical reaction. The cytoplasmic partially disassembled SV40 particles retain some of the SV40 capsid proteins, VP1, VP2, and VP3, in addition to the viral genome. In the current study, we asked where in the cell the SV40 genome might disassociate from capsid components. We observed partially disassembled input SV40 particles around the nucleus and, beginning at 12 hours post-infection, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled parental SV40 DNA in the nucleus, as detected using anti-BrdU antibodies. However, among the more than 1500 cells examined, we never detected input VP2/VP3 in the nucleus. Upon translocation of the BrdU-labeled SV40 genomes into nuclei, they were transcribed and, thus, are representative of productive infection. Our findings imply that the SV40 genome disassociates from the capsid proteins before or at the point of entry into the nucleus, and then enters the nucleus devoid of VP2/3.

  14. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Capsid Protein Gene of Iridovirus Indonesian Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murwantoko .

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available generated by an Adobe application 11.5606 Iridovirus was known as agents that caused serious systemic disease in freshwater and marine fishes. The mortality up to 100% of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides due to iridovirus infection has been reported in Indonesia. The gene encoding capsid protein of iridovirus is supposed to be conserved and has the potency for the development of control methods. The objectives of this study are to clone the gene encoding capsid protein iridovirus and to analyze their sequences. The   spleen tissues of orange-spotted grouper were collected and extracted their DNA. The DNA fragment of capsid protein of iridovirus genes were amplified by PCR using designed primers with the extraction DNA as templates. The amplified DNA fragments were cloned in pBSKSII and sequenced.  The genes encoding capsid protein of iridovirus from Jepara and Bali were successfully amplified and cloned. The Jepara clone (IJP03 contained complete open reading frame (ORF of the gene composed by 1362 bp nucleotides which encoded 453 amino acids. Those Jepara and Bali (IGD01 clones shared 99.8% similarity in nucleotide level and 99.4% at amino acid level. Based on those sequences, Indonesian iridovirus was belonged to genus Megalocystivirus and shared 99,6-99,9% similarity on nucleotide level with DGIV, ISKNV, MCIV, and ALIV Normal 0 36 false false false

  15. Production of monoclonal antibodies specific to Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus using recombinant capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangman, Pradit; Senapin, Saengchan; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin; Longyant, Siwaporn; Rukpratanporn, Sombat; Sithigorngul, Paisarn

    2012-03-20

    The gene encoding the capsid protein of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) was cloned into pGEX-6P-1 expression vector and then transformed into the Escherichia coli strain BL21. After induction, capsid protein-glutathione-S-transferase (GST-MrNV; 64 kDa) was produced. The recombinant protein was separated using SDS-PAGE, excised from the gel, electro-eluted and then used for immunization for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production. Four MAbs specific to the capsid protein were selected and could be used to detect natural MrNV infections in M. rosenbergii by dot blotting, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry without cross-reaction with uninfected shrimp tissues or other common shrimp viruses. The detection sensitivity of the MAbs was 10 fmol µl-1 of the GST-MrNV, as determined using dot blotting. However, the sensitivity of the MAb on dot blotting with homogenate from naturally infected M. rosenbergii was approximately 200-fold lower than that of 1-step RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis using these MAbs with infected shrimp tissues demonstrated staining in the muscles, nerve cord, gill, heart, loose connective tissue and inter-tubular tissue of the hepatopancreas. Although the positive reactions occurred in small focal areas, the immunoreactivity was clearly demonstrated. The MAbs targeted different epitopes of the capsid protein and will be used to develop a simple immunoassay strip test for rapid detection of MrNV.

  16. The conformation of double-stranded DNA inside bacteriophages depends on capsid size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Anton S; Boz, Mustafa Burak; Harvey, Stephen C

    2007-11-01

    The packaging of double-stranded DNA into bacteriophages leads to the arrangement of the genetic material into highly-packed and ordered structures. Although modern experimental techniques reveal the most probable location of DNA inside viral capsids, the individual conformations of DNA are yet to be determined. In the current study we present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA packaging into several bacteriophages performed within the framework of a coarse-grained model. The final DNA conformations depend on the size and shape of the capsid, as well as the size of the protein portal, if any. In particular, isometric capsids with small or absent portals tend to form concentric spools, whereas the presence of a large portal favors coaxial spooling; slightly and highly elongated capsids result in folded and twisted toroidal conformations, respectively. The results of the simulations also suggest that the predominant factor in defining the global DNA arrangement inside bacteriophages is the minimization of the bending stress upon packaging.

  17. Functional dissection of the alphavirus capsid protease: sequence requirements for activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pützer Brigitte M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The alphavirus capsid is multifunctional and plays a key role in the viral life cycle. The nucleocapsid domain is released by the self-cleavage activity of the serine protease domain within the capsid. All alphaviruses analyzed to date show this autocatalytic cleavage. Here we have analyzed the sequence requirements for the cleavage activity of Chikungunya virus capsid protease of genus alphavirus. Results Amongst alphaviruses, the C-terminal amino acid tryptophan (W261 is conserved and found to be important for the cleavage. Mutating tryptophan to alanine (W261A completely inactivated the protease. Other amino acids near W261 were not having any effect on the activity of this protease. However, serine protease inhibitor AEBSF did not inhibit the activity. Through error-prone PCR we found that isoleucine 227 is important for the effective activity. The loss of activity was analyzed further by molecular modelling and comparison of WT and mutant structures. It was found that lysine introduced at position 227 is spatially very close to the catalytic triad and may disrupt electrostatic interactions in the catalytic site and thus inactivate the enzyme. We are also examining other sequence requirements for this protease activity. Conclusions We analyzed various amino acid sequence requirements for the activity of ChikV capsid protease and found that amino acids outside the catalytic triads are important for the activity.

  18. Porcine circovirus-2 capsid protein induces cell death in PK15 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walia, Rupali; Dardari, Rkia, E-mail: rdardari@ucalgary.ca; Chaiyakul, Mark; Czub, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Studies have shown that Porcine circovirus (PCV)-2 induces apoptosis in PK15 cells. Here we report that cell death is induced in PCV2b-infected PK15 cells that express Capsid (Cap) protein and this effect is enhanced in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-treated cells. We further show that transient PCV2a and 2b-Cap protein expression induces cell death in PK15 cells at rate similar to PCV2 infection, regardless of Cap protein localization. These data suggest that Cap protein may have the capacity to trigger different signaling pathways involved in cell death. Although further investigation is needed to gain deeper insights into the nature of the pathways involved in Cap-induced cell death, this study provides evidence that PCV2-induced cell death in kidney epithelial PK15 cells can be mapped to the Cap protein and establishes the need for future research regarding the role of Cap-induced cell death in PCV2 pathogenesis. - Highlights: • IFN-γ enhances PCV2 replication that leads to cell death in PK15 cells. • IFN-γ enhances nuclear localization of the PCV2 Capsid protein. • Transient PCV2a and 2b-Capsid protein expression induces cell death. • Cell death is not dictated by specific Capsid protein sub-localization.

  19. Nanofluidic Devices with Two Pores in Series for Resistive-Pulse Sensing of Single Virus Capsids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Zachary D.; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Rodrigues de Sousa Nunes, Pedro André;

    2011-01-01

    We report fabrication and characterization of nanochannel devices with two nanopores in series for resistive-pulse sensing of hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids. The nanochannel and two pores are patterned by electron beam lithography between two microchannels and etched by reactive ion etching. The...

  20. Essential C-Terminal region of the baculovirus minor capsid protein VP80 binds DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marek, M.; Merten, O.W.; Francis-Devaraj, F.; Oers, van M.M.

    2012-01-01

    The essential Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) minor capsid protein VP80 has been recently shown to interact with the virus-triggered, nuclear F-actin cytoskeleton. A role for VP80 in virus morphogenesis has been proposed in the maturation of progeny nucleocapsids and

  1. Capsid coding sequences of foot-and-mouth disease viruses are determinants of pathogenicity in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Jackson, Terry; Bøtner, Anette

    2012-01-01

    showed symptoms of disease within the time frame of the experiment (10 days). All pigs that developed clinical disease showed a high level of viral RNA in serum and infected pigs that survived the acute phase of infection developed a serotype specific antibody response. It is concluded that the capsid...

  2. Disassociation of the SV40 Genome from Capsid Proteins Prior to Nuclear Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuksin Dmitry

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, we demonstrated that input SV40 particles undergo a partial disassembly in the endoplasmic reticulum, which exposes internal capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 to immunostaining. Then, in the cytoplasm, disassembly progresses further to also make the genomic DNA accessible to immune detection, as well as to detection by an ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU-based chemical reaction. The cytoplasmic partially disassembled SV40 particles retain some of the SV40 capsid proteins, VP1, VP2, and VP3, in addition to the viral genome. Findings In the current study, we asked where in the cell the SV40 genome might disassociate from capsid components. We observed partially disassembled input SV40 particles around the nucleus and, beginning at 12 hours post-infection, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU-labeled parental SV40 DNA in the nucleus, as detected using anti-BrdU antibodies. However, among the more than 1500 cells examined, we never detected input VP2/VP3 in the nucleus. Upon translocation of the BrdU-labeled SV40 genomes into nuclei, they were transcribed and, thus, are representative of productive infection. Conclusions Our findings imply that the SV40 genome disassociates from the capsid proteins before or at the point of entry into the nucleus, and then enters the nucleus devoid of VP2/3.

  3. The Herpes Simplex Virus 1 UL17 Protein Is the Second Constituent of the Capsid Vertex-Specific Component Required for DNA Packaging and Retention▿

    OpenAIRE

    Toropova, Katerina; Huffman, Jamie B.; Homa, Fred L.; James F Conway

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) UL17 and UL25 minor capsid proteins are essential for DNA packaging. They are thought to comprise a molecule arrayed in five copies around each of the capsid vertices. This molecule was initially termed the “C-capsid-specific component” (CCSC) (B. L. Trus et al., Mol. Cell 26:479-489, 2007), but as we have subsequently observed this feature on reconstructions of A, B, and C capsids, we now refer to it more generally as the “capsid vertex-specific component” (CVS...

  4. Hidden symmetry of small spherical viruses and organization principles in "anomalous" and double-shelled capsid nanoassemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochal, S B; Konevtsova, O V; Myasnikova, A E; Lorman, V L

    2016-09-29

    We propose the principles of structural organization in spherical nanoassemblies with icosahedral symmetry constituted by asymmetric protein molecules. The approach modifies the paradigmatic geometrical Caspar and Klug (CK) model of icosahedral viral capsids and demonstrates the common origin of both the "anomalous" and conventional capsid structures. In contrast to all previous models of "anomalous" viral capsids the proposed modified model conserves the basic structural principles of the CK approach and reveals the common hidden symmetry underlying all small viral shells. We demonstrate the common genesis of the "anomalous" and conventional capsids and explain their structures in the same frame. The organization principles are derived from the group theory analysis of the positional order on the spherical surface. The relationship between the modified CK geometrical model and the theory of two-dimensional spherical crystallization is discussed. We also apply the proposed approach to complex double-shelled capsids and capsids with protruding knob-like proteins. The introduced notion of commensurability for the concentric nanoshells explains the peculiarities of their organization and helps to predict analogous, but yet undiscovered, double-shelled viral capsid nanostructures.

  5. Physics of Fully Depleted CCDs

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, S E; Kolbe, W F; Lee, J S

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present simple, physics-based models for two effects that have been noted in the fully depleted CCDs that are presently used in the Dark Energy Survey Camera. The first effect is the observation that the point-spread function increases slightly with the signal level. This is explained by considering the effect on charge-carrier diffusion due to the reduction in the magnitude of the channel potential as collected signal charge acts to partially neutralize the fixed charge in the depleted channel. The resulting reduced voltage drop across the carrier drift region decreases the vertical electric field and increases the carrier transit time. The second effect is the observation of low-level, concentric ring patterns seen in uniformly illuminated images. This effect is shown to be most likely due to lateral deflection of charge during the transit of the photogenerated carriers to the potential wells as a result of lateral electric fields. The lateral fields are a result of space charge in the fully...

  6. Electrostatic potential of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 and rhesus macaque simian immunodeficiency virus capsid proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna eBozek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from a macaque monkey (SIVmac are assumed to have originated from simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from sooty mangabey (SIVsm. Despite their close similarity in genome structure, HIV-2 and SIVmac show different sensitivities to TRIM5α, a host restriction factor against retroviruses. The replication of HIV-2 strains is potently restricted by rhesus (Rh monkey TRIM5α, while that of SIVmac strain 239 (SIVmac239 is not. Viral capsid protein is the determinant of this differential sensitivity to TRIM5α, as the HIV-2 mutant carrying SIVmac239 capsid protein evaded Rh TRIM5α-mediated restriction. However, the molecular determinants of this restriction mechanism are unknown. Electrostatic potential on the protein-binding site is one of the properties regulating protein-protein interactions. In this study, we investigated the electrostatic potential on the interaction surface of capsid protein of HIV-2 strain GH123 and SIVmac239. Although HIV-2 GH123 and SIVmac239 capsid proteins share more than 87% amino acid identity, we observed a large difference between the two molecules with the HIV-2 GH123 molecule having predominantly positive and SIVmac239 predominantly negative electrostatic potential on the surface of the loop between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5. As L4/5 is one of the major determinants of Rh TRIM5α sensitivity of these viruses, the present results suggest that the binding site of the Rh TRIM5α may show complementarity to the HIV-2 GH123 capsid surface charge distribution.

  7. Mutation of the N-Terminal Region of Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Zaid, Ali; Goh, Lucas Y. H.; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Hall, Roy A.; Merits, Andres

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleolus. In encephalitic alphaviruses, nuclear translocation induces host cell transcriptional shutoff; however, the role of capsid protein nucleolar localization in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged expression constructs and CHIKV infectious clones, we describe a nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS) in the N-terminal region of capsid protein, previously uncharacterized in CHIKV. Mutation of the NoLS by site-directed mutagenesis reduced efficiency of nuclear import of CHIKV capsid protein. In the virus, mutation of the capsid protein NoLS (CHIKV-NoLS) attenuated replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, producing a small-plaque phenotype. Attenuation of CHIKV-NoLS is likely due to disruption of the viral replication cycle downstream of viral RNA synthesis. In mice, CHIKV-NoLS infection caused no disease signs compared to wild-type CHIKV (CHIKV-WT)-infected mice; lack of disease signs correlated with significantly reduced viremia and decreased expression of proinflammatory factors. Mice immunized with CHIKV-NoLS, challenged with CHIKV-WT at 30 days postimmunization, develop no disease signs and no detectable viremia. Serum from CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice is able to efficiently neutralize CHIKV infection in vitro. Additionally, CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice challenged with the related alphavirus Ross River virus showed reduced early and peak viremia postchallenge, indicating a cross-protective effect. The high degree of CHIKV-NoLS attenuation may improve CHIKV antiviral and rational vaccine design. PMID:28223458

  8. Mutation of the N-Terminal Region of Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Taylor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleolus. In encephalitic alphaviruses, nuclear translocation induces host cell transcriptional shutoff; however, the role of capsid protein nucleolar localization in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-tagged expression constructs and CHIKV infectious clones, we describe a nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS in the N-terminal region of capsid protein, previously uncharacterized in CHIKV. Mutation of the NoLS by site-directed mutagenesis reduced efficiency of nuclear import of CHIKV capsid protein. In the virus, mutation of the capsid protein NoLS (CHIKV-NoLS attenuated replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, producing a small-plaque phenotype. Attenuation of CHIKV-NoLS is likely due to disruption of the viral replication cycle downstream of viral RNA synthesis. In mice, CHIKV-NoLS infection caused no disease signs compared to wild-type CHIKV (CHIKV-WT-infected mice; lack of disease signs correlated with significantly reduced viremia and decreased expression of proinflammatory factors. Mice immunized with CHIKV-NoLS, challenged with CHIKV-WT at 30 days postimmunization, develop no disease signs and no detectable viremia. Serum from CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice is able to efficiently neutralize CHIKV infection in vitro. Additionally, CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice challenged with the related alphavirus Ross River virus showed reduced early and peak viremia postchallenge, indicating a cross-protective effect. The high degree of CHIKV-NoLS attenuation may improve CHIKV antiviral and rational vaccine design.

  9. Topography of the Human Papillomavirus Minor Capsid Protein L2 during Vesicular Trafficking of Infectious Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Keiffer, Timothy R.; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Luszczek, Wioleta; Guion, Lucile G. M.; Müller, Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is composed of the major capsid protein L1 and the minor capsid protein L2. During entry, the HPV capsid undergoes numerous conformational changes that result in endosomal uptake and subsequent trafficking of the L2 protein in complex with the viral DNA to the trans-Golgi network. To facilitate this transport, the L2 protein harbors a number of putative motifs that, if capable of direct interaction, would interact with cytosolic host cell factors. These data imply that a portion of L2 becomes cytosolic during infection. Using a low concentration of digitonin to selectively permeabilize the plasma membrane of infected cells, we mapped the topography of the L2 protein during infection. We observed that epitopes within amino acid residues 64 to 81 and 163 to 170 and a C-terminal tag of HPV16 L2 are exposed on the cytosolic side of intracellular membranes, whereas an epitope within residues 20 to 38, which are upstream of a putative transmembrane region, is luminal. Corroborating these findings, we also found that L2 protein is sensitive to trypsin digestion during infection. These data demonstrate that the majority of the L2 protein becomes accessible on the cytosolic side of intracellular membranes in order to interact with cytosolic factors to facilitate vesicular trafficking. IMPORTANCE In order to complete infectious entry, nonenveloped viruses have to pass cellular membranes. This is often achieved through the viral capsid protein associating with or integrating into intracellular membrane. Here, we determine the topography of HPV L2 protein in the endocytic vesicular compartment, suggesting that L2 becomes a transmembrane protein with a short luminal portion and with the majority facing the cytosolic side for interaction with host cell transport factors. PMID:26246568

  10. Controlled Assembly of Viral Surface Proteins into Biological Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani-Webster, Eri

    In recent years, therapeutic use of engineered particles on the 1-1,000 nm scale has gained popularity; these nanoparticles have been developed for use in drug delivery, gene therapy, vaccine preparation, and diagnostics. Often, viral proteins are utilized in the design of such species, and outlined here are completed studies on the in vitro assembly of nanoparticles derived from two very different viral systems. The incorporation of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein precursor gp160 into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs is discussed as a potential platform for vaccine design; efforts were successful, however yield currently limits the practical application of this approach. The utility of bacteriophage lambda procapsids and virus-like particles in therapeutic nanoparticle design is also outlined, as are efforts toward the structural and thermodynamic characterization of a urea-triggered capsid maturation event. It is demonstrated that lambda virus-like particles can be assembled from purified capsid and scaffolding proteins, and that these particles undergo urea-triggered maturation and in vitro decoration protein addition similar to that seen in lambda procapsids. The studies on lambda provided materials for the further development of nanoparticles potentially useful in a clinical setting, as well as shedding light on critical viral assembly and maturation events as they may take place in vivo.

  11. Fully integrated, fully automated generation of short tandem repeat profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The generation of short tandem repeat profiles, also referred to as ‘DNA typing,’ is not currently performed outside the laboratory because the process requires highly skilled technical operators and a controlled laboratory environment and infrastructure with several specialized instruments. The goal of this work was to develop a fully integrated system for the automated generation of short tandem repeat profiles from buccal swab samples, to improve forensic laboratory process flow as well as to enable short tandem repeat profile generation to be performed in police stations and in field-forward military, intelligence, and homeland security settings. Results An integrated system was developed consisting of an injection-molded microfluidic BioChipSet cassette, a ruggedized instrument, and expert system software. For each of five buccal swabs, the system purifies DNA using guanidinium-based lysis and silica binding, amplifies 15 short tandem repeat loci and the amelogenin locus, electrophoretically separates the resulting amplicons, and generates a profile. No operator processing of the samples is required, and the time from swab insertion to profile generation is 84 minutes. All required reagents are contained within the BioChipSet cassette; these consist of a lyophilized polymerase chain reaction mix and liquids for purification and electrophoretic separation. Profiles obtained from fully automated runs demonstrate that the integrated system generates concordant short tandem repeat profiles. The system exhibits single-base resolution from 100 to greater than 500 bases, with inter-run precision with a standard deviation of ±0.05 - 0.10 bases for most alleles. The reagents are stable for at least 6 months at 22°C, and the instrument has been designed and tested to Military Standard 810F for shock and vibration ruggedization. A nontechnical user can operate the system within or outside the laboratory. Conclusions The integrated system represents the

  12. Fully automated (operational) modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynders, Edwin; Houbrechts, Jeroen; De Roeck, Guido

    2012-05-01

    Modal parameter estimation requires a lot of user interaction, especially when parametric system identification methods are used and the modes are selected in a stabilization diagram. In this paper, a fully automated, generally applicable three-stage clustering approach is developed for interpreting such a diagram. It does not require any user-specified parameter or threshold value, and it can be used in an experimental, operational, and combined vibration testing context and with any parametric system identification algorithm. The three stages of the algorithm correspond to the three stages in a manual analysis: setting stabilization thresholds for clearing out the diagram, detecting columns of stable modes, and selecting a representative mode from each column. An extensive validation study illustrates the accuracy and robustness of this automation strategy.

  13. Singularities in fully developed turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K., E-mail: bhimsen.shivamoggi@ucf.edu

    2015-09-18

    Phenomenological arguments are used to explore finite-time singularity (FTS) development in different physical fully-developed turbulence (FDT) situations. Effects of spatial intermittency and fluid compressibility in three-dimensional (3D) FDT and the role of the divorticity amplification mechanism in two-dimensional (2D) FDT and quasi-geostrophic FDT and the advection–diffusion mechanism in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are considered to provide physical insights into the FTS development in variant cascade physics situations. The quasi-geostrophic FDT results connect with the 2D FDT results in the barotropic limit while they connect with 3D FDT results in the baroclinic limit and hence apparently provide a bridge between 2D and 3D. - Highlights: • Finite-time singularity development in turbulence situations is phenomenologically explored. • Spatial intermittency and compressibility effects are investigated. • Quasi-geostrophic turbulence is shown to provide a bridge between two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases.

  14. Sabot assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bzorgi, Fariborz

    2016-11-08

    A sabot assembly includes a projectile and a housing dimensioned and configured for receiving the projectile. An air pressure cavity having a cavity diameter is disposed between a front end and a rear end of the housing. Air intake nozzles are in fluid communication with the air pressure cavity and each has a nozzle diameter less than the cavity diameter. In operation, air flows through the plurality of air intake nozzles and into the air pressure cavity upon firing of the projectile from a gun barrel to pressurize the air pressure cavity for assisting in separation of the housing from the projectile upon the sabot assembly exiting the gun barrel.

  15. Drawing a high-resolution functional map of adeno-associated virus capsid by massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kei; Enoki, Tatsuji; Kawano, Yasuhiro; Veraz, Michael; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid engineering is an emerging approach to advance gene therapy. However, a systematic analysis on how each capsid amino acid contributes to multiple functions remains challenging. Here we show proof-of-principle and successful application of a novel approach, termed AAV Barcode-Seq, that allows us to characterize phenotypes of hundreds of different AAV strains in a high-throughput manner and therefore overcomes technical difficulties in the systematic analysis. In this approach, we generate DNA barcode-tagged AAV libraries and determine a spectrum of phenotypes of each AAV strain by Illumina barcode sequencing. By applying this method to AAV capsid mutant libraries tagged with DNA barcodes, we can draw a high-resolution map of AAV capsid amino acids important for the structural integrity and functions including receptor binding, tropism, neutralization and blood clearance. Thus, Barcode-Seq provides a new tool to generate a valuable resource for virus and gene therapy research.

  16. The herpesvirus VP1/2 protein is an effector of dynein-mediated capsid transport and neuroinvasion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaichick, Sofia V; Bohannon, Kevin P; Hughes, Ami; Sollars, Patricia J; Pickard, Gary E; Smith, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Microtubule transport of herpesvirus capsids from the cell periphery to the nucleus is imperative for viral replication and, in the case of many alphaherpesviruses, transmission into the nervous system...

  17. Stability and assembly in vitro of bacteriophage PP7 virus-like particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peabody David S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The stability of a virus-like particle (VLP is an important consideration for its use in nanobiotechnology. The icosahedral capsid of the RNA bacteriophage PP7 is cross-linked by disulfide bonds between coat protein dimers at its 5-fold and quasi-6-fold symmetry axes. This work determined the effects of these disulfides on the VLP's thermal stability. Results Measurements of the thermal denaturation behavior of PP7 VLPs in the presence and absence of a reducing agent show that disulfide cross-links substantially stabilize them against thermal denaturation. Although dimers in the capsid are linked to one another by disulfides, the two subunits of dimers themselves are held together only by non-covalent interactions. In an effort to confer even greater stability a new cross-link was introduced by genetically fusing two coat protein monomers, thus producing a "single-chain dimer" that assembles normally into a completely cross-linked VLP. However, subunit fusion failed to increase the thermal stability of the particles, even though it stabilized the isolated dimer. As a step toward gaining control of the internal composition of the capsid, conditions that promote the assembly of PP7 coat protein dimers into virus-like particles in vitro were established. Conclusion The presence of inter-dimer disulfide bonds greatly stabilizes the PP7 virus-like particle against thermal denaturation. Covalently cross-linking the subunits of the dimers themselves by genetically fusing them through a dipeptide linker sequence, offers no further stabilization of the VLP, although it does stabilize the dimer. PP7 capsids readily assemble in vitro in a reaction that requires RNA.

