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Sample records for full-scale municipal wastewater

  1. Seasonal and diurnal variability of N2O emissions from a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daelman, Matthijs R J; van Voorthuizen, Ellen M; van Dongen, Udo G J M; Volcke, Eveline I P; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2015-12-01

    During nitrogen removal in conventional activated sludge processes, nitrous oxide can be emitted. With a global warming potential of 298 CO2-equivalents it is an important greenhouse gas that affects the sustainability of wastewater treatment. The present study reports nitrous oxide emission data from a 16 month monitoring campaign on a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment. The emission demonstrated a pronounced diurnal and seasonal variability. This variability was compared with the variability of a number of process variables that are commonly available on a municipal wastewater treatment plant. On a seasonal timescale, the occurrence of peaks in the nitrite concentration correlated strongly with the emission. The diurnal trend of the emission coincided with the diurnal trend of the nitrite and nitrate concentrations in the tank, suggesting that suboptimal oxygen concentrations may induce the production of nitrous oxide during both nitrification and denitrification. This study documents an unprecedented dataset that could serve as a reference for further research.

  2. Seasonal and diurnal variability of N{sub 2}O emissions from a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daelman, Matthijs R.J., E-mail: m.r.j.daelman@tudelft.nl [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands); Department of Biosystems engineering, Ghent University, Coupure links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Voorthuizen, Ellen M. van [Royal HaskoningDHV, P.O. Box 151, 6500AD Nijmegen (Netherlands); Dongen, Udo G.J.M. van [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands); Volcke, Eveline I.P. [Department of Biosystems engineering, Ghent University, Coupure links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Loosdrecht, Mark C.M. van [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-12-01

    During nitrogen removal in conventional activated sludge processes, nitrous oxide can be emitted. With a global warming potential of 298 CO{sub 2}-equivalents it is an important greenhouse gas that affects the sustainability of wastewater treatment. The present study reports nitrous oxide emission data from a 16 month monitoring campaign on a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment. The emission demonstrated a pronounced diurnal and seasonal variability. This variability was compared with the variability of a number of process variables that are commonly available on a municipal wastewater treatment plant. On a seasonal timescale, the occurrence of peaks in the nitrite concentration correlated strongly with the emission. The diurnal trend of the emission coincided with the diurnal trend of the nitrite and nitrate concentrations in the tank, suggesting that suboptimal oxygen concentrations may induce the production of nitrous oxide during both nitrification and denitrification. This study documents an unprecedented dataset that could serve as a reference for further research. - Highlights: • Unique dataset of long-term nitrous oxide emission from activated sludge tanks • Emission exhibited pronounced diurnal variability, superimposed on seasonal trend • Seasonal nitrous oxide emission trend correlated with daily nitrite peaks • Emission’s diurnal trend suggests suboptimal oxygen concentrations as cause.

  3. Full-Scale Implementation of a Vertical Membrane Bioreactor for Simultaneous Removal of Organic Matter and Nutrients from Municipal Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Ryong Chae

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In nutrient-sensitive estuaries, wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs are required to implement more advanced treatment methods in order to meet increasingly stringent effluent guidelines for organic matter and nutrients. To comply with current and anticipated water quality regulations and to reduce the volume of produced sludge, we have successfully developed a vertical membrane bioreactor (VMBR that is composed of anoxic (lower layer and oxic (upper layer zones in one reactor. Since 2009, the VMBR has been commercialized (Q = 1100–16,000 m3/d under the trade-name of DMBRTM for recycling of municipal wastewater in South Korea. In this study, we explore the performance and stability of the full-scale systems. As a result, it was found that the DMBRTM systems showed excellent removal efficiencies of organic substances, suspended solids (SS and Escherichia coli (E. coli. Moreover, average removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN and total phosphorus (TP by the DMBRTM systems were found to be 79% and 90% at 18 °C, 8.3 h HRT and 41 d SRT. Moreover, transmembrane pressure (TMP was maintained below 40 kPa at a flux of 18 L/m2/h (LMH more than 300 days. Average specific energy consumption of the full-scale DMBRTM systems was found to be 0.94 kWh/m3.

  4. Fouling characteristics of reverse osmosis membranes at different positions of a full-scale plant for municipal wastewater reclamation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fang; Hu, Hong-Ying; Sun, Li-Juan; Sun, Ying-Xue; Shi, Na; Crittenden, John C

    2016-03-01

    Membrane fouling is an important shortcoming limiting the efficiency and wide application of reverse osmosis (RO) technology. In this paper, RO membranes in a full-scale municipal wastewater reclamation plant were autopsied. From the lead to tail position RO membranes in RO system, both of organic and inorganic matters on membranes reduced gradually. The higher ion products in RO concentrate didn't result in more serious inorganic scaling on the last position RO membranes, which was contrast with some other researches. Fe, Ca and Mg were major inorganic elements. Fe had a relatively low concentration in RO influent but the highest content on membranes. However, there was no specific pretreatment in terms of Fe removal. Ca and Mg scaling was controlled by the antiscalants injected. Organic fouling (75.0-84.5% of dry weights) was major problem on RO membranes due to the large amount of dissolved organic matters in secondary effluent as raw water. Hydrophilic acid (HIA, 48.0% of total DOC), hydrophobic acid (HOA, 23.6%) and hydrophobic neutral (HON, 19.0%) fraction was largest among the six fractions in RO influent, while HON (38.2-51.1%) and HOA (22.1-26.1%) tended to accumulate on membranes in higher quantities. Monitoring HON and HOA might help to forecast organic fouling.

  5. Systematic analysis of microfauna indicator values for treatment performance in a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Qi, Rong; Yang, Min

    2013-07-01

    The indicator values of microfauna functional groups and species for treatment performance were systematically evaluated based on the continuous monitoring of the entire microfauna communities including both protozoa and metazoa over a period of 14 months, in two parallel full-scale municipal wastewater treatment systems in a plant in Beijing, China. A total of 57 species of ciliates, 14 species (units) of amoebae, 14 species (units) of flagellates and 4 classes of small metazoa were identified, with Arcella hemisphaerica, Vorticella striata, Vorticella convallaria, Epistylis plicatilis and small flagellates (e.g. Bodo spp.) as the dominant protozoa, and rotifers as the dominant metazoa. The abundance of the sessile ciliates was correlated with the removals of BOD5 (Pearson's r = 0.410, p < 0.05) and CODcr (r = 0.397, p < 0.05) while the testate amoebae was significantly positively related to nitrification (r = 0.523, p < 0.01). At the same time, some other associations were also identified: the abundances of the large flagellates (r = 0.447, p < 0.01), the metazoa (r = 0.718, p < 0.01) and species Aspidisca sulcata (r = 0.337, p < 0.05) were positively related to nitrification; the abundance of Aspidisca costata was correlated to the TN (total nitrogen) removal (r = -0.374, p < 0.05 ); the abundances of the sessile species Carchesium polypinum (r = 0.458, p < 0.01) and E. plicatilis (r = 0.377, p < 0.05) were correlated with the removal of suspended solids.

  6. Dynamics of the microfauna community in a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant experiencing sludge bulking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Qi, Rong; An, Wei; Xu, Muqi; Zhang, Yu; Bai, Xue; Bao, Haipeng; Wen, Yang; Gu, Jian; Yang, Min

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the dynamics of the microfauna community in activated sludge, with special reference to sludge bulking, in two parallel municipal wastewater treatment systems in Beijing, China over a period of 14 months. Annual cyclic changes in microfauna community structures occurred in both systems. RELATE analysis based on Spearman's Rank correlation indicated that microfauna community structures were highly correlated with the sludge volume index (SVI) (pVorticella striata increased significantly with an increase in SVI (p<0.001) and decrease in water temperature (p<0.001), suggesting that sludge bulking may have created favorable conditions for the two species, even under unfavorable temperature conditions. Sludge de-flocculation primarily due to the excessive growth of Microthrix parvicella-like filaments could be an important driving force for the microfauna community changes. The release of flocculated non-filamentous bacteria may represent a suitable food source for these species. The two species may be considered as potential bioindicators for sludge bulking.

  7. Full scale application of combined SBF- AS process for municipal wastewater treatment in small towns and cities in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shuo; WANG Bao-zhen; WANG Lin; DING Yong-wei; ZHOU Hong-jun

    2006-01-01

    The combined submerged biofilm (SBF)-activated sludge (AS) process for treatment of municipal wastewater in a small city in China is described in this paper. The process exhibited high removal efficiencies for carbonaceous substances, nitrogen and phosphorus which mainly took place in the combined SBF-AS bioreactor. The SBF-AS bioreactor was divided into pre-anoxic, anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic zones from inlet to outlet, in which fixed biofilm carriers were packed. Excellent performance had been obtained under normal operating conditions in more than one year of operation in Dong' e municipal WWTP, Shandong province, with mean removal efficiencies of BOD5 93.4% , COD 88% , SS 92% , NH4+ - N 82.1% , TP 75% and TN 66. 7%, and quite high effluent quality such as BOD5 6 to 10 mg/L, COD 20 to 40 mg/L, SS 5 to 10 mg/L,TN 10 to 20 mg/L, NH4+ - N 4 to 8 mg/L and TP 0.6 to 1.0 mg/L. The effluent was reused multi-purposely,such as toilet flushing, green belt watering and artificial lake pounding. Simultaneous nitrification and denitrification took place due to the DO gradient in biofilm in aerobic zone of the SBF-AS bioreactor, which made TN removal efficiency improved remarkably in system. Some activated sludge was returned from final clarifiers to the bioreactor for phosphorus removal. The process had the advantages of low investment and low operational/maintenance (O/M) costs, low sludge yield and was preferably employed in small towns and cities.

  8. Biological Nutrient Removal in a Full Scale Anoxic/Anaerobic/Aerobic/Pre-anoxic-MBR Plant for Low C/N Ratio Municipal Wastewater Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡香; 谢丽; 张善发; 杨殿海

    2014-01-01

    A novel full scale modified A2O (anoxic/anaerobic/aerobic/pre-anoxic)-membrane bioreactor (MBR) plant combined with the step feed strategy was operated to improve the biological nutrient removal (BNR) from low C/N ratio municipal wastewater in Southern China. Transformation of organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and membrane fouling were investigated. Experimental results for over four months demonstrated good efficiencies for chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 4NH+-N removal, with average values higher than 84.5%and 98.1%, re-spectively. A relatively higher total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency (52.1%) was also obtained at low C/N ratio of 3.82, contributed by the configuration modification (anoxic zone before anaerobic zone) and the step feed with a distribution ratio of 1︰1. Addition of sodium acetate into the anoxic zone as the external carbon source, with a theoretical amount of 31.3 mg COD per liter in influent, enhanced denitrification and the TN removal efficiency in-creased to 74.9%. Moreover, the total phosphate (TP) removal efficiency increased by 18.0%. It is suggested that the external carbon source is needed to improve the BNR performance in treating low C/N ratio municipal waste-water in the modified A2O-MBR process.

  9. Co-digestion of food waste in a municipal wastewater treatment plant: Comparison of batch tests and full-scale experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Konrad; Plabst, Markus; Schmidt, Andreas; Helmreich, Brigitte; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    The effects of co-digestion of food waste in a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) were studied in batch tests. The results obtained were compared with the mass balance of a digester at a full-scale WWTP for a one-year period without and with the addition of co-substrate. The specific methane yield calculated from the balance was 18% higher than the one in the batch tests, suggesting a stimulation of methane generation by co-digestion. It was hypothesized that this increase was caused by shifting the C/N ratio of raw sludge (8.8) to a more favourable ratio of the added food waste (17.7). In addition, potential benefits by adding food waste for energy autarky was investigated. While just 25% of the total energy demand of the plant could be recovered by biogas generation when no co-substrate was fed, this percentage has more than doubled when food waste was added at a ratio of 10% (w/w).

  10. Treatment of municipal wastewater in full-scale on-site sand filter reduces BOD efficiently but does not reach requirements for nitrogen and phosphorus removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaksonen, Petteri; Sinkkonen, Aki; Zaitsev, Gennadi; Mäkinen, Esa; Grönroos, Timo; Romantschuk, Martin

    2017-04-01

    A traditional sand filter for treatment of household wastewater was constructed in the fall of 2012 at Biolinja 12, Turku, Finland. Construction work was led and monitored by an authorized wastewater treatment consultant. The filter was placed on a field bordered by open ditches from all sides in order to collect excess rain and snowmelt waters. The filter was constructed and insulated from the environment so that all outflowing water was accounted for. Untreated, mainly municipal, wastewater from Varissuo suburb was pumped from a sewer separately via three septic tanks (volume = 1 m(3) each) into the filters. Normally, wastewater was distributed to ground filters automatically according to pre-programmed schedule. Initially, the daily flow was 1200 L day(-1) to reflect the average organic load of a household of five persons (load: ca 237 g day(-1) BOD; 73 g day(-1) total N; and 10.4 g day(-1) total P). Later in the test, the flow rate was decreased first to 900 and then to 600 L day(-1) to better reflect the average volume produced by five persons. Volumes of inlet wastewater as well as treated water were monitored by magnetic flow meters. Samples were withdrawn from the inlet water, from the water entering the filters after the third septic tank, and from the outflowing water. After an initial adaption time, the reductions in BOD and chemical oxygen demand were constantly between 92 and 98%, showing that the biological degradation process in the filters functioned optimally and clearly comply with the national and EU standards. The reduction in total nitrogen and total phosphorus, however, reached required levels only during the first months of testing, apparently when buildup of microbial biomass was still ongoing. After this initial period of 3 months showing satisfactory reduction levels, the reduction of total nitrogen varied between 5 and 25% and total phosphorus mostly between 50 and 65%. Nitrification was efficient in the filter, but as

  11. Kinetic assessment and modeling of an ozonation step for full-scale municipal wastewater treatment: micropollutant oxidation, by-product formation and disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Saskia G; Wittenwiler, Mathias; Hollender, Juliane; Krauss, Martin; Ort, Christoph; Siegrist, Hansruedi; von Gunten, Urs

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidation and disinfection processes during ozonation in a full-scale reactor treating secondary wastewater effluent were investigated for seven ozone doses ranging from 0.21 to 1.24 g O(3) g(-1) dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Substances reacting fast with ozone, such as diclofenac or carbamazepine (k(P, O3) > 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), were eliminated within the gas bubble column, except for the lowest ozone dose of 0.21 g O(3) g(-1) DOC. For this low dose, this could be attributed to short-circuiting within the reactor. Substances with lower ozone reactivity (k(P, O3) scale measurements. Monte Carlo simulations showed that the observed differences were higher than model uncertainties. The overestimation of micropollutant oxidation was attributed to a protection of micropollutants from ozone attack by the interaction with aquatic colloids. Laboratory-scale batch experiments using wastewater from the same full-scale treatment plant could predict the oxidation of slowly-reacting micropollutants on the full-scale level within a factor of 1.5. The Rct value, the experimentally determined ratio of the concentrations of hydroxyl radicals and ozone, was identified as a major contribution to this difference. An increase in the formation of bromate, a potential human carcinogen, was observed with increasing ozone doses. The final concentration for the highest ozone dose of 1.24 g O(3) g(-1) DOC was 7.5 μg L(-1), which is below the drinking water standard of 10 μg L(-1). N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation of up to 15 ng L(-1) was observed in the first compartment of the reactor, followed by a slight elimination during sand filtration. Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) increased up to 740 μg AOC L(-1), with no clear trend when correlated to the ozone dose, and decreased by up to 50% during post-sand filtration. The disinfection capacity of the ozone reactor was assessed to be 1-4.5 log units in terms of total cell counts (TCC) and 0.5 to 2.5 log units for

  12. Considerations on the design and financial feasibility of full-scale membrane bioreactors for municipal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brepols, Ch; Schäfer, H; Engelhardt, N

    2010-01-01

    Based on the practical experience in design and operation of three full-scale membrane bioreactors (MBR) for municipal wastewater treatment that were commissioned since 1999, an overview on the different design concepts that were applied to the three MBR plants is given. The investment costs and the energy consumption of the MBRs and conventional activated sludge (CAS) plants (with and without tertiary treatment) in the Erft river region are compared. It is found that the specific investment costs of the MBR plants are lower than those of comparable CAS with tertiary treatment. A comparison of the specific energy demand of MBRs and conventional WWTPs is given. The structure of the MBRs actual operational costs is analysed. It can be seen that energy consumption is only responsible for one quarter to one third of all operational expenses. Based on a rough design and empirical cost data, a cost comparison of a full-scale MBR and a CAS is carried out. In this example the CAS employs a sand filtration and a disinfection in order to achieve comparable effluent quality. The influence of membrane lifetime on life cycle cost is assessed.

  13. Nitrosamines in pilot-scale and full-scale wastewater treatment plants with ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrity, Daniel; Pisarenko, Aleksey N; Marti, Erica; Trenholm, Rebecca A; Gerringer, Fred; Reungoat, Julien; Dickenson, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Ozone-based treatment trains offer a sustainable option for potable reuse applications, but nitrosamine formation during ozonation poses a challenge for municipalities seeking to avoid reverse osmosis and high-dose ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Six nitrosamines were monitored in full-scale and pilot-scale wastewater treatment trains. The primary focus was on eight treatment trains employing ozonation of secondary or tertiary wastewater effluents, but two treatment trains with chlorination or UV disinfection of tertiary wastewater effluent and another with full advanced treatment (i.e., reverse osmosis and advanced oxidation) were also included for comparison. N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) were the most prevalent nitrosamines in untreated (up to 89 ng/L and 67 ng/L, respectively) and treated wastewater. N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) were detected at one facility each, while N-nitrosodipropylamine (NDPrA) and N-nitrosodibutylamine (NDBA) were less than their method reporting limits (MRLs) in all samples. Ozone-induced NDMA formation ranging from UV photolysis were effective for NDMA mitigation. NMOR was also removed with activated sludge but did not form during ozonation.

  14. Full-scale anaerobic co-digestion of organic waste and municipal sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zupancic, Gregor D.; Ros, Milenko [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, PO Box 660, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Uranjek-Zevart, Natasa [Municipality of Velenje, Koroska 37/b, 3320 Velenje (Slovenia)

    2008-02-15

    A full-scale experiment on the anaerobic co-digestion of organic waste from domestic refuse (swill) and municipal sludge is described. In a wastewater treatment plant of 50,000 population equivalents, two conventional mesophilic digesters with a combined volume of 2000 m{sup 3} and 20 days hydraulic retention time were used. The digesters' usual influent is waste sludge from wastewater treatment plants (a mixture of primary sludge and waste activated sludge) with an average organic loading rate of 0.8 kg m{sup -3} d{sup -1} of volatile suspended solids. In the experiment, organic waste was added to the digester influent to increase the organic loading rate by 25% to 1.0 kg m{sup 3} d{sup -1} of volatile suspended solids. Biogas quantity increased by 80% and specific biogas production increased from 0.39 m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} volatile suspended solids inserted prior to the experiment to over 0.60 m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} volatile suspended solids' inserted, peaking at 0.89 m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} volatile suspended solids inserted. The excess biogas was used in a boiler and a 50 kW combined heat and power engine. Electrical energy production increased by 130% and heat production increased by 55%. Volatile suspended solids degradation efficiency increased from 71% to 81% with no increase of volatile suspended solids in the digester effluent. Virtually all of the organic waste was degraded. (author)

  15. Full scale demonstration plant for anaerobic digestion of sorted municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szikriszt, G.; Koehlin, S.-E.; Kaellersjoe, L. (BIOMET AB, Sundbyberg (SE)); Frostell, B. (Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm (SE))

    1992-01-01

    A possible future alternative for the treatment of organic material inmunicipal solid waste is anaerobic digestion at a TS concentration of around 10%. The results from a successful pilot plant experiment were reported. An existing 900 m{sup 3} full scale anaerobic digester for municipal sludge was reconstructed for digestion of a mixture of sorted municipal solid waste and municipal sludge. The reconstruction of the anaerobic digester system involved the installation of a novel milling stage for size reduction of incoming waste, removal of unsuitable materials, such as glass, metals etc and preparation of a feedstock with a TS concentration of 10%. The anaerobic digester has been equipped with a mechanical mixing system. The system also comprises an internal water recirculation system, allowing a minimal production of waste water for further treatment. The retrofitted digester was started in September 1991 and the milling station and the separation system in April 1992. During the demonstration operation, the interest is focused on the following key areas: May the succesful results in a 20 m{sup 3} pilot plant be realised also on a full scale Is it possible to solve potential accumulation problems Is the reliability and durability of the milling equipment chosen In the paper, the full scale plant is presented as well as initial results of operation. (au).

  16. Genome-based microbial ecology of anammox granules in a full-scale wastewater treatment system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speth, D.; Zandt, M.H. In 't; Guerrero-Cruz, S.; Dutilh, B.E.; Jetten, M.S.M

    2016-01-01

    Partial-nitritation anammox (PNA) is a novel wastewater treatment procedure for energy-efficient ammonium removal. Here we use genome-resolved metagenomics to build a genome-based ecological model of the microbial community in a full-scale PNA reactor. Sludge from the bioreactor examined here is use

  17. Genome-based microbial ecology of anammox granules in a full-scale wastewater treatment system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speth, D.; Zandt, M.H. In 't; Guerrero-Cruz, S.; Dutilh, B.E.; Jetten, M.S.M

    2016-01-01

    Partial-nitritation anammox (PNA) is a novel wastewater treatment procedure for energy-efficient ammonium removal. Here we use genome-resolved metagenomics to build a genome-based ecological model of the microbial community in a full-scale PNA reactor. Sludge from the bioreactor examined here is

  18. Optimization-based methodology for wastewater treatment plant synthesis – a full scale retrofitting case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozkurt, Hande; Gernaey, Krist; Sin, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    technologies. The superstructure optimization problem is formulated as a Mixed Integer (non)Linear Programming problem and solved for different scenarios - represented by different objective functions and constraint definitions. A full-scale domestic wastewater treatment plant (265,000 PE) is used as a case...

  19. Optimization-based methodology for wastewater treatment plant synthesis – a full scale retrofitting case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozkurt, Hande; Gernaey, Krist; Sin, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    technologies. The superstructure optimization problem is formulated as a Mixed Integer (non)Linear Programming problem and solved for different scenarios - represented by different objective functions and constraint definitions. A full-scale domestic wastewater treatment plant (265,000 PE) is used as a case...... framework to manage the multi-criteria WWTP design/retrofit problem for domestic wastewater treatment. The design space (i.e. alternative treatment technologies) is represented in a superstructure, which is coupled with a database containing data for both performance and economics of the novel alternative...

  20. Evolution of the Total Sulphur Content in Full-Scale Wastewater Sludge Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Dewil, Raf; Baeyens, Jan; Roels, Joris; Van De Steene, Boudewijn

    2009-01-01

    The present research studies the evolution of sulphur concentrations during wastewater treatment for various full-scale treatment plants and reveals that a significant amount of S is released as highly soluble sulphates with the sludge water during sludge thickening when sludge is still in aerobic conditions. During digestion, sulphur concentrations in the sludge (expressed as mg S/kg of dry solids) generally increased due to destruction of organic material, and relatively low release of H2S....

  1. Biogas production from cheese whey wastewater: laboratory- and full-scale studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatelatou, K; Giantsiou, N; Diamantis, V; Alexandridis, C; Alexandridis, A; Aivasidis, A

    2014-01-01

    A two-phase system for biogas production from cheese whey wastewater (CWW) was designed, set up and operated at laboratory and full scale for a whole cheese production season (8-9 months). The high efficiency and stability of the laboratory-scale system was demonstrated under various organic loading rates (OLRs) reaching 13 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) L(-1)d(-1) and producing up to 9 L L(-1)d(-1) of biogas (approximately 55% in methane). The COD removal was above 95% and the pH was maintained above 6.3 without any chemical addition. The full-scale system was operated at lower OLRs than its normal capacity, following the good response and high stability in disturbances of the laboratory-scale unit.

  2. Genome-based microbial ecology of anammox granules in a full-scale wastewater treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Daan R; In 't Zandt, Michiel H; Guerrero-Cruz, Simon; Dutilh, Bas E; Jetten, Mike S M

    2016-03-31

    Partial-nitritation anammox (PNA) is a novel wastewater treatment procedure for energy-efficient ammonium removal. Here we use genome-resolved metagenomics to build a genome-based ecological model of the microbial community in a full-scale PNA reactor. Sludge from the bioreactor examined here is used to seed reactors in wastewater treatment plants around the world; however, the role of most of its microbial community in ammonium removal remains unknown. Our analysis yielded 23 near-complete draft genomes that together represent the majority of the microbial community. We assign these genomes to distinct anaerobic and aerobic microbial communities. In the aerobic community, nitrifying organisms and heterotrophs predominate. In the anaerobic community, widespread potential for partial denitrification suggests a nitrite loop increases treatment efficiency. Of our genomes, 19 have no previously cultivated or sequenced close relatives and six belong to bacterial phyla without any cultivated members, including the most complete Omnitrophica (formerly OP3) genome to date.

  3. Troubleshooting a Full-scale Wastewater Treatment Plant for Biological Nutrient Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleyiblo Oloche James

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The International Association of Water Quality (IAWQ Activated Sludge Model No.2 (ASM2 was applied to troubleshoot an existing underperforming full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP built for biological nutrient removal. The WWTP is operated in a 3-stage pho-redox process configuration (A2O. This study was undertaken with the aim of finding optimal operating conditions that will meet TP and TN concentration requirements in the effluent of the WWTP under study without the use of either chemical or external carbon sources and also to verify the applicability, capability and predictability of ASM2 as implemented in STOAT software. ASM2 was successfully used to troubleshoot bottle neck areas and to define the operational schedule for optimal performance of the wastewater treatment plant. Consequently, the costs of chemical and external carbon sources were eliminated and the effect of residual chemicals on the environment reduced.

  4. Optimization of a full-scale Unitank wastewater treatment plant for biological phosphorus removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen; Xing, Can; Wu, Zhichao; Tong, Fei; Wang, Junru

    2014-01-01

    The Unitank process combines the advantages of traditional continuous-flow activated sludge processes and sequencing batch reactors, and has been extensively employed in many wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in China. Biological phosphorus removal (BPR) of a full-scale Unitank WWTP was optimized by increasing anaerobic time from 80 to 120 min in an operation cycle of 360 min and reducing solid retention time (SRT) from 21.3 to 13.1 d. The BPR efficiency of the full-scale Unitank system increased from 63.8% (SRT of 21.3 d) to 83.2% for a SRT of 13.1 d. When the anaerobic time increased from 80 to 120 min, the net anaerobic phosphorus release amount increased from 0.25 to 1.06 mg L(-1), and sludge phosphorus content rose from 13.8 to 15.0 mgP x (gSS)(-1). During half an operation cycle, the average specific phosphorus release rate increased from 0.097mgP x (gVSS x h)(-1) in 0-40 min to 0.825 mgP x (gVSS x h)(-1) in 40-60 min. Reducing SRT and increasing anaerobic time account for 84.6% and 15.4% in the total increment of phosphorus removal of 1.15 mgL(-1).

  5. A full-scale biological treatment system application in the treated wastewater of pharmaceutical industrial park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ge; Ren, Hongqiang; Ding, Lili; Wang, Feifei; Zhang, Xingsong

    2010-08-01

    A full-scale combined biological system is used for the treatment of treated wastewater discharged from a pharmaceutical industrial park. This treated water is rich in NH(4)(+)-N (average in 86.4 mg/L), low in COD/NH(4)(+)-N (average in 3.4) and low in BOD(5)/COD ratio (average in 0.24) with pH varying from 7.16 to 7.78. The final effluent of the combined treatment process was stably below 100mg/L COD and 20mg/L NH(4)(+)-N, separately, with organic loading rate of 4954 kg COD/d and 92.5 kg NH(4)(+)-N/d. It is found that the BOD(5)/COD ratio could be raised from 0.24 to 0.35, and the production of total VFAs account for 9.57% of the total COD via the treatment of hydrolysis/acidification. MBBR and oxidation ditch represent 35.4% and 60.7% of NH(4)(+)-N removal, 30.2% and 61.5% of COD removal, separately, of the total treatment process. PCR-DGGE is used for microbial community analysis of MBBR and oxidation ditch.

  6. FULL-SCALE TREATMENT WETLANDS FOR METAL REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, E; John Gladden, J

    2007-03-22

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River National Laboratory. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, and water routinely failed toxicity tests. These conditions necessitated treatment of nearly one million gallons of water per day plus storm runoff. Washington Savannah River Company personnel explored options to bring process and runoff waters into compliance with the permit conditions, including source reduction, engineering solutions, and biological solutions. A conceptual design for a constructed wetland treatment system (WTS) was developed and the full-scale system was constructed and began operation in 2000. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland with a hydraulic retention time of approximately 48 hours. Copper, mercury, and lead removal efficiencies are very high, all in excess of 80% removal from water passing through the wetland system. Zinc removal is 60%, and nickel is generally unaffected. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Concentrations of metals in the A-01 WTS sediments generally decrease with depth and along the flow path through the wetland. Sequential extraction results indicate that most metals are tightly bound to wetland sediments.

  7. Reuse of microalgae grown in full-scale wastewater treatment ponds: Thermochemical pretreatment and biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Fabiana; Felix, Leonardo; Rocha, Hemyle; Pereira, Jackson de Oliveira; de Aquino, Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed thermochemical pretreatment of microalgae harvested from a full-scale wastewater treatment pond prior to its anaerobic digestion using acid and alkaline chemical doses combined with thermal pretreatment at 80°C. Results indicated that alkaline and thermal pretreatment contributed mostly to glycoprotein and pectin solubilisation; whilst acid pretreatment solubilised mostly hemicellulose, with lower effectiveness for proteins. Regarding the anaerobic biodegradability, biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests showed that final methane yield was enhanced after almost all pretreatment conditions when compared to non-pretreated microalgae, with the highest increase for thermochemical pretreatment at the lowest dose (0.5%), i.e. 82% and 86% increase for alkaline and acid, respectively. At higher doses, salt toxicity was revealed by K(+) concentrations over 5000mg/L. All BMP data from pretreated biomass was successfully described by the modified Gompertz model and optimal condition (thermochemical 0.5% HCl) showed an increase in final methane yield and the process kinetics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Population Dynamics of Bulking and Foaming Bacteria in a Full-scale Wastewater Treatment Plant over Five Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiao-Tao; Guo, Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2016-04-11

    Bulking and foaming are two notorious problems in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), which are mainly associated with the excessive growth of bulking and foaming bacteria (BFB). However, studies on affecting factors of BFB in full-scale WWTPs are still limited. In this study, data sets of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of 16S V3-V4 amplicons of 58 monthly activated sludge samples from a municipal WWTP was re-analyzed to investigate the BFB dynamics and further to study the determinative factors. The population of BFB occupied 0.6~36% (averagely 8.5% ± 7.3%) of the total bacteria and showed seasonal variations with higher abundance in winter-spring than summer-autumn. Pair-wise correlation analysis and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) showed that Gordonia sp. was positively correlated with NO2-N and negatively correlated with NO3-N, and Nostocodia limicola II Tetraspharea sp. was negatively correlated with temperature and positively correlated with NH3-N in activated sludge. Bacteria species correlated with BFB could be clustered into two negatively related modules. Moreover, with intensive time series sampling, the dominant BFB could be accurately modeled with environmental interaction network, i.e. environmental parameters and biotic interactions between BFB and related bacteria, indicating that abiotic and biotic factors were both crucial to the dynamics of BFB.

  9. Population Dynamics of Bulking and Foaming Bacteria in a Full-scale Wastewater Treatment Plant over Five Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiao-Tao; Guo, Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2016-04-01

    Bulking and foaming are two notorious problems in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), which are mainly associated with the excessive growth of bulking and foaming bacteria (BFB). However, studies on affecting factors of BFB in full-scale WWTPs are still limited. In this study, data sets of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of 16S V3-V4 amplicons of 58 monthly activated sludge samples from a municipal WWTP was re-analyzed to investigate the BFB dynamics and further to study the determinative factors. The population of BFB occupied 0.6~36% (averagely 8.5% ± 7.3%) of the total bacteria and showed seasonal variations with higher abundance in winter-spring than summer-autumn. Pair-wise correlation analysis and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) showed that Gordonia sp. was positively correlated with NO2-N and negatively correlated with NO3-N, and Nostocodia limicola II Tetraspharea sp. was negatively correlated with temperature and positively correlated with NH3-N in activated sludge. Bacteria species correlated with BFB could be clustered into two negatively related modules. Moreover, with intensive time series sampling, the dominant BFB could be accurately modeled with environmental interaction network, i.e. environmental parameters and biotic interactions between BFB and related bacteria, indicating that abiotic and biotic factors were both crucial to the dynamics of BFB.

  10. Sustainability of municipal wastewater treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeleveld, P.J.; Klapwijk, A.; Eggels, P.G.; Rulkens, W.H.; Starkenburg, van W.

    1997-01-01

    n this study the insustainability of the treatment of municipal wastewater is evaluated with the LCA-methodology. Life-Cycle Assessments (LCA) analyze and assess the environmental profile over the entire life cycle of a product or process. The LCA-methodology proved to be a proper instrument to

  11. Population dynamics of filamentous bacteria identified in Polish full-scale wastewater treatment plants with nutrients removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miłobędzka, A; Muszyński, A

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the identity and population dynamics of filamentous bacteria in five Polish full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with nutrients removal had been carried out for 2 years. A quantitative culture-independent, molecular method - fluorescence in situ hybridization - was applied to evaluate the structure of different filamentous bacteria populations and their temporal variations. Activated sludge was examined for the abundance of 11 groups of filamentous bacteria. On average, filaments constituted 28% of all bacteria. All samples presented a low diversity of probe-defined filamentous bacteria, usually with significant domination of Chloroflexi (with distinction to types 1851, 0803 and others) and/or Microthrix (14% and 7% of EUBmix, respectively). Haliscomenobacter hydrossis, Mycolata, Skermania piniformis and TM7 were less abundant, whereas Curvibacter, Thiothrix/021N and family Gordonia have not been detected in any of the samples. The tested WWTPs showed similarity among species found and differences in their abundance. The composition of filamentous populations was rather stable in each plant and similar to those found in other European countries. Little differences between plants were shown by multivariate analysis of variance in terms of Chloroflexi and Microthrix. No significant general correlations have been found with Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Medium correlation strength between the presence of different filaments was recorded only for Microthrix and Skermania piniformis. Deleterious effect on settling properties of sludge (measured as sludge volume index) was found only for abundance of Microthrix; a strong linear correlation was recorded between them. However, no other correlations with wastewater and operational data were revealed.

  12. Performance evaluation of a full-scale ABS resin manufacturing wastewater treatment plant: a case study in Tabriz Petrochemical Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Shakerkhatibi; Mohammad Mosaferi; Khaled Zorufchi Benis; Zahra Akbari

    2016-01-01

    Background: The measurement data regarding the influent and effluent of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) provides a general overview, demonstrating an overall performance of WWTP. Nevertheless, these data do not provide the suitable operational information for the optimization of individual units involved in a WWTP. A full-scale evolution of WWTP was carried out in this study via a reconciled data. Methods: A full-scale evolution of acrylonitrile, butadiene and styrene (ABS) r...

  13. Orientation to Municipal Wastewater Treatment. Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    Introductory-level material on municipal wastewater treatment facilities and processes is presented. Course topics include sources and characteristics of municipal wastewaters; objectives of wastewater treatment; design, operation, and maintenance factors; performance testing; plant staffing; and laboratory considerations. Chapter topics include…

  14. SANASA Capivari II - the first full-scale municipal membrane bioreactor in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagotto, R; Rossetto, R; Gasperi, R L P; Andrade, J P; Trovati, J; Vallero, M V G; Okumura, A; Arntsen, B

    2014-01-01

    The macro region of Campinas (Brazil) is rapidly evolving with new housing developments and industries, creating the challenge of finding new ways to treat wastewater to a quality that can be reused in order to overcome water scarcity problems. To address this challenge, SANASA (a publicly owned water and wastewater concessionaire from Campinas) has recently constructed the 'EPAR (Water Reuse Production Plant) Capivari II' using the GE ZeeWeed 500D(®) ultrafiltration membrane system. This is the first large-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) system in Latin America with biological tertiary treatment capability (nitrogen and phosphorus removal), being able to treat an average flow of 182 L/s in its first phase of construction. The filtration system is composed of three membrane trains with more than 36,000 m(2) of total membrane filtration area. The membrane bioreactor (MBR) plant was commissioned in April 2012 and the permeate quality has exceeded expectations. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates are around and above 97% on a consistent basis, with biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) and NH3 (ammonia) concentrations at very low levels, and turbidity lower than 0.3 nephelometric turbidity unit (NTU). Treated effluent is sent to a water reuse accumulation tank (from where will be distributed as reuse water), and the excess is discharged into the Capivari River.

  15. Biological treatment of TMAH (tetra-methyl ammonium hydroxide) in a full-scale TFT-LCD wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tai-Ho; Whang, Liang-Ming; Liu, Pao-Wen Grace; Hung, Yu-Ching; Chen, Hung-Wei; Lin, Li-Bin; Chen, Chia-Fu; Chen, Sheng-Kun; Hsu, Shu Fu; Shen, Wason; Fu, Ryan; Hsu, Romel

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluated biological treatment of TMAH in a full-scale methanogenic up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) followed by an aerobic bioreactor. In general, the UASB was able to perform a satisfactory TMAH degradation efficiency, but the effluent COD of the aerobic bioreactor seemed to increase with an increased TMAH in the influent wastewater. The batch test results confirmed that the UASB sludge under methanogenic conditions would be favored over the aerobic ones for TMAH treatment due to its superb ability of handling high strength of TMAH-containing wastewaters. Based on batch experiments, inhibitory chemicals present in TFT-LCD wastewater like surfactants and sulfate should be avoided to secure a stable methanogenic TMAH degradation. Finally, molecular monitoring of Methanomethylovorans hollandica and Methanosarcina mazei in the full-scale plant, the dominant methanogens in the UASB responsible for TMAH degradation, may be beneficial for a stable TMAH treatment performance.

  16. Performance of Four Full-Scale Artificially Aerated Horizontal Flow Constructed Wetlands for Domestic Wastewater Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butterworth, Eleanor; Richards, Andrew; Jones, Mark; Mansi, Gabriella; Ranieri, Ezio; Dotro, Gabriela; Jefferson, Bruce

    2016-01-01

      A comparison of the performance of four full-scale aerated horizontal flow constructed wetlands was conducted to determine the efficacy of the technology on sites receiving high and variable ammonia...

  17. Minimizing N2O fluxes from full-scale municipal solid waste landfill with properly selected cover soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Municipal solid waste landfills emit nitrous oxide (N2O) gas. Assuming that the soil cover is the primary N2O source from landfills,this study tested, during a four-year project, the hypothesis that the proper use of chosen soils with fine texture minimizes N2O emissions. A full-scale sanitary landfill, a full-scale bioreactor landfill and a cell planted with Nerium indicum or Festuca arundinacea Schreb, at the Hangzhou Tianziling landfill in Hangzhou City were the test sites. The N2O emission rates from all test sites were considerably lower than those reported in the published reports. Specifically, the N2O emission rate was dependent on soil water content and nitrate concentrations in the cover soil. The effects of leachate recirculation and irrigation were minimal. Properly chosen cover soils applied to the landfills reduced N2O flux.

  18. Methane emission during municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daelman, Matthijs R J; van Voorthuizen, Ellen M; van Dongen, Udo G J M; Volcke, Eveline I P; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2012-07-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment plants emit methane. Since methane is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change, the abatement of the emission is necessary to achieve a more sustainable urban water management. This requires thorough knowledge of the amount of methane that is emitted from a plant, but also of the possible sources and sinks of methane on the plant. In this study, the methane emission from a full-scale municipal wastewater facility with sludge digestion was evaluated during one year. At this plant the contribution of methane emissions to the greenhouse gas footprint were slightly higher than the CO₂ emissions related to direct and indirect fossil fuel consumption for energy requirements. By setting up mass balances over the different unit processes, it could be established that three quarters of the total methane emission originated from the anaerobic digestion of primary and secondary sludge. This amount exceeded the carbon dioxide emission that was avoided by utilizing the biogas. About 80% of the methane entering the activated sludge reactor was biologically oxidized. This knowledge led to the identification of possible measures for the abatement of the methane emission.

  19. Resource recovery from source separated domestic waste(water) streams; Full scale results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeman, G.; Kujawa, K.

    2011-01-01

    A major fraction of nutrients emitted from households are originally present in only 1% of total wastewater volume. New sanitation concepts enable the recovery and reuse of these nutrients from feces and urine. Two possible sanitation concepts are presented, with varying degree of source separation

  20. Community analysis of a full-scale anaerobic bioreactor treating paper mill wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, C.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Smidt, H.; Vos, de W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.

    2005-01-01

    To get insight into the microbial community of an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactor treating paper mill wastewater, conventional microbiological methods were combined with 16S rRNA gene analyses. Particular attention was paid to microorganisms able to degrade propionate or butyrate in the pres

  1. Influent pathogenic bacteria may go straight into effluent in full scale wastewater treatment plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jannie Munk; Nierychlo, Marta; Albertsen, Mads

    Incoming microorganisms to wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are usually considered to be adsorbed onto the activated sludge flocs, consumed by protozoan or to just die off. Analyses of the effluent generally show a very high degree of reduction of pathogens supporting this assumption. Thus......, it is assumed that the bacteria present in the effluent comprise primarily of those bacteria that thrive/grow in the plants. However, standard techniques for detecting bacteria in the effluent, particularly pathogens, are based on culture-dependent methods, which may give erroneous results by underestimating...... in influent, process tank and effluent in the 14 WWTPs showed that the microbial communities in incoming wastewater were very similar across the plants. The same was observed for communities in the activated sludge in the process tanks. In contrast, the effluent community was in some WWTPs very similar...

  2. Metabolic versatility in full-scale wastewater treatment plants performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanham, Ana B; Oehmen, Adrian; Saunders, Aaron M; Carvalho, Gilda; Nielsen, Per H; Reis, Maria A M

    2013-12-01

    This study analysed the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) microbial community and metabolic performance of five full-scale EBPR systems by using fluorescence in situ hybridisation combined with off-line batch tests fed with acetate under anaerobic-aerobic conditions. The phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) in all systems were stable and showed little variability between each plant, while glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) were present in two of the plants. The metabolic activity of each sludge showed the frequent involvement of the anaerobic tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) in PAO metabolism for the anaerobic generation of reducing equivalents, in addition to the more frequently reported glycolysis pathway. Metabolic variability in the use of the two pathways was also observed, between different systems and in the same system over time. The metabolic dynamics was linked to the availability of glycogen, where a higher utilisation of the glycolysis pathway was observed in the two systems employing side-stream hydrolysis, and the TCA cycle was more active in the A(2)O systems. Full-scale plants that showed higher glycolysis activity also exhibited superior P removal performance, suggesting that promotion of the glycolysis pathway over the TCA cycle could be beneficial towards the optimisation of EBPR systems.

  3. Sequential modeling of fecal coliform removals in a full-scale activated-sludge wastewater treatment plant using an evolutionary process model induction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Chang-Won; Lee, Joong-Won; Hong, Yoon-Seok Timothy; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2009-01-01

    We propose an evolutionary process model induction system that is based on the grammar-based genetic programming to automatically discover multivariate dynamic inference models that are able to predict fecal coliform bacteria removals using common process variables instead of directly measuring fecal coliform bacteria concentration in a full-scale municipal activated-sludge wastewater treatment plant. A sequential modeling paradigm is also proposed to derive multivariate dynamic models of fecal coliform removals in the evolutionary process model induction system. It is composed of two parts, the process estimator and the process predictor. The process estimator acts as an intelligent software sensor to achieve a good estimation of fecal coliform bacteria concentration in the influent. Then the process predictor yields sequential prediction of the effluent fecal coliform bacteria concentration based on the estimated fecal coliform bacteria concentration in the influent from the process estimator with other process variables. The results show that the evolutionary process model induction system with a sequential modeling paradigm has successfully evolved multivariate dynamic models of fecal coliform removals in the form of explicit mathematical formulas with high levels of accuracy and good generalization. The evolutionary process model induction system with sequential modeling paradigm proposed here provides a good alternative to develop cost-effective dynamic process models for a full-scale wastewater treatment plant and is readily applicable to a variety of other complex treatment processes.

  4. Surfactant effects on alpha factors in full-scale wastewater aeration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, D; Larson, L E; Stenstrom, M K

    2006-01-01

    Aeration is an essential process in the majority of wastewater treatment processes, and accounts for the largest fraction of plant energy costs. Aeration systems can achieve wastewater oxygenation by shearing the surface (surface aerators) or releasing bubbles at the bottom of the tank (coarse- or fine-bubble aerators). Surfactants accumulate on gas-liquid interfaces and reduce mass transfer rates. This reduction in general is larger for fine-bubble aerators. This study was conducted to evaluate mass transfer effects on the characterization and specification of aeration systems in clean and process water conditions. Tests at different interfacial turbulence regimes were analysed, showing higher gas transfer depression for lower turbulence regimes. Higher turbulence regimes can offset contamination effects, at the expense of operating efficiency. This phenomenon is characteristic of surface aerators and coarse bubble diffusers and is here discussed. The results explain the variability of alpha factors measured at small scale, due to uncontrolled energy density. Results are also reported in dimensionless empirical correlations that describe mass transfer as a function of physiochemical and geometrical characteristics of the aeration process.

  5. Occurence of methanogenesis during start-up of a full-scale synthesis gas-fed reactor treating sulfate and metal-rich wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, van B.H.G.W.; Roest, C.; Tzeneva, V.A.; Dijkman, H.; Smidt, H.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The start-up of a full-scale synthesis gas-fed gas-lift reactor treating metal and sulfate-rich wastewater was investigated. Sludge from a pilot-scale reactor was used to seed the full-scale reactor. The main difference in design between the pilot- and full-scale reactor was that metal precipitation

  6. Performance of Four Full-Scale Artificially Aerated Horizontal Flow Constructed Wetlands for Domestic Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Butterworth

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of the performance of four full-scale aerated horizontal flow constructed wetlands was conducted to determine the efficacy of the technology on sites receiving high and variable ammonia loading rates not yet reported in the literature. Performance was assessed in terms of ammonia and solids removal, hydraulic conductivity and mixing patterns. The capability of systems to produce ammonium effluent concentrations <3 mgNH4+-N/L was observed across all sites in systems receiving variable loadings between 0.1 and 13.0 gNH4+-N/m2/d. Potential resilience issues were observed in relation to response to spike loadings posited to be due to an insufficient nitrifying population within the beds. Hydraulic conductivity and flow mixing patterns observed suggested deterioration of the reactor effective volume over time. Overall, the study demonstrates the efficacy of the technology where ammonium removal is required on small sites receiving high and variable flow rates, with adequate removal of organics and solids, but no significant benefit to the long term hydraulics of the system.

  7. Community analysis of a full-scale anaerobic bioreactor treating paper mill wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, Kees; Heilig, Hans G H J; Smidt, Hauke; de Vos, Willem M; Stams, Alfons J M; Akkermans, Antoon D L

    2005-03-01

    To get insight into the microbial community of an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactor treating paper mill wastewater, conventional microbiological methods were combined with 16S rRNA gene analyses. Particular attention was paid to microorganisms able to degrade propionate or butyrate in the presence or absence of sulphate. Serial enrichment dilutions allowed estimating the number of microorganisms per ml sludge that could use butyrate with or without sulphate (10(5)), propionate without sulphate (10(6)), or propionate and sulphate (10(8)). Quantitative RNA dot-blot hybridisation indicated that Archaea were two-times more abundant in the microbial community of anaerobic sludge than Bacteria. The microbial community composition was further characterised by 16S rRNA-gene-targeted Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting, and via cloning and sequencing of dominant amplicons from the bacterial and archaeal patterns. Most of the nearly full length (approximately 1.45 kb) bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed less than 97% similarity to sequences present in public databases, in contrast to the archaeal clones (approximately. 1.3 kb) that were highly similar to known sequences. While Methanosaeta was found as the most abundant genus, also Crenarchaeote-relatives were identified. The microbial community was relatively stable over a period of 3 years (samples taken in July 1999, May 2001, March 2002 and June 2002) as indicated by the high similarity index calculated from DGGE profiles (81.9+/-2.7% for Bacteria and 75.1+/-3.1% for Archaea). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated the presence of unknown and yet uncultured microorganisms, but also showed that known sulphate-reducing bacteria and syntrophic fatty acid-oxidising microorganisms dominated the enrichments.

  8. Quantification of Nitrosomonas oligotropha-Like Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrospira spp. from Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plants by Competitive PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisi, Hebe M.; Layton, Alice C.; Harms, Gerda; Gregory, Igrid R.; Robinson, Kevin G.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2002-01-01

    Utilizing the principle of competitive PCR, we developed two assays to enumerate Nitrosomonas oligotropha-like ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the genus Nitrospira. The specificities of two primer sets, which were designed for two target regions, the amoA gene and Nitrospira 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), were verified by DNA sequencing. Both assays were optimized and applied to full-scale, activated sludge wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) samples. If it was assumed that there was an average of 3.6 copies of 16S rDNA per cell in the total population and two copies of the amoA gene per ammonia-oxidizing bacterial cell, the ammonia oxidizers examined represented 0.0033% ± 0.0022% of the total bacterial population in a municipal WWTP. N. oligotropha-like ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were not detected in an industrial WWTP. If it was assumed that there was one copy of the 16S rDNA gene per nitrite-oxidizing bacterial cell, Nitrospira spp. represented 0.39% ± 0.28% of the biosludge population in the municipal WWTP and 0.37% ± 0.23% of the population in the industrial WWTP. The number of Nitrospira sp. cells in the municipal WWTP was more than 62 times greater than the number of N. oligotropha-like cells, based on a competitive PCR analysis. The results of this study extended our knowledge of the comparative compositions of nitrifying bacterial populations in wastewater treatment systems. Importantly, they also demonstrated that we were able to quantify these populations, which ultimately will be required for accurate prediction of process performance and stability for cost-effective design and operation of WWTPs. PMID:11772633

  9. Performance evaluation of a full-scale ABS resin manufacturing wastewater treatment plant: a case study in Tabriz Petrochemical Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shakerkhatibi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The measurement data regarding the influent and effluent of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP provides a general overview, demonstrating an overall performance of WWTP. Nevertheless, these data do not provide the suitable operational information for the optimization of individual units involved in a WWTP. A full-scale evolution of WWTP was carried out in this study via a reconciled data. Methods: A full-scale evolution of acrylonitrile, butadiene and styrene (ABS resin manufacturing WWTP was carried out. Data reconciliation technique was employed to fulfil the mass conservation law and also enhance the accuracy of the flow measurements. Daily average values from long-term measurements by the WWTP library along with the results of four sampling runs, were utilized for data reconciliation with further performance evaluation and characterization of WWTP. Results: The full-scale evaluation, based on balanced data showed that removal efficiency based on chemical oxygen demand (COD and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5 through the WWTP were 80% and 90%, respectively, from which only 28% of COD and 20% of BOD5 removal had occurred in biological reactor. In addition, the removal efficiency of styrene and acrylonitrile, throughout the plant, was approximately 90%. Estimation results employing Toxchem model showed that 43% of acrylonitrile and 85% of styrene were emitted into the atmosphere above water surfaces. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the volatilization of styrene and acrylonitrile is the main mechanism for their removal along with corresponded COD elimination from the WWTP.

  10. Proteolytic bacterial dominance in a full-scale municipal solid waste anaerobic reactor assessed by 454 pyrosequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali-Rezende, Juliana; Rojas-Ojeda, Patricia; Nascimento, Andréa M A; Sanz, José L

    2016-03-01

    Biomethanization entails a good means to reduce the organic fraction (OF) derived from municipal solid wastes (MSW). The bacterial diversity of a full scale MSW anaerobic reactor located in Madrid (Spain) was investigated using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing. Even though the proteolytic bacteria prevailed throughout all of the process, community shifts were observed from the start-up to the steady-state conditions, with an increasing biodiversity displayed over time. The Bacteroidetes and the Firmicutes were the majority phyla: 55.1 and 40.2% (start-up) and 18.7 and 78.7 (steady-state) of the total reads. The system's lack of evenness remains noteworthy as the sequences affiliated to the proteolytic non-saccharolytic Proteiniphylum, Gallicola and Fastidiosipila genera, together with the saccharolytic Saccharofermentans, were predominant on the system and this predominance appears to correlate with the presence of a high ammonium concentration. The 454 pyrosequencing revealed a great diversity of rare organisms which seemingly do not sustain any metabolic roles in the course of the OF-MSW degradation. However, this scarce and unique microbiota can confer great resilience to the system as a buffer against nutritional and environmental changing conditions, thus opening the door to increase the current knowledge about the bacterial community dynamics taking place during MSW treatment processes.

  11. Dominant and novel clades of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis in 18 globally distributed full-scale wastewater treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yanping; Graham, David W.; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Zhang, Tong

    2015-07-01

    Here we employed quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) and 16S rRNA genes to assess relative abundances of dominant clades of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (referred to Accumulibacter) in 18 globally distributed full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) from six countries. Accumulibacter were not only detected in the 6 WWTPs performing biological phosphorus removal, but also inhabited in the other 11 WWTPs employing conventional activated sludge (AS) with abundances ranging from 0.02% to 7.0%. Among the AS samples, clades IIC and IID were found to be dominant among the five Accumulibacter clades. The relative abundance of each clade in the Accumulibacter lineage significantly correlated (p biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) WWTPs. The results deepened our understanding of the Accumulibacter diversity in environmental samples.

  12. Selection of technologies for municipal wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Rodríguez Miranda

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In water environmental planning in watersheds should contain aspects for the decontamination of receiving water body, therefore the selection of the treatment plants municipal wastewater in developing countries, you should consider aspects of the typical composition raw wastewater pollutant removal efficiency by technology, performance indicators for technology, environmental aspects of localization and spatial localization strategy. This methodology is built on the basis of technical, economic and environmental attributes, such as a tool for decision making future investments in treatment plants municipal wastewater with multidisciplinary elements.

  13. Contrasting microbial community composition and function perspective in sections of a full-scale coking wastewater treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuang; Wu, Haizhen; Wei, Chaohai; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Junting

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the microbial community of the coking wastewater (CWW) treatment system and to study the effects of CWW characteristics and operational parameters on microbial communities, active sludge samples were collected from a full-scale CWW treatment plant using three-phase fluidized bed biological reactors. High-throughput MiSeq sequencing was used to examine the 16S rRNA genes of microbiology, revealing a distinct microbial composition among the active sludge samples of three sequential bioreactors. Pseudomonas, Comamonas, and Thiobacillus-related sequences dominated in the anaerobic bioreactor A, aerobic bioreactor O1, and aerobic bioreactor O2 active sludge with relative abundance of 72.59, 56.75, and 27.82 %, respectively. The physico-chemical characteristics of CWW were analyzed by standard methods and operational parameters were recorded to examine their effects on the microbial communities. The redundancy analysis (RDA) results showed that the bacterial communities of bioreactors A, O1, and O2 correlated strongly with cyanides, phenols, and ammonia, respectively. These results expand the knowledge about the biodiversity and population dynamics of microorganisms and discerned the relationships between bacterial communities and environmental variables in the biological treatment processes in the full-scale CWW treatment system.

  14. Characterization of Membrane Foulants in Full-scale and Lab-scale Membrane Bioreactors for Wastewater Treatment and Reuse

    KAUST Repository

    Matar, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) offer promising solution for wastewater treatment and reuse to address the problem of water scarcity. Nevertheless, this technology is still facing challenges associated with membrane biofouling. This phenomenon has been mainly investigated in lab-scale MBRs with little or no insight on biofouling in full-scale MBR plants. Furthermore, the temporal dynamics of biofouling microbial communities and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are less studied. Herein, a multidisciplinary approach was adopted to address the above knowledge gaps in lab- and full-scale MBRs. In the full-scale MBR study, 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing with multivariate statistical analysis revealed that the early and mature biofilm communities from five full-scale MBRs differed significantly from the source community (i.e. activated sludge), and random immigration of species from the source community was unlikely to shape the community structure of biofilms. Also, a core biofouling community was shared between the five MBR plants sampled despite differences in their operating conditions. In the lab-scale MBR studies, temporal dynamics of microbial communities and their EPS products were monitored on different hydrophobic and hydrophilic membranes during 30 days. At the early stages of filtration (1 d), the same early colonizers belonging to the class Betaproteobacteria were identified on all the membranes. However, their relative abundance decreased on day 20 and 30, and sequence reads belonging to the phylum Firmicutes and Chlorobi became dominant on all the membranes on day 20 and 30. In addition, the intrinsic membrane characteristic did not select any specific EPS fractions at the initial stages of filtration and the same EPS foulants developed with time on the hydrophobic and hydrophilic membranes. Our results indicated that the membrane surface characteristics did not select for specific biofouling communities or EPS foulants, and the same early

  15. Life cycle assessment of selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) of nitrous oxides in a full-scale municipal solid waste incinerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob; Munk, Bjarne; Crillesen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) of nitrous oxides in a full-scale municipal solid waste incinerator was investigated using LCA. The relationship between NOx-cleaning and ammonia dosage was measured at the plant. Un-reacted ammonia – the ammonia slip – leaving the flue-gas cleaning system......-removal in flue-gas cleaning from waste incineration....

  16. Association of biodiversity with the rates of micropollutant biotransformations among full-scale wastewater treatment plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David R; Helbling, Damian E; Lee, Tae Kwon; Park, Joonhong; Fenner, Kathrin; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Ackermann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversities can differ substantially among different wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) communities. Whether differences in biodiversity translate into differences in the provision of particular ecosystem services, however, is under active debate. Theoretical considerations predict that WWTP communities with more biodiversity are more likely to contain strains that have positive effects on the rates of particular ecosystem functions, thus resulting in positive associations between those two variables. However, if WWTP communities were sufficiently biodiverse to nearly saturate the set of possible positive effects, then positive associations would not occur between biodiversity and the rates of particular ecosystem functions. To test these expectations, we measured the taxonomic biodiversity, functional biodiversity, and rates of 10 different micropollutant biotransformations for 10 full-scale WWTP communities. We have demonstrated that biodiversity is positively associated with the rates of specific, but not all, micropollutant biotransformations. Thus, one cannot assume whether or how biodiversity will associate with the rate of any particular micropollutant biotransformation. We have further demonstrated that the strongest positive association is between biodiversity and the collective rate of multiple micropollutant biotransformations. Thus, more biodiversity is likely required to maximize the collective rates of multiple micropollutant biotransformations than is required to maximize the rate of any individual micropollutant biotransformation. We finally provide evidence that the positive associations are stronger for rare micropollutant biotransformations than for common micropollutant biotransformations. Together, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that differences in biodiversity can indeed translate into differences in the provision of particular ecosystem services by full-scale WWTP communities. Copyright © 2015, American Society for

  17. Bioaugmentation for treatment of full-scale diethylene glycol monobutyl ether (DGBE) wastewater by Serratia sp. BDG-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Maoxia; Fan, Rong; Zou, Wenhui; Zhou, Houzhen [Key Laboratory of Environmental and Applied Microbiology, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Tan, Zhouliang, E-mail: tanzhl@cib.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Environmental and Applied Microbiology, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Xudong [Key Laboratory of Environmental and Applied Microbiology, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • BDG-2 grew well at 30 °C, pH 9 and 2000 mg L{sup −1} of initial DGBE concentration. • It could obtain 96.92% of COD (generated by DGBE) removal efficiency in 39.9 h. • The technological matching was made based on the characteristics of DGBE wastewater and BDG-2. • Stable operation of bio-augmentation treatment facilities was finally accomplished. - Abstract: A novel bacterial strain BDG-2 was isolated and used to augment the treatment of silicon plate manufacturing wastewater that primarily contains diethylene glycol monobutyl ether (DGBE). BDG-2 was identified as a Serratia sp. Under the optimal conditions of 30 °C, pH 9 and DGBE concentration of 2000 mg L{sup −1}, the bioaugmented system achieved 96.92% COD removal after 39.9 h. Laboratory-scale technological matching results indicated that, in a biofilm process with the addition of 100 mg L{sup −1} ammonia and 5 mg L{sup −1} total phosphorus (TP), 70.61% COD removal efficiency could be obtained in 46 h. Addition of polyaluminium chloride (PAC) to the reactors during the suspension process enhanced the settleability of the BDG-2 culture. Subsequently, successful start-up and stable operation of a full-scale bioaugmented treatment facilities were accomplished, and the volumetric organic load in the plug-flow aeration tank was 2.17 ± 0.81 kg m{sup −3} d{sup −1}. The effluent COD of the facilities was stable and always below 100 mg L{sup −1}.

  18. Municipal Treated Wastewater Irrigation: Microbiological Risk Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Lonigro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Municipal wastewater for irrigation, though treated, can contain substances and pathogens toxic for humans and animals. Pathogens, although not harmful from an agronomical aspect, undoubtedly represent a major concern with regards to sanitary and hygienic profile. In fact, vegetable crops irrigated with treated wastewater exalt the risk of infection since these products can also be eaten raw, as well as transformed or cooked. Practically, the evaluation of the microbiological risk is important to verify if the microbial limits imposed by law for treated municipal wastewater for irrigation, are valid, thus justifying the treatments costs, or if they are too low and, therefore, they don’ t justify them. Different probabilistic models have been studied to assess the microbiological risk; among these, the Beta-Poisson model resulted the most reliable. Thus, the Dipartimento di Scienze delle Produzioni Vegetali of the University of Bari, which has been carrying out researches on irrigation with municipal filtered wastewater for several years, considered interesting to verify if the microbial limits imposed by the italian law n.185/03 are too severe, estimating the biological risk by the probabilistic Beta-Poisson model. Results of field trials on vegetable crops irrigated by municipal filtered wastewater, processed by the Beta-Poisson model, show that the probability to get infection and/or illness is extremely low, and that the actual italian microbial limits are excessively restrictive.

  19. Particle related fractionation and characterisation of municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, A F; van der Graaf, J H J M; Kampschreur, M J; Mels, A R

    2004-01-01

    Several studies show that a more detailed characterisation of the particulate matter in municipal wastewater gives a better understanding and prediction of removal efficiencies of physical-chemical treatment techniques and the application of optimal chemical dosages. Such a characterisation should include the distribution of contaminants over various particle sizes. This article describes a method and results of experimental and full-scale investigations, conducted to determine how contaminants in wastewater are distributed over different particle sizes. For this purpose, particle size fractionations of wastewater influents originating from more than thirteen WWTP were carried out. One of these fractionations (WWTP Venray) is shown and interpreted in this article. First, the wastewaters were fractionated into 5 to 6 particle fractions (45, 5.0, 1.0/1.2, 0.45 and 0.1 microm) after which the fractions were analyzed for various water quality parameters like organic components, nutrients, salts, solids and turbidity. Based on the results the effects of removal of the different size fractions on design of the biological treatment and energy balance of a wastewater treatment plant can be assessed. The method also indicates whether a certain wastewater is efficiently treatable with physical-chemical pre-treatment methods. It is concluded wastewater fractionation on particle size is very useful, but that wastewater characteristics and particle size distributions should not be generalised, but have to be interpreted as indications for a certain average wastewater composition. To give more insight into the distribution of contaminants over particle size and the particle removal potential, a specific wastewater fractionation has to be carried out per WWTP.

  20. Spectroscopic characterization of dissolved organic matter in coking wastewater during bio-treatment: full-scale plant study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ronghua; Ou, Huase; Yu, Xubiao; He, Runsheng; Lin, Chong; Wei, Chaohai

    2015-01-01

    This paper taking a full-scale coking wastewater (CWW) treatment plant as a case study aimed to characterize removal behaviors of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by UV spectra and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix-parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), and investigate the correlations between spectroscopic indices and water quality parameters. Efficient removal rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total nitrogen (TN) after the bio-treatment were 91.3%, 87.3% and 69.1%, respectively. UV270 was proven to be a stable UV absorption peak of CWW that could reflect the mixture of phenols, heterocyclics, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives. Molecular weight and aromaticity were increased, and also the content of polar functional groups was greatly reduced after bio-treatment. Three fluorescent components were identified by PARAFAC: C1 (tyrosine-like), C2 (tryptophan-like) and C3 (humic-like). The removal rate of protein-like was higher than that of humic-like and C1 was identified as biodegradable substance. Correlation analysis showed UV270 had an excellent correlation with COD (r=0.921, n=60, Ptreatment.

  1. Nitrification performance and microbial ecology of nitrifying bacteria in a full-scale membrane bioreactor treating TFT-LCD wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Liang-Ming; Wu, Yi-Ju; Lee, Ya-Chin; Chen, Hong-Wei; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Chang, Ming-Yu; Cheng, Sheng-Shung; Hsu, Shu-Fu; Chang, Cheng-Huey; Shen, Wason; Huang, Chung Kai; Fu, Ryan; Chang, Barkley

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated nitrification performance and nitrifying community in one full-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating TFT-LCD wastewater. For the A/O MBR system treating monoethanolamine (MEA) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), no nitrification was observed, due presumably to high organic loading, high colloidal COD, low DO, and low hydraulic retention time (HRT) conditions. By including additional A/O or O/A tanks, the A/O/A/O MBR and the O/A/O MBR were able to perform successful nitrification. The real-time PCR results for quantification of nitrifying populations showed a high correlation to nitrification performance, and can be a good indicator of stable nitrification. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) results of functional gene, amoA, suggest that Nitrosomonas oligotropha-like AOB seemed to be important to a good nitrification in the MBR system. In the MBR system, Nitrobacter- and Nitrospira-like NOB were both abundant, but the low nitrite environment is likely to promote the growth of Nitrospira-like NOB.

  2. Sequential dynamic artificial neural network modeling of a full-scale coking wastewater treatment plant with fluidized bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Hua-Se; Wei, Chao-Hai; Wu, Hai-Zhen; Mo, Ce-Hui; He, Bao-Yan

    2015-10-01

    This study proposed a sequential modeling approach using an artificial neural network (ANN) to develop four independent models which were able to predict biotreatment effluent variables of a full-scale coking wastewater treatment plant (CWWTP). Suitable structure and transfer function of ANN were optimized by genetic algorithm. The sequential approach, which included two parts, an influent estimator and an effluent predictor, was used to develop dynamic models. The former parts of models estimated the variations of influent COD, volatile phenol, cyanide, and NH4 (+)-N. The later parts of models predicted effluent COD, volatile phenol, cyanide, and NH4 (+)-N using the estimated values and other parameters. The performance of these models was evaluated by statistical parameters (such as coefficient of determination (R (2) ), etc.). Obtained results indicated that the estimator developed dynamic models for influent COD (R (2)  = 0.871), volatile phenol (R (2)  = 0.904), cyanide (R (2)  = 0.846), and NH4 (+)-N (R (2)  = 0.777), while the predictor developed feasible models for effluent COD (R (2)  = 0.852) and cyanide (R (2)  = 0.844), with slightly worse models for effluent volatile phenol (R (2)  = 0.752) and NH4 (+)-N (R (2)  = 0.764). Thus, the proposed modeling processes can be used as a tool for the prediction of CWWTP performance.