  18. Physical mechanisms and biological significance of supramolecular protein self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentsis, Alex; Borden, Katherine L B

    2004-04-01

    In living cells, chemical reactions of metabolism, information processing, growth and development are organized in a complex network of interactions. At least in part, the organization of this network is accomplished as a result of physical assembly by supramolecular scaffolds. Indeed, most proteins function in cells within the context of multimeric or supramolecular assemblies. With the increasing availability of atomic structures and molecular thermodynamics, it is possible to recast the problem of non-covalent molecular self-assembly from a unified perspective of structural thermodynamics and kinetics. Here, we present a generalized theory of self-assembly based on Wegner's kinetic model and use it to delineate three physical mechanisms of self-assembly: as limited by association of assembly units (nucleation), by association of monomers (isodesmic), and by conformational reorganization of monomers that is coupled to assembly (conformational). Thus, we discuss actin, tubulin, clathrin, and the capsid of icosahedral cowpea chlorotic mottle virus with respect to assembly of architectural scaffolds that perform largely mechanical functions, and pyruvate dehydrogenase, and RING domain proteins PML, arenaviral Z, and BRCA1:BARD1 with regard to assembly of supramolecular enzymes with metabolic and chemically directive functions. In addition to the biological functions made possible by supramolecular self-assembly, such as mesoscale mechanics of architectural scaffolds and metabolic coupling of supramolecular enzymes, we show that the physical mechanisms of self-assembly and their structural bases are biologically significant as well, having regulatory roles in both formation and function of the assembled structures in health and disease.

  19. Engineering aspects of a fully mirrored endoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra, A., E-mail: a.terra@fz-juelich.de [Institute for Energy and Climate Research IEK-4 (Plasma Physics), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Assoc. EURATOM-FZJ, Member of the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Mertens, Ph. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research IEK-4 (Plasma Physics), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Assoc. EURATOM-FZJ, Member of the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Arnoux, G.; Balshaw, N. [Euratom-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research IEK-4 (Plasma Physics), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Assoc. EURATOM-FZJ, Member of the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Egner, S.; Hartl, M.; Kampf, D. [Kayser-Threde GmbH, D-81379 Munich (Germany); Klammer, J. [KRP-Mechatec Engineering GbR, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lambertz, H.T. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research IEK-4 (Plasma Physics), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Assoc. EURATOM-FZJ, Member of the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Morlock, C.; Murari, A. [EFDA-CSU, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Reindl, M. [KRP-Mechatec Engineering GbR, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Sanders, S. [Euratom-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sergienko, G. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research IEK-4 (Plasma Physics), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Assoc. EURATOM-FZJ, Member of the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Spencer, G. [Euratom-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Replacement of JET diagnostics to match the new ITER-like Wall. ► The endoscope test ITER-like design with only mirror based optics. ► Withstanding and diagnostic capability during Plasma operation and disruptions. ► Engineering process from design to installation and procurement. -- Abstract: The development of optical diagnostics, like endoscopes, compatible with the ITER environment (metallic plasma facing components, neutron proof optics, etc.) is a challenge, but current tokamaks such as JET provide opportunities to test fully working concepts. This paper describes the engineering aspects of a fully mirrored endoscope that has recently been designed, procured and installed on JET. The system must operate in a very strict environment with high temperature, high magnetic fields up to B = 4 T and rapid field variations (∂B/∂t ∼ 100 T/s) that induce high stresses due to eddy currents in the front mirror assembly. It must be designed to withstand high mechanical loads especially during disruptions, which lead to acceleration of about 7 g at 14 Hz. For the JET endoscope, when the plasma thermal loading, direct and indirect, was added to the assumed disruption loads, the reserve factor, defined as a ratio of yield strength over summed up von Mises stresses, was close to 1 for the mirror components. To ensure reliable operation, several analyses were performed to evaluate the thermo-mechanical performance of the endoscope and a final validation was obtained from mechanical and thermal tests, before the system's final installation in May 2011. During the tests, stability of the field of view angle variation was kept below 1° despite the high thermal gradient on endoscope head (∂T/∂x ∼ 500 K/m). In parallel, to ensure long time operation and to prevent undesirable performance degradation, a shutter system was also implemented in order to reduce impurity deposition on in-vessel mirrors but also to allow in situ transmission

  20. Restaurant No. 1 fully renovated

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Restaurant No. 1 team. After several months of patience and goodwill on the part of our clients, we are delighted to announce that the major renovation work which began in September 2006 has now been completed. From 21 May 2007 we look forward to welcoming you to a completely renovated restaurant area designed with you in mind. The restaurant team wishes to thank all its clients for their patience and loyalty. Particular attention has been paid in the new design to creating a spacious serving area and providing a wider choice of dishes. The new restaurant area has been designed as an open-plan space to enable you to view all the dishes before making your selection and to move around freely from one food access point to another. It comprises user-friendly areas that fully comply with hygiene standards. From now on you will be able to pick and choose to your heart's content. We invite you to try out wok cooking or some other speciality. Or select a pizza or a plate of pasta with a choice of two sauces fr...

  1. Location of the Bacteriophage P22 Coat Protein C-terminus Provides Opportunities for the Design of Capsid Based Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Servid, Amy; Jordan, Paul; O’Neil, Alison; Prevelige, Peter; Douglas, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Rational design of modifications to the interior and exterior surfaces of virus-like particles (VLPs) for future therapeutic and materials applications is based on structural information about the capsid. Existing cryo-electron microscopy based models suggest that the C-terminus of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein (CP) extends towards the capsid exterior. Our biochemical analysis through genetic manipulations of the C-terminus supports the model where the CP C-terminus is exposed on the ext...

  2. Targeting of herpesvirus capsid transport in axons is coupled to association with specific sets of tegument proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Luxton, G.W. Gant; Haverlock, Sarah; Coller, Kelly Elizabeth; Antinone, Sarah Elizabeth; Pincetic, Andrew; Smith, Gregory Allan

    2005-01-01

    The capsids of neurotropic herpesviruses have the remarkable ability to move in specific directions within axons. By modulating bidirectional capsid transport to favor either retrograde (minus-end) or anterograde (plus-end) motion, these viruses travel to sensory ganglia or peripheral tissue at specific stages of infection. By using correlative motion analysis to simultaneously monitor the trafficking of distinct viral proteins in living neurons, we demonstrate that viral “tegument” proteins ...

  3. Assembling consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies...... societies. This is an essential reading for both seasoned scholars and advanced students of markets, economies and social forms of consumption....

  4. Chronic hepatitis B infection and HBV DNA-containing capsids: Modeling and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Kalyan; Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of chronic HBV infection taking into account both uninfected and infected hepatocytes along with the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids and the virions. While previous HBV models have included either the uninfected hepatocytes or the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids, our model accounts for both these two populations. We prove the conditions for local and global stability of both the uninfected and infected steady states in terms of the basic reproduction number. Further, we incorporate a time lag in the model to encompass the intracellular delay in the production of the infected hepatocytes and find that this delay does not affect the overall dynamics of the system. The results for the model and the delay model are finally numerically illustrated.

  5. Theory of morphological transformation of viral capsid shells during maturation process

    CERN Document Server

    Konevtsova, O V; Rochal, S B

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of the Landau-Ginzburg formalism we propose a minimal phenomenological model for a morphological transformation in viral capsid shells. The transformation takes place during virus maturation process which renders virus infectious. The theory is illustrated on the example of the HK97 bacteriophage and viruses with similar morphological changes in the protective protein shell. The transformation is shown to be a structural phase transition driven by two order parameters. The first order parameter describes the isotropic expansion of the protein shell while the second one is responsible for the shape symmetry breaking and the resulting shell faceting. The group theory analysis and the resulting thermodynamic model make it possible to choose the parameter which discriminates between the icosahedral shell faceting often observed in viral capsids and the dodecahedral one observed in viruses of the Parvovirus family. Calculated phase diagram illustrates the discontinuous character of the virus morpholog...

  6. DNA condensates organized by the capsid protein VP15 in White Spot Syndrome Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingjie; Wu, Jinlu; Chen, Hu; Hew, Choy Leong; Yan, Jie

    2010-12-20

    The White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) has a large circular double-stranded DNA genome of around 300kb and it replicates in the nucleus of the host cells. The machinery of how the viral DNA is packaged has been remained unclear. VP15, a highly basic protein, is one of the major capsid proteins found in the virus. Previously, it was shown to be a DNA binding protein and was hypothesized to participate in the viral DNA packaging process. Using Atomic Force Microscopy imaging, we show that the viral DNA is associated with a (or more) capsid proteins. The organized viral DNA qualitatively resembles the conformations of VP15 induced DNA condensates in vitro. Furthermore, single-DNA manipulation experiments revealed that VP15 is able to condense single DNA against forces of a few pico Newtons. Our results suggest that VP15 may aid in the viral DNA packaging process by directly condensing DNA.

  7. Anti-HERV-K (HML-2) capsid antibody responses in HIV elite controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mulder, Miguel; SenGupta, Devi; Deeks, Steven G; Martin, Jeffrey N; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sacha, Jonah B; Nixon, Douglas F; Michaud, Henri-Alexandre

    2017-08-22

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) comprise approximately 8% of the human genome and while the majority are transcriptionally silent, the most recently integrated HERV, HERV-K (HML-2), remains active. During HIV infection, HERV-K (HML-2) specific mRNA transcripts and viral proteins can be detected. In this study, we aimed to understand the antibody response against HERV-K (HML-2) Gag in the context of HIV-1 infection. We developed an ELISA assay using either recombinant protein or 164 redundant "15mer" HERV-K (HML-2) Gag peptides to test sera for antibody reactivity. We identified a total of eight potential HERV-K (HML-2) Gag immunogenic domains: two on the matrix (peptides 16 and 31), one on p15 (peptide 85), three on the capsid (peptides 81, 97 and 117), one on the nucleocapsid (peptide 137) and one on the QP1 protein (peptide 157). Four epitopes (peptides 16, 31, 85 and 137) were highly immunogenic. No significant differences in antibody responses were found between HIV infected participants (n = 40) and uninfected donors (n = 40) for 6 out of the 8 epitopes tested. The antibody response against nucleocapsid (peptide 137) was significantly lower (p K (HML-2) capsid recombinant peptide in gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme immunospot (Elispot) assays. We found that the HERV-K (HML-2) Gag antibody and T cell response by Elispot were significantly correlated. HIV elite controllers had a strong cellular and antibody response against HERV-K (HML-2) Gag directed mainly against the Capsid region. Collectively, these data suggest that anti-HERV-K (HML-2) antibodies targeting capsid could have an immunoprotective effect in HIV infection.

  8. Interactions of the HSV-1 UL25 Capsid Protein with Cellular Microtubule-associated Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei GUO; Ying ZHANG; Yan-chun CHE; Wen-juan WU; Wei-zhong LI; Li-chun WANG; Yun LIAO; Long-ding LIU; Qi-han LI

    2008-01-01

    An interaction between the HSV-1 UL25 capsid protein and cellular microtubule-associated protein was found using a yeast two-hybrid screen and β-D-galactosidase activity assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy of the UL25 protein demonstrated its co-localization with cellular microtubule-associated protein in the plasma membrane. Further investigations with deletion mutants suggest that UL25 is likely to have a function in the nucleus.

  9. The fully Mobile City Government Project (MCity)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholl, Hans; Fidel, Raya; Mai, Jens Erik

    2006-01-01

    The Fully Mobile City Government Project, also known as MCity, is an interdisciplinary research project on the premises, requirements, and effects of fully mobile, wirelessly connected applications (FWMC). The project will develop an analytical framework for interpreting the interaction...

  10. Mapping the AAV capsid host antibody response towards the development of second generation gene delivery vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shan eTseng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recombinant Adeno-associated virus (rAAV gene delivery system is entering a crucial and exciting phase with the promise of more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials. However, as a natural host to AAV infection, anti-AAV antibodies are prevalent in the human population. For example, ~70% of human sera samples are positive for AAV serotype 2 (AAV2. Furthermore, low levels of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in the circulation are detrimental to the efficacy of corrective therapeutic AAV gene delivery. A key component to overcoming this obstacle is the identification of regions of the AAV capsid that participate in interactions with host immunity, especially neutralizing antibodies, to be modified for neutralization escape. Three main approaches have been utilized to map antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids. The first is directed evolution in which AAV variants are selected in the presence of monoclonal antibodies or pooled human sera. This results in AAV variants with mutations on important neutralizing epitopes. The second is epitope searching, achieved by peptide scanning, peptide insertion or site-directed mutagenesis. The third, a structure biology-based approach, utilizes cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of AAV capsids complexed to fragment antibodies, which are generated from monoclonal antibodies, to directly visualize the epitopes. In this review, the contribution of these three approaches to the current knowledge of AAV epitopes and success in their use to create second generation vectors will be discussed.

  11. Detection of major capsid protein of infectious myonecrosis virus in shrimps using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Caroline H; Borsa, Mariana; Rosa, Rafael D; Cargnin-Ferreira, Eduardo; Pereira, Alitiene M L; Grisard, Edmundo C; Zanetti, Carlos R; Pinto, Aguinaldo R

    2010-10-01

    Infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) has been causing a progressive disease in farm-reared shrimps in Brazil and Indonesia. Immunodiagnostic methods for IMNV detection, although reliable, are not employed currently because monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against this virus are not available. In this study, a fragment of the IMNV major capsid protein gene, comprising amino acids 300-527 (IMNV(300-527)), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequence of the recombinant IMNV(300-527) fragment displayed a high degree of identity to the major capsid protein of IMNV isolates from Brazil (99%) and Indonesia (98%). Ten MAbs were generated against the expressed fragment, and eight of these, mostly IgG(2a) or IgG(2b), were able to bind to IMNV in tissue extracts from shrimps infected naturally in immunodot-blot assays. Six of these MAbs recognized a approximately 100 kDa protein in a Western-blot, which is the predicted mass of IMNV major capsid protein, and also bound to viral inclusions present in muscle fibroses and in coagulative myonecrosis, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. Among all those MAbs created, four did not cross-react with non-infected shrimp tissues; this observation supports their applicability as a sensitive and specific immunodiagnosis of IMNV infection in shrimps.

  12. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal of canine parvovirus capsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihinen-Ranta, M; Kakkola, L; Kalela, A; Vilja, P; Vuento, M

    1997-12-01

    We investigated the abilities of synthetic peptides mimicking the potential nuclear localization signal of canine parvovirus (CPV) capsid proteins to translocate a carrier protein to the nucleus following microinjection into the cytoplasm of A72 cells. Possible nuclear localization sequences were chosen for synthesis from CPV capsid protein sequences (VP1, VP2) on the basis of the presence of clustered basic residues, which is a common theme in most of the previously identified targeting peptides. Nuclear targeting activity was found within the N-terminal residues 4-13 (PAKRARRGYK) of the VP1 capsid protein. While replacement of Arg10 with glycine did not affect the activity, replacement of Lys6, Arg7, or Arg9 with glycine abolished it. The targeting activity was found to residue in a cluster of basic residues, Lys5, Arg7, and Arg9. Nuclear import was saturated by excess of unlabelled peptide conjugates (showing that it was a receptor-mediated process). Transport into the nucleus was an energy-dependent and temperature-dependent process actively mediated by the nuclear pores and inhibited by wheat germ agglutinin.

  13. Viral capsid is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern in adenovirus keratitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish V Chintakuntlawar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Human adenovirus (HAdV infection of the human eye, in particular serotypes 8, 19 and 37, induces the formation of corneal subepithelial leukocytic infiltrates. Using a unique mouse model of adenovirus keratitis, we studied the role of various virus-associated molecular patterns in subsequent innate immune responses of resident corneal cells to HAdV-37 infection. We found that neither viral DNA, viral gene expression, or viral replication was necessary for the development of keratitis. In contrast, empty viral capsid induced keratitis and a chemokine profile similar to intact virus. Transfected viral DNA did not induce leukocyte infiltration despite CCL2 expression similar to levels in virus infected corneas. Mice without toll-like receptor 9 (Tlr9 signaling developed clinical keratitis upon HAdV-37 infection similar to wild type mice, although the absolute numbers of activated monocytes in the cornea were less in Tlr9(-/- mice. Virus induced leukocytic infiltrates and chemokine expression in mouse cornea could be blocked by treatment with a peptide containing arginine glycine aspartic acid (RGD. These results demonstrate that adenovirus infection of the cornea induces chemokine expression and subsequent infiltration by leukocytes principally through RGD contact between viral capsid and the host cell, possibly through direct interaction between the viral capsid penton base and host cell integrins.

  14. Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Binds Core Histones and Inhibits Nucleosome Formation in Human Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M.; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection. PMID:21909430

  15. Phage-displayed peptides that mimic epitopes of hepatitis E virus capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, Osmany; Petrik, Juraj

    2017-08-01

    Hepatitis E is an emerging zoonotic infection of increasing public health threat for the UK, especially for immunosuppressed individuals. A human recombinant vaccine has been licensed only in China and is not clear whether it protects against hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3, the most prevalent in Europe. The aim of this study was to use phage display technology as a tool to identify peptides that mimic epitopes of HEV capsid (mimotopes). We identified putative linear and conformational mimotopes using sera from Scottish blood donors that have the immunological imprint of past HEV infection. Four mimotopes did not have homology with the primary sequence of HEV ORF2 capsid but competed effectively with a commercial HEV antigen for binding to anti-HEV reference serum. When the reactivity profile of each mimotope was compared with Wantai HEV-IgG ELISA, the most sensitive HEV immunoassay, mimotopes showed 95.2-100% sensitivity while the specificity ranged from 81.5 to 95.8%. PepSurf algorithm was used to map affinity-selected peptides onto the ORF2 crystal structure of HEV genotype 3, which predicted that these four mimototopes are clustered in the P domain of ORF2 capsid, near conformational epitopes of anti-HEV neutralising monoclonal antibodies. These HEV mimotopes may have potential applications in the design of structural vaccines and the development of new diagnostic tests.

  16. The Feline Calicivirus Leader of the Capsid Protein Is Associated with Cytopathic Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abente, Eugenio J.; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Parra, Gabriel I.; Bok, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Open reading frame 2 (ORF2) of the feline calicivirus (FCV) genome encodes a capsid precursor that is posttranslationally processed to release the mature capsid protein (VP1) and a small protein of 124 amino acids, designated the leader of the capsid (LC). To investigate the role of the LC protein in the virus life cycle, mutations and deletions were introduced into the LC coding region of an infectious FCV cDNA clone. Three cysteine residues that are conserved among all vesivirus LC sequences were found to be critical for the recovery of FCV with a characteristic cytopathic effect in feline kidney cells. A cell-rounding phenotype associated with the transient expression of wild-type and mutagenized forms of the LC correlated with the cytopathic and growth properties of the corresponding engineered viruses. The host cellular protein annexin A2 was identified as a binding partner of the LC protein, consistent with a role for the LC in mediating host cell interactions that alter the integrity of the cell and enable virus spread. PMID:23269802

  17. Addition of exogenous polypeptides on the mammalian reovirus outer capsid using reverse genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochu-Lafontaine, Virginie; Lemay, Guy

    2012-02-01

    Addition of exogenous peptide sequences on viral capsids is a powerful approach to study the process of viral infection or to retarget viruses toward defined cell types. Until recently, it was not possible to manipulate the genome of mammalian reovirus and this was an obstacle to the addition of exogenous sequence tags onto the capsid of a replicating virus. This obstacle has now been overcome by the availability of the plasmid-based reverse genetics system. In the present study, reverse genetics was used to introduce different exogenous peptides, up to 40 amino acids long, at the carboxyl-terminal end of the σ1 outer capsid protein. The tagged viruses obtained were infectious, produce plaques of similar size, and could be easily propagated at high titers. However, attempts to introduce a 750 nucleotides-long sequence failed, even when it was added after the stop codon, suggesting a possible size limitation at the nucleic acid level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Motion of an antiviral compound in a rhinovirus capsid under rotational symmetry boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Shigetaka; Yoneda, Teruyo; Kurihara, Youji; Umeyama, Hideaki

    2002-08-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of a complex of a rhinovirus protein shell referred to as a "capsid" and an anti-rhinovirus drug, WIN52084s, was performed under the rotational symmetry boundary conditions. For the simulation, the energy parameters of WIN52084s in all-atom approximations were determined by ab initio calculations using a 6-31G* basis set and the two-conformational two-stage restricted electrostatic potential fit method. The motion of WIN52084s and the capsid was focused on in the analysis of the trajectory of the simulation. The root mean square deviations of WIN52084s from the X-ray structure were decomposed to conformational, translational, and rotational components. The translation was further decomposed to radial, longitudinal, and lateral components. The conformation of WIN52084s was rigid, but moving in the pocket. The easiest path of motion for WlN52084s was on the longitudinal line, providing a track for the binding process required of the anti-rhinovirus drug to enter the pocket. The conformation of the pocket was also preserved in the simulation, although the position of the pocket in the capsid fluctuated in the lateral and radial directions.

  19. Enhancing the clinical potential of AAV vectors by capsid engineering to evade pre-existing immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa eBartel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Vectors based on adeno-associated viruses have shown considerable promise in both preclinical models and increasingly in clinical trials. However, one formidable challenge is pre-existing immunity due to widespread exposure to numerous AAV variants and serotypes within the human population, which affect efficacy of clinical trials due to the accompanying high levels of anti-capsid neutralizing antibodies. Transient immunosuppression has promise in mitigating cellular and humoral responses induced by vector application in naïve hosts, but cannot overcome the problem that pre-existing neutralizing antibodies pose towards the goal of safe and efficient gene delivery. Shielding of AAV from antibodies, however, may be possible by covalent attachment of polymers to the viral capsid or by encapsulation of vectors inside biomaterials. In addition, there has been considerable progress in using rational mutagenesis, combinatorial libraries, and directed evolution approaches to engineer capsid variants that are not recognized by anti-AAV antibodies generally present in the human population. While additional progress must be made, such strategies, alone or in combination with immunosuppression to avoid de novo induction of antibodies, have strong potential to significantly enhance the clinical efficacy of AAV vectors.

  20. Modeling of the human rhinovirus C capsid suggests possible causes for antiviral drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, Holly A; Ashraf, Shamaila; Sgro, Jean-Yves; Bochkov, Yury A; Gern, James E; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2014-01-05

    Human rhinoviruses of the RV-C species are recently discovered pathogens with greater clinical significance than isolates in the RV-A+B species. The RV-C cannot be propagated in typical culture systems; so much of the virology is necessarily derivative, relying on comparative genomics, relative to the better studied RV-A+B. We developed a bioinformatics-based structural model for a C15 isolate. The model showed the VP1-3 capsid proteins retain their fundamental cores relative to the RV-A+B, but conserved, internal RV-C residues affect the shape and charge of the VP1 hydrophobic pocket that confers antiviral drug susceptibility. When predictions of the model were tested in organ cultures or ALI systems with recombinant C15 virus, there was a resistance to capsid-binding drugs, including pleconaril, BTA-188, WIN56291, WIN52035 and WIN52084. Unique to all RV-C, the model predicts conserved amino acids within the pocket and capsid surface pore leading to the pocket may correlate with this activity.

  1. Dengue virus capsid protein binds core histones and inhibits nucleosome formation in human liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonya M Colpitts

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (reemerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection.

  2. Solid-to-fluid DNA transition inside HSV-1 capsid close to the temperature of infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sae-Ueng, Udom; Li, Dong; Zuo, Xiaobing; Huffman, Jamie B.; Homa, Fred L.; Rau, Donald; Evilevitch, Alex

    2014-10-01

    DNA in the human Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsid is packaged to a tight density. This leads to tens of atmospheres of internal pressure responsible for the delivery of the herpes genome into the cell nucleus. In this study we show that, despite its liquid crystalline state inside the capsid, the DNA is fluid-like, which facilitates its ejection into the cell nucleus during infection. We found that the sliding friction between closely packaged DNA strands, caused by interstrand repulsive interactions, is reduced by the ionic environment of epithelial cells and neurons susceptible to herpes infection. However, variations in the ionic conditions corresponding to neuronal activity can restrict DNA mobility in the capsid, making it more solid-like. This can inhibit intranuclear DNA release and interfere with viral replication. In addition, the temperature of the human host (37 °C) induces a disordering transition of the encapsidated herpes genome, which reduces interstrand interactions and provides genome mobility required for infection.

  3. Development of an IP-Free Biotechnology Platform for Constitutive Production of HPV16 L1 Capsid Protein Using the Pichia pastoris PGK1 Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Mariz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV L1 major capsid protein, which forms the basis of the currently available vaccines against cervical cancer, self-assembles into virus-like particles (VLPs when expressed heterologously. We report the development of a biotechnology platform for HPV16 L1 protein expression based on the constitutive PGK1 promoter (PPGK1 from the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The L1 gene was cloned under regulation of PPGK1 into pPGKΔ3 expression vector to achieve intracellular expression. In parallel, secretion of the L1 protein was obtained through the use of an alternative vector called pPGKΔ3α, in which a codon optimized α-factor signal sequence was inserted. We devised a work-flow based on the detection of the L1 protein by dot blot, colony blot, and western blot to classify the positive clones. Finally, intracellular HPV VLPs assembly was demonstrated for the first time in yeast cells. This study opens up perspectives for the establishment of an innovative platform for the production of HPV VLPs or other viral antigens for vaccination purposes, based on constitutive expression in P. pastoris.

  4. Application of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels in light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, C.; George, N.; Maldonado, I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee-Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); Godfrey, A.; Terrani, K.; Gehin, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This study performs a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of incorporation of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuels in light water reactors (LWRs). In particular, pin cell, lattice, and full core analyses are carried out on FCM fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Using uranium-based fuel and Pu/Np-based fuel in TRistructural isotropic (TRISO) particle form, each fuel design was examined using the SCALE 6.1 analytical suite. In regards to the uranium-based fuel, pin cell calculations were used to determine which fuel material performed best when implemented in the fuel kernel as well as the size of the kernel and surrounding particle layers. The higher fissile material density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, while the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design with 19.75% enrichment would need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO{sub 2} rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a 'color-set' array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In regards to the Pu/Np-based fuel, lattice calculations were performed to determine an optimal lattice design based on reactivity behavior, pin power peaking, and isotopic content. After obtaining a satisfactory lattice design, the feasibility of core designs fully loaded with Pu/Np FCM lattices was demonstrated using the NESTLE three-dimensional core simulator. (authors)

  5. Application of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuels in Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, Cole A [ORNL; George, Nathan M [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to perform a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of incorporation of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuels in Light Water Reactors (LWRs). In particular pin cell, lattice, and full core analyses are carried out on FCM fuel in a pressurized water reactor. Using uranium-based fuel and transuranic (TRU) based fuel in TRistructural ISOtropic (TRISO) particle form, each fuel design was examined using the SCALE 6.1 analytical suite. In regards to the uranium-based fuel, pin cell calculations were used to determine which fuel material performed best when implemented in the fuel kernel as well as the size of the kernel and surrounding particle layers. The higher physical density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, while the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design would need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a color-set array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In regards to the TRU based fuel, lattice calculations were performed to determine an optimal lattice design based on reactivity behavior, pin power peaking, and isotopic content. After obtaining a satisfactory lattice design, feasibility of core designs fully loaded with TRU FCM lattices was demonstrated using the NESTLE three-dimensional core simulator.

  6. STS-100 MS Phillips is fully suited up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - STS-100 Mission Specialist John L. Phillips is fully suited for launch. The 11-day mission to the International Space Station will deliver and integrate the Spacelab Logistics Pallet/Launch Deployment Assembly, which includes the Space Station Remote Manipulator system and the UHF Antenna, and the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello. The mission includes two planned spacewalks for installation of the SSRMS. The mission is also the inaugural flight of Raffaello, carrying resupply stowage racks and resupply/return stowage platforms. Liftoff on mission STS-100 is scheduled at 2:41 p.m. EDT April 19.

  7. Dump assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Louis H.

    1986-01-01

    A dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough.

  8. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  9. Mutational Analysis of the Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 (AAV2) Capsid Gene and Construction of AAV2 Vectors with Altered Tropism

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Pei; Xiao, Wu; Conlon, Thomas; Hughes, Jeffrey; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; FERKOL, THOMAS; Flotte, Terence; Muzyczka, Nicholas

    2000-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) has proven to be a valuable vector for gene therapy. Characterization of the functional domains of the AAV capsid proteins can facilitate our understanding of viral tissue tropism, immunoreactivity, viral entry, and DNA packaging, all of which are important issues for generating improved vectors. To obtain a comprehensive genetic map of the AAV capsid gene, we have constructed 93 mutants at 59 different positions in the AAV capsid gene by site-directed mut...

  10. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenen, Antje [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Gillespie, Leah [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der [Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Khromykh, Alexander [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Mackenzie, Jason, E-mail: jason.mackenzie@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-01-05

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV{sub KUN} particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV{sub KUN} under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV{sub KUN} assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV{sub KUN} assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition.

  11. High-resolution mass spectrometry of viral assemblies: Molecular composition and stability of dimorphic hepatitis B virus capsids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uetrecht, Charlotte; Versluis, Cees; Watts, Norman R.; Roos, Wouter H.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Wingfield, Paul T.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major human pathogen. In addition to its importance in human health, there is growing interest in adapting HBV and other viruses for drug delivery and other nanotechnological applications. In both contexts, precise biophysical characterization of these large macromolecul

  12. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : 1- Adoption de l’ordre du jour. 2- Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. 3- Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. 4- Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. 5- Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. 6- Programme 2015. 7- Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. 8- Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. 9- Élections des membres de la Commission é...

  13. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Mardi 5 avril à 11 h 00 BE Auditorium Meyrin (6-2-024) Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 mai 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2015. Programme de travail 2016. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2016 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2017. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commissio...

  14. General assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. Programme 2015. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. &am...

  15. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 avril 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2016. Programme de travail 2017. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2017 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2018. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposées. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. Élections des vérifica...

  16. Assembly of lamins in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MINGUNGWEI; XIANGJUNTONG; 等

    1996-01-01

    After lamins A,B and C were isolated and purified from rat liver,their assembly properties were examined by electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy by electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy using negative staining and the glycerol coating method,respectively.By varying the assembly time or the ionic conditions under which polymerization takes place,we have observed different stages of lamin assembly,which may provide clues on the structure of the 10 nm lamin filaments.At the first level of structural organization,two lamin polypeptides associate laterally into dimers with the two domains being parallel and in register.At the second level of structural organization,two dimers associate in a half-staggered and antiparallel fashion to form a tetramer 75 nm in length.At the third level of structural organization,4-10 lamin tetramers associate laterally in register to form 75 nm long 10nm filaments,which in turn combine head to head into long,fully assembled lamin filaments.The assembled lamin filaments are nonpolar.

  17. Latest insights on adenovirus structure and assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martín, Carmen

    2012-05-01

    Adenovirus (AdV) capsid organization is considerably complex, not only because of its large size (~950 Å) and triangulation number (pseudo T = 25), but also because it contains four types of minor proteins in specialized locations modulating the quasi-equivalent icosahedral interactions. Up until 2009, only its major components (hexon, penton, and fiber) had separately been described in atomic detail. Their relationships within the virion, and the location of minor coat proteins, were inferred from combining the known crystal structures with increasingly more detailed cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) maps. There was no structural information on assembly intermediates. Later on that year, two reports described the structural differences between the mature and immature adenoviral particle, starting to shed light on the different stages of viral assembly, and giving further insights into the roles of core and minor coat proteins during morphogenesis [1,2]. Finally, in 2010, two papers describing the atomic resolution structure of the complete virion appeared [3,4]. These reports represent a veritable tour de force for two structural biology techniques: X-ray crystallography and cryoEM, as this is the largest macromolecular complex solved at high resolution by either of them. In particular, the cryoEM analysis provided an unprecedented clear picture of the complex protein networks shaping the icosahedral shell. Here I review these latest developments in the field of AdV structural studies.

  18. Latest Insights on Adenovirus Structure and Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen San Martín

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (AdV capsid organization is considerably complex, not only because of its large size (~950 Å and triangulation number (pseudo T = 25, but also because it contains four types of minor proteins in specialized locations modulating the quasi-equivalent icosahedral interactions. Up until 2009, only its major components (hexon, penton, and fiber had separately been described in atomic detail. Their relationships within the virion, and the location of minor coat proteins, were inferred from combining the known crystal structures with increasingly more detailed cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM maps. There was no structural information on assembly intermediates. Later on that year, two reports described the structural differences between the mature and immature adenoviral particle, starting to shed light on the different stages of viral assembly, and giving further insights into the roles of core and minor coat proteins during morphogenesis [1,2]. Finally, in 2010, two papers describing the atomic resolution structure of the complete virion appeared [3,4]. These reports represent a veritable tour de force for two structural biology techniques: X-ray crystallography and cryoEM, as this is the largest macromolecular complex solved at high resolution by either of them. In particular, the cryoEM analysis provided an unprecedented clear picture of the complex protein networks shaping the icosahedral shell. Here I review these latest developments in the field of AdV structural studies.

  19. HSV-1 Glycoproteins Are Delivered to Virus Assembly Sites Through Dynamin-Dependent Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albecka, Anna; Laine, Romain F; Janssen, Anne F J; Kaminski, Clemens F; Crump, Colin M

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is a large enveloped DNA virus that belongs to the family of Herpesviridae. It has been recently shown that the cytoplasmic membranes that wrap the newly assembled capsids are endocytic compartments derived from the plasma membrane. Here, we show that dynamin-dependent endocytosis plays a major role in this process. Dominant-negative dynamin and clathrin adaptor AP180 significantly decrease virus production. Moreover, inhibitors targeting dynamin and clathrin lead to a decreased transport of glycoproteins to cytoplasmic capsids, confirming that glycoproteins are delivered to assembly sites via endocytosis. We also show that certain combinations of glycoproteins colocalize with each other and with the components of clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytosis pathways. Importantly, we demonstrate that the uptake of neutralizing antibodies that bind to glycoproteins when they become exposed on the cell surface during virus particle assembly leads to the production of non-infectious HSV-1. Our results demonstrate that transport of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane prior to endocytosis is the major route by which these proteins are localized to the cytoplasmic virus assembly compartments. This highlights the importance of endocytosis as a major protein-sorting event during HSV-1 envelopment.

  20. Exacerbated Leishmaniasis Caused by a Viral Endosymbiont can be Prevented by Immunization with Its Viral Capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglioni, Patrik; Hartley, Mary-Anne; Rossi, Matteo; Prevel, Florence; Desponds, Chantal; Utzschneider, Daniel T.; Eren, Remzi-Onur; Zangger, Haroun; Brunner, Livia; Collin, Nicolas; Zehn, Dietmar; Kuhlmann, F. Matthew; Beverley, Stephen M.; Ronet, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that a cytoplasmic virus called Leishmaniavirus (LRV) is present in some Leishmania species and acts as a potent innate immunogen, aggravating lesional inflammation and development in mice. In humans, the presence of LRV in Leishmania guyanensis and in L. braziliensis was significantly correlated with poor treatment response and symptomatic relapse. So far, no clinical effort has used LRV for prophylactic purposes. In this context, we designed an original vaccine strategy that targeted LRV nested in Leishmania parasites to prevent virus-related complications. To this end, C57BL/6 mice were immunized with a recombinant LRV1 Leishmania guyanensis viral capsid polypeptide formulated with a T helper 1-polarizing adjuvant. LRV1-vaccinated mice had significant reduction in lesion size and parasite load when subsequently challenged with LRV1+ Leishmania guyanensis parasites. The protection conferred by this immunization could be reproduced in naïve mice via T-cell transfer from vaccinated mice but not by serum transfer. The induction of LRV1 specific T cells secreting IFN-γ was confirmed in vaccinated mice and provided strong evidence that LRV1-specific protection arose via a cell mediated immune response against the LRV1 capsid. Our studies suggest that immunization with LRV1 capsid could be of a preventive benefit in mitigating the elevated pathology associated with LRV1 bearing Leishmania infections and possibly avoiding symptomatic relapses after an initial treatment. This novel anti-endosymbiotic vaccine strategy could be exploited to control other infectious diseases, as similar viral infections are largely prevalent across pathogenic pathogens and could consequently open new vaccine opportunities. PMID:28099431

  1. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F. [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); McDonald, Sarah M., E-mail: mcdonaldsa@vtc.vt.edu [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia—Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy.

  2. B- and T-cell epitope mapping of human sapovirus capsid protein: an immunomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M Ruhul; Siddiqui, Mohammad S; Ahmed, Dilruba; Ahmed, Firoz; Hossain, Anowar

    2011-01-01

    Human sapovirus is one of the major causes of viral gastroenteritis. Although the capsid protein (VP1) confers antigenic cross-reactivity, immunity against sapovirus is still unclear. Using immunoinformatics approach, we defined putative T- and B-cell epitopes of VP1 and mapped on to its predicted three-dimensional structure. Identified five putative T-cell epitopes also occupied the putative B-cell epitope region. These putative epitopes were conserved in all existing serotypes. Predicted epitopes can be generated through proteasome cleavage and may be useful in designing peptide-based subunit vaccine to confer both humoral and cell-mediated immunity.

  3. Optimization of Substitution Matrix for Sequence Alignment of Major Capsid Proteins of Human Herpes Simplex Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipan Kumar Sohpal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein sequence alignment has become an informative tool in modern molecular biology research. A number of substitution matrices have been readily available for sequence alignments, but it is challenging task to compute optimal matrices for alignment accuracy. Here, we used the parameter optimization procedure to select the optimal Q of substitution matrices for major viral capsid protein of human herpes simplex virus. Results predict that Blosum matrix is most accurate on alignment benchmarks, and Blosum 60 provides the optimal Q in all substitution matrices. PAM 200 matrices results slightly below than Blosum 60, while VTML matrices are intermediate of PAM and VT matrices under dynamic programming.

  4. Sizing up large protein complexes by electrospray ionisation-based electrophoretic mobility and native mass spectrometry : morphology selective binding of Fabs to hepatitis B virus capsids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bereszczak, Jessica Z; Havlik, Marlene; Weiss, Victor U; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; van Duijn, Esther; Watts, Norman R; Wingfield, Paul T; Allmaier, Guenter; Steven, Alasdair C; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-01-01

    The capsid of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major viral antigen and important diagnostic indicator. HBV capsids have prominent protrusions ('spikes') on their surface and are unique in having either T = 3 or T = 4 icosahedral symmetry. Mouse monoclonal and also human polyclonal antibodies bind either

  5. Analogs of LDL Receptor Ligand Motifs in Dengue Envelope and Capsid Proteins as Potential Codes for Cell Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Guevara; Jaime Romo; Troy McWhorter; Natalia Valentinova Guevara

    2015-01-01

    It is established that cell entry of low density lipoprotein particles (LLPs) containing Apo B100 and Apo E is mediated by receptors and GAGs. Receptor ligand motifs, XBBBXXBX, XBBXBX, and ΨBΨXB, and mono- and bipartite NLS sequences are abundant in Apo E and Apo B100 as well as in envelope and capsid proteins of Dengue viruses 1–4 (DENV1–4). Synthetic, fluorescence-labeled peptides of sequences in DENV2 envelope protein, and DENV3 capsid that include these motifs were used to conduct a quali...

  6. Structural Basis for the Development of Avian Virus Capsids That Display Influenza Virus Proteins and Induce Protective Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual, Elena; Mata, Carlos P.; Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Moreno, Noelia; Bárcena, Juan; Blanco, Esther; Rodríguez-Frandsen, Ariel; Nieto, Amelia; Carrascosa, José L.; Castón, José R.

    2014-01-01

    Bioengineering of viruses and virus-like particles (VLPs) is a well-established approach in the development of new and improved vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. We report here that the capsid of a major avian pathogen, infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), can accommodate heterologous proteins to induce protective immunity. The structural units of the ∼70-nm-diameter T=13 IBDV capsid are trimers of VP2, which is made as a precursor (pVP2). The pVP2 C-terminal domain has an am...

  7. Chirality controlled responsive self-assembled nanotubes in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijken, D. J.; Stacko, P.; Stuart, M. C. A.; Browne, W. R.; Feringa, B. L.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of using chirality to dictate dimensions and to store chiral information in self-assembled nanotubes in a fully controlled manner is presented. We report a photoresponsive amphiphile that co-assembles with its chiral counterpart to form nanotubes and demonstrate how chirality can be used

  8. Genetically Thermo-Stabilised, Immunogenic Poliovirus Empty Capsids; a Strategy for Non-replicating Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Helen; Minor, Philip D.

    2017-01-01

    While wild type polio has been nearly eradicated there will be a need to continue immunisation programmes for some time because of the possibility of re-emergence and the existence of long term excreters of poliovirus. All vaccines in current use depend on growth of virus and most of the non-replicating (inactivated) vaccines involve wild type viruses known to cause poliomyelitis. The attenuated vaccine strains involved in the eradication programme have been used to develop new inactivated vaccines as production is thought safer. However it is known that the Sabin vaccine strains are genetically unstable and can revert to a virulent transmissible form. A possible solution to the need for virus growth would be to generate empty viral capsids by recombinant technology, but hitherto such particles are so unstable as to be unusable. We report here the genetic manipulation of the virus to generate stable empty capsids for all three serotypes. The particles are shown to be extremely stable and to generate high levels of protective antibodies in animal models. PMID:28103317

  9. Cross-serotype immunity induced by immunization with a conserved rhinovirus capsid protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Glanville

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (RV infections are the principle cause of common colds and precipitate asthma and COPD exacerbations. There is currently no RV vaccine, largely due to the existence of ∼150 strains. We aimed to define highly conserved areas of the RV proteome and test their usefulness as candidate antigens for a broadly cross-reactive vaccine, using a mouse infection model. Regions of the VP0 (VP4+VP2 capsid protein were identified as having high homology across RVs. Immunization with a recombinant VP0 combined with a Th1 promoting adjuvant induced systemic, antigen specific, cross-serotype, cellular and humoral immune responses. Similar cross-reactive responses were observed in the lungs of immunized mice after infection with heterologous RV strains. Immunization enhanced the generation of heterosubtypic neutralizing antibodies and lung memory T cells, and caused more rapid virus clearance. Conserved domains of the RV capsid therefore induce cross-reactive immune responses and represent candidates for a subunit RV vaccine.

  10. Critical Role of Autophagy in the Processing of Adenovirus Capsid-Incorporated Cancer-Specific Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R Klein

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are highly immunogenic and are being examined as potential vectors for immunotherapy. Infection by oncolytic adenovirus is followed by massive autophagy in cancer cells. Here, we hypothesize that autophagy regulates the processing of adenoviral proteins for antigen presentation. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the presentation of viral antigens by infected cells using an antibody cocktail of viral capsid proteins. We found that viral antigens were processed by JNK-mediated autophagy, and that autophagy was required for their presentation. Consistent with these results, splenocytes isolated from virus-immunized mice were activated by infected cells in an MHC II-dependent manner. We then hypothesize that this mechanism can be utilized to generate an efficient cancer vaccine. To this end, we constructed an oncolytic virus encompassing an EGFRvIII cancer-specific epitope in the adenoviral fiber. Infection of cancer cells with this fiber-modified adenovirus resulted in recognition of infected cancer cells by a specific anti-EGFRvIII antibody. However, inhibition of autophagy drastically decreased the capability of the specific antibody to detect the cancer-related epitope in infected cells. Our data suggest that combination of adenoviruses with autophagy inducers may enhance the processing and presentation of cancer-specific antigens incorporated into capsid proteins.

  11. Sequence analysis and location of capsid proteins within RNA 2 of strawberry latent ringspot virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiah, S; Strunk, G; Cooper, J I

    1994-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the RNA 2 of a strawberry isolate (H) of strawberry latent ringspot virus (SLRSV) comprised 3824 nucleotides and contained one long open reading frame with a theoretical coding capacity of 890 amino acids equivalent to a protein of 98.8K. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of virion-derived proteins were determined by Edman degradation allowing the capsid coding regions to be located and serine/glycine cleavage sites to be identified within the polyprotein. The amino acid sequence in the capsid coding region of an isolate of SLRSV from flowering cherry in New Zealand was 97% identical to that of SLRSV-H. Except in the 3' and 5' terminal non-coding sequences, computer-based alignment and comparison algorithms did not reveal any substantial homologies between RNA 2 of SLRSV-H and the equivalent genomic segments in the nepoviruses arabis mosaic, cherry leaf roll, grapevine fanleaf, raspberry ringspot, grapevine hungarian chrome mosaic, tomato blackring, tomato ringspot, tobacco ringspot, or in the comoviruses cowpea mosaic and red clover mottle. Despite the similarities in overall genome organization, data from RNA 2 remain insufficient for unambiguous positioning of SLRSV in relation to species/genera in the Comoviridae.

  12. Uniform description of polymer ejection dynamics from capsid with and without hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piili, J.; Suhonen, P. M.; Linna, R. P.

    2017-05-01

    We use stochastic rotation dynamics (SRD) to examine the dynamics of the ejection of an initially strongly confined flexible polymer from a spherical capsid with and without hydrodynamics. The results obtained using stochastic rotation dynamics (SRD) are compared to similar Langevin simulations. Inclusion of hydrodynamic modes speeds up the ejection but also allows the part of the polymer outside the capsid to expand closer to equilibrium. This shows as higher values of radius of gyration when hydrodynamics are enabled. By examining the waiting times of individual polymer beads, we find that the waiting time tw grows with the number of ejected monomers s as a sum of two exponents. When ≈63 % of the polymer has ejected, the ejection enters the regime of slower dynamics. The functional form of tw versus s is universal for all ejection processes starting from the same initial monomer densities. Inclusion of hydrodynamics only reduces its magnitude. Consequently, we define a universal scaling function h such that the cumulative waiting time t =N0h (s /N0) for large N0. Our unprecedentedly precise measurements of force indicate that this form for tw(s ) originates from the corresponding force toward the pore decreasing superexponentially at the end of the ejection. Our measured tw(s ) explains the apparent superlinear scaling of the ejection time with the polymer length for short polymers. However, for asymptotically long polymers, tw(s ) predicts linear scaling.

  13. Dissociation of an antiviral compound from the internal pocket of human rhinovirus 14 capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yumin; Zhou, Zhigang; Post, Carol Beth

    2005-05-24

    WIN antiviral compounds bind human rhinovirus, as well as enterovirus and parechovirus, in an internal cavity located within the viral protein capsid. Access to the buried pocket necessitates deviation from the average viral protein structure identified by crystallography. We investigated the dissociation of WIN 52084 from the pocket in human rhinovirus 14 by using an adiabatic, biased molecular dynamics simulation method. Multiple dissociation trajectories are used to characterize the pathway. WIN 52084 exits between the polypeptide chain near the ends of betaC and betaH in a series of steps. Small, transient packing defects in the protein are sufficient for dissociation. A number of torsion-angle transitions of the antiviral compound are involved, which suggests that flexibility in antiviral compounds is important for binding. It is interesting to note that dissociation is associated with an increase in the conformational fluctuations of residues never in direct contact with WIN 52084 over the course of dissociation. These residues are N-terminal residues in the viral proteins VP3 and VP4 and are located in the interior of the capsid near the icosahedral 5-fold axis. The observed changes in dynamics may be relevant to structural changes associated with virion uncoating and its inhibition by antiviral compounds.

  14. Controlled immobilisation of active enzymes on the cowpea mosaic virus capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2012-08-01

    Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors.Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Alternative conjugation strategies, agarose gel electrophoresis of CPMV and CPMV-HRP conjugates, UV-vis spectrum of HRP-ADHCPMV, agarose gel electrophoresis of GOX-ADHCPMV particles and corresponding TEM image, calibration curves for HRP-ADHCPMV and GOX-ADHCPMV, DLS data for GOX-ADHCPMV are made available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31485a

  15. Immunochemical assessment of p16 and HPV L1 capsid protein in cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Raluca; Giuşcă, Simona; Căruntu, Irina Draga; Gheorghiţă, V; Neacşu, D; Amălinei, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of the cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions cannot be predicted, many of them, particularly of the low grade type, may disappear without treatment. Invasive cervical carcinoma occurs in approximately 10% of the intraepithelial precursor lesions, being strongly associated with HPV infection. The aim of this study was to make a comparative assessment between immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical expression of p16 and L1 HPV capsid protein respectively, in low grade and high grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions. The study involved 20 patients with cytological diagnosis of LSIL/CIN1 (low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion/cervical intraepithelial neoplasia) and HSIL (CIN2 and CIN3) (high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion), which underwent a subsequent cervical biopsy. The conventional smears were evaluated for the immunoexpression of L1HPV protein and the corresponding biopsies for the immunoexpression of p16. The HPV L1 capsid protein was expressed in 46% of LSIL and 24% of HSIL. P16 was positive in 68% of LSIL, 84% of CIN2 and 100% of CIN3. The correlative analysis of p16 status and protein L1HPV expression can be very useful in the assessment of progression risk of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions.

  16. Engineering Virus Capsids Into Biomedical Delivery Vehicles: Structural Engineering Problems in Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Saumya; Banerjee, Manidipa

    2015-01-01

    Virus capsids have evolved to protect the genome sequestered in their interior from harsh environmental conditions, and to deliver it safely and precisely to the host cell of choice. This characteristic makes them naturally perfect containers for delivering therapeutic molecules to specific locations. Development of an ideal virus-based nano-container for medical usage requires that the capsid be converted into a targetable protein cage which retains the original stability, flexibility and host cell penetrating properties of the native particles, without the associated immunogenicity, and is able to encapsulate large quantities of therapeutic or diagnostic material. In the last few years, several icosahedral, non-enveloped viruses, with a diameter of 25-90 nm-a size which conveniently falls within the 10-100 nm range desirable for biomedical nanoparticles-have been chemically or genetically engineered towards partial fulfilment of the above criteria. This review summarizes the approaches taken towards engineering viruses into biomedical delivery devices and discusses the challenges involved in achieving this goal.

  17. 76 FR 36176 - Fully Developed Claim (Fully Developed Claims-Applications for Compensation, Pension, DIC, Death...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Fully Developed Claim (Fully Developed Claims--Applications for Compensation, Pension, DIC, Death Pension, and/or Accrued Benefits); Correction AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department...

  18. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: Implications for replication and genome packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A.L.N., E-mail: arao@ucr.edu

    2014-09-15

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein–protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. - Highlights: • YFP fusion proteins of BMV p1a and p2a are biologically active. • Self-interaction was observed for p1a, p2a and CP. • CP interacts with p2a but not p1a. • Majority of reconstituted YFP resulting from bona fide fusion protein partners localized on ER.