  3. An integrated 45L pilot microbial fuel cell system at a full-scale wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiegemann, Heinz; Herzer, Daniel; Nettmann, Edith; Lübken, Manfred; Schulte, Patrick; Schmelz, Karl-Georg; Gredigk-Hoffmann, Sylvia; Wichern, Marc

    2016-10-01

    A 45-L pilot MFC system, consisting of four single-chamber membraneless MFCs, was integrated into a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and operated under practical conditions with the effluent of the primary clarifier for nine months to identify an optimal operational strategy for stable power output and maximum substrate based energy recovery (Normalized Energy Recovery, NER). Best results with the MFC were obtained at a hydraulic retention time of 22h with COD, TSS and nitrogen removal of 24%, 40% and 28%, respectively. Mean NER of 0.36kWhel/kgCOD,deg and coulombic efficiency of 24.8% were reached. Experimental results were used to set up the first described energy balance for a whole WWTP with an integrated MFC system. Energetic calculations of the model WWTP showed that energy savings due to reduced excess sludge production and energy gain of the MFC are significantly higher than the loss of energy due to reduced biogas production.

  4. Full-scale phosphorus recovery from digested wastewater sludge in Belgium - part II: economic opportunities and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, Sam; Marchi, Adrien; Weemaes, Marjoleine

    2015-01-01

    One of the options to recycle phosphorus (P) in the wastewater sector is to recover it as struvite crystals from digested sludge. Measurements on a full-scale demonstration plant in Leuven, Belgium, yielded a first indication of the profitability of struvite recovery, in function of different variables such as incoming PO(4)(3-) concentration, MgCl₂dosing, improved dewaterability, etc. An uncertainty and sensitivity analysis was carried out. Although possible improvement in sludge dewaterability when recovering struvite from digested sludge has a positive economic amortization effect, it is at the same time the largest source of financial risk. A theoretical exercise showed that for struvite recovery from centrate, uncertainty would be lower, and the largest sensitivity would be attributed to ingoing PO(4)(3-) concentration. Although struvite recovery from digested sludge is riskier, it is an investment with potentially a higher return than investment in struvite recovery from centrate. The article provides information for possible financial incentive schemes to support P-recovery.

  5. Assessment of full-scale biological nutrient removal systems upgraded with physico-chemical processes for the removal of emerging pollutants present in wastewaters from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Arriaga, Edson Baltazar; Cortés-Muñoz, Juana Enriqueta; González-Herrera, Arturo; Calderón-Mólgora, César Guillermo; de Lourdes Rivera-Huerta, Ma; Ramírez-Camperos, Esperanza; Montellano-Palacios, Leticia; Gelover-Santiago, Silvia Lucila; Pérez-Castrejón, Sara; Cardoso-Vigueros, Lina; Martín-Domínguez, Alejandra; García-Sánchez, Liliana

    2016-11-15

    Two full-scale biological nutrient removal systems upgraded with three physico-chemical processes (coagulation, chemical precipitation, and neutral Fenton) were evaluated in order to determine the removal of emerging pollutants (EPs) present in municipal wastewater from Mexico. Between 41 and 55 EPs were detected in the influents of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), including personal care products (PPCPs), antibiotics, analgesics, antiepileptics, antilipidemics, antihypertensives, antiseptics, stimulants, and hormones. Emerging pollutants were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.69ng/L to 94,600ng/L. High concentrations of emerging pollutants were found during dry season. WWTP 1, integrated by oxidation ditches and UV light lamps, showed removal efficiencies of EPs between 20% and 22%. On the other hand, WWTP 2 consisted of anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic tanks coupled with two disinfection processes; chlorine dioxide and UV light lamps, for which the removal of EPs was significant (up to 80%). The concentrations of emerging pollutants in WWTP 1 effluent was found within a rangeremovals, compared to those of WWTP 1, due to a greater activity of the simultaneous nitrification-denitrification processes, hydraulic retention time, and solids retention time. The compounds that were more persistent with removals below 50% in both effluents were: carbamazepine, dehydronifedipine, meprobamate, sertraline, propranolol, propoxyphene, norverapamil, diazepam, alprazolam, sulfamethoxazole, metoprolol, ofloxacin, norfloxacin, fluoxetine, erythromycin-H2O, diphenhydramine, dehydronifedipine, clarithromycin, hydrochlorothiazide, and albuterol. The application of neutral Fenton reaction as post-treatment for the two effluents from the WWTPs is promising for the removal of emerging pollutants (up to 100%) and for assuring high quality of treated water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fate and proliferation of typical antibiotic resistance genes in five full-scale pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jilu [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Processes and Environmental Criteria, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Mao, Daqing, E-mail: mao@tju.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Mu, Quanhua [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Processes and Environmental Criteria, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Luo, Yi, E-mail: luoy@nankai.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Processes and Environmental Criteria, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of 10 subtypes of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) for sulfonamide, tetracycline, β-lactam and macrolide resistance and the class 1 integrase gene (intI1). In total, these genes were monitored in 24 samples across each stage of five full-scale pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plants (PWWTPs) using qualitative and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). The levels of typical ARG subtypes in the final effluents ranged from (2.08 ± 0.16) × 10{sup 3} to (3.68 ± 0.27) × 10{sup 6} copies/mL. The absolute abundance of ARGs in effluents accounted for only 0.6%–59.8% of influents of the five PWWTPs, while the majority of the ARGs were transported to the dewatered sludge with concentrations from (9.38 ± 0.73) × 10{sup 7} to (4.30 ± 0.81) × 10{sup 10} copies/g dry weight (dw). The total loads of ARGs discharged through dewatered sludge was 7–308 folds higher than that in the raw influents and 16–638 folds higher than that in the final effluents. The proliferation of ARGs mainly occurs in the biological treatment processes, such as conventional activated sludge, cyclic activated sludge system (CASS) and membrane bio-reactor (MBR), implying that significant replication of certain subtypes of ARGs may be attributable to microbial growth. High concentrations of antibiotic residues (ranging from 0.14 to 92.2 mg/L) were detected in the influents of selected wastewater treatment systems and they still remain high residues in the effluents. Partial correlation analysis showed significant correlations between the antibiotic concentrations and the associated relative abundance of ARG subtypes in the effluent. Although correlation does not prove causation, this study demonstrates that in addition to bacterial growth, the high antibiotic residues within the pharmaceutical WWTPs may influence the proliferation and fate of the associated ARG subtypes. - Highlights: • The ARGs in final discharges were 7

  7. Appling hydrolysis acidification-anoxic–oxic process in the treatment of petrochemical wastewater: From bench scale reactor to full scale wastewater treatment plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Changyong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Research Center of Water Pollution Control Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environment Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhou, Yuexi, E-mail: zhouyuexi@263.net [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Research Center of Water Pollution Control Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environment Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Sun, Qingliang [School of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Fu, Liya [Research Center of Water Pollution Control Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environment Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xi, Hongbo; Yu, Yin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Research Center of Water Pollution Control Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environment Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Yu, Ruozhen [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Hydrolysis acidification-anoxic–oxic process can be used to treat petrochemical wastewater. • The toxicity and treatability changed significantly after hydrolysis acidification. • The type and concentration of organics reduced greatly after treatment. • The effluent shows low acute toxicity by luminescent bacteria assay. • Advanced treatment is recommended for the effluent. - Abstract: A hydrolysis acidification (HA)-anoxic–oxic (A/O) process was adopted to treat a petrochemical wastewater. The operation optimization was carried out firstly by a bench scale experimental reactor. Then a full scale petrochemical wastewater treatment plant (PCWWTP, 6500 m{sup 3} h{sup −1}) was operated with the same parameters. The results showed that the BOD{sub 5}/COD of the wastewater increased from 0.30 to 0.43 by HA. The effluent COD was 54.4 mg L{sup −1} for bench scale reactor and 60.9 mg L{sup −1} for PCWWTP when the influent COD was about 480 mg L{sup −1} on optimized conditions. The organics measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC–MS) reduced obviously and the total concentration of the 5 organics (1,3-dioxolane, 2-pentanone, ethylbenzene, 2-chloromethyl-1,3-dioxolane and indene) detected in the effluent was only 0.24 mg L{sup −1}. There was no obvious toxicity of the effluent. However, low acute toxicity of the effluent could be detected by the luminescent bacteria assay, indicating the advanced treatment is needed. The clone library profiling analysis showed that the dominant bacteria in the system were Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria and Bacteriodetes. HA-A/O process is suitable for the petrochemical wastewater treatment.

  8. Emissions of methane and nitrous oxide from full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daelman, M.R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Since 1750, the year that commonly marks the start of the Industrial Revolution, the atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide have risen about 40 %, 150 % and 20 %, respectively, above the pre-industrial levels due to human activity (IPCC (2013) Climate Change 2013: Th

  9. Emissions of methane and nitrous oxide from full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daelman, M.R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Since 1750, the year that commonly marks the start of the Industrial Revolution, the atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide have risen about 40 %, 150 % and 20 %, respectively, above the pre-industrial levels due to human activity (IPCC (2013) Climate Change 2013:

  10. Oxidation pond for municipal wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Erick; Hung, Yung-Tse; Suleiman Al Ahmad, Mohammed; Yeh, Ruth Yu-Li; Liu, Robert Lian-Huey; Fu, Yen-Pei

    2017-03-01

    This literature review examines process, design, and cost issues related to using oxidation ponds for wastewater treatment. Many of the topics have applications at either full scale or in isolation for laboratory analysis. Oxidation ponds have many advantages. The oxidation pond treatment process is natural, because it uses microorganisms such as bacteria and algae. This makes the method of treatment cost-effective in terms of its construction, maintenance, and energy requirements. Oxidation ponds are also productive, because it generates effluent that can be used for other applications. Finally, oxidation ponds can be considered a sustainable method for treatment of wastewater.

  11. Demonstration of a full-scale plant using an UASB followed by a ceramic MBR for the reclamation of industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Terutake; Hatamoto, Masashi; Yamashita, Takuya; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Takase, Osamu; Kekre, Kiran A; Ang, Wui Seng; Tao, Guihe; Seah, Harry; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    This study comprehensively evaluated the performance of a full-scale plant (4550m(3)d(-1)) using a UASB reactor followed by a ceramic MBR for the reclamation and reuse of mixed industrial wastewater containing many inorganics, chemical, oil and greases. This plant was demonstrated as the first full-scale system to reclaim the mixed industrial wastewater in the world. During 395days of operation, influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) fluctuated widely, but this system achieved COD removal rate of 91% and the ceramic MBR have operated flux of 21-25LMH stably. This means that this system adsorbed the feed water fluctuation and properly treated the water. Energy consumption of this plant was achieved 0.76kWhmm(-3) and this value is same range of domestic sewage MBR system. The combination of an UASB reactor and ceramic MBR is the most economical and feasible solution for water reclamation of mixed industrial wastewater.

  12. Performance Assessment of Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plants Based on Seasonal Variability of Microbial Communities via High-Throughput Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tang; Liu, Shufeng; Zheng, Maosheng; Chen, Qian; Ni, Jinren

    2016-01-01

    Microbial communities of activated sludge (AS) play a key role in the performance of wastewater treatment processes. However, seasonal variability of microbial population in varying AS-based processes has been poorly correlated with operation of full-scale wastewater treatment systems (WWTSs). In this paper, significant seasonal variability of AS microbial communities in eight WWTSs located in the city of Guangzhou were revealed in terms of 16S rRNA-based Miseq sequencing. Furthermore, variation redundancy analysis (RDA) demonstrated that the microbial community compositions closely correlated with WWTS operation parameters such as temperature, BOD, NH4+-N and TN. Consequently, support vector regression models which reasonably predicted effluent BOD, SS and TN in WWTSs were established based on microbial community compositions. This work provided an alternative tool for rapid assessment on performance of full-scale wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27049964

  13. Identification of wastewater treatment processes for nutrient removal on a full-scale WWTP by statistical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Jakob; Madsen, Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad;

    1994-01-01

    with variable influent flows and pollution loads. In this paper nonlinear time series models describing the variations of the ammonia and nitrate concentrations in the aeration tanks of a biological nutrient removal WWTP are established. The models proposed herein are identified by combining well-known theory......The introduction of on-line sensors of nutrient salt concentrations on wastewater treatment plants opens a wide new area of modelling wastewater processes. Time series models of these processes are very useful for gaining insight in real time operation of wastewater treatment systems which deal...

  14. Identification of wastewater treatment processes for nutrient removal on a full-scale WWTP by statistical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Jakob; Madsen, Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    1994-01-01

    The introduction of on-line sensors of nutrient salt concentrations on wastewater treatment plants opens a wide new area of modelling wastewater processes. Time series models of these processes are very useful for gaining insight in real time operation of wastewater treatment systems which deal...... with variable influent flows and pollution loads. In this paper nonlinear time series models describing the variations of the ammonia and nitrate concentrations in the aeration tanks of a biological nutrient removal WWTP are established. The models proposed herein are identified by combining well-known theory...... which are continuously updated as new information from the on-line sensors becomes available....

  15. Bacterial Communities and Antibiotic Resistance Communities in a Full-Scale Hospital Wastewater Treatment Plant by High-Throughput Pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngho Ahn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The community of whole microbes and antibiotic resistance bacteria (ARB in hospital wastewater treatment plants (WWTP receiving domestic wastewater (DWW and hospital wastewater (HWW was investigated. Samples from an influent of a secondary clarifier, at each treatment train, were characterized for the whole microbial community and ARB on the antibiotic resistance database, based on high-throughput pyrosequencing. The pyrosequencing analysis revealed that the abundance of Bacteroidetes in the DWW sample was higher (~1.6 times than in the HWW sample, whereas the abundance of Proteobacteria in the HWW sample was greater than in the DWW sample. At the top twenty of the genus level, distinct genera were observed—Saprospiraceae in the DWW and Zoogloea in the HWW. Apart from the top twenty genera, minor genera showed various antibiotic resistance types based on the antibiotic resistance gene database.

  16. Removal performance and water quality analysis of paper machine white water in a full-scale wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuai; Wang, Can; Fang, Shuai; Jia, Minghao; Li, Xiaoguang

    2016-09-29

    Paper machine white water is generally characterized as a high concentration of suspended solids and organic matters. A combined physicochemical-biological and filtration process was used in the study for removing pollutants in the wastewater. The removal efficiency of the pollutant in physicochemical and biological process was evaluated, respectively. Furthermore, advanced technology was used to analyse the water quality before and after the process treatment. Experimental results showed that the removal efficiency of suspend solids (SS) of the system was above 99%, while the physicochemical treatment in the forepart of the system had achieved about 97%. The removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and colour had the similar trend after physicochemical treatment and were corresponding to the proportion of suspended and the near-colloidal organic matter in the wastewater. After biological treatment, the removal efficiency of COD and colour achieved were about 97% and 90%, respectively. Furthermore, molecular weight (MW) distribution analysis showed that after treatment low MW molecules (chromatography/mass spectrometry showed that the composition of organic matter in the wastewater was not complicated. Methylsiloxanes were the typical organic components in the raw wastewater and most of them were removed after treatment.

  17. Emergence of Competitive Dominant Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial Populations in a Full-Scale Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Alice C.; Dionisi, Hebe; Kuo, H.-W.; Robinson, Kevin G.; Garrett, Victoria M.; Meyers, Arthur; Sayler, Gary S.

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial populations in an industrial wastewater treatment plant were investigated with amoA and 16S rRNA gene real-time PCR assays. Nitrosomonas nitrosa initially dominated, but over time RI-27-type ammonia oxidizers, also within the Nitrosomonas communis lineage, increased from below detection to codominance. This shift occurred even though nitrification remained constant. PMID:15691975

  18. Emergence of Competitive Dominant Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial Populations in a Full-Scale Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, Alice C.; Dionisi, Hebe; Kuo, H.-W.; Robinson, Kevin G; Garrett, Victoria M.; Meyers, Arthur; Sayler, Gary S.

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial populations in an industrial wastewater treatment plant were investigated with amoA and 16S rRNA gene real-time PCR assays. Nitrosomonas nitrosa initially dominated, but over time RI-27-type ammonia oxidizers, also within the Nitrosomonas communis lineage, increased from below detection to codominance. This shift occurred even though nitrification remained constant.

  19. Cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina in municipal wastewater or digester centrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bingfeng; Ho, Nam; Ogden, Kimberly L; Arnold, Robert G

    2014-05-01

    Meaningful use of biofuels for transportation depends on utilization of water from non-traditional, non-potable resources. Here it is hypothesized that (i) reclaimed wastewater or nutrient-rich side streams derived from municipal wastewater treatment are suitable for that purpose and (ii) use of those waters for algal growth can promote water quality through nutrient management. Experiments showed that metals levels in municipal wastewaters are unlikely to inhibit algal growth and lipid production, at least by metals tolerant microalgae like Nannochloropsis salina. Cells grew without inhibition in treated municipal wastewater or centrate derived from wastewater treatment at additions up to 75 percent v/v in their normal growth medium minus nitrogen and phosphorus. Although wastewater provides a suitable nutrient source for algal growth, not enough municipal wastewater is available to support a meaningful biofuels industry without efficient water recycling and nutrient recovery/reuse from spent algae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Occurrence, distribution, and potential influencing factors of sewage sludge components derived from nine full-scale wastewater treatment plants of Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Li, Meiyan; Liu, Junxin; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-07-01

    Millions of tons of waste activated sludge (WAS) produced from biological wastewater treatment processes cause severe adverse environmental consequences. A better understanding of WAS composition is thus very critical for sustainable sludge management. In this work, the occurrence and distribution of several fundamental sludge constituents were explored in WAS samples from nine full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) of Beijing, China. Among all the components investigated, active heterotrophic biomass was dominant in the samples (up to 9478mg/L), followed by endogenous residues (6736mg/L), extracellular polymeric substances (2088mg/L), and intracellular storage products (464mg/L) among others. Moreover, significant differences (p<0.05) were observed in composition profiles of sludge samples among the studied WWTPs. To identify the potential parameters affecting the variable fractions of sludge components, wastewater source as well as design and operational parameters of WWTPs were studied using statistical methods. The findings indicated that the component fraction of sewage sludge depends more on wastewater treatment alternatives than on wastewater characteristics among other parameters. A principal component analysis was conducted, which further indicated that there was a greater proportion of residual inert biomass in the sludge produced by the combined system of the conventional anaerobic/anoxic/oxic process and a membrane bioreactor. Additionally, a much longer solids retention time was also found to influence the sludge composition and induce an increase in both endogenous inert residues and extracellular polymeric substances in the sludge.

  1. Decolorizing and detoxifying textile wastewater, containing both soluble and insoluble dyes, in a full scale combined anaerobic/aerobic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijters, C T M J; Vos, R H; Scheffer, G; Mulder, R

    2006-03-01

    The wastewater originating from the bleaching and dyeing processes in the textile factory Ten Cate Protect in Nijverdal (the Netherlands) was successfully treated in a sequential anaerobic/aerobic system. In the system, a combination of an anaerobic 70-m3 fluidized bed reactor and a 450-m3 aerobic basin with integrated tilted plate settlers, 80-95% of the color was removed. The color was largely removed in the preacidification basin and the anaerobic reactor. Color, deriving from both reactive as well as disperse, was anaerobically removed, indicating that these type of dyes were reduced to colorless products. Interestingly, the vat dyes, the anthraquinones and indigoids, which were thought to be removed mainly aerobically, were largely anaerobically decolorized. Apparently the anaerobic system is capable of effectively removing the color of both soluble as insoluble dyes. The treated effluent of the sequential anaerobic/aerobic treatment showed no toxicity towards the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fisheri (EC20 (95%) > 45%). Partially bypassing the anaerobic stage resulted in increased toxicity (EC20 (95%) of 9% and 14%) in the effluent of the aerobic treatment and caused significant decrease of color removal. The results of this study show a main contribution of anaerobic treatment in decolorizing and detoxifying the textile wastewater in the sequential anaerobic/aerobic system.

  2. Solar Photocatalytic Treatment of Synthetic Municipal Wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kositzi, M.; Poulios, I.; Malato, S.; Caceres, J.; Campos, A.

    2002-07-01

    The photocatalytic organic content reduction of a selected synthetic municipal wastewater (SYMAWE), using heterogeneous and homogeneous photocatalytic methods under solar irradiation, has been studied at pilot plant scale at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria. In the case of heterogenous photocatalysis the effect of catalysts concentration, pH values and oxidants on the decomposition degree of the wastewater was examined. By an accumulation energy of 50 KJ I''-1 the synergetic effect of TiO{sub 2} P-25 with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} leads to a 55% and 73% reduction of the initial organic carbon content respectively. The Photo-Fenton process shows to be more efficient for this type of wastewater in comparison to the TiO{sub 2}/oxidant system. An accumulation energy of 20 KJ I''-1 leads to 80% reduction of the organic content. The presence of oxalate in the Fe''+3/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system leads to an additional improvement of the photocatalytic efficiency. (Author) 11 refs.

  3. Solar photocatalytic treatment of synthetic municipal wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kositzi, M.; Poulios, I. [University of Thessaloniki (Greece). Department of Chemistry, Lab. Physical Chemistry; Malato, S.; Caceres, J.; Campos, A. [Plataforma Solar de Almeria, Tabernas (Spain)

    2004-03-01

    The photocatalytic organic content reduction of a selected synthetic municipal wastewater by the use of heterogeneous and homogeneous photocatalytic methods under solar irradiation has been studied at a pilot-plant scale at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria. In the case of heterogeneous photocatalysis the effect of catalysts and oxidants concentration on the decomposition degree of the wastewater was examined. By an accumulation energy of 50 kJ L{sup -1} the synergetic effect of 0.2 g L{sup -1} TiO{sub 2} P-25 with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} leads to a 55% and 73% reduction of the initial organic carbon content, respectively. The photo-fenton process appears to be more efficient for this type of wastewater in comparison to the TiO{sub 2}/oxidant system. An accumulation energy of 20 kJ L{sup -1} leads to 80% reduction of the organic content. The presence of oxalate in the Fe{sup 3+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system leads to an additional improvement of the photocatalytic efficiency. (author)

  4. Microalgae-based advanced municipal wastewater treatment for reuse in water bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Han; Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Dao, Guo-Hua; Xu, Xue-Qiao; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Hu, Hong -Ying

    2017-04-01

    Reuse of secondary municipal effluent from wastewater treatment plants in water bodies could effectively alleviate freshwater resource shortage. However, excessive nutrients must be efficiently removed to prevent eutrophication. Compared with other means of advanced wastewater treatment, microalgae-based processes display overwhelming advantages including efficient and simultaneous N and P removal, no requirement of additional chemicals, O2 generation, CO2 mitigation, and potential value-added products from harvested biomass. One particular challenge of microalgae-based advanced municipal wastewater treatment compared to treatment of other types of wastewater is that concentrations of nutrients and N:P ratios in secondary municipal effluent are much lower and imbalanced. Therefore, there should be comprehensive considerations on nutrient removal from this specific type of effluent. Removal of nutrients and organic substances, and other environmental benefits of microalgae-based advanced municipal wastewater treatment systems were summarized. Among the existing studies on microalgal advanced nutrient removal, much information on major parameters is absent, rendering performances between studies not really comparable. Mechanisms of microalgae-based nitrogen and phosphorus removal were respectively analyzed to better understand advanced nutrient removal from municipal secondary effluent. Factors influencing microalgae-based nutrient removal were divided into intrinsic, environmental, and operational categories; several factors were identified in each category, and their influences on microalgal nutrient removal were discussed. A multiplicative kinetic model was integrated to estimate microalgal growth-related nutrient removal based majorly on environmental and intrinsic factors. Limitations and prospects of future full-scale microalgae-based advanced municipal wastewater treatment were also suggested. The manuscript could offer much valuable information for future

  5. Quantification method of N2O emission from full-scale biological nutrient removal wastewater treatment plant by laboratory batch reactor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yesul; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2014-08-01

    This study proposes a simplified method for the quantification of N2O emission from a biological nutrient removal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The method incorporates a laboratory-scale batch reactor which had almost the same operational (wastewater and sludge flow rates) condition of a unit operation/process of the WWTP. Cumulative N2O emissions from the batch reactor at the corresponding hydraulic retention times of the full-scale units (primary and secondary clarifiers, pre-anoxic, anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic basins) were used for the quantification of N2O emission. The analysis showed that the aerobic basin emitted 95% of the total emission and the emission factor (yield) reached 0.8% based on the influent nitrogen load. The method successfully estimated N2O emission from the WWTP and it has shown advantages in measurement time and cost over the direct field measurement (floating chamber) method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Performance of the Full-scale Loop Hybrid Reactor Treating Coal Gasification Wastewater under Different Recirculation Modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Zhao; Hongjun Han; Fang Fang; Wang Bing

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the simultaneous removal efficiencies of both COD and nitrogen in a single reactor treating coal gasification wastewater ( CGW ) . A novel loop hybrid reactor was developed and operated under different recirculation modes in order to achieve simultaneous removal of refractory compounds and total nitrogen ( TN) in a full⁃scale CGW treatment plant. Mid⁃ditch recirculation was superior to other operational modes in terms of the NH3⁃N and TN removal, resulting in a TN removal efficiency of 52. 3%. Although the system achieved equal COD removal rates under different recirculation modes, hydrophobic acid ( HPO⁃A) fraction of effluent dissolved organic matter ( DOMef) in mid⁃ditch recirculation mode accounted for 35.7%, compared to the proportions of 59. 2%, 45. 3% and 39. 4% for the other modes. The ultraviolet absorbance to dissolved organic carbon ratio test revealed that effluent under mid⁃ditch recirculation mode contained more non⁃aromatic hydrophilic components. Furthermore, appropriate recirculation and anoxic/oxic ( A/O) partitions were also demonstrated to remove some refractory metabolites ( phenols, alkanes, aniline, etc.), which reduced the chromaticity and improved the biodegradability.

  7. Use of fluorescence EEM to monitor the removal of emerging contaminants in full scale wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgroi, Massimiliano; Roccaro, Paolo; Korshin, Gregory V; Greco, Valentina; Sciuto, Sebastiano; Anumol, Tarun; Snyder, Shane A; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2017-02-05

    This study investigated the applicability of different techniques for fluorescence excitation/emission matrices data interpretations, including peak-picking method, fluorescence regional integration and PARAFAC modelling, to act as surrogates in predicting emerging trace organic compounds (ETOrCs) removal during conventional wastewater treatments that usually comprise primary and secondary treatments. Results showed that fluorescence indexes developed using alternative methodologies but indicative of a same dissolved organic matter component resulted in similar predictions of the removal of the target compounds. The peak index defined by the excitation/emission wavelength positions (λex/λem) 225/290nm and related to aromatic proteins and tyrosine-like fluorescence was determined to be a particularly suitable surrogate for monitoring ETOrCs that had very high removal rates (average removal >70%) (i.e., triclosan, caffeine and ibuprofen). The peak index defined by λex/λem=245/440nm and the PARAFAC component with wavelength of the maxima λex/λem=245, 350/450, both identified as humic-like fluorescence, were found remarkably well correlated with ETOrCs such as atenolol, naproxen and gemfibrozil that were moderately removed (51-70% average removal). Finally, the PARAFAC component with wavelength of the maxima λex/λem=<240, 315/380 identified as microbial humic-like fluorescence was the only index correlated with the removal of the antibiotic trimethoprim (average removal 68%).

  8. Full-scale experiences of nitrogen removal of fish-processing wastewater with flotation and anoxic-aerobic activated sludge system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, M; Barjenbruch, M

    2010-01-01

    This article presents full scale experience of one of the largest fish-processing factories in Europe with a production capacity of about 50,000 tons herring per year and a maximum daily wastewater discharge of 1,500 m(3). The wastewater treatment plant is the only direct discharger in the fish-processing industry in Germany. Thus, very low effluent values have to be keep in, especially the nitrogen reduction has to be operated during the whole year even when the temperature is low. The central point of the multi-stage WWTP (about 90,000 PE) is the biological nutrient removal (BNR) with pre-denitrification. The wastewater pre-treatment with sieves (0.8 mm) and a two staged flotation reduces the nitrogen load - mainly the particle bounded fraction - but the optimal nutrient ratios for biological treatment need to be observed. The activated sludge system has maximum OLR of 0.12 g COD/(g MLSS d) and NLR of 0.015 g TN/(g MLSS d) but a "Stand-By"-Operation with periods without wastewater influent is unavoidable. Discontinuous operating is one problem. The dependence on temperature as one of the main influences of nitrification-activity is the second point. The article gives an overview about the start-up and the optimisation of the process.

  9. Unravelling the spatial variation of nitrous oxide emissions from a step-feed plug-flow full scale wastewater treatment plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuting; van den Akker, Ben; Ye, Liu; Ni, Bing-Jie; Watts, Shane; Reid, Katherine; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-02-01

    Plug-flow activated sludge reactors (ASR) that are step-feed with wastewater are widely adopted in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) due to their ability to maximise the use of the organic carbon in wastewater for denitrification. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are expected to vary along these reactors due to pronounced spatial variations in both biomass and substrate concentrations. However, to date, no detailed studies have characterised the impact of the step-feed configuration on emission variability. Here we report on the results from a comprehensive online N2O monitoring campaign, which used multiple gas collection hoods to simultaneously measure emission along the length of a full-scale, step-fed, plug-flow ASR in Australia. The measured N2O fluxes exhibited strong spatial-temporal variation along the reactor path. The step-feed configuration had a substantial influence on the N2O emissions, where the N2O emission factors in sections following the first and second step feed were 0.68% ± 0.09% and 3.5% ± 0.49% of the nitrogen load applied to each section. The relatively high biomass-specific nitrogen loading rate in the second section of the reactor was most likely cause of the high emissions from this section.

  10. Calibration and validation of a modified ASM1 using long-term simulation of a full-scale pulp mill wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskitalo, Jukka; Jansen, Jes la Cour; Leiviskä, Kauko

    2010-04-14

    A mathematical model modified from the well established Activated Sludge Model no. 1 was used for modelling a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in a bleached kraft pulp mill. Effluents from the pulp and paper industry are typically nutrient deficient, which was considered in the model. The wastewater characterization and model calibration were based on respirometric batch experiments with sludge and wastewater sampled from the WWTP. The model performance was validated in a long-term simulation using routinely measured process data from the WWTP as the model inputs. The simulation results proved useful in evaluating nutrient dosage strategies at the WWTP and in troubleshooting poor treatment plant performance. However, in order to achieve a completely accurate description of nitrogen removal, more complex phenomena would have to be included in the model. Even though the simulated period was long compared to the brief measurement campaign used in the model calibration, the model was able to describe the treatment plant's behaviour. The calibrated model can be expected to stay valid for a long time, which allows the use of deterministic modelling in practical applications at pulp and paper WWTPs.

  11. Performance and model of a full-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) to treat the pharmaceutical wastewater containing 6-APA and amoxicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Hongcheng; Chen, Zhaobo; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Shi, Yue; Li, Xiaoming

    2011-01-30

    A full-scale test was conducted with an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) pre-treating pharmaceutical wastewater containing 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) and amoxicillin. The aim of the study is to investigate the performance of UASB in the condition of a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rate from 12.57 to 21.02 kgm(-3)d(-1) and a wide pH from 5.57 to 8.26, in order to provide a reference for treating the similar chemical synthetic pharmaceutical wastewater containing 6-APA and amoxicillin. The results demonstrated that the UASB average percentage reduction in COD, 6-APA and amoxicillin were 52.2%, 26.3% and 21.6%, respectively. In addition, three models, built on the back propagation neural network (BPNN) theory and linear regression techniques were developed for the simulation of the UASB system performance in the biodegradation of pharmaceutical wastewater containing 6-APA and amoxicillin. The average error of COD, 6-APA and amoxicillin were -0.63%, 2.19% and 5.40%, respectively. The results indicated that these models built on the BPNN theory were well-fitted to the detected data, and were able to simulate and predict the removal of COD, 6-APA and amoxicillin by UASB. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Energy savings by reduced mixing in aeration tanks: Results from a full scale investigation and long term implementation at Avedoere wastewater treatment plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anitha Kumari; Guildal, T.; Thomsen, H.R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate the potential of reducing number of mixers in the biological treatment process and thereby achieve energy and economical savings and contribute to cleaner environment. The project was carried out at Avedoere wastewater treatment plant and a full scale...... investigation was conducted to study the effect of reduced mixing on flow velocity, suspended solid sedimentation, concentration gradients of oxygen and SS with depth and treatment efficiency. The only negative effect observed was on flow velocity; however the velocity was above the critical velocity. The plant...... has been operating with 50% of its designed number of mixers since September 2007 and long term results also confirm that reduced mixing did not have any negative effect on treatment efficiency. The estimated yearly electricity saving is 0.75 GWh/year. © IWA Publishing 2011....

  13. Successful startup of a full-scale acrylonitrile wastewater biological treatment plant (ACN-WWTP) by eliminating the inhibitory effects of toxic compounds on nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuanyuan; Jin, Xibiao; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yongdi; Chen, Xiurong

    2014-01-01

    During the startup of a full-scale anoxic/aerobic (A/O) biological treatment plant for acrylonitrile wastewater, the removal efficiencies of NH(3)-N and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) were 1.29 and 0.83% on day 30, respectively. The nitrification process was almost totally inhibited, which was mainly caused by the inhibitory effects of toxic compounds. To eliminate the inhibition, cultivating the bacteria that degrade toxic compounds with patience was applied into the second startup of the biological treatment plant. After 75 days of startup, the inhibitory effects of the toxic compounds on nitrification were eliminated. The treatment plant has been operated stably for more than 3 years. During the last 100 days, the influent concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH(3)-N, TKN and total cyanide (TCN) were 831-2,164, 188-516, 306-542 and 1.17-9.57 mg L(-1) respectively, and the effluent concentrations were 257 ± 30.9, 3.30 ± 1.10, 31.6 ± 4.49 and 0.40 ± 0.10 mg L(-1) (n = 100), respectively. Four strains of cyanide-degrading bacteria which were able to grow with cyanide as the sole carbon and nitrogen source were isolated from the full-scale biological treatment plant. They were short and rod-shaped under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and were identified as Brevundimonas sp., Rhizobium sp., Dietzia natronolimnaea and Microbacterium sp., respectively.

  14. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products in the leachates from a typical landfill reservoir of municipal solid waste in Shanghai, China: Occurrence and removal by a full-scale membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Qian; Zhao, Wentao; Cao, Xuqi; Lu, Shuguang; Qiu, Zhaofu; Gu, Xiaogang; Yu, Gang

    2017-02-05

    Knowledge on the pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in landfill leachates, which are an important source of PPCPs in the environment, was very limited. Hence, four sampling campaigns were conducted to determine eighteen PPCPs in the landfill leachates from a landfill reservoir in Shanghai. Five of the target PPCPs were first included in a landfill leachate study. Additionally, their removal from landfill leachates by a full-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) was illustrated. The results showed fourteen out of eighteen PPCPs were detectable in at least one sampling campaign and achieved individual concentrations ranging from 0.39 to 349μg/L in the landfill leachates. Some PPCPs exhibited higher contamination levels than those reported in other countries. Good removal of PPCPs by MBR led to a largely reduced contamination level (municipal wastewaters in Shanghai. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the removal of PPCPs in landfill leachates. The findings emphasized the necessity to further study the PPCPs in the landfill leachates in China and the requirement to enhance their removal in the landfill leachates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Parameter Identification of an Ultrafiltration Model for Organics Removal in a Full-Scale Wastewater Reclamation Plant with Sparse and Incomplete Monitoring Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fu; Zeng, Siyu; Huang, Yunqing; He, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafiltration (UF) has become one of the dominant treatment processes for wastewater reclamation in China. Modeling is an effective instrument to understand and optimize UF systems. To this end, a previously developed UF model for organics removal was applied to the UF process in a typical, full-scale wastewater reclamation plant (WRP) in China. However, the sparse and incomplete field monitoring data from the studied WRP made the traditional model analysis approaches hardly work in this case. Therefore, two strategies, namely Strategy 1 and Strategy 2, were proposed, following a regional sensitivity analysis approach, for model parameter identification. Strategy 1 aimed to identify the model parameters and the missing model input, i.e. sampling times, simultaneously, while Strategy 2 tried to separate these two processes to reduce the dimension of the identification problem through an iteration procedure. With these two strategies, the model performed well in the Qinghe WRP with the absolute relative errors between the simulated and observed total organic carbon (TOC) generally below 10%. The four model parameters were all sensitive and identifiable, and even the sampling times could be roughly identified. Given the incomplete model input, these results were encouraging and added to the trustworthiness of model when it was applied to the Qinghe WRP.

  16. Stability of alumina, ceria, and silica nanoparticles in municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-González, Lila; Barbero, Isabel; Field, Jim A; Shadman, Farhang; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in semiconductor manufacturing operations such as wafer chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP). Understanding the stability of NPs in municipal wastewater is essential for the evaluation of the fate of NPs released to municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This study aimed to evaluate the stability of Al(2)O(3), CeO(2), and SiO(2) NPs and CMP waste effluents containing these NPs in municipal wastewater. Al(2)O(3) and CeO(2) NPs were destabilized by wastewater constituents, as indicated by the formation of large agglomerates. However, the same NPs in the CMP waste slurries showed high stability in wastewater, probably due to additives present in the slurry that modify the surface chemistry of the particles. Likewise, both the commercial SiO(2) NPs and the CMP waste slurry containing SiO(2) NPs showed substantial stability in wastewater since this NP has a very low point of zero charge, which suggests that this NP could be the hardest one to remove in conventional WWTPs by aggregation-sedimentation. In summary, the results indicate that wastewater may destabilize NPs suspensions, which would facilitate NP removal in WWTPs. However, some chemicals present in real CMP slurries may counterbalance this effect. More research is needed to completely understand the surface chemistry involved.

  17. Physical-chemical pretreatment as an option for increased sustainability of municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mels, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Keywords : municipal wastewater treatment, physical-chemical pretreatment, chemically enhanced primary treatment, organic polymers, environmental sustainabilityMost of the currently applied municipal wastewater treatment plants in The Netherlands are based on the activated sludge process and include

  18. Tracing pharmaceuticals in a municipal plant for integrated wastewater and organic solid waste treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelic, Aleksandra; Fatone, Francesco; Di Fabio, Silvia; Petrovic, Mira; Cecchi, Franco; Barcelo, Damia

    2012-09-01

    The occurrence and removal of 42 pharmaceuticals, belonging to different therapeutic groups (analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-ulcer agent, psychiatric drugs, antiepileptic drug, antibiotics, ß-blockers, diuretics, lipid regulator and cholesterol lowering statin drugs and anti-histamines), were studied in the wastewater and sewage sludge trains of a full scale integrated treatment plant. The plant employs a biological nutrient removal (BNR) process for the treatment of municipal wastewater, and a single-stage mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion for the treatment of wasted activated sludge mixed with the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), followed by a short-cut nitrification-denitrification of the anaerobic supernatant in a sequential batch reactor. Influent and effluent wastewater, as well as thickened, digested and treated sludge were sampled and analyzed for the selected pharmaceuticals in order to study their presence and fate during the treatment. Twenty three compounds were detected in influent and effluent wastewater and eleven in sludge. Infiltration of groundwater in the sewer system led to a dilution of raw sewage, resulting in lower concentrations in wastewater (up to 0.7 μg/L in influent) and sludge (70 ng/g d.w.). Due to the dilution, overall risk quotient for the mixture of pharmaceuticals detected in effluent wastewater was less than one, indicating no direct risk for the aquatic environment. A wide range of removal efficiencies during the treatment was observed, i.e. <20% to 90%. The influent concentrations of the target pharmaceuticals, as polar compounds, were undoubtedly mostly affected by BNR process in the wastewater train, and less by anaerobic-co-digestion. Mass balance calculations showed that less than 2% of the total mass load of the studied pharmaceuticals was removed by sorption. Experimentally estimated distribution coefficients (<500 L/kg) also indicated that the selected pharmaceuticals preferably remain in

  19. Microbial-based evaluation of foaming events in full-scale wastewater treatment plants by microscopy survey and quantitative image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Cristiano; Amaral, António Luís; Costa, Maria de Lourdes

    2016-08-01

    Activated sludge systems are prone to be affected by foaming occurrences causing the sludge to rise in the reactor and affecting the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) performance. Nonetheless, there is currently a knowledge gap hindering the development of foaming events prediction tools that may be fulfilled by the quantitative monitoring of AS systems biota and sludge characteristics. As such, the present study focuses on the assessment of foaming events in full-scale WWTPs, by quantitative protozoa, metazoa, filamentous bacteria, and sludge characteristics analysis, further used to enlighten the inner relationships between these parameters. In the current study, a conventional activated sludge system (CAS) and an oxidation ditch (OD) were surveyed throughout a period of 2 and 3 months, respectively, regarding their biota and sludge characteristics. The biota community was monitored by microscopic observation, and a new filamentous bacteria index was developed to quantify their occurrence. Sludge characteristics (aggregated and filamentous biomass contents and aggregate size) were determined by quantitative image analysis (QIA). The obtained data was then processed by principal components analysis (PCA), cross-correlation analysis, and decision trees to assess the foaming occurrences, and enlighten the inner relationships. It was found that such events were best assessed by the combined use of the relative abundance of testate amoeba and nocardioform filamentous index, presenting a 92.9 % success rate for overall foaming events, and 87.5 and 100 %, respectively, for persistent and mild events.

  20. Disinfection of tertiary wastewater effluent prior to river discharge using peracetic acid; treatment efficiency and results on by-products formed in full scale tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Per Overgaard; Brodersen, Erling; Cecil, David

    2013-01-01

    This is an investigation of chemical disinfection, with peracetic acid (PAA), in a tertiary sand filter at a full scale activated sludge plant with nitrification/denitrification and P-removal. The reduction efficiency of Escherichia coli and intestinal enterococci in the sand filter is reported. E. coli log reductions of between 0.4 and 2.2 were found with contact times from 6 to 37 min and with dosing from 0 to 4.8 mg L(-1). The average log reduction was 1.3. The decomposition products, bromophenols, chlorophenols and formaldehyde and residual H2O2 were measured before and after the sand filter. The residual H2O2 concentration in the effluent was critical at short contact times and high dosages of PAA due to the discharge limit of 25 μg L(-1). The other three products could not be detected at 0.1 μg L(-1) levels. The chemical cost of PAA dosing is estimated to be 0.039 US$ m(-3) treated wastewater.

  1. Microbial diversity of a full-scale UASB reactor applied to poultry slaughterhouse wastewater treatment: integration of 16S rRNA gene amplicon and shotgun metagenomic sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delforno, Tiago Palladino; Lacerda Júnior, Gileno Vieira; Noronha, Melline F; Sakamoto, Isabel K; Varesche, Maria Bernadete A; Oliveira, Valéria M

    2017-02-23

    The 16S rRNA gene amplicon and whole-genome shotgun metagenomic (WGSM) sequencing approaches were used to investigate wide-spectrum profiles of microbial composition and metabolic diversity from a full-scale UASB reactor applied to poultry slaughterhouse wastewater treatment. The data were generated by using MiSeq 2 × 250 bp and HiSeq 2 × 150 bp Illumina sequencing platforms for 16S amplicon and WGSM sequencing, respectively. Each approach revealed a distinct microbial community profile, with Pseudomonas and Psychrobacter as predominant genus for the WGSM dataset and Clostridium and Methanosaeta for the 16S rRNA gene amplicon dataset. The virome characterization revealed the presence of two viral families with Bacteria and Archaea as host, Myoviridae, and Siphoviridae. A wide functional diversity was found with predominance of genes involved in the metabolism of acetone, butanol, and ethanol synthesis; and one-carbon metabolism (e.g., methanogenesis). Genes related to the acetotrophic methanogenesis pathways were more abundant than methylotrophic and hydrogenotrophic, corroborating the taxonomic results that showed the prevalence of the acetotrophic genus Methanosaeta. Moreover, the dataset indicated a variety of metabolic genes involved in sulfur, nitrogen, iron, and phosphorus cycles, with many genera able to act in all cycles. BLAST analysis against Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database (ARDB) revealed that microbial community contained 43 different types of antibiotic resistance genes, some of them were associated with growth chicken promotion (e.g., bacitracin, tetracycline, and polymyxin).

  2. Evaluation of a coagulation/flocculation-lamellar clarifier and filtration-UV-chlorination reactor for removing emerging contaminants at full-scale wastewater treatment plants in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros, Víctor; Salvadó, Victòria

    2013-03-15

    The presence and elimination of 25 emerging contaminants in two full-scale Spanish wastewater treatment plants was studied. The tertiary treatment systems consisted of coagulation, flocculation lamellar settlement and filtration (pulsed-bed sand filters) units, and disinfection was carried out by medium pressure UV light lamps and chlorination. Diclofenac and carbamazepine were found to be the emerging contaminants with the highest concentrations in secondary effluents. Photodegradable emerging contaminants (e.g. ketoprofen, triclosan and diclofenac) were removed by filtration-UV light radiation-chlorination whereas most hydrophobic compounds (e.g. galaxolide and tonalide) were eliminated by coagulation-flocculation followed by lamellar clarification, a unit in which a seasonal trend was observed. Overall mass removal efficiency was about 60%. 1-(8-Chlorocarbazolyl) acetic acid, an intermediate product of the photodegradation of diclofenac, was detected after filtration-UV-chlorination, but not after coagulation-flocculation and lamellar clarification. This study demonstrated potential for general applicability of two established tertiary treatment systems to eliminate emerging contaminants.

  3. Increased biogas production in a wastewater treatment plant by anaerobic co-digestion of fruit and vegetable waste and sewer sludge - a full scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nathan D; Thring, Ronald W; Garton, Randy P; Rutherford, Michael P; Helle, Steve S

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a well established technology for the reduction of organic matter and stabilization of wastewater. Biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide, is produced as a useful by-product of the process. Current solid waste management at the city of Prince George is focused on disposal of waste and not on energy recovery. Co-digestion of fresh fruit and vegetable waste with sewer sludge can improve biogas yield by increasing the load of biodegradable material. A six week full-scale project co-digesting almost 15,000 kg of supermarket waste was completed. Average daily biogas production was found to be significantly higher than in previous years. Digester operation remained stable over the course of the study as indicated by the consistently low volatile acids-to-alkalinity ratio. Undigested organic material was visible in centrifuged sludge suggesting that the waste should have been added to the primary digester to prevent short circuiting and to increase the hydraulic retention time of the freshly added waste.

  4. Use of Ionizing Radiation Technology for Treating Municipal Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas R. Al-Khalidy

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In big cities, the cost of treating wastewater is increasing with more stringent environmental requirements. Ionizing radiation technology for treating municipal wastewater may be an alternative to reduce treatment costs. In this paper, laboratory tests were carried out using different doses of radiation to treat wastewater samples collected from the AL-Rustamia wastewater treatment plant in Baghdad city. According to the results, irradiation by gamma radiation with a dose ranging from 100 to 500 krad was efficient in reducing some of the physical contaminants. The organic contaminants were degraded and reduced to about 12% of their original concentrations. Generally, irradiation technology could effectively modify the characteristics of the wastewater to such levels that are compatible with Iraqi disposal standards. The results of the study also showed that, an experimental pilot plant study is required to optimize the cost of wastewater treatment through the use of this technology.

  5. Microbiological analysis of municipal wastewater treating photobioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Krustok, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae reactors, commonly known as photobioreactors, have become increasingly popular as an alternative for wastewater treatment. These systems reduce pollutants and remove nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous compounds from wastewater utilizing microalgae and bacteria. The biomass produced in the reactors can potentially be used to produce biofuels and decrease some of the energy demands of the process. Wastewater treating photobioreactors are a relatively new technology and many a...

  6. Characteristics of integrated biological aerated filter in municipal wastewater treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qiang; ZHANG Yu-ping; XU Jian-bin

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristics of integrated biological aerated filter (IBAF) applied to municipal wastewater treatment were studied in a pilot scale experiment. The experimental results showed that IBAF has high efficiencies in removing organic pollutants, such as CODCr and SS, in municipal wastewater. The removal rates of CODCr and SS can reach over 90% and 80%, respectively, when COD and SS in the influent are 234 mg L-1 and 112 mg L-1, hydraulic retention time (HRT) is 8 h, and the aerated intensity is in the range of (0.5 to 0.6) L m-2 s-1.

  7. Removal of Alkylphenols from Industrial and Municipal Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Derco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of the study of removal of nonylphenol, octylphenol and their ethoxylates from real industrial and municipal wastewater are presented. Industrial wastewater was pre-treated by coagulation with FeCl3 and adsorption on zeolite, before discharging into municipal sewer system. Their removal efficiencies in primary sedimentation tank of municipal WWTP were very low. From the practical point of view, the highest and the most significant removal efficiencies within the whole WWTP were observed for nonylphenol and nonylphenol ethoxylates. Dominancy of abiotic mechanisms of alkylphenols removal follows from adsorption measurements. Activated sludge cultivated in lab-scale extended aeration tank accounted for relatively high adsorption affinity to these substances. Activated sludge sampled from municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP receiving industrial wastewater containing alkylphenols accounted for very low adsorption affinity to these pollutants. Significantly higher removal efficiency of octylphenol ethoxylates was observed with the O3/granular active carbon (GAC process compared to the ozonation process alone. Lower toxicity impact of intermediates and products of ozonation treatment on Vibrio fischeri was measured in comparison to the O3/GAC process. Actually, the municipal WWTP effluent discharge concentration values complies with EQS values, including nonylphenols.

  8. Agricultural use of treated municipal wastewaters preserving environmental sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Rubino

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the utility of the treated municipal wastewaters in agriculture, analyzing the chemical, physical and microbiological characteristics and their pollution indicators evaluation are being illustrated. Some methods employed for treating wastewaters are examined, as well as instructions and rules actually in force in different countries of the world, for evaluating the legislative hygienic and sanitary and agronomic problems connected with the treated wastewaters use, are being collected and compared. Successively, in order to provide useful indications for the use of treated municipal wastewaters, results of long-term field researches, carried out in Puglia, regarding two types of waters (treated municipal wastewater and conventional water and two irrigation methods (drip and capillary sub-irrigation on vegetable crops grown in succession, are being reported. For each crop cycle, chemical physical and microbiological analyses have been performed on irrigation water, soil and crop samples. The results evidenced that although irrigating with waters having high colimetric values, higher than those indicated by law and with two different irrigation methods, never soil and marketable yield pollutions have been observed. Moreover, the probability to take infection and/or disease for ingestion of fruits coming from crops irrigated with treated wastewaters, calculated by Beta-Poisson method, resulted negligible and equal to 1 person for 100 millions of exposed people. Concentrations of heavy metals in soil and crops were lesser than those admissible by law. The free chlorine, coming from disinfection, found in the wastewaters used for watering, in some cases caused toxicity effects, which determined significant yield decreases. Therefore, municipal wastewaters, if well treated, can be used for irrigation representing a valid alternative to the conventional ones.

  9. Optimum municipal wastewater treatment plant design with consideration of uncertainty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Guang-ming; LIN Yu-peng; QIN Xiao-sheng; HUANG Guo-he; LI Jian-bing; JIANG Ru

    2004-01-01

    A newly developed model for the optimum municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) design is presented. Through introducing the interval variables, the model attempts to consider the effects of uncertainties caused by the fluctuation of the wastewater quality and quantity during the design of MWTP. The model solution procedure is illustrated in detail, and a numerical example is given to verify the feasibility and advantage of the model. Furthermore, the possibility of the model application is briefly outlined.

  10. Communities of microalgae and bacteria in photobioreactors treating municipal wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Krustok, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Everyone who uses water produces wastewater. This inevitability creates several problems that increase with the growth of the population and industry. What to do with the wastewater, how to purify it and how to design the infrastructure are all important questions that each municipality has to deal with, taking into account ever growing demands to reduce environmental impact. In these conditions scientists and engineers have turned to biological processes to help treat the water. Currently th...

  11. MANUAL - CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS TREATMENT OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constructed wetlands are man-made wastewater treatment systems. They usually have one or more cells less than 1 meter deep and are planted with aquatic greenery. Water outlet structures control the flow of wastewater through the system to keep detention times and water levels at ...

  12. Dutch analysis for P-recovery from municipal wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeleveld, Paul; Loeffen, Patricia; Temmink, Hardy; Klapwijk, Bram

    2003-07-01

    There is a considerable practical interest in phosphorus recovery from water authorities, elementary P-industry, fertilizer industry and regulators in a number of countries. Due to a handful of full-scale plants worldwide, P-recovery can be seen as technically feasible. However, the economic feasibility of P-recovery from sewage can still be judged as dubious. Most important reason for this is that the prices of the techniques (in Euro/tonne P) are much higher compared to the prices of phosphate rock. In this paper an analysis is given to recover phosphate from municipal wastewater for the elementary P-industry Thermphos International B.V. and the fertiliser industry Amsterdam Fertilizers B.V. in The Netherlands. Several scenarios are evaluated and the end products of these scenarios are compared to the quality required by both industries. From a Dutch study it became clear that all end products from the final sludge treatment do not provide a good source of secondary phosphate. As a consequence of this, the most preferred possibility for P-recovery is to extract phosphate before sludge goes to the final sludge treatment. Different scenario's can be selected based on the position of P-recovery in the WWTP configuration, the type of P-recovery product, and the precipitation technique. Local conditions will determine which scenario is the most expedient. Because it is more realistic to judge a practical situation instead of theoretical estimations based on literature, some local situations have to be assessed in sufficient detail to gain more feeling for the expenses and possible savings of P-recovery. One important actor that should be involved in the process management around P-recovery, is the national government. Especially they have the responsibility for a sustainable development and should have attention for some stimulation of P-recovery in The Netherlands. Water authorities and the P- and fertilizer industry made already some good steps. (author)

  13. A Critical Assessment of the Microorganisms Proposed to be Important to Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal in Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; McIlroy, Simon J.; Nierychlo, Marta; Karst, Søren M.; Albertsen, Mads; Nielsen, Per H.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the microbiology of phosphorus (P) removal is considered essential to knowledge-based optimization of enhanced biological P removal (EBPR) systems. Biological P removal is achieved in these systems by promoting the growth of organisms collectively known as the polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Also considered important to EBPR are the glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs), which are theorized to compete with the PAOs for resources at the expense of P removal efficiency. Numerous studies have sought to identify the PAOs and their GAOs competitors, with several candidates proposed for each over the last few decades. The current study collectively assessed the abundance and diversity of all proposed PAOs and GAOs in 18 Danish full-scale wastewater treatment plants with well-working biological nutrient removal over a period of 9 years using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. The microbial community structure in all plants was relatively stable over time. Evidence for the role of the proposed PAOs and GAOs in EBPR varies and is critically assessed, in light of their calculated amplicon abundances, to indicate which of these are important in full-scale systems. Bacteria from the genus Tetrasphaera were the most abundant of the PAOs. The “Candidatus Accumulibacter” PAOs were in much lower abundance and appear to be biased by the amplicon-based method applied. The genera Dechloromonas, Microlunatus, and Tessaracoccus were identified as abundant putative PAO that require further research attention. Interestingly, the actinobacterial Micropruina and sbr-gs28 phylotypes were among the most abundant of the putative GAOs. Members of the genera Defluviicoccus, Propionivibrio, the family Competibacteraceae, and the spb280 group were also relatively abundant in some plants. Despite observed high abundances of GAOs (periodically exceeding 20% of the amplicon reads), P removal performance was maintained, indicating that these organisms were not

  14. A Critical Assessment of the Microorganisms Proposed to be Important to Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal in Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per H. Nielsen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the microbiology of phosphorus (P removal is considered essential to knowledge-based optimization of enhanced biological P removal (EBPR systems. Biological P removal is achieved in these systems by promoting the growth of organisms collectively known as the polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs. Also considered important to EBPR are the glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs, which are theorized to compete with the PAOs for resources at the expense of P removal efficiency. Numerous studies have sought to identify the PAOs and their GAOs competitors, with several candidates proposed for each over the last few decades. The current study collectively assessed the abundance and diversity of all proposed PAOs and GAOs in 18 Danish full-scale wastewater treatment plants with well-working biological nutrient removal over a period of 9 years using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. The microbial community structure in all plants was relatively stable over time. Evidence for the role of the proposed PAOs and GAOs in EBPR varies and is critically assessed, in light of their calculated amplicon abundances, to indicate which of these are important in full-scale systems. Bacteria from the genus Tetrasphaera were the most abundant of the PAOs. The “Candidatus Accumulibacter” PAOs were in much lower abundance and appear to be biased by the amplicon-based method applied. The genera Dechloromonas, Microlunatus, and Tessaracoccus were identified as abundant putative PAO that require further research attention. Interestingly, the actinobacterial Micropruina and sbr-gs28 phylotypes were among the most abundant of the putative GAOs. Members of the genera Defluviicoccus, Propionivibrio, the family Competibacteraceae, and the spb280 group were also relatively abundant in some plants. Despite observed high abundances of GAOs (periodically exceeding 20% of the amplicon reads, P removal performance was maintained, indicating that these organisms

  15. A Critical Assessment of the Microorganisms Proposed to be Important to Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal in Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; McIlroy, Simon J; Nierychlo, Marta; Karst, Søren M; Albertsen, Mads; Nielsen, Per H

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the microbiology of phosphorus (P) removal is considered essential to knowledge-based optimization of enhanced biological P removal (EBPR) systems. Biological P removal is achieved in these systems by promoting the growth of organisms collectively known as the polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Also considered important to EBPR are the glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs), which are theorized to compete with the PAOs for resources at the expense of P removal efficiency. Numerous studies have sought to identify the PAOs and their GAOs competitors, with several candidates proposed for each over the last few decades. The current study collectively assessed the abundance and diversity of all proposed PAOs and GAOs in 18 Danish full-scale wastewater treatment plants with well-working biological nutrient removal over a period of 9 years using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. The microbial community structure in all plants was relatively stable over time. Evidence for the role of the proposed PAOs and GAOs in EBPR varies and is critically assessed, in light of their calculated amplicon abundances, to indicate which of these are important in full-scale systems. Bacteria from the genus Tetrasphaera were the most abundant of the PAOs. The "Candidatus Accumulibacter" PAOs were in much lower abundance and appear to be biased by the amplicon-based method applied. The genera Dechloromonas, Microlunatus, and Tessaracoccus were identified as abundant putative PAO that require further research attention. Interestingly, the actinobacterial Micropruina and sbr-gs28 phylotypes were among the most abundant of the putative GAOs. Members of the genera Defluviicoccus, Propionivibrio, the family Competibacteraceae, and the spb280 group were also relatively abundant in some plants. Despite observed high abundances of GAOs (periodically exceeding 20% of the amplicon reads), P removal performance was maintained, indicating that these organisms were not outcompeting

  16. Evaluation of direct membrane filtration and direct forward osmosis as concepts for compact and energy-positive municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Tobias; Bajraktari, Niada; Davidsson, Åsa; Vogel, Jörg; Madsen, Henrik Tækker; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; Jansen, Jes la Cour; Jönsson, Karin

    2017-02-22

    Municipal wastewater treatment commonly involves mechanical, biological and chemical treatment steps to protect humans and the environment from adverse effects. Membrane technology has gained increasing attention as an alternative to conventional wastewater treatment due to increased urbanization. Among the available membrane technologies, microfiltration and forward osmosis have been selected for this study due to their specific characteristics, such as compactness and efficient removal of particles. In this study, two treatment concepts were evaluated with regard to their specific electricity, energy and area demands. Both concepts would fulfil the Swedish discharge demands for small and medium-sized wastewater treatment plants at full scale: 1) direct microfiltration and 2) direct forward osmosis with seawater as the draw solution. The framework of this study is based on a combination of data obtained from bench- and pilot-scale experiments applying direct microfiltration and forward osmosis, respectively. Additionally, available complementary data from a Swedish full-scale wastewater treatment plant and the literature were used to evaluate the concepts in depth. The results of this study indicate that both concepts are net positive with respect to electricity and energy, as more biogas can be produced compared to conventional wastewater treatment. Furthermore, the specific area demand is significantly reduced. This study demonstrates that municipal wastewater could be treated in a more energy- and area-efficient manner with techniques that are already commercially available and with future membrane technology.

  17. Cost of phosphate removal in municipal wastewater treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuessler, H.

    1983-01-01

    Construction and operating costs of advanced wastewater treatment for phosphate removal at municipal wastewater treatment plants have been investigated on orders from the Federal Environmental Bureau in Berlin. Particular attention has been paid to applicable kinds of precipitants for pre-, simultaneous and post-precipitation as well as to different phosphate influent and effluent concentrations. The article offers detailed comments on determination of technical data, investments, capital costs, operating costs and annual costs as well as potential cost reductions resulting from precipitation. Selected results of the cost investigation are shown in graphical form as specific investments, operating and annual costs depending on wastewater flow.

  18. Production of lightweight aggregates from coal fly ash and municipal wastewater sludge; Produktion af letvaegtsklinker paa baggrund af aske med et hoejt restkulindhold og spildevandsslam fra kommunale rensningsanlaeg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    The municipalities have difficulties in disposing the wastewater sludge. To use wastewater sludge in agriculture limit values for the content of hazardous substanceshave have been established. These limit values have been tightened in 2000, and the municipalities therefore need alternative ways of disposal. Wastewater sludge combusted in solid waste incineration plants will result in slag corresponding to 40-45% solid matter, mainly sand. Wastewater sludge used as additive in production of light clinkers, gives 100% utilization of the sludge. This project uses wet wastewater sludge, which means that the municipalities do not need to invest in new natural gas fired drying plants. USA has for many years had a similar production, and in Denmark Aalborg Portland Cement uses 7.500 tons of wastewater sludges (100% solid matter) annually in the cement production. Satisfactory laboratory tests and full scale tests on a Danish plant, Hingevaerket, is carried out. For the full scale tests about 40 tons of sludge and about 30 tons of coal fly ash were used. Washing out tests with the new light clinkers have been carried out, and the result was acceptable. Furthermore, the flue gas was analysed for content of mercury before and after the full scale test. Thus there are no insoluble technical problems in relation to addition of wastewater sludge and coal fly ash. (EHS)

  19. Particle related fractionation and characterisation of municipal wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, van A.F.; Graaf, van der J.H.J.M.; Kampschreur, M.J.; Mels, A.R.

    2004-01-01

    Several studies show that a more detailed characterisation of the particulate matter in municipal wastewater gives a better understanding and prediction of removal efficiencies of physical-chemical treatment techniques and the application of optimal chemical dosages. Such a characterisation should i

  20. Particle related fractionation and characterisation of municipal wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, van A.F.; Graaf, van der J.H.J.M.; Kampschreur, M.J.; Mels, A.R.

    2004-01-01

    Several studies show that a more detailed characterisation of the particulate matter in municipal wastewater gives a better understanding and prediction of removal efficiencies of physical-chemical treatment techniques and the application of optimal chemical dosages. Such a characterisation should

  1. Removal of micropollutants in municipal wastewater treatment plants by powder-activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehler, M; Zwickenpflug, B; Hollender, J; Ternes, T; Joss, A; Siegrist, H

    2012-01-01

    Micropollutants (MP) are only partly removed from municipal wastewater by nutrient removal plants and are seen increasingly as a threat to aquatic ecosystems and to the safety of drinking water resources. The addition of powder activated carbon (PAC) is a promising technology to complement municipal nutrient removal plants in order to achieve a significant reduction of MPs and ecotoxicity in receiving waters. This paper presents the salient outcomes of pilot- and full-scale applications of PAC addition in different flow schemes for micropollutant removal in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The sorption efficiency of PAC is reduced with increasing dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Adequate treatment of secondary effluent with 5-10 g DOC m(-3) requires 10-20 g PAC m(-3) of effluent. Counter-current use of PAC by recycling waste PAC from post-treatment in a contact tank with an additional clarifier to the biology tank improved the overall MP removal by 10 to 50% compared with effluent PAC application alone. A dosage of 15 g PAC m(-3) to a full-scale flocculation sand filtration system and recycling the backwash water to the biology tank showed similar MP elimination. Due to an adequate mixing regime and the addition of adapted flocculants, a good retention of the fine fraction of the PAC in the deep-bed filter were observed (1-3 g TSS m(-3); TSS: total suspended solids). With double use of PAC, only half of the PAC was required to reach MP removal efficiencies similar to the direct single dosage of PAC to the biology tank. Overall, the application of PAC in WWTPs seems to be an adequate and feasible technology for efficient MP elimination (>80%) from wastewater comparable with post ozonation.

  2. Characteristics and Biodegradability of Wastewater Organic Matter in Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants Collecting Domestic Wastewater and Industrial Discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Yun-Young Choi; Seung-Ryong Baek; Jae-In Kim; Jeong-Woo Choi; Jin Hur; Tae-U Lee; Cheol-Joon Park; Byung Joon Lee

    2017-01-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Korea collect and treat not only domestic wastewater, but also discharge from industrial complexes. However, some industrial discharges contain a large amount of non-biodegradable organic matter, which cannot be treated properly in a conventional biological WWTP. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics and biodegradability of the wastewater organic matter contained in the industrial discharges and to examine the fate of the industri...

  3. Developing Anammox for mainstream municipal wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lotti, T

    2016-01-01

    Conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), like activated sludge systems, are energy demanding requiring a large electrical energy supply (e.g. 25 kWh PE-1 year-1) which, especially during peak-load periods, may account for an important quote of the grid installed power of the surrounding area. Only across the EU, there are 16000 WWTPs that consume around 10000 GWh year-1 of electricity. Furthermore, the volume of wastewater treated in WWTPs in the EU is increasing with a rate of aroun...

  4. Successional development of biofilms in moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kristi; Taylor, Michael W; Turner, Susan J

    2014-02-01

    Biofilm-based technologies, such as moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems, are widely used to treat wastewater. Biofilm development is important for MBBR systems as much of the microbial biomass is retained within reactors as biofilm on suspended carriers. Little is known about this process of biofilm development and the microorganisms upon which MBBRs rely. We documented successional changes in microbial communities as biofilms established in two full-scale MBBR systems treating municipal wastewater over two seasons. 16S rRNA gene-targeted pyrosequencing and clone libraries were used to describe microbial communities. These data indicate a successional process that commences with the establishment of an aerobic community dominated by Gammaproteobacteria (up to 52 % of sequences). Over time, this community shifts towards dominance by putatively anaerobic organisms including Deltaproteobacteria and Clostridiales. Significant differences were observed between the two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), mostly due to a large number of sequences (up to 55 %) representing Epsilonproteobacteria (mostly Arcobacter) at one site. Archaea in young biofilms included several lineages of Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. In contrast, the mature biofilm consisted entirely of Methanosarcinaceae (Euryarchaeota). This study provides new insights into the community structure of developing biofilms at full-scale WWTPs and provides the basis for optimizing MBBR start-up and operational parameters.

  5. Developing Anammox for mainstream municipal wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lotti, T.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), like activated sludge systems, are energy demanding requiring a large electrical energy supply (e.g. 25 kWh PE-1 year-1) which, especially during peak-load periods, may account for an important quote of the grid installed power of the surrounding are

  6. Developing Anammox for mainstream municipal wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lotti, T.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), like activated sludge systems, are energy demanding requiring a large electrical energy supply (e.g. 25 kWh PE-1 year-1) which, especially during peak-load periods, may account for an important quote of the grid installed power of the surrounding

  7. Municipal-wastewater treatment using upflow-anaerobic filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manariotis, loannis D; Grigoropoulos, Sotirios G

    2006-03-01

    Three 12.5-L upflow-anaerobic filters (AF), with ceramic-saddle, plastic-ring, and crushed-stone packing, were used to evaluate the sustained treatment of municipal wastewater. The reactors were initially fed dogfood-fortified wastewater and then raw municipal wastewater, and operated at 25.4 degrees C (32 months) and 15.5 degrees C (2 months). During 23 months, the AF units treated municipal wastewater (mean chemical oxygen demand [COD] 442 mg/L and total suspended solids [TSS] 247 mg/L), the hydraulic retention time (HRT) ranged from 3.1 to 0.30 d (empty bed), and the organic loading rate ranged from 0.115 to 1.82 kg COD/m3d. At the higher temperature and an HRT (void volume) of 1.0 d, COD and TSS removals ranged from 74 to 79% and 95 to 96%, respectively; however, efficiencies declined substantially at HRT values less than 0.4 d. Reactor performance, under the same hydraulic and organic loadings, deteriorated with time and was adversely affected by lower temperature.

  8. Integrated production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) with municipal wastewater and sludge treatment at pilot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Sagastume, F; Hjort, M; Cirne, D; Gérardin, F; Lacroix, S; Gaval, G; Karabegovic, L; Alexandersson, T; Johansson, P; Karlsson, A; Bengtsson, S; Arcos-Hernández, M V; Magnusson, P; Werker, A

    2015-04-01

    A pilot-scale process was operated over 22 months at the Brussels North Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) in order to evaluate polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production integration with services of municipal wastewater and sludge management. Activated sludge was produced with PHA accumulation potential (PAP) by applying feast-famine selection while treating the readily biodegradable COD from influent wastewater (average removals of 70% COD, 60% CODsol, 24% nitrogen, and 46% phosphorus). The biomass PAP was evaluated to be in excess of 0.4gPHA/gVSS. Batch fermentation of full-scale WWTP sludge at selected temperatures (35, 42 and 55 °C) produced centrate (6-9.4 gCODVFA/L) of consistent VFA composition, with optimal fermentation performance at 42 °C. Centrate was used to accumulate PHA up to 0.39 gPHA/gVSS. The centrate nutrients are a challenge to the accumulation process but producing a biomass with 0.5 gPHA/gVSS is considered to be realistically achievable within the typically available carbon flows at municipal waste management facilities.

  9. Tracing pharmaceuticals in a municipal plant for integrated wastewater and organic solid waste treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelic, Aleksandra [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA), Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Fatone, Francesco; Di Fabio, Silvia [Department of Biotechnology, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, I-37134, Verona (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium ' Chemistry for the Environment' (INCA), Via delle Industrie, I-30135, Marghera-Venice (Italy); Petrovic, Mira, E-mail: mpetrovic@icra.cat [Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Passeig Lluis Companys 23, 80010 Barcelona (Spain); Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), H2O Building, Scientific and Technological Park of the University of Girona, 101-E-17003 Girona (Spain); Cecchi, Franco [Department of Biotechnology, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, I-37134, Verona (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium ' Chemistry for the Environment' (INCA), Via delle Industrie, I-30135, Marghera-Venice (Italy); Barcelo, Damia [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA), Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), H2O Building, Scientific and Technological Park of the University of Girona, 101-E-17003 Girona (Spain)

    2012-09-01

    The occurrence and removal of 42 pharmaceuticals, belonging to different therapeutic groups (analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-ulcer agent, psychiatric drugs, antiepileptic drug, antibiotics, ss-blockers, diuretics, lipid regulator and cholesterol lowering statin drugs and anti-histamines), were studied in the wastewater and sewage sludge trains of a full scale integrated treatment plant. The plant employs a biological nutrient removal (BNR) process for the treatment of municipal wastewater, and a single-stage mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion for the treatment of wasted activated sludge mixed with the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), followed by a short-cut nitrification-denitrification of the anaerobic supernatant in a sequential batch reactor. Influent and effluent wastewater, as well as thickened, digested and treated sludge were sampled and analyzed for the selected pharmaceuticals in order to study their presence and fate during the treatment. Twenty three compounds were detected in influent and effluent wastewater and eleven in sludge. Infiltration of groundwater in the sewer system led to a dilution of raw sewage, resulting in lower concentrations in wastewater (up to 0.7 {mu}g/L in influent) and sludge (70 ng/g d.w.). Due to the dilution, overall risk quotient for the mixture of pharmaceuticals detected in effluent wastewater was less than one, indicating no direct risk for the aquatic environment. A wide range of removal efficiencies during the treatment was observed, i.e. < 20% to 90%. The influent concentrations of the target pharmaceuticals, as polar compounds, were undoubtedly mostly affected by BNR process in the wastewater train, and less by anaerobic-co-digestion. Mass balance calculations showed that less than 2% of the total mass load of the studied pharmaceuticals was removed by sorption. Experimentally estimated distribution coefficients (< 500 L/kg) also indicated that the selected pharmaceuticals preferably remain

  10. Analysis of Microbial Community Structure at Full-scale Wastewater Treatment Plants by Oxidation Ditch%城市污水处理厂氧化沟工艺微生物种群分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭云; 杨殿海; 卢文健

    2012-01-01

    应用荧光原位杂交技术(fluorescent in situ hybridization,FISH)对我国北方某城市污水处理厂氧化沟工艺中的微生物进行种群分析,考察系统活性污泥中聚磷菌(phosphorus accumulating organisms,PAOs)和聚糖原菌(glycogen accumulatingorganisms,GAOs)的种群结构特点及其空间分布变化关系.结果表明,厌氧池、氧化沟缺氧区和好氧区中PAOs占全菌百分比分别为2.0%±0.6%、3.4%±0.6%和3.5%±1.2%;GAOs所占全菌百分比分别为25.3%±8.7%、30.3%±7.1%和24.4%±6.1%.该厂氧化沟工艺PAOs含量低于已报道其他脱氮除磷系统水平(7%~22%),其除磷性能较差.数据统计分析显示,氧化沟缺氧、好氧区中PAOs含量相对于厌氧池有显著上升,而GAOs含量沿程变化不大.%The microbial populations of the oxidation ditch process at the full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants(WWTP) in a city in north China were analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization(FISH).Fractions structure varieties and distribution characteristics of Accumulibacter as potential phosphorus accumulating organisms(PAOs),and Competibacter as potential glycogen accumulating organisms(GAOs) were quantified.The results indicated that Accumulibacter comprised around 2.0%±0.6%,3.4%±0.6% and 3.5%±1.2% of the total biomass in the anaerobic tank,anoxic zone and zone,respectively,while the corresponding values for Competibacter were 25.3%±8.7%,30.3%±7.1% and 24.4%±6.1%.Lower Accumulibacter fractions were found compared with previous full-scale reports(7%-22%),indicating low phosphorus removal efficiency in the oxidation ditch system.Statistical analysis indicated that the amount of PAOs was significantly higher in the anoxic zone and the aerobic zone compared with that in the anaerobic tank,while GAOs remained at the same level.

  11. Aerobic digestion reduces the quantity of antibiotic resistance genes in residual municipal wastewater solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucker R Burch

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous initiatives have been undertaken to circumvent the problem of antibiotic resistance, including the development of new antibiotics, the use of narrow spectrum antibiotics, and the reduction of inappropriate antibiotic use. We propose an alternative but complimentary approach to reduce antibiotic resistant bacteria by implementing more stringent technologies for treating municipal wastewater, which is known to contain large quantities of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs. In this study, we investigated the ability of conventional aerobic digestion to reduce the quantity of ARGs in untreated wastewater solids. A bench-scale aerobic digester was fed untreated wastewater solids collected from a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment facility. The reactor was operated under semi-continuous flow conditions for more than 200 days at a residence time of approximately 40 days. During this time, the quantities of tet(A, tet(W, and erm(B decreased by more than 90%. In contrast, intI1 did not decrease, and tet(X increased in quantity by 5-fold. Following operation in semi-continuous flow mode, the aerobic digester was converted to batch mode to determine the first-order decay coefficients, with half-lives ranging from as short as 2.8 days for tet(W to as long as 6.3 days for intI1. These results demonstrated that aerobic digestion can be used to reduce the quantity of antibiotic resistance genes in untreated wastewater solids, but that rates can vary substantially depending on the reactor design (i.e., batch versus continuous-flow and the specific ARG.

  12. Study of microbial community structures in UASB sludge treating municipal wastewater by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; Sunny Aiyuk; XU Hui; CHEN Guanxiong; Willy Verstraete

    2005-01-01

    The structures of microbial communities in lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors for treating municipal wastewater with different ratios of COD soluble/COD total were studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes.The microbial structure of the inoculum sludge obtained from a full-scale UASB reactor of treating potato processing wastewater was compared with the structures of sludges collected from three lab-scale UASB reactors after eight months feeding with raw municipal wastewater, with CEPS (chemically enhanced primary sedimentation) pretreated municipal wastewater, and with a synthetic municipal sewage, respectively. Computer-aided numerical analysis of the DGGE fingerprints showed that the bacterial community underwent major changes. The sludges for treating raw and CEPS pretreated wastewater had very similar bacterial and archaeal communities (82%and 96% similarity) but were different from that for treating the synthetic sewage. Hence, despite similar % COD in the particulate form in the synthetic and the real wastewater, the two wastewaters were selected for different microbial communities. Prominent DGGE bands of Bacteria and Archaea were purified and sequenced. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the dominant archaeal bands found in the inoculum, and UASB sludge fed with raw sewage, CEPS pretreated wastewater, and synthetic sewage were closely associated with Methanosaeta concilii. In the UASB sludge fed with synthetic sewage, another dominant band associated with an uncultured archaeon 39-2 was found together with M. concilii.

  13. Removal of suspended solids from municipal wastewater using geotextile columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, M.H. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, Texas (United States); Kotha, K.K. [Hillis-Carnes Inc., Manassas, VA (United States)

    2002-06-15

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to investigate the filtration behavior of geotextiles to remove suspended solids from municipal wastewater. Four nonwoven geotextiles were used in this preliminary investigation. The study also involved evaluating the suspended solids removal efficiency and regeneration potential of geotextiles for using as filter media. Wastewater samples were collected from the local wastewater treatment plant. Influent and effluent suspended solids concentration, chemical oxygen demand, and effluent flow rates were monitored during the tests. During filtration tests, suspended solids were retained on the upstream face and within the geotextile as wastewater passed through it. Due to the formation of a thin layer of suspended solids or filter cake on the upstream face of the geotextile, the effluent flow rate and suspended solids concentration decreased exponentially with time. When the effluent flow rate reduced below 90%, the filter media was backwashed to restore its filtering efficiency, for reuse. Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that using geotextile columns, it was possible to remove 50 to 70% of suspended solids and decrease in chemical oxygen demand from 70 to 90% from the influent. This technique may be suitable for treating wastewater streams with low inflow and suspended solids concentrations, preferably in the range of 100 to 200 mg/L. The technique may be further evaluated for determining its suitability for treatment of wastewater generated from less populated areas and as a polishing step after secondary treatment. (author)

  14. Dissecting microbial community structure and methane-producing pathways of a full-scale anaerobic reactor digesting activated sludge from wastewater treatment by metagenomic sequencing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guo, Jianhua; Peng, Yongzhen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Han, Xiaoyu; Fan, Lu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied to treat the waste activated sludge from biological wastewater treatment and produce methane for biofuel, which has been one of the most efficient solutions...

  15. Countermeasures of Reclaimed Municipal Wastewater for Safety of Agricultural Use in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Rong-guang; PENG Sheng-wei; WANG Yue-hua; ZHANG Hao; ZHAO Yu-jie; LIU Feng-zhi; ZHOU Qi-xing

    2008-01-01

    China is facing a severe water resource crisis, and the shortage of water for agricultural consumption is a prominent problem. Irrigation with reclaimed municipal wastewater that can reach the agricultural recycling standards is an important way to deal with water shortage in agricultural production. Owing to the complex sources of municipal wastewater, there are multifarious pollutants in municipal wastewater. Improper use of wastewater can cause potential risks to ago-environment, agricultural products safety, and human health. This article deals with the current situation and the development prospects of reclaimed wastewater for agricultural use in China and abroad; the potential risks to human health and environmental pollution from the reclaimed municipal wastewater for agricultural reuse are also discussed. And some countermeasures and advices of reclaimed municipal wastewater for safety of agricultural reuse are provided.

  16. Wastewater Treatment Anaerobic Digester Foaming Prevention and Control Methods - Literature Review and Survey - Full-Scale Studies (WERF Report INFR1SG10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project addresses the issue of anaerobic digester (AD) foaming in different water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs). This two-volume report is a compilation of an AD foaming literature review, a plant survey, and findings from full-scale studies. The literature review hel...

  17. Wastewater Treatment Anaerobic Digester Foaming Prevention and Control Methods - Literature Review and Survey - Full-Scale Studies (WERF Report INFR1SG10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project addresses the issue of anaerobic digester (AD) foaming in different water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs). This two-volume report is a compilation of an AD foaming literature review, a plant survey, and findings from full-scale studies. The literature review hel...

  18. Mathematical modeling of MSW combustion and SNCR in a full-scale municipal incinerator and effects of grate speed and oxygen-enriched atmospheres on operating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zengying; Ma, Xiaoqian

    2010-12-01

    The rising popularity of incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) calls for detailed mathematical modeling and accurate prediction of pollutant emissions. In this paper, mathematical modeling methods for both solid and gaseous phases were employed to simulate the operation of a 450 t/d MSW-burning incinerator to obtain detailed information on the flow and combustion characteristics in the furnace and to predict the amount of pollutant emissions. The predicted data were compared to on-site measurements of gas temperature, gas composition and SNCR de-NO(X) system. The major operating conditions considered in this paper were grate speed and oxygen concentration. A suitable grate speed ensures complete waste combustion. The predictions are as follows: volatile release increases with increasing grate speed, and the maximal value is within the range of 700-800 kg/m(2)h; slow grate speeds result in incomplete combustion of fixed carbon; the gas temperature at slow grate speeds is higher due to adequate oxygenation for fixed carbon combustion, and the deviation reaches 200K; NO(X) emission decreases, but CO emission and O(2) concentrations increase, and the deviation is 63%, 34% and 35%, respectively. Oxygen-enriched atmospheres promote the destruction of most pollutants due to the high oxygen partial pressure and temperature. The furnace temperature, NO production and CO emission increase as the oxygen concentration increases, and the deviation of furnace exit temperature, NO and CO concentration is 38.26%, 58.43% and 86.67%, respectively. Finally, oxygen concentration is limited to below 35% to prevent excessive CO and NO(X) emission without compromising plant performance. The current work greatly helps to understand the operating characteristics of large-scale MSW-burning plants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of refractory matters in dyeing wastewater during a full-scale Fenton process following pure-oxygen activated sludge treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Wookeun; Won, Hosik; Hwang, Byungho; de Toledo, Renata Alves; Chung, Jinwook; Kwon, Kiwook; Shim, Hojae

    2015-04-28

    Refractory pollutants in raw and treated dyeing wastewaters were characterized using fractional molecular weight cut-off, Ultraviolet-vis spectrophotometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI/MS). Significant organics and color compounds remained after biological (pure-oxygen activated sludge) and chemical (Fenton) treatments at a dyeing wastewater treatment plant (flow rate ∼100,000m(3)/d). HPLC-ESI/MS analysis revealed that some organic compounds disappeared after the biological treatment but reappeared after the chemical oxidation process, and some of that were originally absent in the raw dyeing wastewater was formed after the biological or chemical treatment. It appeared that the Fenton process merely impaired the color-imparting bonds in the dye materials instead of completely degrading them. Nevertheless, this process did significantly reduce the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD, 66%) and color (73%) remaining after initial biological treatment which reduced SCOD by 53% and color by 13% in raw wastewater. Biological treatment decreased the degradable compounds substantially, in such a way that the following Fenton process could effectively remove recalcitrant compounds, making the overall hybrid system more economical. In addition, ferric ion inherent to the Fenton reaction effectively coagulated particulate matters not removed via biological and chemical oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Combined coagulation flocculation pre treatment unit for municipal wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim M. Ismail

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The potentials of using the hydraulic technique in combined unit for municipal wastewater treatment were studied. A combined unit in which processes of coagulation, flocculation and sedimentation, has been designed utilizing hydraulic mixing instead of mechanical mixing. A jar test treatability study has been conducted to locate the optimum dose of the coagulants to be used. Alum, ferrous sulfate, ferric sulfate, a mixture of ferric and ferrous sulfates, and mixture of lime and ferrous sulfate were all tested. A pilot unit was constructed in the existing wastewater treatment plant at El Mansoura governorate located in north Egypt. The optimum dose of coagulants used in the combined unit gives removal efficiencies for COD, BOD, and total phosphorous as 65%, 55%, and 83%, respectively.

  1. Analysis of some pharmaceuticals in municipal wastewater of Almadinah Almunawarah

    KAUST Repository

    Shraim, Amjad

    2012-11-29

    The chemical pollution of water resources is a major challenge facing the humanity in this century. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are a group of emerging environmental chemical pollutants distinguished by their bioactivity and high solubility. They may also cause health complications to humans and living organisms. Pharmaceuticals enter the environment, mainly via wastewater and can eventually reach the surface and ground water. Despite this, PPCPs received less attention as environmental pollutants than other chemical pollutants (e.g. heavy metals and pesticides). The purpose of this work was to investigate the presence of some of the most frequently dispensed drugs for the residents of Almadinah Almunawarah, Saudi Arabia in the municipal wastewater before and after treatment. For this purpose, wastewater samples were collected biweekly from the city’s sewage treatment plant for a period of 4 months and analyzed the targeted drugs using tandem LC–MS. Out of the 19 investigated drugs, 5 pharmaceuticals have been found in concentrations greater than the limit of detection in both the influents and effluents of the sewage treatment plant. As expected, the concentrations of investigated pharmaceuticals in the wastewater were found to be low. These drugs and their average concentrations (in ng mL−1) in the influents were: acetaminophen (38.9), metformin (15.2), norfluoxetine (7.07), atenolol (2.04), and cephalexin (1.88). Meanwhile, the effluents contained slightly lower levels (in ng mL−1) than those of influents: acetaminophen (31.2), metformin (3.19), norfluoxetine (7.25), atenolol (0.545), and cephalexin (1.53). The results of this study supported by many other investigations indicate the inefficiency of current conventional wastewater treatment protocols in eliminating such a group of active and potentially hazardous pollutants from the wastewater.

  2. Analysis of some pharmaceuticals in municipal wastewater of Almadinah Almunawarah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Shraim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The chemical pollution of water resources is a major challenge facing the humanity in this century. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs are a group of emerging environmental chemical pollutants distinguished by their bioactivity and high solubility. They may also cause health complications to humans and living organisms. Pharmaceuticals enter the environment, mainly via wastewater and can eventually reach the surface and ground water. Despite this, PPCPs received less attention as environmental pollutants than other chemical pollutants (e.g. heavy metals and pesticides. The purpose of this work was to investigate the presence of some of the most frequently dispensed drugs for the residents of Almadinah Almunawarah, Saudi Arabia in the municipal wastewater before and after treatment. For this purpose, wastewater samples were collected biweekly from the city's sewage treatment plant for a period of 4 months and analyzed the targeted drugs using tandem LC–MS. Out of the 19 investigated drugs, 5 pharmaceuticals have been found in concentrations greater than the limit of detection in both the influents and effluents of the sewage treatment plant. As expected, the concentrations of investigated pharmaceuticals in the wastewater were found to be low. These drugs and their average concentrations (in ng mL−1 in the influents were: acetaminophen (38.9, metformin (15.2, norfluoxetine (7.07, atenolol (2.04, and cephalexin (1.88. Meanwhile, the effluents contained slightly lower levels (in ng mL−1 than those of influents: acetaminophen (31.2, metformin (3.19, norfluoxetine (7.25, atenolol (0.545, and cephalexin (1.53. The results of this study supported by many other investigations indicate the inefficiency of current conventional wastewater treatment protocols in eliminating such a group of active and potentially hazardous pollutants from the wastewater.

  3. Operational energy performance assessment system of municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lingbo; Zeng, Siyu; Chen, Jining; He, Miao; Yang, Wan

    2010-01-01

    Based on the statistical analysis of operational energy consumption and its influential factors from data of 599 Chinese WWTPs in 2006, it is noticed that the most influential factors include treatment technology adopted, treated sewage amount, removed pollutants amount, etc. Using the conclusion above, this paper sets up an integrated system of operational energy performance assessment for municipal wastewater treatment plants. Combining with result from on-spot research and model simulation, the calculating method of benchmark value and score of 7 energy efficiency indicators grouped into 3 levels is stated. Applying the assessment system to three plants, its applicability and objectivity are proved and suggestions to improve energy performance are provided.

  4. Drivers for and against municipal wastewater recycling: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Nadja C; Fischer, Manuel; Ingold, Karin; Hering, Janet G

    2016-01-01

    The reclamation, treatment and reuse of municipal wastewater can provide important environmental benefits. In this paper, 25 studies on this topic were reviewed and it was found that there are many (>150) different drivers acting for and against wastewater recycling. To deal with the challenge of comparing studies which entailed different research designs, a framework was developed which allowed the literature to be organized into comparable study contexts. Studies were categorized according to the level of analysis (wastewater recycling scheme, city, water utility, state, country, global) and outcome investigated (development/investment in new schemes, program implementation, percentage of wastewater recycled, percentage of water demand covered by recycled water, multiple outcomes). Findings across comparable case studies were then grouped according to the type (for or against recycling) and category of driver (social, natural, technical, economic, policy or business). The utility of the framework is demonstrated by summarizing the findings from four Australian studies at the city level. The framework offers a unique approach for disentangling the broad range of potential drivers for and against water recycling and to focus on those that seem relevant in specific study contexts. It may offer a valuable starting point for building hypotheses in future work.

  5. A full-scale study on thermal degradation of polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash and its secondary air pollution control in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xingbao; Ji, Bingjing; Yan, Dahai; Huang, Qifei; Zhu, Xuemei

    2017-04-01

    Degradation of polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash is beneficial to its risk control. Fly ash was treated in a full-scale thermal degradation system (capacity 1 t d(-1)) to remove polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans. Apart from the confirmation of the polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxin and dibenzofuran decomposition efficiency, we focused on two major issues that are the major obstacles for commercialising this decomposition technology in China, desorption and regeneration of dioxins and control of secondary air pollution. The toxic equivalent quantity values of polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans decreased to pollution control system. The degradation furnace released relatively large amounts of cadmium, lead and polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans compared with the municipal solid waste incinerator, but the amounts emitted to the atmosphere did not exceed the Chinese national emission limits. Thermal degradation can therefore be used as a polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxin and dibenzofuran abatement method for municipal solid waste incinerator source in China.

  6. A critical assessment of the microorganisms proposed to be important to enhanced biological phosphorus removal in full-scale wastewater treatment systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; McIlroy, Simon Jon; Nierychlo, Marta

    2017-01-01

    sequencing. The microbial community structure in all plants was relatively stable over time. Evidence for the role of the proposed PAOs and GAOs in EBPR varies and is critically assessed, in light of their calculated amplicon abundances, to indicate which of these are important in full-scale systems....... Bacteria from the genus Tetrasphaera were the most abundant of the PAOs. The “Candidatus Accumulibacter” PAOs were in much lower abundance and appear to be biased by the amplicon-based method applied. The genera Dechloromonas, Microlunatus, and Tessaracoccus were identified as abundant putative PAO......, which is consistent with reported metabolic diversity for these. Whether or not key traits can be assigned to sub-genus level clades requires further investigation....

  7. The pollutants removal and bacterial community dynamics relationship within a full-scale British Gas/Lurgi coal gasification wastewater treatment using a novel system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shengyong; Han, Hongjun; Zhuang, Haifeng; Hou, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    The novel system of EBA (based on external circulation anaerobic (EC) process-biological enhanced (BE) process-anoxic/oxic (A/O) process) was applied to treat the British Gas/Lurgi coal gasification wastewater in Erdos, China. After a long time of commissioning, the EBA system represented a stable and highly efficient performance, particularly, the concentrations of COD, NH4(+)-N, total organic carbon, total nitrogen and volatile phenols in the final effluent reached 53, 0.3, 18, 106mg/L and not detected, respectively. Both the GC-MS and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix analyses revealed significant variations of organic compositions in the effluent of different process. The results of high-throughput sequencing represented the EBA system composed 34 main bacteria which were affiliated to 7 phyla. In addition, the canonical correspondence analysis indicated high coherence among community composition, wastewater characteristics and environmental variables, in which the pH, mixed liquid suspended solids and total phenols loading were the most three significant variables.

  8. A full-scale UASB reactor for treatment of pig and cattle slaughterhouse wastewater with a high oil and grease content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. S. Miranda

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the performance of an 800m³ full-scale UASB reactor in treating meat-packing plant and slaughterhouse effluents containing high concentrations of oil and grease (O&G (413-645 mg/L, resulting in a COD/O&G ratio of 26-32%. Those macromolecules were considered responsible for the unbalance of the system resulting in a total washout of the biomass. The removal of O&G from the influent using a physicochemical system (coagulation-flocculation improved the physical characteristics of the anaerobic sludge, controlling the biomass washout. Reactor performance was significantly improved when the COD/O&G ratio influent was maintained in the 10%. The COD and O&G removal rates obtained after implantation of the physicochemical system were 70-92% and 27-58%, respectively. The specific methanogenic activity (SMA of the biomass shows towards a tendency stabilisation and adaptation to the substrate influent. Pretreatment of the influent allowed the maximum organic load to be increased (1.46 to 2.43 Kg COD/m³.d and improved the quality of the effluent.

  9. Disinfection of Ebola Virus in Sterilized Municipal Wastewater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Bibby

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised regarding handling of Ebola virus contaminated wastewater, as well as the adequacy of proposed disinfection approaches. In the current study, we investigate the inactivation of Ebola virus in sterilized domestic wastewater utilizing sodium hypochlorite addition and pH adjustment. No viral inactivation was observed in the one-hour tests without sodium hypochlorite addition or pH adjustment. No virus was recovered after 20 seconds (i.e. 4.2 log10 unit inactivation to detection limit following the addition of 5 and 10 mg L-1 sodium hypochlorite, which resulted in immediate free chlorine residuals of 0.52 and 1.11 mg L-1, respectively. The addition of 1 mg L-1 sodium hypochlorite resulted in an immediate free chlorine residual of 0.16 mg L-1, which inactivated 3.5 log10 units of Ebola virus in 20 seconds. Further inactivation was not evident due to the rapid consumption of the chlorine residual. Elevating the pH to 11.2 was found to significantly increase viral decay over ambient conditions. These results indicate the high susceptibility of the enveloped Ebola virus to disinfection in the presence of free chlorine in municipal wastewater; however, we caution that extension to more complex matrices (e.g. bodily fluids will require additional verification.

  10. Disinfection of Ebola Virus in Sterilized Municipal Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Robert J.; Casson, Leonard W.; de Carvalho, Nathalia Aquino; Haas, Charles N.; Munster, Vincent J.

    2017-01-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding handling of Ebola virus contaminated wastewater, as well as the adequacy of proposed disinfection approaches. In the current study, we investigate the inactivation of Ebola virus in sterilized domestic wastewater utilizing sodium hypochlorite addition and pH adjustment. No viral inactivation was observed in the one-hour tests without sodium hypochlorite addition or pH adjustment. No virus was recovered after 20 seconds (i.e. 4.2 log10 unit inactivation to detection limit) following the addition of 5 and 10 mg L-1 sodium hypochlorite, which resulted in immediate free chlorine residuals of 0.52 and 1.11 mg L-1, respectively. The addition of 1 mg L-1 sodium hypochlorite resulted in an immediate free chlorine residual of 0.16 mg L-1, which inactivated 3.5 log10 units of Ebola virus in 20 seconds. Further inactivation was not evident due to the rapid consumption of the chlorine residual. Elevating the pH to 11.2 was found to significantly increase viral decay over ambient conditions. These results indicate the high susceptibility of the enveloped Ebola virus to disinfection in the presence of free chlorine in municipal wastewater; however, we caution that extension to more complex matrices (e.g. bodily fluids) will require additional verification. PMID:28146555

  11. Scenario Analysis of Nutrient Removal from Municipal Wastewater by Microalgal Biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Temmink, H.; Janssen, M.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae can be used for the treatment of municipal wastewater. The application of microalgal biofilms in wastewater treatment systems seems attractive, being able to remove nitrogen, phosphorus and COD from wastewater at a short hydraulic retention time. This study therefore investigates the area

  12. Scenario Analysis of Nutrient Removal from Municipal Wastewater by Microalgal Biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Temmink, H.; Janssen, M.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae can be used for the treatment of municipal wastewater. The application of microalgal biofilms in wastewater treatment systems seems attractive, being able to remove nitrogen, phosphorus and COD from wastewater at a short hydraulic retention time. This study therefore investigates the area

  13. Determination and variation of core bacterial community in a two-stage full-scale anaerobic reactor treating high-strength pharmaceutical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haijun; Ye, Lin; Hu, Haidong; Zhang, Lulu; Ding, Lili; Ren, Hongqiang

    2017-08-25

    The functional characterization and temporal variation of anaerobic bacterial population is important to better understanding of microbial process of two-stage anaerobic reactor. However, due to the high diversity of anaerobic bacteria, close attention should be prioritized to be paid to the frequently abundant bacteria that were defined as core bacteria and putatively functionally important. Here in this study, using Miseq sequencing technology, the core bacterial community of 98 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was determined in a two-stage upflow blanket filter reactors treating pharmaceutical wastewater. The core bacterial community accounted for 61.66% of the total sequences and accurately predicted the sample location in the principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) scatter plot as the total bacterial OTUs did. The core bacterial community in the first-stage (FS) and second-stage (SS) reactors were generally distinct that FS core bacterial community was indicated to be more related to higher-level fermentation process and SS core bacterial community contained more microbes in syntrophic cooperation with methanogens. Moreover, the different responses of FS and SS core bacterial community to the temperature shock and influent disturbance caused by solid contamination were fully investigated. Co-occurring analysis at the order level implied that Bacteroidales, Selenomonadales, Anaerolineales, Syneristales and Thermotogales might play keystone roles in anaerobic digestion due to their high abundance and tight correlation with other microbes. These findings advanced our knowledge about the core bacteria community and its temporal variability for future comparative research and the improvement of the two-stage anaerobic system operation.

  14. Full Scale Performance of Primary Settling Tanks

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Shamim; Murad, M.; Javed, K. H.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics and the flowrate of municipal wastewater from the city of Doha, located in the Arabian Gulf have been studied to examine their effect on the performance of the primary settling tanks at the local sewage treatment plant. The wastweater is predominantly domestic and characterized by low suspended solids concentration but high total dissolved solids. The high temperature of the wastewater and long flowtime in the sewerage system turn it septic. The performance efficiency o...

  15. Ammonium removal by modified zeolite from municipal wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ya-ping; GAO Ting-yao; JIANG Shang-ying; CAO Da-wen

    2004-01-01

    Ammonium removal by modified zeolite, H-form and Na-form zeolite, were examined by batch-type methods. The adsorption of ammonium on modified zeolite was exothermic process. The saturation adsorption capacity of ammonium on H-form and Na-form zeolite were 21.23 and 41.15 mg/g, respectively. After ten times adsorption- desorption-readsorption cycles the standard deviations of H-form and Na-form zeolite were 6.34% and 6.59%. The zeolite adsorption process has proved cost effective and practical in reducing ammonium by H-form and Na-form zeolite in municipal wastewater from concentration 27.68 mg/L to 2.80 mg/L and 5.91 mg/L.

  16. Characteristics and Biodegradability of Wastewater Organic Matter in Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants Collecting Domestic Wastewater and Industrial Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Young Choi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs in Korea collect and treat not only domestic wastewater, but also discharge from industrial complexes. However, some industrial discharges contain a large amount of non-biodegradable organic matter, which cannot be treated properly in a conventional biological WWTP. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics and biodegradability of the wastewater organic matter contained in the industrial discharges and to examine the fate of the industrial discharges in a biological WWTP. In contrast to most previous studies targeting a specific group of organic compounds or traditional water quality indices, such as biological oxygen demand (BOD and chemical oxygen demand (COD, this study was purposed to quantify and characterize the biodegradable and nonbiodegradable fractions of the wastewater organic matter. Chemical oxygen demand (COD fractionation tests and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the industrial discharge from dyeing or pulp mill factories contained more non-biodegradable soluble organic matter than did the domestic wastewater. Statistical analysis on the WWTPs’ monitoring data indicated that the industrial discharge containing non-biodegradable soluble organic matter was not treated effectively in a biological WWTP, but was escaping from the system. Thus, industrial discharge that contained non-biodegradable soluble organic matter was a major factor in the decrease in biodegradability of the discharge, affecting the ultimate fate of wastewater organic matter in a biological WWTP. Further application of COD fractionation and fluorescence spectroscopy to wastewaters, with various industrial discharges, will help scientists and engineers to better design and operate a biological WWTP, by understanding the fate of wastewater organic matter.

  17. Using treated municipal wastewater in a linerboard mill -- legal, political, and technical issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, W. (Montville Water Pollution Control Authority, Montville, CT (United States)); Scogin, R. (Rand-Whitney Containerboard, L.P., Montville, CT (United States)); Cobery, J.E. (Bingham, Dana and Gould, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-10-01

    When plans to expand production at an antiquated mill were jeopardized by an inadequate source of process water, the mill explored the possibility of producing first-quality linerboard using treated municipal wastewater. This paper outlines the legal, technical, and political issues encountered in developing a plan that would allow the mill to use effluent from a municipal wastewater treatment system. The technology is available to make reuse of municipal wastewater feasible, as evidence by the closed-loop delivery and discharge system describe in this report. Nevertheless, legal and political concerns make the implementation process arduous and time consuming.

  18. Effect of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) on the biodegradability of municipal wastewater for its reuse in the textile industry

    OpenAIRE

    Jarni, Klara; Kompare, Boris; Drev, Darko; Griessler Bulc, Tjaša; Krivograd-Klemenčič, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Reuse of treated municipal wastewater to supplement part of fresh water is becoming more and more important. However, treated water can contain some pollutants that cannot be successfully removed with classical biological wastewater treatment processes. Aim of the study presented was to assess whether advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) and special enzymes enhance biodegradation of municipal wastewater and if treated municipal wastewater can be reused in the production process of ...

  19. Bioremediation Potential of Bacterial Isolates for Municipal Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh A. Sonune

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The potential of bacteria for the treatment of municipal wastewater was investigated in present study. Total eight bacterial isolates were used for this study that showed growth on wastewater agar medium. These isolates were identified on the basis of morphological and biochemical test and identified as Bacillus licheniformis NW16, Pseudomonas aeruginosa NS19, Pseudomonas sp. NS20, Planococcus salinarum NS23, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia NS21, Paenibacillus sp. NW9, Paenibacillus borealis NS3 and Aeromonas hydrophilia NS17. The B. licheniformis NW16 showed highest potential to reduce all parameter under study than other isolates except Ammonical nitrogen. B. licheniformis NW16 and Aeromonas hydrophilia NS17 showed maximum reduction (42.86% in BOD each. B. licheniformis NW16 and Paenibacillus sp. NW9 showed 82.76% and 81.61% reduction in COD respectively. B. licheniformis NW16, P. salinarum NS23 and Aeromonas hydrophilia NS17 showed reduction in nitrate ranging from 17.36%-63.64%. All the isolates have potential to reduced phosphate from 17.55% -72.3%. B. licheniformis NW16, Ps. aeruginosa NS19, Pseudomonas sp. NS20, Paenibacillus sp. NW9 and Aeromonas hydrophilia NS17 showed reduction in TSS ranging from 42.69%-79.94%. B. licheniformis NW16, Ps. aeruginosa NS19, Pseudomonas sp. NS20, S. maltophilia NS21 and Paenibacillus sp. NW9 showed reduction in TDS ranging from 14%-81.4%.

  20. Activity and growth of anammox biomass on aerobically pre-treated municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureni, Michele; Weissbrodt, David G; Szivák, Ilona; Robin, Orlane; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Joss, Adriano

    2015-09-01

    Direct treatment of municipal wastewater (MWW) based on anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria holds promise to turn the energy balance of wastewater treatment neutral or even positive. Currently, anammox processes are successfully implemented at full scale for the treatment of high-strength wastewaters, whereas the possibility of their mainstream application still needs to be confirmed. In this study, the growth of anammox organisms on aerobically pre-treated municipal wastewater (MWW(pre-treated)), amended with nitrite, was proven in three parallel reactors. The reactors were operated at total N concentrations in the range 5-20 mg(N)∙L(-1), as expected for MWW. Anammox activities up to 465 mg(N)∙L(-1)∙d(-1) were reached at 29 °C, with minimum doubling times of 18 d. Lowering the temperature to 12.5 °C resulted in a marked decrease in activity to 46 mg(N)∙L(-1)∙d(-1) (79 days doubling time), still in a reasonable range for autotrophic nitrogen removal from MWW. During the experiment, the biomass evolved from a suspended growth inoculum to a hybrid system with suspended flocs and wall-attached biofilm. At the same time, MWW(pre-treated) had a direct impact on process performance. Changing the influent from synthetic medium to MWW(pre-treated) resulted in a two-month delay in net anammox growth and a two to three-fold increase in the estimated doubling times of the anammox organisms. Interestingly, anammox remained the primary nitrogen consumption route, and high-throughput 16S rRNA gene-targeted amplicon sequencing analyses revealed that the shift in performance was not associated with a shift in dominant anammox bacteria ("Candidatus Brocadia fulgida"). Furthermore, only limited heterotrophic denitrification was observed in the presence of easily biodegradable organics (acetate, glucose). The observed delays in net anammox growth were thus ascribed to the acclimatization of the initial anammox population or/and the development of a side

  1. Recovery of valuable products from municipal wastewater sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, S. [Kemira Kemi AB, Kemwater, Helsingborg (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    Municipal wastewater sludge is a complex product containing both valuable substances as well as contaminants. The valuable substances are: (i) Phosphorus, (ii) Organic matter, and (iii) Coagulants. The contaminants include heavy metals and organic micro-pollutants. With increasing wastewater volumes and advanced wastewater treatment processes, sludge production continues to grow and with it, the volumes of contaminated sludge which is not suitable for arable land. This will have an unacceptable, negative impact on the environment. This is why new sustainable sludge treatment technologies/disposal alternatives have become so interesting. Kemwater`s KREPRO-process is a process which can re-use valuable substances from sludge. In this process, three different products, namely, organic sludge, a phosphorus salt and a carbon source are produced. The organic sludge had a dry solids content of around 50% which makes it suitable for energy production. The heat value in the sludge is dependent on the dry solids content. This value of around 8 MJ/kg was found to be similar to that of wood-chips. The phosphorus salt has a low content of contaminants and is therefore suitable for use as a fertiliser. Its lower solubility compared to that of artificial fertilisers, however, makes the phosphorus less available to plants. This was supported in both field and pot trials, which suggested that the phosphorus is available, but not to the same extent as with artificial fertilisers. The carbon source contains easily degradable COD and coagulants. The COD was tested as a carbon source for increasing both denitrification and biological phosphorus removal. The results showed that the carbon source is good for both applications, although not as good as acetate. (orig.)

  2. Are standard wastewater treatment plant design methods suitable for any municipal wastewater?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, G; Güder, B; Güneş, G; Ubay Cokgor, E

    2012-01-01

    The design and operational parameters of an activated sludge system were analyzed treating the municipal wastewaters in Istanbul. The design methods of ATV131, Metcalf & Eddy together with model simulations were compared with actual plant operational data. The activated sludge model parameters were determined using 3-month dynamic data for the biological nutrient removal plant. The ATV131 method yielded closer sludge production, total oxygen requirement and effluent nitrogen levels to the real plant after adopting correct influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) fractionation. The enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) could not easily be predicted with ATV131 method due to low volatile fatty acids (VFA) potential.

  3. Buffering municipal wastewater pollution using urban wetlands in sub-Saharan Africa: a case of Masaka municipality, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateganya, Najib Lukooya; Nakalanzi, Diana; Babu, Mohammed; Hein, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In many sub-Saharan Africa municipalities and cities, wastewater is discharged with limited or no treatment at all, thus creating public and environmental health risks. This study assessed the performance of a conventional municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), based on effluent pollution flux, in Masaka Municipality, Uganda. Also, the downstream pollution attenuation through a natural wetland was analysed to ascertain its role in buffering the WWTP performance deficits. Generally, there was deficiency in WWTP performance, with 100% failure over a five-year assessment period, for example, the mean effluent biochemical oxygen demand (BOD)5 and chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations (mg l(-1)) were found to be 316 ± 15 and 582 ± 28 compared with 50 and 100 maximum permissible environment discharge limits, respectively. Despite these deficits in WWTP performance, the wetland buffer effectively reduced pollutant loads for suspended solids (73%), organic matter (BOD5, 88% and COD, 75%), nutrients (total nitrogen, 74% and total phosphorus, 83%) and pathogens (faecal coliforms, 99%). These findings underpin the challenge of managing municipal wastewater using centralized mechanical WWTPs in the region. However, the wetland buffer system demonstrated a critical role these ecosystems play in abating both pulse and intermittent pollution loads from urban environments of sub-Saharan Africa whose sanitation systems are defective and inadequate. Therefore, it was concluded that integrating wetland ecosystems in urban planning as natural landscape features to enhance municipal wastewater management and pollution control is paramount.

  4. Seasonal isolation of microalgae from municipal wastewater for remediation and biofuel applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Kyoung Chul; Whitney, Crystal Gayle Elizabeth; Kozera, Catherine; O'Leary, Stephen James Bernard; McGinn, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to isolate the microalgae strains from treated municipal wastewater in both summer and winter seasons in order to identify strains better suited for nutrient remediation...

  5. Evaluation of flat sheet membrane bioreactor efficiency for municipal wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Fazeli

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: It is concluded that FS-MBR can be used in the large scale municipal wastewater treatment plants to improve effluent quality due to high removal of COD, BOD 5 , TSS and VSS to meet effluent discharge standards.

  6. Fate of Malathion in an Activated Sludge Municipal Wastewater Treatment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    treatment plant ( WWTP ). There have been few studies to document the fate of these CWAs when subjected to a municipal wastewater treatment process. This...municipal activated sludge (AS) WWTP . Results show that v malathion may degrade in an AS WWTP as approximately 90% of an initial concentration of 4.25 mg...the decontamination wastewater must be disposed of as hazardous waste or possibly treated at a WWTP . There are no studies that document the fate of

  7. MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER AS AN SOURCE OF WASTE HEAT – CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Żogała

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the possibility of useing treated wastewater from municipal waste water treatment plant as a waste heat source. Presented and calculated theoretical possibilities of receiving heat takes into account the indirect and direct method. A variant case study was carried out on the example of municipal mechanical and biological wastewater treatment plant Ruptawa belonging to Jastrzębskie Przedsiębiorstwo Wodociągów i Kanalizacji (voivodship Silesia, Jastrzębie City.

  8. 77 FR 1687 - EPA Workshops on Achieving Water Quality Through Integrated Municipal Stormwater and Wastewater...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... AGENCY EPA Workshops on Achieving Water Quality Through Integrated Municipal Stormwater and Wastewater... water quality objectives of the CWA. The workshops are intended to assist EPA in developing an integrated planning approach framework that could be used to help municipalities prioritize their...

  9. Energy and nutrient recovery for municipal wastewater treatment: How to design a feasible plant layout?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khiewwijit, R.; Temmink, B.G.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.; Keesman, K.J.

    2015-01-01

    Activated sludge systems are commonly used for robust and efficient treatment of municipal wastewater. However, these systems cannot achieve their maximum potential to recover valuable resources from wastewater. This study demonstrates a procedure to design a feasible novel configuration for maximiz

  10. Municipal Wastewater Processes. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Lorna

    Described is a one-hour overview of the unit processes which comprise a municipal wastewater treatment system. Topics covered in this instructor's guide include types of pollutants encountered, treatment methods, and procedures by which wastewater treatment processes are selected. A slide-tape program is available to supplement this component of…

  11. Removal of nutrients by algae from municipal wastewater contaminated with heavy metals

    OpenAIRE

    Aryal, Bigyan

    2015-01-01

    Selected species of algae (green algae and blue green algae) were cultivated in municipal wastewater using PBR (photo-bioreactor) bottles. Uptake of nutrients by these algae species was measured on different dates. From the results of the experiments, it was observed that a combination of certain blue green algae species (cyanobacteria) was able to remove most of the nutrients from the wastewater. The presence of heavy metal ions in the wastewater also affected the nutrient-absorbing capacit...

  12. Sustainable risk management of emerging contaminants in municipal wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, O V; Voulvoulis, N

    2009-10-13

    The presence of emerging contaminants in municipal wastewaters, particularly endocrine-disrupting compounds such as oestrogenic substances, has been the focus of much public concern and scientific attention in recent years. Due to the scientific uncertainty still surrounding their effects, the Precautionary Principle could be invoked for the interim management of potential risks. Therefore, precautionary prevention risk-management measures could be employed to reduce human exposure to the compounds of concern. Steroid oestrogens are generally recognized as the most significant oestrogenically active substances in domestic sewage effluent. As a result, the UK Environment Agency has championed a 'Demonstration Programme' to investigate the potential for removal of steroid oestrogens and alkylphenol ethoxylates during sewage treatment. Ecological and human health risks are interdependent, and ecological injuries may result in increased human exposures to contaminants or other stressors. In this context of limiting exposure to potential contaminants, examining the relative contribution of various compounds and pathways should be taken into account when identifying effective risk-management measures. In addition, the explicit use of ecological objectives within the scope of the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive poses new challenges and necessitates the development of ecosystem-based decision tools. This paper addresses some of these issues and proposes a species sensitivity distribution approach to support the decision-making process related to the need and implications of sewage treatment work upgrade as risk-management measures to the presence of oestrogenic compounds in sewage effluent.

  13. Ozone and UV254 radiation for municipal wastewater disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchley, Ernest R; Weng, Shihchi; Afifi, Mehrnaz Zare; Chiu, Hsiao-Han; Reichlin, Douglas B; Jousset, Stéphane; Erhardt, Richard S

    2012-11-01

    Bench-scale experiments were conducted with municipal wastewater effluent samples to examine the feasibility of combined application of ozone and ultraviolet (UV) radiation for disinfection. Effluent samples displayed rapid initial ozone demand, which promotes ozone transfer but diminishes disinfection efficacy. Ozone doses up to 10 mg/L yielded only trace quantities of residual ozone; despite the fact that initial ozone demand was never exceeded, quantifiable (though variable) inactivation of E. coli was observed, along with modest improvements of UV transmittance. Results from collimated beam experiments demonstrated that compliance with effluent discharge permit limitations could be achieved consistently with a UV254 dose of 12.4 mJ/cm2 at a pre-ozonation dose of 2 to 3 mg/L. In the absence of pre-ozonation, consistent compliance was observed at a UV dose of 16.5 mJ/cm2. No evidence of synergism between ozone and UV254 radiation was found in the measured inactivation responses of E. coli.

  14. Economic analysis of municipal wastewater utilization for thermoelectric power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Theregowda, R.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

    2011-01-01

    The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of freshwater. The large water demand is increasingly a problem, especially for new power plant development, as availability of freshwater for new uses diminishes in the United States. Reusing non-traditional water sources, such as treated municipal wastewater, provides one option to mitigate freshwater usage in the thermoelectric power industry. The amount of freshwater withdrawal that can be displaced with non-traditional water sources at a particular location requires evaluation of the water management and treatment requirements, considering the quality and abundance of the non-traditional water sources. This paper presents the development of an integrated costing model to assess the impact of degraded water treatment, as well as the implications of increased tube scaling in the main condenser. The model developed herein is used to perform case studies of various treatment, condenser cleaning and condenser configurations to provide insight into the ramifications of degraded water use in the cooling loops of thermoelectric power plants. Further, this paper lays the groundwork for the integration of relationships between degraded water quality, scaling characteristics and volatile emission within a recirculating cooling loop model.

  15. Scenario Based Municipal Wastewater Estimation: Development and Application of a Dynamic Simulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops causal loop diagrams and a system dynamics model for estimation of wastewater quantity changes as a function of future socioeconomic development and the municipal water environment of the city under the influence of several key factors. Using Wuhan (a city with population more than 10 million in China as a case study, the variability of Wuhan’s wastewater quantity and water environment is modeled under different development patterns by year 2030. Nine future scenarios are designed by assigning different values to those key factors, including GDP growth rate, water consumption of annual ten thousand GDP, and wastewater treatment fee. The results show that (1 GDP growth leads to an increase in municipal wastewater quantity, but an increase in wastewater treatment fee can be in favor of reducing urban water pollution, and (2 the impact of per ten thousand yuan GDP water consumption on the amount of municipal wastewater is larger in the near future, while the impact of GDP growth rate is much larger in the long term. The dynamic model has proven to be reliable for simulating the municipal wastewater changes, and it could help decision makers to make the scientific and reasonable decisions.

  16. Influences of mechanical pre-treatment on the non-biological treatment of municipal wastewater by forward osmosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey, Tobias; Zarebska, Agata; Bajraktari, Niada

    2016-01-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment commonly involves mechanical, biological and chemical treatment steps as state-of-the-art technologies for protecting the environment from adverse effects. The biological treatment step consumes the most energy and can create greenhouse gases. This study investigates...... municipal wastewater treatment without the biological treatment step, including the effects of different pre-treatment configurations, e.g., direct membrane filtration before forward osmosis. Forward osmosis was tested using raw wastewater and wastewater subjected to different types of mechanical pre...

  17. CHANGES IN THE MICROBIAL COMPOSITION OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATED IN BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Jolanta Bawiec

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Municipal wastewater is characterized by diverse microbial content, largely dependent on their sources as well as many other factors like condition and health of their producer, but also environmental factors. The number and share of individual bacterial population in wastewater is changing during the process of their treatment in wastewater treatment plants. The microbial content of treated wastewater is significantly affected by the type of technology used for wastewater treatment. The paper presents the results of the species composition of bacteria present in the wastewater at various stages of treatment for the two different technologies. Samples of wastewater from hydroponic wastewater treatment plant and from the plant which technology is based on biofilters were analysed. A key mechanism for wastewater treatment in both cases is biological treatment, using microbial activity that decomposes pollutants in the wastewater, which significantly contributes to changes in the species composition of bacteria comparing to microbiological composition of sewage flowing into the treatment plant. Analyses of microbial composition showed that in the objects consisting of preliminary tank and biofilter, composition of bacteria species is changing, but many species isolated from raw sewage is also found in treated wastewater. In the plant with hydroponic lagoon after wastewater treatment throughout the process system, bacteria present in raw sewage or in wastewater after biological treatment were not identified in the outlet.

  18. Hydrologic Impacts of Municipal Wastewater Irrigation to a Temperate Forest Watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Andrew L; Emanuel, Ryan E; James, April L; Nichols, Elizabeth Guthrie

    2016-07-01

    Land application of municipal wastewater to managed forests is an important treatment and water reuse technology used globally, but the hydrological processes of these systems are not well characterized for temperate areas with annual rainfall of 1200 mm or greater. This study evaluated the impact of municipal wastewater irrigation to the local water balance at a 3000-ha land application facility where secondary-treated wastewater is land applied to a mixed hardwood-pine forest over 900 ha. Stable isotopes of hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O), chloride concentrations, and specific conductance were used in combination with hydrometric measurements to estimate the wastewater composition in groundwater, surface water, and at the watershed outlet during dry and wet seasonal periods and during one large rainfall event. Wastewater and water bodies receiving irrigation were found to have significantly higher δH, δO, specific conductance, and chloride concentrations. Using these tracers, a two-component, three-end member geochemical mixing model estimated mean wastewater compositions in the surficial aquifer receiving irrigation from 47 to 73%. Surface water onsite was found to reflect the high wastewater composition in groundwater. Land-applied wastewater contributed an estimated 24% of total streamflow, with the highest wastewater compositions in surface water observed during major storm events and at low-flow conditions. Groundwater and surface water within the watershed were found to have proportionally higher wastewater compositions than expected based on the proportion of irrigation to rainfall received by these areas.

  19. Biological nutrient removal from municipal wastewater in sequencing batch biofilm reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnz, P.

    2001-07-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) has only been put into practice in activated sludge systems. In recent years, the Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (SBBR) has emerged as an alternative allowing EBPR to be achieved in a biofilm reactor. High efficiency of phosphate removal was demonstrated in a SBBR fed with synthetic wastewater containing acetate. The aim of this study was to investigate EBPR from municipal wastewater in semi full-scale and laboratory-scale SBBRs. The focus of the investigation in the semi full-scale reactor was on determination of achievable reaction rates and effluent concentrations under varying influent conditions throughout all seasons of a year. Interactions between nitrogen and phosphorus removal and the influence of backwashing on the reactor performance was examined. Summing up, it can be stated that the SBBR proved to be an attractive alternative to activated sludge systems. Phosphorus elimination efficiency was comparable to common systems but biomass sedimentation problems were avoided. In order to further exploit the potential of the SBBR and to achieve reactor performances superior to those of existing systems designing a special biofilm carrier material may allow to increase the phenomenon of simultaneous nitrification/denitrification while maintaining EBPR activity. (orig.) [German] Die vermehrte biologische Phosphorelimination (Bio-P) aus Abwasser wurde bisher nur in Belebtschlammsystemen praktiziert. In den letzten Jahren konnte jedoch gezeigt werden, dass sich durch die Anwendung des Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (SBBR) - Verfahrens auch in Biofilmreaktoren Bio-P verwirklichen laesst. Versuche in Laboranlagen haben ergeben, dass sich eine weitgehende Phosphorelimination aufrecht erhalten laesst, wenn die Reaktoren mit einem ideal zusammengesetzten, synthetischen Abwasser beschickt werden. Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, Bio-P aus kommunalem Abwasser in SBBR-Versuchsanlagen im halbtechnischen und im Labormassstab zu

  20. Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, Iman [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Walker, Michael E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Hsieh, Ming-Kai [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Dzombak, David A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Liu, Wenshi [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Vidic, Radisav D. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Miller, David C. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Abbasian, Javad [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-09-01

    A process simulation model has been developed using Aspen Plus® with the OLI (OLI System, Inc.) water chemistry model to predict water quality in the recirculating cooling loop utilizing secondary- and tertiary-treated municipal wastewater as the source of makeup water. Simulation results were compared with pilot-scale experimental data on makeup water alkalinity, loop pH, and ammonia evaporation. The effects of various parameters including makeup water quality, salt formation, NH3 and CO2 evaporation mass transfer coefficients, heat load, and operating temperatures were investigated. The results indicate that, although the simulation model can capture the general trends in the loop pH, experimental data on the rates of salt precipitation in the system are needed for more accurate prediction of the loop pH. It was also found that stripping of ammonia and carbon dioxide in the cooling tower can influence the cooling loop pH significantly. The effects of the NH3 mass transfer coefficient on cooling loop pH appear to be more significant at lower values (e.g., kNH3 < 4×10-3 m/s) when the makeup water alkalinity is low (e.g., <90 mg/L as CaCO3). The effect of the CO2 mass transfer coefficient was found to be significant only at lower alkalinity values (e.g., kCO2<4×10-6 m/s).

  1. Influences of mechanical pretreatment on the non-biological treatment of municipal wastewater by forward osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Tobias; Zarebska, Agata; Bajraktari, Niada; Vogel, Jörg; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; la Cour Jansen, Jes; Jönsson, Karin

    2016-11-24

    Municipal wastewater treatment involves mechanical, biological and chemical treatment steps for protecting the environment from adverse effects. The biological treatment step consumes the most energy and can create greenhouse gases. This study investigates municipal wastewater treatment without the biological treatment step, including the effects of different pretreatment configurations, for example, direct membrane filtration before forward osmosis. Forward osmosis was tested using raw wastewater and wastewater subjected to different types of mechanical pretreatment, for example, microsieving and microfiltration permeation, as a potential technology for municipal wastewater treatment. Forward osmosis was performed using Aquaporin Inside™ and Hydration Technologies Inc. (HTI) membranes with NaCl as the draw solution. Both types of forward osmosis membranes were tested in parallel for the different types of pretreated feed and evaluated in terms of water flux and solute rejection, that is, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD7) and total and soluble phosphorus contents. The Aquaporin and HTI membranes achieved a stable water flux with rejection rates of more than 96% for BOD7 and total and soluble phosphorus, regardless of the type of mechanical pretreated wastewater considered. This result indicates that forward osmosis membranes can tolerate exposure to municipal waste water and that the permeate can fulfil the Swedish discharge limits.

  2. Pharmaceutical occurrence in groundwater and surface waters in forests land-applied with municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachran, Andrew D; Shea, Damian; Bodnar, Wanda; Nichols, Elizabeth Guthrie

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence and fate of pharmaceutical and personal care products in the environment are of increasing public importance because of their ubiquitous nature and documented effects on wildlife, ecosystems, and potentially humans. One potential, yet undefined, source of entry of pharmaceuticals into the environment is via the land application of municipal wastewater onto permitted lands. The objective of the present study is to determine the extent to which pharmaceuticals are mitigated by or exported from managed tree plantations irrigated with municipal wastewater. A specific focus of the present study is the presence of pharmaceutical compounds in groundwater and surface water discharge. The study site is a municipality that land-applies secondary treated wastewater onto 930 hectares of a 2000-hectare managed hardwood and pine plantation. A suite of 33 pharmaceuticals and steroid hormones was targeted in the analysis, which consisted of monthly grab sampling of groundwater, surface water, and wastewater, followed by concentration and cleanup via solid phase extraction and separation, detection, and quantification via liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. More than one-half of all compounds detected in irrigated wastewater were not present in groundwater and subsequent surface water. However, antibiotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, caffeine, and other prescription and over-the-counter drugs remained in groundwater and were transported into surface water at concentrations up to 10 ng/L. These results provide important documentation for pharmaceutical fate and transport in forest systems irrigated with municipal wastewater, a previously undocumented source of environmental entry.

  3. Effects of spray-irrigated municipal wastewater on a small watershed in Chester County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreffler, Curtis L.; Galeone, Daniel G.

    2005-01-01

    Spray irrigation is a method for disposing of secondary treated municipal wastewater by spraying it on the land surface (fig. 1). The sprayed wastewater either evaporates into the air, soaks into the soil, or percolates through the soil and recharges the ground water. Land application of wastewater has advantages over conventional means of disposal by direct discharge to streams because the wastewater recharges the ground-water system and increases base flow in streams. Additional benefits are derived from the "natural" treatment of the wastewater that takes place in the soil when plants and other biota remove some nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from the wastewater (Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, 2003). The removal of nutrients is one advantage spray irrigation has to conventional disposal methods like instream discharge.

  4. Detection of a wide variety of human and veterinary fluoroquinolone antibiotics in municipal wastewater and wastewater-impacted surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ke; Soares, Ana Dulce; Adejumo, Hollie; McDiarmid, Melissa; Squibb, Katherine; Blaney, Lee

    2015-03-15

    As annual sales of antibiotics continue to rise, the mass of these specially-designed compounds entering municipal wastewater treatment systems has also increased. Of primary concern here is that antibiotics can inhibit growth of specific microorganisms in biological processes of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) or in downstream ecosystems. Growth inhibition studies with Escherichia coli demonstrated that solutions containing 1-10 μg/L of fluoroquinolones can inhibit microbial growth. Wastewater samples were collected on a monthly basis from various treatment stages of a 30 million gallon per day WWTP in Maryland, USA. Samples were analyzed for the presence of 11 fluoroquinolone antibiotics. At least one fluoroquinolone was detected in every sample. Ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin exhibited detection frequencies of 100% and 98%, respectively, across all sampling sites. Concentrations of fluoroquinolones in raw wastewater were as high as 1900 ng/L for ciprofloxacin and 600 ng/L for ofloxacin. Difloxacin, enrofloxacin, fleroxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin, and orbifloxacin were also detected at appreciable concentrations of 9-170 ng/L. The total mass concentration of fluoroquinolones in raw wastewater was in the range that inhibited E. coli growth, suggesting that concerns over antibiotic presence in wastewater and wastewater-impacted surface water are valid. The average removal efficiency of fluoroquinolones during wastewater treatment was approximately 65%; furthermore, the removal efficiency for fluoroquinolones was found to be negatively correlated to biochemical oxygen demand removal and positively correlated to phosphorus removal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development and application of some renovated technologies for municipal wastewater treatment in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Yi; WEN Xianghua; HUANG Xia

    2007-01-01

    China has been experiencing fast economic development in recent decades at the cost of serious environmental deterioration.Wastewater discharge,especially municipal wastewater discharge,and non-point pollution sources are becoming the major water pollution source and research focus.Great efforts have been made on water pollution control and a number of renovated technologies and processes for municipal wastewater treatment and reclamation as well as non-point pollution control have been developed and applied in China.This paper discusses the development and application of the appropriate technologies,including natural treatment systems,anaerobic biological treatment,biofilm reactors and wastewater reclamation technologies,for water pollution control in the country.

  6. Cultivation of Nannochloropsis sp. in brackish groundwater supplemented with municipal wastewater as a nutrient source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Lins de Sousa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study growth potential of the green microalgae Nannochloropsis sp. using brackish groundwater from a well in the semi-arid northeast region of Brazil as culture medium. The medium was supplemented with (% 19.4, 22.0, 44.0 and 50.0% of municipal wastewater after UASB treatment as a low-cost nutrient source. The results showed that the culture tested was capable of growing in the brackish groundwater even at salinity levels as low as 2 ppt. Furthermore it was shown that municipal wastewater could be used as a sole nutrient source for Nannochloropsis sp.

  7. Ozone inactivation of infectious prions in rendering plant and municipal wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Neumann, Norman F; Price, Luke M; Braithwaite, Shannon L; Balachandran, Aru; Belosevic, Miodrag; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2014-02-01

    Disposal of tissues and organs associated with prion accumulation and infectivity in infected animals (designated as Specified Risk Materials [SRM]) is strictly regulated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); however, the contamination of wastewater from slaughterhouses that handle SRM still poses public concern. In this study, we examined for the first time the partitioning of infectious prions in rendering plant wastewater and found that a large proportion of infectious prions were partitioned into the scum layer formed at the top after gravity separation, while quite a few infectious prions still remained in the wastewater. Subsequently, we assessed the ozone inactivation of infectious prions in the raw, natural gravity-separated and dissolved air flotation (DAF)-treated (i.e., primary-treated) rendering plant wastewater, and in a municipal final effluent (i.e., secondary-treated municipal wastewater). At applied ozone doses of 43.4-44.6 mg/L, ozone was instantaneously depleted in the raw rendering plant wastewater, while a greater than 4-log10 inactivation was achieved at a 5 min exposure in the DAF-treated rendering plant wastewater. Prion inactivation in the municipal final effluent was conducted with two levels of applied ozone doses of 13.4 and 22.5mg/L, and a greater than 4-log10 inactivation was achieved at a 5 min exposure with the higher ozone dose. Efficiency factor Hom (EFH) models were used to model (i.e., fit) the experimental data. The CT (disinfectant concentration multiplied by contact time) values were determined for 2- and 3-log10 inactivation in the municipal final effluent treated with an ozone dose of 13.4 mg/L. Our results indicate that ozone could serve as a final barrier for prion inactivation in primary- and/or secondary-treated wastewaters.

  8. Occurrence and fate of dissolved and particulate antimicrobials in municipal wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Senta, Ivan; Terzić, Senka; Ahel, Marijan

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive study on the occurrence and fate of several classes of antimicrobials, including sulfonamides, trimethoprim, fluoroquinolones and macrolides, in Croatian municipal wastewaters was performed using an integrated approach, which comprised analysis of both dissolved and particulate fractions. A nation-wide screening showed ubiquitous occurrence of human-use antimicrobials in raw wastewater samples with the total concentrations ranging from 2 to 20 μg/L, while veterinary antimicrobia...

  9. Stabilisation of Biological Phosphorus Removal from Municipal Wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krühne, Ulrich

    The biological phosphorus removal (BPR) from wastewater has developed considerably during the last decades and is applied in many present wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) all over the world. The process performance and the control of the BPR are under the influences of daily and seasonal...

  10. Treatment of Municipal Wastewater by Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozgun, H.

    2013-01-01

    Reclamation and reuse of wastewater for various purposes such as landscape and agricultural irrigation are increasingly recognized as essential strategies in the world, especially for the areas suffering from water scarcity. Wastewater treatment and reuse have two major advantages including the redu

  11. Energy Efficiency Strategies for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, J.; Hallett, K.; DeWolfe, J.; Venner, I.