  19. Infectious RNA transcripts derived from cloned cDNA of papaya mosaic virus: effect of mutations to the capsid and polymerase proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, T L; AbouHaidar, M G

    1993-06-01

    Genomic length cDNAs of papaya mosaic virus (PMV) RNA were generated utilizing reverse transcriptase (RNase H-) for first strand synthesis, Sequenase for second strand synthesis and primers specific for the 5' and 3' termini of the viral genome. These cDNAs were cloned into plasmid pUC18 and infectious RNA transcripts were synthesized in vitro from a bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase promoter incorporated into the 5' specific primer. The infectivity of transcripts was 16% that of native PMV RNA. Increasing the poly(A) tail length from A24 to A71 produced a 43% increase in infectivity. Transcripts synthesized with or without an m7GpppG cap structure were biologically active although uncapped transcripts were much less infectious. The addition of up to 2434 non-viral nucleotides at the 3' end of transcripts decreased but did not abolish infectivity. Insertions of two amino acid residues within the polymerase coding region inactivated viral transcripts. A single amino acid deletion within the capsid protein (CP) produced local lesions of a reduced size as compared to native PMV RNA. Viral particles could not be observed in crude extracts from lesions produced by this deletion mutant suggesting that it exists as a naked RNA species within the host. Mutations to the CP suggest that it is required not only for viral assembly but also for some other unidentified function(s) during the replication cycle.

  20. Development of Viral Capsid DNA Aptamer Conjugates as Cell-Targeted Delivery Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Gary Jen-Wei

    The ability to generate semi-synthetic DNA-protein conjugates has become increasingly important in the fields of chemical biology and nanobiotechnology. As applications in these fields become more complex, there is also an increased need for methods of attaching synthetic DNA to protein substrates in a well-defined manner. This work outlines the development of new methods for site-specific DNA-protein bioconjugation, as well as the development of novel viral capsid DNA aptamer conjugates for cell-targeting purposes. In order to generate DNA-protein conjugates in a site-specific manner, chemistries orthogonal to native functional groups present on DNA and proteins were exploited. In one method, the attachment of DNA to proteins was achieved via oxime formation. This strategy involved the in situ deprotection of an allyloxycarbonyl-protected alkoxyamine-bearing DNA in the presence of a protein containing a single ketone group. The utility of this approach was demonstrated in the synthesis of a DNA-GFP conjugate. In addition to the oxime formation route, two oxidative coupling methods were also developed for DNA-protein bioconjugation. The first reaction coupled phenylenediamine-containing DNA to anilines, which had been site-specifically incorporated into proteins, in the presence of NaIO4. These reaction conditions were demonstrated on the proteins bacteriophage MS2 and GFP, and were mild enough for the components to retain both protein structure and DNA base-pairing capabilities. The second oxidative coupling reaction conjugated aniline-containing proteins to DNA bearing an o-aminophenol moiety. This reaction occurred under similarly mild conditions; however, higher coupling yields were achieved on MS2 at shorter reaction times by using this strategy. In all three of these methods, the generation of a singly-modified product was achieved. Using one of our oxidative coupling strategies, MS2-DNA aptamer conjugates were synthesized for the development of multivalent

  1. NEW RSW & Wall Medium Fully Tetrahedral Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New Medium Fully Tetrahedral RSW Grid with viscous wind tunnel wall at the root. This grid is for a node-based unstructured solver. Medium Tet: Quad Surface Faces= 0...

  2. NEW RSW & Wall Fine Fully Tetrahedral Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NEW RSW Fine Fully Tetrahedral Grid with Viscous Wind Tunnel wall at the root. This grid is for a node-based unstructured solver. Note that the CGNS file is very...

  3. Automated fully-stressed design with NASTRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, D. V.; Haggenmacher, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    An automated strength sizing capability is described. The technique determines the distribution of material among the elements of a structural model. The sizing is based on either a fully stressed design or a scaled feasible fully stressed design. Results obtained from the application of the strength sizing to the structural sizing of a composite material wing box using material strength allowables are presented. These results demonstrate the rapid convergence of the structural sizes to a usable design.

  4. In vitro assembly of catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureder, Michael; Barane, Elisabeth; Hederstedt, Lars

    2014-10-10

    Most aerobic organisms contain catalase, which functions to decompose hydrogen peroxide. Typical catalases are structurally complex homo-tetrameric enzymes with one heme prosthetic group buried in each subunit. It is not known how catalase in the cell is assembled from its constituents. The bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme but can acquire it from the environment to form a cytoplasmic catalase. We have in E. faecalis monitored production of the enzyme polypeptide (KatA) depending on the availability of heme and used our findings to devise a procedure for the purification of preparative amounts of in vivo-synthesized apocatalase. We show that fully active catalase can be obtained in vitro by incubating isolated apoprotein with hemin. We have characterized features of the assembly process and describe a temperature-trapped hemylated intermediate of the enzyme maturation process. Hemylation of apocatalase does not require auxiliary cell components, but rapid assembly of active enzyme seemingly is assisted in the cell. Our findings provide insight about catalase assembly and offer new experimental possibilities for detailed studies of this process.

  5. Structure and assembly of scalable porous protein cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Eita; Böhringer, Daniel; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Leibundgut, Marc; Zschoche, Reinhard; Heck, Albert J. R.; Ban, Nenad; Hilvert, Donald

    2017-03-01

    Proteins that self-assemble into regular shell-like polyhedra are useful, both in nature and in the laboratory, as molecular containers. Here we describe cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structures of two versatile encapsulation systems that exploit engineered electrostatic interactions for cargo loading. We show that increasing the number of negative charges on the lumenal surface of lumazine synthase, a protein that naturally assembles into a ~1-MDa dodecahedron composed of 12 pentamers, induces stepwise expansion of the native protein shell, giving rise to thermostable ~3-MDa and ~6-MDa assemblies containing 180 and 360 subunits, respectively. Remarkably, these expanded particles assume unprecedented tetrahedrally and icosahedrally symmetric structures constructed entirely from pentameric units. Large keyhole-shaped pores in the shell, not present in the wild-type capsid, enable diffusion-limited encapsulation of complementarily charged guests. The structures of these supercharged assemblies demonstrate how programmed electrostatic effects can be effectively harnessed to tailor the architecture and properties of protein cages.

  6. Protection of chickens against avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) infection by immunization with recombinant avian HEV capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H; Zhou, E M; Sun, Z F; Meng, X J

    2007-04-12

    Avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) is an emerging virus associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens in North America. Avian HEV is genetically and antigenically related to human HEV, the causative agent of hepatitis E in humans. In the lack of a practical animal model, avian HEV infection in chickens has been used as a model to study human HEV replication and pathogenesis. A 32 kDa recombinant ORF2 capsid protein of avian HEV expressed in Escherichia coli was found having similar antigenic structure as that of human HEV containing major neutralizing epitopes. To determine if the capsid protein of avian HEV can be used as a vaccine, 20 chickens were immunized with purified avian HEV recombinant protein with aluminum as adjuvant and another 20 chickens were mock immunized with KLH precipitated in aluminum as controls. Both groups of chickens were subsequently challenged with avian HEV. All the tested mock-immunized control chickens developed typical avian HEV infection characterized by viremia, fecal virus shedding and seroconversion to avian HEV antibodies. Gross hepatic lesions were also found in portion of these chickens. In contrast, none of the tested chickens immunized with avian HEV capsid protein had detectable viremia, fecal virus shedding or observable gross hepatitis lesions. The results from this study suggested that immunization of chickens with avian HEV recombinant ORF2 capsid protein with aluminum as adjuvant can induce protective immunity against avian HEV infection. Chickens are a useful small animal model to study anti-HEV immunity and pathogenesis.

  7. α-Defensin HD5 Inhibits Human Papillomavirus 16 Infection via Capsid Stabilization and Redirection to the Lysosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayim E. Wiens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available α-Defensins are an important class of abundant innate immune effectors that are potently antiviral against a number of nonenveloped viral pathogens; however, a common mechanism to explain their ability to block infection by these unrelated viruses is lacking. We previously found that human defensin 5 (HD5 blocks a critical host-mediated proteolytic processing step required for human papillomavirus (HPV infection. Here, we show that bypassing the requirement for this cleavage failed to abrogate HD5 inhibition. Instead, HD5 altered HPV trafficking in the cell. In the presence of an inhibitory concentration of HD5, HPV was internalized and reached the early endosome. The internalized capsid became permeable to antibodies and proteases; however, HD5 prevented dissociation of the viral capsid from the genome, reduced viral trafficking to the trans-Golgi network, redirected the incoming viral particle to the lysosome, and accelerated the degradation of internalized capsid proteins. This mechanism is equivalent to the mechanism by which HD5 inhibits human adenovirus. Thus, our data support capsid stabilization and redirection to the lysosome during infection as a general antiviral mechanism of α-defensins against nonenveloped viruses.

  8. X-ray structure of Triatoma virus empty capsid: insights into the mechanism of uncoating and RNA release in dicistroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Eugenia, Rubén; Durana, Aritz; López-Marijuan, Ibai; Marti, Gerardo A; Guérin, Diego M A

    2016-10-01

    In viruses, uncoating and RNA release are two key steps of successfully infecting a target cell. During these steps, the capsid must undergo the necessary conformational changes to allow RNA egress. Despite their importance, these processes are poorly understood in the family Dicistroviridae. Here, we used X-ray crystallography to solve the atomic structure of a Triatoma virus(TrV) empty particle (Protein Data Bank ID 5L7O), which is the resulting capsid after RNA release. It is observed that the overall shape of the capsid and of the three individual proteins is maintained in comparison with the mature virion. Furthermore, no channels indicative of RNA release are formed in the TrV empty particle. However, the most prominent change in the empty particle when compared with the mature virion is the loss of order in the N-terminal domain of the VP2 protein. In mature virions, the VP2 N-terminal domain of one pentamer is swapped with its twofold related copy in an adjacent pentamer, thereby stabilizing the binding between the pentamers. The loss of these interactions allows us to propose that RNA release may take place through transient flipping-out of pentameric subunits. The lower number of stabilizing interactions between the pentamers and the lack of formation of new holes support this model. This model differs from the currently accepted model for rhinoviruses and enteroviruses, in which genome externalization occurs by extrusion of the RNA through capsid channels.

  9. α-Defensin HD5 Inhibits Human Papillomavirus 16 Infection via Capsid Stabilization and Redirection to the Lysosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Mayim E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT α-Defensins are an important class of abundant innate immune effectors that are potently antiviral against a number of nonenveloped viral pathogens; however, a common mechanism to explain their ability to block infection by these unrelated viruses is lacking. We previously found that human defensin 5 (HD5) blocks a critical host-mediated proteolytic processing step required for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Here, we show that bypassing the requirement for this cleavage failed to abrogate HD5 inhibition. Instead, HD5 altered HPV trafficking in the cell. In the presence of an inhibitory concentration of HD5, HPV was internalized and reached the early endosome. The internalized capsid became permeable to antibodies and proteases; however, HD5 prevented dissociation of the viral capsid from the genome, reduced viral trafficking to the trans-Golgi network, redirected the incoming viral particle to the lysosome, and accelerated the degradation of internalized capsid proteins. This mechanism is equivalent to the mechanism by which HD5 inhibits human adenovirus. Thus, our data support capsid stabilization and redirection to the lysosome during infection as a general antiviral mechanism of α-defensins against nonenveloped viruses. PMID:28119475

  10. Theory of morphological transformation of viral capsid shell during the maturation process in the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konevtsova, O V; Lorman, V L; Rochal, S B

    2016-05-01

    We consider the symmetry and physical origin of collective displacement modes playing a crucial role in the morphological transformation during the maturation of the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses. It is shown that the experimentally observed hexamer deformation and pentamer twist in the HK97 procapsid correspond to the simplest irreducible shear strain mode of a spherical shell. We also show that the icosahedral faceting of the bacteriophage capsid shell is driven by the simplest irreducible radial displacement field. The shear field has the rotational icosahedral symmetry group I while the radial field has the full icosahedral symmetry I_{h}. This difference makes their actions independent. The radial field sign discriminates between the icosahedral and the dodecahedral shapes of the faceted capsid shell, thus making the approach relevant not only for the HK97-like viruses but also for the parvovirus family. In the frame of the Landau-Ginzburg formalism we propose a simple phenomenological model valid for the first reversible step of the HK97 maturation process. The calculated phase diagram illustrates the discontinuous character of the virus shape transformation. The characteristics of the virus shell faceting and expansion obtained in the in vitro and in vivo experiments are related to the decrease in the capsid shell thickness and to the increase of the internal capsid pressure.

  11. Theory of morphological transformation of viral capsid shell during the maturation process in the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konevtsova, O. V.; Lorman, V. L.; Rochal, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the symmetry and physical origin of collective displacement modes playing a crucial role in the morphological transformation during the maturation of the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses. It is shown that the experimentally observed hexamer deformation and pentamer twist in the HK97 procapsid correspond to the simplest irreducible shear strain mode of a spherical shell. We also show that the icosahedral faceting of the bacteriophage capsid shell is driven by the simplest irreducible radial displacement field. The shear field has the rotational icosahedral symmetry group I while the radial field has the full icosahedral symmetry Ih. This difference makes their actions independent. The radial field sign discriminates between the icosahedral and the dodecahedral shapes of the faceted capsid shell, thus making the approach relevant not only for the HK97-like viruses but also for the parvovirus family. In the frame of the Landau-Ginzburg formalism we propose a simple phenomenological model valid for the first reversible step of the HK97 maturation process. The calculated phase diagram illustrates the discontinuous character of the virus shape transformation. The characteristics of the virus shell faceting and expansion obtained in the in vitro and in vivo experiments are related to the decrease in the capsid shell thickness and to the increase of the internal capsid pressure.

  12. Insights into minor group rhinovirus uncoating: the X-ray structure of the HRV2 empty capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damià Garriga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon attachment to their respective receptor, human rhinoviruses (HRVs are internalized into the host cell via different pathways but undergo similar structural changes. This ultimately results in the delivery of the viral RNA into the cytoplasm for replication. To improve our understanding of the conformational modifications associated with the release of the viral genome, we have determined the X-ray structure at 3.0 Å resolution of the end-stage of HRV2 uncoating, the empty capsid. The structure shows important conformational changes in the capsid protomer. In particular, a hinge movement around the hydrophobic pocket of VP1 allows a coordinated shift of VP2 and VP3. This overall displacement forces a reorganization of the inter-protomer interfaces, resulting in a particle expansion and in the opening of new channels in the capsid core. These new breaches in the capsid, opening one at the base of the canyon and the second at the particle two-fold axes, might act as gates for the externalization of the VP1 N-terminus and the extrusion of the viral RNA, respectively. The structural comparison between native and empty HRV2 particles unveils a number of pH-sensitive amino acid residues, conserved in rhinoviruses, which participate in the structural rearrangements involved in the uncoating process.

  13. Insights into minor group rhinovirus uncoating: the X-ray structure of the HRV2 empty capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garriga, Damià; Pickl-Herk, Angela; Luque, Daniel; Wruss, Jürgen; Castón, José R; Blaas, Dieter; Verdaguer, Núria

    2012-01-01

    Upon attachment to their respective receptor, human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are internalized into the host cell via different pathways but undergo similar structural changes. This ultimately results in the delivery of the viral RNA into the cytoplasm for replication. To improve our understanding of the conformational modifications associated with the release of the viral genome, we have determined the X-ray structure at 3.0 Å resolution of the end-stage of HRV2 uncoating, the empty capsid. The structure shows important conformational changes in the capsid protomer. In particular, a hinge movement around the hydrophobic pocket of VP1 allows a coordinated shift of VP2 and VP3. This overall displacement forces a reorganization of the inter-protomer interfaces, resulting in a particle expansion and in the opening of new channels in the capsid core. These new breaches in the capsid, opening one at the base of the canyon and the second at the particle two-fold axes, might act as gates for the externalization of the VP1 N-terminus and the extrusion of the viral RNA, respectively. The structural comparison between native and empty HRV2 particles unveils a number of pH-sensitive amino acid residues, conserved in rhinoviruses, which participate in the structural rearrangements involved in the uncoating process.

  14. Cell culture adaptation mutations in foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A capsid proteins: implications for receptor interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study we describe the adaptive changes fixed on the capsid of several foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A strains during propagation in cell monolayers. Viruses passaged extensively in three cell lines (BHK-21, LFBK and IB-RS-2), consistently gained several positively charged amino acids...

  15. Self-Assembly of Nanocomponents into Composite Structures: Derivation and Simulation of Langevin Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Pankavich, Stephen; Miao, Yinglong; Ortoleva, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of the self-assembly of nanocomponents into a virus, nanocapsule, or other composite structure is analyzed via a multiscale approach. The objective is to achieve predictability and to preserve key atomic-scale features that underlie the formation and stability of the composite structures. We start with an all-atom description, the Liouville equation, and the order parameters characterizing nanoscale features of the system. An equation of Smoluchowski type for the stochastic dynamics of the order parameters is derived from the Liouville equation via a multiscale perturbation technique. The self-assembly of composite structures from nanocomponents with internal atomic structure is analyzed and growth rates are derived. Applications include the assembly of a viral capsid from capsomers, a ribosome from its major subunits, and composite materials from fibers and nanoparticles. Our approach overcomes errors in other coarse-graining methods which neglect the influence of the nanoscale configuration on ...

  16. Retargeting of rat parvovirus H-1PV to cancer cells through genetic engineering of the viral capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaume, Xavier; El-Andaloussi, Nazim; Leuchs, Barbara; Bonifati, Serena; Kulkarni, Amit; Marttila, Tiina; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    The rat parvovirus H-1PV is a promising anticancer agent given its oncosuppressive properties and the absence of known side effects in humans. H-1PV replicates preferentially in transformed cells, but the virus can enter both normal and cancer cells. Uptake by normal cells sequesters a significant portion of the administered viral dose away from the tumor target. Hence, targeting H-1PV entry specifically to tumor cells is important to increase the efficacy of parvovirus-based treatments. In this study, we first found that sialic acid plays a key role in H-1PV entry. We then genetically engineered the H-1PV capsid to improve its affinity for human tumor cells. By analogy with the resolved crystal structure of the closely related parvovirus minute virus of mice, we developed an in silico three-dimensional (3D) model of the H-1PV wild-type capsid. Based on this model, we identified putative amino acids involved in cell membrane recognition and virus entry at the level of the 2-fold axis of symmetry of the capsid, within the so-called dimple region. In situ mutagenesis of these residues significantly reduced the binding and entry of H-1PV into permissive cells. We then engineered an entry-deficient viral capsid and inserted a cyclic RGD-4C peptide at the level of its 3-fold axis spike. This peptide binds α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) integrins, which are overexpressed in cancer cells and growing blood vessels. The insertion of the peptide rescued viral infectivity toward cells overexpressing α(v)β(5) integrins, resulting in the efficient killing of these cells by the reengineered virus. This work demonstrates that H-1PV can be genetically retargeted through the modification of its capsid, showing great promise for a more efficient use of this virus in cancer therapy.

  17. Photonic hybrid assembly through flexible waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörhoff, K.; Prak, A.; Postma, F.; Leinse, A.; Wu, K.; Peters, T. J.; Tichem, M.; Amaning-Appiah, B.; Renukappa, V.; Vollrath, G.; Balcells-Ventura, J.; Uhlig, P.; Seyfried, M.; Rose, D.; Santos, R.; Leijtens, X. J. M.; Flintham, B.; Wale, M.; Robbins, D.

    2016-05-01

    Fully automated, high precision, cost-effective assembly technology for photonic packages remains one of the main challenges in photonic component manufacturing. Next to the cost aspect the most demanding assembly task for multiport photonic integrated circuits (PICs) is the high-precision (±0.1 μm) alignment and fixing required for optical I/O in InP PICs, even with waveguide spot size conversion. In a European research initiative - PHASTFlex - we develop and investigate an innovative, novel assembly concept, in which the waveguides in a matching TriPleX interposer PIC are released during fabrication to make them movable. After assembly of both chips by flip-chip bonding on a common carrier, TriPleX based actuators and clamping functions position and fix the flexible waveguides with the required accuracy.

  18. Chasing the Origin of Viruses: Capsid-Forming Genes as a Life-Saving Preadaptation within a Community of Early Replicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Mattila, Sari; Hoikkala, Ville

    2015-01-01

    Virus capsids mediate the transfer of viral genetic information from one cell to another, thus the origin of the first viruses arguably coincides with the origin of the viral capsid. Capsid genes are evolutionarily ancient and their emergence potentially predated even the origin of first free-living cells. But does the origin of the capsid coincide with the origin of viruses, or is it possible that capsid-like functionalities emerged before the appearance of true viral entities? We set to investigate this question by using a computational simulator comprising primitive replicators and replication parasites within a compartment matrix. We observe that systems with no horizontal gene transfer between compartments collapse due to the rapidly emerging replication parasites. However, introduction of capsid-like genes that induce the movement of randomly selected genes from one compartment to another rescues life by providing the non-parasitic replicators a mean to escape their current compartments before the emergence of replication parasites. Capsid-forming genes can mediate the establishment of a stable meta-population where parasites cause only local tragedies but cannot overtake the whole community. The long-term survival of replicators is dependent on the frequency of horizontal transfer events, as systems with either too much or too little genetic exchange are doomed to succumb to replication-parasites. This study provides a possible scenario for explaining the origin of viral capsids before the emergence of genuine viruses: in the absence of other means of horizontal gene transfer between compartments, evolution of capsid-like functionalities may have been necessary for early life to prevail.

  19. Probe tip heating assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  20. Nucleotide sequence of maize dwarf mosaic virus capsid protein gene and its expression in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赛吉庆; 康良仪; 黄忠; 史春霖; 田波; 谢友菊

    1995-01-01

    The 3’-terminal 1 279 nucleotide sequence of maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) genome has been determined. This sequence contains an open reading frame of 1023 nudeotides and a 3’ -non-coding region of 256 nucleotides. The open reading frame includes all of the coding regions for the viral capsid protein (CP) and part of the viral nuclear inclusion protein (Nib). The predicted viral CP consists of 313 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 35400. The amino acid sequence of the viral CP derived from MDMV cDNA shows about 47%-54% homology to that of 4 other potyviruses. The viral CP gene was constructed in frame with the lacZ gene in pUC19 plasmid and expressed in E. coli cells. The fusion polypeptide positively reacted in Western blot with an antiserum prepared against the native viral CP.

  1. Identification of two functional nuclear localization signals in the capsid protein of duck circovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Qi-Wang; Zou, Jin-Feng; Wang, Xin [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Shandong Agricultural University, Shandong, Taian 271018 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology and Disease Control and Prevention, Shandong, Taian 271018 (China); Sun, Ya-Ni [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Shanxi, Yangling 712100 (China); Gao, Ji-Ming; Xie, Zhi-Jing [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Shandong Agricultural University, Shandong, Taian 271018 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology and Disease Control and Prevention, Shandong, Taian 271018 (China); Wang, Yu [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Taishan Medical College, Shandong, Taian 271000 (China); Zhu, Yan-Li [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Shandong Agricultural University, Shandong, Taian 271018 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology and Disease Control and Prevention, Shandong, Taian 271018 (China); Jiang, Shi-Jin, E-mail: sjjiang@sdau.edu.cn [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Shandong Agricultural University, Shandong, Taian 271018 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology and Disease Control and Prevention, Shandong, Taian 271018 (China)

    2013-02-05

    The capsid protein (CP) of duck circovirus (DuCV) is the major immunogenic protein and has a high proportion of arginine residues concentrated at the N terminus of the protein, which inhibits efficient mRNA translation in prokaryotic expression systems. In this study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of DuCV CP expressed via recombinant baculoviruses in Sf9 cells and the DNA binding activities of the truncated recombinant DuCV CPs. The results showed that two independent bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSs) situated at N-terminal 1-17 and 18-36 amino acid residue of the CP. Moreover, two expression level regulatory signals (ELRSs) and two DNA binding signals (DBSs) were also mapped to the N terminus of the protein and overlapped with the two NLSs. The ability of CP to bind DNA, coupled with the karyophilic nature of this protein, strongly suggests that it may be responsible for nuclear targeting of the viral genome.

  2. Analysis of epitopes in the capsid protein of avian hepatitis E virus by using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shiwei; Zhao, Qin; Lu, Mingzhe; Sun, Peiming; Qiu, Hongkai; Zhang, Lu; Lv, Junhua; Zhou, En-Min

    2011-02-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) is related genetically and antigenically to human and swine HEVs and capsid protein of avian HEV shares approximately 48-49% amino acid sequence identities with those of human and swine HEVs. Six monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced and used to locate different epitopes in the ORF2 region of aa 339-570 of avian HEV Chinese isolate. The results showed that five epitopes were located in the aa 339-414 region and one in the aa 510-515 region. Two epitopes located in aa 339-355 and aa 384-414 regions are the immunodominant epitopes on the surface of the avian HEV particles as demonstrated by immune capture of viral particles and immunohistochemical detection of the ORF2 antigens with two MAbs.

  3. Kinetics of the association of dengue virus capsid protein with the granular component of nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, Ashish Kumar; Cecilia, D

    2017-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) replicates in the cytoplasm but translocation of the capsid protein (C) to the nucleoli of infected cells has been shown to facilitate virus multiplication for DENV-2. This study demonstrates that the nucleolar localization of C occurs with all four serotypes of DENV. The interaction of C with the nucleolus was found to be dynamic with a mobile fraction of 66% by FRAP. That the C shuttled between the nucleus and cytoplasm was suggested by FLIP and translation inhibition experiments. Colocalization with B23 indicated that DENV C targeted the granular component (GC) of the nucleolus. Presence of DENV C in the nucleolus affected the recovery kinetics of B23 in infected and transfected cells. Sub-nucleolar localization of DENV C of all serotypes to the GC, its mobility in and out of the nucleolus and its affect on the dynamics of B23 is being shown for the first time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Three-dimensional structure of the Epstein-Barr virus capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germi, Raphaele; Effantin, Gregory; Grossi, Laurence; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Morand, Patrice; Schoehn, Guy

    2012-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a gammaherpesvirus, infects >90 % of the world's population. Primary infection by EBV can lead to infectious mononucleosis, and EBV persistence is associated with several malignancies. Despite its importance for human health, little structural information is available on EBV. Here we report the purification of the EBV capsid by CsCl- or sucrose density-gradient centrifugation. Cryo-electron microscopy and image analysis resulted in two slightly different three-dimensional structures at about 20 Å resolution. These structures were compared with that of human herpesvirus 8, another gammaherpesvirus. CsCl-gradient purification leads to the removal of part of the triplex complex around the fivefold axes, whereas the complexes between hexons remained in place. This may be due to local differences in stability resulting from variation in quasi-equivalent interactions between pentons and hexons compared with those between hexons only.