    2012-01-01

    Water and wastewater systems are significant energy consumers with an estimated 3%-4% of total U.S. electricity consumption used for the movement and treatment of water and wastewater. Water-energy issues are of growing importance in the context of water shortages, higher energy and material costs, and a changing climate. In this economic environment, it is in the best interest for utilities to find efficiencies, both in water and energy use. Performing energy audits at water and wastewater treatment facilities is one way community energy managers can identify opportunities to save money, energy, and water. In this paper the importance of energy use in wastewater facilities is illustrated by a case study of a process energy audit performed for Crested Butte, Colorado's wastewater treatment plant. The energy audit identified opportunities for significant energy savings by looking at power intensive unit processes such as influent pumping, aeration, ultraviolet disinfection, and solids handling. This case study presents best practices that can be readily adopted by facility managers in their pursuit of energy and financial savings in water and wastewater treatment. This paper is intended to improve community energy managers understanding of the role that the water and wastewater sector plays in a community's total energy consumption. The energy efficiency strategies described provide information on energy savings opportunities, which can be used as a basis for discussing energy management goals with water and wastewater treatment facility managers.

  12. Design Seminar for Land Treatment of Municipal Wastewater Effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirjian, Y. A.

    This document reports the development and operation of a country-wide wastewater treatment program. The program was designed to treat liquid wastewater by biological treatment in aerated lagoons, store it, and then spray irrigate on crop farmland during the growing season. The text discusses the physical design of the system, agricultural aspects,…

  13. Full scale lightning test technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walko, L. C.; Schneider, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    A test technique was developed for applying a full scale mean value (30 kiloampere peak) simulated lightning return stroke current on a complete flight ready aircraft to assess the threat of lightning to aircraft electrical circuits. A computer-aided generator design was used to establish the parameters of the test system. Data from previous work done on development of low inductance current paths determined the basic system configuration.

  14. Molecular-based detection of potentially pathogenic bacteria in membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems treating municipal wastewater: a case study

    KAUST Repository

    Harb, Moustapha

    2016-12-24

    Although membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems provide better removal of pathogens compared to conventional activated sludge processes, they do not achieve total log removal. The present study examines two MBR systems treating municipal wastewater, one a full-scale MBR plant and the other a lab-scale anaerobic MBR. Both of these systems were operated using microfiltration (MF) polymeric membranes. High-throughput sequencing and digital PCR quantification were utilized to monitor the log removal values (LRVs) of associated pathogenic species and their abundance in the MBR effluents. Results showed that specific removal rates vary widely regardless of the system employed. Each of the two MBR effluents’ microbial communities contained genera associated with opportunistic pathogens (e.g., Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter) with a wide range of log reduction values (< 2 to >5.5). Digital PCR further confirmed that these bacterial groups included pathogenic species, in several instances at LRVs different than those for their respective genera. These results were used to evaluate the potential risks associated both with the reuse of the MBR effluents for irrigation purposes and with land application of the activated sludge from the full-scale MBR system.

  15. Influence of data collection schemes on the Life Cycle Assessment of a municipal wastewater treatment plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshida, Hiroko; Clavreul, Julie; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was conducted to illustrate the effect of an emission inventory data collection scheme on the outcomes of an environmental impact assessment. Due to their burden in respect to data collection, LCAs often rely heavily...

  16. Thermo-Oxidization of Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge for Production of Class A Biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bench-scale reactors were used to test a novel thermo-oxidation process on municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) waste activated sludge (WAS) using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to achieve a Class A sludge product appropriate for land application. Reactor ...

  17. Comparative effectiveness of membrane bioreactors, conventional secondary treatment, and disinfection to remove microorganisms from municipal wastewaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Log removals of bacterial indicators, coliphage, and enteric viruses were studied in three membrane bioreactor activated-sludge (MBR) and two conventional secondary activated-sludge municipal wastewater treatment plants during three disinfection seasons (May–Oct.). In total, 73 regular samples were ...

  18. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater effluent using microalgal biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Temmink, H.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    Microalgal biofilms have so far received little attention as post-treatment for municipal wastewater treatment plants, with the result that the removal capacity of microalgal biofilms in post-treatment systems is unknown. This study investigates the capacity of microalgal biofilms as a post-treatmen

  19. Implementation of biological nutrient removal from municipal wastewater in Finland - HUT/Savonlinna process, a challenge to the UCT process; Asumisjaeteveden biologisen ravinteiden poiston toteuttaminen Suomen oloissa - HUT/Savonlinna-prosessi UCT-prosessin haastajana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuru, H. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    2000-07-01

    The laboratory for Environmental Engineering at the Helsinki University of Technology carried out two successive full-scale R and D projects on biological nutrient removal. As a result of these projects, Pihlajaniemi Wastewater Treatment at Savonlinna in 1991-1996, an activated sludge process, called the HUT/Savonlinna process, was developed. By making use of the organic carbon in wastewater and without any added chemicals, the process is able to reduce the phosphorus content of water by more than 90% and the nitrogen content by about 70%. Total phosphorus contents averaging less than 0.5 mg/l and total nitrogen contents of 8-12 mg/l are usual in the secondary settled wastewater. These projects demonstrated that biological nutrient removal from domestic wastewater would best be started in Finland with year-round complete nitrification. This is the most demanding phase in the removal of biological nutrients from municipal wastewater and also the most expensive way to treat municipal wastewater with the conventional aerated activated sludge process. From there, it would be natural to proceed to effective nitrogen removal by means of denitrification. In that way the operating costs of the treatment plant would be markedly reduced. Nitrogen removal could be implemented without any extension of the treatment plant beyond what would be needed for complete year-round nitrification. The chemical removal of phosphorus from wastewater carried out as simultaneous precipitation could then easily replaced by biological phosphorus removal. This procedure would bring the operating costs of the treatment plant below the level normal in the conventional treatment of municipal wastewaters with an activated sludge process with simultaneous phosphorus precipitation. For this modification the treatment plants would not even have to be enlarged. When biological nutrient removal from municipal wastewaters is implemented in Finland, the HUT/Savonlinna process will surely challenge the UCT

  20. Performance of advanced photocatalytic detoxification of municipal wastewater under solar radiation - A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan Singh, Rubina Chaudhary, Rajendra Singh Thakur

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, there has been a plethora of research and development in the area of solar photocatalysis. The aim is to understand the fundamental processes and enhance photocatalytic efficiencies especially for air, soil and water pollution control. Municipal waste water is limited by continual organic water pollutants and micro-organisms that are not removed by conventional mechanical and biological treatment. In this overview of the most recent paper, studies focused on the treatment of municipal wastewater (containing organic compounds by photocatalysis and the effects of various parameters such as pH, light intensity, Advance oxidation method etc. have been studied It can be concluded that the photocatalysis process is suitable for the treatment of drinking water, municipal and industrial wastewater. Some studies on the economic analysis of photocatalytic systems are also included.

  1. Dutch analysis for P-recovery from municipal wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeleveld, P.; Loeffen, P.; Temmink, H.; Klapwijk, B.

    2004-01-01

    There is a considerable practical interest in phosphorus recovery from water authorities, elementary P-industry, fertilizer industry and regulators in a number of countries. Due to a handful of full-scale plants worldwide, P-recovery can be seen as technically feasible. However, the economic feasibi

  2. Microplastic pollution is widely detected in US municipal wastewater treatment plant effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Sherri A; Garneau, Danielle; Sutton, Rebecca; Chu, Yvonne; Ehmann, Karyn; Barnes, Jason; Fink, Parker; Papazissimos, Daniel; Rogers, Darrin L

    2016-11-01

    Municipal wastewater effluent has been proposed as one pathway for microplastics to enter the aquatic environment. Here we present a broad study of municipal wastewater treatment plant effluent as a pathway for microplastic pollution to enter receiving waters. A total of 90 samples were analyzed from 17 different facilities across the United States. Averaging all facilities and sampling dates, 0.05 ± 0.024 microparticles were found per liter of effluent. Though a small value on a per liter basis, even minor municipal wastewater treatment facilities process millions of liters of wastewater each day, yielding daily discharges that ranged from ∼50,000 up to nearly 15 million particles. Averaging across the 17 facilities tested, our results indicate that wastewater treatment facilities are releasing over 4 million microparticles per facility per day. Fibers and fragments were found to be the most common type of particle within the effluent; however, some fibers may be derived from non-plastic sources. Considerable inter- and intra-facility variation in discharge concentrations, as well as the relative proportions of particle types, was observed. Statistical analysis suggested facilities serving larger populations discharged more particles. Results did not suggest tertiary filtration treatments were an effective means of reducing discharge. Assuming that fragments and pellets found in the effluent arise from the 'microbeads' found in many cosmetics and personal care products, it is estimated that between 3 and 23 billion (with an average of 13 billion) of these microplastic particles are being released into US waterways every day via municipal wastewater. This estimate can be used to evaluate the contribution of microbeads to microplastic pollution relative to other sources (e.g., plastic litter and debris) and pathways (e.g., stormwater) of discharge.

  3. Removal of ammonium from municipal wastewater with powdered and granulated metakaolin geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukkonen, Tero; Věžníková, Kateřina; Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Runtti, Hanna; Yliniemi, Juho; Hu, Tao; Kemppainen, Kimmo; Lassi, Ulla

    2017-03-16

    Ammonium [Formula: see text] removal from municipal wastewater poses challenges with the commonly used biological processes. Especially at low wastewater temperatures, the process is frequently ineffective and difficult to control. One alternative is to use ion-exchange. In the present study, a novel [Formula: see text] ion-exchanger, metakaolin geopolymer (MK-GP), was prepared, characterised, and tested. Batch experiments with powdered MK-GP indicated that the maximum exchange capacities were 31.79, 28.77, and 17.75 mg/g in synthetic, screened, and pre-sedimented municipal wastewater, respectively, according to the Sips isotherm (R(2) ≥ 0.91). Kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order rate equation in all cases (kp2 = 0.04-0.24 g mg(-1) min(-1), R(2) ≥ 0.97) and the equilibrium was reached within 30-90 min. Granulated MK-GP proved to be suitable for a continuous column mode use. Granules were high-strength, porous at the surface and could be regenerated multiple times with NaCl/NaOH. A bench-scale pilot test further confirmed the feasibility of granulated MK-GP in practical conditions at a municipal wastewater treatment plant: consistently <4 mg/L [Formula: see text] could be reached even though wastewater had low temperature (approx. 10°C). The results indicate that powdered or granulated MK-GP might have practical potential for removal and possible recovery of [Formula: see text] from municipal wastewaters. The simple and low-energy preparation method for MK-GP further increases the significance of the results.

  4. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1929-01-01

    Modified propeller and spinner in Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model. On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel. 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST project

  5. ASSESSMENT OF CARBON, NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS TRANSFORMATIONS DURING MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucyna Bogumiła Przywara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Proper exploitation of waste water treatment plant is strictly connected with monitoring of basic parameters and effectiveness of particular its stages. Legal requirements include not only organic compounds (BOD5, COD and general suspensions but also highly effective removal of nutrients: nitrogen and phosphorus. Effectiveness of removal of biogenic compounds interferes with temperature fluctuations, effluent quality, problems of active sediment. The aim of this study was to show changes in concentrations of organic compounds, nitrogen and phosphorus in the municipal wastewater after subsequent stages of mechanical-biological treatment. During researches samples were taken down by the wastewater treatment line: raw wastewater, after mechanical treatment, pre-denitrification, dephosphatation, denitrification, nitrification and treated wastewater. Another aspect of this study was determination of COD fractions, and their changes in the municipal wastewater, after the successive stages of mechanical-biological treatment. It allows separation of dissolved and non-dissolved organic substances, taking into account also their biodegradability and the lack of susceptibility to biological decomposition. It can also be a very important method of the processes control during wastewater treatment.

  6. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation for advanced municipal wastewater treatment: is it feasible?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jie; XIONG Bi-yong; ZHANG Shu-de; YANG Hong; ZHANG Jie

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation(ANAMMOX) is a recently developed process to treat ammonia-rich wastewater. There were numerous articles about the new technology with focus on the ammonium-rich wastewater treatment, but few on advanced municipal wastewater treatment. The paper studied the anaerobic ammonium oxidation(ANAMMOX) process with a down flow anoxic biofilter for nitrogen removal from secondary clarifier effluent of municipal wastewater with low COD/N ratio. The results showed that ANAMMOX process is applicable to advanced wastewater treatment with normal temperature as well as ammonia-rich high temperature wastewater treatment. The results indicated that ammonia removal rate was improved by raising the nitrite concentration, and the reaction rate reached a climax at 118.4 mgN/L of the nitrite nitrogen concentration. If the concentration exceeds 118.4 mgN/L, the ANAMMOX process was significantly inhibited although the ANAMMOX bacteria still showed a relatively high reactivity. The data also indicated that the ratio of NO2- -N:NH4 + -N = 1.3:1 in the influent was appropriate for excellent nitrogen removal. The pH increased gradually along the ANAMMOX biofilter reactor. When the ANAMMOX reaction was ended, the pH was tend to calm. The data suggested that the pH could be used as an indicator to describe the course of ANAMMOX reaction.

  7. Preozonation of primary-treated municipal wastewater for reuse in biofuel feedstock generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondala, Andro H.; Hernandez, Rafael; French, W. Todd; Estévez, L. Antonio; Meckes, Mark; Trillo, Marlene; Hall, Jacqueline

    2010-11-09

    The results of a laboratory scale investigation on ozone pretreatment of primary-treated municipal wastewater for potential reuse in fermentation processes for the production of biofuels and bio-based feedstock chemicals were presented. Semi-batch preozonation with 3.0% (w/w) ozone at 1 L min -1 resulted into a considerable inactivation of the indigenous heterotrophic bacteria in the wastewater with less than 0.0002% comprising the ozone-resistant fraction of the microbial population. The disinfection process was modeled using first-order inactivation kinetics with a rate constant of 4.39 10 -3 s -1. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels were reduced by 30% in 1-h experiments. COD depletion was also modeled using a pseudo-first-order kinetics at a rate constant of 9.50 10 -5 s -1. Biological oxygen demand (BOD 5) values were reduced by 60% up to 20 min of ozonation followed by a plateau and some slight increases attributed to partial oxidation of recalcitrant materials. Ozone also had no substantial effect on the concentration of ammonium and phosphate ions, which are essential for microbial growth and metabolism. Preliminary tests indicated that oleaginous microorganisms could be cultivated in the ozonated wastewater, resulting in relatively higher cell densities than in raw wastewater and comparable results with autoclave-sterilized wastewater. This process could potentially produce significant quantities of oil for biofuel production from municipal wastewater streams.

  8. Impact on the Quality of Life When Living Close to a Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantarakis, A; Paparrodopoulos, S; Kokkinos, P; Vantarakis, G; Fragou, K; Detorakis, I

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the impact on the quality of life of people living close to a municipal wastewater treatment plant. A case control study, including 235 inhabitants living within a 500 m radius by a municipal wastewater treatment plant (cases) and 97 inhabitants living in a different area (controls), was conducted. A standardized questionnaire was self-completed by the participants which examined the general health perception and the overall life satisfaction. Also, the concentration of airborne pathogenic microorganisms in aerosol samples collected around the wastewater treatment plant was investigated. Significant risk for symptoms such as headache, unusual tiredness, and concentration difficulties was recorded and an increased possibility for respiratory and skin diseases was reported. A high rate of the cases being irritable and moody was noticed. Significantly higher gastrointestinal symptoms were also reported among the cases in relation to the controls. The prevalence of pathogenic airborne microorganisms originating from the wastewater treatment plant was reported in high numbers in sampling points close to the wastewater treatment plant. More analytical epidemiological investigations are needed to determine the cause as well as the burden of the diseases to inhabitants living surrounding the wastewater treatment plant.

  9. Estimation of the electric power potential using wastewater sludge produced from the Percy Steward Wastewater Treatment Works (PS-WWTW) in Mogale City local municipality

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mema, V

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Energy recovered from biogas in the form of methane can reduce the usage of electricity generated from fossil fuels thereby lessening greenhouse gas deposits into environment. Sewage sludge produced by Municipal Wastewater Treatment Works composes...

  10. Microalgae cultivation for bioenergy production using wastewaters from a municipal WWTP as nutritional sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sunja; Lee, Nakyeong; Park, Seonghwan; Yu, Jaecheul; Luong, Thanh Thao; Oh, You-Kwan; Lee, Taeho

    2013-03-01

    In order to reduce input cost for microalgal cultivation, we investigated the feasibility of wastewater taken from a municipal WWTP in Busan, Korea as wastewater nutrients. The wastewaters used in this study were the effluent from a primary settling tank (PS), the effluent from an anaerobic digestion tank (AD), the conflux of wastewaters rejected from sludge-concentrate tanks and dewatering facilities (CR), and two combined wastewaters of AD:PS (10:90, v/v) and AD:CR (10:90, v/v). Chlorella sp. ADE5, which was isolated from the AD, was selected for the feasibility test. The highest biomass production (3.01 g-dry cell weight per liter) of the isolate was obtained with the combined wastewater ADCR, and it was 1.72 times higher than that with BG 11 medium. Interestingly, the cells cultivated with wastewater containing PS wastewater were easily separated from the culture and improved lipid content, especially oleic acid content, in their cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of Emergy Analysis to the Sustainability Evaluation of Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Shao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Municipal wastewater treatment plants consume much energy and manpower, are expensive to run, and generate sludge and treated wastewater whilst removing pollutants through specific treatment regimes. The sustainable development of the wastewater treatment industry is therefore challenging, and a comprehensive evaluation method is needed for assessing the sustainability of different wastewater treatment processes, for identifying the improvement potential of treatment plants, and for directing policymakers, management measures and development strategies. This study established improved evaluation indicators based on Emergy Analysis that place total wastewater, resources, energy, economic input and emission of pollutants on the same scale compared to the traditional indicators. The sustainability of four wastewater treatment plants and their associated Anaerobic-Anoxic-Oxic (A2O, Constant Waterlevel Sequencing Batch Reactor (CWSBR, Cyclic Activated Sludge Technology (CAST and Biological Aerated Filter (BAF treatment processes were assessed in a city in northeast China. Results show that the CWSBR process was the most sustainable wastewater treatment process according to its largest calculated value of Improved Emergy Sustainable Index (2.53 × 100, followed by BAF (1.60 × 100, A2O (9.78 × 10−1 and CAST (5.77 × 10−1. Emergy Analysis provided improved indicators that are suitable for comparing different wastewater treatment processes.

  12. AIR POLLUTION FROM ANIMAL AND MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER: ASSESSMENT OF PRODUCTION AND RELEASE OF NOXIOUS GASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Xiaorong

    better gas emissions from wastewater, but also for improving gas emission abatement technologies, such as slurry acidification. Experiments of slurry aeration and acidification were conducted in animal wastewater reactors which acted as dynamic flux chambers. Ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide...... studies of enzymatic degradation process in manure, and the obtained enzyme-kinetic parameters can be utilized in prediction modeling of ammonia production rates and thus ammonia release from animal productions. The results of the acidification study showed that slurry acidification can reduce ammonia......Airborne contaminants and odor from animal manure and municipal wastewater can affect human physical and psychological health, and the environment. The estimation of gas emission rates and development of technologies to reduce the release of noxious gases from wastewater is limited by current...

  13. [Fate analysis of NPEOs and their metabolites in municipal wastewater plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jing; Liu, Jun-Xin

    2012-09-01

    Nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs), as an important group of non-ionic surfactants, have raised the society's serious concern because they can be transformed into their metabolites such as nonylphenol (NP) after biodegradation, which could cause potential disrupting effects on the endocrine system of wild animals. In this paper, NPEOs and their metabolites were taken as the research objects, and the occurrence and output pathways of NPEOs and their metabolites during the municipal wastewater treatment process were investigated, as well as the affecting factors of their removal efficiency. The results showed that NPEOs and their metabolites were ubiquitous in the influents of municipal wastewater plants, and the concentrations were related to seasons, geographic locations, living habits and so on. NPEOs and their metabolites entering WWTPs were output mainly through three pathways: biodegradation, adsorption onto sludge and release via effluents. Endocrine disrupting chemicals such as NP and NPECs were produced during the wastewater treatment process and entered the environment via effluents and sludge. The results of this paper could provide a scientific basis for the construction of safety control techniques in the municipal wastewater treatment plant.

  14. Removal of a broad range of surfactants from municipal wastewater--comparison between membrane bioreactor and conventional activated sludge treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Susana; Petrovic, Mira; Barceló, Damià

    2007-02-01

    Elimination of alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEO) and their degradation products (alkylphenols and alkylphenoxy carboxylates), as well as linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) and coconut diethanol amides (CDEA), was studied in a pilot plant membrane bioreactor (MBR) working in parallel to a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) using conventional activated sludge (CAS). In the CAS system 87% of parent long ethoxy chain NPEOs were eliminated, but their decomposition yielded persistent acidic and neutral metabolites which were poorly removed. The elimination of short ethoxy chain NPEOs (NP(1)EO and NP(2)EO) averaged 50%, whereas nonylphenoxy carboxylates (NPECs) showed an increase in concentrations with respect to the ones measured in influent samples. Nonylphenol (NP) was the only nonylphenolic compound efficiently removed (96%) in the CAS treatment. On the other hand, MBR showed good performance in removing nonylphenolic compounds with an overall elimination of 94% for the total pool of NPEO derived compounds (in comparison of 54%-overall elimination in the CAS). The elimination of individual compounds in the MBR was as follows: 97% for parent, long ethoxy chain NPEOs, 90% for short ethoxy chain NPEOs, 73% for NPECs, and 96% for NP. Consequently, the residual concentrations were in the low mug/l level or below it. LAS and CDEA showed similar elimination in the both wastewater treatment systems that were investigated, and no significant differences were observed between the two treatment processes. Nevertheless, for all studied compounds the MBR effluent concentrations were consistently lower and independent of the influent concentrations. Additionally, MBR effluent quality in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH(4)(+) concentration and total suspended solids (TSS) was always superior to the ones of the CAS and also independent of the influent quality, which demonstrates high potential of MBRs in the treatment of municipal wastewaters.

  15. Fate of diclofenac in municipal wastewater treatment plant - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieno, Niina; Sillanpää, Mika

    2014-08-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a common anti-inflammatory pharmaceutical that is often detected in waste wasters, effluents and surface waters. Recently, DCF was included in the watch list of substances in EU that requires its environmental monitoring in the member states. DCF is also known to harmfully affect several environmental species already at concentrations of ≤ 1 μg/l. This review focuses on the occurrence and fate of DCF in conventional wastewater treatment processes. Research done in this area was gathered and analyzed in order to find out the possibilities to enhance DCF elimination during biological wastewater treatment. More precisely, human metabolism, concentrations in wastewater influents and effluents, elimination rates in the treatment train, roles of sorption and biotransformation mechanisms during the treatment as well as formation of transformation products are reported. Additionally, the effect of process configuration, i.e. conventional activated sludge (CAS), biological nutrient removal (BNR), membrane bioreactor (MBR) and attached-growth bioreactor, and process parameters, i.e. solids retention time (SRT) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) are presented. Generally, DCF is poorly biodegradable which often translates into low elimination rates during biological wastewater treatment. Only a minor portion is sorbed to sludge. MBR and attached-growth bioreactors may result in higher elimination of DCF over CAS or BNR. Long SRTs (>150 d) favor the DCF elimination due to sludge adaptation. Longer HRTs (>2-3d) could significantly increase the elimination of DCF during biological wastewater treatment. Bioaugmentation could be used to enhance DCF elimination, however, this requires more research on microbial communities that are able to degrade DCF. Also, further research is needed to gain more information about the deconjugation processes and biotic and abiotic transformation and the nature of transformation products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All

  16. Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria And Their Associated Resistance Genes in a Conventional Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant

    KAUST Repository

    Aljassim, Nada I.

    2013-12-01

    With water scarcity as a pressing issue in Saudi Arabia and other Middle Eastern countries, the treatment and reuse of municipal wastewater is increasingly being used as an alternative water source to supplement country water needs. Standards are in place to ensure a safe treated wastewater quality, however they do not regulate pathogenic bacteria and emerging contaminants. Information is lacking on the levels of risk to public health associated with these factors, the efficiency of conventional treatment strategies in removing them, and on wastewater treatment in Saudi Arabia in general. In this study, a municipal wastewater treatment plant in Saudi Arabia is investigated to assess the efficiency of conventional treatment in meeting regulations and removing pathogens and emerging contaminants. The study found pathogenic bacterial genera, antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotic resistant bacteria, many of which were multi-resistant in plant discharges. It was found that although the treatments are able to meet traditional quality guidelines, there remains a risk from the discussed contaminants with wastewater reuse. A deeper understanding of this risk, and suggestions for more thorough guidelines and monitoring are needed.

  17. Municipal wastewater effluent licensing: A global perspective and recommendations for best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Liz; Colombo, Valentina; Hassell, Kathryn; Kellar, Claudette; Leahy, Paul; Long, Sara M; Myers, Jackie H; Pettigrove, Vincent

    2017-02-15

    Advances in wastewater treatment have greatly improved the quality of municipal wastewater effluents in many parts of the world, but despite this, treated wastewaters can still pose a risk to the environment. Licensing plays a crucial role in the regulation of municipal wastewater effluents by setting standards or limits designed to protect the economic, environmental and societal values of waterbodies. Traditionally these standards have focused on physical and chemical water quality parameters within the discharge itself, however these approaches do not adequately account for emerging contaminants, potential effects of chemical mixtures, or variations in the sensitivity and resilience of receiving environments. In this review we focus on a number of industrialised countries and their approach to licensing. We consider how we can ensure licensing is effective, particularly when considering the rapid changes in our understanding of the impacts of discharges, the technical advances in our ability to detect chemicals at low concentrations and the progress in wastewater treatment technology. In order to meet the challenges required to protect the values of our waterways, licensing of effluents will need to ensure that there is no disconnect between the core values to be protected and the monitoring system designed to scrutinise performance of the WWTP. In many cases this may mean an expansion in the monitoring approaches used for both the effluent itself and the receiving waterbody. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of irrigation with treated municipal wastewater on yield of Nitraria schoberi under greenhouse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Shahriari

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Water crisis is an important issue in arid and semi-arid regions like Iran. Due to drought events, the situation has become more acute in recent years. Therefore, where good quality water is not available, the use of unconventional water has increased considerably. One of these resources is municipal wastewater that can also provide some of the nutrients needed for plant nutrition. Therefore, in this research, the combined effects of treated municipal wastewater and soil texture on growth and yield of Nitraria schoberi under greenhouse conditions, was investigated. The experiment was a factorial completely randomized design with four replications. The treatments included: two types of irrigation water (wastewater and water, two soil textures (clay and sandy and two irrigation frequencies (5 and 15 days. Analysis of the wastewater showed that concentrations of the elements were in the standard limits. The results also showed that the use of wastewater has positive effect on stem length and dry and fresh weight of the plants. Therefore, due to the problem of water supply to plant species in the arid regions, this method can have a significant role in the stability of plants, reducing costs of irrigation and fertilizers, and biological restoration.

  19. Balancing the organic load and light supply in symbiotic microalgal–bacterial biofilm reactors treating synthetic municipal wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Temmink, B.G.; Janssen, M.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic microalgal–bacterial biofilms can be very attractive for municipal wastewater treatment. Microalgae remove nitrogen and phosphorus and simultaneously produce the oxygen that is required for the aerobic, heterotrophic degradation of organic pollutants. For the application of these biofilms

  20. Balancing the organic load and light supply in symbiotic microalgal–bacterial biofilm reactors treating synthetic municipal wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Temmink, B.G.; Janssen, M.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic microalgal–bacterial biofilms can be very attractive for municipal wastewater treatment. Microalgae remove nitrogen and phosphorus and simultaneously produce the oxygen that is required for the aerobic, heterotrophic degradation of organic pollutants. For the application of these biofilms

  1. Fouling Characterization of Forward Osmosis Biomimetic Aquaporin Membranes Used for Water Recovery from Municipal Wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarebska, Agata; Petrinic, Irena; Hey, Tobias;

    /ultrafiltration coupled with RO and sand filtration, or advanced oxidation process require high energy. Contrary to pressure driven membrane processes, forward osmosis (FO) offers advantages such as no need of high hydraulic pressure, reduced fouling and simple cleaning. Even though fouling of FO membranes is less severe......Generally more than 99.93% of municipal wastewater is composed of water, therefore water recovery can alleviate global water stress which currently exists. Traditional ways to extract water from wastewater by the use of membrane bioreactors combined with reverse osmosis (RO), or micro...

  2. Genomic and functional characterization of qnr-encoding plasmids from municipal wastewater biosolid Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Ella eKaplan; Noa eSela; Adi eDoron-faigenboim; Shiri eNavon-Venezia; Edouard eJurkevitch; Eddie eCytryn

    2015-01-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are considered to be hotspots for antibiotic resistance since they conjoin high densities of environmental and fecal bacteria with selective pressure in the form of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. Discharged effluents and biosolids from these facilities can disseminate antibiotic resistant genes to terrestrial and aquatic environments, potentially contributing to the increasing global trend in antibiotic resistance. This phenomenon is e...

  3. Genomic and Functional Characterization of qnr-Encoding Plasmids from Municipal Wastewater Biosolid Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Ella; Sela, Noa; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Cytryn, Eddie

    2015-01-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are considered to be “hotspots” for antibiotic resistance, since they conjoin high densities of environmental and fecal bacteria with selective pressure in the form of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. Discharged effluents and biosolids from these facilities can disseminate antibiotic resistant genes to terrestrial and aquatic environments, potentially contributing to the increasing global trend in antibiotic resistance. This phenomenon i...

  4. Kinetic analysis for destruction of municipal sewage sludge and alcohol distillery wastewater by supercritical water oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Motonobu; Nada, Takatsugu; Kodama, Akio; Hirose, Tsutomu [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry

    1999-05-01

    Supercritical water oxidation was applied to the destruction of municipal excess sewage sludge and alcohol distillery wastewater of molasses. The reaction was carried out in a batch reactor with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant in the temperature range 673--773 K. Total organic carbon was measured as a function of reaction time. The dynamic data were analyzed by a first-order reaction model. The reaction rate constant coincides with those reported in the literature.

  5. Fate and Toxicity of Zinc Oxide Nanomaterial in Municipal Wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeraldi, Josh; Ganesh, Rajagopalan; Hosseini, Turaj; Khatib, Leila; Olson, Betty H; Rosso, Diego

    2017-09-01

      The production of zinc nanomaterial has increased significantly over the past several years and, as a result, nanoparticles have navigated their way into wastewater streams. The transportation and toxicity of zinc nanomaterial within the wastewater treatment processes is not well known. In this study, the zinc nanomaterial and its fate were characterized in an activated sludge treatment process. The tests performed included batch studies to evaluate abiotic and biotic removal, toxicity studies to evaluate inhibition to coliform and nitrifying bacteria, and bioreactor studies to evaluate impact on operating parameters. Stock solutions of zinc nanomaterial varied in size from 50 to 500 nm, but when added to an activated sludge solution, the nanoparticles agglomerated to larger sizes such that more than 60% of the zinc nanomaterial settled out of solution. However, when ionic zinc was added to activated sludge, more than 60% of the ionic zinc remained in suspension. It is likely that the ionic strength of the wastewater influenced the aggregation of the nanomaterial. Differences in the extent of removal between ionic and nano zinc species indicate that the mechanisms governing their removal are different. Toxicity analysis showed that zinc nanomaterial did not inhibit growth of coliform and ammonia oxidizing bacteria. However, ionic zinc inhibited the growth of both the coliform and ammonia oxidizing bacteria. Bioreactors were set up using activated sludge that was collected from a local treatment plant operating only in carbon oxidation mode. The treatment plant was operated at an SRT of 1.2 days and an MLSS of 650 mg/L. Several key parameters (COD, MLSS, pH) in the bioreactors were monitored through a 7-day incubation period, but showed no significant changes due to the addition of nano or ionic zinc. It is possible that the toxicity of zinc nanomaterial was not observed in these experiments because the nanomaterial agglomerated and settled out of solution.

  6. Corrosion control when using secondary treated municipal wastewater as alternative makeup water for cooling tower systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Li, Heng; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Monnell, Jason D; Chowdhury, Indranil; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2010-12-01

    Secondary treated municipal wastewater is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water, especially in arid regions. Laboratory and field testing was conducted in this study to evaluate the corrosiveness of secondary treated municipal wastewater for various metals and metal alloys in cooling systems. Different corrosion control strategies were evaluated based on varied chemical treatment. Orthophosphate, which is abundant in secondary treated municipal wastewater, contributed to more than 80% precipitative removal of phosphorous-based corrosion inhibitors. Tolyltriazole worked effectively to reduce corrosion of copper (greater than 95% inhibition effectiveness). The corrosion rate of mild steel in the presence of free chlorine 1 mg/L (as Cl2) was approximately 50% higher than in the presence of monochloramine 1 mg/L (as Cl2), indicating that monochloramine is a less corrosive biocide than free chlorine. The scaling layers observed on the metal alloys contributed to corrosion inhibition, which could be seen by comparing the mild steel 21-day average corrosion rate with the last 5-day average corrosion rate, the latter being approximately 50% lower than the former.

  7. UASB/flash aeration enable complete treatment of municipal wastewater for reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abid Ali; Gaur, Rubia Zahid; Lew, Beni; Diamantis, Vasileios; Mehrotra, Indu; Kazmi, A A

    2012-08-01

    A simple, efficient and cost-effective method for municipal wastewater treatment is examined in this paper. The municipal wastewater is treated using an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor followed by flash aeration (FA) as the post-treatment, without implementing aerobic biological processes. The UASB reactor was operated without recycle, at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 8 h and achieved consistent removal of BOD, COD and TSS of 60-70% for more than 12 months. The effect of FA on UASB effluent post-treatment was studied at different HRT (15, 30 and 60 min) and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations (low DO = 1-2 mg/L and high DO = 5-6 mg/L). The optimum conditions for BOD, COD and sulfide removal were 30-60 min HRT and high DO concentration inside the FA tank. The final effluent after clarification was characterized by BOD and COD values of 28-35 and 50-58 mg/L, respectively. Sulfides were removed by more than 80%, but the fecal coliform only by ~2 log. The UASB followed by FA is a simple and efficient process for municipal wastewater treatment, except for fecal coliform, enabling water and nutrients recycling to agriculture.

  8. A Survey on the Removal Efficiency of Fat, Oil and Grease in Shiraz Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghani; Sadatjo; Maleknia; Shamsedini

    2014-01-01

    Background Fat, oil and grease (FOG) in municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP) caused many problems. Objectives This study aimed to determine the removal efficiency of FOG in Shiraz MWWTP. Materials and Methods The removal efficiencies of FOG in the MWWTP were studied from June 2011 to September 2011 in Shiraz (Iran). The influent and effluent wastewater samples were collecte...

  9. Microalgal biomass and lipid production in mixed municipal, dairy, pulp and paper wastewater together with added flue gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Francesco G

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to grow microalgae on mixed municipal and industrial wastewater to simultaneously treat the wastewater and produce biomass and lipids. All algal strains grew in all wastewater mixtures; however, Selenastrum minutum had the highest biomass and lipids yields, up to 37% of the dry matter. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal were high and followed a similar trend in all three strains. Ammonium was reduced from 96% to 99%; this reduction was due to algal growth and not to stripping to the atmosphere, as confirmed by the amount of nitrogen in the dry algal biomass. Phosphate was reduced from 91% to 99%. In all strains used the lipid content was negatively correlated to the nitrogen concentration in the algal biomass. Mixtures of pulp and paper wastewater with municipal and dairy wastewater have great potential to grow algae for biomass and lipid production together with effective wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Accumulation and Risk of Triclosan in Surface Sediments Near the Outfalls of Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Wang, Zheng; Jing, Zhaoqian; Wang, Zhulai; Cao, Shiwei; Yu, Ting

    2015-10-01

    Triclosan is an antimicrobial agent which is widely used in many personal care products. This toxic chemical is frequently found in the aquatic environment. The municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent has been reported to be one of the major sources for triclosan in the aquatic system. The aim of the present study was to investigate the accumulation of triclosan in the surface sediments near the outfalls of the five major municipal WWTPs of Nanjing, China, as well as to evaluate its potential ecological risk. The concentration of triclosan in the sediment samples ranged from 48.3 to 226 ng/g dry weight, which was well correlated with the acute and genetic toxicity by bioassay. The results suggested that triclosan released from municipal WWTPs could accumulate in the surface sediments nearby and may pose undetermined risk to aquatic organisms.

  11. Biosensor-based control of nitrification inhibitor in municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayasu, Y; Tanaka, H; Inui, T; Tanaka, Y

    2006-01-01

    The effect of potassium cyanide (KCN) on nitrification processes in municipal wastewater treatment plants was studied by batch nitrification tests, which indicated that nitrification processes tend to be inhibited at a lower KCN concentration than the present discharge standard to sewerage. The experiment of the biosensor using nitrifying bacteria was also conducted for continuous monitoring of nitrification inhibitor in influent wastewater, and demonstrated that the biosensor can detect KCN at as low as EC10 of the abovementioned batch nitrification test. Moreover, to determine the effectiveness of application of the biosensor to avoid the impact of KCN due to an accidental spillage in a sewerage system, KCN was intentionally injected into the experimental models of activated sludge process equipped both with and without the biosensor. The model with the biosensor that could detect KCN could divert the wastewater including KCN to a refuge tank, which resulted in the avoidance of upset of the activated sludge process. On the other hand, the model without the biosensor was upset in the nitrification process due to KCN. Such differences demonstrate the effectiveness of the biosensor applied to countermeasures of an accidental spillage of toxic chemicals to avoid upset of nitrification in municipal wastewater treatment plants.

  12. Energy optimization of water and wastewater management for municipal and industrial applications conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    These proceedings document the presentations given at the Energy Optimization of Water and Wastewater Management for Municipal and Industrial Applications, Conference, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The conference was organized and coordinated by Argonne National Laboratory. The conference focused on energy use on conservation in water and wastewater. The General Session also reflects DOE's commitment to the support and development of waste and wastewater systems that are environmentally acceptable. The conference proceedings are divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the General Session and Sessions 1 to 5. Volume 2 covers Sessions 6 to 12. Separate abstracts are prepared for each item within the scope of the Energy Data Base.

  13. Technical Innovation of Land Treatment Systems for Municipal Wastewater in Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qi-Xing; ZHANG Qian-Ru; SUN Tie-Heng

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of ecological principles including holistic optimization, cycling and regeneration, and regional differen tiation, land treatment systems (LTSs) for municipal wastewater were continuously explored and updated in the western Shenyang area and the Huolinhe area, China. Intensified pretreatment, addition of a man-made soil filtration layer, and use of an ecologically diversified secondary plant cover were proved to be technically feasible. Hydraulic loading was de termined according to the assimilation capacity of soil ecosystems, thus ensuring safe operation of wastewater treatment.This modernized and alternative approach to wastewater treatment had been widely applied in middle-sized and small cities and towns of Northeast China, and these innovative systems in some areas had indicated favorable ecological, social,and economic benefits.

  14. Energy optimization of water and wastewater management for municipal and industrial applications conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    These proceedings document the presentations given at the Energy Optimization of Water and Wastewater Management for Municipal and Industrial Applications Conference, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The conference was organized and coordinated by Argonne National Laboratory. The conference focused on energy use and conservation in water and wastewater. The General Session also reflects DOE's commitment to the support and development of waste and wastewater systems that are environmentally acceptable. The conference proceedings are divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the General Session and Sessions 1 to 5. Volume 2 covers Sessions 6 to 12. Separate abstracts are prepared for each item within the scope of the Energy Data Base.

  15. Ultraviolet and solar photocatalytic ozonation of municipal wastewater: Catalyst reuse, energy requirements and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecha, Achisa C; Onyango, Maurice S; Ochieng, Aoyi; Momba, Maggy N B

    2017-11-01

    The present study evaluated the treatment of municipal wastewater containing phenol using solar and ultraviolet (UV) light photocatalytic ozonation processes to explore comparative performance. Important aspects such as catalyst reuse, mineralization of pollutants, energy requirements, and toxicity of treated wastewater which are crucial for practical implementation of the processes were explored. The activity of the photocatalysts did not change significantly even after three consecutive uses despite approximately 2% of the initial quantity of catalyst being lost in each run. Analysis of the change in average oxidation state (AOS) demonstrated the formation of more oxidized degradation products (ΔAOS values of 1.0-1.7) due to mineralization. The energy requirements were determined in terms of electrical energy per order (EEO) and the collector area per order (ACO). The EEO (kWh m(-3) Order(-1)) values were 26.2 for ozonation, 38-47 for UV photocatalysis and 7-22 for UV photocatalytic ozonation processes. On the other hand, ACO (m(2) m(-3) order(-1)) values were 31-69 for solar photocatalysis and 8-13 for solar photocatalytic ozonation. Thus photocatalytic ozonation processes required less energy input compared to the individual processes. The cytotoxicity of the wastewater was analysed using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay with Vero cells. The cell viability increased from 28.7% in untreated wastewater to 80% in treated wastewater; thus showing that the treated wastewater was less toxic. The effectiveness of photocatalytic ozonation, recovery and reusability of the photocatalysts, as well as detoxification of the wastewater make this low energy consumption process attractive for wastewater remediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation in traditional municipal wastewater treatment plants with low-strength ammonium loading: Widespread but overlooked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanyun; Peng, Yongzhen; Ma, Bin; Wang, Shuying; Zhu, Guibing

    2015-11-01

    Occurrence of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) in marine and freshwater systems has greatly changed our understanding of global nitrogen (N) cycle and promoted the investigation of the role and ecological features of anammox in anthropogenic ecosystems. This study focused on the spatio-temporal abundance, activity, and biodiversity of anammox bacteria in full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) via traditional nitrification/denitrification route with low-strength ammonium loading. The anammox bacteria were detected in all the treatment units at the five WWTPs tested, even in aerobic zones (dissolved oxygen >2 mg L(-1)) with abundance of 10(5)-10(7) hydrazine synthase (hzs) gene copies g(-1). The (15)N-isotope tracing technology revealed that the anammox rates in WWTPs ranged from 0.08 to 0.36 μmol N g(-1) h(-1) in winter and 0.12-1.20 μmol N g(-1) h(-1) in summer with contributions of 2.05-6.86% and 1.71-7.26% to N2 production, respectively. The diversity of anammox bacteria in WWTPs was distributed over only two genera, Brocadia and Kuenenia. Additionally, the exploration of potential interspecies relationships indicated that ammonia oxidation bacteria (AOB) was the major nitrite-substrate producer for anammox during nitrification, while Nitrospira, a nitrite oxidation bacteria (NOB), was the potential major competitor for nitrite. These results suggested the contribution of N-removal by the widespread of anammox has been overlooked in traditional municipal WWTPs, and the ecological habitats of anammox bacteria in anthropogenic ecosystems are much more abundant than previously assumed.

  17. Mineral scaling mitigation in cooling systems using tertiary-treated municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenshi; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2012-09-15

    Treated municipal wastewater (MWW) is recognized as a significant potential source of cooling water for power generation. One of the key challenges for the successful use of the effluent from wastewater treatment facilities for cooling is the potential for significant mineral scaling when the raw water is concentrated as much as 4-6 times in recirculating cooling systems. Previous bench- and pilot-scale tests have shown that commonly used phosphorus- and polymer- based scaling inhibitors are ineffective when secondary-treated municipal wastewater (MWW) is used as make-up. In this study, two types of tertiary-treated municipal wastewaters, namely secondary-treated MWW with pH adjustment (MWW_pH) and secondary-treated MWW subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF) were evaluated as the sole source of make-up water for recirculating cooling systems. Both laboratory studies and pilot-scale tests revealed that adjusting the pH to 7.8 could reduce the mineral scaling rate by more than 80% without causing any significant corrosion problems. In contrast to MWW, where calcium carbonate was the dominant scaling mineral, the main component of mineral scale in MWW_pH was calcium phosphate. Both static and dynamic bench-scale tests indicated that scaling would not be a significant concern when MWW_NF is used as the make-up water in recirculating cooling systems operated at 4-6 cycles of concentration (CoC). Extended pilot-scale studies confirmed that MWW_NF is suitable makeup water for power plant cooling systems and that no anti-scaling chemicals would be required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gaseous and bioaerosol emissions from municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetha, N; Bhargava, Renu; Gurjar, B R

    2013-10-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are identified as potential emission sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and bioaerosols. This paper reviews and analyse the potential sources of GHGs and bioaerosols from different unit operations and processes of WWTPs. Aeration tanks of activated sludge process (ASP) are found to be the most important sources of GHGs as well as bioaerosol emissions. Nitrification and denitrification processes are found to be important sources of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. To minimize the N2O emissions from WWTPs, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration should be kept greater than 2 mg/L in nitrification process, whereas purely anoxic condition (0 mg/L DO) is required in denitrification process. Diffused aeration emits fewer microbes into the air than surface aerators. It is observed that fixed-film processes emit microbes by two orders of magnitude less than aeration tanks. The various WWTPs discussed in this study used different methods of treatment sample collection and species of microorganisms studied. It is realised that the standardisation of the microorganisms to be analysed and methods of sample collection needs to be done. It is also found that from the microbiological point of view, there is no clean air in the vicinity of a WWTP.

  19. Ultraviolet reduction of erythromycin and tetracycline resistant heterotrophic bacteria and their resistance genes in municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance in wastewater is becoming a major public health concern, but poorly understood about impact of disinfection on antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes. The UV disinfection of antibiotic resistant heterotrophic bacteria and their relevant genes in the wastewater of a municipal wastewater treatment plant has been evaluated. Two commonly used antibiotics, erythromycin and tetracycline were selected because of their wide occurrences in regard to the antibiotic resistance problem. After UV treatment at a fluence of 5mJcm(-2), the log reductions of heterotrophic bacteria resistant to erythromycin and tetracycline in the wastewater were found to be 1.4±0.1 and 1.1±0.1, respectively. The proportion of tetracycline-resistant bacteria (5%) was nearly double of that before UV disinfection (3%). Tetracycline-resistant bacteria exhibited more tolerance to UV irradiation compared to the erythromycin-resistant bacteria (pUV treatment at a fluence of 5mJcm(-2) removed the total erythromycin- and tetracycline-resistance genes by 3.0±0.1 log and 1.9±0.1 log, respectively. UV treatment was effective in reducing antibiotic resistance in the wastewater.

  20. Potential investigation of Reusing Ardabil Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge Based on AHP and TOPSIS Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizhan Maghsoudlou Kamali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction :By ever-increasing of population, shortage of water resources and the necessity of wastewater treatment, huge volumes of sludge that is a byproduct of wastewater treatment, requires to be disposed in environmentally secure ways. The target of specifying strategic preferences of reuse of sludge has been to find the correct way of disposal or beneficial use of sludge. Material and methods: In this study, to select the best alternative for reuse of wastewater sludge two systematic methods are introduced, which four alternatives for reuse of sludge (use in agriculture, use in green space, biogas, desert combat are introduced and they are compared by four main parameters including: 1- physicochemical 2-biological 3 - economic, social and cultural, and 4 - environmental pollution situation, that each contains some criteria. In this study, first each of the related parameters and criteria are compared by the expert groups of and through questionnaire. Then these weights are entered into Expert Choice software for the analyze of AHP model and paired comparisons and weightings have been done on the related parameters and criteria. Ultimately, the output of the software is entered into TOPSIS software for the analyze of TOPSIS model until the best alternative is selected. Results: sludge of Ardabil municipal wastewater treatment plant, according to standards and EPA regulations is eligible to class B, and due to the chemical in terms of heavy metals have special (excellent quality and contains considerable quantities of organic substance, nutrients and micronutrients which indicates the fertilizer value of the sludge. Conclusion: The result of this comparison has shown that the application of sludge in green spaces is the most appropriate alternative and then use in agriculture, biogas alternative, and desert combat alternative are, respectively, placed in the second to fourth preference for the reuse of sludge derived from municipal

  1. Greenhouse gas emissions from municipal wastewater treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parravicini, Vanessa; Svardal, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Operating wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) represent a source of greenhouse gases (GHG). Direct GHG emissions include emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) that can be biologically produced during wastewater and sewage sludge treatment. This is also highlighted in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2006) guidelines used for national GHG inventories. Indirect GHG emissions occur at WWTPs mainly by the consumption of electricity, fossil fuel for transportation and by the use of chemicals (e.g. coagulants). In this study, the impact of direct and indirect GHG emissions was quantified for two model WWTPs of 50.000 person equivalents (p.e.) using carbon footprint analyses. It was assumed that at one WWTP sewage sludge is digested anaerobically, at the other one it is aerobically stabilised in the activated sludge tank. The carbon footprint analyses were performed using literature emission factors. A new estimation model based on measurements at eight Austrian WWTPs was used for the assessment of N2O direct emissions (Parravicini et al., 2015). The results of the calculations show that, under the selected assumptions, the direct N2O emission from the activated sludge tank can dominate the carbon footprint of WWTP with a poor nitrogen removal efficiency. Through an improved operation of nitrogen removal several advantages can be gained: direct N2O emissions can be reduced, the energy demand for aeration can be decreased and a higher effluent quality can be achieved. Anaerobic digesters and anaerobic sludge storage tanks can become a relevant source of direct CH4 emissions. Minimising of CH4 losses from these sources improves the carbon footprint of the WWTP also increasing the energy yield achievable by combusting this renewable energy carrier in a combined heat and power unit. The estimated carbon footprint of the model WWTPs lies between 20 and 40 kg CO2e/p.e./a. This corresponds to 0.2 to 0.4% of the CO2e average emission caused yearly

  2. Removal of suspended substances by coagulation and foam separation from municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y; Maruyama, T; Tegane, H; Goto, T

    2002-01-01

    A new method for solid-liquid separation for wastewater incorporating simple operation and shortened treatment time is necessary for improvement of sewage systems. In this study, removal of suspended solids from municipal wastewater by coagulation and foam separation using coagulant and milk casein was examined. By adding casein before the foam separation process, the removal of suspended substances was dramatically improved. The optimum condition for treating sewage was 20 mg-Fe/L of FeCl3, 3 mg/L of casein, and pH 5.5, which resulted in a removal rates of over 98% for turbidity and SS. A removal of 96-98% was also possible for phosphate and anionic surfactant. When PAC was used, the floc was also efficiently recovered in foam by the addition of casein. It became clear that coagulation and foam separation using casein as the collector is an effective method for removing suspended solids in municipal wastewater in a short time (within 10 min).

  3. Odorous compounds in municipal wastewater effluent and potable water reuse systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agus, Eva; Lim, Mong Hoo; Zhang, Lifeng; Sedlak, David L

    2011-11-01

    The presence of effluent-derived compounds with low odor thresholds can compromise the aesthetics of drinking water. The potent odorants 2,4,6-trichloroanisole and geosmin dominated the profile of odorous compounds in wastewater effluent with concentrations up to 2 orders of magnitude above their threshold values. Additional odorous compounds (e.g., vanillin, methylnaphthalenes, 2-pyrrolidone) also were identified in wastewater effluent by gas chromatography coupled with mass-spectrometry and olfactometry detection. Full-scale advanced treatment plants equipped with reverse osmosis membranes decreased odorant concentrations considerably, but several compounds were still present at concentrations above their odor thresholds after treatment. Other advanced treatment processes, including ozonation followed by biological activated carbon and UV/H(2)O(2) also removed effluent-derived odorants. However, no single treatment technology alone was able to reduce all odorant concentrations below their odor threshold values. To avoid the presence of odorous compounds in drinking water derived from wastewater effluent, it is necessary to apply multiple barriers during advanced treatment or to dilute wastewater effluent with water from other sources.

  4. Identification and evaluation of a dominant alga from municipal wastewater in removal of nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yixuan; Tang, Fei; Su, Xiaoling; Yin, Hua; Ge, Fei

    2016-12-01

    To access better removal of nutrients with algae-based techniques, a dominant alga from real municipal wastewater was identified and its capacity in removing low concentrations of nitrogen (NH(+)4 or NO(-)3) and phosphorus (PO(3-)4) was evaluated. Results showed that Oedogonium brevicingulatum, a filamentous green alga, was confirmed as the dominant alga in the secondary effluent of a municipal wastewater treatment plant by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Low concentrations of NH(+)4 or NO(-)3 (≤5 mg N L(-1)) and PO(3-)4 (≤0.5 mg P L(-1)) were 100% removed by the algae in a 7-d test. The maximum nutrient removal rate (Vmax) and the half-saturation constant (Km) for NH(+)4 (10.03 ± 0.95 mg g(-1)d(-1) and 0.19 ± 0.03 mg L(-1)) and NO(-)3 (8.43 ± 0.21 mg g(-1) d(-1) and 0.27 ± 0.11 mg L(-1)) indicated the uptake capability for NH(+)4 is higher than that for NO(-)3. Meanwhile, it showed higher affinity for PO(3-)4 (Vmax: 1.42 ± 0.02 mg g(-1) d(-1); Km: 0.02 ± 0.00 mg L(-1)) with NH(+)4 as nitrogen source than that (Vmax: 1.24 ± 0.15 mg g(-1) d(-1); Km: 0.06 ± 0.03 mg L(-1)) with NO(-)3 as nitrogen source. Moreover, nutrient removal efficiencies were observed steady when nitrogen/phosphorus ratio ranged from 5:1 to 20:1. These results suggest that the dominant algae from municipal wastewater have potentials to be applied in nutrient removal.

  5. Municipality of Cluj-Napoca – The Quality of Wastewaters. Note 2. Monitoring Turbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. BURDUHOS

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of turbidity monitoring, from municipal wastewater collected from the Cluj – Napoca channelsnetwork. Monitoring was performed during one year and five months. The water samples were harvested from threedistinct areas of the same municipal collection channel (Canalul Morii – Mărăsti quarter, Canalul Morii - Parcul Mareand Pârâul Popii – inside of the University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj – Napoca. Thesamples were instumentally analyzed (nefelometry and statistical processed with STATISTICA v. 7.0. During entireexperimental time interval, values that did not exceed the established limits for water turbidity were recorded. Anaverage of 1.47 Nefelometric Units of Turbidity (NFU with a minim of 0.54 Nefelometric Units of Turbidity and amaxim of 3.03 Nefelometric Units of Turbidity.

  6. Inhibition of nitrification in municipal wastewater-treating photobioreactors: Effect on algal growth and nutrient uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krustok, I; Odlare, M; Truu, J; Nehrenheim, E

    2016-02-01

    The effect of inhibiting nitrification on algal growth and nutrient uptake was studied in photobioreactors treating municipal wastewater. As previous studies have indicated that algae prefer certain nitrogen species to others, and because nitrifying bacteria are inhibited by microalgae, it is important to shed more light on these interactions. In this study allylthiourea (ATU) was used to inhibit nitrification in wastewater-treating photobioreactors. The nitrification-inhibited reactors were compared to control reactors with no ATU added. Microalgae had higher growth in the inhibited reactors, resulting in a higher chlorophyll a concentration. The species mix also differed, with Chlorella and Scenedesmus being the dominant genera in the control reactors and Cryptomonas and Chlorella dominating in the inhibited reactors. The nitrogen speciation in the reactors after 8 days incubation was also different in the two setups, with N existing mostly as NH4-N in the inhibited reactors and as NO3-N in the control reactors.

  7. Photocatalytic treatment of municipal wastewater using modified neodymium doped TiO(2) hybrid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmoradi, Behzad; Ibrahim, Ibrahim A; Sakamoto, Naonori; Ananda, Sannaiah; Somashekar, Rudrappa; Row, Tagur N Guru; Byrappa, Kullaiah

    2010-08-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of municipal wastewater was investigated using reagent grade TiO(2) and modified neodymium doped TiO(2) hybrid nanoparticles. For the first time, surface modification of Nd(3 +) doped TiO(2) hybrid nanoparticles were carried out with n-butylamine as surface modifier under mild hydrothermal conditions. The modified nanoparticles obtained were characterized by Powder XRD, FTIR, DLS, TEM, BET surface area, zeta potential and UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The characterization results indicated better morphology, particle size distribution and low agglomeration of the nanoparticles synthesized. It was found that photodegradation of wastewater using surface modified neodymium doped TiO(2) nanoparticles was more compared to pure TiO(2), which can be attributed to the doping and modification with n-butylamine.

  8. Escalating water demand for energy production and the potential for use of treated municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2011-05-15

    To ensure sufficient thermoelectric power production in the future, the use of alternative water sources to replace freshwater consumption in power plants will be required. The amount of municipal wastewater (MWW) being produced and its widespread availability merit the investigation of this potential source of cooling water. This is particularly important for thermoelectric power plants in regions where freshwater is not readily available. Critical regulatory and technical challenges for using MWW as makeup water in recirculating cooling systems are examined. The existing regulations do not prohibit wastewater reuse for power plant cooling. The challenges of controlling corrosion, mineral scaling, and biofouling in recirculating cooling systems need to be carefully considered and balanced in a holistic fashion. Initial investigations suggest that many of these challenges can be surmounted to ensure the use of MWW in recirculating cooling systems.

  9. Fate of copper in submerged membrane bioreactors treating synthetic municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhla, George; Holakoo, Ladan; Yanful, Ernest; Bassi, Amarjeet

    2008-05-30

    This paper assesses the impact of copper on the performance of two membrane bioreactors (MBR) treating municipal wastewater at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4h, and solids residence times (SRT) of 20 days, at influent copper concentrations of 0.2-8 mg Cu/L. The addition of copper resulted in a significant increase in soluble microbial products (SMPs), and a predominance of >100 kDa molecular weight SMPs. The study showed that in well-buffered wastewaters, complete nitrification was achieved at total copper concentrations as high as 840 mg/L or 10% of the mixed liquor volatile suspended solids. MINTEQ simulation showed that most of the copper (99.8%) in the MBR was in the form of inorganic copper precipitates, with free Cu2+ and total soluble copper in the range of 0.0-0.11 and 0.1-0.82 mg/L, respectively.

  10. Performance of A-stage process treating combined municipal-industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzcinski, Antoine Prandota; Wang, Chong; Zhang, Dongqing; Ang, Wui Seng; Lin, Li Leonard; Niwa, Terutake; Fukuzaki, Yasuhiro; Ng, Wun Jern

    2017-01-01

    A biosorption column and a settling tank were operated for 6 months with combined municipal and industrial wastewaters (1 m(3)/hr) to study the effect of dissolved oxygen (DO) levels and Fe(3+) dosage on removal efficiency of dissolved and suspended organics prior to biological treatment. High DO (>0.4 mg/L) were found to be detrimental for soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals and iron dosing (up to 20 ppm) did not improve the overall performance. The system performed significantly better at high loading rate (>20 kg COD.m(-3).d(-1)) where suspended solids and COD removals were greater than 80% and 60%, respectively. This is a significant improvement compared to the conventional primary sedimentation tank, and the process is a promising alternative for the pre-treatment of industrial wastewater.

  11. Multiple antibiotic resistance genes distribution in ten large-scale membrane bioreactors for municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanmei; Shen, Yue-Xiao; Liang, Peng; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng; Huang, Xia

    2016-12-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are thought to be potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, GeoChip was used for analyzing multiple antibiotic resistance genes, including four multidrug efflux system gene groups and three β-lactamase genes in ten large-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for municipal wastewater treatment. Results revealed that the diversity of antibiotic genes varied a lot among MBRs, but about 40% common antibiotic resistance genes were existent. The average signal intensity of each antibiotic resistance group was similar among MBRs, nevertheless the total abundance of each group varied remarkably and the dominant resistance gene groups were different in individual MBR. The antibiotic resistance genes majorly derived from Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Further study indicated that TN, TP and COD of influent, temperature and conductivity of mixed liquor were significant (Pantibiotic resistance genes distribution in MBRs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An analysis of the market potential of water hyacinth-based systems for municipal wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A. C.; Gorman, H. J.; Hillman, M.; Lawhon, W. T.; Maase, D. L.; Mcclure, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    The potential U.S. market for tertiary municipal wastewater treatment facilities which make use of water hyacinths was investigated. A baseline design was developed which approximates the "typical" or "average" situation under which hyacinth-based systems can be used. The total market size for tertiary treatment was then estimated for those geographical regions in which hyacinths appear to be applicable. Market penetration of the baseline hyacinth system when competing with conventional chemical and physical processing systems was approximated, based primarily on cost differences. A limited analysis was made of the sensitivity of market penetration to individual changes in these assumptions.

  13. Enhanced primary treatment of low-concentration municipal wastewater by means of bio-flocculant Pullulan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Kai; YANG Xiao-Jun; YANG Mo

    2007-01-01

    Jar tests were conducted to investigate the performance of enhanced primary treatment processes for low-concentration municipal wastewater from South China by using composite flocculant combined with bio-flocculants Pullulan and poly-aluminum-chloride (PAC). The optimum dosage for composite flocculant and conditions for flocculation were determined.The experimental results indicated that composite flocculant had high efficiency for removing over 95% of turbidity, over 58% of CODCr (chemical oxygen demand determined with potassium dichromate), over 91% of TP (total phosphate), and over 15% of NH3-N. Moreover, it could improve sludge settling and dehydration properties, and decrease the treatment cost.

  14. Rapid aerobic granulation in an SBR treating piggery wastewater by seeding sludge from a municipal WWTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Li, Jun; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Qi; Littleton, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic sludge granulation was rapidly obtained in the erlenmeyer bottle and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) using piggery wastewater. Aerobic granulation occurred on day 3 and granules with mean diameter of 0.2mm and SVI30 of 20.3mL/g formed in SBR on day 18. High concentrations of Ca and Fe in the raw piggery wastewater and operating mode accelerated aerobic granulation, even though the seed sludge was from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Alpha diversity analysis revealed Operational Taxonomic Units, Shannon, ACE and Chao 1 indexes in aerobic granules were 2013, 5.51, 4665.5 and 3734.5, which were obviously lower compared to seed sludge. The percentages of major microbial communities, such as Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were obviously higher in aerobic granules than seed sludge. Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, Actinobacteria, TM7 and Acidobacteria showed much higher abundances in the inoculum. The main reasons might be the characteristics of raw piggery wastewater and granule structure. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Restoration of a Canadian Prairie Wetland with Agricultural and Municipal Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White; Bayley

    1999-07-01

    / A rapid development and approval process was employed by Ducks Unlimited Canada and other stakeholders to restore a 1246-ha (3079-acre) northern prairie wetland in southern Alberta, Canada, with 3640 m3/day (800,000 US gallons) of municipal wastewater and beef processing wastewater. A large nongovernmental organization hastened restoration with a development process that outlined restoration goals and management objectives to satisfy a dual mandate of wastewater treatment and wildlife habitat creation. In 1995, after five years of wastewater additions, the basins had been refilled and the surrounding uplands had been acquired and restored. The Frank Lake Conservation Area currently provides high-quality habitat for a variety of wildlife in a region where many of the native plants and animals species have been lost due to habitat loss and fragmentation. The success of upland and water management strategies is reflected in the increase of target species' abundance and richness: 50 shorebird species, 44 waterfowl species, 15 raptor species, and 28 other new bird species have returned to the marsh since restoration. As well, significant N and P reduction occurs as waters flow through the first basin of the marsh. The management strategies of this project that satisfied a dual mandate serve as a model to guide managers of other large-scale wetland restoration projects.KEY WORDS: Frank Lake; Wetland restoration; Adaptive management; Prairie; Wastewaterhttp://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00267/bibs/24n1p25.html

  16. Chronic effects of exposure to a pharmaceutical mixture and municipal wastewater in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galus, Michal; Jeyaranjaan, Judy; Smith, Emily; Li, Hongxia; Metcalfe, Chris; Wilson, Joanna Y

    2013-05-15

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are discharged in municipal wastewater. Effects in aquatic organisms exposed to individual pharmaceuticals in the laboratory have raised concerns regarding the environmental impacts of PPCPs, yet environmental exposures are always to complex mixtures. In this study, adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) showed significantly decreased embryo production after a 6 week exposure to a pharmaceutical mixture (MIX; 0.5 and 10μgL(-1)) of acetaminophen, carbamazepine, gemfibrozil and venlafaxine and to diluted wastewater effluent (WWE; 5% and 25%). Atretic oocytes and altered ovarian histology were significantly increased in female zebrafish exposed to both concentrations of MIX or WWE, which indicates a direct effect on oocyte development that may account for reduced embryo production. Apoptosis within the thecal and granulosa cell layers was identified in female zebrafish with atresia. Exposures to MIX or WWE at both concentrations severely altered kidney proximal tubule morphology, but no histological impacts on other organs were observed. Exposure of embryos to MIX or WWE at the high concentration significantly increased the incidence of developmental abnormalities. Embryo mortality was elevated with exposure to the high concentration of MIX. These studies indicate that chronic exposure of fish to pharmaceutical mixtures and wastewater impacts reproduction and induces histopathological changes, similar to what we have previously seen with single compound exposures. These data suggest that fish populations exposed to pharmaceuticals discharged in wastewater are at risk of negative impacts to reproductive capacity and health.

  17. Energy demand for elimination of organic micropollutants in municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousel, Danièle; Palmowski, Laurence; Pinnekamp, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Organic micropollutants (OMP), e.g. pharmaceuticals and household/industrial chemicals, are not fully eliminated in state-of-the-art municipal wastewater treatment plants and can potentially harm the aquatic environment. Therefore, several pilot and large-scale investigations on the elimination of organic micropollutants have taken place in recent years. Based on the present findings, the most efficient treatment steps to eliminate organic micropollutants have proven to be ozonation, adsorption on powdered activated carbon (PAC), or filtration through granular activated carbon (GAC). Yet a further treatment step implies an increase in energy demand of the wastewater treatment plant, which has to be considered along with OMP elimination. To this aim, data on energy demand of ten large-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) with processes for OMP elimination was collected and analyzed. Moreover, calculations on energy demand beyond the WWTP for production and transport of ancillary materials were performed to assess the cumulative energy demand of the processes. An assessment of the greenhouse gas emissions of the processes was achieved, which shall facilitate future life cycle analyses. The results show that energy demand of ozonation at the wastewater treatment plant is dependent upon the ozone dosage and is significantly higher than energy demand of PAC addition or GAC filtration (2 to 4 times higher without consideration of delivery heads). Despite uncertainties regarding the energy demand for production of activated carbon, it could be shown that the cumulative energy demand of adsorption steps is significantly higher than the energy demand at the WWTP. Using reactivated GAC can lead to energy and greenhouse gas emissions savings compared to using fresh GAC/PAC. Moreover, energy demand is always plant-specific and depends on different factors (delivery heads, existing filtration or post-treatment etc.). Since processes for elimination of organic

  18. Peracetic Acid (PAA Disinfection: Inactivation of Microbial Indicators and Pathogenic Bacteria in a Municipal Wastewater Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Bonetta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have noted that treated and untreated wastewaters are primary contributors of a variety of pathogenic microorganisms to the aquatic ecosystem. Conventional wastewater treatment may not be sufficient to achieve microbiologically safe effluent to be discharged into natural waters or reused, thus requiring wastewater effluents to be disinfected. In recent years, peracetic acid (PAA has been adopted as a disinfectant for wastewater effluents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the disinfection efficiency of PAA at low doses (range 0.99–2.10 mg/L against microbial indicators and pathogenic bacteria in a municipal wastewater plant. Samples of untreated sewage and effluents before and after PAA treatment were collected seasonally for 1 year and were analysed for pathogenic Campylobacter, Salmonella spp., E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli virulence genes using molecular methods; moreover, the detection of specific microbial indicators (E. coli, faecal coliforms, enterococci, C. perfringens and Salmonella spp. were carried out using culturing methods. Salmonella spp. DNA was found in all untreated sewage and effluent before PAA treatment, whereas it was recovered in 50% of the samples collected after PAA treatment. Although E. coli O157:H7 was never identified, the occurrence of Shiga-like toxin I amplicons was identified in 75% of the untreated sewage samples, in 50% of the effluents assayed before PAA treatment, and in 25% of the effluents assayed after PAA treatment, whereas the stx2 gene was never found. Campylobacter coli was only detected in one effluent sample before PAA treatment. In the effluents after PAA treatment, a lower load of indicator bacteria was observed compared to the effluents before treatment. The results of this study highlight that the use of low doses of PAA seems to lead to an improvement of the microbiological quality of the effluent, although it is not sufficient to guarantee its suitability for irrigation

  19. Seasonal isolation of microalgae from municipal wastewater for remediation and biofuel applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K C; Whitney, C G E; Kozera, C; O'Leary, S J B; McGinn, P J

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the study was to isolate the microalgae strains from treated municipal wastewater in both summer and winter seasons in order to identify strains better suited for nutrient remediation and biofuel production under either cooler or warmer temperatures. Fifty-six strains in total were isolated and identified by DNA sequencing from effluent samples collected from a local wastewater treatment plant during the summer and winter of 2011. Screening of 41 isolates based on the fatty acid productivity at either 22 or 10°C resulted in the selection of 12 strains organized into two groups of 6-the M (mild) and C (cool) groups, respectively. Four of the C-group strains were isolated from the winter sample, while four of the M-group isolates were isolated from the summer sample. Fatty acid pools in M-group strains were heavily regulated in response to growth temperature while C-group strains were more insensitive. In three of the six C-group strains, the rates of biomass and fatty acid productivity at 10°C exceeded the corresponding rates at 22°C. Conversely, M group were always more productive at 22 compared to 10°C. Mixotrophic strategies to enhance productivity were generally unsuccessful in M-group strains at 22°C but proved to be more effective in C-group cultures at 10°C. In general, C-group strains appeared better suited for growth in municipal wastewater at 10°C, while M-group strains were better suited at 22°C. On balance, C-group isolates were more likely to come from winter wastewater samples while M-group strains were more likely to come from the summer sample. Our results demonstrate that the effects of temperature on microalgal growth for wastewater remediation can be mitigated somewhat by isolation and careful selection of strains adapted to seasonal wastewater conditions. © 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology. Reproduced with the permission of the Director General of the National

  20. Evaluation of direct membrane filtration and direct forward osmosis as concepts for compact and energy-positive municipal wastewater treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey, Tobias; Bajraktari, Niada; Davidsson, Åsa

    2017-01-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment commonly involves mechanical, biological and chemical treatment steps to protect humans and the environment from adverse effects. Membrane technology has gained increasing attention as an alternative to conventional wastewater treatment due to increased urbanization...... positive with respect to electricity and energy, as more biogas can be produced compared to that using conventional wastewater treatment. Furthermore, the specific area demand is significantly reduced. This study demonstrates that municipal wastewater could be treated in a more energy- and area....... Among the available membrane technologies, microfiltration (MF) and forward osmosis (FO) have been selected for this study due to their specific characteristics, such as compactness and efficient removal of particles. In this study, two treatment concepts were evaluated with regard to their specific...

  1. Seasonal variation of diclofenac concentration and its relation with wastewater characteristics at two municipal wastewater treatment plants in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Sevgi; Ozdemir, Gamze; Yangin-Gomec, Cigdem; Zengin, Gulsum Emel; Topuz, Emel; Aydin, Egemen; Pehlivanoglu-Mantas, Elif; Okutman Tas, Didem

    2014-05-15

    The pharmaceutically active compound diclofenac has been monitored during one year at separate treatment units of two municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to evaluate its seasonal variation and the removal efficiency. Conventional wastewater characterization was also performed to assess the possible relationship between conventional parameters and diclofenac. Diclofenac concentrations in the influent and effluent of both WWTPs were detected in the range of 295-1376 and 119-1012ng/L, respectively. Results indicated that the higher diclofenac removal efficiency was observed in summer season in both WWTPs. Although a consistency in diclofenac removal was observed in WWTP_1, significant fluctuation was observed at WWTP_2 based on seasonal evaluation. The main removal mechanism of diclofenac in the WWTPs was most often biological (55%), followed by UV disinfection (27%). When diclofenac removal was evaluated in terms of the treatment units in WWTPs, a significant increase was achieved at the treatment plant including UV disinfection unit. Based on the statistical analysis, higher correlation was observed between diclofenac and suspended solids concentrations among conventional parameters in the influent whereas the removal of diclofenac was highly correlated with nitrogen removal efficiency.

  2. Removal of Nitrate and Phosphate from Municipal Wastewater Sludge by Chlorella vulgaris, Spirulina platensis and Scenedesmus quadricauda

    OpenAIRE

    Jalal K.C.A; Md Zahangir Alam; Matin W. A.; Kamaruzzaman B. Y.; Akbar J.; and Tofazzel Hossain

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate and phosphorus in wastewater contribute to health and environmental threats as they are linked to illnesses as well as ecosystem disruption via algal blooms in contaminated water bodies. Based on above perspectives a comparative study was conducted on three local freshwater microalgae:Chlorella vulgaris, Spirulina platensis and Scenedesmus quadricauda to evaluate their effects on nitrate and phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater sludge (MWS). Algae performance in removing nitra...

  3. Removal of phthalates and pharmaceuticals from municipal wastewater by graphene adsorption process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gordon C C; Tang, Pei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    In this work graphene was used for evaluation of its adsorption behavior and performance in removing phthalate esters and pharmaceuticals in municipal wastewater. Di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), acetaminophen (ACE), caffeine (CAF), cephalexin (CLX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were emerging contaminants (ECs) with detection frequencies over 92% in a one-year monitoring of the occurrence of ECs in influent samples of a sewage treatment plant in Taiwan. Thus, these ECs were selected as the target contaminants for removal by graphene adsorption process. Experimental results showed that the adsorption isotherm data were fitted well to Langmuir model equation. It was also found that the adsorption process obeyed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. A graphene dosage of 0.1 g/L and adsorption time of 12 h were found to be the optimal operating conditions for the ECs of concern in model solutions in a preliminary study. By using the determined optimal operating conditions for removal of such ECs in actual municipal wastewater, removal efficiencies for various ECs were obtained and given as follows: (1) DnBP, 89%, (2) DEHP, 86%, (3) ACE, 43%, (4) CAF, 84%, (5) CLX, 81%, and (6) SMX, 34%.

  4. Energy-efficient stirred-tank photobioreactors for simultaneous carbon capture and municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, K; Ahammad, S Z; Sallis, P J; Mota, C R

    2014-01-01

    Algal based wastewater treatment (WWT) technologies are attracting renewed attention because they couple energy-efficient sustainable treatment with carbon capture, and reduce the carbon footprint of the process. A low-cost energy-efficient mixed microalgal culture-based pilot WWT system, coupled with carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration, was investigated. The 21 L stirred-tank photobioreactors (STPBR) used light-emitting diodes as the light source, resulting in substantially reduced operational costs. The STPBR were operated at average optimal light intensity of 582.7 μmol.s(-1).m(-2), treating synthetic municipal wastewater containing approximately 250, 90 and 10 mg.L(-1) of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), ammonium (NH4-N), and phosphate, respectively. The STPBR were maintained for 64 days without oxygen supplementation, but had a supply of CO2 (25 mL.min(-1), 25% v/v in N2). Relatively high SCOD removal efficiency (>70%) was achieved in all STPBR. Low operational cost was achieved by eliminating the need for mechanical aeration, with microalgal photosynthesis providing all oxygenation. The STPBR achieved an energy saving of up to 95%, compared to the conventional AS system. This study demonstrates that microalgal photobioreactors can provide effective WWT and carbon capture, simultaneously, in a system with potential for scaling-up to municipal WWT plants.

  5. Aeration of large-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Diego; Stenstrom, Michael K; Larson, Lory E

    2008-01-01

    Aeration is the most energy-intensive operation in wastewater treatment, amounting to 45-75% of plant energy costs. Fine-pore diffusers are today almost ubiquitous in municipal wastewater aeration, due to their advantageous aeration efficiency (mass of oxygen transferred per unit energy required). Nevertheless, older municipal treatment facilities and many industrial treatment plants are still equipped with coarse-bubble or surface aerators. Fine-pore diffusers are subject to two major disadvantages: a) fouling, if not cleaned periodically; b) decrease in oxygen transfer efficiency caused by dissolved surfactants. Coarse-bubble and surface aerators are typically not subject to the traditional problems affecting fine-pore diffusers. Nonetheless, they achieve oxygen transfer at the expense of increased energy intensity. The increased biomass concentration associated with high mean cell retention time (MCRT) operations has a beneficial effect on aeration. Nutrient-removing selectors are able to further increase aeration efficiency, as they sorb and utilize the readily available substrate which otherwise would accumulate at bubble surfaces and dramatically decrease aeration efficiency. We summarise here our 30-year long experience in aeration research, and results obtained with clean- and process-water tests are used to show the beneficial effects of high MCRT operations, the beneficial effect of selectors, and the decline of aeration efficiency due to dissolved surfactants. Copyright IWA Publishing 2008.

  6. Application of solar AOPs and ozonation for elimination of micropollutants in municipal wastewater treatment plant effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Rodríguez, L; Oller, I; Klamerth, N; Agüera, A; Rodríguez, E M; Malato, S

    2013-03-15

    Conventional municipal wastewater treatment plants are not able to entirely degrade some organic pollutants that end up in the environment. Within this group of contaminants, Emerging Contaminants are mostly unregulated compounds that may be candidates for future regulation. In this work, different advanced technologies: solar heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO(2), solar photo-Fenton and ozonation, are studied as tertiary treatments for the remediation of micropollutants present in real municipal wastewater treatment plants effluents at pilot plant scale. Contaminants elimination was followed by Liquid Chromatography/Quadrupole ion trap Mass Spectrometry analysis after a pre-concentration 100:1 by automatic solid phase extraction. 66 target micropollutants were identified and quantified. 16 of those contaminants at initial concentrations over 1000 ng L(-1), made up over 88% of the initial total effluent pollutant load. The order of micropollutants elimination efficiency under the experimental conditions evaluated was solar photo-Fenton > ozonation > solar heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO(2). Toxicity analyses by Vibrio fischeri and respirometric tests showed no significant changes in the effluent toxicity after the three tertiary treatments application. Solar photo-Fenton and ozonation treatments were also compared from an economical point of view. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Removal of emerging contaminants from municipal wastewater with an integrated membrane system, MBR-RO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolar, Davor; Gros, Meritxell; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Moreno, Jordi; Comas, Joaquim; Rodriguez-Roda, Ignasi; Barceló, Damià

    2012-11-15

    The presence of emerging contaminants in the aquatic environment and their potential effects on living organisms has become an issue of growing concern. Among emerging contaminants, pharmaceuticals may enter the aquatic environment due to their high consumption and their incomplete removal in conventional municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The main goal of this study was the assessment of the removal efficiency of pharmaceuticals found in municipal wastewater of a coastal WWTP (Castell-Platja d'Aro, Spain) using an integrated pilot scale membrane system (MBR-RO). Twenty multiple-class pharmaceuticals (including psychiatric drugs, macrolide antibiotics, β-blockers, sulfonamide and fluoroquinolone antibiotics, histamine H2 receptor antagonists, anti-inflammatories, nitroimidazole, β-agonist and antiplatelet agent) were measured in real influent with the lowest average concentration for psychiatric drugs (0.017 μg L(-1)) to the highest for macrolide antibiotics (2.02 μg L(-1)). Although some contaminants were in relatively high concentrations (even up to 2.90 μg L(-1) in the case of ofloxacin). The combination of MBR and RO treatment showed excellent overall removal of target emerging contaminants with removal rates above 99% for all of them. For some compounds (metronidazole, hydrocodone, codein, ranitidine) MBR provided high removal efficiency (up to 95%). Additionally RO membrane showed removal rates always higher than 99%.

  8. Study on Relationship between Seasonal Temperatures and Municipal Wastewater Pollutant Concentration and Removal Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Shaoxiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the temperatures, pollutant concentrations and other indicators of municipal wastewater influent and effluent were tested for 7 months in 6 constructed wetland microcosms; the hydraulic retention time is 2 days. The results indicated that for both influent and effluent, there was a highly significant negative correlation (P<0.01 between the temperature and the pollutant concentrations, there was a significant difference (P<0.05 between seasonal temperatures, and the pollutant concentrations in summer and autumn were significantly different from those in winter (P<0.05. Furthermore, a regression analysis of pollutant concentration (y based on changes in water temperature (x in different seasons was performed. The analysis revealed that the relationship has the form ‘y = a -bx + cx2’, that under certain circumstances, pollutant concentrations can be calculated based on the temperature, and that the concentrations of NH4-N, Total Phosphorus (TP and Soluble Reactive Phosphorus (SRP had a significantly negative correlation with their removal rate (P < 0.01. However, seasonal temperature clearly did not have a direct impact on the pollutant concentration, and some studies have indicated that the different manners in which urban residents use water as the temperature changes may be the real reason that the pollutant concentrations of municipal wastewater vary with seasonal temperature. Furthermore, when designing and operating constructed wetlands, the impact of the changes in pollutant concentrations generated by seasonal temperature should be fully considered, dilution and other means should be taken to ensure purification.

  9. Nutrient removal and biofuel production in high rate algal pond using real municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Kang, Zion; Ramanan, Rishiram; Choi, Jong-Eun; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the growth and nutrient removal ability of an indigenous algal consortium on real untreated municipal wastewater in a high rate algal pond (HRAP). The HRAP was operated semicontinuously under different hydraulic retention times (HRT: 2, 4, 6, and 8 days). The average removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand, and total nitrogen and phosphate of real municipal wastewater were maintained at 85.44 ± 5.10%, 92.74 ± 5.82%, and 82.85 ± 8.63%, respectively, in 2 day HRT. Algae dominated the consortium and showed high settling efficiency (99%), and biomass and lipid productivity of 0.500 ± 0.03 g/l/day and 0.103 ± 0.0083 g/l/day (2 day HRT), respectively. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis revealed a predominance of palmitate (C16:0), palmitoleate (C16:1), linoleate (C18:2), and linolenate (C18:3). Microalgal diversity analyses determined the presence of Chlorella, Scenedesmus, and Stigeoclonium as the dominant microalgae. The algal consortium provides significant value not only in terms of energy savings and nutrient removal but also because of its bioenergy potential as indicated by the lipid content (20-23%) and FAME profiling.

  10. Cultivation of the marine macroalgae Chaetomorpha linum in municipal wastewater for nutrient recovery and biomass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shijian; Champagne, Pascale

    2017-02-21

    Compared to microalgae, macroalgae are larger in size, thereby imposing lower separation and drying costs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of cultivating macroalgae Chaetomorpha linum (C. linum) in different types of municipal wastewaters, their ability to remove nutrient and their biomass composition for downstream biofuel production. Screening experiments indicated that C. linum grew well on primary (PW) and secondary wastewaters (SW), as well as centrate wastewater (CW) diluted to less than 20%. In a subsequent experiment, a step feeding approach was found to significantly increase biomass productivity to 10.7±0.2 g AFDW∙m-2∙d-1 (p<0.001), a 26.5% improvement in comparison to the control with single feeding, when grown on 10% CW; meanwhile, nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies rose to 86.8±1.1 % (p<0.001) and 92.6±0.2% (p<0.001), respectively. The CO2-supplemented SW cultures (10.1±0.4 g AFDW∙m-2∙d-1) were 1.20 times more productive than the corresponding controls without CO2 supplementation (p<0.001); however, similar improvements were not observed in PW (p=0.07) and 10-CW cultures (p=0.07). Moreover, wastewater type and nutrient concentration influenced biomass composition (protein, carbohydrate and lipid). These findings indicate that the application of the macroalgae C. linum could represent an effective wastewater treatment alternative that could also provide a feedstock for downstream processing to biofuels.

  11. Dissolved air flotation (DAF) for primary and tertiary treatment of municipal wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, J; Heinonen-Tanski, H

    2008-01-01

    Tertiary treatment of municipal wastewater by dissolved air flotation was studied on a pilot-scale. The effects of coagulant dose, flocculation pattern, dispersion water recycle ratio and hydraulic surface load on process performance were evaluated. The treatment of primary effluents by dissolved air flotation was investigated to assess the suitability of this process for the treatment of heavily polluted effluents and wastewater treatment plant by-passes. The tertiary dissolved air flotation process typically achieved 90-99% reductions in the numbers of enteric microbes (total coliforms, enterococci and F-RNA coliphages). The average reductions of total phosphorus and chemical oxygen demand were 55-81% and 28-39%, respectively. Increasing the polyaluminium chloride coagulant dose from 2 to 10 mgAl(3+) l(-1) and the dispersion water recycle ratio from 11 to 22% improved the efficiency of the process. Changes in the flocculation conditions (range of G-values 10-55 s(-1); retention time 4-8 min) and hydraulic surface load (5 or 10 m h(-1)) did not clearly affect the process efficiency. The dissolved air flotation process decreased the numbers of enteric microbes and reduced total phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand and suspended solids from the primary treated wastewaters on average by 98-99.8%, 90%, 47% and 77%, respectively. The dissolved air flotation process was demonstrated to be a suitable method for efficient tertiary treatment of wastewaters, as well as for the elimination of peak pollution loads or by-pass wastewaters during the treatment plant overloading situations.

  12. Methane emissions by management and treatment of municipal wastewater in Mexico 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes Figueroa, M. G.; Güereca, L. P.; Noyola, A.; Herndon, S.; Roscioli, J. R.; Yacovitch, T. I.; Fortner, E.; Knighton, W. B.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    CH4 flares associated with the digestors. Measurement results will be presented. In 2010, the number of municipal wastewater treatment plants (MWWTP) in Mexico was 2186, with a total treated flow of 93.6 m3/s, representing just 45% of collected wastewater at the national level. The percentage of treated wastewater varies by region: in northern Mexico, 93% of the collected wastewater is treated, while the central and southern regions have treatment coverages of only 31% and 28%, respectively. As a result, the north has a 51% removal of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) by WWT, while the central and southern regions remove only 17% and 16% of BOD, respectively. The management and treatment of municipal wastewater in Mexico for the year 2010 generated 600.4 Gigagrams (Gg) of CH4. By region: north 23.5% (141.1 Gg), central 53.4% (320.6 Gg) and south 23.1% (138.7 Gg). These values are directly related to the population of each region and the amount of BOD removed by different WWT systems.

  13. Why Online Education Will Attain Full Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, John

    2010-01-01

    Online higher education has attained scale and is poised to take the next step in its growth. Although significant obstacles to a full scale adoption of online education remain, we will see full scale adoption of online higher education within the next five to ten years. Practically all higher education students will experience online education in…

  14. Vertical migration of municipal wastewater in deep injection well systems, South Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliva, Robert G.; Guo, Weixing; Missimer, Thomas

    2007-11-01

    Deep well injection is widely used in South Florida, USA for wastewater disposal largely because of the presence of an injection zone (“boulder zone” of Floridan Aquifer System) that is capable of accepting very large quantities of fluids, in some wells over 75,000 m3/day. The greatest potential risk to public health associated with deep injection wells in South Florida is vertical migration of wastewater, containing pathogenic microorganisms and pollutants, into brackish-water aquifer zones that are being used for alternative water-supply projects such as aquifer storage and recovery. Upwards migration of municipal wastewater has occurred in a minority of South Florida injection systems. The results of solute-transport modeling using the SEAWAT program indicate that the measured vertical hydraulic conductivities of the rock matrix would allow for only minimal vertical migration. Fracturing at some sites increased the equivalent average vertical hydraulic conductivity of confining zone strata by approximately four orders of magnitude and allowed for vertical migration rates of up 80 m/year. Even where vertical migration was rapid, the documented transit times are likely long enough for the inactivation of pathogenic microorganisms.

  15. Feasibility study for the treatment of municipal wastewater by using a hybrid bio-solar process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwal, Anjali; Chaudhary, Rubina

    2016-07-15

    A moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) coupled with solar parabolic structured system has been designed and developed to get the maximum organic load removal and microbial disinfection from the wastewater. The effluent was first subjected to organic degradation in MBBR (with optimized carrier filling rate of 30%) followed by the bacterial degradation using solar energy in parabolic trough and the changes in values of parameters like pH, turbidity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), bio-chemical oxygen demand (BOD) and microbial count were monitored. The titanium dioxide (TiO2) was used as a photocatalyst for the removal of organic load from the wastewater but in optimized conditions. At optimum dose of 1.0 g/L of TiO2 and pH value of 7.6, maximum COD removal of 69% and 13% was achieved at sunny days (solar irradiation 400-700 W m(-2)) and cloudy days (solar irradiation 170-250 W m(-2)) respectively within 5-6 h solar irradiation time. The results obtained showed that it is possible to decrease in six logarithms (log) the concentration of TC and FC within only 240 min of solar exposure. Moreover, this process can offer economically reasonable, chemical free and practical solution to the processing of municipal wastewater where solar intensity is readily available and can be used for making zero liquid discharge (ZLD) an effective reality.

  16. Integration of microalgae systems at municipal wastewater treatment plants: implications for energy and emission balances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger-Krug, Eve; Niederste-Hollenberg, Jutta; Hillenbrand, Thomas; Hiessl, Harald

    2012-11-06

    Integrating microalgae systems (MAS) at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to produce of bioenergy offers many potential synergies. Improved energy balances provide a strong incentive for WWTPs to integrate MAS, but it is crucial that WWTPs maintain their barrier function to protect water resources. We perform a prospective analysis of energy and emission balances of a WWTP with integrated MAS, based on a substance flow analysis of the elements carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P). These elements are the main ingredients of wastewater, and the key nutrients for algae growth. We propose a process design which relies solely on resources from wastewater with no external input of water, fertilizer or CO(2). The whole process chain, from cultivation to production of bioelectricity, takes place at the WWTP. Our results show that MAS can considerably improve energy balances of WWTPs without any external resource input. With optimistic assumptions, they can turn WWTPs into net energy producers. While intensive C recycling in MAS considerably improves the energy balance, we show that it also impacts on effluent quality. We discuss the importance of nonharvested biomass for effluent quality and highlight harvesting efficiency as key factor for energy and emission balances of MAS at WWTP.

  17. Regulating specific organic substances and heavy metals in industrial wastewater discharged to municipal wastewater treatment plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grüttner, Henrik; Munk, L.; Pedersen, F.

    1994-01-01

    Due to the extension of wastewater treatment plants to nutrient removal and the development towards reuse of sludge m agriculture, new guidelines for regulating industrial discharges m Denmark were needed. The paper describes how a concept for regulating the discharge of specific organic substances...... substances, present knowledge of fate and effects in biological treatment plants is too scarce to underpin the setting of general standards. Therefore, it has been decided to base the developed priority system on the data used in the EEC-system for classification of hazardous chemicals. This includes ready...... and heavy metals has been developed during the past two years. The concept is based on guidelines that are made according to considerations of me environment and the treatment plant system, and that encourage the introduction of a cleaner technology and integrated preventive measures. For most organic...

  18. Co-conditioning of the anaerobic digested sludge of a municipal wastewater treatment plant with alum sludge: benefit of phosphorus reduction in reject water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Zhao, Y Q; Babatunde, A O; Kearney, P

    2007-12-01

    In this study, alum sludge was introduced to co-conditioning and dewatering with an anaerobic digested sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant, to examine the role of the alum sludge in improving the dewaterbility of the mixed sludge and also in immobilizing phosphorus in the reject water. Experiments have demonstrated that the optimal mix ratio for the two sludges is 2:1 (anaerobic digested sludge:alum sludge: volume basis), and this can bring approximately 99% phosphorus reduction in the reject water through the adsorption of phosphorus by alum in the sludge. The phosphorus loading in wastewater treatment plants is itself derived from the recycling of reject water during the wastewater treatment process. Consequently, this co-conditioning and dewatering strategy can achieve a significant reduction in phosphorus loading in wastewater treatment plants. In addition, the use of the alum sludge has been shown to beneficially enhance the dewaterability of the resultant mixed sludge, by decreasing both the specific resistance to filtration and the capillary suction time. This is attributed to the alum sludge acting in charge neutralization and/or as adsorbent for phosphate in the aqueous phase of the sludge. Experiments have also demonstrated that the optimal polymer (Superfloc C2260, Cytec, Botlek, Netherlands) dose for the anaerobic digested sludge was 120 mg/L, while the optimal dose for the mixed sludge (mix ratio 2:1) was 15 mg/L, highlighting a huge savings in polymer addition. Therefore, from the technical perspective, the co-conditioning and dewatering strategy can be viewed as a "win-win" situation. However, for its full-scale application, integrated cost-effective analysis of process capabilities, sludge transport, increased cake disposal, additional administration, polymer saving, and so on, should be factored in.

  19. Green microalga Scenedesmus acutus grown on municipal wastewater to couple nutrient removal with lipid accumulation for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristán de Alva, Manuel; Luna-Pabello, Víctor M; Cadena, Erasmo; Ortíz, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    The green microalga Scenedesmus acutus was cultivated in two different municipal wastewater discharges (pre- and post-treated), and was compared to a culture medium with basic nutrients (20% of N, P, K), in order to study the simultaneous potential of nutrient removal and lipid accumulation ability. The highest level of nutrient removal was found in the pretreated wastewater discharge (achieving a high removal of phosphorus [66%] and organic nitrogen [94%]). Likewise, better results on biomass productivity and lipid accumulation were found in cultures using pretreated wastewater compared to enriched medium, obtaining 79.9 mg/L, and 280 mg/L, respectively. Since the best results were found in pretreated wastewater, the biodiesel preparation was performed using said medium at small-scale. After cultivation, 249.4 mg/L of biodiesel were obtained. According to this analysis, S. acutus could be used for wastewater treatment producing biomass with a suitable content of lipids, convenient for biodiesel production.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the Triclosan- and Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain B10W Isolated from Municipal Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Nelson, Matthew; Cao, Guangxiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the triclosan- and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain B10W, obtained from municipal wastewater in Hawaii. The bacterium has a 6.7-Mb genome, contains 6,391 coding sequences and 78 RNAs, with an average G+C content of 66.2 mol%. PMID:28104659

  1. DETERMINATION OF SEX HORMONES AND NONYLPHENOL ETHOXYLATES IN THE AQUEOUS MATRIXES OF TWO PILOT-SCALE MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two analytical methods were developed and refined for the detection and quantitation of two groups of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the liquid matrixes of two pilot-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants. The targeted compounds are seven sex hormones (estradiol, ...

  2. Treatment of micropollutants in municipal wastewater: ozone or powdered activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margot, Jonas; Kienle, Cornelia; Magnet, Anoÿs; Weil, Mirco; Rossi, Luca; de Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Abegglen, Christian; Thonney, Denis; Chèvre, Nathalie; Schärer, Michael; Barry, D A

    2013-09-01

    Many organic micropollutants present in wastewater, such as pharmaceuticals and pesticides, are poorly removed in conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). To reduce the release of these substances into the aquatic environment, advanced wastewater treatments are necessary. In this context, two large-scale pilot advanced treatments were tested in parallel over more than one year at the municipal WWTP of Lausanne, Switzerland. The treatments were: i) oxidation by ozone followed by sand filtration (SF) and ii) powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption followed by either ultrafiltration (UF) or sand filtration. More than 70 potentially problematic substances (pharmaceuticals, pesticides, endocrine disruptors, drug metabolites and other common chemicals) were regularly measured at different stages of treatment. Additionally, several ecotoxicological tests such as the Yeast Estrogen Screen, a combined algae bioassay and a fish early life stage test were performed to evaluate effluent toxicity. Both treatments significantly improved the effluent quality. Micropollutants were removed on average over 80% compared with raw wastewater, with an average ozone dose of 5.7 mg O3 l(-1) or a PAC dose between 10 and 20 mg l(-1). Depending on the chemical properties of the substances (presence of electron-rich moieties, charge and hydrophobicity), either ozone or PAC performed better. Both advanced treatments led to a clear reduction in toxicity of the effluents, with PAC-UF performing slightly better overall. As both treatments had, on average, relatively similar efficiency, further criteria relevant to their implementation were considered, including local constraints (e.g., safety, sludge disposal, disinfection), operational feasibility and cost. For sensitive receiving waters (drinking water resources or recreational waters), the PAC-UF treatment, despite its current higher cost, was considered to be the most suitable option, enabling good removal of most micropollutants

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF BARRIER CAPABILITIES OF SMALL MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS IN VOLOGDA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulakov Artem Alekseevich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The findings of the research project that encompasses 137 small municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP are presented in the paper. The source data for the research is the official statistical reporting according to Form № 2-TP (water submitted in 2010, as well as the information on completed and approved projects that demonstrate admissible discharge standards. The method of environmental assessment of barrier capabilities of municipal WWTP based on six major indicators (TSS, BOD, N-NH4+, N-NO2-, N-NO3-, P-PO43- is proposed to ensure compliance with the present-day environmental standards. The maximal likelihood of incompliance with the pre-set standards is demonstrated by phosphorus phosphate (97 %, ammonium nitrogen (95 % and nitrite nitrogen (79 %. The substances that demonstrate their maximal excessive content in the wastewater include phosphorus phosphate (its content exceeds the admissible standard 18-fold, ammonium nitrogen (21.7-fold excess and nitrite nitrogen (7.6-fold excess.This overview indicates a low possibility of compliance of the content of N-NH4+, N-NO2-, and P-PO43- with the environmental standards that extend to biological WWTPs. The highest relative excess of the admissible content of admixtures is typical for the plants that have a design capacity of 600-800 m3/day and that process 50-200 m3/day. The lowest relative excess of the admissible content of admixtures is typical for the plants that have a design capacity of over 1,000 m3/day and that process over 500 m3/day. The average relative excess of the admissible content of admixtures for all plants equals to 8.4 times. The ecological assessment of the barrier capabilities of small municipal WWTPs has proven that their compliance with the standards of admissible content of N-NH4+, N-NO2-, and P-PO43- in the wastewater is impossible to attain in practice.

  4. [Performance of constructed wetland for municipal wastewater tertiary treatment: winter and summer comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xue-Min; Yang, Hong-Tao; Zhou, Ji-Ti; Yang, Feng-Lin; Wang, Zhong-Hua

    2009-03-15

    An improved three-stage vertical flow constructed wetland (CW) was used for tertiary treatment of effluent from two typical Dalian municipal wastewater treatment plants. The experiments were carried out under ambient condition in Dalian for the whole year. Performances of the CW for COD, TN, NH4(+) -N and TP removal in summer (Jun.-Aug.), winter (Nov.-Jan. the second year) and spring (Feb.-Apr.) were compared. In summer, the removal rates of COD, TN, NH4(+) -N and TP reached 88.5%, 76%, 100% and 98%, respectively. While in winter they reached 88%, 85.3%, 86.4% and 97%, respectively. In spring, the removal rates reached 87.7%, 76.7%, 70.3% and 95.5%, respectively. The effluent water quality for summer, winter and spring were: COD 2.8, 3.8 and 3.9 mg x L(-1), respectively; TP 0.02, 0.05, and 0.07 mg x L(-1), respectively; TN 6.8, 2.9, and 9.2 mg x L(-1), respectively; NH4(+)-N 0.01, 0.3, and 8.1 mg x L(-1), respectively. Results showed good performance of CW for Dalian municipal wastewater tertiary treatment, especially for COD and TP removal. The effluent COD and TP meet the needs of Environmental Quality Standard for Surface Water (GB 3838-2002) III, whereas the effluent TN and NH4(+)- N meet the needs of Discharge Standard of Pollutants for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (GB 18918-2002) class I A and B, separately. The pollutant removal loads in summer, winter and spring were as flow: COD 4.9, 5.1, and 5.0 g x (m2 x d)(-1); TN 3.4, 3.0, and 5.5 g x (m2 x d)(-1); NH4(+) -N 0.2, 0.6, and 3.7 g x (m2 x d)(-1); TP 0.15, 0.30, and 0.28 g(m2 x d)(-1). It is indicated that no significant influence of seasons on pollutant removal is found by comparing the removal rates as well as pollutant removal loads in different seasons, however, the removal of NH4(+) -N and TN in CW is mainly influenced by influent pollutant loads.

  5. Fipronil washoff to municipal wastewater from dogs treated with spot-on products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teerlink, Jennifer; Hernandez, Jorge; Budd, Robert

    2017-12-01

    Fipronil and fipronil degradates have been reported in treated wastewater effluent at concentrations that exceed USEPA Aquatic Life Benchmarks, posing a potential risk to the surface waters to which they discharge. Fipronil is a common insecticide found in spot-on flea and tick treatment products that have the potential for down-the-drain transport and direct washoff into surface water. Volunteers currently treating their dogs with a fipronil-containing spot-on product were recruited. Dogs were washed either 2, 7, or 28days after product application, and rinsate from 34 discrete bathing events were analyzed by LC-MS/MS for fipronil and fipronil degradates (collectively known as fiproles). Total fipronil application dosage ranged from 67.1-410.0mg per dog following manufacturers' recommendation based on dog body weight. Total mass of fiproles measured in rinsate ranged from 3.6-230.6mg per dog (0.2 ̶ 86.0% of mass applied). Average percentage of fiproles detected in rinsate generally decreased with increasing time from initial application: 21±22, 16±13, and 4±5% respectively for 2, 7, and 28days post application. Fipronil was the dominant fiprole, >63% of total fiproles for all samples and >92% of total fiproles in 2 and 7day samples. Results confirm a direct pathway of pesticides to municipal wastewater through the use of spot-on products on dogs and subsequent bathing by either professional groomers or by pet owners in the home. Comparisons of mass loading calculated using California sales data and recent wastewater monitoring results suggest fipronil-containing spot-on products are a potentially important source of fipronil to wastewater treatment systems in California. This study highlights the potential for other active ingredients (i.e., bifenthrin, permethrin, etofenprox, imidacloprid) contained in spot-on and other pet products (i.e., shampoos, sprays) to enter wastewater catchments through bathing activities, posing a potential risk to the aquatic

  6. Genomic and Functional Characterization of qnr-Encoding Plasmids from Municipal Wastewater Biosolid Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ella; Sela, Noa; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Cytryn, Eddie

    2015-01-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are considered to be "hotspots" for antibiotic resistance, since they conjoin high densities of environmental and fecal bacteria with selective pressure in the form of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. Discharged effluents and biosolids from these facilities can disseminate antibiotic resistant genes to terrestrial and aquatic environments, potentially contributing to the increasing global trend in antibiotic resistance. This phenomenon is especially pertinent when resistance genes are associated with mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which can be transferred between bacterial phyla. Fluoroquinolones are among the most abundant antibiotic compounds detected in wastewater treatment facilities, especially in biosolids, where due to their hydrophobic properties they accumulate to concentrations that may exceed 40 mg/L. Although fluoroquinolone resistance is traditionally associated with mutations in the gyrA/topoisomerase IV genes, there is increasing evidence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance, which is primarily encoded on qnr genes. In this study, we sequenced seven qnr-harboring plasmids from a diverse collection of Klebsiella strains, isolated from dewatered biosolids from a large wastewater treatment facility in Israel. One of the plasmids, termed pKPSH-11XL was a large (185.4 kbp), multi-drug resistance, IncF-type plasmid that harbored qnrB and 10 additional antibiotic resistance genes that conferred resistance to five different antibiotic families. It was highly similar to the pKPN3-like plasmid family that has been detected in multidrug resistant clinical Klebsiella isolates. In contrast, the six additional plasmids were much smaller (7-9 Kbp) and harbored a qnrS -type gene. These plasmids were highly similar to each other and closely resembled pGNB2, a plasmid isolated from a German wastewater treatment facility. Comparative genome analyses of pKPSH-11XL and other pKPN3-like

  7. Electrodialytic treatment of municipal wastewater and sludge for the removal of heavy metals and recovery of phosphorus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbers, Benjamin; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2015-01-01

    Municipal wastewater and sewage sludge is an abundant source of phosphorus (P), but its usage is often limited due to wastewater treatment methods and contaminants, mostly heavy metals (HM's). Three compartment (3C) electrodialysis (ED) was used to simultaneously extract HM's (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb...... and Zn) and recover P from municipal sludge samples obtained at different stages during wastewater treatment involving biological and chemical treatment as well as polymer addition for thickening of sludge and anaerobic digestion of excess sludge. Direct P recovery was investigated for high P reject...... concentration P streams was most effective using a 3C ED cell setup, with the electrodes separated from the sample by ion-exchange membranes. Extraction with the 2C ED cell setup was less effective due to a rise in pH, caused by half reactions at the cathode and subsequent precipitation of P. For either removal...

  8. Treatment of micropollutants in municipal wastewater: Ozone or powdered activated carbon?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margot, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.margot@epfl.ch [School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering (ENAC), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 2, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kienle, Cornelia, E-mail: cornelia.kienle@oekotoxzentrum.ch [Swiss Centre for Applied Ecotoxicology, Eawag/EPFL, Überlandstrasse 133, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Magnet, Anoÿs, E-mail: anoys.magnet@lausanne.ch [Sanitation Service, City of Lausanne, Rue des terreaux 33, 1002 Lausanne (Switzerland); Weil, Mirco, E-mail: m.weil@ect.de [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Boettgerstrasse 2-14, 65439 Floersheim/Main (Germany); Rossi, Luca, E-mail: luca.rossi@epfl.ch [School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering (ENAC), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 2, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Alencastro, Luiz Felippe de, E-mail: felippe.dealencastro@epfl.ch [School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering (ENAC), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 2, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Abegglen, Christian, E-mail: christian.abegglen@vsa.ch [Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag), Überlandstrasse 133, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Thonney, Denis, E-mail: denis.thonney@sige.ch [Sanitation Service, City of Lausanne, Rue des terreaux 33, 1002 Lausanne (Switzerland); Chèvre, Nathalie, E-mail: nathalie.chevre@unil.ch [Faculty of Geosciences and the Environment, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Schärer, Michael, E-mail: michael.schaerer@bafu.admin.ch [Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN), Water Division, 3003 Bern (Switzerland); and others

    2013-09-01

    Many organic micropollutants present in wastewater, such as pharmaceuticals and pesticides, are poorly removed in conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). To reduce the release of these substances into the aquatic environment, advanced wastewater treatments are necessary. In this context, two large-scale pilot advanced treatments were tested in parallel over more than one year at the municipal WWTP of Lausanne, Switzerland. The treatments were: i) oxidation by ozone followed by sand filtration (SF) and ii) powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption followed by either ultrafiltration (UF) or sand filtration. More than 70 potentially problematic substances (pharmaceuticals, pesticides, endocrine disruptors, drug metabolites and other common chemicals) were regularly measured at different stages of treatment. Additionally, several ecotoxicological tests such as the Yeast Estrogen Screen, a combined algae bioassay and a fish early life stage test were performed to evaluate effluent toxicity. Both treatments significantly improved the effluent quality. Micropollutants were removed on average over 80% compared with raw wastewater, with an average ozone dose of 5.7 mg O{sub 3} l{sup −1} or a PAC dose between 10 and 20 mg l{sup −1}. Depending on the chemical properties of the substances (presence of electron-rich moieties, charge and hydrophobicity), either ozone or PAC performed better. Both advanced treatments led to a clear reduction in toxicity of the effluents, with PAC-UF performing slightly better overall. As both treatments had, on average, relatively similar efficiency, further criteria relevant to their implementation were considered, including local constraints (e.g., safety, sludge disposal, disinfection), operational feasibility and cost. For sensitive receiving waters (drinking water resources or recreational waters), the PAC-UF treatment, despite its current higher cost, was considered to be the most suitable option, enabling good removal of

  9. Removal of steroid estrogens from municipal wastewater in a pilot scale expanded granular sludge blanket reactor and anaerobic membrane bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ayumi; Mensah, Lawson; Cartmell, Elise; Lester, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment of municipal wastewater offers the prospect of a new paradigm by reducing aeration costs and minimizing sludge production. It has been successfully applied in warm climates, but does not always achieve the desired outcomes in temperate climates at the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) values of municipal crude wastewater. Recently the concept of ‘fortification' has been proposed to increase organic strength and has been demonstrated at the laboratory and pilot scale treating municipal wastewater at temperatures of 10–17°C. The process treats a proportion of the flow anaerobically by combining it with primary sludge from the residual flow and then polishing it to a high effluent standard aerobically. Energy consumption is reduced as is sludge production. However, no new treatment process is viable if it only addresses the problems of traditional pollutants (suspended solids – SS, BOD, nitrogen – N and phosphorus – P); it must also treat hazardous substances. This study compared three potential municipal anaerobic treatment regimes, crude wastewater in an expanded granular sludge blanket (EGSB) reactor, fortified crude wastewater in an EGSB and crude wastewater in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor. The benefits of fortification were demonstrated for the removal of SS, BOD, N and P. These three systems were further challenged with the removal of steroid estrogens at environmental concentrations from natural indigenous sources. All three systems removed these compounds to a significant degree, confirming that estrogen removal is not restricted to highly aerobic autotrophs, or aerobic heterotrophs, but is also a faculty of anaerobic bacteria. PMID:26212345

  10. Oxidation of municipal wastewater by free radicals mechanism. A UV/Vis spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakopoulos, E; Isari, E; Bourikas, K; Karapanagioti, H K; Psarras, G; Oron, G; Kalavrouziotis, I K

    2017-06-15

    This study investigates the oxidation of municipal wastewater (WW) by complexation with natural polyphenols having radical scavenging activity, such as (3,4,5 tri-hydroxy-benzoic acid) gallic acid (GA) in alkaline pH (>7), under ambient O2 and temperature. Physicochemical and structural characteristics of GA-WW complex-forming are evaluated by UV/Vis spectroscopy. The comparative analysis among UV/Vis spectra of GA monomer, GA-GA polymer, WW compounds, and GA-WW complex reveals significant differences within 350-450 and 500-900 nm. According to attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), these spectra differences correspond to distinct complexes formed. This study suggests a novel role of natural polyphenols on the degradation and humification of wastes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimizing municipal wastewater treatment plants using an improved multi-objective optimization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Xie, Wen-Ming; Yu, Han-Qing; Li, Wen-Wei

    2014-04-01

    An improved multi-objective optimization (MOO) model was established and used for simultaneously optimizing the treatment cost and multiple effluent quality indexes (including effluent COD, NH4(+)-N, NO3(-)-N) of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Compared with previous models that were mainly based on the use of fixed decision factors and did not taken into account the treatment cost, this model introduces a relationship model based on back propagation algorithm to determine the set of decision factors according to the expected optimization targets. Thus, a more flexible and precise optimization of the treatment process was allowed. Moreover, a MOO of conflicting objectives (i.e., treatment cost and effluent quality) was achieved. Applying this method, an optimal balance between operating cost and effluent quality of a WWTP can be found. This model may offer a useful tool for optimized design and control of practical WWTPs.

  12. A field study of advanced municipal wastewater treatment technology for artificial groundwater recharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PI Yun-zheng; WANG Jian-long

    2006-01-01

    Field studies were conducted to investigate the advanced treatment of the municipal secondary effluent and a subsequent artificial groundwater recharge at Gaobeidian Wastewater Treatment Plant, Beijing. To improve the secondary effluent quality, the combined process of powdered activated carbon adsorption, flocculation and rapid sand filtration was applied, which could remove about 40% dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and 70% adsorbable organic halogens. The results of liquid size exclusion chromatography indicate that in the adsorption unit the removed organic fiaction was mainly low molecular weight compounds. The fiactions removed by the flocculation unit were polysaccharides and high molecular weight compounds. The retention of water in summer in the open recharge basins resulted in a growth of algae. Consequently, DOC increased in the polysaccharide and high molecular weight humic substances fiaction. The majority of the DOC removal during soil passage took place in the unsaturated area.A limited reduction of DOC was observed in the aquifer zone.

  13. Effect of macroporous adsorption resin-membrane bioreactor hybrid system against fouling for municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiwei; Luo, Jing; Cao, Ruyi; Li, Yuting; Liu, Jinrong

    2017-01-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) displays significant advantages in effluent quality, sludge production, footprint, and operation. However, membrane fouling limits the application of MBR. This study investigated membrane fouling in a macroporous adsorption resin-membrane bioreactor hybrid system established by adding macroporous adsorption resin (MAR) into MBR. MAR addition increased the critical flux by 27.97%, indicating that membrane fouling was successfully mitigated. Consequently, comparative experiments were designed to analyze the pathway. MAR addition mitigated external fouling development and improved mixed liquor characteristics, thereby mitigating gel layer formation and sludge floc deposition on the membrane surface. MAR effectively reduced the supernatant viscosity and dissolved COD by adsorbing soluble microbial products. Sludge production decreased because the sludge activity in MAR-MBR was inhibited. The fouled MAR could be regenerated effectively by deionized water and chemical cleaning. This work demonstrated the feasibility of using MAR-MBR to mitigate fouling in municipal wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Plant-integrated measurement of greenhouse gas emissions from a municipal wastewater treatment plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshida, Hiroko; Mønster, Jacob; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contribute to anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Due to its spatial and temporal variation in emissions, whole plant characterization of GHG emissions from WWTPs face a number of obstacles. In this study, a tracer dispersion method was applied...... to quantify plant-integrated, real-time emissions of methane and nitrous oxides. Two mobile cavity ring-down spectroscopy sampling devices were used to record downwind gas concentrations emitted from a municipal WWTP situated in Copenhagen, Denmark. This plant is equipped to remove biological nitrogen...... in the plant. As high as 4.27% of nitrogen entering the WWTP was emitted as nitrous oxide under the sub-optimal operation of biological treatment processes. The study shows that the unit process configuration, as well as the operation of the WWTP, determines the rate of GHG emission. The applied plant...

  15. Microbial community analysis of a full-scale DEMON bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Muñoz-Palazon, Barbara; Garcia-Ruiz, Maria-Jesus; Osorio, Francisco; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus

    2015-03-01

    Full-scale applications of autotrophic nitrogen removal technologies for the treatment of digested sludge liquor have proliferated during the last decade. Among these technologies, the aerobic/anoxic deammonification process (DEMON) is one of the major applied processes. This technology achieves nitrogen removal from wastewater through anammox metabolism inside a single bioreactor due to alternating cycles of aeration. To date, microbial community composition of full-scale DEMON bioreactors have never been reported. In this study, bacterial community structure of a full-scale DEMON bioreactor located at the Apeldoorn wastewater treatment plant was analyzed using pyrosequencing. This technique provided a higher-resolution study of the bacterial assemblage of the system compared to other techniques used in lab-scale DEMON bioreactors. Results showed that the DEMON bioreactor was a complex ecosystem where ammonium oxidizing bacteria, anammox bacteria and many other bacterial phylotypes coexist. The potential ecological role of all phylotypes found was discussed. Thus, metagenomic analysis through pyrosequencing offered new perspectives over the functioning of the DEMON bioreactor by exhaustive identification of microorganisms, which play a key role in the performance of bioreactors. In this way, pyrosequencing has been proven as a helpful tool for the in-depth investigation of the functioning of bioreactors at microbiological scale.

  16. Temporal dynamics of norovirus determined through monitoring of municipal wastewater by pyrosequencing and virological surveillance of gastroenteritis cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Shinobu; Masago, Yoshifumi; Tohma, Kentaro; Souma, Nao; Imagawa, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Akira; Liu, Xiaofang; Saito, Mayuko; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Omura, Tatsuo

    2016-04-01

    Norovirus is a leading etiological agent of viral gastroenteritis. Because of relatively mild disease symptoms and frequent asymptomatic infections, information on the ecology of this virus is limited. Our objective was to examine the genetic diversity of norovirus circulating in the human population by means of genotyping the virus in municipal wastewater. We investigated norovirus genogroups I and II (GI and GII) in municipal wastewater in Japan by pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR (qPCR) from November 2012 to March 2013. Virological surveillance for gastroenteritis cases was concurrently conducted in the same area. A total of fourteen distinct genotypes in total (GI.1, 3, 4, 6, 7, GII.2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, and 17), with up to eight genotypes detected per sample, were observed in wastewater using pyrosequencing; only four genotypes (GI.6, GII.4, 5, and 14) were obtained from clinical samples. Seventy-eight percent of norovirus-positive stool samples contained GII.4, but this genotype was not dominant in wastewater. The norovirus GII.4 Sydney 2012 variant, which appeared and spread during our study period, was detected in both the wastewater and clinical samples. These results suggest that an environmental approach using pyrosequencing yields a more detailed distribution of norovirus genotypes/variants. Thus, wastewater monitoring by pyrosequencing is expected to provide an effective analysis of the distribution of norovirus genotypes causing symptomatic and asymptomatic infections in human populations.

  17. Composting trial with BioFoam® products in a full scale commercial composting facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der M.

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the trial was to be able to judge whether BioFoam® material degrades at sufficient rate to be composted together with regular source separated municipal solid biowaste in a full scale industrial composting facility.

  18. Application of real-time quantitative PCR for the detection of selected bacterial pathogens during municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, K E; Lee, D-Y; Trevors, J T; Beaudette, L A

    2007-08-15

    Bacteria were detected at five stages of municipal wastewater treatment using TaqMan(R) real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Thirteen probe and primer sets were tested for diverse pathogens that may be present in wastewater, including Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, Helicobacter pylori, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella sp., and Staphylococcus aureus. The sensitivity of the assay was 100 fg of genomic DNA (=22 gene copies), based on a standard curve generated using A. hydrophila purified DNA. Samples from five stages of wastewater treatment were collected, including raw wastewater, primary effluents, mixed liquor, waste activated sludge and final effluents. In duplicate samples, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, C. perfringens and E. faecalis were detected throughout the wastewater process, and their numbers decreased by 3.52-3.98, 4.23-4.33, 3.15-3.39, and 3.24 orders of magnitude respectively, between the raw wastewater and final effluent stage. This qPCR method was effective for the detection of pathogens in wastewater and confirmed that the risk of exposure to pathogens in the wastewater discharge was well within the Environment Canada guidelines.

  19. Treatment efficiency in wastewater treatment plant of Hat Yai Municipality by quantitative removal of microbial indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duangporn Kantachote

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of treatment in a wastewater treatment plant of Hat Yai Municipality through stabilization ponds and constructed wetlands was monitored by using the bacterial indicators, total coliforms (TC, fecal coliforms (FC, Escherichia coli and fecal streptococci (FS, and photosynthetic microbes. The sequence of water flow in the wastewater treatment plant is as follows: primary or anaerobic pond (P, facultative pond (F, maturation pond (M, constructed wetlands (W1, W2 and W3, and an effluent storage pond (S for the treated wastewater. The wastewater treatment plant has an approximate area of 3,264,000 m2 (2,040 rai and its dry weather flow was running at only 40,000 m3/ day. There were 10 sampling times used for all the 7 ponds during July-October, 2006.Statistical analysis using a Two-Factorial Design model, indicated that pond types significantly affected temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO, and pH (p<0.05, whereas the time of sampling during the day had a significant effect (p<0.05 only on the temperature and light intensity available to the ponds. There were also significant different removal efficiencies of the different bacterial indicator groups tested (p<0.05. The overall performance of the wastewater treatment plant effectively removed TC, FC, E. coli, and FS as follows, 99.8%, 99.8%, 75.8% and 98.8%, respectively. The amounts of bacterial indicators, except for E. coli, showed a negative correlation with levels of light intensity and DO, whereas there was no correlation between the pH and the different indicator bacteria. There was a positive middle level correlation between pHand chlorophyll a.There were five different divisions of photosynthetic organisms detected throughout the plant as follows, Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, Bacillariophyta, Euglenophyta, and Pyrrhophyta. The least diversity was found in the anaerobic pond (P as there were only 15 genera. Euglena, an indicator of dirty water, was detected only in this pond. The

  20. Genomic and functional characterization of qnr-encoding plasmids from municipal wastewater biosolid Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella eKaplan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are considered to be hotspots for antibiotic resistance since they conjoin high densities of environmental and fecal bacteria with selective pressure in the form of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. Discharged effluents and biosolids from these facilities can disseminate antibiotic resistant genes to terrestrial and aquatic environments, potentially contributing to the increasing global trend in antibiotic resistance. This phenomenon is especially pertinent when resistance genes are associated with mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which can be transferred between bacterial phyla. Fluoroquinolones are among the most abundant antibiotic compounds detected in wastewater treatment facilities, especially in biosolids, where due to their hydrophobic properties they accumulate to concentrations that may exceed 40 mg/L. Although fluoroquinolone resistance is traditionally associated with mutations in the gyrA/topoisomerase IV genes, there is increasing evidence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance, which is primarily encoded on qnr genes. In this study, we sequenced seven qnr-harboring plasmids from a diverse collection of Klebsiella strains, isolated from dewatered biosolids from a large wastewater treatment facility in Israel. One of the plasmids, termed pKPSH-11XL was a large (185.4 kbp, multi-drug resistance, IncF-type plasmid that harbored qnrB and 10 additional antibiotic resistance genes that conferred resistance to 5 different antibiotic families. It was highly similar to the pKPN3-like plasmid family that has been detected in multidrug resistant clinical Klebsiella isolates. In contrast, the six additional plasmids were much smaller (7-9Kbp and harbored a qnrS -type gene. These plasmids were highly similar to each other and closely resembled pGNB2, a plasmid isolated from a German wastewater treatment facility. Comparative genome analyses of pKPSH-11XL and other p

  1. Upgrade of three municipal wastewater treatment lagoons using a high surface area media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John WANC; Peng JINt; Paul L. BISHOP; Fuzhi LI

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lagoon-based municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are facing difficulties meeting the needs of rapid population growth as well as the more stringent requirements of discharge permits. Three municipal WWTPs were modified using a high surface area media with upgraded fine-bubble aeration systems. Performance data collected showed very promising results in terms of five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), ammonia (NH3) and total suspended solids (TSS) removal. Two-year average ammonia effluents were 4.1 mg. L-1 for Columbia WWTP, 4 mg. L-1 for Larchmont WWTP and 2.1 mg. L-1 for Laurelville WWTE respectively. Two- year average BOD5 effluents were 6.8, 4.9 and 2.7 mg.Ll, and TSS effluents were 15.0, 9.6 and 7.5 mg.L-L The systems also showed low fecal coliform (FC) levels in their effluents.

  2. Feminization and masculinization of western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) observed in rivers impacted by municipal wastewaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guo-Yong; Liu, You-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Wen; Liang, Yan-Qiu; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Yang, Yuan-Yuan; Hu, Li-Xin; Shi, Wen-Jun; Tian, Fei; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Chen, Jun; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2016-02-01

    Municipal wastewaters have been known to contain various estrogens and androgens. Little is known about the joint action of these chemicals from wastewaters on fishes in the aquatic environment. The objectives of this study were to investigate the estrogenic and/or androgenic effects in wild mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) of two effluent-impacted rivers in South China by determining morphological changes and hepatic mRNA expression levels of relevant genes such as vitellogenin (Vtg), estrogen receptor (ERα) and androgen receptors (ARα and ARβ), and to assess the linkages of those morphological changes and hepatic mRNA expression levels to the chemical concentrations measured by in vitro bioassays and chemical analysis. The results showed a significant induction of Vtg and ERα mRNA in the livers of the males and a gonopodium-like anal fin in the females collected at the majority of sites. Redundancy analysis and Pearson correlation analysis showed that the chemical concentrations obtained by in vitro bioassays and chemical analysis had significant correlations with some of the endpoints for the estrogenic and/or androgenic effects in mosquitofish. The findings from this study indicate that the estrogens and androgens present in the two rivers could cause the observed estrogenic and androgenic effects in mosquitofish.

  3. Membrane fouling in pilot-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Katsuki; Yamato, Nobuhiro; Yamamura, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2005-08-15

    The main obstacle for wider use of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for wastewater treatment is membrane fouling (i.e., deterioration of membrane permeability),which increases operating costs. For more efficient control of membrane fouling in MBRs, an understanding of the mechanisms of membrane fouling is important. However, there is a lack of information on membrane fouling in MBRs, especially information on features of components that are responsible for the fouling. We conducted a pilot-scale experiment using real municipal wastewater with three identical MBRs under different operating conditions. The results obtained in this study suggested that the food-microorganisms ratio (F/M) and membrane filtration flux were the important operating parameters that significantly influenced membrane fouling in MBRs. Neither concentrations of dissolved organic matter in the reactors nor viscosity of mixed liquor, which have been thought to have influences on fouling in MBRs, showed clear relationships with membrane fouling in this study. Organic substances that had caused the membrane fouling were desorbed from fouled membranes of the MBRs at the termination of the operation and were subjected to Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses. These analyses revealed that the nature of the membrane foulant changes depending on F/M. It was shown that high F/M would make the foulant more proteinaceous. Carbohydrates were dominant in membrane foulants in this study, while features of humic substances were not apparent.

  4. Impact of municipal wastewater effluent on seed bank response and soils excavated from a wetland impoundment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchiaro, R.G.; Kremer, R.J.; Fredrickson, L.H.

    2009-01-01

    Intensive management of wetlands to improve wildlife habitat typically includes the manipulation of water depth, duration, and timing to promote desired vegetation communities. Increased societal, industrial, and agricultural demands for water may encourage the use of alternative sources such as wastewater effluents in managed wetlands. However, water quality is commonly overlooked as an influence on wetland soil seed banks and soils. In four separate greenhouse trials conducted over a 2-yr period, we examined the effects of municipal wastewater effluent (WWE) on vegetation of wetland seed banks and soils excavated from a wildlife management area in Missouri, USA. We used microcosms filled with one of two soil materials and irrigated with WWE, Missouri River water, or deionized water to simulate moist-soil conditions. Vegetation that germinated from the soil seed bank was allowed to grow in microcosms for approximately 100 d. Vegetative taxa richness, plant density, and biomass were significantly reduced in WWE-irrigated soil materials compared with other water sources. Salinity and sodicity rapidly increased in WWE-irrigated microcosms and probably was responsible for inhibiting germination or interfering with seedling development. Our results indicate that irrigation with WWE promoted saline-sodic soil conditions, which alters the vegetation community by inhibiting germination or seedling development. ?? 2009, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  5. A pilot scale comparison of advanced oxidation processes for estrogenic hormone removal from municipal wastewater effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pešoutová, Radka; Stříteský, Luboš; Hlavínek, Petr

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the oxidation of selected endocrine disrupting compounds (estrone, 17β-estradiol, estriol and 17α-ethinylestradiol) during ozonation and advanced oxidation of biologically treated municipal wastewater effluents in a pilot scale. Selected estrogenic substances were spiked in the treated wastewater at levels ranging from 1.65 to 3.59 μg · L(-1). All estrogens were removed by ozonation by more than 99% at ozone doses ≥1.8 mg · L(-1). At a dose of 4.4 · mg L(-1) ozonation reduced concentrations of estrone, 17β-estradiol, estriol and 17α-ethinylestradiol by 99.8, 99.7, 99.9 and 99.7%, respectively. All tested advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) achieved high removal rates but they were slightly lower compared to ozonation. The lower removal rates for all tested advanced oxidation processes are caused by the presence of naturally occurring hydroxyl radical scavengers - carbonates and bicarbonates.

  6. Unit Process Wetlands for Removal of Trace Organic Contaminants and Pathogens from Municipal Wastewater Effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Justin T.; Nguyen, Mi T.; Jones, Zackary L.; Ismail, Niveen S.; Sedlak, David L.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Luthy, Richard G.; Horne, Alex J.; Nelson, Kara L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Treatment wetlands have become an attractive option for the removal of nutrients from municipal wastewater effluents due to their low energy requirements and operational costs, as well as the ancillary benefits they provide, including creating aesthetically appealing spaces and wildlife habitats. Treatment wetlands also hold promise as a means of removing other wastewater-derived contaminants, such as trace organic contaminants and pathogens. However, concerns about variations in treatment efficacy of these pollutants, coupled with an incomplete mechanistic understanding of their removal in wetlands, hinder the widespread adoption of constructed wetlands for these two classes of contaminants. A better understanding is needed so that wetlands as a unit process can be designed for their removal, with individual wetland cells optimized for the removal of specific contaminants, and connected in series or integrated with other engineered or natural treatment processes. In this article, removal mechanisms of trace organic contaminants and pathogens are reviewed, including sorption and sedimentation, biotransformation and predation, photolysis and photoinactivation, and remaining knowledge gaps are identified. In addition, suggestions are provided for how these treatment mechanisms can be enhanced in commonly employed unit process wetland cells or how they might be harnessed in novel unit process cells. It is hoped that application of the unit process concept to a wider range of contaminants will lead to more widespread application of wetland treatment trains as components of urban water infrastructure in the United States and around the globe. PMID:23983451

  7. Phytoaccumulation of Heavy Metals in Natural Vegetation at the Municipal Wastewater Site in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Muhammad; Ruqia, Bibi; Hussain, Zahid

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metal accumulation in crops and soils from wastewater irrigation poses a significant threat to the human health. A study was carried out to investigate the removal potential of heavy metals (HM) by native plant species, namely Cannabis sativa L., Chenopodium album L., Datura stramonium L., Sonchus asper L., Amaranthus viridus L., Oenothera rosea (LHer), Xanthium stramonium L., Polygonum macalosa L., Nasturtium officinale L. and Conyza canadensis L. growing at the municipal wastewater site in Abbottabad city, Pakistan. The HM concentrations varied among plants depending on the species. Metal concentrations across species varied in the order iron (Fe) > zinc (Zn) > chromium (Cr) > nickel (Ni) > cadmium (Cd). Majority of the species accumulated more HM in roots than shoots. Among species, the concentrations (both in roots and shoots) were in the order C. sativa > C. album > X. stramonium > C. canadensis > A. viridus > N. officinale > P. macalosa > D. stramonium > S. asper > O. rosea. No species was identified as a hyperaccumulator. All species exhibited a translocation factor (TF) less than 1. Species like C. sativa, C. album and X. stramonium gave higher (> 1) biological concentration factor (BCF) and biological accumulation coefficient (BAC) especially for Fe, Cr and Cd than other species. Higher accumulation of heavy metals in these plant species signifies the general application of these species for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of HM from polluted soils.

  8. Application of Moving Bed Biofilm Process for Biological Organics and Nutrients Removal from Municipal Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kermani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, experiments have been conducted to evaluate the organics and nutrients removal from synthetic wastewater by a laboratory scale moving bed biofilm process. For nutrients removal, moving bed biofilm process has been applied in series with anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic units in four separate reactors. Moving bed biofilm reactors were operated continuously at different loading rates of nitrogen and Phosphorus. During optimum conditions, close to complete nitrification with average ammonium removal efficiency of 99.72% occurred in the aerobic reactor. In the aerobic reactor, the average specific nitrification rate was 1.8 g NOx-N kg VSS-1 h-1. The results of the average effluent soluble COD concentration from each reactor showed that denitrification process in the second anoxic reactor consumed most of the biodegradable organic matter. As seen from the results, denitrification rate has increased with increasing NOx-N loading in the second anoxic reactor. The aerobic phosphate removal rate showed a good correlation to the anaerobic phosphate release rate. Moreover, phosphate removal rate showed a strong correlation to the phosphate loading rate in the aerobic reactor. In optimum conditions, the average SCOD, total nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies were 96.9, 84.6 and 95.8%, respectively. This study showed that the moving bed biofilm process could be used as an ideal and efficient option for the total nutrient removal from municipal wastewater.

  9. Fate of phthalate esters in municipal wastewater treatment plant and their environmental impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Minghao; Song, Yonghui; Zhang, Yizhang; Liu, Ruixia; Wei, Jian; Zheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The fate and distribution of six phthalate esters (PAEs) in a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) employing an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A(2)/O) process were investigated. The process achieved relatively high removal efficiencies of PAEs in the range 55-97%. It illustrated that biotransformation and sludge-adsorption were major elimination pathways by analyzing the mass balance and flux of PAEs. About 83% of ∑PAEs was entirely removed by A(2)/O bioreactors indicating biotransformation is the dominant removal mechanism. PAEs with shorter alkyl chain length and higher water solubility were more biodegradable. Less than 6% of ∑PAEs were removed by excess sludge adsorption. The sludge-adsorption capacity of PAE depends on its hydrophobicity. The levels and fluxes of PAEs were analyzed by monitoring different sites of the receiving river of the WWTP effluent to clarify the potential impact of discharge. Daily flux of PAEs upstream and downstream of the discharging point were 113 kg·d(-1) and 205 kg·d(-1), respectively, which were higher than the effluent devotion value of 6.67 kg·d(-1). It suggested that the emissions from the WWTP appeared to be less than those from the other possible sources, such as potential untreated discharge and surface runoff. Improvement of wastewater collection efficiencies is necessary to eliminate the PAE load in the urban river.

  10. Design and operation of an eco-system for municipal wastewater treatment and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Peng, J; Wang, B; Yang, L

    2006-01-01

    An eco-system consisting of integrated ponds and constructed wetland systems is employed in Dongying City, Shandong Province for the treatment and utilization of municipal wastewater with design capacity of 100,000 m(3)/d. The total capital cost of this system is 680 Yuan (RMB) or US dollars 82/m(3)/d, or about half that of the conventional system based on activated sludge process, and the O/M cost is 0.1 Yuan (RMB) or US dollars 0.012/m(3), only one fifth that of conventional treatment systems. The performance of the wastewater treatment and utilization eco-system is quite good with a final effluent COD, BOD, SS, NH3-N and TP of 45-65 mg/l, 7-32 mg/l, 12-35 mg/l, 2-13 mg/l and 0.2-1.8mg/l respectively and the annual average removals of COD, BOD, SS, NH3-N and TP are 69.1%, 78.3%, 76.4%, 62.1% and 52.9%o respectively, which is much better than that of conventional pond system or constructed wetland used separately and illustrates that the artificial and integrated eco-system is more effective and efficient than the simple natural eco-system.