  5. Multiple functions of capsid proteins in (+) stranded RNA viruses during plant-virus interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Philipp H; Bujarski, Jozef J

    2015-01-22

    In addition to providing a protective shell for genomic RNA(s), the coat (capsid) proteins (CPs) of plus-stranded RNA viruses play a variety of other functions that condition the plant-virus relationship. In this review we outline the extensive research progress that has been made within the last decade on those CP characteristics that relate to virus infectivity, pathogenicity, symptom expression, interactions with host factors, virus movement, vector transmission, host range, as well as those used to study virus evolution. By discussing the examples among a variety of plant RNA viruses we show that in addition to general features and pathways, the involvement of CPs may assume very distinct tasks that depend on the particular virus life style. Research perspectives and potential applications are discussed at the end.

  6. Specific interaction of capsid protein and importin-{alpha}/{beta} influences West Nile virus production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuvanakantham, Raghavan; Chong, Mun-Keat [Flavivirology Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, 5 Science Drive 2, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Ng, Mah-Lee, E-mail: micngml@nus.edu.sg [Flavivirology Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, 5 Science Drive 2, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597 (Singapore)

    2009-11-06

    West Nile virus (WNV) capsid (C) protein has been shown to enter the nucleus of infected cells. However, the mechanism by which C protein enters the nucleus is unknown. In this study, we have unveiled for the first time that nuclear transport of WNV and Dengue virus C protein is mediated by their direct association with importin-{alpha}. This interplay is mediated by the consensus sequences of bipartite nuclear localization signal located between amino acid residues 85-101 together with amino acid residues 42 and 43 of C protein. Elucidation of biological significance of importin-{alpha}/C protein interaction demonstrated that the binding efficiency of this association influenced the nuclear entry of C protein and virus production. Collectively, this study illustrated the molecular mechanism by which the C protein of arthropod-borne flavivirus enters the nucleus and showed the importance of importin-{alpha}/C protein interaction in the context of flavivirus life-cycle.

  7. Polymer ejection from bacteriophages is fully determined by confinement energy

    CERN Document Server

    Piili, J

    2015-01-01

    The ejection dynamics through a nanoscale pore of a flexible polymer that is initially strongly confined inside a spherical capsid is examined. By extensive simulations using the stochastic rotation dynamics method we show that the time for an individual monomer to eject grows exponentially with the number of ejected monomers under constant initial monomer density. This dependence is a consequence of the excess free energy of the polymer due to confinement growing exponentially with the initial monomer number inside the capsid, which we address to strong monomer-monomer interactions. Consequently, for sufficiently strong initial confinement and long polymers ejection times for polymers of different lengths depend linearly on the length. At polymer lengths amenable to computer simulations the dependence is superlinear due to the finite-size effect related to the retraction of polymer tails at final stages of ejection.

  8. Adaptive mutations in the JC virus protein capsid are associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamil R Sunyaev

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available PML is a progressive and mostly fatal demyelinating disease caused by JC virus infection and destruction of infected oligodendrocytes in multiple brain foci of susceptible individuals. While JC virus is highly prevalent in the human population, PML is a rare disease that exclusively afflicts only a small percentage of immunocompromised individuals including those affected by HIV (AIDS or immunosuppressive drugs. Viral- and/or host-specific factors, and not simply immune status, must be at play to account for the very large discrepancy between viral prevalence and low disease incidence. Here, we show that several amino acids on the surface of the JC virus capsid protein VP1 display accelerated evolution in viral sequences isolated from PML patients but not in sequences isolated from healthy subjects. We provide strong evidence that at least some of these mutations are involved in binding of sialic acid, a known receptor for the JC virus. Using statistical methods of molecular evolution, we performed a comprehensive analysis of JC virus VP1 sequences isolated from 55 PML patients and 253 sequences isolated from the urine of healthy individuals and found that a subset of amino acids found exclusively among PML VP1 sequences is acquired via adaptive evolution. By modeling of the 3-D structure of the JC virus capsid, we showed that these residues are located within the sialic acid binding site, a JC virus receptor for cell infection. Finally, we go on to demonstrate the involvement of some of these sites in receptor binding by demonstrating a profound reduction in hemagglutination properties of viral-like particles made of the VP1 protein carrying these mutations. Collectively, these results suggest that a more virulent PML causing phenotype of JC virus is acquired via adaptive evolution that changes viral specificity for its cellular receptor(s.

  9. Identification, expression, and immunogenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded small viral capsid antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Gradoville, L; Shedd, D; Haglund, K; Rigsby, M; Miller, G

    1997-04-01

    We describe a recombinant antigen for use in serologic tests for antibodies to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). The cDNA for a small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) was identified by immunoscreening of a library prepared from the BC-1 body cavity lymphoma cell line induced into KSHV lytic gene expression by sodium butyrate. The cDNA specified a 170-amino-acid peptide with homology to small viral capsid proteins encoded by the BFRF3 gene of Epstein-Barr virus and the ORF65 gene of herpesvirus saimiri. KSHV sVCA was expressed from a 0.85-kb mRNA present late in lytic KSHV replication in BC-1 cells. This transcript was sensitive to phosphonoacetic acid and phosphonoformic acid, inhibitors of herpesvirus DNA replication. KSHV sVCA expressed in mammalian cells or Escherichia coli or translated in vitro was recognized as an antigen by antisera from KS patients. Rabbit antisera raised to KSHV sVCA expressed in E. coli detected a 22-kDa protein in KSHV-infected human B cells. Overexpressed KSHV sVCA purified from E. coli and used as an antigen in immunoblot screening assay did not cross-react with EBV BFRF3. Antibodies to sVCA were present in 89% of 47 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with KS, in 20% of 54 HIV-positive patients without KS, but in none of 122 other patients including children born to HIV-seropositive mothers and patients with hemophilia, autoimmune disease, or nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Low-titer antibody was detected in three sera from 28 healthy subjects. Antibodies to recombinant sVCA correlate with KS in high-risk populations. Recombinant sVCA can be used to examine the seroepidemiology of infection with KSHV in the general population.

  10. Newnes electronics assembly handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Electronics Assembly Handbook: Techniques, Standards and Quality Assurance focuses on the aspects of electronic assembling. The handbook first looks at the printed circuit board (PCB). Base materials, basic mechanical properties, cleaning of assemblies, design, and PCB manufacturing processes are then explained. The text also discusses surface mounted assemblies and packaging of electromechanical assemblies, as well as the soldering process. Requirements for the soldering process; solderability and protective coatings; cleaning of PCBs; and mass solder/component reflow soldering are des

  11. Fully Distributed Cooperative Motion of Group Robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper is focused on the fully distributed cooperative motion of group robots and proposes a new approach. Each robot has a local sensing ability and a simple action selection strategy. Computational complexity is decreased by the fully distributed architecture and the information insufficiency is solved by the interaction between the robots and the environment. Variable loop and random method are used to deal with the fluctuation and equity selection problem and the rapidity and reasonabiliiy are guaranteed. Some simulations have proved the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  12. Optimality of a Fully Stressed Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1998-01-01

    For a truss a fully stressed state is reached and when all its members are utilized to their full strength capacity. Historically, engineers considered such a design optimum. But recently this optimality has been questioned, especially since the weight of the structure is not explicitly used in fully stressed design calculations. This paper examines optimality of the full stressed design (FSD) with analytical and graphical illustrations. Solutions for a set of examples obtained by using the FSD method and optimization methods numerically confirm the optimality of the FSD. The FSD, which can be obtained with a small amount of calculation, can be extended to displacement constraints and to nontruss-type structures.

  13. The C Terminus of the Herpes Simplex Virus UL25 Protein Is Required for Release of Viral Genomes from Capsids Bound to Nuclear Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Jamie B; Daniel, Gina R; Falck-Pedersen, Erik; Huet, Alexis; Smith, Greg A; Conway, James F; Homa, Fred L

    2017-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) capsid is released into the cytoplasm after fusion of viral and host membranes, whereupon dynein-dependent trafficking along microtubules targets it to the nuclear envelope. Binding of the capsid to the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is mediated by the capsid protein pUL25 and the capsid-tethered tegument protein pUL36. Temperature-sensitive mutants in both pUL25 and pUL36 dock at the NPC but fail to release DNA. The uncoating reaction has been difficult to study due to the rapid release of the genome once the capsid interacts with the nuclear pore. In this study, we describe the isolation and characterization of a truncation mutant of pUL25. Live-cell imaging and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the mutant was not impaired in penetration of the host cell or in trafficking of the capsid to the nuclear membrane. However, expression of viral proteins was absent or significantly delayed in cells infected with the pUL25 mutant virus. Transmission electron microscopy revealed capsids accumulated at nuclear pores that retained the viral genome for at least 4 h postinfection. In addition, cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstructions of virion capsids did not detect any obvious differences in the location or structural organization for the pUL25 or pUL36 proteins on the pUL25 mutant capsids. Further, in contrast to wild-type virus, the antiviral response mediated by the viral DNA-sensing cyclic guanine adenine synthase (cGAS) was severely compromised for the pUL25 mutant. These results demonstrate that the pUL25 capsid protein has a critical role in releasing viral DNA from NPC-bound capsids.IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is the causative agent of several pathologies ranging in severity from the common cold sore to life-threatening encephalitic infection. Early steps in infection include release of the capsid into the cytoplasm, docking of the capsid at a nuclear pore, and release of the viral genome into the nucleus

  14. Assembly design system based on engineering connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wensheng

    2016-12-01

    An assembly design system is an important part of computer-aided design systems, which are important tools for realizing product concept design. The traditional assembly design system does not record the connection information of production on the engineering layer; consequently, the upstream design idea cannot be fully used in the downstream design. An assembly design model based on the relationship of engineering connection is presented. In this model, all nodes are divided into two categories: The component and the connection. Moreover, the product is constructed on the basis of the connection relationship of the components. The model is an And/Or graph and has the ability to record all assembly schemes. This model records only the connection information that has engineering application value in the product design. In addition, this model can significantly reduce the number of combinations, and is very favorable for the assembly sequence planning in the downstream. The system contains a connection knowledge system that can be mapped to the connection node, and the connection knowledge obtained in practice can be returned to the knowledge system. Finally, VC++ 6.0 is used to develop a prototype system called Connect-based Assembly Planning (CAP). The relationship between the CAP system and the commercial assembly design system is also established.

  15. Packaging signals in two single-stranded RNA viruses imply a conserved assembly mechanism and geometry of the packaged genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykeman, Eric C; Stockley, Peter G; Twarock, Reidun

    2013-09-09

    The current paradigm for assembly of single-stranded RNA viruses is based on a mechanism involving non-sequence-specific packaging of genomic RNA driven by electrostatic interactions. Recent experiments, however, provide compelling evidence for sequence specificity in this process both in vitro and in vivo. The existence of multiple RNA packaging signals (PSs) within viral genomes has been proposed, which facilitates assembly by binding coat proteins in such a way that they promote the protein-protein contacts needed to build the capsid. The binding energy from these interactions enables the confinement or compaction of the genomic RNAs. Identifying the nature of such PSs is crucial for a full understanding of assembly, which is an as yet untapped potential drug target for this important class of pathogens. Here, for two related bacterial viruses, we determine the sequences and locations of their PSs using Hamiltonian paths, a concept from graph theory, in combination with bioinformatics and structural studies. Their PSs have a common secondary structure motif but distinct consensus sequences and positions within the respective genomes. Despite these differences, the distributions of PSs in both viruses imply defined conformations for the packaged RNA genomes in contact with the protein shell in the capsid, consistent with a recent asymmetric structure determination of the MS2 virion. The PS distributions identified moreover imply a preferred, evolutionarily conserved assembly pathway with respect to the RNA sequence with potentially profound implications for other single-stranded RNA viruses known to have RNA PSs, including many animal and human pathogens.

  16. Parametrization of Fully Dressed Quark Propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Wei-Xing; ZHU Ji-Zhen; ZHOU Li-Juan; SHEN Peng-Nian; HU Zhao-Hui

    2005-01-01

    Based on an extensive study of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for a fully dressed quark propagator in the "rainbow" approximation, a parametrized form of the quark propagator is suggested. The corresponding quark selfform of the quark propagator proposed in this work describes a confining quark propagation, and is quite convenient to be used in any numerical calculations.

  17. Fully Integrated Biochip Platforms for Advanced Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni De Micheli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in microelectronics and biosensors are enabling developments of innovative biochips for advanced healthcare by providing fully integrated platforms for continuous monitoring of a large set of human disease biomarkers. Continuous monitoring of several human metabolites can be addressed by using fully integrated and minimally invasive devices located in the sub-cutis, typically in the peritoneal region. This extends the techniques of continuous monitoring of glucose currently being pursued with diabetic patients. However, several issues have to be considered in order to succeed in developing fully integrated and minimally invasive implantable devices. These innovative devices require a high-degree of integration, minimal invasive surgery, long-term biocompatibility, security and privacy in data transmission, high reliability, high reproducibility, high specificity, low detection limit and high sensitivity. Recent advances in the field have already proposed possible solutions for several of these issues. The aim of the present paper is to present a broad spectrum of recent results and to propose future directions of development in order to obtain fully implantable systems for the continuous monitoring of the human metabolism in advanced healthcare applications.

  18. Transport properties of fully screened Kondo models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hörig, Christoph B M; Mora, Christophe; Schuricht, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    We study the nonequilibrium transport properties of fully (exactly) screened Kondo quantum dots subject to a finite bias voltage or a finite temperature. First, we calculate the Fermi-liquid coefficients of the conductance for models with arbitrary spin, i.e., its leading behavior for small bias vol

  19. A Fully Automated Penumbra Segmentation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagenthiraja, Kartheeban; Ribe, Lars Riisgaard; Hougaard, Kristina Dupont

    2012-01-01

    salavageable tissue, quickly and accurately. We present a fully Automated Penumbra Segmentation (APS) algorithm using PWI and DWI images. We compare automatically generated PWI-DWI mismatch mask to mask outlined manually by experts, in 168 patients. Method: The algorithm initially identifies PWI lesions...

  20. Learner Perspectives on Fully Online Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Susan Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    This study builds on this author's 2011 article in which the author reflects on the pedagogical challenges and resultant changes made while teaching two fully online foreign language papers over a four-year period (Y. H. S. Sun (2011). Online language teaching: The pedagogical challenges. "Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An…

  1. Remote control of self-assembled microswimmers

    CERN Document Server

    Grosjean, Galien; Darras, Alexis; Hubert, Maxime; Lumay, Geoffroy; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Physics governing the locomotion of microorganisms and other microsystems is dominated by viscous damping. An effective swimming strategy involves the non-reciprocal and periodic deformations of the considered body. Here, we show that a magnetocapillary-driven self-assembly, composed of three soft ferromagnetic beads, is able to swim along a liquid-air interface when powered by an external magnetic field. More importantly, we demonstrate that trajectories can be fully controlled, opening ways to explore low Reynolds number swimming. This magnetocapillary system spontaneously forms by self-assembly, allowing miniaturization and other possible applications such as cargo transport or solvent flows.

  2. Land cover classification comparisons among dual polarimetric, pseudo-fully polarimetric, and fully polarimetric SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Bhogendra; Susaki, Junichi

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, an approach is proposed that predicts fully polarimetric data from dual polarimetric data, and then applies selected supervised algorithm for dual polarimetric, pseudo-fully polarimetric and fully polarimetric dataset for the land cover classification comparison. A regression model has been developed to predict the complex variables of VV polarimetric component and amplitude independently using corresponding complex variables and amplitude in HH and HV bands. Support vector machine (SVM)is implemented for the land cover classification. Coherency matrix and amplitude were used for all dataset for the land cover classification independently.They are used to compare the data from different perspective. Finally, a post processing technique is implemented to remove the isolated pixels appeared as a noise. AVNIR-2 optical data over the same area is used as ground truth data to access the classification accuracy.The result from SVM indicates that the fully polarimetric mode gives the maximum classification accuracy followed by pseudo-fully polarimetric and dual polarimetric datasets using coherency matrix input for fully polarimetric image and pseudo-fully polarimetric image and covariance matrix input for dual polarimetric image. Additionally, it is observed that pseudo-fully polarimetric image with amplitude input does not show the significant improvement over dual polarimetric image with same input.

  3. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  4. Identification of an antigenic domain in the N-terminal region of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein that is not common to swine and human HEVs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lizhen; Sun, Yani; Du, Taofeng; Wang, Chengbao; Xiao, Shuqi; Mu, Yang; Zhang, Gaiping; Liu, Lihong; Widén, Frederik; Hsu, Walter H; Zhao, Qin; Zhou, En-Min

    2014-12-01

    The antigenic domains located in the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein have been characterized. This region shares common epitopes with swine and human HEVs. However, epitopes in the N-terminal 338 amino acid residues have never been reported. In this study, an antigenic domain located between amino acids 23 and 85 was identified by indirect ELISA using the truncated recombinant capsid proteins as coating antigens and anti-avian HEV chicken sera as primary antibodies. In addition, this domain did not react with anti-swine and human HEV sera. These results indicated that the N-terminal 338 amino acid residues of avian HEV capsid protein do not share common epitopes with swine and human HEVs. This finding is important for our understanding of the antigenicity of the avian HEV capsid protein. Furthermore, it has important implications in the selection of viral antigens for serological diagnosis.

  5. Protein-like fully reversible tetramerisation and super-association of an aminocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolajski, Melanie; Adams, Gary G.; Gillis, Richard B.; Besong, David Tabot; Rowe, Arthur J.; Heinze, Thomas; Harding, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Unusual protein-like, partially reversible associative behaviour has recently been observed in solutions of the water soluble carbohydrates known as 6-deoxy-6-(ω-aminoalkyl)aminocelluloses, which produce controllable self-assembling films for enzyme immobilisation and other biotechnological applications. Now, for the first time, we have found a fully reversible self-association (tetramerisation) within this family of polysaccharides. Remarkably these carbohydrate tetramers are then seen to associate further in a regular way into supra-molecular complexes. Fully reversible oligomerisation has been hitherto completely unknown for carbohydrates and instead resembles in some respects the assembly of polypeptides and proteins like haemoglobin and its sickle cell mutation. Our traditional perceptions as to what might be considered ``protein-like'' and what might be considered as ``carbohydrate-like'' behaviour may need to be rendered more flexible, at least as far as interaction phenomena are concerned.

  6. RNA Packing Specificity and Folding during Assembly of the Bacteriophage MS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottar Rolfsson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a combination of biochemistry, mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM, we have been able to show that quasi-equivalent conformer switching in the coat protein (CP of an RNA bacteriophage (MS2 is controlled by a sequence-specific RNA–protein interaction. The RNA component of this complex is an RNA stem-loop encompassing just 19 nts from the phage genomic RNA, which is 3569 nts in length. This binding results in the conversion of a CP dimer from a symmetrical conformation to an asymmetric one. Only when both symmetrical and asymmetrical dimers are present in solution is assembly of the T = 3 phage capsid efficient. This implies that the conformers, we have characterized by NMR correspond to the two distinct quasi-equivalent conformers seen in the 3D structure of the virion. An icosahedrally-averaged single particle cryo-EM reconstruction of the wild-type phage (to ∼9 Å resolution has revealed icosahedrally ordered density encompassing up to 90% of the single-stranded RNA genome. The RNA is seen with a novel arrangement of two concentric shells, with connections between them along the 5-fold symmetry axes. RNA in the outer shell interacts with each of the 90 CP dimers in the T = 3 capsid and although the density is icosahedrally averaged, there appears to be a different average contact at the different quasi-equivalent protein dimers: precisely the result that would be expected if protein conformer switching is RNA-mediated throughout the assembly pathway. This unprecedented RNA structure provides new constraints for models of viral assembly and we describe experiments aimed at probing these. Together, these results suggest that viral genomic RNA folding is an important factor in efficient assembly, and further suggest that RNAs that could sequester viral CPs but not fold appropriately could act as potent inhibitors of viral assembly.

  7. Wrinkling vs. scarring: Stress collapse in surface-confined assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grason, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Confining assemblies to surfaces possessing Gaussian curvature frustrates the microscopic order of the packing, thus introducing mechanical costs for assemblies in such diverse contexts as viral capsids and particle-coated drops. The structure and stability of these systems is complicated by the non-trivial competition between distinct modes of stress relaxation, including ``elastic'' shape deformation of the surface-bound assembly; defect-mediated ``plastic'' reorganization of packing. We consider the interplay between these shape-deformation and defect-relaxation for a model of crystalline patch bound to an adhesive and deformable sphere, where the distinct patterns of relaxation become, respectively, radial chains of dislocations, or ``scars'', and radial wrinkles. Analysis of highly-wrinkled and defect-riddle states reveals remarkably that both modes achieve the identical mechanical state in the limits of vanishing thickness and lattice spacing, and further, that the degeneracy between these modes is lifted only by the microscopic and sub-dominant energetics that select their optimal symmetry. We present a structural relaxation phase diagram that predicts a wrinkle-to-scar transition driven both by increasing substrate stiffness and substrate curvature.

  8. Crystal structure of an HIV assembly and maturation switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Jonathan M.; Zadrozny, Kaneil K.; Chrustowicz, Jakub; Purdy, Michael D.; Yeager, Mark; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Pornillos, Owen

    2016-07-14

    Virus assembly and maturation proceed through the programmed operation of molecular switches, which trigger both local and global structural rearrangements to produce infectious particles. HIV-1 contains an assembly and maturation switch that spans the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the capsid (CA) region and the first spacer peptide (SP1) of the precursor structural protein, Gag. The crystal structure of the CTD-SP1 Gag fragment is a goblet-shaped hexamer in which the cup comprises the CTD and an ensuing type II β-turn, and the stem comprises a 6-helix bundle. The β-turn is critical for immature virus assembly and the 6-helix bundle regulates proteolysis during maturation. This bipartite character explains why the SP1 spacer is a critical element of HIV-1 Gag but is not a universal property of retroviruses. Our results also indicate that HIV-1 maturation inhibitors suppress unfolding of the CA-SP1 junction and thereby delay access of the viral protease to its substrate.

  9. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tyler G; Garzon, Max H; Deaton, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are "strong" assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self-assembly systems

  10. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler G Moore

    Full Text Available Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are "strong" assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic

  11. The Herpes Simplex Virus 1 UL17 Protein Is the Second Constituent of the Capsid Vertex-Specific Component Required for DNA Packaging and Retention▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Katerina; Huffman, Jamie B.; Homa, Fred L.; Conway, James F.

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) UL17 and UL25 minor capsid proteins are essential for DNA packaging. They are thought to comprise a molecule arrayed in five copies around each of the capsid vertices. This molecule was initially termed the “C-capsid-specific component” (CCSC) (B. L. Trus et al., Mol. Cell 26:479-489, 2007), but as we have subsequently observed this feature on reconstructions of A, B, and C capsids, we now refer to it more generally as the “capsid vertex-specific component” (CVSC) (S. K. Cockrell et al., J. Virol. 85:4875-4887, 2011). We previously confirmed that UL25 occupies the vertex-distal region of the CVSC density by visualizing a large UL25-specific tag in reconstructions calculated from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) images. We have pursued the same strategy to determine the capsid location of the UL17 protein. Recombinant viruses were generated that contained either a small tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) attached to the C terminus of UL17. Purification of the TAP-tagged UL17 or a similarly TAP-tagged UL25 protein clearly demonstrated that the two proteins interact. A cryo-EM reconstruction of capsids containing the UL17-GFP protein reveals that UL17 is the second component of the CVSC and suggests that UL17 interfaces with the other CVSC component, UL25, through its C terminus. The portion of UL17 nearest the vertex appears to be poorly constrained, which may provide flexibility in interacting with tegument proteins or the DNA-packaging machinery at the portal vertex. The exposed locations of the UL17 and UL25 proteins on the HSV-1 capsid exterior suggest that they may be attractive targets for highly specific antivirals. PMID:21632758

  12. The herpes simplex virus 1 UL17 protein is the second constituent of the capsid vertex-specific component required for DNA packaging and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Katerina; Huffman, Jamie B; Homa, Fred L; Conway, James F

    2011-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) UL17 and UL25 minor capsid proteins are essential for DNA packaging. They are thought to comprise a molecule arrayed in five copies around each of the capsid vertices. This molecule was initially termed the "C-capsid-specific component" (CCSC) (B. L. Trus et al., Mol. Cell 26:479-489, 2007), but as we have subsequently observed this feature on reconstructions of A, B, and C capsids, we now refer to it more generally as the "capsid vertex-specific component" (CVSC) (S. K. Cockrell et al., J. Virol. 85:4875-4887, 2011). We previously confirmed that UL25 occupies the vertex-distal region of the CVSC density by visualizing a large UL25-specific tag in reconstructions calculated from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) images. We have pursued the same strategy to determine the capsid location of the UL17 protein. Recombinant viruses were generated that contained either a small tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) attached to the C terminus of UL17. Purification of the TAP-tagged UL17 or a similarly TAP-tagged UL25 protein clearly demonstrated that the two proteins interact. A cryo-EM reconstruction of capsids containing the UL17-GFP protein reveals that UL17 is the second component of the CVSC and suggests that UL17 interfaces with the other CVSC component, UL25, through its C terminus. The portion of UL17 nearest the vertex appears to be poorly constrained, which may provide flexibility in interacting with tegument proteins or the DNA-packaging machinery at the portal vertex. The exposed locations of the UL17 and UL25 proteins on the HSV-1 capsid exterior suggest that they may be attractive targets for highly specific antivirals.

  13. Fully resolved simulations of particle sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowski, Adam; Wang, Yayun; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Progress in computational capabilities - and specifically in the realm of massively parallel architectures - render possible the simulation of fully resolved fluid-particle systems. This development will drastically improve physical understanding and modelling of these systems when the particle size is not negligible and their concentration appreciable. Using a newly developed GPU-centric implementation of the Physalis method for the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the presence of finite-sized spheres, we carry out fully resolved simulations of more than one thousand sedimenting spheres. We discuss the results of these simulations focusing on statistical aspects such as particle velocity fluctuations, particle pair distribution function, microstructure, and others. Supported by NSF Grant CBET 1335965.

  14. MHD power generation with fully ionized seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, H.; Shioda, S.

    1977-01-01

    Recovery of power density in the regime of fully ionized seed has been demonstrated experimentally using an MHD disk generator with the effective Hall parameter up to 5.0 when the seed was fully ionized. The experiments were conducted with a shock-heated and potassium-seeded argon plasma under the following conditions: stagnation gas pressure = 0.92 atm, stagnation gas temperature = 2750 K, flow Mach number = 2.5, and seed fraction = 1.4 x 10/sup -5/. Measurements of electron-number density and spectroscopic observations of both potassium and argon lines confirmed that the recovery of power output was due to the reduction of ionization instability. This fact indicates that the successful operation of a disk generator utilizing nonequilibrium ionization seems to be possible and that the suppression of ionization instability can also provide higher adiabatic efficiency. Furthermore, the lower seed fraction offers technological advantages related to seed problems.

  15. Fully Adaptive Radar Modeling and Simulation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Organization (NATO) Sensors Electronics Technology (SET)-227 Panel on Cognitive Radar. The FAR M&S architecture developed in Phase I allows for...Air Force’s previously developed radar M&S tools. This report is organized as follows. In Chapter 3, we provide an overview of the FAR framework...AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0074 FULLY ADAPTIVE RADAR MODELING AND SIMULATION DEVELOPMENT Kristine L. Bell and Anthony Kellems Metron, Inc

  16. Fully implicit kinetic modelling of collisional plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousseau, V.A.

    1996-05-01

    This dissertation describes a numerical technique, Matrix-Free Newton Krylov, for solving a simplified Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equation. This method is both deterministic and fully implicit, and may not have been a viable option before current developments in numerical methods. Results are presented that indicate the efficiency of the Matrix-Free Newton Krylov method for these fully-coupled, nonlinear integro-differential equations. The use and requirement for advanced differencing is also shown. To this end, implementations of Chang-Cooper differencing and flux limited Quadratic Upstream Interpolation for Convective Kinematics (QUICK) are presented. Results are given for a fully kinetic ion-electron problem with a self consistent electric field calculated from the ion and electron distribution functions. This numerical method, including advanced differencing, provides accurate solutions, which quickly converge on workstation class machines. It is demonstrated that efficient steady-state solutions can be achieved to the non-linear integro-differential equation, obtaining quadratic convergence, without incurring the large memory requirements of an integral operator. Model problems are presented which simulate plasma impinging on a plate with both high and low neutral particle recycling typical of a divertor in a Tokamak device. These model problems demonstrate the performance of the new solution method.

  17. Production and Application of Polyclonal Antibodies Against Recombinant Capsid Protein of Extra Small Virus of Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neethi, V; Sivakumar, N; Kumar, Kundan; Rajendran, K V; Makesh, M

    2012-12-01

    Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus along with a satellite virus, extra small virus (XSV) causes white tail disease (WTD) in the giant freshwater prawn M. rosenbergii. Infected M. rosenbergii postlarvae were collected from a hatchery in Kakinada, Andhra Pradesh. The gene coding the capsid protein of XSV was cloned in a bacterial expression vector pRSET A and the recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)pLysS cells. The recombinant protein was purified by Nickel affinity chromatography. Polyclonal antibodies were produced in mice against the recombinant protein and the antibodies reacted specifically with the recombinant protein and XSV in WTD-infected tissues. This is the first report of detection of XSV using antibodies against recombinant capsid protein.

  18. Detention of HPV L1 Capsid Protein and hTERC Gene in Screening of Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Bin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: To investigate the expression of human papilloma virus (HPV L1 capsid protein, and human telomerase RNA component (hTERC in cervical cancer and the role of detection of both genes in screening of cervical cancer.   Materials and Methods: A total of 309 patients were recruited and cervical exfoliated cells were collected. Immunocytochemistry was employed to detect HPV L1 capsid protein, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH was performed to detect the hTERC. Results: The expression of HPV L1 capsid protein reduced with the increase of the histological grade of cervical cells and was negatively related to the grade of cervical lesions. However, the expression of hTERC increased with the increase of the histological grade and positively associated with the grade of cervical lesions. The proportion of patients with L1(-/hTERC(+ was higher in patients with histological grade of CIN2 or higher than that in those with histological grade of CIN1. The L1(+/hTERC(- and L1(-/hTERC(- were negatively related to the grade of cervical lesions. L1(-/hTERC(+ was positively associated with the grade of cervical lesions. The L1/hTERC ratio increased. The negative predictive value of both HPV L1 and hTERC was higher than that of HPV L1 or hTERC, but there was no marked difference in the screening efficacy of cervical cancer among HPV L1, hTERC and HPV L1+hTERC. Conclusion: HPV L1 capsid protein and hTERC gene may serve as markers for the early diagnosis and prediction of cervical lesions. The increase in L1/hTERC ratio reflects the progression of cervical lesions to a certain extent.

  19. Potential recombinant vaccine against influenza A virus based on M2e displayed on nodaviral capsid nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong CY

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chean Yeah Yong,1 Swee Keong Yeap,2 Kok Lian Ho,3 Abdul Rahman Omar,2,4 Wen Siang Tan1,2 1Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, 2Institute of Bioscience, 3Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, 4Department of Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: Influenza A virus poses a major threat to human health, causing outbreaks from time to time. Currently available vaccines employ inactivated viruses of different strains to provide protection against influenza virus infection. However, high mutation rates of influenza virus hemagglutinin (H and neuraminidase (N glycoproteins give rise to vaccine escape mutants. Thus, an effective vaccine providing protection against all strains of influenza virus would be a valuable asset. The ectodomain of matrix 2 protein (M2e was found to be highly conserved despite mutations of the H and N glycoproteins. Hence, one to five copies of M2e were fused to the carboxyl-terminal end of the recombinant nodavirus capsid protein derived from Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The chimeric proteins harboring up to five copies of M2e formed nanosized virus-like particles approximately 30 nm in diameter, which could be purified easily by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. BALB/c mice immunized subcutaneously with these chimeric proteins developed antibodies specifically against M2e, and the titer was proportional to the copy numbers of M2e displayed on the nodavirus capsid nanoparticles. The fusion proteins also induced a type 1 T helper immune response. Collectively, M2e displayed on the nodavirus capsid nanoparticles could provide an alternative solution to a possible influenza pandemic in the future. Keywords: matrix 2 ectodomain, nodavirus capsid, virus-like particle, fusion protein, subunit vaccine, immunogenicity

  20. Protection against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease with recombinant myxoma viruses expressing rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Le Gall, Ghislaine; Boilletot, Eric; Vautherot, Jean-François; Rasschaert, Denis; Laurent, Sylvie; Petit, Frédérique; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Milon, Alain

    1996-01-01

    Two myxoma virus-rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) recombinant viruses were constructed with the SG33 strain of myxoma virus to protect rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease. These recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV capsid protein (VP60). The recombinant protein, which is 60 kDa in size, was antigenic, as revealed by its reaction in immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against RHDV. Both recombinant viruses induced high levels of RHDV- and myxoma vir...

  1. Nucleic localization of human papillomavirus minor capsid protein L2%人乳头瘤病毒次要衣壳蛋白L2核定位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卫东; 井申荣

    2012-01-01

    在人乳头瘤病毒(human papillomavirus,HPV)次要衣壳蛋白L2的N端和C端,有大量带正电荷的氨基酸残基组成核定位信号(nuclear localization signal,NLS).细胞的核结构域10 (nuclear domain 10,ND10)是细胞周期和病毒生活周期的重要调节者.L2定位到ND10的过程不仅会受到早幼粒细胞白血病蛋白(promyleocytic leukaemia protein,PML)、死亡结构域相关蛋白(death domain-associated protein,Daxx)、Sp100核抗原(Sp100 nuclear antigen)等细胞蛋白的影响,也会与L1在ND10发生相互作用.在HPV感染和组装过程中,L2的核定位信号有着重要作用.%The nuclear localization signal, NLS, which is composed of many amino acids with positive charge residue, is located in both ends of N terminus and C terminus of the human papillomavirus minor capsid protein L2. The nuclear domain 10, ND-10, which is in the cell nucleus, is an important modulator of both cell cycle and virus cyclogeny. The process of the locating of L2 to ND-10, is not only impacted by the cell proteins, such as the promyelocytic leukemia protein, death domain-associated protein Daxx, nuclear antigen Sp100, but also interacts with L1 in ND-10. The NLS of L2 plays a significant role during the HPV virus assembly course.

  2. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  3. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  4. Antigenic relationships among human rotaviruses as determined by outer capsid protein VP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorziglia, M; Larralde, G; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M

    1990-01-01

    cDNA clones representing the VP4 gene of symptomatic human rotavirus strain KU (VP7 serotype 1) or DS-1 (VP7 serotype 2) or asymptomatic human rotavirus strain 1076 (VP7 serotype 2) were constructed and inserted into a baculovirus expression vector under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. The resulting recombinants expressed the appropriate authentic VP4 rotavirus outer capsid protein. Guinea pigs immunized with these VP4 proteins developed antibodies that neutralized infectivity of the rotavirus from which the immunizing VP4 was derived. These antisera were then used in neutralization tests to define the extent and distribution of VP4 antigenic polymorphism among human rotaviruses. Three distinct serotypes and one subtype of the VP4 outer capsid protein were identified among 17 human rotavirus strains that had previously been assigned to five distinct VP7 serotypes. For the most part, VP4 serotype segregated independently of VP7 serotype. Ten strains of human rotavirus that were associated with symptomatic infection and that exhibited VP7 serotype 1, 3, 4, or 9 specificity, each possessed a VP4 of the same serotype and subtype, designated VP4 serotype 1A. Both symptomatic human rotavirus strains with VP7 serotype 2 specificity were related by neutralization to the VP4 serotype 1A strains and were classified as a subtype of VP4 serotype 1--i.e., serotype 1B--since viruses of serotype 1A appeared to be prime strains. Four human rotavirus strains that were recovered from healthy infants in newborn nurseries in which virus transmission persisted over a long interval, belonged to VP7 serotype 1, 2, 3, or 4, but each strain possessed the same VP4 antigenic specificity that was designated VP4 serotype 2. Finally, a single strain of symptomatic human rotavirus of VP7 serotype 1 specificity possessed a unique VP4 that was provisionally classified as VP4 serotype 3 but this remains to be confirmed because neutralization tests were performed in only one direction. Among

  5. VP2 capsid domain of the H-1 parvovirus determines susceptibility of human cancer cells to H-1 viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, I-R; Kaowinn, S; Song, J; Kim, S; Koh, S S; Kang, H-Y; Ha, N-C; Lee, K H; Jun, H-S; Chung, Y-H

    2015-05-01

    Although H-1 parvovirus is used as an antitumor agent, not much is known about the relationship between its specific tropism and oncolytic activity. We hypothesize that VP2, a major capsid protein of H-1 virus, determines H-1-specific tropism. To assess this, we constructed chimeric H-1 viruses expressing Kilham rat virus (KRV) capsid proteins, in their complete or partial forms. Chimeric H-1 viruses (CH1, CH2 and CH3) containing the whole KRV VP2 domain could not induce cytolysis in HeLa, A549 and Panc-1 cells. However, the other chimeric H-1 viruses (CH4 and CH5) expressing a partial KRV VP2 domain induced cytolysis. Additionally, the significant cytopathic effect caused by CH4 and CH5 infection in HeLa cells resulted from preferential viral amplification via DNA replication, RNA transcription and protein synthesis. Modeling of VP2 capsid protein showed that two variable regions (VRs) (VR0 and VR2) of H-1 VP2 protein protrude outward, because of the insertion of extra amino-acid residues, as compared with those of KRV VP2 protein. This might explain the precedence of H-1 VP2 protein over KRV in determining oncolytic activity in human cancer cells. Taking these results together, we propose that the VP2 protein of oncolytic H-1 parvovirus determines its specific tropism in human cancer cells.

  6. Structural determination of importin alpha in complex with beak and feather disease virus capsid nuclear localization signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Edward I. [Charles Sturt University, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Dombrovski, Andrew K. [Charles Sturt University, School of Biomedical Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Swarbrick, Crystall M.D. [Charles Sturt University, School of Biomedical Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Raidal, Shane R. [Charles Sturt University, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Forwood, Jade K., E-mail: jforwood@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, School of Biomedical Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Circovirus capsid proteins contain large nuclear localization signals (NLS). •A method of nuclear import has not been elucidated. •Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) capsid NLS was crystallized with importin α. •The structure showed BFDV NLS binding to the major site of importin α. •Result shows implications for mechanism of nuclear transport for all circoviruses. -- Abstract: Circoviruses represent a rapidly increasing genus of viruses that infect a variety of vertebrates. Replication requires shuttling viral molecules into the host cell nucleus, a process facilitated by capsid-associated protein (Cap). Whilst a nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been shown to mediate nuclear translocation, the mode of nuclear transport remains to be elucidated. To better understand this process, beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) Cap NLS was crystallized with nuclear import receptor importin-α (Impα). Diffraction yielded structural data to 2.9 Å resolution, and the binding site on both Impα and BFDV Cap NLS were well resolved. The binding mechanism for the major site is likely conserved across circoviruses as supported by the similarity of NLSs in circovirus Caps. This finding illuminates a crucial step for infection of host cells by this viral family, and provides a platform for rational drug design against the binding interface.

  7. Host cofactors and pharmacologic ligands share an essential interface in HIV-1 capsid that is lost upon disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Price

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 capsid is involved in all infectious steps from reverse transcription to integration site selection, and is the target of multiple host cell and pharmacologic ligands. However, structural studies have been limited to capsid monomers (CA, and the mechanistic basis for how these ligands influence infection is not well understood. Here we show that a multi-subunit interface formed exclusively within CA hexamers mediates binding to linear epitopes within cellular cofactors NUP153 and CPSF6, and is competed for by the antiretroviral compounds PF74 and BI-2. Each ligand is anchored via a shared phenylalanine-glycine (FG motif to a pocket within the N-terminal domain of one monomer, and all but BI-2 also make essential interactions across the N-terminal domain: C-terminal domain (NTD:CTD interface to a second monomer. Dissociation of hexamer into CA monomers prevents high affinity interaction with CPSF6 and PF74, and abolishes binding to NUP153. The second interface is conformationally dynamic, but binding of NUP153 or CPSF6 peptides is accommodated by only one conformation. NUP153 and CPSF6 have overlapping binding sites, but each makes unique CA interactions that, when mutated selectively, perturb cofactor dependency. These results reveal that multiple ligands share an overlapping interface in HIV-1 capsid that is lost upon viral disassembly.

  8. Effects of capsid-modified oncolytic adenoviruses and their combinations with gemcitabine or silica gel on pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangasniemi, Lotta; Parviainen, Suvi; Pisto, Tommi; Koskinen, Mika; Jokinen, Mika; Kiviluoto, Tuula; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Jalonen, Harry; Koski, Anniina; Kangasniemi, Anna; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-07-01

    Conventional cancer treatments often have little impact on the course of advanced pancreatic cancer. Although cancer gene therapy with adenoviruses is a promising developmental approach, the primary receptor is poorly expressed in pancreatic cancers which might compromise efficacy and thus targeting to other receptors could be beneficial. Extended stealth delivery, combination with standard chemotherapy or circumvention of host antiadenoviral immune response might improve efficacy further. In this work, capsid-modified adenoviruses were studied for transduction of cell lines and clinical normal and tumor tissue samples. The respective oncolytic viruses were tested for oncolytic activity in vitro and in vivo. Survival was studied in a peritoneally disseminated pancreas cancer model, with or without concurrent gemcitabine while silica implants were utilized for extended intraperitoneal virus delivery. Immunocompetent mice and Syrian hamsters were used to study the effect of silica mediated delivery on antiviral immune responses and subsequent in vivo gene delivery. Capsid modifications selectively enhanced gene transfer to malignant pancreatic cancer cell lines and clinical samples. The respective oncolytic viruses resulted in increased cell killing in vitro, which translated into a survival benefit in mice. Early proinfammatory cytokine responses and formation of antiviral neutralizing antibodies was partially avoided with silica implants. The implant also shielded the virus from pre-existing neutralizing antibodies, while increasing the pancreas/liver gene delivery ratio six-fold. In conclusion, capsid modified adenoviruses would be useful for testing in pancreatic cancer trials. Silica implants might increase the safety and efficacy of the approach.

  9. Heat-shock protein 90 promotes nuclear transport of herpes simplex virus 1 capsid protein by interacting with acetylated tubulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meigong Zhong

    Full Text Available Although it is known that inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 can inhibit herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection, the role of Hsp90 in HSV-1 entry and the antiviral mechanisms of Hsp90 inhibitors remain unclear. In this study, we found that Hsp90 inhibitors have potent antiviral activity against standard or drug-resistant HSV-1 strains and viral gene and protein synthesis are inhibited in an early phase. More detailed studies demonstrated that Hsp90 is upregulated by virus entry and it interacts with virus. Hsp90 knockdown by siRNA or treatment with Hsp90 inhibitors significantly inhibited the nuclear transport of viral capsid protein (ICP5 at the early stage of HSV-1 infection. In contrast, overexpression of Hsp90 restored the nuclear transport that was prevented by the Hsp90 inhibitors, suggesting that Hsp90 is required for nuclear transport of viral capsid protein. Furthermore, HSV-1 infection enhanced acetylation of α-tubulin and Hsp90 interacted with the acetylated α-tubulin, which is suppressed by Hsp90 inhibition. These results demonstrate that Hsp90, by interacting with acetylated α-tubulin, plays a crucial role in viral capsid protein nuclear transport and may provide novel insight into the role of Hsp90 in HSV-1 infection and offer a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance.

  10. Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Tu, Ya-Ting; Amunts, Alexey; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally and functionally conserved macromolecular machine universally responsible for catalyzing protein synthesis. Within eukaryotic cells, mitochondria contain their own ribosomes (mitoribosomes), which synthesize a handful of proteins, all essential for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of the yeast, porcine and human mitoribosomal subunits and of the entire human mitoribosome have uncovered a wealth of new information to illustrate their evolutionary divergence from their bacterial ancestors and their adaptation to synthesis of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. With such structural data becoming available, one of the most important remaining questions is that of the mitoribosome assembly pathway and factors involved. The regulation of mitoribosome biogenesis is paramount to mitochondrial respiration, and thus to cell viability, growth and differentiation. Moreover, mutations affecting the rRNA and protein components produce severe human mitochondrial disorders. Despite its biological and biomedical significance, knowledge on mitoribosome biogenesis and its deviations from the much-studied bacterial ribosome assembly processes is scarce, especially the order of rRNA processing and assembly events and the regulatory factors required to achieve fully functional particles. This article focuses on summarizing the current available information on mitoribosome assembly pathway, factors that form the mitoribosome assembly machinery, and the effect of defective mitoribosome assembly on human health.

  11. Self-assembly of silver nanoparticles and bacteriophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi Scibilia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biohybrid nanostructured materials, composed of both inorganic nanoparticles and biomolecules, offer prospects for many new applications in extremely diverse fields such as chemistry, physics, engineering, medicine and nanobiotechnology. In the recent years, Phage display technique has been extensively used to generate phage clones displaying surface peptides with functionality towards organic materials. Screening and selection of phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest because of their use for development of hybrid materials with multiple functionalities. Here, we present a self-assembly approach for the construction of hybrid nanostructured networks consisting of M13 P9b phage clone, specific for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, selected by Phage display technology, directly assembled with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, previously prepared by pulsed laser ablation. These networks are characterized by UV–vis optical spectroscopy, scanning/transmission electron microscopies and Raman spectroscopy. We investigated the influence of different ions and medium pH on self-assembly by evaluating different phage suspension buffers. The assembly of these networks is controlled by electrostatic interactions between the phage pVIII major capsid proteins and the AgNPs. The formation of the AgNPs-phage networks was obtained only in two types of tested buffers at a pH value near the isoelectric point of each pVIII proteins displayed on the surface of the clone. This systematic study allowed to optimize the synthesis procedure to assembly AgNPs and bacteriophage. Such networks find application in the biomedical field of advanced biosensing and targeted gene and drug delivery.

  12. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  13. Self-assembly of nanocomponents into composite structures: derivation and simulation of Langevin equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankavich, S; Shreif, Z; Miao, Y; Ortoleva, P

    2009-05-21

    The kinetics of the self-assembly of nanocomponents into a virus, nanocapsule, or other composite structure is analyzed via a multiscale approach. The objective is to achieve predictability and to preserve key atomic-scale features that underlie the formation and stability of the composite structures. We start with an all-atom description, the Liouville equation, and the order parameters characterizing nanoscale features of the system. An equation of Smoluchowski type for the stochastic dynamics of the order parameters is derived from the Liouville equation via a multiscale perturbation technique. The self-assembly of composite structures from nanocomponents with internal atomic structure is analyzed and growth rates are derived. Applications include the assembly of a viral capsid from capsomers, a ribosome from its major subunits, and composite materials from fibers and nanoparticles. Our approach overcomes errors in other coarse-graining methods, which neglect the influence of the nanoscale configuration on the atomistic fluctuations. We account for the effect of order parameters on the statistics of the atomistic fluctuations, which contribute to the entropic and average forces driving order parameter evolution. This approach enables an efficient algorithm for computer simulation of self-assembly, whereas other methods severely limit the timestep due to the separation of diffusional and complexing characteristic times. Given that our approach does not require recalibration with each new application, it provides a way to estimate assembly rates and thereby facilitate the discovery of self-assembly pathways and kinetic dead-end structures.

  14. Soldering in electronics assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Soldering in Electronics Assembly discusses several concerns in soldering of electronic assemblies. The book is comprised of nine chapters that tackle different areas in electronic assembly soldering. Chapter 1 discusses the soldering process itself, while Chapter 2 covers the electronic assemblies. Chapter 3 talks about solders and Chapter 4 deals with flux. The text also tackles the CS and SC soldering process. The cleaning of soldered assemblies, solder quality, and standards and specifications are also discussed. The book will be of great use to professionals who deal with electronic assem

  15. Advanced DNA assembly technologies in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetanova, Billyana; Peng, Lansha; Liang, Xiquan; Li, Ke; Hammond, Linda; Peterson, Todd C; Katzen, Federico

    2012-05-01

    Recombinant DNA technologies have had a fundamental impact on drug discovery. The continuous emergence of unique gene assembly techniques resulted in the generation of a variety of therapeutic reagents such as vaccines, cancer treatment molecules and regenerative medicine precursors. With the advent of synthetic biology there is a growing need for precise and concerted assembly of multiple DNA fragments of various sizes, including chromosomes. In this article, we summarize the highlights of the recombinant DNA technology since its inception in the early 1970s, emphasizing on the most recent advances, and underscoring their principles, advantages and shortcomings. Current and prior cloning trends are discussed in the context of sequence requirements and scars left behind. Our opinion is that despite the remarkable progress that has enabled the generation and manipulation of very large DNA sequences, a better understanding of the cell's natural circuits is needed in order to fully exploit the current state-of-the-art gene assembly technologies.

  16. Assembly and Mechanical Properties of the Cargo-Free and Cargo-Loaded Bacterial Nanocompartment Encapsulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijder, Joost; Kononova, Olga; Barbu, Ioana M; Uetrecht, Charlotte; Rurup, W Frederik; Burnley, Rebecca J; Koay, Melissa S T; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri; Wuite, Gijs J L; Heck, Albert J R

    2016-08-08

    Prokaryotes mostly lack membranous compartments that are typical of eukaryotic cells, but instead, they have various protein-based organelles. These include bacterial microcompartments like the carboxysome and the virus-like nanocompartment encapsulin. Encapsulins have an adaptable mechanism for enzyme packaging, which makes it an attractive platform to carry a foreign protein cargo. Here we investigate the assembly pathways and mechanical properties of the cargo-free and cargo-loaded nanocompartments, using a combination of native mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and multiscale computational molecular modeling. We show that encapsulin dimers assemble into rigid single-enzyme bacterial containers. Moreover, we demonstrate that cargo encapsulation has a mechanical impact on the shell. The structural similarity of encapsulins to virus capsids is reflected in their mechanical properties. With these robust mechanical properties encapsulins provide a suitable platform for the development of nanotechnological applications.