  11. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in the river receiving the effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Taherkhani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Listeria spp. in the river water before and after discharge of the effluent of the municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP in Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 66 samples were collected bi-weekly over 4 months from eleven discrete sampling locations in Zayandehrood River, Iran. Three sampling sites were located above the discharge point and five sites were located after the discharge point of WWTP. Samples were also collected from the influent and the effluent of WWTP. Listeria spp. were isolated using a selective enrichment procedure and a subculture onto polymyxin-acriflavine-lithium chloride-ceftazidime-esculin-mannitol Agar. All isolates were subjected to standard biochemical tests. Results: L. monocytogenes was isolated from influent (83%, effluent (50% and (18.5% river water. Listeria spp. was not found before the discharge point in river water. However, L. monocytogenes was isolated in samples collected from 200 m (33%, 500 m (33%, 2 km (16.5%, 5 km (16.5% and 10 km (16.5% downstream from the WWTP. Listeria innocua (9% and Listeria seeligeri (10% were the second most frequently isolated species. Conclusion: During the wastewater treatment, Listeria spp. is not removed completely. L. monocytogenes is widely distributed in the Zayandehrood river. L. monocytogenes released into surface water demonstrates a potential risk for public health. These results indicate the need for appropriate water management in order to reduce human and animal exposure to such pathogens.

  12. Control of mineral scale deposition in cooling systems using secondary-treated municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Monnell, Jason D; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2011-01-01

    Secondary-treated municipal wastewater (MWW) is a promising alternative to freshwater as power plant cooling system makeup water, especially in arid regions. A prominent challenge for the successful use of MWW for cooling is potentially severe mineral deposition (scaling) on pipe surfaces. In this study, theoretical, laboratory, and field work was conducted to evaluate the mineral deposition potential of MWW and its deposition control strategies under conditions relevant to power plant cooling systems. Polymaleic acid (PMA) was found to effectively reduce scale formation when the makeup water was concentrated four times in a recirculating cooling system. It was the most effective deposition inhibitor of those studied when applied at 10 mg/L dosing level in a synthetic MWW. However, the deposition inhibition by PMA was compromised by free chlorine added for biogrowth control. Ammonia present in the wastewater suppressed the reaction of the free chlorine with PMA through the formation of chloramines. Monochloramine, an alternative to free chlorine, was found to be less reactive with PMA than free chlorine. In pilot tests, scaling control was more challenging due to the occurrence of biofouling even with effective control of suspended bacteria. Phosphorous-based corrosion inhibitors are not appropriate due to their significant loss through precipitation reactions with calcium. Chemical equilibrium modeling helped with interpretation of mineral precipitation behavior but must be used with caution for recirculating cooling systems, especially with use of MWW, where kinetic limitations and complex water chemistries often prevail. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Occurrence and fate of dissolved and particulate antimicrobials in municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senta, Ivan; Terzic, Senka; Ahel, Marijan

    2013-02-01

    Comprehensive study on the occurrence and fate of several classes of antimicrobials, including sulfonamides, trimethoprim, fluoroquinolones and macrolides, in Croatian municipal wastewaters was performed using an integrated approach, which comprised analysis of both dissolved and particulate fractions. A nation-wide screening showed ubiquitous occurrence of human-use antimicrobials in raw wastewater samples with the total concentrations ranging from 2 to 20 μg/L, while veterinary antimicrobials were typically present in much lower concentrations (removal mechanisms of investigated compounds during the conventional activated sludge treatment. The overall removal efficiencies of antimicrobials from the water phase were rather variable, ranging from 0% for trimethoprim to 85% for norfloxacin. A significant percentage of fluoroquinolones (norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin) and macrolides (azithromycin and clarithromycin) was associated with the primary and excess secondary sludge, explaining 14-77% of the total removal. The removal, which could be attributed to biological transformation, was relatively poor for all antimicrobials, exceeding 30% only for SMX (32%) and clarithromycin (55%). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of cyclic phytoremediation with different wetland plants on municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Mudassar; Irshad, Muhammad; Fawad, Muhammad; Ali, Zeshan; Eneji, A Egrinya; Aurangzeb, Naureen; Mohammad, Ashiq; Ali, Barkat

    2014-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a promising cleanup technology for contaminated soils, groundwater, and wastewater that is both low-tech and low-cost. The objective of this study was to investigate the ameliorative effect of phytoremediation on municipal wastewater (MWW). For this purpose, a phytoremediation garden was established using different aquatic plants species [Pistia stratiotes, Eichhornia crassipess, Hydrocotyle umbellatta, Lemna minor, Tyhpa latifolia, and Scirpus acutus] in seven earthen pond systems (P1-P7) for the cyclic treatment of MWW. The physico-chemical analysis of MWW was carried out before and after the cyclic phytoremediation. Results showed that pH, EC and turbidity of MWW were reduced by 5.5%, 33.7%, and 93.1%, respectively after treatment (from P1 to P7). Treatment system also reduced total dissolved solids (TDS) by 35.2%, Cl by 61%, HCO3 by 29.2%, hardness by 45.7%, Ca by 32.3% and Mg by 55.9%. Nitrate concentration was reduced by 77.6% but SO4 was enhanced slightly. An ameliorative combined effect of wetland plants namely L. minor, T. latifolia, and S. acutus on MWW was noticed. Sequential phytoremediation with a mixture of plants was more effective than that relying only on a single plant species.

  15. Mesquite wood chips (Prosopis) as filter media in a biofilter system for municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Hernández, D B; Vigueras-Cortés, J M; Garzón-Zúñiga, M A

    2016-01-01

    The biofiltration system over organic bed (BFOB) uses organic filter material (OFM) to treat municipal wastewater (MWW). This study evaluated the performance of a BFOB system employing mesquite wood chips (Prosopis) as OFM. It also evaluated the effect of hydraulic loading rates (HLRs) in order to achieve the operational parameters required to remove organic matter, suspended material, and pathogens, thus meeting Mexican and US regulations for reuse in irrigation. Two biofilters (BFs) connected in series were installed; the first one aerated (0.62 m(3)air m(-2)h(-1)) and the second one unaerated. The source of MWW was a treatment plant located in Durango, Mexico. For 200 days, three HLRs (0.54, 1.07, and 1.34 m(3)m(-2)d(-1)) were tested. The maximum HLR at which the system showed a high removal efficiency of pollutants and met regulatory standards for reuse in irrigation was 1.07 m(3)m(-2)d(-1), achieving removal efficiencies of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) 92%, chemical oxygen demand (COD) 78%, total suspended solids (TSS) 95%, and four log units of fecal coliforms. Electrical conductivity in the effluent ensures that it would not cause soil salinity. Therefore, mesquite wood chips can be considered an innovative material suitable as OFM for BFs treating wastewaters.

  16. Organic carbon, influent microbial diversity and temperature strongly influence algal diversity and biomass in raceway ponds treating raw municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dae-Hyun; Ramanan, Rishiram; Heo, Jina; Kang, Zion; Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Algae based wastewater treatment coupled to biofuel production has financial benefits and practical difficulties. This study evaluated the factors influencing diversity and growth of indigenous algal consortium cultivated on untreated municipal wastewater in a high rate algal pond (HRAP) for a period of 1 year using multivariate statistics. Diversity analyses revealed the presence of Chlorophyta, Cyanophyta and Bacillariophyta. Dominant microalgal genera by biovolume in various seasons were Scenedesmus sp., Microcystis sp., and Chlorella sp. Scenedesmus sp., persisted throughout the year but none of three strains co-dominated with the other. The most significant factors affecting genus dominance were temperature, inflow cyanophyta and organic carbon concentration. Cyanophyta concentration affected microalgal biomass and diversity, whereas temperature impacted biomass. Preferred diversity of microalgae is not sustained in wastewater systems but is obligatory for biofuel production. This study serves as a guideline to sustain desired microalgal consortium in wastewater treatment plants for biofuel production.

  17. Intersex and reproductive impairment of wild fish exposed to multiple municipal wastewater discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetreault, Gerald R; Bennett, Charles J; Shires, K; Knight, B; Servos, Mark R; McMaster, Mark E

    2011-08-01

    The Grand River watershed in Ontario, Canada, receives and assimilates the outflow of 29 Municipal Wastewater Effluent (MWWE) discharges which is a mixture of domestic and industrial wastes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cumulative impact of multiple sewage discharges on populations of wild fish. In field studies, responses of fish populations and individual fish responses in terms of growth (condition factor), reproduction (in vitro sex steroid production, gonadosomatic indices, histology [cellular development and intersex]) were assessed upstream and downstream of two municipal discharges. Fish [Greenside Darters Etheostoma blennioides and Rainbow Darters E. caeruleum] collected downstream of two municipal wastewater plants had the potential to have greater growth (longer and heavier) when compared to reference fish collections regardless of sex. Fish were not assimilating additional anthropogenic resources into energy storage (increased condition, liver somatic index). Impacts on ovarian development appeared to be minor with no differences in growth, steroid production or cellular development. Sewage exposed male fish were experiencing impairment in the capacity to produce testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone in vitro, and in cellular development (GSI, intersex). Male darters of both species collected in the upstream agricultural region demonstrated no evidence of intersex whereas our urban reference sites had incidence of intersex of up to 20%. Rates of intersex were elevated downstream of both sewage discharges studied (33% and>60%, respectively). Lower rates of intersex at the intermediate sites, and then increases downstream of second sewage discharge suggests that fish populations have to potential to recover prior to exposure to the second sewage effluent. Pre-spawning darters demonstrated dramatically higher incidence of intersex in the spring at both urban reference sites (33% and 50%, respectively), and increased more so downstream of

  18. Applicability of one-stage partial nitritation and anammox in MBBR for anaerobically pre-treated municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouba, Vojtech; Widiayuningrum, P; Chovancova, L; Jenicek, P; Bartacek, J

    2016-07-01

    Energy consumption of municipal wastewater treatment plants can be reduced by the anaerobic pre-treatment of the main wastewater stream. After this pre-treatment, nitrogen can potentially be removed by partial nitritation and anammox (PN/A). Currently, the application of PN/A is limited to nitrogen-rich streams (>500 mg L(-1)) and temperatures 25-35 °C. But, anaerobically pretreated municipal wastewater is characterized by much lower nitrogen concentrations (20-100 mg L(-1)) and lower temperatures (10-25 °C). We operated PN/A under similar conditions: total ammonium nitrogen concentration 50 mg L(-1) and lab temperature (22 °C). PN/A was operated for 342 days in a 4 L moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR). At 0.4 mg O2 L(-1), nitrogen removal rate 33 g N m(-3) day(-1) and 80 % total nitrogen removal efficiency was achieved. The capacity of the reactor was limited by low AOB activity. We observed significant anammox activity (40 g N m(-3) day(-1)) even at 12 °C, improving the applicability of PN/A for municipal wastewater treatment.

  19. A pilot-scale forward osmosis membrane system for concentrating low-strength municipal wastewater: performance and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiwei; Zheng, Junjian; Tang, Jixu; Wang, Xinhua; Wu, Zhichao

    2016-02-01

    Recovery of nutrients and energy from municipal wastewater has attracted much attention in recent years; however, its efficiency is significantly limited by the low-strength properties of municipal wastewater. Herein, we report a pilot-scale forward osmosis (FO) system using a spiral-wound membrane module to concentrate real municipal wastewater. Under active layer facing feed solution mode, the critical concentration factor (CCF) of this FO system was determined to be 8 with 0.5 M NaCl as draw solution. During long-term operation at a concentration factor of 5, (99.8 ± 0.6)% of chemical oxygen demand and (99.7 ± 0.5)% of total phosphorus rejection rates could be achieved at a flux of 6 L/(m2 h) on average. In comparison, only (48.1 ± 10.5)% and (67.8 ± 7.3)% rejection of ammonium and total nitrogen were observed. Cake enhanced concentration polarization is a major contributor to the decrease of water fluxes. The fouling also led to the occurrence of a cake reduced concentration polarization effect, improving ammonium rejection rate with the increase of operation time in each cycle. This work demonstrates the applicability of using FO process for wastewater concentrating and also limitations in ammonium recovery that need further improvement in future.

  20. Effect of sulfate ions on growth and pollutants removal of self-flocculating microalga Chlorococcum sp. GD in synthetic municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Junping; Guo, Junyan; Feng, Jia; Liu, Qi; Xie, Shulian

    2017-03-11

    Sulfate is a primary sulfur source and can be available in wastewaters. Nevertheless, effect of sulfate ions on growth and pollutants removal of microalgae seems to be less investigated. At the present study, self-flocculating microalga Chlorococcum sp. GD was grown in synthetic municipal wastewater with different sulfate concentrations. Results indicated that Chlorococcum sp. GD grew better in synthetic municipal wastewater with 18, 45, 77, 136 and 271mg/L SO4(2-) than in wastewater without SO4(2-). Chlorococcum sp. GD had also excellent removal efficiencies of nitrogen and phosphorus and effectively flocculated in sulfate wastewater. Sulfate deprivation weakened the growth, pollutants removal and self-flocculation of Chlorococcum sp. GD in wastewater. Antioxidative enzymes activity significantly increased and photosynthetic activity significantly decreased when Chlorococcum sp. GD was cultivated in sulfate-free wastewater. Sulfate deprivation probably reduced cell activity of growth, pollutants removal and flocculation via inducing the over-accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  1. A Survey on the Removal Efficiency of Fat, Oil and Grease in Shiraz Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant

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    Dehghani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Fat, oil and grease (FOG in municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP caused many problems. Objectives This study aimed to determine the removal efficiency of FOG in Shiraz MWWTP. Materials and Methods The removal efficiencies of FOG in the MWWTP were studied from June 2011 to September 2011 in Shiraz (Iran. The influent and effluent wastewater samples were collected in a volume of one liter (4 samples per week and analyzed according to the standard methods. Samples are transferred to the laboratory immediately. The concentration of FOG was determined using the solvent extraction and separating funnel and then compared with the effluent standards. To analyze the data, SPSS (version 11.5, Chi-square test and t test were used. Results The results showed that the FOG amount in input raw sewage in the MWWTP from June 2011 to September 2011 was around 25.5 mg/L and the amount in treated wastewater was about 8.1 mg/L. The FOG removal efficiency in this refinery was about 70% and met the environmental standards for the discharge (less than 10 mg/L (P < 0.05. Conclusions The effluent can be discharged to surface waters or used for irrigation. In order to the FOG concentration met the effluent standards, it is very crucial to control the entrance of industrial wastewater to the municipal wastewater collection networks. Otherwise, the MWWTP should be upgraded and the special techniques used to reduce FOG.

  2. Education, Wechler's Full Scale IQ and "g."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colom, Roberto; Abad, Francisco J.; Garcia, Luis F.; Juan-Espinosa, Manuel

    2002-01-01

    Investigated whether average Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) differences can be attributed to "g" using the Spanish standardization sample of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale III (WAIS III) (n=703 females and 666 men). Results support the conclusion that WAIS III FSIQ does not directly or exclusively measure "g" across the full range…

  3. Municipal wastewater treatment plants in Mediterranean coastal cities [electronic resource]: inventory of treatment plants in cities of between 2,000 and 10,000 inhabitatnts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    The present document contains information on the municipal wastewater treatment plants in Mediterranean coastal cities with population between 2,000 and 10,000 inhabitants, respective to the MAP Technical Report Series...

  4. Biomass production and nitrogen and phosphorus removal by the green alga Neochloris oleoabundans in simulated wastewater and secondary municipal wastewater effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Lan, Christopher Q

    2011-05-01

    Biomass productivity of 350 mg DCW L(-1)day(-1) with a final biomass concentration of 3.15 g DCW L(-1) was obtained with Neochloris oleoabundans grown in artificial wastewater at sodium nitrate and phosphate concentrations of 140 and 47 mg L(-1), respectively, with undetectable levels of residual N and P in effluents. In secondary municipal wastewater effluents enriched with 70 mg N L(-1), the alga achieved a final biomass concentration of 2.1 g DCW L(-1) and a biomass productivity of 233.3 mg DCW L(-1)day(-1). While N removal was very sensitive to N:P ratio, P removal was independent of N:P ratio in the tested range. These results indicate that N. oleoabundans could potentially be employed for combined biofuel production and wastewater treatment.

  5. Study of Kinetic coefficients of a Membrane Bioreactor (MBR for municipal wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Naghizadeh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: In order to design membrane bioreactors (MBR properly, it is essential to comprehend the behavior of microorganisms in such wastewater treatment processes. Materials & Methods: In this study, a lab-scale MBR process was operated to determine the biokinetic coefficients of the MBR system under different MLSS concentrations of 6800, 7000, 7400, and 7800 mg/l and organic loading rates of 0.5 kg COD/m3/day. Results: The results of this study showed that the yield of microorganisms (Y, the endogenous decay coefficient (kd, the maximum specific growth rate (μmax and the saturation constant (Ks were in the range of 0.67 g VSS/g COD, 0.56 d−1, 1.86 d−1 and 6.65 mg COD/l, respectively. Conclusions: The kinetic coefficients in this study can be used to improve the operation and design the MBR system in full scale.

  6. Distillery wastes as external carbon sources for denitrification in municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwionka, K; Makinia, J; Kaszubowska, M; Majtacz, J; Angowski, M

    2012-01-01

    In this study, by-products from alcohol production were examined in terms of their potential application as external carbon sources for enhancing denitrification in biological nutrient removal systems. Three types of batch tests were used to compare the effects of the distillery by-products, such as fusel oil, syrup and reject water, on the non-acclimated activated sludge. Much higher nitrate utilization rates (NURs) were observed for the latter two carbon sources. In the conventional NUR measurements (one-phase experiments), the observed NURs with syrup and reject water were 3.2-3.3 g N/(kg VSS h) compared with 1.0 g N/(kg VSS h) obtained for fusel oils from two different distilleries. When the carbon sources were added at the beginning of the anoxic phase preceded by an anaerobic phase (two-phase experiments), the NURs were 4.2 g N/(kg VSS h) (syrup and reject water) and 2.4-2.7 g N/(kg VSS h) (fusel oils). The heterotrophic yield coefficient, determined based on the conventional OUR measurements, varied in a relatively narrow range (0.72-0.79 g COD/g COD) for all the examined carbon sources. Due to advantageous composition (much higher COD concentrations and COD/N ratios), fusel is a preferred carbon source for practical handling in full-scale wastewater treatment plants.

  7. Tertiary treatment of a municipal wastewater toward pharmaceuticals removal by chemical and electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Francisca C; Soler, J; Alpendurada, M F; Boaventura, Rui A R; Brillas, Enric; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2016-11-15

    This study focuses on the degradation of pharmaceuticals from a municipal wastewater after secondary treatment by applying various advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) and electrochemical AOPs (EAOPs) like UVC, H2O2/UVC, anodic oxidation (AO), AO with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), AO-H2O2/UVC and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) using either UVC radiation (PEF-UVC) or UVA radiation (PEF-UVA). The municipal wastewater after secondary treatment was spiked with 5.0 mg L(-1) of trimethoprim (TMP) antibiotic. The efficiency of processes to remove TMP followed the order UVC UVC UVC UVC ≈ PEF-UVC (pH = 2.8), using neutral pH, except when identified. While the UVC radiation alone led to a very low TMP removal, the H2O2/UVC process promoted a very high TMP degradation due to the production of hydroxyl radicals (OH) by H2O2 cleavage. In the AO-H2O2/UVC process, the electrogeneration of H2O2 can avoid the risks associated with the transportation, storage and manipulation of this oxidant and, furthermore, OH at the anode surface are also formed. Nevertheless, low contents of H2O2 were detected mainly at the beginning of the reaction, leading to a lower initial reaction rate when compared with the H2O2/UVC system. In the PEF-UVC, the addition of iron at neutral pH led to the visible formation of insoluble iron oxides that can filter the light. At pH 2.8, the iron remained dissolved, thereby promoting the Fenton's reaction and increasing the organics removal. The UVA-driven processes showed limited efficiency when compared with those using UVC light. For all processes with H2O2 electrogeneration, the active chlorine species can be scavenged by the H2O2, diminishing the efficiency of the processes. This can explain the lower efficiency of AO-H2O2 when compared with AO. Moreover, the degradation of the MWWTP effluent spiked with 18 pharmaceuticals in μg L(-1) during AO process was assessed as well as the influence of the following operational variables on the process

  8. Low removal of acidic and hydrophilic pharmaceutical products by various types of municipal wastewater treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Gagnon

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical substances represent a risk for aquatic environments and their potential impacts on the receiving environment are poorly understood. Municipal effluents are important sources of contaminants including common pharmaceuticals like anti-inflammatory and anti-convulsive substances. The removal of pharmaceuticals, particularly those highly soluble can represent a great challenge to conventional wastewater treatment processes. Hydrophilic drugs (e.g. acidic drugs have properties that can highly influence removal efficiencies of treatment plants. The performance of different wastewater treatment processes for the removal of specific pharmaceutical products that are expected to be poorly removed was investigated. The obtained results were compared to inherent properties of the studied substances. Clofibric acid, carbamazepine, diclofenac, ibuprofen and naproxen were largely found in physicochemical primary-treated effluents at concentrations ranging from 77 to 2384 ng/L. This treatment type showed removal yields lower than 30%. On the other hand, biological treatments with activated sludge under aerobic conditions resulted in much better removal rates (>50% for 5 of the 8 studied substances. Interestingly, this latter type of process showed evidence of selectivity with respect to the size (R2=0.7388, solubility (R2=0.6812, and partitioning (R2=0.9999 of the removed substances; the smallest and least sorbed substances seemed to be removed at better rates, while the persistent carbamazepine (392 ng/L and diclofenac (66 ng/L were poorly removed (<10% after biological treatment. In the case of treatment by aerated lagoons, the most abundant substances were the highly soluble hydroxy-ibuprofen (350-3321 ng/L, followed by naproxen (42-413 n/L and carbamazepine (254-386 ng/L. In order to assess the impacts of all these contaminants of various properties on the environment and human health, we need to better understand the chemical and physical

  9. Combined physico-chemical treatment of secondary settled municipal wastewater in a multifunctional reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, O; Pastore, T; Santoro, D; Crapulli, F; Raisee, M; Moghaddami, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the physico-chemical treatment of municipal wastewater for the simultaneous removal of pollutant indicators (chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total coliforms) and organic contaminants (total phenols) was investigated and assessed. A secondary settled effluent was subjected to coagulation, disinfection and absorption in a multifunctional reactor by dosing, simultaneously, aluminum polychloride (dose range: 0-150 μL/L), natural zeolites (dose range: 0-150 mg/L), sodium hypochlorite (dose range: 0-7.5 mg/L) and powder activated carbon (dose range: 0-30 mg/L). The treatment process was optimized using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and response surface methodology. Specifically, a Latin square technique was employed to generate 16 combinations of treating agent types and concentrations which were pilot tested on an 8 m(3)/h multifunctional reactor fed by a secondary effluent with COD and total coliform concentrations ranging from ≈20 to 120 mg/L and from 10(5) to 10(6) CFU/100 mL, respectively. Results were promising, indicating that removal yields up to 71% in COD and 5.4 log in total coliforms were obtained using an optimal combination of aluminum polychloride (dose range ≈ 84-106 μL/L), powder activated carbon ≈ 5 mg/L, natural zeolite (dose range ≈ 34-70 mg/L) and sodium hypochlorite (dose range ≈ 3.4-5.6 mg/L), with all treating agents playing a statistically significant role in determining the overall treatment performance. Remarkably, the combined process was also able to remove ≈ 50% of total phenols, a micropollutant known to be recalcitrant to conventional wastewater treatments.

  10. Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC) in municipal wastewater treatment: a need for mass balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y M; Oleszkiewicz, J A; Cicek, N; Londry, K

    2004-06-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) as pollutants in municipal wastewater. Recent studies have shown that these compounds can have a negative impact on the environment, and that in many cases they are not efficiently removed in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Studies have also revealed that their destruction and transport out into the environment depend on the design and operational characteristics of these treatment systems and on the properties of the chemicals themselves. This paper reviews the current knowledge on EDCs, natural and synthetic hormones including estrone (E1), 17beta-estradiol (E2), and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in WWTP. Several key data gaps are addressed when assessing the removal of EDCs in WWTPs. First, analytical methods used by most researchers do not account for the inactive or conjugated form of the compounds, yet they can become deconjugated to active forms during treatment, leading to an additional source of contaminant load. Next, insufficient measurements are made at various stages within the WWTP preventing adequate analyses on how each u nit process contributes to degradation. Currently, there is no standardized procedure for assessing degradation of EDCs in WWTPs, and it is often difficult to compare published data generated by individual test protocols. This paper identifies streams that should be sampled in WWTPs and suggests a mass balance approach that takes into account all forms of the compound in both liquid and solid phases. Issues of potential concern in performing mass balances are discussed leading to a proposal of variables that should be analyzed and included in published articles. The adoption of similar methods by researchers in future work will produce a better picture of the presence and fate of these compounds in the environment.

  11. Effects of Plant Species on Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Constructed Wetlands Treating Municipal Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanda Chuersuwan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to quantify emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs, methane (CH4 and Nitrous Oxide (N2, from free water surface constructed wetlands used for domestic wastewater treatment. All constructed wetlands were monoculture and each plot was planted with Phragmites sp., Cyperus sp., or Canna sp. The average CH4 and N2 O emissions were in the range of 5.9-11.2 and 0.9-1.8 g/m2/h, respectively. Seasonal fluctuations of CH4 and N2 O emissions were observed. The highest fluxes of both GHGs occurred during hot rainy season (July-October followed by summer and the lowest found in cool season. The mean of CH4 and N2O emissions from different plants species were significantly different (p<0.05. Average CH4 emissions from constructed wetlands planted with Phragmites sp., Cyperus sp. and Cannasp. were 11.2, 6.0 and 5.9 mg/m2/h, respectively, while mean N2O emissions were 0.9, 1.0 and 1.8 mg/m2/h, respectively. Calculated of Global Warming Potential (GWP found that GWP of CH4 and N2O flux from constructed wetlands planted with Cyperus sp., was the highest (669 mg CO2 equivalent/m2/h, followed by Phragmite sp., (524 mg CO2 equivalent/m2/h and Cannasp., (434 mg CO2 equivalent/mm2/h, respectively. These results suggested that municipal wastewater treatment by constructed wetlands planted with Canna sp. and Phragmite sp., had potential of lower GHGs emissions into the atmosphere and Phragmite sp., provided the highest removal rate of Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD.

  12. Integrated chemical treatment of municipal wastewater using waste hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Zulfiqar Ahmed; Mahmood, Qaisar; Raja, Iftikhar Ahmad; Malik, Amir Haider; Rashid, Naim; Wu, Donglei

    Dilemmas like water shortage, rapid industrialization, growing human population and related issues have seriously affected human health and environmental sustainability. For conservation and sustainable use of our water resources, innovative methods for wastewater treatment are continuously being explored. Advance Oxidation Processes (AOPs) show a promising approach to meet specific objectives of municipal wastewater treatment (MWW). The MWW samples were pretreated with Al 2(SO 4) 4·8H 2O (Alum) at different doses 4, 8, 12-50 mg/L to enhance the sedimentation. The maximum COD removal was observed at alum treatments in range of 28-32 mg/L without increasing total dissolved solids (TDS). TDS were found to increase when the alum dose was increased from 32-40 mg/L. In the present study, the optimum alum dose of 30 mg/L for 3 h of sedimentation and subsequent integrated H 2O 2/UV treatment was applied (using 2.5 mL/L of 40% waste H 2O 2 and 35% fresh H 2O 2 separately). Organic and inorganic pollutants, contributing towards chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), turbidity and total dissolved solids were degraded by H 2O 2/UV. About 93% COD, 90% BOD and 83% turbidity reduction occurred when 40% waste H 2O 2 was used. When using fresh H 2O 2, 63% COD, 68% BOD and 86% turbidity reduction was detected. Complete disinfection of coliform bacteria occurred by using 40% H 2O 2/UV. The most interesting part of this research was to compare the effectiveness of waste H 2O 2 with fresh H 2O 2. Waste H 2O 2 generated from an industrial process of disinfection was found more effective in the treatment of MWW than fresh 35% H 2O 2.

  13. Treatment of Copper Contaminated Municipal Wastewater by Using UASB Reactor and Sand-Chemically Carbonized Rubber Wood Sawdust Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Swarup; Mishra, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    The performance of a laboratory scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and its posttreatment unit of sand-chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust (CCRWSD) column system for the treatment of a metal contaminated municipal wastewater was investigated. Copper ion contaminated municipal wastewater was introduced to a laboratory scale UASB reactor and the effluent from UASB reactor was then followed by treatment with sand-CCRWSD column system. The laboratory scale UASB reactor and column system were observed for a period of 121 days. After the posttreatment column the average removal of monitoring parameters such as copper ion concentration (91.37%), biochemical oxygen demand (BODT) (93.98%), chemical oxygen demand (COD) (95.59%), total suspended solid (TSS) (95.98%), ammonia (80.68%), nitrite (79.71%), nitrate (71.16%), phosphorous (44.77%), total coliform (TC) (99.9%), and fecal coliform (FC) (99.9%) was measured. The characterization of the chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust was done by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray fluorescence spectrum (XRF), and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Overall the system was found to be an efficient and economical process for the treatment of copper contaminated municipal wastewater.

  14. The Energy, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Cost Implications of Municipal Water Supply & Wastewater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Winter, Thelma

    All man-made structures and materials have a design life. Across the United States there is a common theme for our water and wastewater treatment facilities and infrastructure. The design life of many of our mid 20 th century water and wastewater infrastructures in the United States have reached or are reaching life expectancy limits (ASCE, 2010). To compound the financial crisis of keeping up with the degradation, meeting and exceeding quality standards has never been more important in order to protect local fresh water supplies. This thesis analyzes the energy consumption of a municipal water and wastewater treatment system from a Lake Erie intake through potable treatment and back through wastewater treatment then discharge. The system boundary for this thesis includes onsite energy consumed by the treatment system and distribution/reclamation system as well as the energy consumed by the manufacturing of treatment chemicals applied during the study periods. By analyzing energy consumption, subsequent implications from greenhouse gas emissions and financial expenditures were quantified. Through the segregation of treatment and distribution processes from non-process energy consumption, such as heating, lighting, and air handling, this study identified that the potable water treatment system consumed an annual average of 2.42E+08 kBtu, spent 5,812,144 for treatment and distribution, and emitted 28,793 metric tons of CO2 equivalent emissions. Likewise, the wastewater treatment system consumed an annual average of 2.45E+08 kBtu, spent 3,331,961 for reclamation and treatment, and emitted 43,780 metric tons of CO2 equivalent emissions. The area with the highest energy usage, financial expenditure, and greenhouse gas emissions for the potable treatment facility and distribution system was from the manufacturing of the treatment chemicals, 1.10E+08 kBtu, 3.7 million, and 17,844 metric tons of CO2 equivalent, respectively. Of the onsite energy (1.4E-03 kWh per gallon

  15. Effect of lake water on algal biomass and microbial community structure in municipal wastewater-based lab-scale photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krustok, I; Truu, J; Odlare, M; Truu, M; Ligi, T; Tiirik, K; Nehrenheim, E

    2015-08-01

    Photobioreactors are a novel environmental technology that can produce biofuels with the simultaneous removal of nutrients and pollutants from wastewaters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lake water inoculation on the production of algal biomass and phylogenetic and functional structure of the algal and bacterial communities in municipal wastewater-treating lab-scale photobioreactors. Inoculating the reactors with lake water had a significant benefit to the overall algal biomass growth and nutrient reduction in the reactors with wastewater and lake water (ratio 70/30 v/v). The metagenome-based survey showed that the most abundant algal phylum in these reactors was Chlorophyta with Scenedesmus being the most prominent genus. The most abundant bacterial phyla were Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes with most dominant families being Sphingobacteriaceae, Cytophagaceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Comamonadaceae, Planctomycetaceae, Nocardiaceae and Nostocaceae. These photobioreactors were also effective in reducing the overall amount of pathogens in wastewater compared to reactors with wastewater/tap water mixture. Functional analysis of the photobioreactor metagenomes revealed an increase in relative abundance genes related to photosynthesis, synthesis of vitamins important for auxotrophic algae and decrease in virulence and nitrogen metabolism subsystems in lake water reactors. The results of the study indicate that adding lake water to the wastewater-based photobioreactor leads to an altered bacterial community phylogenetic and functional structure that could be linked to higher algal biomass production, as well as to enhanced nutrient and pathogen reduction in these reactors.

  16. Microalgae Cultivation on Anaerobic Digestate of Municipal Wastewater, Sewage Sludge and Agro-Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Zuliani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are fast-growing photosynthetic organisms which have the potential to be exploited as an alternative source of liquid fuels to meet growing global energy demand. The cultivation of microalgae, however, still needs to be improved in order to reduce the cost of the biomass produced. Among the major costs encountered for algal cultivation are the costs for nutrients such as CO2, nitrogen and phosphorous. In this work, therefore, different microalgal strains were cultivated using as nutrient sources three different anaerobic digestates deriving from municipal wastewater, sewage sludge or agro-waste treatment plants. In particular, anaerobic digestates deriving from agro-waste or sewage sludge treatment induced a more than 300% increase in lipid production per volume in Chlorella vulgaris cultures grown in a closed photobioreactor, and a strong increase in carotenoid accumulation in different microalgae species. Conversely, a digestate originating from a pilot scale anaerobic upflow sludge blanket (UASB was used to increase biomass production when added to an artificial nutrient-supplemented medium. The results herein demonstrate the possibility of improving biomass accumulation or lipid production using different anaerobic digestates.

  17. Genotoxicity evaluation of domestic sewage in a municipal wastewater treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Koppe Grisolia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of the genotoxicity of domestic sewage was carried out in a municipal wastewater treatment plant. The study was carried out using Allium cepa root tip cells through cytological parameters such as aberrant cells in anaphase-telophase and the mitotic index, and the fish species Oreochromis niloticus and Tilapia rendalli, through the index of micronuclei in peripheral erythrocytes. In the Allium test, each of the four stages of the wasterwater treatment routine was analyzed, i.e., crude sewage, primary effluent, secondary effluent, and tertiary effluent. O. niloticus and T. rendalli specimens were maintained in an aquarium continuously receiving the final effluent, in an open system, before being discharged into Lake Paranoá. For micronuclei analysis, blood samples were drawn after 7, 21, 60, 102 and 142 days, respectively, in controlled conditions. The numbers of aberrant cells found in the Allium test did not differ among the four stages tested, nor when compared with the control. At all stages, the most concentrated sample was more toxic than the respective diluted samples, as demonstrated by the decreased mitotic index. Different sampling of the same group of fish revealed no increase in the micronuclei frequency, regardless of the period of exposure. A correlation between long-term exposure and micronuclei induction was not found either.

  18. Anaerobic Codigestion of Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge with Food Waste: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendram, William

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the codigestion of food manufacturing and processing wastes (FW) with sewage sludge (SS), that is, municipal wastewater treatment plant primary sludge and waste activated sludge. Bench scale mesophilic anaerobic reactors were fed intermittently with varying ratio of SS and FW and operated at a hydraulic retention time of 20 days and organic loading of 2.0 kg TS/m3·d. The specific biogas production (SBP) increased by 25% to 50% with the addition of 1%–5% FW to SS which is significantly higher than the SBP from SS of 284 ± 9.7 mLN/g VS added. Although the TS, VS, and tCOD removal slightly increased, the biogas yield and methane content improved significantly and no inhibitory effects were observed as indicated by the stable pH throughout the experiment. Metal screening of the digestate suggested the biosolids meet the guidelines for use as a soil conditioner. Batch biochemical methane potential tests at different ratios of SS : FW were used to determine the optimum ratio using surface model analysis. The results showed that up to 47-48% FW can be codigested with SS. Overall these results confirm that codigestion has great potential in improving the methane yield of SS. PMID:27689091

  19. Pilot scale anaerobic co-digestion of municipal wastewater sludge with biodiesel waste glycerin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razaviarani, Vahid; Buchanan, Ian D; Malik, Shahid; Katalambula, Hassan

    2013-04-01

    The effect on process performance of adding increasing proportions of biodiesel waste glycerin (BWG) to municipal wastewater sludge (MWS) was studied using two 1300 L pilot-scale digesters under mesophilic conditions at 20 days SRT. The highest proportion of BWG that did not cause a process upset was determined to be 23% and 35% of the total 1.04 kg VS/(m(3)d) and 2.38 kg COD/(m(3)d) loadings, respectively. At this loading, the biogas and methane production rates in the test digester were 1.65 and 1.83 times greater than of those in the control digester which received only MWS, respectively. The COD and VS removal rates at this loading in the test digester were 1.82 and 1.63-fold those of the control digester, respectively. Process instability was observed when the proportion of BWG in the test digester feed was 31% and 46% of the 1.18 kg VS/(m(3)d) and 2.88 kg COD/(m(3)d) loadings, respectively.

  20. Chemical characterization of municipal wastewater sludges produced by two-phase anaerobic digestion for biogas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francioso, Ornella, E-mail: ornella.francioso@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Agroambientali, V.le Fanin 40, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Rodriguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa [Dipartimento di Scienze degli Alimenti, V.le Fanin 40, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Montecchio, Daniela [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Agroambientali, V.le Fanin 40, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Salomoni, Cesare; Caputo, Armando [Biotec sys srl, Via Gaetano Tacconi, 59, 40139 Bologna (Italy); Palenzona, Domenico [Dipartimento di Biologia Evoluzionistica Sperimentale, Via Selmi 3, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    In the present study, the chemical features of municipal wastewater sludges treated in two-phase separate digesters (one for acetogenesis and the other one for methanogenesis), were characterized by using chemical analysis, stable carbon isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 13}C), HS-SPME-GC-MS, TG-DTA analysis and DRIFT spectroscopy. The results obtained showed that sludges from acetogenesis and methanogenesis differed from each other, as well as from influent raw sludges. Both processes exhibited a diverse chemical pattern in term of VFA and VOC. Additional variations were observed for {delta}{sup 13}C values that changed from acetogenesis to methanogenesis, as a consequence of fermentation processes that led to a greater fractionation of {sup 12}C with respect to the {sup 13}C isotope. Similarly, the thermal profiles of acetogenesis and methanogenesis sludges greatly differed in terms of heat combustion produced. These changes were also supported by higher lipid content (probably fatty acids) in acetogenesis than in methanogenesis, as also shown by DRIFT spectroscopy.

  1. Life cycle assessment of introducing an anaerobic digester in a municipal wastewater treatment plant in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, David; Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is being established as a standard technology to recover some of the energy contained in the sludge in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as biogas, allowing an economy in electricity and heating and a decrease in climate gas emission. The purpose of this study was to quantify the contributions to the total environmental impact of the plant using life cycle assessment methodology. In this work, data from real operation during 2012 of a municipal WWTP were utilized as the basis to determine the impact of including AD in the process. The climate change human health was the most important impact category when AD was included in the treatment (Scenario 1), especially due to fossil carbon dioxide emissions. Without AD (Scenario 2), increased emissions of greenhouse gases, mostly derived from the use of electricity, provoked a rise in the climate change categories. Biogas utilization was able to provide 47% of the energy required in the WWTP in Scenario 1. Results obtained make Scenario 1 the better environmental choice by far, mainly due to the use of the digested sludge as fertilizer.

  2. Hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs) in biosolids from municipal wastewater treatment plants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianteng; Liu, Jiyan; Liu, Qian; Ruan, Ting; Yu, Miao; Wang, Yawei; Wang, Thanh; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-03-01

    Hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs) along with methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs) have been frequently identified as natural compounds in marine environment and also assumed as metabolites of PBDEs. In the present study, nine OH-PBDE, nine MeO-PBDE and 10 PBDE congeners were studied in the sewage sludge collected from 36 municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in 27 cities of China. The results suggest that OH-PBDEs and PBDEs are ubiquitous in sewage sludge in China, however, methoxylated PBDEs were not detectable. Composition profiles of detected OH-PBDE congeners were different depending on the sampling location. ΣOH-PBDEs in WWTPs sludge ranged from 0.04 to 2.24 ng g(-1) dry weight (mean: 0.35 ng g(-1) dry weight). The total amount of the two most prominent congeners (6-OH-BDE-47+2'-OH-BDE-68) accounted for about 53.3-100% of the sum of all six identified congeners. A significant linear relationship was found between 6-OH-BDE-47 and 2'-OH-BDE-68. A distinct geographical distribution of ΣOH-PBDEs was observed with greater concentrations of OH-PBDEs at coastal areas than inland regions in China.

  3. Absorption of phosphorus from wastewater by aged refuse excavated from municipal solid waste landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO You-cai; SHAO Fang

    2005-01-01

    Municipal solid waste(refuse) landfill stabilizes as the refuse degrades. After years of biodegradation, the refuse in the landfill becomes stabilized and aged, which may vary with the local climate, humidity, and composition of refuse placed. In this work, it is found that the refuse with an age of over 8 years at Shanghai Refuse Landfill has been significantly stabilized and sufficiently aged and is thus suitable for excavation. The 8-year old aged refuse is mechanically screened, and the fine fractions of refuse(aged refuse) with a diameter less than 2 cm are then used as a biological absorbent for removal of both inorganic and organic phosphorus in livestock wastewater and prepared aqueous solution. It is proved that the aged refuse is very effective for the quantitative removal of both types of phosphorus. The absorption mechanism is proposed. It is considered that phosphorus is firstly absorbed onto the surface of the aged refuse and then used as a substrate for the growth of microorganisms which ultimately leave the aged refuse as sludge.

  4. Performance of a biofilter system with agave fiber filter media for municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigueras-Cortés, Juan Manuel; Villanueva-Fierro, Ignacio; Garzón-Zúñiga, Marco Antonio; de Jesús Návar-Cháidez, José; Chaires-Hernández, Isaías; Hernández-Rodríguez, César

    2013-01-01

    Agave plants grow in semi-arid regions and are used for mescal production. However, agave fiber by-products are considered waste materials. Thus, we tested agave fiber as a filter media and biofilm material carrier for removing pollutants from municipal wastewater. Three laboratory-scale biofiltration reactors were used in two trials with five hydraulic loading rates (HLRs = 0.27, 0.54, 0.80, 1.07 and 1.34 m(3) m(-2) d(-1)). One series was conducted using mechanical aeration (0.62 m(3) m(-2) h(-1)). To prevent compaction, decreasing pressure and clogging of the filter media, 4, 8 and 12 internal divisions were evaluated in the biofilter column. After 17 months of continuous operation at an HLR of 0.80 m(3) m(-2) d(-1), the removal efficiencies of the aerated biofilters were 92.0% biochemical oxygen demand, 79.7% chemical oxygen demand, 98.0% helminth eggs, 99.9% fecal coliforms and 91.9% total suspended solids. Statistical analysis showed that the chosen operational parameters significantly influenced the removal efficiencies of the biofilters. The effluent quality obtained under these conditions complied with the Mexican and US EPA standards for agricultural irrigation and green spaces, except for coliforms, which is why the effluents must be disinfected. Thus, agave fiber is a favorable choice for use as a packing material in biofiltration processes.

  5. The effect of managing nutrients in the performance of anaerobic digesters of municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirer, Sibel Uludag; Taskin, Bilgin; Demirer, Goksel N; Duran, Metin

    2013-09-01

    Is it possible to create conditions in the anaerobic digesters to control nutrients without changing the performance of a reactor? This study investigates an answer for this question. To this purpose, anaerobic reactors are operated at high concentrations of Mg(2+) ion to harvest the nutrient ions (NH4 (+) and PO4 (3-)) in the form of struvite, that is, magnesium ammonium phosphate. The effects of this modification on the anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge were investigated in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and cumulative CH4 production as well as the changes in the biological diversity. The results showed that approximately 50 % of the nutrients (NH4 (+) and PO4 (3-)) were removed regardless of the method adopted for the addition of Mg(2+) ion, slug or daily dosing. The numbers of Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina in the samples withdrawn prior to and after the addition of Mg(2+) did not show significant difference according to the results obtained from qPCR analyses. The research results showed that the addition of Mg(2+) into the anaerobic digesters in municipal wastewater treatment facilities may help to remove the nutrients from the effluent while recovering in their solid forms.

  6. Simultaneous carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous removal from municipal wastewater in a circulating fluidized bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ajay; Zhu, Jesse; Nakhla, George

    2006-11-01

    In this study, the performance of the circulating fluidized bed bioreactor (CFBB) with anoxic and aerobic beds and employing lava rock as a carrier media for the simultaneous removal of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus from municipal wastewater at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 0.82 h was discussed. The CFBB was operated without and with bioparticles' recirculation between the anoxic and aerobic bed for 260 and 110 d respectively. Without particles' recirculation, the CFBB was able to achieve carbon (C), total nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) removal efficiencies of 94%, 80% and 65% respectively, whereas with bioparticles' recirculation, 91%, 78% and 85% removals of C, N and P were achieved. The CFBB was operated at long sludge retention time (SRT) of 45-50 d, and achieved a sludge yield of 0.12-0.135 g VSS g COD(-1). A dynamic stress study of the CFBB was carried out at varying feed flow rates and influent ammonia concentrations to determine response to shock loadings. The CFBB responded favourably in terms of TSS and COD removal to quadrupling of the feed flow rate. However, nitrification was more sensitive to hydraulic shock loadings than to doubling of influent nitrogen loading.

  7. Removal of nitrate and sulphate from biologically treated municipal wastewater by electrocoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arun Kumar; Chopra, A. K.

    2015-07-01

    The present investigation observed the effect of current density (j), electrocoagulation (EC) time, inter electrode distance, electrode area, initial pH and settling time on the removal of nitrate (NO3 -) and sulphate (SO4 2-) from biologically treated municipal wastewater (BTMW), and optimization of the operating conditions of the EC process. A glass chamber of two-liter volume was used for the experiments with DC power supply using two electrode plates of aluminum (Al-Al). The maximum removal of NO3 - (63.21 %) and SO4 2- (79.98 %) of BTMW was found with the optimum operating conditions: current density: 2.65 A/m2, EC time: 40 min, inter electrode distance: 0.5 cm, electrode area: 160 cm2, initial pH: 7.5 and settling time: 60 min. The EC brought down the concentration of NO3 - within desirable limit of the Bureau of Indian Standard (BIS)/WHO for drinking water. Under optimal operating conditions, the operating cost was found to be 1.01/m3 of water in terms of the electrode consumption (23.71 × 10-5 kg Al/m3) and energy consumption (101.76 kWh/m3).

  8. Influence of SRT and HRT on Bioprocess Performance in Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors Treating Municipal Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qirong; Parker, Wayne; Dagnew, Martha

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of Solid Retention Time (SRT) (40 to 100 days) and Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) (2.5 to 8.5 hours) on the treatment of municipal wastewater in pilot and bench scale AnMBRs. The results revealed good permeate quality with respect to concentrations of COD (<40 mg/L) and BOD5 (<10 mg/L) was achieved under all conditions. Over the range of values tested SRT and HRTdid not significantly influence COD and BOD5 removal efficiencies. Extended SRTs resulted in reduced sludge production and enhanced methane production. Oversaturation of dissolved methane in permeate appears to have been responsible for a consistent lack of COD mass balance closure in all tests. After calibration of biokinetic coefficients, PetWin 4 (EnviroSim Canada) was found to effectively simulate the concentrations of particulate COD, readily biodegradable COD and acetic acid over a range of SRTs and HRTs. The calibrated saturation coefficients for hydrolysis and aceticlastic methanogenesis processes were comparable to those reported in literature. The saturation coefficient of fermentation was significantly lower than those reported in literature. The simulated methane mass flows were consistently higher than the measured values which was consistent with the lack of COD mass balance closure and was attributed to reduction of sulfate and oversaturation of the permeate with respect to Henry's Law.

  9. Nitrogen and Phosphorous Removal in Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants in China: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Qiu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface water environment in China was degraded rapidly in the last two decades, resulting in increasingly tighten criteria issued for municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs. This paper reviewed the recent advances of process design and operational optimization for nutrients removal. Three major processes, as anaerobic-anoxic-oxic (AAO process, oxidation ditch (OD, and sequencing batch reactor (SBR occupied 65% of WWTPs amounts and 54% of treatment volumes of China in 2006. However conservative process designs and operational faults often impaired the process performances and energy efficiency. Therefore, typical processes were modified, combined, and innovated to meet the requirements of the diverse influent characteristics and lower energy consumptions. Furthermore, operational optimization techniques by modeling, simulation, and real-time control were also developed and applied in China to improve the process operation. Although great efforts had been contributed to improve the WWTPs performances in China, attentions should be continuously paid to the introduction, instruction, and implementation of advanced techniques. At last, the technical demands and appropriated techniques of WWTPs in China were briefly discussed.

  10. Removal of nitrate and sulphate from biologically treated municipal wastewater by electrocoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arun Kumar; Chopra, A. K.

    2017-06-01

    The present investigation observed the effect of current density ( j), electrocoagulation (EC) time, inter electrode distance, electrode area, initial pH and settling time on the removal of nitrate (NO3 -) and sulphate (SO4 2-) from biologically treated municipal wastewater (BTMW), and optimization of the operating conditions of the EC process. A glass chamber of two-liter volume was used for the experiments with DC power supply using two electrode plates of aluminum (Al-Al). The maximum removal of NO3 - (63.21 %) and SO4 2- (79.98 %) of BTMW was found with the optimum operating conditions: current density: 2.65 A/m2, EC time: 40 min, inter electrode distance: 0.5 cm, electrode area: 160 cm2, initial pH: 7.5 and settling time: 60 min. The EC brought down the concentration of NO3 - within desirable limit of the Bureau of Indian Standard (BIS)/WHO for drinking water. Under optimal operating conditions, the operating cost was found to be 1.01/m3 of water in terms of the electrode consumption (23.71 × 10-5 kg Al/m3) and energy consumption (101.76 kWh/m3).

  11. Anaerobic Codigestion of Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge with Food Waste: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubayeda Zahan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the codigestion of food manufacturing and processing wastes (FW with sewage sludge (SS, that is, municipal wastewater treatment plant primary sludge and waste activated sludge. Bench scale mesophilic anaerobic reactors were fed intermittently with varying ratio of SS and FW and operated at a hydraulic retention time of 20 days and organic loading of 2.0 kg TS/m3·d. The specific biogas production (SBP increased by 25% to 50% with the addition of 1%–5% FW to SS which is significantly higher than the SBP from SS of 284±9.7 mLN/g VS added. Although the TS, VS, and tCOD removal slightly increased, the biogas yield and methane content improved significantly and no inhibitory effects were observed as indicated by the stable pH throughout the experiment. Metal screening of the digestate suggested the biosolids meet the guidelines for use as a soil conditioner. Batch biochemical methane potential tests at different ratios of SS : FW were used to determine the optimum ratio using surface model analysis. The results showed that up to 47-48% FW can be codigested with SS. Overall these results confirm that codigestion has great potential in improving the methane yield of SS.

  12. Hydrothermal liquefaction of municipal wastewater cultivated algae: Increasing overall sustainability and value streams of algal biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Griffin William

    The forefront of the 21st century presents ongoing challenges in economics, energy, and environmental remediation, directly correlating with priorities for U.S. national security. Displacing petroleum-derived fuels with clean, affordable renewable fuels represents a solution to increase energy independence while stimulating economic growth and reducing carbon-based emissions. The U.S. government embodied this goal by passing the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) in 2007, mandating 36 billion gallons of annual biofuel production by 2022. Algae possess potential to support EISA goals and have been studied for the past 30-50 years as an energy source due to its fast growth rates, noncompetitive nature to food markets, and ability to grow using nutrient waste streams. Algae biofuels have been identified by the National Research Council to have significant sustainability concerns involving water, nutrient, and land use. Utilizing municipal wastewater to cultivate algae provides both water and nutrients needed for growth, partially alleviating these concerns. This dissertation demonstrates a pathway for algae biofuels which increases both sustainability and production of high-value products. Algae are cultivated in pilot-scale open ponds located at the Lawrence Wastewater Treatment Plant (Lawrence, KS) using solely effluent from the secondary clarifier, prior to disinfection and discharge, as both water and nutrient sources. Open ponds were self-inoculated by wastewater effluent and produced a mixed-species culture of various microalgae and macroalgae. Algae cultivation provided further wastewater treatment, removing both nitrogen and phosphorus, which have devastating pollution effects when discharged to natural watersheds, especially in large draining watersheds like the Gulf Coast. Algae demonstrated significant removal of other trace metals such as iron, manganese, barium, aluminum, and zinc. Calcium did not achieve high removal rate but did present a

  13. Full Scale Experiment with Interactive Urban Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Skouboe; Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Jensen, Ole B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses the results of a full-scale interactive urban illumination experiment. The experiment investigates how human motion intensities can be used as input for controlling the illumination of a town square in the city of Aalborg in Denmark. The trajectory, velocity...... changed according to their presence or actions, whereas people watching from the outside noticed to a larger degree the interaction between the illumination and the immersed persons. We seek to develop new knowledge about the experience of responsive environments and to explore technical, social...

  14. ARKTOS full-scale evacuation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligman, B.; Hatfield, P. [ARKTOS Developments Ltd., Surrey, BC (Canada); Bercha, F. [Bercha Group, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-09-15

    The ARKTOS amphibious vehicle can be used for evacuation operations in both open water and ice conditions. It is approved as an evacuation system by various regulators, such as the United States Coast Guard, and is operational in several marine cold regions as an escape, evacuation, and rescue (EER) system. An EER research project was performed in 2006 that provided a general reliability evaluation of the ARKTOS system. However, the project did not have the benefit of detailed full-scale tests in order to validate the associated computer model in drill or non-life threatening evacuation conditions. This paper described a follow-up set of full-scale evacuation tests designed to provide more detailed information and validation data for the reliability that the computer model described in the 2006 research project. A description and photographic illustrations of the ARKTOS system were presented. The tests and subsequent analyses were described. Specifically, the paper described the observations, and presented the statistical results from the data collected, and compared observed results with predicted results of a probabilistic EER simulation computer model. Conclusions and recommendations for reliability improvements were also provided. It was concluded that under the benign conditions, the drill performance was satisfactory in all aspects, both in the evacuation activities and the rescue or de-boarding activities. 3 refs., 1 tab., 17 figs.

  15. Coagulant recovery from water treatment plant sludge and reuse in post-treatment of UASB reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Abhilash T; Ahammed, M Mansoor

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, feasibility of recovering the coagulant from water treatment plant sludge with sulphuric acid and reusing it in post-treatment of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater were studied. The optimum conditions for coagulant recovery from water treatment plant sludge were investigated using response surface methodology (RSM). Sludge obtained from plants that use polyaluminium chloride (PACl) and alum coagulant was utilised for the study. Effect of three variables, pH, solid content and mixing time was studied using a Box-Behnken statistical experimental design. RSM model was developed based on the experimental aluminium recovery, and the response plots were developed. Results of the study showed significant effects of all the three variables and their interactions in the recovery process. The optimum aluminium recovery of 73.26 and 62.73 % from PACl sludge and alum sludge, respectively, was obtained at pH of 2.0, solid content of 0.5 % and mixing time of 30 min. The recovered coagulant solution had elevated concentrations of certain metals and chemical oxygen demand (COD) which raised concern about its reuse potential in water treatment. Hence, the coagulant recovered from PACl sludge was reused as coagulant for post-treatment of UASB reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater. The recovered coagulant gave 71 % COD, 80 % turbidity, 89 % phosphate, 77 % suspended solids and 99.5 % total coliform removal at 25 mg Al/L. Fresh PACl also gave similar performance but at higher dose of 40 mg Al/L. The results suggest that coagulant can be recovered from water treatment plant sludge and can be used to treat UASB reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater which can reduce the consumption of fresh coagulant in wastewater treatment.

  16. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1929-01-01

    Model of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) under construction. On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. Small included angle for the exit cone; 2. Carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. Tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST project. In a 1979

  17. Comparative analysis of the composition of bacterial communities from two constructed wetlands for municipal and swine wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Paula; Ansola, Gemma; Blanco, Ivan; Molleda, Patricia; de Luis Calabuig, Estanislao; Sáenz de Miera, Luis E

    2010-03-01

    This work provides information about bacterial community structure in natural wastewater treatment systems treating different types of wastewater. The diversity and composition of bacterial communities associated with the rhizosphere of Typha latifolia and Salix atrocinerea were studied and compared among two different natural wastewater treatment systems, using the direct sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA codifying genes. Phylogenetic affiliations of the bacteria detected allowed us to define the main groups present in these particular ecosystems. Moreover, bacterial community structure was studied through two diversity indices. Ten identified and five non-identified phyla were found in the samples; the phylum Proteobacteria was the predominant group in the four ecosystems. The results showed a bacterial community dominated by beta-proteobacteria and a lower diversity value in the swine wastewater treatment system. The municipal wastewater treatment system presented a high diverse community in both macrophytes (Typha latifolia and Salix atrocinerea), with gamma-proteobacteria and alpha-proteobacteria, respectively, as the most abundant groups.

  18. Biomass recovery during municipal wastewater treatment using photosynthetic bacteria and prospect of production of single cell protein for feedstuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saejung, Chewapat; Thammaratana, Thani

    2016-12-01

    Utilization of photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) for wastewater treatment and production of biomass for economical single cell protein production is a feasible option. In this study, Rhodopseudomonas sp. CSK01 was used for municipal wastewater treatment and the effect of initial pH, light intensity and additional carbon source was investigated. Optimum chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and biomass production were achieved when the initial pH and light intensity were 7 and 4000 lux, respectively. The specific growth rate, biomass yield and biomass productivity were found to be 0.4/d, 3.2 g/g COD and 2.1 g/L/d, respectively, which were improved by 100%, 167% and 200% relative to the original condition. Under the optimal conditions, COD removal reached 85% and maximum biomass was 6.2 g/L accomplished within three days of cultivation. The biomass had a relatively high protein content (60.1%) consisting of all essential amino acids. The contents of histidine, lysine, phenylalanine and leucine were superior to those of the previously described PSB. Results showed that COD removal was not improved in the presence of additional carbon sources (glucose, sucrose and malic acid). The addition of malic acid significantly increased the biomass accumulation by 279% relative to the original condition, whereas COD removal was declined due to carbon catabolite repression. In this study, PSB biomass recovery and catabolite repression are proposed in municipal wastewater treatment by Rhodopseudomonas sp.

  19. Reduction of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater effluent by advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhuang, Yao; Geng, Jinju; Ren, Hongqiang; Xu, Ke; Ding, Lili

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the reduction of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), intI1 and 16S rRNA genes, by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), namely Fenton oxidation (Fe(2+)/H2O2) and UV/H2O2 process. The ARGs include sul1, tetX, and tetG from municipal wastewater effluent. The results indicated that the Fenton oxidation and UV/H2O2 process could reduce selected ARGs effectively. Oxidation by the Fenton process was slightly better than that of the UV/H2O2 method. Particularly, for the Fenton oxidation, under the optimal condition wherein Fe(2+)/H2O2 had a molar ratio of 0.1 and a H2O2 concentration of 0.01molL(-1) with a pH of 3.0 and reaction time of 2h, 2.58-3.79 logs of target genes were removed. Under the initial effluent pH condition (pH=7.0), the removal was 2.26-3.35 logs. For the UV/H2O2 process, when the pH was 3.5 with a H2O2 concentration of 0.01molL(-1) accompanied by 30min of UV irradiation, all ARGs could achieve a reduction of 2.8-3.5 logs, and 1.55-2.32 logs at a pH of 7.0. The Fenton oxidation and UV/H2O2 process followed the first-order reaction kinetic model. The removal of target genes was affected by many parameters, including initial Fe(2+)/H2O2 molar ratios, H2O2 concentration, solution pH, and reaction time. Among these factors, reagent concentrations and pH values are the most important factors during AOPs.

  20. Steam-explosion pretreatment for enhancing anaerobic digestion of municipal wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereix, Marcela; Parker, Wayne; Kennedy, Kevin

    2006-05-01

    This study evaluated the use of steam explosion as a pretreatment for municipal wastewater treatment sludges and biosolids as a technique for enhancing biogas generation during anaerobic digestion. Samples of dewatered anaerobic digester effluent (biosolids) and a mixture of thickened waste activated sludge (TWAS) and biosolids were steam-exploded under differing levels of intensity in this study. The results indicate that steam explosion can solublize components of these sludge streams. Increasing the intensity of the steam-explosion pressure and temperature resulted in increased solublization. The steam-explosion pretreatment also increased the bioavailability of sludge components under anaerobic digestion conditions. Increasing the steam-explosion intensity increased the ultimate yield of methane during anaerobic digestion. Batch anaerobic digestion tests suggested that pretreatment at 300 psi was the most optimal condition for enhanced biogas generation while minimizing energy input. Semicontinuous anaerobic digestion revealed that the results that were observed in the batch tests were sustainable in prolonged operation. Semicontinuous digestion of the TWAS/biosolids mixture that was pretreated at 300 psi generated approximately 50% more biogas than the controls. Semicontinuous digestion of the pretreated biosolids resulted in a 3-fold increase in biogas compared with the controls. Based on capillary suction test results, steam-explosion pretreatment at 300 psi improved the dewaterability of the final digested sludge by 32 and 45% for the TWAS/ biosolids mixture and biosolids, respectively, compared with controls. The energy requirements of the nonoptimized steam-explosion process were substantially higher than the additional energy produced from enhanced digestion of the pretreated sludge. Substantial improvements in energy efficiency will be required to make the process viable from an energy perspective.

  1. Different removal behaviours of multiple trace antibiotics in municipal wastewater chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong

    2013-06-01

    The chlorination behaviours of 12 antibiotics belonging to six classes at environmentally relevant concentrations were systematically examined under typical conditions relevant to municipal wastewater chlorination. Cefotaxime, cefalexin, ampicillin and tetracycline were completely removed under all three initial free chlorine dosages (5 mg/L, 10 mg/L, and 15 mg/L). The removal efficiencies of sulphamethoxazole, sulphadiazine, roxithromycin, anhydro-erythromycin, ofloxacin, and trimethoprim were closely correlated to the residual free chlorine concentration, and no further significant mass removal was observed after the residual free chlorine concentration decreased to less than ≈ 0.75 mg/L. Ammonia plays a critical role during chlorination because of its competition with antibiotics for free chlorine to form combined chlorine, which reacts slowly with these antibiotics. Except for norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin, the removal behaviours of the 10 other target antibiotics under ammonia nitrogen concentrations ranging from 2 to 15 mg/L were characterised by a rapid initial removal rate upon contact with free chlorine during the first 5 s-1 min (depending on the specific antibiotic and ammonia nitrogen concentration) and then a much slower removal rate. Free chlorine was responsible for the reaction with antibiotics during the rapid stage (first 5 s-1 min), whereas combined chlorine reacted with antibiotics in the subsequent slow stage. Combined chlorine can remove norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin at a relatively faster rate. The presence of suspended solids at 30 mg/L slightly decreased the antibiotic removal rate. The kinetic rate constants decreased by 2.1-13.9%, while the half-lives increased by 2.0-15.0% compared to those of a 0 mg/L suspended solid for the target antibiotics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrolytic anaerobic reactor and aerated constructed wetland systems for municipal wastewater treatment - HIGHWET project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, A; de la Varga, D; Arias, C A; Van Oirschot, D; Kilian, R; Álvarez, J A; Soto, M

    2017-01-01

    The HIGHWET project combines the hydrolytic up-flow sludge bed (HUSB) anaerobic digester and constructed wetlands (CWs) with forced aeration for decreasing the footprint and improving effluent quality. The HIGHWET plant in A Coruña (NW of Spain) treating municipal wastewater consists of a HUSB and four parallel subsurface horizontal flow (HF) CWs. HF1, HF2 and HF3 units are fitted with forced aeration, while the control HF4 is not aerated. All the HF units are provided with effluent recirculation, but different heights of gravel bed (0.8 m in HF1 and HF2, and 0.5 m in HF3 and HF4) are implemented. Besides, a tobermorite-enriched material was added in the HF2 unit in order to improve phosphorus removal. The HUSB 76-89% of total suspended solids (TSS) and about 40% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD). Aerated HF units reached above 96% of TSS, COD and BOD at a surface loading rate of 29-47 g BOD5/m(2)·d. An aeration regime ranging from 5 h on/3 h off to 3 h on/5 h off was found to be adequate to optimize nitrogen removal, which ranged from 53% to 81%. Average removal rates of 3.4 ± 0.4 g total nitrogen (TN)/m(2)·d and 12.8 ± 3.7 g TN/m(3)·d were found in the aerated units, being 5.5 and 4.1 times higher than those of the non-aerated system. The tobermorite-enriched HF2 unit showed a distinct higher phosphate (60-67%) and total phosphorus (54%) removal.