  17. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF FULLY SOLUBLE POLYPHENYLENEVINYLENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-qing Pan; Zi-kuan Chen; Yang Xiao; Wei Huang

    2000-01-01

    Fully soluble poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyl)-oxy)-p-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) was synthesized by the addition of molecular weight modifiers (chain stopper, free radical scavengers) to a polymerization system containing monomer, catalyst and a solvent. These PPV products synthesized in this work were characterized by IR, NMR, UV-visible spectroscopy and GPC. Results show that the Mw of polyphenylvinylene (PPV) can be controlled by the addition of chain stopper (benzyl bromide) and radical inhibitor (2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methyl phenol). The polymerization mechanism in the presence of these additives was also discussed. A dual mechanism involving carbene for PPV polymerization was proposed.

  18. The fully differential top decay distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Granada (Spain); Boudreau, J.; Mueller, J. [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Escobar, C. [CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Paterna (Spain)

    2017-03-15

    We write down the four-dimensional fully differential decay distribution for the top quark decay t → Wb → lνb. We discuss how its eight physical parameters can be measured, either with a global fit or with the use of selected one-dimensional distributions and asymmetries. We give expressions for the top decay amplitudes for a general tbW interaction, and show how the untangled measurement of the two components of the fraction of longitudinal W bosons - those with b quark helicities of 1/2 and -1/2, respectively - could improve the precision of a global fit to the tbW vertex. (orig.)

  19. Fully Coupled FE Analyses of Buried Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James T. Baylot

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Current procedures for determining the response of buried structures to the effects of the detonation of buried high explosives recommend decoupling the free-field stress analysis from the structure response analysis. A fully coupled (explosive–soil structure finite element analysis procedure was developed so that the accuracies of current decoupling procedures could be evaluated. Comparisons of the results of analyses performed using this procedure with scale-model experiments indicate that this finite element procedure can be used to effectively evaluate the accuracies of the methods currently being used to decouple the free-field stress analysis from the structure response analysis.

  20. Molecular variability analyses of Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus capsid protein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Rana; V Chandel; Y Kumar; R Ram; V Hallan; A A Zaidi

    2010-12-01

    The complete sequences of the coat protein (CP) gene of 26 isolates of Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) from India were determined. The isolates were obtained from various pome (apple, pear and quince) and stone (plum, peach, apricot, almond and wild Himalayan cherry) fruit trees. Other previously characterized ACLSV isolates and Trichoviruses were used for comparative analysis. Indian ACLSV isolates among themselves and with isolates from elsewhere in the world shared 91–100% and 70–98% sequence identities at the amino acid and nucleotide levels, respectively. The highest degree of variability was observed in the middle portion with 9 amino acid substitutions in contrast to the N-terminal and C-terminal ends, which were maximally conserved with only 4 amino acid substitutions. In phylogenetic analysis no reasonable correlation between host species and/or geographic origin of the isolates was observed. Alignment with capsid protein genes of other Trichoviruses revealed the TaTao ACLSV peach isolate to be phylogenetically closest to Peach mosaic virus, Apricot pseudo chlorotic leaf spot virus and Cherry mottle leaf virus. Recombination analysis (RDP3 ver.2.6) done for all the available ACLSV complete CP sequences of the world and Indian isolates indicate no significant evidence of recombination. However, one recombination event among Indian ACLSV-CP isolates was detected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of complete CP sequence variability study from India and also the first evidence of homologous recombination in ACLSV.

  1. Several recombinant capsid proteins of equine rhinitis a virus show potential as diagnostic antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Stevenson, Rachel A; Crabb, Brendan S; Studdert, Michael J; Hartley, Carol A

    2005-06-01

    Equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV) is a significant pathogen of horses and is also closely related to Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Despite these facts, knowledge of the prevalence and importance of ERAV infections remains limited, largely due to the absence of a simple, robust diagnostic assay. In this study, we compared the antigenicities of recombinant full-length and fragmented ERAV capsid proteins expressed in Escherichia coli by using sera from experimentally infected and naturally exposed horses. We found that, from the range of antigens tested, recombinant proteins encompassing the C-terminal region of VP1, full-length VP2, and the N-terminal region of VP2 reacted specifically with antibodies present in sera from each of the five experimentally infected horses examined. Antibodies to epitopes on VP2 (both native and recombinant forms) persisted longer postinfection (>105 days) than antibodies specific for epitopes on other fragments. Our data also suggest that B-cell epitopes within the C terminus of VP1 and N terminus of VP2 contribute to a large proportion of the total reactivity of recombinant VP1 and VP2, respectively. Importantly, the reactivity of these VP1 and VP2 recombinant proteins in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) correlated well with the results from a range of native antigen-based serological assays using sera from 12 field horses. This study provides promising candidates for development of a diagnostic ERAV ELISA.

  2. A Novel Pharmacophore Model Derived from a Class of Capsid Protein Enterovirus 71 Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Hong-Xia; YANG Xin-Ling; WANG Dao-Quan; NING Jun; MEI Xiang-Dong; ZHANG Jian

    2012-01-01

    Capsid protein enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major viruses that cause the severe encephalitis and thus result in a high mortality in children less than 5 years of age.In an effort to discover new potent inhibitors against EV71,a novel three-dimensional pharmacophore model was developed on 24 inhibitors with different molecular structures and bioactivities.The best hypothesis (Hypo1) has a high predictive power and consists of four features,namely,one hydrophobic point (HY) and three hydrogen-bond acceptors (HA).Two key features of the best Hypo1,HY1 and HA3 match well with an important narrow hydrophobic canyon and with the surface of LYS274 in the target EV71 active site,respectively.The more versatile feature,HA1,is firstly found to be very influential on these compounds’ bioactivities,which may interact with the other side of the active site in the EV71 receptor.The application of the model is successful in predicting the activities of 30 known EV71 inhibitors with a correlation coefficient of 0.831.Furthermore,Hypo1 demonstrates a superior screening capability for retrieving inhibitors from the database with a high enrichment factor of 70.This study provides some important clues in search for more potent inhibitors against EV71 infection.

  3. Human serum antibodies to a major defined epitope of human herpesvirus 8 small viral capsid antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, R; De Paoli, P; Schulz, T F; Dillner, J

    1999-04-01

    The major antibody-reactive epitope of the small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) was defined by use of overlapping peptides. Strong IgG reactivity was found among approximately 50% of 44 human immunodeficiency virus-positive or -negative patients with Kaposi's sarcoma and 13 subjects who were seropositive by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for the latent HHV-8 nuclear antigen. Only 1 of 106 subjects seronegative for both lytic and latent HHV-8 antigens and 10 of 81 subjects IFA-seropositive only for the lytic HHV-8 antigen had strong IgG reactivity to this epitope. Among 534 healthy Swedish women, only 1.3% were strongly seropositive. Comparison of the peptide-based and purified sVCA protein-based ELISAs found 55% sensitivity and 98% specificity. However, only 1 of 452 serum samples from healthy women was positive in both tests. In conclusion, the defined sVCA epitope was a specific, but not very sensitive, serologic marker of active HHV-8 infection. Such infection appears to be rare among Swedish women, even with sexual risk-taking behavior.

  4. Engineering bacterial surface displayed human norovirus capsid proteins: A novel system to explore interaction between norovirus and ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengya eNiu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human noroviruses (HuNoVs are major contributors to acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks. Many aspects of HuNoVs are poorly understood due to both the current inability to culture HuNoVs, and the lack of efficient small animal models. Surrogates for HuNoVs, such as recombinant viral like particles (VLPs expressed in eukaryotic system or P particles expressed in prokaryotic system, have been used for studies in immunology and interaction between the virus and its receptors. However, it is difficult to use VLPs or P particles to collect or isolate potential ligands binding to these recombinant capsid proteins. In this study, a new strategy was used to collect HuNoVs binding ligands through the use of ice nucleation protein (INP to display recombinant capsid proteins of HuNoVs on bacterial surfaces. The viral protein-ligand complex could be easily separated by a low speed centrifugation step. This system was also used to explore interaction between recombinant capsid proteins of HuNoVs and their receptors. In this system, the VP1 capsid encoding gene (ORF2 and the protruding domain (P domain encoding gene (3’ terminal fragment of ORF2 of HuNoVs GI.1 and GII.4 were fused with 5’ terminal fragment of ice nucleation protein encoding gene (inaQn. The results demonstrated that the recombinant VP1 and P domains of HuNoVs were expressed and anchored on the surface of Escherichia coli BL21 cells after the bacteria were transformed with the corresponding plasmids. Both cell surface displayed VP1 and P domains could be recognized by HuNoVs specific antibodies and interact with the viral histo-blood group antigens receptors. In both cases, displayed P domains had better binding abilities than VP1. This new strategy of using displayed HuNoVs capsid proteins on the bacterial surface could be utilized to separate HuNoVs binding components from complex samples, to investigate interaction between the virus and its receptors, as well as to develop an

  5. Composite fan stator assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donges, G.L.

    1993-07-13

    A composite fan stator assembly is described for a gas turbine engine having at least two fan rotor stages, the composite stator assembly comprising: an annular composite fan case assembly including an access port, the fan case assembly circumferentially disposed around first and second fan rotor stage locations, a composite fan stator stage supported by and extending radially inward of the fan case assembly and axially disposed between the two fan rotor stage locations, the fan stator stage includes at least one removable vane segment accessible for removal through the access port for assembly and reassembly, the composite fan case assembly including a separable composite forward fan case assembly and a separable composite aft fan case assembly spaced axially aft of the forward fan case assembly, the forward fan case assembly being bolted to the aft fan case assembly, wherein the composite fan stator stage is axially and radially trapped and supported by the forward and aft fan case assemblies. A composite stator vane assembly comprising: a composite inner shroud, a composite outer shroud disposed radially outward of the inner shroud, a plurality of vanes disposed between the shrouds, the vanes including a suction side and a pressure side and radially inner and outer roots, the roots extending through platforms of corresponding ones of the inner and outer shrouds, four box-type attachment elements corresponding to curved suction and pressure sides of the inner and outer roots, the box-type attachment elements having two connected legs angled with respect to each other, a first one of the legs extending along, conforming to the curve of, and bonded to a corresponding one of the airfoil root sides, and a second one of the legs extending along and bonded to a composite shroud surface.

  6. Fully 3D GPU PET reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L., E-mail: joaquin@nuclear.fis.ucm.es [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Cal-Gonzalez, J. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Departmento de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Desco, M. [Departmento de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Fully 3D iterative tomographic image reconstruction is computationally very demanding. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been proposed for many years as potential accelerators in complex scientific problems, but it has not been used until the recent advances in the programmability of GPUs that the best available reconstruction codes have started to be implemented to be run on GPUs. This work presents a GPU-based fully 3D PET iterative reconstruction software. This new code may reconstruct sinogram data from several commercially available PET scanners. The most important and time-consuming parts of the code, the forward and backward projection operations, are based on an accurate model of the scanner obtained with the Monte Carlo code PeneloPET and they have been massively parallelized on the GPU. For the PET scanners considered, the GPU-based code is more than 70 times faster than a similar code running on a single core of a fast CPU, obtaining in both cases the same images. The code has been designed to be easily adapted to reconstruct sinograms from any other PET scanner, including scanner prototypes.

  7. Fully Equipped Dynamic Model of a Bus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kowarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the time to market a new vehicle is crucial for every company as it is easier to meet the customers’ needs and expectations. However, designing a new vehicle is a long process which needs to take into account different performances. The most difficult is to predict a dynamic behavior of a vehicle especially when such a big vehicles as urban buses are considered. Therefore, there is a necessity to use a virtual model to investigate different performances. However, there is a lack of urban bus models that can fully reflect a dynamic behavior of the bus. This paper presents a fully equipped urban bus model which can be used to study a dynamic behavior of such vehicles. The model is based on innovative technique called cosimulation, which connects different modeling techniques (3D and 1D. Such a technique allows performing different analyses that require small deformations and large translations and rotations in shorter time and automatic way. The work has been carried out in a project EUREKA CHASING.

  8. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Justin A., E-mail: jabriggs@stanford.edu [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Naik, Gururaj V.; Baum, Brian K.; Dionne, Jennifer A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Petach, Trevor A.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  9. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Justin A.; Naik, Gururaj V.; Petach, Trevor A.; Baum, Brian K.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  10. Mesoscopic Self-Assembly: A Shift to Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo eMastrangeli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available By focusing on the construction of thermodynamically stable structures, the self-assembly of mesoscopic systems has proven capable of formidable achievements in the bottom-up engineering of micro- and nanosystems. Yet, inspired by an analogous evolution in supramolecular chemistry, synthetic mesoscopic self-assembly may have a lot more ahead, within reach of a shift toward fully three-dimensional architectures, collective interactions of building blocks and kinetic control. All over these challenging fronts, complexity holds the key.

  11. Selecting Superior De Novo Transcriptome Assemblies: Lessons Learned by Leveraging the Best Plant Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren A Honaas

    Full Text Available Whereas de novo assemblies of RNA-Seq data are being published for a growing number of species across the tree of life, there are currently no broadly accepted methods for evaluating such assemblies. Here we present a detailed comparison of 99 transcriptome assemblies, generated with 6 de novo assemblers including CLC, Trinity, SOAP, Oases, ABySS and NextGENe. Controlled analyses of de novo assemblies for Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa transcriptomes provide new insights into the strengths and limitations of transcriptome assembly strategies. We find that the leading assemblers generate reassuringly accurate assemblies for the majority of transcripts. At the same time, we find a propensity for assemblers to fail to fully assemble highly expressed genes. Surprisingly, the instance of true chimeric assemblies is very low for all assemblers. Normalized libraries are reduced in highly abundant transcripts, but they also lack 1000s of low abundance transcripts. We conclude that the quality of de novo transcriptome assemblies is best assessed through consideration of a combination of metrics: 1 proportion of reads mapping to an assembly 2 recovery of conserved, widely expressed genes, 3 N50 length statistics, and 4 the total number of unigenes. We provide benchmark Illumina transcriptome data and introduce SCERNA, a broadly applicable modular protocol for de novo assembly improvement. Finally, our de novo assembly of the Arabidopsis leaf transcriptome revealed ~20 putative Arabidopsis genes lacking in the current annotation.

  12. Electron Capture in a Fully Ionized Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y N

    2014-01-01

    Properties of fully ionized water plasmas are discussed including plasma charge density oscillations and the screening of the Coulomb law especially in the dilute classical Debye regime. A kinetic model with two charged particle scattering events determines the transition rate per unit time for electron capture by a nucleus with the resulting nuclear transmutations. Two corrections to the recent Maiani et al. calculations are made: (i) The Debye screening length is only employed within its proper domain of validity. (ii) The WKB approximation employed by Maiani in the long De Broglie wave length limit is evidently invalid. We replace this incorrect approximation with mathematically rigorous Calogero inequalities in order to discuss the scattering wave functions. Having made these corrections, we find a verification for our previous results based on condensed matter electro-weak quantum field theory for nuclear transmutations in chemical batteries.

  13. A fully quantum model of Big Bang

    CERN Document Server

    Maydanyuk, Sergei P; Olkhovsky, Vladislav S

    2013-01-01

    In the paper the closed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model with quantization in the presence of the positive cosmological constant and radiation is studied. For analysis of tunneling probability for birth of an asymptotically deSitter, inflationary Universe as a function of the radiation energy a new definition of a "free" wave propagating inside strong fields is proposed. On such a basis, tunneling boundary condition is corrected, penetrability and reflection concerning to the barrier are calculated in fully quantum stationary approach. For the first time non-zero interference between the incident and reflected waves has been taken into account which turns out to play important role inside cosmological potentials and could be explained by non-locality of barriers in quantum mechanics. Inside whole region of energy of radiation the tunneling probability for the birth of the inflationary Universe is found to be close to its value obtained in semiclassical approach. The reflection from the barrier is determined f...

  14. Fully Automatic Expression-Invariant Face Correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Salazar, Augusto; Shu, Chang; Prieto, Flavio

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of computing accurate point-to-point correspondences among a set of human face scans with varying expressions. Our fully automatic approach does not require any manually placed markers on the scan. Instead, the approach learns the locations of a set of landmarks present in a database and uses this knowledge to automatically predict the locations of these landmarks on a newly available scan. The predicted landmarks are then used to compute point-to-point correspondences between a template model and the newly available scan. To accurately fit the expression of the template to the expression of the scan, we use as template a blendshape model. Our algorithm was tested on a database of human faces of different ethnic groups with strongly varying expressions. Experimental results show that the obtained point-to-point correspondence is both highly accurate and consistent for most of the tested 3D face models.

  15. Fully compressive tides in galaxy mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, Florent; Naab, Thorsten; Theis, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The disruptive effect of galactic tides is a textbook example of gravitational dynamics. However, depending on the shape of the potential, tides can also become fully compressive. When that is the case, they might trigger or strengthen the formation of galactic substructures (star clusters, tidal dwarf galaxies), instead of destroying them. We perform N-body simulations of interacting galaxies to quantify this effect. We demonstrate that tidal compression occurs repeatedly during a galaxy merger, independently of the specific choice of parameterization. With a model tailored to the Antennae galaxies, we show that the distribution of compressive tides matches the locations and timescales of observed substructures. After extending our study to a broad range of parameters, we conclude that neither the importance of the compressive tides (~15% of the stellar mass) nor their duration (~ 10 Myr) are strongly affected by changes in the progenitors' configurations and orbits. Moreover, we show that individual clumps ...

  16. Argentina to fully privatize state owned YPF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-05

    Argentina's Congress has voted to fully privatize state petroleum company Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales (YPF), a move the government expects to net at least $8 billion. Despite some political opposition, the vote was 119-10 in favor, with one abstention and opposition party members refusing to participate in the vote. Argentina's President Carlos Menem had threatened to authorize YPF privatization by decree if there was no quorum for a vote. YPF is responsible for 40% of Argentina's oil production. The country h as been self-sufficient in crude since 1982. Current production is 563,472 b/d, and proved reserves of oil and gas are valued at $7 billion.

  17. A novel fully integrated handheld gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C. [Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute (IBB), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [University of Rome “La Sapienza”, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Soluri, A., E-mail: alessandro.soluri@ibb.cnr.it [Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute (IBB), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Rome (Italy)

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present an innovative, fully integrated handheld gamma camera, namely designed to gather in the same device the gamma ray detector with the display and the embedded computing system. The low power consumption allows the prototype to be battery operated. To be useful in radioguided surgery, an intraoperative gamma camera must be very easy to handle since it must be moved to find a suitable view. Consequently, we have developed the first prototype of a fully integrated, compact and lightweight gamma camera for radiopharmaceuticals fast imaging. The device can operate without cables across the sterile field, so it may be easily used in the operating theater for radioguided surgery. The prototype proposed consists of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) array coupled with a proprietary scintillation structure based on CsI(Tl) crystals. To read the SiPM output signals, we have developed a very low power readout electronics and a dedicated analog to digital conversion system. One of the most critical aspects we faced designing the prototype was the low power consumption, which is mandatory to develop a battery operated device. We have applied this detection device in the lymphoscintigraphy technique (sentinel lymph node mapping) comparing the results obtained with those of a commercial gamma camera (Philips SKYLight). The results obtained confirm a rapid response of the device and an adequate spatial resolution for the use in the scintigraphic imaging. This work confirms the feasibility of a small gamma camera with an integrated display. This device is designed for radioguided surgery and small organ imaging, but it could be easily combined into surgical navigation systems.

  18. 49 CFR 572.145 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... lumbar spine and abdomen of a fully assembled dummy (drawing 210-0000) to flexion articulation between... the thorax forward three times from vertical until the torso reference plane reaches 30 ±2 degrees...

  19. Assembling and Installing LRUs for NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonanno, R E

    2003-12-31

    Within the 192 National Ignition Facility (NIF) beamlines, there are over 7000 large (40 x 40 cm) optical components, including laser glass, mirrors, lenses, and polarizers. These optics are held in large opto-mechanical assemblies called line-replaceable units (LRUs). Each LRU has strict specifications with respect to cleanliness, alignment, and wavefront so that once activated, each NIF beamline will meet its performance requirements. NIF LRUs are assembled, tested, and refurbished in on-site cleanroom facilities. The assembled LRUs weigh up to 1800 kilograms, and are about the size of a phone booth. They are transported in portable clean canisters and inserted into the NIF beampath using robotic transporters. This plug and play design allows LRUs to be easily removed from the beampath for maintenance or upgrades. Commissioning of the first NIF quad, an activity known as NIF Early Light (NEL), has validated LRU designs and architecture, as well as demonstrated that LRUs can be assembled and installed as designed. Furthermore, it has served to develop key processes and tools forming the foundation for NIF s long-term LRU production and maintenance strategy. As we look forward to building out the rest of NIF, the challenge lies in scaling up the production rate while maintaining quality, implementing process improvements, and fully leveraging the learning and experience gained from NEL. This paper provides an overview of the facilities, equipment and processes used to assemble and install LRUs in NIF.

  20. [INVITED] Self-assembled optical metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Alexandre; Aradian, Ashod; Ponsinet, Virginie; Barois, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Self-assembled metamaterials constitute a promising platform to achieving bulk and homogenous optical materials that exhibit unusual effective medium properties. For many years now, the research community has contemplated lithographically fabricated metasurfaces, with extraordinary optical features. However, achieving large volumes at low cost is still a challenge by top-down fabrication. Bottom-up fabrication, that relies both on nanochemistry and self-assembly, is capable of building such materials while greatly reducing the energy footprint in the formulation of the metamaterial. Self-assembled metamaterials have shown that they are capable of reaching unprecedented values of bulkiness and homogeneity figures of merit. This feat is achieved by synthesizing plasmonic nanoresonators (meta-atoms in the sense of artificial polarizable units) and assembling them into a fully three-dimensional matrix through a variety of methods. Furthermore it has been shown that a wide range of material parameters can be tailored by controlling the geometry and composition of the meta-atoms as well as the volume fraction of the nano-objects in the metamaterial. Here we conduct a non-comprehensive review of some of the recent trends in self-assembled optical metamaterials and illustrate these trends with our recent work.

  1. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  2. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  3. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  4. Identification of two neutralization epitopes on the capsid protein of avian hepatitis E virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, E-M; Guo, H; Huang, F F; Sun, Z F; Meng, X J

    2008-02-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) is genetically and antigenically related to human HEV, the causative agent of hepatitis E. To identify the neutralizing epitopes on the capsid (ORF2) protein of avian HEV, four mAbs (7B2, 1E11, 10A2 and 5G10) against recombinant avian HEV ORF2 protein were generated. mAbs 7B2, 1E11 and 10A2 blocked each other for binding to avian HEV ORF2 protein in a competitive ELISA, whereas 5G10 did not block the other mAbs, suggesting that 7B2, 1E11 and 10A2 recognize the same or overlapping epitopes and 5G10 recognizes a different one. The epitopes recognized by 7B2, 1E11 and 10A2, and by 5G10 were mapped by Western blotting between aa 513 and 570, and between aa 476 and 513, respectively. mAbs 1E11, 10A2 and 5G10 were shown to bind to avian HEV particles in vitro, although only 5G10 reacted to viral antigens in transfected LMH cells. To assess the neutralizing activities of the mAbs, avian HEV was incubated in vitro with each mAb before inoculation into specific-pathogen-free chickens. Both viraemia and faecal virus shedding were delayed in chickens inoculated with the mixtures of avian HEV and 1E11, 10A2 or 5G10, suggesting that these three mAbs partially neutralize avian HEV.

  5. A replicating adenovirus capsid display recombinant elicits antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites in Aotus nancymaae monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen, Kasey A; Deal, Cailin; Adams, Robert J; Nielsen, Carolyn; Ward, Cameron; Espinosa, Diego A; Xie, Jane; Zavala, Fidel; Ketner, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Decades of success with live adenovirus vaccines suggest that replication-competent recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) could serve as effective vectors for immunization against other pathogens. To explore the potential of a live rAd vaccine against malaria, we prepared a viable adenovirus 5 (Ad5) recombinant that displays a B-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum on the virion surface. The recombinant induced P. falciparum sporozoite-neutralizing antibodies in mice. Human adenoviruses do not replicate in mice. Therefore, to examine immunogenicity in a system in which, as in humans, the recombinant replicates, we constructed a similar recombinant in an adenovirus mutant that replicates in monkey cells and immunized four Aotus nancymaae monkeys. The recombinant replicated in the monkeys after intratracheal instillation, the first demonstration of replication of human adenoviruses in New World monkeys. Immunization elicited antibodies both to the Plasmodium epitope and the Ad5 vector. Antibodies from all four monkeys recognized CSP on intact parasites, and plasma from one monkey neutralized sporozoites in vitro and conferred partial protection against P. falciparum sporozoite infection after passive transfer to mice. Prior enteric inoculation of two animals with antigenically wild-type adenovirus primed a response to the subsequent intratracheal inoculation, suggesting a route to optimizing performance. A vaccine is not yet available against P. falciparum, which induces the deadliest form of malaria and kills approximately one million children each year. The live capsid display recombinant described here may constitute an early step in a critically needed novel approach to malaria immunization. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Characterization of virus-like particles and identification of capsid proteins in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Oriana; Alcaíno, Jennifer; Fernandez-Lobato, María; Cifuentes, Víctor; Baeza, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    Two dsRNAs of estimated lengths of 5 (L1) and 3.7 (L2) kpb are commonly found in strains of the basidiomycetous yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous, and the presence of virus-like particles (VLPs) have been described in some strains. Recently, two putative totiviruses (XdV-L1A and XdV-L1B) were identified from L1 dsRNA and one (XdV-L2) from L2 dsRNA in the strain UCD 67-385. In some strains, there are smaller dsRNAs (0.9-1.4 kb) that probable are satellite elements. In this work, the VLPs from several strains of X. dendrorhous, which differ in their dsRNAs content, were separated by sucrose gradient and characterized in relation to the dsRNAs and proteins that compose them. It was found that all types of dsRNAs were encapsidated into VLPs, supporting the hypothesis that the smaller dsRNAs are satellite molecules. A main protein of approx. 76 or 37 kDa composed the virions that only have the L1-dsRNA or L2-dsRNA, respectively. In the strain UCD 67-385, these both proteins were identified as viral capsid protein (CP), allow to confirm the gag predicted ORFs in XdV-L1A, XdV-L1B, and XdV-L2, with CPs of 76.6, 76.2, and 38.8 kDa, respectively. Analysis of predicted structures of CPs of XdV-L1A and XdV-L1B, showed high similitudes with the CPs of ScV-L-A and other totiviruses.