  3. Microbial-based evaluation of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) for the sustainable and efficient treatment of municipal wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Harb, Moustapha

    2017-03-01

    Conventional activated sludge-based wastewater treatment is an energy and resource-intensive process. Historically it has been successful at producing safely treated wastewater effluents in the developed world, specifically in places that have the infrastructure and space to support its operation. However, with a growing need for safe and efficient wastewater treatment across the world in both urban and rural settings, a paradigm shift in waste treatment is proving to be necessary. The sustainability of the future of wastewater treatment, in a significant way, hinges on moving towards energy neutrality and wastewater effluent reuse. This potential for reuse is threatened by the recent emergence and study of contaminants that have not been previously taken into consideration, such as antibiotics and other organic micropollutants (OMPs), antibiotic resistance genes, and persistent pathogenic bacteria. This dissertation focuses on investigating the use of anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology for the sustainable treatment of municipal-type wastewaters. Specifically, a microbial approach to understanding biofouling and methane recovery potential in anaerobic MBR systems has been employed to assess different reactor systems’ efficiency. This dissertation further compares AnMBRs to their more widely used aerobic counterparts. This comparison specifically focuses on the removal and biodegradation of OMPs and antibiotics in both anaerobic and aerobic MBRs, while also investigating their effect on the proliferation of antibiotic resistance genes. Due to rising interest in wastewater effluent reuse and the lack of a comprehensive understanding of MBR systems’ effects on pathogen proliferation, this dissertation also investigates the presence of pathogens in both aerobic and anaerobic MBR effluents by using molecularbased detection methods. The findings of this dissertation demonstrate that membrane-associated anaerobic digestion processes have significant

  4. Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading of Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge: A Preliminary Techno-Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhu, Yunhua [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jones, Susanne B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Elliott, Douglas C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schmidt, Andrew J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hallen, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Billing, Justin M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hart, Todd R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fox, Samuel P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Maupin, Gary D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-08

    A preliminary process model and techno-economic analysis (TEA) was completed for fuel produced from hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of sludge waste from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and subsequent biocrude upgrading. The model is adapted from previous work by Jones et al. (2014) for algae HTL, using experimental data generated in fiscal year 2015 (FY15) bench-scale HTL testing of sludge waste streams. Testing was performed on sludge samples received from MetroVancouver’s Annacis Island WWTP (Vancouver, B.C.) as part of a collaborative project with the Water Environment and Reuse Foundation (WERF). The full set of sludge HTL testing data from this effort will be documented in a separate report to be issued by WERF. This analysis is based on limited testing data and therefore should be considered preliminary. Future refinements are necessary to improve the robustness of the model, including a cross-check of modeled biocrude components with the experimental GCMS data and investigation of equipment costs most appropriate at the smaller scales used here. Environmental sustainability metrics analysis is also needed to understand the broader impact of this technology pathway. The base case scenario for the analysis consists of 10 HTL plants, each processing 100 dry U.S. ton/day (92.4 ton/day on a dry, ash-free basis) of sludge waste and producing 234 barrel per stream day (BPSD) biocrude, feeding into a centralized biocrude upgrading facility that produces 2,020 barrel per standard day of final fuel. This scale was chosen based upon initial wastewater treatment plant data collected by the resource assessment team from the EPA’s Clean Watersheds Needs Survey database (EPA 2015a) and a rough estimate of what the potential sludge availability might be within a 100-mile radius. In addition, we received valuable feedback from the wastewater treatment industry as part of the WERF collaboration that helped form the basis for the selected HTL and upgrading

  5. Evaluating the Effects of Municipal Waste and Wastewater on Absorption of Nickel and Cadmium of Helianthus Annuus Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhossein Ashouri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is an attempt to examine the effects of municipal waste and wastewater on absorption of nickel and cadmium of helianthus annuus plant. In order to determine cadmium and nickel in different organs of the plant in soil with organic fertilizers of municipal waste and municipal sewage sludge, we conducted a split plot study. The study was in form of randomized complete block from 2011 to 2015 under farm conditions. We considered the main factor in five levels of control, 10 and 20 tons of sewage sludge and municipal waste compost per hectare besides the minor factor of yearly treatment during four years. The results showed that using 20 tons of sewage sludge and waste per hectare increased absorbable soil nickel and cadmium up to approximately 220%. Also, the amount of cadmium and nickel in root was about 400% more than the control group. Bacteria found in soil contaminated to heavy metals showed remarkable resistance against higher concentration of these elements. Both bioaccumulation and biosorption techniques indicated high potential to refine aquatic environments. However, the bioaccumulation technique showed better efficiency in lower concentrations and the biosorption revealed better efficiency in higher concentrations of metals.

  6. Impact assessment of mine drainage water and municipal wastewater on the surface water in the vicinity of Bor

    OpenAIRE

    Gardić Vojka R.; Petrović Jelena V.; Đurđevac-Ignjatović Lidija V.; Kolaković Srđan R.; Vujović Svetlana R.

    2015-01-01

    Mining and copper production in Bor, in the past hundred years, had a huge impact on the environment of town, but also in a wide region. In the area of Bor, in the zone of Mining and Smelting Company (RTB) activity, over 29,000 ha of land under forests and fields is degraded. The area of degraded agricultural land in the Bor municipality is over 60% of total agricultural land. Wastewater, generated in the sites of RTB Bor, pollute the Bor River and Krivelj ...

  7. Photoreactivation and subsequent solar disinfection of Escherichia coli in UV-disinfected municipal wastewater under natural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtlein, F; Lübken, M; Grote, I; Orth, H; Wichern, M

    2015-01-01

    Photoreactivation of ultraviolet (UV)-disinfected wastewater of different qualities was experimentally assessed. Photoreactivation ability of secondary effluent and microstrained inflow was analyzed in different samples of 50 mL (Petri dish) and 7,000 mL volume to describe open channel effluent situations of wastewater treatment plants in a more realistic approach. The small sample of secondary effluent revealed a total log10 inactivation of 1.8 units and the small sample of microstrained inflow a total log10 inactivation of 3.2, with an applied UV-254 fluence of 84 and 253 J/m², respectively. Maximum net photoreactivation for secondary effluent and microstrained inflow was in the order of 1.2 log10 and 0.37 log10 units, respectively, for both sample sizes. However, significantly faster photoreactivation performance was generally determined for small sample volumes. The photoreactivation processes were completely compensated for by solar disinfection within a 120 min exposure time. Solar disinfection processes were negligible in the larger sample volumes of microstrained inflow. For municipal wastewater treatment systems with open channel effluents, it is essential to take into consideration the dependence of solar UV-365 fluence rate on water depth and wastewater characteristics.

  8. Analysis of Trace Pharmaceuticals and Related Compounds in Municipal Wastewaters by Preconcentration, Chromatography, Derivatization, and Separation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Camilla Lindholm

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A significant portion of pharmaceuticals and other organic chemicals consumed by people and animals are released into municipal wastewater treatment plants. Most of them are degraded during the wastewater treatment processes, but some of them degrade only partially and may be widely transported and dispersed into the aquatic environment. This is why efficient and fast analytical methods are needed for detection of organic compounds in wastewaters at trace levels. Because wastewaters often consist of complex matrices and high-molecular mass materials, e.g., lignocellulosic biomass, which may bring challenges to the sample preparation procedures, efficient pre-concentration methods such as solid phase extraction (SPE solid phase microextraction (SPME, or single drop microextraction (SDME are needed. The most common analysis methods are gas chromatography (GC and liquid chromatography (LC coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS. The aim of this review is to give an overview of chromatographic and spectroscopic methods when characterizing low- and medium-molecular weight organic pollutants, mainly focusing on pharmaceuticals, biocides, and personal care products in environmental matrices.

  9. Comparative evaluation of three attached growth systems and a constructed wetland for in situ treatment of raw municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupasaki, E; Diamadopoulos, E

    2013-01-01

    The necessity to treat municipal wastewaters in situ, with a low cost, yet effective system, led to the research of alternative methods for wastewater treatment. Attached growth systems can be an alternative option. Three attached growth systems with different media substrate, a rockwool cubes unit, a Kaldnes rings unit and a plastic bottle caps unit were studied in comparison with a constructed wetland in order to evaluate their ability to treat raw municipal wastewater. The selection of the three different media was based on their high porosity and surface area, as well as their availability and price. Three different operating periods were carried out with variations in the organic loading rate and the feeding frequency. The units were fed intermittently with short resting periods, less than 32 h, and relative high mean organic loading rates of 70, 50 and 30 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/(m2d), respectively for each operating period. The constructed wetland and the rockwool cubes unit were the most effective, with mean COD reduction as mass rate (mg/d) 88% and 88%, biological oxygen demand 78% and 76%, dissolved organic carbon 73% and 67%, and total suspended solids 91% and 92%, respectively. Total nitrogen reduction was significantly higher at the constructed wetland with mean reduction as mass rate 51%, 60% and 83% for each period, compared to 41%, 43% and 60%, respectively, of the rockwool cubes unit. This study showed that it is possible to design, build and operate in situ small and decentralized treatment systems by using readily available packing materials and with minimum wastewater pretreatment.

  10. Photocatalytic Degradation of Municipal Wastewater and Brilliant Blue Dye Using Hydrothermally Synthesized Surface-Modified Silver-Doped ZnO Designer Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabasom Parvin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalytic degradation of local municipal wastewater and brilliant blue FCF dye were investigated using silver-doped ZnO designer particles. The silver-doped ZnO designer particles were synthesized under mild hydrothermal conditions (T = 150–250∘C, =autogeneous, experimental duration = 16–24 h in the presence of surface modifiers. The resultant products were characterized using powder XRD, FTIR, Zeta potential, and SEM. Various parameters including catalyst amount, light source, pH, and photocatalytic time duration were studied to find out their effects on photodegradation efficiency with respect to municipal wastewater and brilliant blue dye. The effect of these parameters was evaluated using chemical oxygen demand (COD and % transmittance analyses. The photodegradation results showed that the surface-modified silver-doped ZnO designer particles had higher efficiency compared to the reagent-grade ZnO in photodegradation of municipal wastewater and brilliant blue dye.

  11. Endocrine disrupting compounds reduction and water quality improvement in reclaimed municipal wastewater: A field-scale study along Jialu River in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Ji, Xiaowen; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Yu; Liang, Ying; Du, Jinhui; Xie, Xianchuan; Li, Aimin

    2016-08-01

    Several ecological restoration projects have been constructed along urban rivers in North China to purify reclaimed municipal wastewater and improve the water quality of urban rivers. These projects attempt to address several environmental issues, including treating water contamination that is not fully remediated through standard wastewater treatment. This study investigated the efficiency of reducing endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and estrogenic activity in reclaimed municipal wastewater along an 18.5 km field-scale ecological restoration project in Jialu River. The river only receives reclaimed municipal wastewater without natural effluent in North China. Data show that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) of reclaimed municipal effluent improved when compared to the Chinese surface water standard, and natural estrogens, such as estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2), were effectively removed during ecological restoration purification processes. The estradiol activity based on measured EDCs concentrations (ΣEEQEDC) was less than 0.01 ng/L after the ecological purification of restoration river; however, synthetic endocrine disrupting compounds in reclaimed municipal wastewater, such as octylphenol (OP), bisphenol A (BPA), and dibutyl phthalate (DBP), were difficult to eliminate. The bioassays of MDA-kb2 cells and recombinant yeast in vitro showed no direct androgen response and estrogen effect in reclaimed municipal effluent after the purification processes. However, a chorionic long-term (21d) exposure in vivo test showed that exposure to the reclaimed municipal effluents, even after river purification, still significantly induced yolk protein vitellogenin (Vtg) in male zebrafish, leading to abnormal expression of testosterone (T) and E2. This indicates continued potent estrogenic activity to aquatic organisms, even after treatment and purification.

  12. Effective growth of dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum by cultivating the cells using municipal wastewater as nutrient source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kin-Chung; Xu, Steven Jing-Liang; Wu, Kam-Chau; Lee, Fred Wang-Fat

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted worldwide in order to develop a more economical method for mass algal cultivation so that more cost-effective biomass production can be accessed. One of the directions is to reduce production costs by using wastewater as a nutrient source in algal cell cultivation. The growth ability of a red-tide causative dinoflagellate species, Prorocentrum minimum, in various concentrations of local urban wastewater was examined in this study. The highest exponential growth rate and maximum cell density (MCD) were achieved when autoclaved 10% wastewater was used for cell cultivation, although the cells could survive in 0.01-100% wastewater. Both growth rate and MCD of the cells in wastewater were found to be substantially higher than that in optimized L1 culture medium. This research highlights the potential of using wastewater as a cost-effective approach for mass cultivation of dinoflagellate cells with consequent production of valuable microalgal biomass.

  13. Treatment of municipal and industrial wastewater by reed bed technology: A low cost treatment approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bansari M. Ribadiya; Mehali J. Mehta

    2014-01-01

    Reed bed system for wastewater treatment has been proven to be effective and sustainable alternative for conventional wastewater treatment technologies. Use of macrophytes to treat wastewater is also categorized in this method. This new approach is based on natural processes for the removal of different aquatic macrophytes such as floating, submerged and emergent. Macrophytes are assumed to be the main biological components of wetlands. These techniques are reported to be cost eff...

  14. Sustainable wastewater network management in Lempäälä Municipality

    OpenAIRE

    Obijaju, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Deterioration of a wastewater network can be attributed to a number of factors, from aging and damaged infrastructure (pipes, manholes and pump stations), to seismic activity and human activities. This deterioration can cause huge problems in a wastewater network, including leakage of water into the network, which can cause overflow and an increase in the cost of transporting and treating the wastewater. The aim of this study was to determine the level of deterioration in the sewer netwo...

  15. Removal and Degradation Pathways of Sulfamethoxazole Present in Synthetic Municipal Wastewater via an Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor

    KAUST Repository

    Sanchez Huerta, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    The current global water crisis in addition to continues contamination of natural water bodies with harmful organic micropollutants (OMPs) have driven the development of new water treatment technologies that allow the efficient removal of such compounds. Among a long list of OMPs, antibiotics are considered as top priority pollutants to be treated due to their great resistance to biological treatments and their potential to develop bacterial resistance. Different approaches, such as membrane-based and advance oxidation processes have been proposed to alleviate or minimize antibiotics discharge into aquatic environments. However most of these processes are costly and generate either matrices with high concentration of OMPs or intermediate products with potentially greater toxicity or persistence. Therefore, this thesis proposes the study of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for the treatment of synthetic municipal wastewater containing sulfamethoxazole (SMX), a world widely used antibiotic. Besides the general evaluation of AnMBR performance in the COD removal and biogas production, this research mainly focuses on the SMX removal and its degradation pathway. Thus 5 SMX quantification was performed through solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and the identification of its transformation products (TPs) was assessed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. The results achieved showed that, working under optimal conditions (35°C, pH 7 and ORP around -380 to -420 mV) and after a biomass adaptation period (maintaining 0.85 VSS/TSS ratio), the AnMBR process provided over 95% COD removal and 95-98% SMX removal, while allowing stable biogas composition and methane production (≈130 mL CH4/g CODremoved). Kinetic analysis through a batch test showed that after 24 h of biological reaction, AnMBR process achieved around 94% SMX removal, indicating a first order kinetic reaction with K= 0.119, which highlights the high degradation

  16. Polishing of Anaerobic Secondary Effluent and Symbiotic Bioremediation of Raw Municipal Wastewater by Chlorella Vulgaris

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Tuoyuan

    2016-05-01

    To assess polishing of anaerobic secondary effluent and symbiotic bioremediation of primary effluent by microalgae, bench scale bubbling column reactors were operated in batch modes to test nutrients removal capacity and associated factors. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) together with oil and grease in terms of hexane extractable material (HEM) in the reactors were measured after batch cultivation tests of Chlorella Vulgaris, indicating the releasing algal metabolites were oleaginous (dissolved HEM up to 8.470 mg/L) and might hazard effluent quality. Ultrafiltration adopted as solid-liquid separation step was studied via critical flux and liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) analysis. Although nutrients removal was dominated by algal assimilation, nitrogen removal (99.6% maximum) was affected by generation time (2.49 days minimum) instead of specific nitrogen removal rate (sN, 20.72% maximum), while phosphorus removal (49.83% maximum) was related to both generation time and specific phosphorus removal rate (sP, 1.50% maximum). COD increase was affected by cell concentration (370.90 mg/L maximum), specific COD change rate (sCOD, 0.87 maximum) and shading effect. sCOD results implied algal metabolic pathway shift under nutrients stress, generally from lipid accumulation to starch accumulation when phosphorus lower than 5 mg/L, while HEM for batches with initial nitrogen of 10 mg/L implied this threshold around 8 mg/L. HEM and COD results implied algal metabolic pathway shift under nutrients stress. Anaerobic membrane bioreactor effluent polishing showed similar results to synthetic anaerobic secondary effluent with slight inhibition while 4 symbiotic bioremediation of raw municipal wastewater with microalgae and activated sludge showed competition for ammonium together with precipitation or microalgal luxury uptake of phosphorus. Critical flux was governed by algal cell concentration for ultrafiltration membrane with pore size of 30 nm, while

  17. Reduction of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater effluent by advanced oxidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhuang, Yao; Geng, Jinju, E-mail: jjgeng@nju.edu.cn; Ren, Hongqiang; Xu, Ke; Ding, Lili

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the reduction of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), intI1 and 16S rRNA genes, by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), namely Fenton oxidation (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process. The ARGs include sul1, tetX, and tetG from municipal wastewater effluent. The results indicated that the Fenton oxidation and UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process could reduce selected ARGs effectively. Oxidation by the Fenton process was slightly better than that of the UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} method. Particularly, for the Fenton oxidation, under the optimal condition wherein Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} had a molar ratio of 0.1 and a H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration of 0.01 mol L{sup −1} with a pH of 3.0 and reaction time of 2 h, 2.58–3.79 logs of target genes were removed. Under the initial effluent pH condition (pH = 7.0), the removal was 2.26–3.35 logs. For the UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process, when the pH was 3.5 with a H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration of 0.01 mol L{sup −1} accompanied by 30 min of UV irradiation, all ARGs could achieve a reduction of 2.8–3.5 logs, and 1.55–2.32 logs at a pH of 7.0. The Fenton oxidation and UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process followed the first-order reaction kinetic model. The removal of target genes was affected by many parameters, including initial Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molar ratios, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, solution pH, and reaction time. Among these factors, reagent concentrations and pH values are the most important factors during AOPs. - Highlights: • AOPs including Fenton oxidation and UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process could reduce ARGs effectively. • Fenton oxidation is slightly more effective than UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process in ARG reduction. • Removal of ARGs by AOPs follows the first-order reaction kinetic model. • Selected ARGs and 16S rRNA genes exhibit similar change trends during AOPs.

  18. Influence of data collection schemes on the Life Cycle Assessment of a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroko; Clavreul, Julie; Scheutz, Charlotte; Christensen, Thomas H

    2014-06-01

    A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was conducted to illustrate the effect of an emission inventory data collection scheme on the outcomes of an environmental impact assessment. Due to their burden in respect to data collection, LCAs often rely heavily on existing emission and operational data, which are gathered under either compulsory monitoring or reporting requirements under law. In this study, an LCA was conducted using three input data sources: Information compiled under compulsory disclosure requirements (the European Pollutant Release and Transfer Registry), compliance with national discharge limits, and a state-of-the-art emission data collection scheme conducted at the same WWTP. Parameter uncertainty for each collection scheme was assessed through Monte Carlo simulation. The comparison of the results confirmed that LCA results depend heavily on input data coverage. Due to the threshold on reporting value, the E-PRTR did not capture the impact for particulate matter emission, terrestrial acidification, or terrestrial eutrophication. While the current practice can capture more than 90% of non-carcinogenic human toxicity and marine eutrophication, an LCA based on the data collection scheme underestimates impact potential due to limitations of substance coverage. Besides differences between data collection schemes, the results showed that 3-13,500% of the impacts came from background systems, such as from the provisioning of fuel, electricity, and chemicals, which do not need to be disclosed currently under E-PRTR. The incidental release of pollutants was also assessed by employing a scenario-based approach, the results of which demonstrated that these non-routine emissions could increase overall WWTP greenhouse gas emissions by between 113 and 210%. Overall, current data collection schemes have the potential to provide standardized data collection and form the basis for a sound environmental impact assessment, but

  19. Role of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and Ag-nano particle in the bioremediation of heavy metals and maize growth under municipal wastewater irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naeem; Bano, Asghari

    2016-01-01

    The investigation evaluated the role of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and Ag-nano particle on the growth and metabolism of maize irrigated with municipal wastewater (MW). Three PGPR isolated from MW were identified on the basis of 16S-rRNA gene sequence analyses as Pseudomonas sp., Pseudomonas fluorescence, and Bacillus cereus. The municipal waste water was used to irrigate the maize seeds inoculated with 3 isolated PGPR. The isolated PGPR had catalase and oxidase enzymes, solubilize insoluble bound phosphate and exhibit antifungal and antibacterial activities. The colony forming unit (cfu) of the PGPR was inhibited by Ag-nano particle, but was stimulated by the municipal wastewater. The Ag-nano particles augmented the PGPR induced increase in root area and root length. The root-shoot ratio was also changed with the Ag-nano particles. The plants irrigated with municipal wastewater had higher activities of peroxidase and catalase which were further augmented by Ag-nano particle. The Ag- nano particle application modulated level of ABA (34%), IAA (55%), and GA (82%), increased proline production (70%) and encountered oxidative stress and augmented the bioremediation potential of PGPR for Pb, Cd, and Ni. Municipal wastewater needs to be treated with PGPR and Ag nano particle prior to be used for irrigation. This aims for the better growth of the plant and enhanced bioremediation of toxic heavy metals.

  20. Study of soil bacterial and crop quality irrigated with treated municipal wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alinezhadian, A; Karim, A; Mohammadi, J

    2014-01-01

    bacterial and crops quality irrigated with treated wastewater. Material and Methods: This research was conducted on a maize field near the wastewater treatment plant in Shahr-e-kord in summer,2011. Plots were arranged in a randomized complete block design in 3 replications and 2 treatments, well water (W1......Background and Objectives: In arid and semi-arid regions, wastewater reuse has become an important element in agriculture. However, irrigation with this resource can be either beneficial or harmful, depending on the wastewater characteristics. The aim of this research was to investigate the soil...

  1. Water reuse: potential for expanding the nation's water supply through reuse of municipal wastewater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on the Assessment of Water Reuse as an Approach to Meeting Future Water Supply Needs; National Research Council

    "Expanding water reuse--the use of treated wastewater for beneficial purposes including irrigation, industrial uses, and drinking water augmentation--could significantly increase the nation's total...

  2. Improving municipal wastewater nitrogen and phosphorous removal by feeding sludge fermentation products to sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yue; Liu, Jinjin; Ma, Bin; Liu, Ye; Wang, Bo; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-12-01

    This study presents a novel strategy to improve the removal efficiency of nitrogen and phosphorus from municipal wastewater by feeding sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with sludge alkaline fermentation products as carbon sources. The performances of two SBRs treating municipal wastewater (one was fed with sludge fermentation products; F-SBR, and the other without sludge fermentation products; B-SBR) were compared. The removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) and phosphorus (PO4(3-)-P) were found to be 82.9% and 96.0% in F-SBR, while the corresponding values in B-SBR were 55.9% (TN) and -6.1% (PO4(3-)-P). Illumina MiSeq sequencing indicated that ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (Nitrosomonadaceae and Nitrosomonas) and denitrifying polyphosphate accumulating organisms (Dechloromonas) were enriched in F-SBR, which resulted in NO2(-)-N accumulation and denitrifying phosphorus removal via nitrite (DPRN). Moreover, feeding of sludge fermentation products reduced 862.1mg VSS/d of sludge in the F-SBR system (volume: 10L).

  3. On-line controlling system for nitrogen and phosphorus removal of municipal wastewater in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun LI; Yongjiong NI; Yongzhen PENG; Guowei GU; Jingen LU; Su WEI; Guobiao CHENG; Changjin OU

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish an on-line controlling system for nitrogen and phosphorus removal synchronously of municipal wastewater in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The SBR for municipal wastewater treatment was operated in sequences: filling, anaerobic, oxic, anoxic, oxic, settling and discharge. The reactor was equipped with on-line monitoring sensors for dissolved oxygen (DO), oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and pH. The variation of DO, ORP and pH is relevant to each phase of biological process for nitrogen and phosphorus removal in this SBR. The characteristic points of DO, ORP and pH can be used to judge and control the stages of process that include: phosphate release by the turning points of ORP and pH; nitrification by the ammonia valley of pH and ammonia elbows of DO and ORP; denitrification by the nitrate knee of ORP and nitrate apex ofpH; phosphate uptake by the turning point ofpH; and residual organic carbon oxida-tion by the carbon elbows of DO and ORP. The controlling system can operate automatically for nitrogen and phosphorus efficiently removal.

  4. Sustainable organic loading rate and energy recovery potential of mesophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Chunhai

    2014-08-01

    The overall performance of a mesophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for synthetic municipal wastewater treatment was investigated under a range of organic loading rate (OLR). A very steady and high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal (around 98%) was achieved over a broad range of volumetric OLR of 0.8-10gCOD/L/d. The sustainable volumetric and sludge OLR satisfying a permeate COD below 50mg/L for general reuse was 6gCOD/L/d and 0.63gCOD/gMLVSS (mixed liquor volatile suspended solids)/d, respectively. At a high sludge OLR of over 0.6gCOD/gMLVSS/d, the AnMBR achieved high methane production of over 300ml/gCOD (even approaching the theoretical value of 382ml/gCOD). A low biomass production of 0.015-0.026gMLVSS/gCOD and a sustainable flux of 6L/m2/h were observed. The integration of a heat pump and forward osmosis into the mesophilic AnMBR process would be a promising way for net energy recovery from typical municipal wastewater in a temperate area. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Enhanced phosphorus removal in the DAF process by flotation scum recycling for advanced treatment of municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dong-Heui; Lee, Ki-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    To remove phosphorus (P) from municipal wastewater, various types of advanced treatment processes are being actively applied. However, there is commonly a space limit in municipal wastewater treatment plants (MWTPs). For that reason, the dissolved air flotation (DAF), which is well known for small space and flexible application process, is preferred as an additive process to enhance the removal of P. A series of experiments were conducted to investigate the feasibility of flotation scum recycling for effective P removal from a MWTP using a DAF pilot plant over 1 year. The average increases in the removal efficiencies due to flotation scum recycling were 22.6% for total phosphorus (T-P) and 18.3% for PO4-P. A higher removal efficiency of T-P was induced by recycling the flotation scum because a significant amount of Al components remained in the flotation scum. The increase in T-P removal efficiency, due to the recycling of flotation scum, shifted from the boundary of the stoichiometric precipitate to the equilibrium control region. Flotation scum recycling may contribute to improving the quality of treated water and reducing treatment costs by minimizing the coagulant dosage required.

  6. Assessment of biomarkers for contaminants of emerging concern on aquatic organisms downstream of a municipal wastewater discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinska, Edyta J; Goss, Greg G; Gillis, Patricia L; Van Der Kraak, Glen J; Matsumoto, Jacqueline; de Souza Machado, Anderson A; Giacomin, Marina; Moon, Thomas W; Massarsky, Andrey; Gagné, Francois; Servos, Mark R; Wilson, Joanna; Sultana, Tamanna; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2015-10-15

    Contaminants of emerging concern (CECs), including pharmaceuticals, personal care products and estrogens, are detected in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharges. However, analytical monitoring of wastewater and surface water does not indicate whether CECs are affecting the organisms downstream. In this study, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and freshwater mussels Pyganodon grandis Say, 1829 (synonym: Anodonta grandis Say, 1829) were caged for 4 weeks in the North Saskatchewan River, upstream and downstream of the discharge from the WWTP that serves the Edmonton, AB, Canada. Passive samplers deployed indicated that concentrations of pharmaceuticals, personal care products, an estrogen (estrone) and an androgen (androstenedione) were elevated at sites downstream of the WWTP discharge. Several biomarkers of exposure were significantly altered in the tissues of caged fathead minnows and freshwater mussels relative to the upstream reference sites. Biomarkers altered in fish included induction of CYP3A metabolism, an increase in vitellogenin (Vtg) gene expression in male minnows, elevated ratios of oxidized to total glutathione (i.e. GSSG/TGSH), and an increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes (i.e. glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase). In mussels, there were no significant changes in biomarkers of oxidative stress and the levels of Vtg-like proteins were reduced, not elevated, indicating a generalized stress response. Immune function was altered in mussels, as indicated by elevated lysosomal activity per hemocyte in P. grandis caged closest to the wastewater discharge. This immune response may be due to exposure to bacterial pathogens in the wastewater. Multivariate analysis indicated a response to the CECs Carbamazepine (CBZ) and Trimethoprim (TPM). Overall, these data indicate that there is a 1 km zone of impact for aquatic organisms downstream of WWTP discharge. However, multiple stressors in municipal wastewater make measurement and

  7. Disinfection process of municipal wastewater through ultraviolet radiation: Application in the wastewater treatment plant of Jerez de la Frontera; Desinfeccion de aguas residuales urbanas mediante radiacion ultravioleta: Aplicacion enla EDAR de Jerez de la Frontera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcedo Davila, I.; Andrades Balao, J. A.; Quiroga Alonso, J. M.

    2002-07-01

    This paper reports the results obtained of the disinfection through ultraviolet radiation of the treated municipal wastewater in the plant of Jerez de la Frontera for possible municipal and tourist/recreational reuse. The results obtained show that 1.265 J/m''2 of UV doses cause nearly a 99, 9% decrease of the studied microorganisms (total coliform, fecal coliform and fecal strepto cocos) in more than 77% of the carried out studies. The disinfection unitary cost, at industrial scale, was 0.03 E/m''3 waste-water, which means the UV radiation treatment is very competitive against others disinfection systems. (Author) 10 refs.

  8. Study of soil bacterial and crop quality irrigated with treated municipal wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alinezhadian, A; Karim, A; Mohammadi, J

    2014-01-01

    bacterial and crops quality irrigated with treated wastewater. Material and Methods: This research was conducted on a maize field near the wastewater treatment plant in Shahr-e-kord in summer,2011. Plots were arranged in a randomized complete block design in 3 replications and 2 treatments, well water (W1...

  9. Inter-municipal cooperation for wastewater treatment: Case studies from Israel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hophmayer-Tokich, Sharon; Kliot, Nurit

    2008-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s, local authorities in Israel have been engaged in promoting advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) projects throughout the country, resulting in the “wastewater treatment revolution” of the 1990s. These achievements are extremely important in the water-scarce cou

  10. A new low-cost biofilm carrier for the treatment of municipal wastewater in a moving bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orantes, J C; González-Martínez, S

    2003-01-01

    The Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor has proven to be an efficient system in wastewater treatment and has become a viable solution for small treatment plants. The main objective of this research was to analyse the performance of a moving bed reactor using low-cost local material when fed with municipal wastewater. A pilot reactor with a total volume of 900 litres was built and it was fed continuously with municipal wastewater. The operation of the system was adjusted to six different organic loading rates. The biofilm carrier was polyethylene tubing with internal diameter of 1.1 cm, cut into pieces of 1.2 cm. The tested material offered a specific surface area of 590 m2/m3. Air was provided with a fine-bubble diffuser. The main results show that the reactor performance was stable and predictable. The COD removal confidently behaves according to a general hyperbolic kinetic equation. The maximal total COD removal attained was 81%. Nitrification was observed only for organic loads with values under 5.7 gCOD/m2 x d. Good adherence of the microorganisms was observed for the applied organic loading rates. After several months of operation, the material showed no signs of abrasion or deformation. The sludge production behaved linearly with the organic load reaching 979 gTSS/d with the highest organic load of 35.7 gCOD/m2 x d. The amount of microorganisms attached to the carrier increased with the organic load tending to an asymptotical maximal value of 17.3 g/m2 (as dry solids). Mean cellular retention times from 2.0 to 23.1 days were determined.

  11. A metagenome of a full-scale microbial community carrying out Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Saunders, Aaron Marc

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is widely used for removal of phosphorus from wastewater. In this study, a metagenome (18.2 Gb) was generated using Illumina sequencing from a full-scale EBPR plant to study the community structure and genetic potential. Quantitative fluorescence...

  12. Genotoxicity biomonitoring of sewage in two municipal wastewater treatment plants using the Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewes, Márcia Regina; Junior, Delio Endres; Droste, Annette

    2011-01-01

    The genotoxicity of untreated and treated sewage from two municipal wastewater treatment plants (WTP BN and WTP SJN) in the municipality of Porto Alegre, in the southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, was evaluated over a one-year period using the Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea (Trad-MCN) bioassay. Inflorescences of T. pallida var. purpurea were exposed to sewage samples in February (summer), April (autumn), July (winter) and October (spring) 2009, and the micronuclei (MCN) frequencies were estimated in each period. The high genotoxicity of untreated sewage from WTP BN in February and April was not observed in treated sewage, indicating the efficiency of treatment at this WTP. However, untreated and treated sewage samples from WTP SJN had high MCN frequencies, except in October, when rainfall may have been responsible for reducing these frequencies at both WTPs. Physicochemical analyses of sewage from both WTPs indicated elevated concentrations of organic matter that were higher at WTP SJN than at WTP BN. Chromium was detected in untreated and treated sewage from WTP SJN, but not in treated sewage from WTP BN. Lead was found in all untreated sewage samples from WTP SJN, but only in the summer and autumn at WTP BN. These results indicate that the short-term Trad-MCN genotoxicity assay may be useful for regular monitoring of municipal WTPs. PMID:22215975

  13. Comparative Inactivation of Murine Norovirus and MS2 Bacteriophage by Peracetic Acid and Monochloramine in Municipal Secondary Wastewater Effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkin, Nathan; Weng, ShihChi; Schwab, Kellogg J; McQuarrie, James; Bell, Kati; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2017-03-07

    Chlorination has long been used for disinfection of municipal wastewater (MWW) effluent while the use peracetic acid (PAA) has been proposed more recently in the United States. Previous work has demonstrated the bactericidal effectiveness of PAA and monochloramine in wastewater, but limited information is available for viruses, especially ones of mammalian origin (e.g., norovirus). Therefore, a comparative assessment was performed of the virucidal efficacy of PAA and monochloramine against murine norovirus (MNV) and MS2 bacteriophage in secondary effluent MWW and phosphate buffer (PB). A suite of inactivation kinetic models was fit to the viral inactivation data. Predicted concentration-time (CT) values for 1-log10 MS2 reduction by PAA and monochloramine in MWW were 1254 and 1228 mg-min/L, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 3-log10 model predicted CT values for MNV viral reduction in MWW were 32, 47, and 69 mg-min/L for PAA and 6, 13, and 28 mg-min/L for monochloramine, respectively. Wastewater treatment plant disinfection practices informed by MS2 inactivation data will likely be protective for public health but may overestimate CT values for reduction of MNV. Additionally, equivalent CT values in PB resulted in greater viral reduction which indicate that viral inactivation data in laboratory grade water may not be generalizable to MWW applications.

  14. Ferrate (Fe(VI)) application for Municipal wastewater treatment: a novel process for simultaneous micropollutant oxidation and phosphate removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunho; Zimmermann, Saskia Gisela; Kieu, Anh Trung; Von Gunten, Urs

    2009-05-15

    A novel technology for enhanced municipal wasterwater treatment was assessed based on the dual functions of Fe(VI) to oxidize micropollutants and remove phosphate by formation of ferric phosphates. Second-order rate constants (k) for the reactions of selected pharmaceuticals, endocrine disruptors, and organic model compounds with Fe(VI) were in the range of 1 (trimethylamine) to 9000 M(-1) s(-1) (aniline) in the pH-range 7-8. The selected compounds contained electron-rich moieties (ERM) such as phenols, anilines, amines, and olefins. Oxidation experiments in wastewater spiked with micropollutants at concentrations in the low microM range at pH 7 and 8 showed that Fe(VI) doses higher than 5 mg Fe L(-1) are capable of eliminating various ERM-containing micropollutants by more than 85%. In comparison to ozone, Fe(VI) was as effective or slightly less effective in terms of micropollutants oxidation, with Fe(VI) having the benefit of phosphate removal. To lower phosphate from 3.5 to 0.8 mg PO4-P L(-1) (regulatory limit for wastewater discharge in Switzerland), a Fe(VI) dose of 7.5 mg Fe L(-1) was needed. Overall, this study demonstrates Fe(VI) as a promising tool for an enhanced wastewater treatment to remove micropollutants as well as to control phosphate in a single treatment step.

  15. Comparing the efficiency of Cyperus alternifolius and Phragmites australis in municipal wastewater treatment by subsurface constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Davod Hossein; Eslami, Hadi; Ehrampoosh, Mohamad Hasan; Ebrahimi, Asghar; Ghaneian, Mohamad Taghy; Ayatollah, Shirin; Mozayan, Mohamad Reza

    2013-04-15

    Nowadays, application of natural wastewater treatment systems such as wetland not only reduces economic costs and energy consumption, but also decreases environmental pollution. This study aimed to compare efficiency of Cyperus alternifolius and Phragmites australis in Municipal wastewater treatment by Subsurface Constructed Wetland Method. This is an applied-interventionnal study in which three reactors (control pilot, Cyperus alternifolius (umbrella palm) plant pilot and Phragmites australis (reed) plant pilot were designed by subsurface constructed wetland method. Then 90 samples were taken from input and output of reactors with four-day retention time. These samples were tested and finally the data were analyzed by Paired Sample Test statistical analysis. The results showed that removal efficiency of the parameters such as COD, BOD5, TSS, NO3-N, NH3-N, PO4-P, total coliform and fecal coliform was 74, 73, 84, 40, 36, 70, 33 and 38% in Cyperus alternifolius plant wetland, 44, 34, 77, 15, 0.3, 1, 17 and 26% in control wetland and 59, 54, 73, 6, 3, 10, 93 and 50 in Phragmites australis plant wetland, respectively. This reduction rate in all parameters- except fecal coliform- was statistically significant (p = 0.05). The results of this study showed that Cyperus alternifolius plant had higher efficiency in the removal of chemical parameters, whereas Phragmites australis plant had appropriate efficiency in the removal of microbiological parameters. Therefore, it can be concluded that application of these two plants can be effective in wastewater treatment.

  16. Biofilms in bioremediation and wastewater treatment: characterization of bacterial community structure and diversity during seasons in municipal wastewater treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousra Turki; Mehri, Ines; Lajnef, Rim; Rejab, Asma Ben; Khessairi, Amel; Cherif, Hanene; Ouzari, Hadda; Hassen, Abdennaceur

    2017-02-01

    The bacterial community structure and diversity were assessed at the scale of rotating biodisk procedure (RB) in a semi-industrial pilot plant. As well, the Salmonella community was particularly monitored, and the effects of ultraviolet (UV-C254) on the bacterial community were studied. The identification of dominant bacteria revealed the presence of beneficial and useful species that could play an important role in the process of wastewater purification. Several species as Enterobacter agglomerans, Cronobacter sakazakii, and Pantoea agglomerans known for their bioremediation activities were revealed in the majority of biofilm samples. Common detection of Salmonella community provides evidence that the RB system did not seriously affect Salmonella. Furthermore, the investigation on the (UV)-C254 inactivation of the whole bacterial community, in secondary treated wastewater, showed variable UV resistance results. No Salmonella detection was registered at a dose of around 1440 mW s cm(-2) since a total disappearance of Salmonella was recorded.

  17. The Developmental Effects Of A Municipal Wastewater Effluent On The Northern Leopard Frog, Rana pipiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastewater effluents are complex mixtures containing a variety of anthropogenic compounds, many of which are known endocrine disruptors. In order to characterize the development and behavorial effects of such a complex mixture, northern leopard frogs, Rana pipiens, were e...

  18. Alternative Treatment Technologies for Low-Cost Industrial and Municipal Wastewater Management

    OpenAIRE

    Hodges, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    Roughly the same volume of water that rushes over the Niagara Falls is produced as wastewater in North America. This wastewater is treated through a variety of means to ensure that it can be safely returned to the natural ecosystem. This thesis examines two novel means for this treatment, one biological and one physical-chemical in nature, namely, Rotating Algae Biofilm Reactor treatment and expanded shale augmented coagulation-flocculation. Rotating algae biofilm reactors (RABRs) support ...

  19. Rate of change in concentration of organic compounds and nutrients in municipal and dairy wastewater treated in full technical SBR scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struk-Sokolowska Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Municipal WWTP often receive the industrial wastewater, including dairy sewage. The problem of sewage treatment from this sector of economy is not completely solved, especially in plants of medium and small milk processing capacity. The aim of the study was to determine the rate of change in organic compounds and nutrients in municipal wastewater with the participation of dairy products during the processing phases of SBR-type reactor in a technical scale. The study was conducted in WWTP in Sokolka. Rate of changes in the concentrations of organic compounds, nitrogen and phosphorus in wastewater during the processing phases of SBR reactor was determined. Presence of dairy sewage (13% volume participation affected the decrease in the rate of changes in organic compounds concentrations defined as BOD5 during all processing phases of SBR reactor. Significant influence of dairy sewage on rates of change in nitrogen and phosphorus compounds concentrations during filling, aeration, stirring, sedimentation and decantation phases, was found.

  20. Removal of Nitrate and Phosphate from Municipal Wastewater Sludge by Chlorella vulgaris, Spirulina platensis and Scenedesmus quadricauda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal K.C.A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate and phosphorus in wastewater contribute to health and environmental threats as they are linked to illnesses as well as ecosystem disruption via algal blooms in contaminated water bodies. Based on above perspectives a comparative study was conducted on three local freshwater microalgae:Chlorella vulgaris, Spirulina platensis and Scenedesmus quadricauda to evaluate their effects on nitrate and phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater sludge (MWS. Algae performance in removing nitrate and phosphorus was evaluated by measuring nitrate and phosphorus content of MWS incubated with the strains for 7 days. Instantaneous readings were taken every 48 hours to determine periodic levels of the nutrients phosphate and nitrate. BOD5 was also evaluated to identify the strain with the most robust growth that would demand for oxygen the most in the dark. Spirulina platensis was shown as the most efficient microalgae to reduce nitrate in MWS and the best-growing among the three strains, while Chlorella vulgaris removed phosphorus the most effectively. Thus Spirulina and Chlorella could be potential candidates by showing their intrinsic merit for the reduction of phosphate and nitrate in wastewater treatment.ABSTRAK: Nitrat dan fosforus dalam air sisa menggugat kesihatan dan mengancam alam sekitar memandangkan ia berkait dengan penyakit-penyakit serta gangguan terhadap ekosistem melalui pembiakan alga dalam air yang tercemar. Berdasarkan perspektif di atas, satu kajian perbandingan telah dijalankan terhadap tiga mikro alga air tawar tempatan : Chlorella vulgaris, Spirulina platensis dan Scenedesmus quadricauda untuk dinilai kesannya terhadap penyingkiran nitrat dan fosforus dari enap cemar air sisa bandaran (municipal wastewater sludge (MWS. Kebolehan alga dalam penyingkiran nitrat dan fosforus dikaji dengan menyukat kandungan nitrat dan fosforus dalam MWS yang dieramkan dengan strain ini selama 7 hari. Bacaan serta-merta diambil setiap 48 jam untuk

  1. Models tasks of the municipality on the basis of laws: the collective water supply and discharge of wastewater, the public transport and on maintaining cleanliness and order in municipalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Cilak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The municipalities carry out numerous tasks of their own. For this purpose, they can create their own organizational units, as well as enter into contracts with private entrepreneurs. The rules of the various tasks are defined by the specific laws, which shows how the municipality can carry out these tasks. On the basis of special laws there are some models of conduct, eg. an obligation to conclude a civil law contract, to create their own entities or mixed solutions. The article attempts to analyze the models of carry out the municipalities own tasks on the basis of laws: the collective water supply and discharge of wastewater, the public transport and on maintaining cleanliness and order in municipalities.

  2. SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION OF MICROALGAE OIL FEEDSTOCK USING MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER AND CO2 FERTILIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Chaput

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasing scarcity of fossil fuels has forced industry to look for new cost effective, clean,and sustainable sources of energy. With recent advances in technology, biofuels have become a more viableoption. Microalgae are cost effective and efficient feedstock for the production of biodiesel. One of the algae advantages is the ability to grow it in a wastewater media. This provides essential nutrients without the addition of chemicals. When grown in a photobioreactor, the algae can be cultivated on non-arable land, preventing competition with food supply unlike other leading biodiesel feedstocks such as canola and soybean crop. The strain of algae used in this study was Chlorella sp. The primary goals of this project were to determine the viability of algae growth in a wastewater medium, test the effectiveness of an alternate nitrogen source, andexamine the effects of CO2 fertilization on algae growth and lipid content. Sodium bicarbonate was used to simulate CO2 fertilization. Results showed that: the use of a 50/50 wastewater/reverse osmosis (RO medium yielded 83% of the lipid productivity of a 100% RO medium while the 100% wastewater medium yielded 35% of the lipid productivity; urea as a substitute for KNO3 in 100% RO, 50/50, and 100% Wastewater medium increased lipid productivity by 1.4%, 52.3%, and 88.3%, respectively. The lipid productivity of urea 100% wastewater medium was increased by 68.9% when fertilized with sodium bicarbonate. The optimum trial, a urea 100% wastewater medium with daily additions of sodium bicarbonate, had a lipid productivity of 0.062 grams/liter of growth medium and a volumetric biomass yield of 0.15 grams per liter-day.

  3. R&D priorities in the field of sustainable remediation and purification of agro-industrial and municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksch, Korneliusz; Cema, Grzegorz; Corvini, Philippe F-X; Felis, Ewa; Sochacki, Adam; Surmacz-Górska, Joanna; Wiszniowski, Jarosław; Zabczynski, Sebastian

    2015-01-25

    This article was presented as a position paper during the Environmental Biotechnology and Microbiology Conference in Bologna, Italy in April 2012. It indicates major and emerging environmental biotechnology research and development (R&D) priorities for EU members in the field of sustainable remediation and purification of agro-industrial and municipal wastewater. The identified priorities are: anaerobic/aerobic microbial treatment, combination of photochemical and biological treatment, phytoremediation and algae-based remediation, as well as innovative technologies currently investigated, such as enzyme-based treatment, bioelectrochemical treatment and recovery of nutrients and reuse of cleaned water. State of the art, research needs and prospective development in these domains are crucially discussed. As a result, goals of the future development of bioremediation and purification processes are defined and the way to achieve them is proposed.

  4. Investigating the Energy-Water Usage Efficiency of the Reuse of Treated Municipal Wastewater for Artificial Groundwater Recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Eric D; Keller, Arturo A; Geyer, Roland; Frew, James

    2016-02-16

    This project investigates the energy-water usage efficiency of large scale civil infrastructure projects involving the artificial recharge of subsurface groundwater aquifers via the reuse of treated municipal wastewater. A modeling framework is introduced which explores the various ways in which spatially heterogeneous variables such as topography, landuse, and subsurface infiltration capacity combine to determine the physical layout of proposed reuse system components and their associated process energy-water demands. This framework is applied to the planning and evaluation of the energy-water usage efficiency of hypothetical reuse systems in five case study regions within the State of California. Findings from these case study analyses suggest that, in certain geographic contexts, the water requirements attributable to the process energy consumption of a reuse system can exceed the volume of water that it is able to recover by as much as an order of magnitude.

  5. The role of free water surface constructed wetlands as polishing step in municipal wastewater reclamation and reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghermandi, A; Bixio, D; Thoeye, C

    2007-07-15

    In Europe, the last two decades witnessed growing water stress, both in terms of water scarcity and quality deterioration, which prompted many municipalities for a more efficient use of the water resources, including a more widespread acceptance of water reuse practices. Treatment technology encompasses a vast variety of options. Constructed wetlands are regarded as key elements in polishing conventionally treated wastewater for recreational and environmental applications. A survey was conducted to assess the performance of tertiary free water surface constructed wetlands in treating both key and emerging contaminant categories in the perspective of water reuse. A database was created with information concerning systems with emerging and free-floating macrophytes. The database includes results from both full- and pilot-scale systems, and considers a broad variety of operating conditions. This paper provides an overview of the treatment performances of the constructed wetlands in the database and discusses their significance in the optic of water reclamation and reuse practices.

  6. Membrane bioreactor and nanofiltration hybrid system for reclamation of municipal wastewater: removal of nutrients, organic matter and micropollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Kangmin; KyongShon, Ho; Cho, Jaeweon

    2012-10-01

    A membrane bioreactor (MBR) and nanofiltration (NF) hybrid system was investigated to demonstrate the performance of treating nitrogen, phosphorus and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in municipal wastewater. With the MBR and NF (molecular weight cut off (MWCO): 210 Da), the concentration of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) was effectively reduced by nitrification by MBR and negatively charged surface of NF (TN: 8.67 mgN/L and TP: 0.46 mgP/L). Biosorption and microbial decomposition in MBR seem to be major removal mechanisms for the removal of PPCPs. Among various parameters affecting the removal of PPCPs by NF, namely, physicochemical properties of the PPCPs (charge characteristics, hydrophobicity and M(W)) and membranes (MWCO and surface charge), the MWCO effect was found to be the most critical aspect.

  7. Inhibition effect of phosphorus-based chemicals on corrosion of carbon steel in secondary-treated municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhanhui; Ren, Hongqiang; Xu, Ke; Geng, Jinju; Ding, Lili

    2013-01-01

    Secondary-treated municipal wastewater (MWW) could supply a viable alternative water resource for cooling water systems. Inorganic salts in the concentrated cooling water pose a great challenge to corrosion control chemicals. In this study, the inhibition effect of 1-hydroxy ethylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDP), trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP) and 2-phosphonobutane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid (PBTCA) on corrosion of carbon steel in secondary-treated MWW was investigated by the means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The inhibition effect increased with increasing concentration of inhibitors. The corrosion rates of carbon steel were 1.5, 0.8, 0.2 and 0.5 mm a(-1) for blank, HEDP, ATMP and PBTCA samples at 50 mg L(-1), respectively. The phosphorus-based chemicals could adsorb onto the surface of the carbon steel electrode, form a coat of protective film and then protect the carbon steel from corrosion in the test solution.

  8. Anaerobic co-digestion of biodiesel waste glycerin with municipal wastewater sludge: microbial community structure dynamics and reactor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razaviarani, Vahid; Buchanan, Ian D

    2015-04-01

    Two 10 L completely mixed reactors operating at 37°C and 20 days SRT were used to evaluate the relationships between reactor performance and microbial community dynamics during anaerobic co-digestion of biodiesel waste glycerin (BWG) with municipal wastewater sludge (MWS). The addition of up to 1.35% (v/v) BWG to reactor feeds yielded increased VS and COD removal together with enhanced the biogas production and methane yield. This represented 50% of the MWS feed COD. Pyrosequencing analysis showed Methanosaeta (acetoclastic) and Methanomicrobium (hydrogenotrophic) to be the methanogenic genera present in greatest diversity during stable reactor operation. Methanosaeta sequences predominated at the lowest BWG loading while those of Methanomicrobium were present in greatest abundance at the higher BWG loadings. Genus Candidatus cloacamonas was present in the greatest number of bacterial sequences at all loadings. Alkalinity, pH, biogas production and methane yield declined and VFA concentrations (especially propionate) increased during the highest BWG loading.

  9. Investigation of fluorescence methods for rapid detection of municipal wastewater impact on drinking water sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleato, Nicolas M.; Legge, Raymond L.; Andrews, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy as a means to detect low levels of treated wastewater impact on two source waters was investigated using effluents from five wastewater facilities. To identify how best to interpret the fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) for detecting the presence of wastewater, several feature selection and classification methods were compared. An expert supervised regional integration approach was used based on previously identified features which distinguish biologically processed organic matter including protein-like fluorescence and the ratio of protein to humic-like fluorescence. Use of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-like (NADH) fluorescence was found to result in higher linear correlations for low levels of wastewater presence. Parallel factors analysis (PARAFAC) was also applied to contrast an unsupervised multiway approach to identify underlying fluorescing components. A humic-like component attributed to reduced semiquinone-like structures was found to best correlate with wastewater presence. These fluorescent features were used to classify, by volume, low (0.1-0.5%), medium (1-2%), and high (5-15%) levels by applying support vector machines (SVMs) and logistic regression. The ability of SVMs to utilize high-dimensional input data without prior feature selection was demonstrated through their performance when considering full unprocessed EEMs (66.7% accuracy). The observed high classification accuracies are encouraging when considering implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy as a water quality monitoring tool. Furthermore, the use of SVMs for classification of fluorescence data presents itself as a promising novel approach by directly utilizing the high-dimensional EEMs.

  10. Illicit drugs in Canadian municipal wastewater and estimates of community drug use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, Chris, E-mail: cmetcalfe@trentu.c [Worsfold Water Quality Centre, Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive Peterborough, ON, K9J 7B8 (Canada); Tindale, Kathryn [Worsfold Water Quality Centre, Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive Peterborough, ON, K9J 7B8 (Canada); Li, Hongxia, E-mail: lihongxia@trentu.c [Worsfold Water Quality Centre, Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive Peterborough, ON, K9J 7B8 (Canada); Rodayan, Angela [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University St., Montreal, QC, H3A 2B2 (Canada); Yargeau, Viviane, E-mail: viviane.yargeau@mcgill.c [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University St., Montreal, QC, H3A 2B2 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    In this study of wastewater treatment plants in three Canadian cities, selected illicit drugs, including cocaine and its major metabolite, benzoylecgonine (BE), amphetamine, methamphetamine and ecstasy (i.e. MDMA) were detected in untreated wastewater. Cocaine was the most widely used illicit drug at a median level for the 3 cities of 15.7 doses per day per 1000 people. For the other drugs, the median doses per day per 1000 people were 1.8 for amphetamine, 4.5 for methamphetamine and 0.4 for ecstasy. Methamphetamine use was highest in the largest city and cocaine use was lowest in the smallest city. Removal of the illicit drugs by wastewater treatment was generally >50%, except in a WWTP that uses primary treatment. The community consumption estimate for ecstasy in the present study is far below published estimates of the prevalence of ecstasy use among the Canadian population, which may be due to only occasional use of ecstasy. - Cocaine and amphetamines were detected in untreated and treated sewage in the wastewater treatment plants of three Canadian cities, and community consumption patterns estimated from the concentrations of the drugs in untreated wastewater were consistent with estimates of the use of illicit drugs in Canada.

  11. Evaluation of diverse microalgal species as potential biofuel feedstocks grown using municipal wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sage R Hiibel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae offer great potential as a third-generation biofuel feedstock, especially when grown on wastewater, as they have the dual application for wastewater treatment and as a biomass feedstock for biofuel production. The potential for growth on wastewater centrate was evaluated for forty microalgae strains from fresh (11, brackish (11, or saltwater (18 genera. Generally, freshwater strains were able to grow at high concentrations of centrate, with two strains, Neochloris pseudostigmata and N. conjuncta, demonstrating growth at up to 40% v/v centrate. Fourteen of eighteen salt water Dunaliella strains also demonstrated growth in centrate concentrations at or above 40% v/v. Lipid profiles of freshwater strains with high-centrate tolerance were determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and compared against those obtained on cells grown on defined maintenance media. The major lipid compounds were found to be palmitic (16:0, oleic (18:1, and linoleic (18:2 acids for all freshwater strains grown on either centrate or their respective maintenance medium. These results demonstrate the highly concentrated wastewater can be used to grow microalgae, which limits the need to dilute wastewater prior to algal production. In addition, the algae produced generate lipids suitable for biodiesel or green diesel production.

  12. Assessment of the irrigation feasibility of low-cost filtered municipal wastewater for red amaranth (Amaranthus tricolor L cv. Surma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokul Chandra Biswas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of the scarcity of clean water, treated wastewater potentially provides an alternative source for irrigation. In the present experiment, the feasibility of using low-cost filtered municipal wastewater in the irrigation of red amaranth (Amaranthus tricolor L cv. Surma cultivation was assessed. The collected municipal wastewater from fish markets, hospitals, clinics, sewage, and kitchens of households in Sylhet City, Bangladesh were mixed and filtered with nylon mesh. Six filtration methods were applied using the following materials: sand (T1; sand and wood charcoal consecutively (T2; sand, wood charcoal and rice husks consecutively (T3; sand, wood charcoal, rice husks and sawdust consecutively (T4; sand, wood charcoal, rice husks, sawdust and brick chips consecutively (T5; and sand, wood charcoal, rice husks, sawdust, brick chips and gravel consecutively (T6. The water from ponds and rivers was considered as the control treatment (To. The chemical properties and heavy metals content of the water were determined before and after the low cost filtering, and the effects of the wastewater on seed germination, plant growth and the accumulation rate of heavy metals by plants were assessed. After filtration, the pH, EC and TDS ranged from 5.87 to 9.17, 292 to 691 µS cm−1 and 267 to 729 mg L−1, respectively. The EC and TDS were in an acceptable level for use in irrigation, satisfying the recommendations of the FAO. However, select pH values were unsuitable for irrigation. The metal concentrations decreased after applying each treatment. The reduction of Fe, Mn, Pb, Cu, As and Zn were 73.23%, 92.69%, 45.51%, 69.57%, 75.47% and 95.06%, respectively. When we considered the individual filtering material, the maximum amount of As and Pb was absorbed by sawdust; Cu and Zn by wood charcoal; Mn and Cu by sand and Fe by gravel. Among the six filtration treatments, T5 showed the highest seed germination (67.14%, similar to the control T0 (77

  13. Treatment of municipal and industrial wastewater by reed bed technology: A low cost treatment approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansari M. Ribadiya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reed bed system for wastewater treatment has been proven to be effective and sustainable alternative for conventional wastewater treatment technologies. Use of macrophytes to treat wastewater is also categorized in this method. This new approach is based on natural processes for the removal of different aquatic macrophytes such as floating, submerged and emergent. Macrophytes are assumed to be the main biological components of wetlands. These techniques are reported to be cost effective compared to other methods. Various contaminants like total suspended solids, dissolved solids, electrical conductivity, hardness, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, dissolved oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorous, heavy metals, and other contaminants have been minimized using aquatic microphytes. In this paper, role of these plant species, origin and their occurrence, ecological factors and their efficiency in reduction of different water contaminants have been presented.

  14. Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

    2012-06-30

    Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by

  15. Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

    2012-06-30

    Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by

  16. Aerobic Sludge Granulation in a Full-Scale Sequencing Batch Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic granulation of activated sludge was successfully achieved in a full-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR with 50,000 m3 d−1 for treating a town’s wastewater. After operation for 337 days, in this full-scale SBR, aerobic granules with an average SVI30 of 47.1 mL g−1, diameter of 0.5 mm, and settling velocity of 42 m h−1 were obtained. Compared to an anaerobic/oxic plug flow (A/O reactor and an oxidation ditch (OD being operated in this wastewater treatment plant, the sludge from full-scale SBR has more compact structure and excellent settling ability. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis indicated that Flavobacterium sp., uncultured beta proteobacterium, uncultured Aquabacterium sp., and uncultured Leptothrix sp. were just dominant in SBR, whereas uncultured bacteroidetes were only found in A/O and OD. Three kinds of sludge had a high content of protein in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS. X-ray fluorescence (XRF analysis revealed that metal ions and some inorganics from raw wastewater precipitated in sludge acted as core to enhance granulation. Raw wastewater characteristics had a positive effect on the granule formation, but the SBR mode operating with periodic feast-famine, shorter settling time, and no return sludge pump played a crucial role in aerobic sludge granulation.

  17. Aerobic sludge granulation in a full-scale sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Ding, Li-Bin; Cai, Ang; Huang, Guo-Xian; Horn, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic granulation of activated sludge was successfully achieved in a full-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with 50,000 m(3) d(-1) for treating a town's wastewater. After operation for 337 days, in this full-scale SBR, aerobic granules with an average SVI30 of 47.1 mL g(-1), diameter of 0.5 mm, and settling velocity of 42 m h(-1) were obtained. Compared to an anaerobic/oxic plug flow (A/O) reactor and an oxidation ditch (OD) being operated in this wastewater treatment plant, the sludge from full-scale SBR has more compact structure and excellent settling ability. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis indicated that Flavobacterium sp., uncultured beta proteobacterium, uncultured Aquabacterium sp., and uncultured Leptothrix sp. were just dominant in SBR, whereas uncultured bacteroidetes were only found in A/O and OD. Three kinds of sludge had a high content of protein in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis revealed that metal ions and some inorganics from raw wastewater precipitated in sludge acted as core to enhance granulation. Raw wastewater characteristics had a positive effect on the granule formation, but the SBR mode operating with periodic feast-famine, shorter settling time, and no return sludge pump played a crucial role in aerobic sludge granulation.

  18. Effects of long-term irrigation with untreated municipal wastewater on soil properties and crop quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Mehmet Emin; Aydin, Senar; Beduk, Fatma; Tor, Ali; Tekinay, Arzu; Kolb, Marit; Bahadir, Müfit

    2015-12-01

    Irrigating crops with untreated wastewater leads to elevated concentrations of heavy metals both in soil and cultivated crops. The current study was designed to determine heavy metal (i.e., Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, Hg) accumulation in Konya soils in selected nine sites irrigated with wastewater for over 40 years. Non-irrigated soil samples and soil samples irrigated with well water were taken as control samples. Transport of these pollutants to the wheat samples cultivated in the investigated site was also examined. The obtained results reveal that high alkaline properties and clay structure of Konya soil reduce the mobility of contaminants and cause accumulation in the top layer of soil. Intense effect of wastewater irrigation on soil EC was determined. The highest concentrations of Pb, Cr, Cu, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Hg in wastewater irrigated soil were 5.32, 37.1, 31.5, 11.4, 91.5, 134, and 0.34 mg kg(-1), respectively. Wastewater irrigated soils were strongly polluted by means of Cd (8.23-11.6 mg kg(-1)) and moderately to strongly polluted by means of Ni (47.7-134 mg kg(-1)), exceeding Maximum Admissible Concentrations for Trace Elements in Agricultural Soils and Sewage Sludge Regulation limit values of Turkey. Maximum concentrations found for Pb, Cr, Cu, Cd, Zn, and Ni in wastewater irrigated wheat grain were 8.44, 1.30, 9.10, n.d, 29.31, and 0.94 mg kg(-1), respectively. Besides, Hg was not detected in any samples of wheat grain. Based on the regulation of Turkish Food Codex, Pb contamination in wheat samples grown in the sampling site was evidenced.

  19. Feasibility of geothermal heat use in the San Bernardino Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report, September 1980-June 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racine, W.C.; Larson, T.C.; Stewart, C.A.; Wessel, H.B.

    1981-06-01

    A system was developed for utilizing nearby low temperature geothermal energy to heat two high-rate primary anaerobic digesters at the San Bernardino Wastewater Treatment Plant. The geothermal fluid would replace the methane currently burned to fuel the digesters. A summary of the work accomplished on the feasibility study is presented. The design and operation of the facility are examined and potentially viable applications selected for additional study. Results of these investigations and system descriptions and equipment specifications for utilizing geothermal energy in the selected processes are presented. The economic analyses conducted on the six engineering design cases are discussed. The environmental setting of the project and an analysis of the environmental impacts that will result from construction and operation of the geothermal heating system are discussed. A Resource Development Plan describes the steps that the San Bernardino Municipal Water Department could follow in order to utilize the resource. A preliminary well program and rough cost estimates for the production and injection wells also are included. The Water Department is provided with a program and schedule for implementing a geothermal system to serve the wastewater treatment plant. Regulatory, financial, and legal issues that will impact the project are presented in the Appendix. An outline of a Public Awareness Program is included.

  20. Influence of nitrite accumulation on "Candidatus Accumulibacter" population structure and enhanced biological phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Li, Boxiao; Wang, Xiangdong; Bai, Xinlong; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-02-01

    A modified University of Cape Town (MUCT) process was used to treat real municipal wastewater with low carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N). To our knowledge, this is the first study where the influence of nitrite accumulation on "Candidatus Accumulibacter" clade-level population structure was investigated during nitritation establishment and destruction. Real time quantitative PCR assays were conducted using the polyphosphate kinase 1 gene (ppk1) as a genetic marker. Abundances of total "Candidatus Accumulibacter", the relative distributions and population structure of the five "Candidatus Accumulibacter" clades were characterized. Under complete nitrification, clade I using nitrate as electron acceptor was below 5% of total "Candidatus Accumulibacter". When the reactor was transformed into nitritation, clade I gradually disappeared. Clade IID using nitrite as electron acceptor for denitrifying phosphorus (P) removal was always the dominant "Candidatus Accumulibacter" throughout the operational period. This clade was above 90% on average in total "Candidatus Accumulibacter", even up to nearly 100%, which was associated with good performance of denitrifying P removal via nitrite pathway. The nitrite concentrations affected the abundance of clade IID. The P removal was mainly completed by anoxic P uptake of about 88%. The P removal efficiency clearly had a positive correlation with the nitrite accumulation ratio. Under nitritation, the P removal efficiency was 30% higher than that under complete nitrification, suggesting that nitrite was appropriate as electron acceptor for denitrifying P removal when treating carbon-limited wastewater. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Integration of coagulation and adsorption for removal of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) precursors from biologically treated municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miaomiao; Meng, Yingjie; Ma, Defang; Wang, Yan; Li, Fengli; Xu, Xing; Xia, Chufan; Gao, Baoyu

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation potential of various dissolved organic matter (DOM) fractions in biologically treated municipal wastewater by UF fractionation, XAD-8 resin adsorption isolation, and excitation and emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. Removal of various NDMA precursor fractions was also analyzed to evaluate the efficiency of traditional water treatment processes (coagulation, adsorption, and coagulation-adsorption). Results showed that NDMA were mainly formed by low molecular weight (MW) fractions (wastewater. Integrated coagulation-adsorption treatments showed the highest reduction capacity for NDMA formation potential (57%), followed by isolated adsorption treatment (50%) and isolated coagulation treatment (28%). The powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption process could reduce the high MW precursors (>30 kDa) by 48%, which was higher than other treatments. In contrast, the highest uptake (66%) of low MW precursors (adsorption process. All treatments preferentially removed the hydrophobic acids (HoA) fraction compared to other fractions. Coagulation could remove more fulvic acid-like substances and adsorption could remove more microbial by-products and aromatic proteins.

  2. Feasibility of geothermal heat use in the San Bernardino Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report, September 1980-June 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racine, W.C.; Larson, T.C.; Stewart, C.A.; Wessel, H.B.

    1981-06-01

    A system was developed for utilizing nearby low temperature geothermal energy to heat two high-rate primary anaerobic digesters at the San Bernardino Wastewater Treatment Plant. The geothermal fluid would replace the methane currently burned to fuel the digesters. A summary of the work accomplished on the feasibility study is presented. The design and operation of the facility are examined and potentially viable applications selected for additional study. Results of these investigations and system descriptions and equipment specifications for utilizing geothermal energy in the selected processes are presented. The economic analyses conducted on the six engineering design cases are discussed. The environmental setting of the project and an analysis of the environmental impacts that will result from construction and operation of the geothermal heating system are discussed. A Resource Development Plan describes the steps that the San Bernardino Municipal Water Department could follow in order to utilize the resource. A preliminary well program and rough cost estimates for the production and injection wells also are included. The Water Department is provided with a program and schedule for implementing a geothermal system to serve the wastewater treatment plant. Regulatory, financial, and legal issues that will impact the project are presented in the Appendix. An outline of a Public Awareness Program is included.

  3. Accelerated carbonation using municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and cold-rolling wastewater: Performance evaluation and reaction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E-E; Pan, Shu-Yuan; Yang, Liuhanzi; Chen, Yi-Hung; Kim, Hyunook; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2015-09-01

    Accelerated carbonation of alkaline wastes including municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash (MSWI-BA) and the cold-rolling wastewater (CRW) was investigated for carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation under different operating conditions, i.e., reaction time, CO2 concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, particle size, and CO2 flow rate. The MSWI-BA before and after carbonation process were analyzed by the thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The MSWI-BA exhibits a high carbonation conversion of 90.7%, corresponding to a CO2 fixation capacity of 102g perkg of ash. Meanwhile, the carbonation kinetics was evaluated by the shrinking core model. In addition, the effect of different operating parameters on carbonation conversion of MSWI-BA was statistically evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM) using experimental data to predict the maximum carbonation conversion. Furthermore, the amount of CO2 reduction and energy consumption for operating the proposed process in refuse incinerator were estimated. Capsule abstract: CO2 fixation process by alkaline wastes including bottom ash and cold-rolling wastewater was developed, which should be a viable method due to high conversion.