  7. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Sharath Makki, S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Mohan Vasu, Ram; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-01

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  8. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki, S Sharath; Kumar, Rajesh; Vasu, Ram Mohan; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-21

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  9. Genome sequence, structural proteins, and capsid organization of the cyanophage Syn5: a "horned" bacteriophage of marine synechococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Welkin H; Weigele, Peter R; Chang, Juan; Pedulla, Marisa L; Ford, Michael E; Houtz, Jennifer M; Jiang, Wen; Chiu, Wah; Hatfull, Graham F; Hendrix, Roger W; King, Jonathan

    2007-05-11

    Marine Synechococcus spp and marine Prochlorococcus spp are numerically dominant photoautotrophs in the open oceans and contributors to the global carbon cycle. Syn5 is a short-tailed cyanophage isolated from the Sargasso Sea on Synechococcus strain WH8109. Syn5 has been grown in WH8109 to high titer in the laboratory and purified and concentrated retaining infectivity. Genome sequencing and annotation of Syn5 revealed that the linear genome is 46,214 bp with a 237 bp terminal direct repeat. Sixty-one open reading frames (ORFs) were identified. Based on genomic organization and sequence similarity to known protein sequences within GenBank, Syn5 shares features with T7-like phages. The presence of a putative integrase suggests access to a temperate life cycle. Assignment of 11 ORFs to structural proteins found within the phage virion was confirmed by mass-spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing. Eight of these identified structural proteins exhibited amino acid sequence similarity to enteric phage proteins. The remaining three virion proteins did not resemble any known phage sequences in GenBank as of August 2006. Cryo-electron micrographs of purified Syn5 virions revealed that the capsid has a single "horn", a novel fibrous structure protruding from the opposing end of the capsid from the tail of the virion. The tail appendage displayed an apparent 3-fold rather than 6-fold symmetry. An 18 A resolution icosahedral reconstruction of the capsid revealed a T=7 lattice, but with an unusual pattern of surface knobs. This phage/host system should allow detailed investigation of the physiology and biochemistry of phage propagation in marine photosynthetic bacteria.

  10. Development of a virtual manufacturing assembly simulation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman M Al-Ahmari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Assembly operations are a key component of modern manufacturing systems. Designing, planning, and conducting assembly operations represent an important part of the cost of a product. Virtual reality provides an efficient and cost-effective solution to manufacturing design, planning, and prototyping. Still there are certain issues (such as data translation, integration of various hardware and software systems, and real-time collision detection faced while applying this advanced technology to the assembly domain. For example, existing works focus on using virtual reality systems and environments mainly to design new products and to plan for assembly. Little focus has been given to develop virtual reality environments that contribute to train operators on assembly operations and to bridge the gap between design and implementation/execution of assembly. Therefore, the research work presented in this article focuses on developing a fully functional virtual manufacturing assembly simulation system that solves the issues related to virtual reality environments. The proposed system uses a virtual environment to create an interactive workbench that can be used for evaluating assembly decisions and training assembly operations. It is a comprehensive system that provides visual, auditory, tactile, as well as force feedback. The system works successfully even with large components.

  11. Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinxin; Li, Hongchang; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yadong; Peng, Bo; Celis, César Díaz; Xu, April; Zou, Qin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Xuefeng; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures of each individual particles of asymmetric and flexible proteins is essential in understanding those proteins’ functions; but their structures are difficult to determine. Electron tomography (ET) provides a tool for imaging a single and unique biological object from a series of tilted angles, but it is challenging to image a single protein for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction due to the imperfect mechanical control capability of the specimen goniometer under both a medium to high magnification (approximately 50,000–160,000×) and an optimized beam coherence condition. Here, we report a fully mechanical control method for automating ET data acquisition without using beam tilt/shift processes. This method could reduce the accumulation of beam tilt/shift that used to compensate the error from the mechanical control, but downgraded the beam coherence. Our method was developed by minimizing the error of the target object center during the tilting process through a closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm. The validations by both negative staining (NS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) suggest that this method has a comparable capability to other ET methods in tracking target proteins while maintaining optimized beam coherence conditions for imaging.

  12. Fully printed flexible carbon nanotube photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suoming; Cai, Le; Wang, Tongyu; Miao, Jinshui; Sepúlveda, Nelson; Wang, Chuan

    2017-03-01

    Here, we report fully printed flexible photodetectors based on single-wall carbon nanotubes and the study of their electrical characteristics under laser illumination. Due to the photothermal effect and the use of high purity semiconducting carbon nanotubes, the devices exhibit gate-voltage-dependent photoresponse with the positive photocurrent or semiconductor-like behavior (conductivity increases at elevated temperatures) under positive gate biases and the negative photocurrent or metal-like behavior (conductivity decreases at elevated temperatures) under negative gate biases. Mechanism for such photoresponse is attributed to the different temperature dependencies of carrier concentration and carrier mobility, which are two competing factors that ultimately determine the photothermal effect-based photoresponse. The photodetectors built on the polyimide substrate also exhibit superior mechanical compliance and stable photoresponse after thousands of bending cycles down to a curvature radius as small as 3 mm. Furthermore, due to the low thermal conductivity of the plastic substrate, the devices show up to 6.5 fold improvement in responsivity compared to the devices built on the silicon substrate. The results presented here provide a viable path to low cost and high performance flexible photodetectors fabricated entirely by the printing process.

  13. A fully covariant description of CMB anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Dunsby, P K S

    1997-01-01

    Starting from the exact non-linear description of matter and radiation, a fully covariant and gauge-invariant formula for the observed temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CBR) radiation, expressed in terms of the electric ($E_{ab}$) and magnetic ($H_{ab}$) parts of the Weyl tensor, is obtained by integrating photon geodesics from last scattering to the point of observation today. This improves and extends earlier work by Russ et al where a similar formula was obtained by taking first order variations of the redshift. In the case of scalar (density) perturbations, $E_{ab}$ is related to the harmonic components of the gravitational potential $\\Phi_k$ and the usual dominant Sachs-Wolfe contribution $\\delta T_R/\\bar{T}_R\\sim\\Phi_k$ to the temperature anisotropy is recovered, together with contributions due to the time variation of the potential (Rees-Sciama effect), entropy and velocity perturbations at last scattering and a pressure suppression term important in low density universes. We a...

  14. Fully inkjet-printed microwave passive electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Mckerricher, Garret

    2017-01-30

    Fully inkjet-printed three-dimensional (3D) objects with integrated metal provide exciting possibilities for on-demand fabrication of radio frequency electronics such as inductors, capacitors, and filters. To date, there have been several reports of printed radio frequency components metallized via the use of plating solutions, sputtering, and low-conductivity pastes. These metallization techniques require rather complex fabrication, and do not provide an easily integrated or versatile process. This work utilizes a novel silver ink cured with a low-cost infrared lamp at only 80 °C, and achieves a high conductivity of 1×107 S m−1. By inkjet printing the infrared-cured silver together with a commercial 3D inkjet ultraviolet-cured acrylic dielectric, a multilayer process is demonstrated. By using a smoothing technique, both the conductive ink and dielectric provide surface roughness values of <500 nm. A radio frequency inductor and capacitor exhibit state-of-the-art quality factors of 8 and 20, respectively, and match well with electromagnetic simulations. These components are implemented in a lumped element radio frequency filter with an impressive insertion loss of 0.8 dB at 1 GHz, proving the utility of the process for sensitive radio frequency applications.

  15. Quantum Optimization of Fully Connected Spin Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturelli, Davide; Mandrà, Salvatore; Knysh, Sergey; O'Gorman, Bryan; Biswas, Rupak; Smelyanskiy, Vadim

    2015-07-01

    Many NP-hard problems can be seen as the task of finding a ground state of a disordered highly connected Ising spin glass. If solutions are sought by means of quantum annealing, it is often necessary to represent those graphs in the annealer's hardware by means of the graph-minor embedding technique, generating a final Hamiltonian consisting of coupled chains of ferromagnetically bound spins, whose binding energy is a free parameter. In order to investigate the effect of embedding on problems of interest, the fully connected Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model with random ±1 couplings is programmed on the D-Wave TwoTM annealer using up to 270 qubits interacting on a Chimera-type graph. We present the best embedding prescriptions for encoding the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick problem in the Chimera graph. The results indicate that the optimal choice of embedding parameters could be associated with the emergence of the spin-glass phase of the embedded problem, whose presence was previously uncertain. This optimal parameter setting allows the performance of the quantum annealer to compete with (and potentially outperform, in the absence of analog control errors) optimized simulated annealing algorithms.

  16. Quantum Optimization of Fully Connected Spin Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Venturelli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many NP-hard problems can be seen as the task of finding a ground state of a disordered highly connected Ising spin glass. If solutions are sought by means of quantum annealing, it is often necessary to represent those graphs in the annealer’s hardware by means of the graph-minor embedding technique, generating a final Hamiltonian consisting of coupled chains of ferromagnetically bound spins, whose binding energy is a free parameter. In order to investigate the effect of embedding on problems of interest, the fully connected Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model with random ±1 couplings is programmed on the D-Wave Two^{TM} annealer using up to 270 qubits interacting on a Chimera-type graph. We present the best embedding prescriptions for encoding the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick problem in the Chimera graph. The results indicate that the optimal choice of embedding parameters could be associated with the emergence of the spin-glass phase of the embedded problem, whose presence was previously uncertain. This optimal parameter setting allows the performance of the quantum annealer to compete with (and potentially outperform, in the absence of analog control errors optimized simulated annealing algorithms.

  17. Fully additive copper metallization on BCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolle, T. [FhG-IZM Berlin (Germany); Schwencke, B.; Reichl, H.

    2000-07-01

    A fully additive copper metallization process on benzocyclobutene cyclotene trademark (BCB) has been investigated for application in MCM-D technology. The process consists of surface pretreatment of the BCB basic layer by reactive ion etching (RIE), spin-coating and photopatterning of an organic seed layer by broad-band I-line photolithography followed by developing and activation steps. The metallization of the seed patterns is performed by a 2-step process by means of electroless copper baths. A height of about 5 {mu}m selectively deposited copper can be achieved. The electrical conductivity of patterns is in the range of 80% - 85% of the bulk conductivity of pure copper. Adhesive strength tests during accelerated aging show good adhesion of copper to the BCB surface, which is influenced by RIE pretreatment, exposure dose and thermal load. Shear experiments performed with optimal treated 200 x 200 {mu}m bumps show shear forces > 150 cN. Design rules have to take into account the lateral growth of copper patterns, which is nearly equal to the vertical growth. Real spaces of {>=} 30 {mu}m between copper lines are possible. The process is considered as a low cost technology because of replacing of sputter technique, few process steps and waste reduction. (orig.)

  18. The first LHC sector is fully interconnected

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Sector 7-8 is the first sector of the LHC to become fully operational. All the magnets, cryogenic line, vacuum chambers and services are interconnected. The cool down of this sector can soon commence. LHC project leader Lyn Evans, the teams from CERN's AT/MCS, AT/VAC and AT/MEL groups, and the members of the IEG consortium celebrate the completion of the first LHC sector. The 10th of November was a red letter day for the LHC accelerator teams, marking the completion of the first sector of the machine. The magnets of sector 7-8, together with the cryogenic line, the vacuum chambers and the distribution feedboxes (DFBs) are now all completely interconnected. Sector 7-8 has thus been closed and is the first LHC sector to become operational. The interconnection work required several thousand electrical, cryogenic and insulating connections to be made on the 210 interfaces between the magnets in the arc, the 30 interfaces between the special magnets and the interfaces with the cryogenic line. 'This represent...

  19. Alternative Polyadenylation of Human Bocavirus at Its 3′ End Is Regulated by Multiple Elements and Affects Capsid Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Sujuan; Zhang, Junmei; Chen, Zhen; Xu, Huanzhou; Wang, Hanzhong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alternative processing of human bocavirus (HBoV) P5 promoter-transcribed RNA is critical for generating the structural and nonstructural protein-encoding mRNA transcripts. The regulatory mechanism by which HBoV RNA transcripts are polyadenylated at proximal [(pA)p] or distal [(pA)d] polyadenylation sites is still unclear. We constructed a recombinant HBoV infectious clone to study the alternative polyadenylation regulation of HBoV. Surprisingly, in addition to the reported distal polyadenylation site, (pA)d, a novel distal polyadenylation site, (pA)d2, which is located in the right-end hairpin (REH), was identified during infectious clone transfection or recombinant virus infection. (pA)d2 does not contain typical hexanucleotide polyadenylation signal, upstream elements (USE), or downstream elements (DSE) according to sequence analysis. Further study showed that HBoV nonstructural protein NS1, REH, and cis elements of (pA)d were necessary and sufficient for efficient polyadenylation at (pA)d2. The distance and sequences between (pA)d and (pA)d2 also played a key role in the regulation of polyadenylation at (pA)d2. Finally, we demonstrated that efficient polyadenylation at (pA)d2 resulted in increased HBoV capsid mRNA transcripts and protein translation. Thus, our study revealed that all the bocaviruses have distal poly(A) signals on the right-end palindromic terminus, and alternative polyadenylation at the HBoV 3′ end regulates its capsid expression. IMPORTANCE The distal polyadenylation site, (pA)d, of HBoV is located about 400 nucleotides (nt) from the right-end palindromic terminus, which is different from those of bovine parvovirus (BPV) and canine minute virus (MVC) in the same genus whose distal polyadenylation is located in the right-end stem-loop structure. A novel polyadenylation site, (pA)d2, was identified in the right-end hairpin of HBoV during infectious clone transfection or recombinant virus infection. Sequence analysis showed that (pA)d2

  20. Crystal structure of a human rhinovirus neutralizing antibody complexed with a peptide derived from viral capsid protein VP2.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the complex between the Fab fragment of an anti-human rhinovirus neutralizing antibody (8F5) and a cross-reactive synthetic peptide from the viral capsid protein VP2 has been determined at 2.5 A resolution by crystallographic methods. The refinement is presently at an R factor of 0.18 and the antigen-binding site and viral peptide are well defined. The peptide antigen adopts a compact fold by two tight turns and interacts through hydrogen bonds, some with io...

  1. Protection against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease with recombinant myxoma viruses expressing rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnoli, S; Gelfi, J; Le Gall, G; Boilletot, E; Vautherot, J F; Rasschaert, D; Laurent, S; Petit, F; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Milon, A

    1996-08-01

    Two myxoma virus-rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) recombinant viruses were constructed with the SG33 strain of myxoma virus to protect rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease. These recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV capsid protein (VP60). The recombinant protein, which is 60 kDa in size, was antigenic, as revealed by its reaction in immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against RHDV. Both recombinant viruses induced high levels of RHDV- and myxoma virus-specific antibodies in rabbits after immunization. Inoculations by the intradermal route protected animals against virulent RHDV and myxoma virus challenges.

  2. Assembly of primary cilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Veland, Iben R; Schrøder, Jacob M

    2008-01-01

    in primary cilia assembly or function have been associated with a panoply of disorders and diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, left-right asymmetry defects, hydrocephalus, and Bardet Biedl Syndrome. Here we provide an up-to-date review focused on the molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly...

  3. Perspective: Geometrically frustrated assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grason, Gregory M.

    2016-09-01

    This perspective will overview an emerging paradigm for self-organized soft materials, geometrically frustrated assemblies, where interactions between self-assembling elements (e.g., particles, macromolecules, proteins) favor local packing motifs that are incompatible with uniform global order in the assembly. This classification applies to a broad range of material assemblies including self-twisting protein filament bundles, amyloid fibers, chiral smectics and membranes, particle-coated droplets, curved protein shells, and phase-separated lipid vesicles. In assemblies, geometric frustration leads to a host of anomalous structural and thermodynamic properties, including heterogeneous and internally stressed equilibrium structures, self-limiting assembly, and topological defects in the equilibrium assembly structures. The purpose of this perspective is to (1) highlight the unifying principles and consequences of geometric frustration in soft matter assemblies; (2) classify the known distinct modes of frustration and review corresponding experimental examples; and (3) describe outstanding questions not yet addressed about the unique properties and behaviors of this broad class of systems.

  4. Laser bottom hole assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  5. Prognostic relevance of human papillomavirus L1 capsid protein detection within mild and moderate dysplastic lesions of the cervix uteri in combination with p16 biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilfrich, Ralf; Hariri, Jalil

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To proof the prognostic relevance of HPV L1 capsid protein detection on colposcopically-guided punch biopsies in combination with p16. STUDY DESIGN: Sections of colposcopically-guided punch biopsies from 191 consecutive cases with at least 5 years of follow-up were stained with HPV L1...... capsid protein antibodies (Cytoactiv screening antibody) and a monoclonal anti-p16 antibody. Fifty sections were derived from a benign group, 91 from low-grade (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN 1]) lesions and 50 from high-grade (CIN 2 and 3) lesions. RESULTS: Overall only 16.1% of the 87 L1......-negative, p16-positive CIN lesions showed remission of the lesion compared to 72.4% of the double positive cases. None of the L1/p16 double negative CIN lesions progressed. CONCLUSION: HPV L1 capsid protein detection with Cytoactiv screening antibody seems to be a promising new tool to predict the behavior...

  6. Assembly: a resource for assembled genomes at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Paul A; Church, Deanna M; Thibaud-Nissen, Françoise; Choi, Jinna; Hem, Vichet; Sapojnikov, Victor; Smith, Robert G; Tatusova, Tatiana; Xiang, Charlie; Zherikov, Andrey; DiCuccio, Michael; Murphy, Terence D; Pruitt, Kim D; Kimchi, Avi

    2016-01-04

    The NCBI Assembly database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/) provides stable accessioning and data tracking for genome assembly data. The model underlying the database can accommodate a range of assembly structures, including sets of unordered contig or scaffold sequences, bacterial genomes consisting of a single complete chromosome, or complex structures such as a human genome with modeled allelic variation. The database provides an assembly accession and version to unambiguously identify the set of sequences that make up a particular version of an assembly, and tracks changes to updated genome assemblies. The Assembly database reports metadata such as assembly names, simple statistical reports of the assembly (number of contigs and scaffolds, contiguity metrics such as contig N50, total sequence length and total gap length) as well as the assembly update history. The Assembly database also tracks the relationship between an assembly submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Consortium (INSDC) and the assembly represented in the NCBI RefSeq project. Users can find assemblies of interest by querying the Assembly Resource directly or by browsing available assemblies for a particular organism. Links in the Assembly Resource allow users to easily download sequence and annotations for current versions of genome assemblies from the NCBI genomes FTP site.

  7. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  8. Constrained space camera assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckendorn, Frank M.; Anderson, Erin K.; Robinson, Casandra W.; Haynes, Harriet B.

    1999-01-01

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

  9. Self-assembly of tetravalent Goldberg polyhedra from 144 small components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Daishi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Sato, Sota; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Kumasaka, Takashi; Fujita, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    Rational control of the self-assembly of large structures is one of the key challenges in chemistry, and is believed to become increasingly difficult and ultimately impossible as the number of components involved increases. So far, it has not been possible to design a self-assembled discrete molecule made up of more than 100 components. Such molecules—for example, spherical virus capsids—are prevalent in nature, which suggests that the difficulty in designing these very large self-assembled molecules is due to a lack of understanding of the underlying design principles. For example, the targeted assembly of a series of large spherical structures containing up to 30 palladium ions coordinated by up to 60 bent organic ligands was achieved by considering their topologies. Here we report the self-assembly of a spherical structure that also contains 30 palladium ions and 60 bent ligands, but belongs to a shape family that has not previously been observed experimentally. The new structure consists of a combination of 8 triangles and 24 squares, and has the symmetry of a tetravalent Goldberg polyhedron. Platonic and Archimedean solids have previously been prepared through self-assembly, as have trivalent Goldberg polyhedra, which occur naturally in the form of virus capsids and fullerenes. But tetravalent Goldberg polyhedra have not previously been reported at the molecular level, although their topologies have been predicted using graph theory. We use graph theory to predict the self-assembly of even larger tetravalent Goldberg polyhedra, which should be more stable, enabling another member of this polyhedron family to be assembled from 144 components: 48 palladium ions and 96 bent ligands.

  10. Peptide ligands incorporated into the threefold spike capsid domain to re-direct gene transduction of AAV8 and AAV9 in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Michelfelder

    Full Text Available Efficiency and specificity of viral vectors are vital issues in gene therapy. Insertion of peptide ligands into the adeno-associated viral (AAV capsid at receptor binding sites can re-target AAV2-derived vectors to alternative cell types. Also, the use of serotypes AAV8 and -9 is more efficient than AAV2 for gene transfer to certain tissues in vivo. Consequently, re-targeting of these serotypes by ligand insertion could be a promising approach but has not been explored so far. Here, we generated AAV8 and -9 vectors displaying peptides in the threefold spike capsid domain. These peptides had been selected from peptide libraries displayed on capsids of AAV serotype 2 to optimize systemic gene delivery to murine lung tissue and to breast cancer tissue in PymT transgenic mice (PymT. Such peptide insertions at position 590 of the AAV8 capsid and position 589 of the AAV9 capsid changed the transduction properties of both serotypes. However, both peptides inserted in AAV8 did not result in the same changes of tissue tropism as they did in AAV2. While the AAV2 peptides selected on murine lung tissue did not alter tropism of serotypes 8 and -9, insertion of the AAV2-derived peptide selected on breast cancer tissue augmented tumor gene delivery in both serotypes. Further, this peptide mediated a strong but unspecific in vivo gene transfer for AAV8 and abrogated transduction of various control tissues for AAV9. Our findings indicate that peptide insertion into defined sites of AAV8 and -9 capsids can change and improve their efficiency and specificity compared to their wild type variants and to AAV2, making these insertion sites attractive for the generation of novel targeted vectors in these serotypes.

  11. Lethal mutations in the major homology region and their suppressors act by modulating the dimerization of the rous sarcoma virus capsid protein C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalessio, Paula M; Craven, Rebecca C; Lokhandwala, Parvez M; Ropson, Ira J

    2013-02-01

    An infective retrovirus requires a mature capsid shell around the viral replication complex. This shell is formed by about 1500 capsid protein monomers, organized into hexamer and pentamer rings that are linked to each other by the dimerization of the C-terminal domain (CTD). The major homology region (MHR), the most highly conserved protein sequence across retroviral genomes, is part of the CTD. Several mutations in the MHR appear to block infectivity by preventing capsid formation. Suppressor mutations have been identified that are distant in sequence and structure from the MHR and restore capsid formation. The effects of two lethal and two suppressor mutations on the stability and function of the CTD were examined. No correlation with infectivity was found for the stability of the lethal mutations (D155Y-CTD, F167Y-CTD) and suppressor mutations (R185W-CTD, I190V-CTD). The stabilities of three double mutant proteins (D155Y/R185W-CTD, F167Y/R185W-CTD, and F167Y/I190V-CTD) were additive. However, the dimerization affinity of the mutant proteins correlated strongly with biological function. The CTD proteins with lethal mutations did not dimerize, while those with suppressor mutations had greater dimerization affinity than WT-CTD. The suppressor mutations were able to partially correct the dimerization defect caused by the lethal MHR mutations in double mutant proteins. Despite their dramatic effects on dimerization, none of these residues participate directly in the proposed dimerization interface in a mature capsid. These findings suggest that the conserved sequence of the MHR has critical roles in the conformation(s) of the CTD that are required for dimerization and correct capsid maturation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The fully nonlinear stratified geostrophic adjustment problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutino, Aaron; Stastna, Marek

    2017-01-01

    The study of the adjustment to equilibrium by a stratified fluid in a rotating reference frame is a classical problem in geophysical fluid dynamics. We consider the fully nonlinear, stratified adjustment problem from a numerical point of view. We present results of smoothed dam break simulations based on experiments in the published literature, with a focus on both the wave trains that propagate away from the nascent geostrophic state and the geostrophic state itself. We demonstrate that for Rossby numbers in excess of roughly 2 the wave train cannot be interpreted in terms of linear theory. This wave train consists of a leading solitary-like packet and a trailing tail of dispersive waves. However, it is found that the leading wave packet never completely separates from the trailing tail. Somewhat surprisingly, the inertial oscillations associated with the geostrophic state exhibit evidence of nonlinearity even when the Rossby number falls below 1. We vary the width of the initial disturbance and the rotation rate so as to keep the Rossby number fixed, and find that while the qualitative response remains consistent, the Froude number varies, and these variations are manifested in the form of the emanating wave train. For wider initial disturbances we find clear evidence of a wave train that initially propagates toward the near wall, reflects, and propagates away from the geostrophic state behind the leading wave train. We compare kinetic energy inside and outside of the geostrophic state, finding that for long times a Rossby number of around one-quarter yields an equal split between the two, with lower (higher) Rossby numbers yielding more energy in the geostrophic state (wave train). Finally we compare the energetics of the geostrophic state as the Rossby number varies, finding long-lived inertial oscillations in the majority of the cases and a general agreement with the past literature that employed ei