  4. Investigation of relationships between removals of tetracycline and degradation products and physicochemical parameters in municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, Murat; Uslu Şenel, Gülşad; Öbek, Erdal; Arslan Topal, E Işıl

    2016-05-15

    Determination of the effect of physicochemical parameters on the removal of tetracycline (TC) and degradation products is important because of the importance of the removal of antibiotics in Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between removals of TC and degradation products and physicochemical parameters in Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (MWWTP). For this aim, (i) the removals of physicochemical parameters in a MWWTP located in Elazığ city (Turkey) were determined (ii) the removals of TC and degradation products in MWWTP were determined (iii) the relationships between removals of TC and degradation products and physicochemical parameters were investigated. TC, 4-epitetracycline (ETC), 4-epianhydrotetracycline (EATC), anhydrotetracycline (ATC), and physicochemical parameters (pH, temperature, electrical conductivity (EC), suspended solids (SS), BOD5, COD, total organic carbon (TOC), NH4(+)-N, NO2(-)-N, NO3(-)-N and O-PO4(-3)) were determined. The calculation of the correlation coefficients of relationships between the physicochemical parameters and TC, EATC, ATC showed that, among the investigated parameters, EATC and SS most correlated. The removals of other physicochemical parameters were not correlated with TC, EATC and ATC.

  5. Cultivation and characterization of Candidatus Nitrosocosmicus exaquare, an ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from a municipal wastewater treatment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Laura A; Albertsen, Mads; Engel, Katja; Schwarz, Jasmin; Nielsen, Per H; Wagner, Michael; Neufeld, Josh D

    2017-01-01

    Thaumarchaeota have been detected in several industrial and municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), despite the fact that ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are thought to be adapted to low ammonia environments. However, the activity, physiology and metabolism of WWTP-associated AOA remain poorly understood. We report the cultivation and complete genome sequence of Candidatus Nitrosocosmicus exaquare, a novel AOA representative from a municipal WWTP in Guelph, Ontario (Canada). In enrichment culture, Ca. N. exaquare oxidizes ammonia to nitrite stoichiometrically, is mesophilic, and tolerates at least 15 mm of ammonium chloride or sodium nitrite. Microautoradiography (MAR) for enrichment cultures demonstrates that Ca. N. exaquare assimilates bicarbonate in association with ammonia oxidation. However, despite using inorganic carbon, the ammonia-oxidizing activity of Ca. N. exaquare is greatly stimulated in enrichment culture by the addition of organic compounds, especially malate and succinate. Ca. N. exaquare cells are coccoid with a diameter of ~1–2 μm. Phylogenetically, Ca. N. exaquare belongs to the Nitrososphaera sister cluster within the Group I.1b Thaumarchaeota, a lineage which includes most other reported AOA sequences from municipal and industrial WWTPs. The 2.99 Mbp genome of Ca. N. exaquare encodes pathways for ammonia oxidation, bicarbonate fixation, and urea transport and breakdown. In addition, this genome encodes several key genes for dealing with oxidative stress, including peroxidase and catalase. Incubations of WWTP biofilm demonstrate partial inhibition of ammonia-oxidizing activity by 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO), suggesting that Ca. N. exaquare-like AOA may contribute to nitrification in situ. However, CARD-FISH-MAR showed no incorporation of bicarbonate by detected Thaumarchaeaota, suggesting that detected AOA may incorporate non-bicarbonate carbon sources or rely on an alternative and yet unknown

  6. Accelerated carbonation using municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and cold-rolling wastewater: Performance evaluation and reaction kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, E-E [Department of Biochemistry, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei City, Taiwan 110, Taiwan, ROC (China); Pan, Shu-Yuan [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71 Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei City, Taiwan 10673, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yang, Liuhanzi [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Haidin District, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Yi-Hung [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, 1, Sec. 3, Zhongxiao E. Rd., Taipei City, Taiwan 10608, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kim, Hyunook [Department of Energy and Environmental System Engineering, University of Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chiang, Pen-Chi, E-mail: pcchiang@ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71 Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei City, Taiwan 10673, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Carbonation was performed using CO{sub 2}, wastewater and bottom ash in a slurry reactor. • A maximum capture capacity of 102 g CO{sub 2} per kg BA was achieved at mild conditions. • A maximum carbonation conversion of MSWI-BA was predicted to be 95% by RSM. • The CO{sub 2} emission from Bali incinerator could be expected to reduce by 6480 ton/y. • The process energy consumption per ton CO{sub 2} captured was estimated to be 180 kW h. - Abstract: Accelerated carbonation of alkaline wastes including municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash (MSWI-BA) and the cold-rolling wastewater (CRW) was investigated for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) fixation under different operating conditions, i.e., reaction time, CO{sub 2} concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, particle size, and CO{sub 2} flow rate. The MSWI-BA before and after carbonation process were analyzed by the thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The MSWI-BA exhibits a high carbonation conversion of 90.7%, corresponding to a CO{sub 2} fixation capacity of 102 g per kg of ash. Meanwhile, the carbonation kinetics was evaluated by the shrinking core model. In addition, the effect of different operating parameters on carbonation conversion of MSWI-BA was statistically evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM) using experimental data to predict the maximum carbonation conversion. Furthermore, the amount of CO{sub 2} reduction and energy consumption for operating the proposed process in refuse incinerator were estimated. Capsule abstract: CO{sub 2} fixation process by alkaline wastes including bottom ash and cold-rolling wastewater was developed, which should be a viable method due to high conversion.

  7. Inhibition of the nitrification process in municipal wastewater treatment plants by industrial discharges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grüttner, Henrik; Winther-Nielsen, M.; Jorgensen, L.

    1994-01-01

    of inhibitory substances and to suggest a program for source control to be implemented by the individual municipalities in the catchment area. This paper describes the strategy for sampling and the results of the first two years of activity. Major conclusions have been that the most important sources...

  8. Superstructure development and optimization under uncertainty for design and retrofit of municipal wastewater treatment plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozkurt, Hande; Quaglia, Alberto; Gernaey, Krist

    2014-01-01

    n this contribution, an optimization - based approach is presented for optimal process selec tion and design for domestic wastewater treatment plant s (WWTP s ). In particular, we address the issue of uncertainties by formulating the WWTP design problem as a Stochastic Mixed Integer (Non) Linear...

  9. A pilot study on municipal wastewater treatment using a constructed wetland in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okurut, T.O.

    2000-01-01

    The potential of using constructed v wetlands as a cheaper and yet effective alternative method for treating domestic wastewater in tropical environments was investigated in this study from May 1996 - April 1999. The major aim was to determine their technical viability with respect to

  10. Extended spectrum beta-lactamases in Escherichia coli from municipal wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Čornejová

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions. The results showed that the wastewater is a source of ESBLs, carbapenemases and plasmid fluoroquinolone resistance. Strains with biofilm production, antibiotic resistance of CTX-M group, CMY-2, qnrS genes and virulence factors present a potential environmental health risk.

  11. Treatment of Municipal Wastewater by using Rotating Biological Contractors (Rbc’s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant A.Kadu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rotating biological contactor process offers the specific advantages of a biofilm system in treatment of wastewater for removal of soluble organic substances. It is a unique adaptation of the movingmedium biofilm system which facilitates easy and effective oxygen transfer. Media in the form of several large flat or corrugated discs with biofilm attached to the surface is mounted on a common shaft partially submerged in the wastewater and rotated through contoured tanks in which wastewater flows on a continuous basis. The compactness of the system and its economical operation makes it a viable option specially suited for decentralized wastewater treatment technologies. The process optimisation and adaptability under different environmental conditions and influent characteristics remain challenging tasks for the efficient use of this technology. Oxygen is accepted to be one of the most important and often limiting substrates in an aerobic treatment process. Oxygen transfer through the water film developed on a rotating disc revealed that the oxygen transfer coefficient varies with the rotational speed and the location on the exposed disc surface. Increase of ambient temperature resulted in decrease of the oxygen mass transfer rate. The biofilm model was implemented for a three stage rotating biological contactor based on a laboratory-scale experimental set-up. The process kinetics was adopted from the Activated Sludge which represents a mixed culture biomass environment.

  12. Evaluation of an ASM1 Model Calibration Precedure on a Municipal-Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Britta; Gernaey, Krist; Henze, Mogens;

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the calibrated model determines how to approach a model calibration, e.g. which information is needed and to which level of detail the model should be calibrated. A systematic model calibration procedure was therefore defined and evaluated for a municipal–industrial wastewater trea...

  13. FATE OF SEX HORMONES IN TWO PILOT-SCALE MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS: CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fate of seven sex hormones (estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), ethinylestradiol (EE2), testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone) was determined in two pilot-scale wastewater treatment plants operated under conventional loading conditions. The levels of hormon...

  14. A pilot study on municipal wastewater treatment using a constructed wetland in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okurut, T.O.

    2000-01-01

    The potential of using constructed v wetlands as a cheaper and yet effective alternative method for treating domestic wastewater in tropical environments was investigated in this study from May 1996 - April 1999. The major aim was to determine their technical viability with respect to treatment perf

  15. Abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in five municipal wastewater treatment plants in the Monastir Governorate, Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafraf, Ikbel Denden; Lekunberri, Itziar; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Aouni, Mahjoub; Borrego, Carles M; Balcázar, José Luis

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing and significant threat to global public health, requiring better understanding of the sources and mechanisms involved in its emergence and spread. We investigated the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) before and after treatment in five wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in different areas of the Monastir Governorate (Tunisia). Three of these WWTPs (Frina, Sahline and Zaouiet) use a conventional activated sludge process as secondary treatment, whereas the WWTP located in Beni Hassen applies an ultraviolet disinfection step after the activated sludge process and the WWTP located in Moknine treats wastewater using naturally aerated lagoons as a secondary treatment process. The abundance of six ARGs (blaCTX-M, blaTEM, qnrA, qnrS, sul I and ermB) and the class 1 integron-integrase gene (intI1) were determined by quantitative PCR. All ARGs and the intI1 gene were detected in the wastewater samples, except the blaCTX-M gene, which was not detected in both influent and effluent samples from Sahline and Beni Hassen WWTPs, and the qnrS gene, which was not detected neither in the WWTP influent in Moknine nor in the WWTP effluent in Beni Hassen. Although the relative concentration of ARGs was generally found to be similar between samples collected before and after the wastewater treatment, the abundance of blaCTX-M, blaTEM, and qnrS genes was higher in the effluent of the Frina WWTP which, unlike other WWTPs, not only receives domestic or industrial sewage but also untreated hospital waste. To the best of our knowledge, this study quantified for the first time the abundance of ARGs in different Tunisian WWTPs, and the results agree with previous studies suggesting that conventional wastewater treatment does not efficiently reduce ARGs. Therefore, these findings could be useful to improve the design or operation of WWTPs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of Microbial Quality in Biosolids Generated from Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ghoreishi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Qualitative evaluation of sewage sludge before any kind of application is essential. The present study was aimed to investigate Total coliform, Fecal coliform and Salmonella in sewage sludge produced at wastewater treatment plants in Azerbaijan Province, Iran. Materials and Methods: Nine wastewater treatment plants were chosen in East Azerbaijan Province, and their sludge from drying bed was studied. Total coliforms, thermo-tolerant coliforms, and Salmonella spp., were surveyed during winter time, 2015. Total and thermos-tolerant coliforms were enumerated by EPA method 1680 and salmonella was counted using EPA method 1682.   Results: In the case of total coliform, sludge sample from Jolfa with 1.82×106 MPN/g showed the highest contamination, while Sarab showed lowest fecal coliform count with 2.02×103 MPN/g. As in the case for fecal coliform, the bacteria count for thermo-tolerant coliforms was higher in Jolfa than other cities; on the other hand, Ahar with no fecal coliform count or less than 2.2 showed the minimum contamination rate to fecal coliforms. In case of Salmonella spp., sludge samples from Ahar and Bostan Abad did not show any salmonella. While sludge sample from Tabriz wastewater treatment plant was determined as the most contaminant sludge with bacteria count equal to 84 per  g. Moreover, sludge sample from Sarab wastewater treatment plant showed the least contamination rate, and bacteria count was 6 per  g. Conclusion: From the stand point of microbial quality, all sludge samples met class B standards set by USEPA, while none of them could provide class A standards. Thus, special precautions must be taken in case of soil amendments by the sludge produced from wastewater treatment plants. 

  17. Isolation and characterization of NDM-positive Escherichia coli from municipal wastewater in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Mantilla-Calderon, David

    2016-06-20

    The emergence of resistance to last resort antibiotics is a public health concern of global scale. Besides direct person-to-person propagation, environmental pathways might contribute to the dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Here, we describe the incidence of blaNDM-1, a gene conferring resistance to carbapenems, in the wastewater of Jeddah city over a one-year period. blaNDM-1 was detected at concentrations ranging from 104 to 105 copies per m3 of untreated wastewater during the entire monitoring period. These results indicate the ubiquity and high incidence of blaNDM-1 in the local wastewater. To track the bacteria carrying blaNDM-1, we isolated Escherichia coli PI7, a strain of the sequence type ST101, from wastewater around the Hajj event in October 2013. Genome sequencing of this strain revealed an extensive repertoire of ARGs as well as virulence and invasive traits. These traits were further confirmed by antibiotic resistance profiling and in-vitro cell internalization in HeLa cell cultures. Given that this strain remains viable even after a certain duration in the sewerage, and that Jeddah lacks a robust sanitary infrastructure to fully capture all generated sewage, the presence of this bacterium in the untreated wastewater would represent a potential hazard to the local public health. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a blaNDM-1-positive E. coli isolated from a non-nosocomial environment in Saudi Arabia, and may set a preceding concern for the need to establish an improved surveillance for carbapenem-resistant E. coli in the country and nearby regions.

  18. Theoretical analysis of the kinetic performance of laboratory- and full-scale composting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Marco; Silveira, Ana; Antunes, Fernando

    2012-07-01

    Composting research at laboratory-scale is critical for the development of optimized full-scale plants. Discrepancies between processes at laboratory-scale and full-scale systems have been investigated in terms of heat balances, but a kinetic analysis of this issue is still missing. In this study, the composting rate at laboratory-scale was, on average, between 1.9 and 5.7 times faster than in full-scale systems for a set of published studies using municipal solid waste, food waste or similar materials. Laboratory-scale performance and full-scale systems were limited to 71 and 46%, respectively, of their maximum potential due to poor management of environmental process conditions far from their optimum. The main limiting environmental factor was found to be moisture content, followed by temperature. Besides environmental factors, waste composition and particle size were identified as factors accounting for kinetic differences between laboratory- and full-scale systems. Overall, this study identifies those factors that affect the kinetics of the composting process most and revealed a significant margin for reducing process time in full-scale composting.

  19. WASTEWATER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acid in the ozonized wastewater were degraded completely by ... wastewater from pulp and paper plants pose serious environmental problems when they are ... support aquatic life (Stern & Gasner 1974), Gupta and Battacharya 1985).

  20. Environmental transport and fate of endocrine disruptors from non-potable reuse of municipal wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, B; Beller, H; Bartel, C M; Kane, S; Campbell, C; Grayson, A; Liu, N; Burastero, S

    2005-11-16

    This project was designed to investigate the important but virtually unstudied topic of the subsurface transport and fate of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) when treated wastewater is used for landscape irrigation (non-potable water reuse). Although potable water reuse was outside the scope of this project, the investigation clearly has relevance to such water recycling practices. The target compounds, which are discussed in the following section and include EDCs such as 4-nonylphenol (NP) and 17{beta}-estradiol, were studied not only because of their potential estrogenic effects on receptors but also because they can be useful as tracers of wastewater residue in groundwater. Since the compounds were expected to occur at very low (part per trillion) concentrations in groundwater, highly selective and sensitive analytical techniques had to be developed for their analysis. This project assessed the distributions of these compounds in wastewater effluents and groundwater, and examined their fate in laboratory soil columns simulating the infiltration of treated wastewater into an aquifer (e.g., as could occur during irrigation of a golf course or park with nonpotable treated water). Bioassays were used to determine the estrogenic activity present in effluents and groundwater, and the results were correlated with those from chemical analysis. In vitro assays for estrogenic activity were employed to provide an integrated measure of estrogenic potency of environmental samples without requiring knowledge or measurement of all bioactive compounds in the samples. For this project, the Las Positas Golf Course (LPGC) in the City of Livermore provided an ideal setting. Since 1978, irrigation of this area with treated wastewater has dominated the overall water budget. For a variety of reasons, a group of 10 monitoring wells were installed to evaluate wastewater impacts on the local groundwater. Additionally, these wells were regularly monitored for tritium ({sup 3}H

  1. A pilot study on municipal wastewater treatment using a constructed wetland in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Okurut, T.O.

    2000-01-01

    The potential of using constructed v wetlands as a cheaper and yet effective alternative method for treating domestic wastewater in tropical environments was investigated in this study from May 1996 - April 1999. The major aim was to determine their technical viability with respect to treatment performance under different operating conditions and the economic competitiveness of the technology in Uganda and within the region. A pilot constructed wetland design, based on horizontal flo...

  2. Water harvesting from municipal wastewater via osmotic gradient: An evaluation of process performance

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, Rodrigo

    2013-11-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) presents a unique opportunity for integrated wastewater treatment and seawater desalination. This study assesses the efficiency of a submerged FO system to reduce the volume of wastewater that needs to be treated while recovering high quality water that can be further treated for sustainable fresh water production. A semi-batch operation was employed with two membrane orientations in terms of active and support layers. A change of membrane orientation could improve the flux and slightly reduce the salt leakage from the draw solution to the feed solution. The formation of fouling on the membrane resulted in a decrease of the initial flux and average flux with both membrane orientations. The fouling layer on the membrane surface was determined to be caused by biopolymer-like substances. Osmotic backwash removed almost all organic foulants from the membrane surface, but did not improve the flux. There was a moderate to high retention of nutrients (N and P), varying from 56% to 99%, and almost a complete retention for trace metals regardless of membrane orientation. However the membrane showed a limited ability to retain low molecular weight acids and low molecular weight neutral compounds. This study identified a possible role of the FO process to integrate wastewater treatment and seawater desalination for a sustainable solution of the water-energy nexus for coastal cities. © 2013 Elsevier B.V..

  3. Extended spectrum beta-lactamases in Escherichia coli from municipal wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Čornejová

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective. Over the past decades, awareness of the environmental load of resistant organisms has increased. The presented paper focuses on antibiotic resistance and detection of resistance genes in environmental [i]E. coli[/i] and on the evaluation of biofilm formation in ESBLs (extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing [i]E. coli[/i] isolated from an urban wastewater treatment plant. Materials and method. Wastewater samples and artificially added polystyrene pellets were used as the source for [i]E. col[/i]i isolation. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of 19 antibiotics were determined according to CLSI (2013. Biofilm formation was investigated by crystal violet or resazurin methods. CTX-M, carbapenemases, [i]qnrS[/i], mobile elements and virulence factors were determined by PCR. Clonal relatedness of strains was detected by principal component analysis by a Maldi biotyper. Results. ESBL phenotype was detected in 26% of environmental strains. CTX-M, CMY-2 and [i]qnrS[/i] genes of antibiotic resistance were detected. IMP gene together with integron 1 in one ertapenem resistant [i]E. coli[/i] was also recorded. There was no evident correlation between antibiotic resistance, virulence and biofilm production. Conclusions. The results showed that the wastewater is a source of ESBLs, carbapenemases and plasmid fluoroquinolone resistance. Strains with biofilm production, antibiotic resistance of CTX-M group, CMY-2, [i]qnrS[/i] genes and virulence factors present a potential environmental health risk.

  4. Evaluating digestion efficiency in full-scale anaerobic digesters by identifying active microbial populations through the lens of microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Ran; Narihiro, Takashi; Nobu, Masaru K.; Kuroda, Kyohei; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a common technology to biologically stabilize wasted solids produced in municipal wastewater treatment. Its efficiency is usually evaluated by calculating the reduction in volatile solids, which assumes no biomass growth associated with digestion. To determine whether this assumption is valid and further evaluate digestion efficiency, this study sampled 35 digester sludge from different reactors at multiple time points together with the feed biomass in a full-scale water reclamation plant at Chicago, Illinois. The microbial communities were characterized using Illumina sequencing technology based on 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene (rDNA). 74 core microbial populations were identified and represented 58.7% of the entire digester community. Among them, active populations were first identified using the ratio of 16S rRNA and 16S rDNA (rRNA/rDNA) for individual populations, but this approach failed to generate consistent results. Subsequently, a recently proposed mass balance model was applied to calculate the specific growth rate (μ), and this approach successfully identified active microbial populations in digester (positive μ) that could play important roles than those with negative μ. It was further estimated that 82% of microbial populations in the feed sludge were digested in comparison with less than 50% calculated using current equations.

  5. Evaluating digestion efficiency in full-scale anaerobic digesters by identifying active microbial populations through the lens of microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Ran; Narihiro, Takashi; Nobu, Masaru K.; Kuroda, Kyohei; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a common technology to biologically stabilize wasted solids produced in municipal wastewater treatment. Its efficiency is usually evaluated by calculating the reduction in volatile solids, which assumes no biomass growth associated with digestion. To determine whether this assumption is valid and further evaluate digestion efficiency, this study sampled 35 digester sludge from different reactors at multiple time points together with the feed biomass in a full-scale water reclamation plant at Chicago, Illinois. The microbial communities were characterized using Illumina sequencing technology based on 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene (rDNA). 74 core microbial populations were identified and represented 58.7% of the entire digester community. Among them, active populations were first identified using the ratio of 16S rRNA and 16S rDNA (rRNA/rDNA) for individual populations, but this approach failed to generate consistent results. Subsequently, a recently proposed mass balance model was applied to calculate the specific growth rate (μ), and this approach successfully identified active microbial populations in digester (positive μ) that could play important roles than those with negative μ. It was further estimated that 82% of microbial populations in the feed sludge were digested in comparison with less than 50% calculated using current equations. PMID:27666090

  6. Phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater by hydrous ferric oxide reactive filtration and coupled chemically enhanced secondary treatment: part II--mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, R L; Strawn, D G; Grant, T M; Childers, S E; Möller, G

    2008-03-01

    The removal mechanism of a hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) reactive filtration (RF) process with coupled chemically enhanced secondary treatment (RECYCLE) for phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater (HFO-RF-RECYCLE) was examined. A 0.95-ML/d (0.25-mgd) demonstration of HFO-RF-RECYCLE was performed at a municipal wastewater treatment plant equipped with oxidation ditches and secondary clarifiers. Influent to the plant averaged 6.0 mg/L phosphorus, with a 3-month tertiary effluent average of 0.011 mg/L phosphorus. In addition to aqueous geochemical modeling, experiments with surface charge, scanning electron microscopy, adsorptive capacity, thermal desorption, and most probable number of iron(III)-reducing bacteria were performed on samples from the system, to determine the major phosphorus-removal pathways. Results suggest that, in addition to filtration of particulate phosphorus, the low tertiary effluent total phosphorus result was achieved by adsorption.

  7. The effect of primary sedimentation on full-scale WWTP nutrient removal performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, S; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Flameling, A G; Colprim, J; Meijer, S C F

    2010-06-01

    Traditionally, the performance of full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is measured based on influent and/or effluent and waste sludge flows and concentrations. Full-scale WWTP data typically have a high variance which often contains (large) measurement errors. A good process engineering evaluation of the WWTP performance is therefore difficult. This also makes it usually difficult to evaluate effect of process changes in a plant or compare plants to each other. In this paper we used a case study of a full-scale nutrient removing WWTP. The plant normally uses presettled wastewater, as a means to increase the nutrient removal the plant was operated for a period by-passing raw wastewater (27% of the influent flow). The effect of raw wastewater addition has been evaluated by different approaches: (i) influent characteristics, (ii) design retrofit, (iii) effluent quality, (iv) removal efficiencies, (v) activated sludge characteristics, (vi) microbial activity tests and FISH analysis and, (vii) performance assessment based on mass balance evaluation. This paper demonstrates that mass balance evaluation approach helps the WWTP engineers to distinguish and quantify between different strategies, where others could not. In the studied case, by-passing raw wastewater (27% of the influent flow) directly to the biological reactor did not improve the effluent quality and the nutrient removal efficiency of the WWTP. The increase of the influent C/N and C/P ratios was associated to particulate compounds with low COD/VSS ratio and a high non-biodegradable COD fraction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Peracetic acid as disinfectant of municipal wastewaters; L'acido peracetico nella disinfezione dei reflui urbani

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funari, E. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita' , Laboratorio di Igiene Ambientale, Reparto di Medicina Ambientale, Rome (Italy); Lopez, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Ricerca sulle Acque, Reparto di Chimica e Tecnologia delle Acque, Bari (Italy)

    2000-09-01

    Based on the currently available literature, this paper is aimed at providing a sort of the <> on the use of peracetic acid (C{sub 3}COOOH{identical_to} Paa) as disinfectant of biologically treated municipal wastewater: the growing interest for this substance, used since many years in other sectors (e.g., food-industry, breweries, etc.) is mainly due to the claimed limited formation, if any, of harmful disinfecting by-products (Dbp) with consequent lack of toxicity in Paa treated wastewaters. Such features are just the opposite of those of chlorine, i.e. the most used disinfectant for municipal wastewater. During chlorine-disinfecting, in fact, numerous harmful organo-chlorinated Dbp are formed and, accordingly, the toxicity of chlorinated effluents results very high. In spite of the above reported <> properties of Paa, its use at large scale facilities is still restricted and this not only because of its costs but even for the limited knowledge concerning: the actual disinfecting effectiveness towards different pathogens, the nature and the toxicological properties of its potential Dbp, and the disinfecting performances at large scale facilities. The present paper, besides reporting an extensive and useful collection of references concerning Paa, provides a critical review on the current knowledge regarding specific Paa features such as: its disinfecting effectiveness towards different pathogenic micro-organisms, the nature and the toxicity of its disinfecting by-products, the environmental impact of Paa treated effluents, and the operative conditions used at large scale wastewater treatment plants. [Italian] Il presente lavoro, basandosi sui dati disponibili in letteratura, si propone di fare il punto sull'impiego dell'acido peracetico (CH{sub 3}COOOH{identical_to} PAA) come disinfettante di reflui urbani depurati. Il crescente interesse nei confronti di questa sostenza, gia' nota come disinfettante in

  9. Dynamics of Bacterial Community Abundance and Structure in Horizontal Subsurface Flow Wetland Mesocosms Treating Municipal Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristjan Oopkaup

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of bacterial community abundance and structure of a newly established horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF pilot-scale wetland were studied using high-throughput sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR methods. Bacterial community abundance increased rapidly within one month and stabilised thereafter in three replicate HSSF constructed wetland (CW mesocosms. The most dominant phylum was Proteobacteria, followed by Bacteroidetes in wetland media biofilms and Firmicutes in influent wastewater. CW bacterial community diversity increased over time and was positively related to the wastewater treatment efficiency. Increase in the abundance of total bacteria in the community was accompanied with the abundance of denitrifying bacteria that promoted nitrate and nitrite removal from the wastewater. During the 150-day study period, similar patterns of bacterial community successions were observed in replicate HSSF CW mesocosms. The data indicate that successions in the bacterial community in HSSF CW are shaped by biotic interactions, with a significant contribution made by external abiotic factors such as influent chemical parameters. Network analysis of the bacterial community revealed that organic matter and nitrogen removal in HSSF CW could be, in large part, allocated to a small subset of tightly interconnected bacterial species. The diversity of bacterial community and abundance of denitrifiers were good predictors of the removal efficiency of ammonia, nitrate and total organic C in HSSF CW mesocosms, while the removal of the seven-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD7 was best predicted by the abundance of a small set of bacterial phylotypes. The results suggest that nitrogen removal in HSSF CW consist of two main pathways. The first is heterotrophic nitrification, which is coupled with aerobic denitrification and mediated by mixotrophic nitrite-oxidizers. The second pathway is anaerobic denitrification, which leads to gaseous

  10. Occurrence of illicit drugs and selected pharmaceuticals in Slovak municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodík, Igor; Mackuľak, Tomáš; Fáberová, Milota; Ivanová, Lucia

    2016-10-01

    We analyzed illicit drugs and their metabolites and pharmaceuticals in wastewater from 15 selected wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Slovakia. Our results indicate that methamphetamine is one of the most commonly used illegal drugs in all the regions of Slovakia monitored in this study. Compared with the international results, the Slovak cities of Dunajská Streda (479 mg/day/1000inh) and Trnava (354 mg/day/1000inh) are among the cities with the largest numbers of methamphetamine users in Europe. These results indicate an increase in the incidence of drugs in big cities and in the satellite cities (Trnava and Dunajská Streda) near Bratislava. These results also confirm the police statistics about production and use of illicit drugs in Slovakia. The highest specific loads of cocaine were found in Bratislava (112 mg/day/1000inh), followed by Petržalka (74 mg/day/1000inh). Compared with other European cities, Bratislava and the other Slovak cities in this study have a relatively low number of COC consumers. The ecstasy load in wastewater from larger cities also significantly increased over the weekend and during music festivals. The highest 2-year mean concentrations of THC-COOH, a cannabis biomarker, were observed in the sewage from BA-Petržalka and BA-Central (191 and 171 ng/L, respectively). A first complex monitoring of pharmaceuticals in all therapeutic groups was also realized in selected Slovak WWTPs. Occurrence of wide spectrum of pharmaceuticals with very high concentrations as well as consumptions were observed mainly in small Slovak cities. Considering all 120 monitored pharmaceuticals, Valsartan had the highest concentrations: 6000 ng/L, on average.

  11. The effect of advanced secondary municipal wastewater treatment on the molecular composition of dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizel, Andrew C; Remucal, Christina K

    2017-10-01

    There is a growing interest in water reuse and in recovery of nutrients from wastewater. Because many advanced treatment processes are designed to remove organic matter, a better understanding of the composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in wastewater is needed. To that end, we assessed DOM in the Nine Springs Wastewater Treatment Plant in Madison, Wisconsin by UV-visible spectroscopy and Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Samples were collected from the influent and effluent of two different secondary treatment processes and their respective secondary clarifiers, the UV disinfection unit, and an Ostara treatment system, which produces struvite via chemical precipitation. The optical properties reveal that DOM throughout the plant is relatively aliphatic and is low in molecular weight compared to DOM in freshwater systems. Furthermore, the DOM is rich in heteroatoms (e.g., N, S, P, and Cl) and its molecular formulas are present in the lipid-, protein-, carbohydrate-, and lignin-like regions of van Krevelen diagrams. Secondary treatment produces DOM that is more aromatic and more complex, as shown by the loss of highly saturated formulas and the increase in the number of CHO, CHON, and CHOP formulas. The two secondary treatment processes produce DOM with distinct molecular compositions, while the secondary clarifiers and UV disinfection unit result in minimal changes in DOM composition. The Ostara process decreases the molecular weight of DOM, but does not otherwise alter its composition. The optical properties agree with trends in the molecular composition of DOM within the main treatment train of the Nine Springs plant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment and Evaluation of Treated Municipal Wastewater Quality for Irrigation Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Ali Al-Khashman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the chemical composition of Petra Wastewater Treatment Plant effluent in southern Jordan. Twenty four Samples were collected over one year period from June 2008 to June 2009. The samples were analyzed for temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, major cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+, major anions (Cl-, NO3-, HCO3-, SO42- and PO43- and trace metals (B, Fe2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Cr2+, Pb2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+. The pH value ranged from 6.52 to 8.14 with a median value of 7.51±0.50. The water quality was characterized by its high salinity hazard (C3 and low Sodium Hazard (S1 which can be considered as marginal for human consumption. The hydrogeochemical behavior is rather complicated and is affected by anthropogenic and natural sources. The positive correlation values between various parameters indicate that most of ions were resulted from the same lithological sources. The abundance of the major ions in water samples is in the following order: HCO3->Ca2+>Cl->Na+>Mg2+>SO42->NO3->NH4+>K+. Moreover, concentrations of trace metals in treated wastewater were found to be low and within guidelines for irrigational purposes due to low level of industrial activities in the study area. According to the residual sodium carbonate, SAR and conductivity values, the studied water is suitable for agricultural purposes. Based on these findings, the effluents of Petra Wastewater Treatment Plant can be considered as possible additional resources for irrigation in Jordan.

  13. Inhibition of the nitrification process in municipal wastewater treatment plants by industrial discharges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grüttner, Henrik; Winther-Nielsen, M.; Jorgensen, L.

    1994-01-01

    More than three years of pilot-plant operation has documented that inhibition of nitrification was found to influence the dimensioning of the largest Danish wastewater treatment plant, which serves a major part of Copenhagen. Hence, a program for investigating the sources of substances inhibitory...... to nitrification was initiated. Since the number of substances potentially inhibitory to nitrification is very high, the investigations used direct testing of inhibitory effects on nitrification as a tool for the mapping operations. The overall purpose of the investigation was to determine the types of sources...

  14. Removal of Organic Pollutants in Municipal Wastewater for Artificial Groundwater Recharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to construct a demonstration artificial groundwater recharge system for wastewater reuse in China, three years of laboratory work has been conducted on advanced treatment technologies in combination with soil aquifer treatment of secondary effluent from sewage treatment plants. An effective and inexpensive process was selected, which uses DGB adsorption, PAC coagulation, sedimentation, sand filtration, ozone disinfection, and soil aquifer treatment. The effluent meets the recommended water quality criteria for groundwater recharge. Ozonation is effective for disinfection as well as for water quality improvement. Results showed that the total N in the SAT system remained constant thus the secondary effluent must have a low NH3-N concentration for groundwater recharge.

  15. A comprehensive substance flow analysis of a municipal wastewater and sludge treatment plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshida, Hiroko; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Guildal, T.

    2015-01-01

    and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) in a conventional wastewater treatment plant were assessed. Mass balances showed reasonable closures for most of the elements. However, gaseous emissions were accompanied by large uncertainties and show the limitation of mass balance based substance flow analysis. Based...... significant substance flows. In contrast, the contribution by spent water from the flue gas treatment process was almost negligible. Screening of human and eco-toxicity by applying the consensus-based environmental impact assessment method USEtox addressing 15 inorganic constituents showed that removal...

  16. Pollutant removal from municipal wastewater employing baffled subsurface flow and integrated surface flow-floating treatment wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Tanveer; Al-Muyeed, Abdullah; Afrin, Rumana; Rahman, Habibur; Sun, Guangzhi

    2014-04-01

    This article reports pollutant removal performances of baffled subsurface flow, and integrated surface flow-floating treatment wetland units, when arranged in series for the treatment of municipal wastewater in Bangladesh. The wetland units (of the hybrid system) included organic, inorganic media, and were planted with nineteen types of macrophytes. The wetland train was operated under hydraulic loading fluctuation and seasonal variation. The performance analyses (across the wetland units) illustrated simultaneous denitrification and organics removal rates in the first stage vertical flow wetland, due to organic carbon leaching from the employed organic media. Higher mean organics removal rates (656.0 g COD/(m(2)·day)) did not completely inhibit nitrification in the first stage vertical flow system; such pattern could be linked to effective utilization of the trapped oxygen, as the flow was directed throughout the media by the baffle walls. Second stage horizontal flow wetland showed enhanced biodegradable organics removal, which depleted organic carbon availability for denitrification. The final stage integrated wetland system allowed further nitrogen removal from wastewater, via nutrient uptake by plant roots (along with nitrification), and generation of organic carbon (by the dead macrophytes) to support denitrification. The system achieved higher E. coli mortality through protozoa predation, E. coli oxidation, and destruction by UV radiation. In general, enhanced pollutant removal efficiencies as demonstrated by the structurally modified hybrid wetland system signify the necessity of such modification, when operated under adverse conditions such as: substantial input organics loading, hydraulic loading fluctuation, and seasonal variation. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Inactivation of natural enteric bacteria in real municipal wastewater by solar photo-Fenton at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Gómez, E; Esteban García, B; Ballesteros Martín, M M; Fernández Ibáñez, P; Sánchez Pérez, J A

    2014-10-15

    This study analyses the use of the solar photo-Fenton treatment in compound parabolic collector photo-reactors at neutral pH for the inactivation of wild enteric Escherichia coli and total coliform present in secondary effluents of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (SEWWTP). Control experiments were carried out to find out the individual effects of mechanical stress, pH, reactants concentration, and UVA radiation as well as the combined effects of UVA-Fe and UVA-H2O2. The synergistic germicidal effect of solar-UVA with 50 mg L(-1) of H2O2 led to complete disinfection (up to the detection limit) of total coliforms within 120 min. The disinfection process was accelerated by photo-Fenton, achieving total inactivation in 60 min reducing natural bicarbonate concentration found in the SEWWTP from 250 to 100 mg L(-1) did not give rise to a significant enhancement in bacterial inactivation. Additionally, the effect of hydrogen peroxide and iron dosage was evaluated. The best conditions were 50 mg L(-1) of H2O2 and 20 mg L(-1) of Fe(2+). Due to the variability of the SEWWTP during autumn and winter seasons, the inactivation kinetic constant varied between 0.07 ± 0.04 and 0.17 ± 0.04 min(-1). Moreover, the water treated by solar photo-Fenton fulfilled the microbiological quality requirement for wastewater reuse in irrigation as per the WHO guidelines and in particular for Spanish legislation.

  18. Ultra high temperature gasification of municipal wastewater primary biosolids in a rotary kiln reactor for the production of synthesis gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gikas, Petros

    2017-12-01

    Primary Fine-Sieved Solids (PFSS) are produced from wastewater by the use of micro-sieves, in place of primary clarification. Biosolids is considered as a nuisance product, however, it contains significant amounts of energy, which can be utilized by biological (anaerobic digestion) or thermal (combustion or gasification) processes. In the present study, an semi-industrial scale UHT rotary kiln gasifier, operating with electric energy, was employed for the gasification of PFSS (at 17% moisture content), collected from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Two gasification temperatures (950 and 1050 °C) had been tested, with minimal differences, with respect to syngas yield. The system appears to reach steady state after about 30-40 min from start up. The composition of the syngas at near steady state was measured approximately as 62.4% H2, 30.0% CO, 2.4% CH4 and 3.4% CO2, plus 1.8% unidentified gases. The potential for electric energy production from the syngas produced is theoretically greater than the electric energy required for gasification. Theoretically, approximately 3.8 MJ/kg PFSS of net electric energy may be produced. However, based on the measured electric energy consumption, and assuming that all the syngas produced is used for electric energy production, addition of excess electric energy (about 0.43 MJ/kg PFSS) is required to break even. The latter is probably due to heat losses to the environment, during the heating process. With the improvement of energy efficiency, the process can be self sustained, form the energy point of view. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Industrial wastewater municipal normative as tools to obtain a better control of industrial pollution to public sewage network systems; Ordenanzas de vertidos como herramienta para lograr un mas eficaz control de vertidos a las redes de saneamiento publico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin Galvin, R.; Mantecon Pascual, R.; Diaz de Durana Uriarte, B.

    2006-07-01

    This paper claims and assesses about the renewal and actualisation of the Spanish industrial wastewater municipal normative, by applying the experience that about these activities has been accumulated by the administration, by the organisms occupied of the management of the control, inspection and treatment of industrial wastewater and, so, by the industries. The main conclusion has been to evidence that the better form to give solution to the problem of industrial wastewater in our cities, can be to go up to an integrated management system which joints the following; control of network systems, control of industrial wastewaters and control of wastewater treatment plants. (Author) 7 refs.

  20. Seawater-driven forward osmosis for enriching nitrogen and phosphorous in treated municipal wastewater: effect of membrane properties and feed solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenchao; Tobino, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Fumiyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    Seawater-driven forward osmosis (FO) is considered to be a novel strategy to concentrate nutrients in treated municipal wastewater for further recovery as well as simultaneous discharge of highly purified wastewater into the sea with low cost. As a preliminary test, the performance of FO membranes in concentrating nutrients was investigated by both batch experiments and model simulation approaches. With synthetic seawater as the draw solution, the dissolved organic carbon, phosphate, and ammonia in the effluent from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating municipal wastewater were 2.3-fold, 2.3-fold, and 2.1-fold, respectively, concentrated by the FO process with approximately 57% of water reduction. Most of the dissolved components, including trace metals in the MBR effluent, were highly retained (>80%) in the feed side, indicating high water quality of permeate to be discharged. The effect of membrane properties on the nutrient enrichment performance was investigated by comparing three types of FO membranes. Interestingly, a polyamide membrane possessing a high negative charge demonstrated a poor capability of retaining ammonia, which was hypothesized because of an ion exchange-like mechanism across the membrane prompted by the high ionic concentration of the draw solution. A feed solution pH of 7 was demonstrated to be an optimum condition for improving the overall retention of nutrients, especially for ammonia because of the pH-dependent speciation of ammonia/ammonium forms. The modeling results showed that higher than 10-fold concentrations of ammonia and phosphate are achievable by seawater-driven FO with a draw solution to feed solution volume ratio of 2:1. The enriched municipal wastewater contains nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations comparable with typical animal wastewater and anaerobic digestion effluent, which are used for direct nutrient recovery.

  1. Phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater by hydrous ferric oxide reactive filtration and coupled chemically enhanced secondary treatment: part I--performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, R L; Rule, R A; Hart, B K; Möller, G

    2008-03-01

    This work examines the performance of a hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) reactive filtration (RF) process with coupled chemically enhanced secondary treatment (RECYCLE) for phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater (HFO-RF-RECYCLE). A 3-month, 0.95-ML/d (0.25-mgd) demonstration of HFO-RF-RECYCLE was performed at a municipal wastewater treatment plant equipped with oxidation ditches and secondary clarifiers. Influent to the plant averaged 6.0 mg/L phosphorus, with a tertiary effluent average of 0.011 mg/L phosphorus. Iron doses to the plant were low, at 5 mg/L. Inline recycling of HFO solution rejects to the plant influent resulted in a maximum 90.3%, dose-dependent reduction of phosphorus in the secondary effluent at 4.5 ML/d (1.2 mgd). Other results included reduction of total suspended solids and turbidity. A mass balance analysis was performed. We conclude that HFO-RF-RECYCLE may allow very low levels of phosphorus discharge from municipal wastewater treatment plants with a ferric-iron-based tertiary filtration process and residual recycling.

  2. Anaerobic hydrolysis of a municipal wastewater in a pilot-scale digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, J A; Zapico, C A; Gómez, M; Presas, J; Soto, M

    2003-01-01

    Raw domestic wastewater from the city of Santiago de Compostela (Northwest Spain) was fed into a pilot-scale hydrolytic up flow sludge bed (HUSB) digester with an active volume of 25.5 m3. The total influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) ranged from 360 to 470 mg/l, the influent SS varied from 190 to 370 mg/l, and the temperature was between 17 degrees and 20 degrees C. The organic load rate (OLR) applied increased step by step from 1.2 to 3.9 kgCOD/m3 x d, while the hydraulic retention time (HRT) decreased from 7.1 h to 2.9 h. A high suspended solids (SS) removal of about 82-85% from the influent was reached, most of which (81 to 88%) was eliminated by hydrolysis, while the rest remained in the purge stream. The total COD removal ranged from 46 to 59%. On the other hand, a high acidification of the COD remaining in the effluent was obtained, so the percent COD in the form of volatile fatty acids (VFA(COD)) with respect to total effluent COD was about 43% for the highest HRT applied, and about 27% for the lowest HRT. The soluble to total COD ratio (CODs/CODt) increased from 25-32% for the influent to 71-86% for the effluent. The results obtained confirm the viability and interest of direct anaerobic hydrolytic pre-treatment of domestic wastewater.

  3. Membrane distillation combined with an anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor for treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Shin, Jaewon; Won, Seyeon; Lee, Jung-Yeol; Maeng, Sung Kyu; Song, Kyung Guen

    2015-03-15

    A fermentative strategy with an anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor (AMBBR) was used for the treatment of domestic wastewater. The feasibility of using a membrane separation technique for post-treatment of anaerobic bio-effluent was evaluated with emphasis on employing a membrane distillation (MD). Three different hydrophobic 0.2 μm membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and polypropylene (PP) were examined in this study. The initial permeate flux of the membranes ranged from 2.5 to 6.3 L m(-2) h(-1) when treating AMBBR effluent at a temperature difference between the feed and permeate streams of 20 °C, with the permeate flux increasing in the order PP distillation, while a flux decline in MD with either the PVDF or PP membrane was not found under the identical distillation conditions. During long-term distillation with the PVDF membrane, total phosphorus was completely rejected and >98% rejection of dissolved organic carbon was also achieved. The characterization of wastewater effluent organic matter (EfOM) using an innovative suite of analytical tools verified that almost all of the EfOM was rejected via the PVDF MD treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microalgal growth in municipal wastewater treated in an anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultberg, Malin; Olsson, Lars-Erik; Birgersson, Göran; Gustafsson, Susanne; Sievertsson, Bertil

    2016-05-01

    Nutrient removal from the effluent of an anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor (AnMBBR) treated with microalgae was evaluated. Algal treatment was highly efficient in removal of nutrients and discharge limits were met after 3days. Extending the cultivation time from 3 to 5days resulted in a large increase in biomass, from 233.3±49.3 to 530.0±72.1mgL(-1), despite nutrients in the water being exhausted after 3days (ammonium 0.04mgL(-1), orthophosphate <0.05mgL(-1)). Biomass productivity, lipid content and quality did not differ in microalgal biomass produced in wastewater sampled before the AnMBBR. The longer cultivation time resulted in a slight increase in total lipid concentration and a significant decrease in linolenic acid concentration in all treatments. Differences were observed in chemical oxygen demand, which decreased after algal treatment in wastewater sampled before the AnMBBR whereas it increased after algal treatment in the effluent from the AnMBBR.

  5. Pilot-Scale Removal of Trace Steroid Hormones and Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products from Municipal Wastewater Using a Heterogeneous Fenton’s Catalytic Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Tangyie Chi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pollution of water sources by endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs and pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs is a growing concern, as conventional municipal wastewater treatment systems are not capable of completely removing these contaminants. A continuous stir tank reactor incorporating a modified polyacrylonitrile (PAN catalyst and dosed with hydrogen peroxide in a heterogeneous Fenton’s process was used at pilot scale to remove these compounds from wastewater that has undergone previous treatment via a conventional wastewater treatment system. The treatment system was effective at ambient temperature and at the natural pH of the wastewater. High levels of both natural and synthetic hormones (EDCs and PPCPs were found in the effluent after biological treatment of the wastewater. The treatment system incorporating the modified PAN catalyst/H2O2 decomposed >90% of the EDCs and >40% of PPCPs using 200 mgL−1 H2O2, 3 hr residence time. The estrogenic potency EE2-EQ was removed by 82.77%, 91.36%, and 96.13% from three different wastewater treatment plants. BOD was completely removed (below detection limits; 30%–40% mineralisation was achieved and turbidity reduced by more than 68%. There was a <4% loss in iron content on the catalyst over the study period, suggesting negligible leaching of the catalyst.

  6. Recovery of benthic-invertebrate communities in the White River near Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, following implementation of advanced treatment of municipal wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Charles G.; Wangsness, David J.

    1992-01-01

    The City of Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, completed construction of advanced-wastewater-treatment systems to enlarge and upgrade existing secondary-treatment processes at the City’s two municipal wastewater-treatment plants in 1983. These plants discharge their effluent to the White River. A study was begun in 1981 to evaluate the effects of municipal wastewater on the quality of the White River near Indianapolis. As part of this study, benthic-invertebrate samples were collected from one riffle upstream and two riffles downstream from the treatment plants annually from 1981 through 1987 (2 times before and 5 times after the plant improvements became operational). Samples were collected during periods of late-summer or early-fall low streamflow with a Surber sampler. Upstream from the wastewater-treatment plants, mayflies and caddisflies were the predominant organisms in the benthic-invertebrate community (from 32 to 93 percent of all organisms; median value is 67 percent) with other insects and mollusks also present. Before implementation of advanced wastewater-treatment, the benthic-invertebrate community downstream from the wastewater treatment plants was predominantly chironomids and oligochaetes (more than 98 percent of all organisms)-organisms that generally are tolerant of organic wastes. Few intolerant species, such as mayflies or caddisflies were found. Following implementation of advanced wastewater treatment, mayflies and caddisflies became numerically dominant in samples collected downstream from the plants. By 1986, these organisms accounted for more than 90 percent of all organisms found at the two downstream sites. The diversity of benthic invertebrates found in these samples resembled that at the upstream site. The improvement in the quality of municipal wastewater effluent resulted in significant improvements in the water quality of the White River downstream from Indianapolis. These changes in river quality, in turn, have resulted in a shift from

  7. A process for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production from municipal wastewater treatment with biological carbon and nitrogen removal demonstrated at pilot-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Simon; Karlsson, Anton; Alexandersson, Tomas; Quadri, Luca; Hjort, Markus; Johansson, Peter; Morgan-Sagastume, Fernando; Anterrieu, Simon; Arcos-Hernandez, Monica; Karabegovic, Lamija; Magnusson, Per; Werker, Alan

    2017-03-25

    A process was developed for biological treatment of municipal wastewater for carbon and nitrogen removal while producing added-value polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). The process comprised steps for pre-denitrification, nitrification and post-denitrification and included integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) with biofilm carrier media to support nitrification. In a pilot-scale demonstration (500-800L), wastewater treatment performance, in line with European standards, were achieved for total chemical oxygen demand (83% removal) and total nitrogen (80% removal) while producing a biomass that was able to accumulate up to 49% PHA of volatile suspended solids with acetic acid or fermented organic residues as substrates. Robust performance in wastewater treatment and enrichment of PHA-producing biomass was demonstrated under realistic conditions including influent variability during 225days of operation. The IFAS system was found to be advantageous since maintaining nitrification on the biofilm allowed for a relatively low (2days) solids retention time (SRT) for the suspended biomass in the bulk phase. Lower SRT has advantages in higher biomass yield and higher active fraction in the biomass which leads to higher PHA productivity and content. The outcomes show that production of added-value biopolymers may be readily integrated with carbon and nitrogen removal from municipal wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of advanced oxidation processes on the micropollutants and the effluent organic matter contained in municipal wastewater previously treated by three different secondary methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakis, Stefanos; Gamarra Vives, Franco Alejandro; Grandjean, Dominique; Magnet, Anoys; De Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Pulgarin, César

    2015-11-01

    In this study, wastewater from the output of three different secondary treatment facilities (Activated Sludge, Moving Bed Bioreactor and Coagulation-Flocculation) present in the municipal wastewater treatment plant of Vidy, Lausanne (Switzerland), was further treated with various oxidation processes (UV, UV/H2O2, solar irradiation, Fenton, solar photo-Fenton), at laboratory scale. For this assessment, 6 organic micropollutants in agreement with the new environmental legislation requirements in Switzerland were selected (Carbamazepine, Clarithromycin, Diclofenac, Metoprolol, Benzotriazole, Mecoprop) and monitored throughout the treatment. Also, the overall removal of the organic load was assessed. After each secondary treatment, the efficiency of the AOPs increased in the following order: Coagulation-Flocculation < Activated Sludge < Moving Bed Bioreactor, in almost all cases. From the different combinations tested, municipal wastewater subjected to biological treatment followed by UV/H2O2 resulted in the highest elimination levels. Wastewater previously treated by physicochemical treatment demonstrated considerably inhibited micropollutant degradation rates. The degradation kinetics were determined, yielding: k (UV) < k (UV/H2O2) and k (Fenton) < k (solar irradiation) < k (photo-Fenton). Finally, the evolution of global pollution parameters (COD & TOC elimination) was followed and the degradation pathways for the effluent organic matter are discussed.

  9. A comparative evaluation of money-based and energy-based cost-benefit analyses of tertiary municipal wastewater treatment using forested wetlands vs. sand filtration in Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Jae-Young; Day, John W.; Lane, Robert R.; Day, Jason N. [Coastal Ecology Institute, School of the Coast and Environment, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Forested wetlands have been used to provide advanced secondary and tertiary treatment for municipal wastewater for a number of cities in southern Louisiana. Wetland assimilation provides the same services as conventional methods in improving wastewater quality, while having positive impacts on wetlands. Suspended solids and nutrients in wastewater increase net primary productivity (NPP), which leads to increased organic soil formation. This leads to increased elevation that offsets subsidence, a major cause of coastal wetland loss in Louisiana. The City of Breaux Bridge, LA, has discharged secondarily treated municipal wastewater into a forested wetland since 1950, and wetland assimilation was permitted by the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality and the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) in 1997. We compared benefits and costs of utilizing forested wetlands and conventional sand treatment using money-based and energy-based cost-benefit analyses (CBA). The wetland method had a higher benefit-cost ratio than conventional treatment by 6.0 times based on dollar-based CBA, and by 21.7 times from the energy analysis. Methodologically, dollar-based CBA is a market price-based assessment, liming to an anthropocentric framework, while embodied energy analysis accounts for monetary and nonmonetary values such as carbon sequestration by wetlands, which contributes a more complete assessment of the interaction between the natural environment and the human economy. Wetlands treat more wastewater per unit of energy and with less financial cost than conventional methods, because the wetland method utilizes natural energies such as sunlight, wind and rain, while conventional treatment methods depend on imported nonrenewable energies and materials such as chemicals and electricity and require additional capital investment. Increasing application of natural energies is becoming more important with depleting fossil fuels. Further, wastewater addition increases NPP

  10. Widespread occurrence and seasonal variation of pharmaceuticals in surface waters and municipal wastewater treatment plants in central Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm-Lehto, Petra C; Ahkola, Heidi S J; Knuutinen, Juha S; Herve, Sirpa H

    2016-04-01

    The presence of five selected pharmaceuticals, consisting of four anti-inflammatory drugs, diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, and an antiepileptic drug carbamazepine, was determined at four municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and in the receiving waterway in central Finland. The samples were taken from influents and effluents of the WWTPs and from surface water of six locations along the water way, including northern Lake Päijänne. In addition, seasonal variation in the area was determined by comparing the concentrations in the winter and summer. The samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. The concentrations in the influents and effluents ranged from hundreds of nanogram per liter to microgram per liter while ranged from tens of nanogram per liter in northern parts of the waterway to hundreds of nanogram per liter in northern Lake Päijänne near the city area. In addition, the concentrations were higher in the winter compared to summer time in surface water due to decreased temperature and solar irradiation. On the other hand, higher concentrations of ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen were found in summer at the WWTPs, possibly due to seasonal variations in consumption. In conclusion, there are considerable amounts of pharmaceuticals not only in influents and effluents of the WWTPs but also in lake water along the waterway and in northern Lake Päijänne.

  11. Effects of treated municipal wastewater on fluctuation trend of leaf area index and quality of maize (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Sayed Roholla; Galavi, Mohammad; Eskandari, Hamdollah

    2013-01-01

    The effect of primary-treated municipal wastewater (TMWW) on the leaf area index (LAI) and quality of maize (Zea mays) was studied in comparison to the clean irrigation water (control). The experiment was based on a randomized block design with four replicates, and it was conducted in a field experiment in Aligoudarz (Iran). Irrigation was applied with five different methods as treatments: T1: irrigation with clean water during whole growing period (control); T2: 75% clean water and 25% TMWW; T3: 50% clean water and 50% TMWW; T4: 25% clean water and 75% TMWW; T5: irrigation with TMWW during whole growing period. Results showed that irrigation with TMWW had a significant positive impact on all characters compared with the control. Maximum LAI was yielded on the 80th day after emergence in T4. Use of TMWW increased seed oil to 5.85%, which was 29.2% more than that in the control. Maximum values for percentage of protein, total dry matter and phosphorus concentration were obtained in T5. Maximum zinc concentration (15.93 mg kg(-1)) was obtained in T4; it was 8% more than the control. According to the results there was no significant difference in treatment T4 and T5.

  12. Kinetics and microbial ecology of batch sulfidogenic bioreactors for co-treatment of municipal wastewater and acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dongyang; Weidhaas, Jennifer L; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2016-03-15

    The kinetics and microbial ecology in sulfidogenic bioreactors used in a novel two-stage process for co-treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) and municipal wastewater (MWW) were investigated. Michaelis-Menten modeling of COD oxidation by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) (Vmax=0.33mgL(-1)min(-1), Km=4.3mgL(-1)) suggested that the Vmax can be reasonably achieved given the typical COD values in MWW and anticipated mixing with AMD. Non-competitive inhibition modeling (Ki=6.55mgL(-1)) indicated that excessive iron level should be avoided to limit its effects on SRB. The COD oxidation rate was positively correlated to COD/sulfate ratio and SRB population, as evidenced by dsrA gene copies. Phylogenetic analysis revealed diverse microbial communities dominated by sulfate reducing delta-proteobacteria. Microbial community and relative quantities of SRB showed significant differences under different COD/sulfate ratios (0.2, 1 and 2), and the highest dsrA gene concentration and most complex microbial diversity were observed under COD/sulfate ratio 2. Major species were associated with Desulfovirga, Desulfobulbus, Desulfovibrio, and Syntrophus sp. The reported COD kinetics, SRB abundances and the phylogenetic profile provide insights into the co-treatment process and help identify the parameters of concerns for such technology development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of seasonal temperature fluctuations on two different partial nitritation-anammox reactors treating mainstream municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Susanne; Welker, Samuel; Gilbert, Eva M; Horn, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Partial nitritation-anammox (PN-A) has gained increasing interest for municipal wastewater treatment in recent years due to its high energy-saving potential. Moving the PN-A technology from side- to mainstream exhibited a set of challenges. Conditions are quite different, with much lower ammonium concentrations and temperatures. Biomass retention becomes highly important due to the even lower growth rates. This study compared two laboratory-scale reactors, a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR), employing realistic seasonal temperature variations over a 1-year period. The results revealed that both systems had to face decreasing ammonium conversion rates and nitrite accumulation at temperatures lower than 12°C. The SBR did not recover from the loss in anammox activity even when the temperature increased again. The MBBR only showed a short nitrite peak and recovered its initial ammonium turnover when the temperature rose back to >15°C. The SBR had higher biomass specific rates, indicating that suspended sludge is less diffusion-limited but also more susceptible to biomass wash-out. However, the MBBR showed the more stable performance also at low temperatures and managed to recover. Ex situ batch activity tests supported reactor operation data by providing additional insight with respect to specific biomass activities.

  14. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic municipal wastewater treatment process residuals as feedstocks for the recovery of simple sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pascale; Li, Caijian

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the hydrolysis of lignocellulose extracted from municipal wastewater treatment process residuals for the purpose of investigating low-cost feedstocks for ethanol production, while providing an alternative solid waste management strategy. Primary and thickened waste activated sludges and anaerobically digested biosolids underwent various pre-treatments to enhance subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Half of the pre-treated samples were dried and grinded, while the other half were used as is (wet). The wet primary sludge yielded the highest reducing sugar conversions. When wet primary sludge without pre-treatment was hydrolyzed at 40 degrees C and an enzyme loading of 800 U/g substrate, 31.1+/-2.7% was converted to reducing sugars in 24 h. This increased to 54.2+/-4.0% when HCl and KOH pre-treatments were applied. FTIR analyses were used to examine differences in the sludge compositions. These indicated that the cellulose content in the primary sludge was higher than that of the thickened waste activated sludge and biosolids, which was consistent with the higher reducing sugar yields observed in the primary sludge.

  15. Changes in the components and biotoxicity of dissolved organic matter in a municipal wastewater reclamation reverse osmosis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying-Xue; Hu, Hong-Ying; Shi, Chun-Zhen; Yang, Zhe; Tang, Fang

    2016-09-01

    The characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the biotoxicity of these components were investigated in a municipal wastewater reclamation reverse osmosis (mWRRO) system with a microfiltration (MF) pretreatment unit. The MF pretreatment step had little effect on the levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the secondary effluent, but the addition of chlorine before MF promoted the formation of organics with anti-estrogenic activity. The distribution of excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence constituents exhibited obvious discrepancies between the secondary effluent and the reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate. Using size exclusion chromatography, DOM with low molecular weights of approximately 1.2 and 0.98 kDa was newly formed during the mWRRO. The normalized genotoxicity and anti-estrogenic activity of the RO concentrate were 32.1 ± 10.2 μg4-NQO/mgDOC and 0.36 ± 0.08 mgTAM/mgDOC, respectively, and these values were clearly higher than those of the secondary effluent and MF permeate. The florescence volume of Regions I and II in the EEM spectrum could be suggested as a surrogate for assessing the genotoxicity and anti-estrogenic activity of the RO concentrate.

  16. Structure and distribution of inorganic components in the cake layer of a membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lijie; Xia, Siqing; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    A laboratory-scale submerged anoxic-oxic membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater was operated to investigate the structure and distribution of the inorganic cake layer buildup on the membrane. BCR (European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and both map and line scan of energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) were performed for cake layer characterization. BCR results showed that Si, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, and Ba were the predominant inorganic elements in the cake layer, and they occurred mostly as crystal particles. Crystal SiO2 was the dominant inorganic compound while Ca in the form of CaSO4 (dominant) and CaCO3 were also present, but exerted little effect on the cake layer structure because most of these compounds were deposited as precipitates on the reactor bottom. EDX results indicated that Si and Al accumulated together along the cross-sectional cake layer in the form of Si-Al (SiO2-Al2O3) crystal particles.

  17. Economic and environmental sustainability of an AnMBR treating urban wastewater and organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretel, R; Moñino, P; Robles, A; Ruano, M V; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the economic and environmental sustainability of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treating urban wastewater (UWW) and organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) at ambient temperature in mild/hot climates. To this aim, power requirements, energy recovery from methane (biogas methane and methane dissolved in the effluent), consumption of reagents for membrane cleaning, and sludge handling (polyelectrolyte and energy consumption) and disposal (farmland, landfilling and incineration) were evaluated within different operating scenarios. Results showed that, for the operating conditions considered in this study, AnMBR technology is likely to be a net energy producer, resulting in considerable cost savings (up to €0.023 per m(3) of treated water) when treating low-sulphate influent. Life cycle analysis (LCA) results revealed that operating at high sludge retention times (70 days) and treating UWW jointly with OFMSW enhances the overall environmental performance of AnMBR technology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhanced removal performance by the core-shell zeolites/MgFe-layered double hydroxides (LDHs) for municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lu; Zhang, Xiangling; Chen, Qiaozhen; Ruan, Congying; Leng, Yujie

    2016-04-01

    The application of powdered layer double hydroxides (LDHs) in constructed rapid infiltration system (CRIS) appears to be an appreciable problem still unsolved due to the small particle size and the low density. Therefore, the core-shell zeolites/MgFe-LDHs composites were prepared via using co-precipitation method in present study. To investigate the practical applicability, a detailed organics, ammonia, and total phosphorus removal study were carried out in columns to treat the municipal wastewater. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) results confirmed the successful synthesis of core-shell zeolites/MgFe-LDHs through coating on the surface of zeolites. Accordingly, the zeolites/MgFe-LDHs largely reduced the COD by 81.14 %, NH4 (+)-N by 81.50%, and TP by 83.29%. Phosphate adsorption study revealed that the equilibrium adsorption data were better fitted by Langmuir isothermal model, with the maximum adsorption capacity of 79.3651 mg/kg for zeolites/MgFe-LDHs and 38.4615 mg/kg for the natural zeolites. In addition, economic analysis indicated that the reagent cost of synthesis of zeolites/MgFe-LDHs was economical. Herein, the zeolites/MgFe-LDHs solved the natural zeolites problem for poor P removal and the application of powdered LDHs in the solid/liquid separation process, suggesting that it was applicable as potential substrates for the removal of organics, ammonia, and total phosphorus in CRIS.

  19. Anaerobic submerged membrane bioreactor (AnSMBR) for municipal wastewater treatment under mesophilic and psychrophilic temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sosa, David; Helmreich, Brigitte; Netter, Thomas; Paris, Stefania; Bischof, Franz; Horn, Harald

    2011-11-01

    A pilot scale anaerobic submerged membrane bioreactor (AnSMBR) with an external filtration unit for municipal wastewater treatment was operated for 100 days. Besides gas sparging, additional shear was created by circulating sludge to control membrane fouling. During the first 69 days, the reactor was operated under mesophilic temperature conditions. Afterwards, the temperature was gradually reduced to 20 °C. A slow and linear increase in the filtration resistance was observed under critical flux conditions (7 L/(m2 h)) at 35 °C. However, an increase in the fouling rate probably linked to an accumulation of solids, a higher viscosity and soluble COD concentrations in the reactor was observed at 20 °C. The COD removal efficiency was close to 90% under both temperature ranges. Effluent COD and BOD5 concentrations were lower than 80 and 25 mg/L, respectively. Pathogen indicator microorganisms (fecal coliforms bacteria) were reduced by log(10)5. Hence, the effluent could be used for irrigation purposes in agriculture.

  20. A new hybrid treatment system of bioreactors and electrocoagulation for superior removal of organic and nutrient pollutants from municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dinh Duc; Ngo, Huu Hao; Yoon, Yong Soo

    2014-02-01

    This paper evaluated a novel pilot scale hybrid treatment system which combines rotating hanging media bioreactor (RHMBR), submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) along with electrocoagulation (EC) as post treatment to treat organic and nutrient pollutants from municipal wastewater. The results indicated that the highest removal efficiency was achieved at the internal recycling ratio as 400% of the influent flow rate which produced a superior effluent quality with 0.26mgBOD5L(-1), 11.46mgCODCrL(-1), 0.00mgNH4(+)-NL(-1), and 3.81mgT-NL(-1), 0.03mgT-PL(-1). During 16months of operation, NH4(+)-N was completely eliminated and T-P removal efficiency was also up to 100%. It was found that increasing in internal recycling ratio could improve the nitrate and nitrogen removal efficiencies. Moreover, the TSS and coliform bacteria concentration after treatment was less than 5mgL(-1) and 30MPNmL(-1), respectively, regardless of internal recycling ratios and its influent concentration.

  1. Performance evaluation of semi continuous vertical flow constructed wetlands (SC-VF-CWs) for municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Singh, Rajesh

    2017-05-01

    The present study demonstrated the understating of municipal wastewater treatment in five types of CWs operated under semi continuous vertical flow mode. All CWs treatment conditions show the significantly lower pollutants concentrations. The average NH4(+)-N, TN, NO2(-)-N, NO3(-)-N, SO4(2-), and PO4(3-) removal efficiency in the ISs-CWs were 83.60%, 82.43%, 15.61%, 48.93%, 80.45%, and 78.94% respectively. The average NO2(-)-N removal efficiency shows that highest nitrite accumulation occurred in the Cont-CWs followed by C-CWs. The lowest increase in the biomass (127.5%) was observed in the Eichhornia crassipes planted in the ISs-CWs. The ISs filtration barrier created in the constructed wetlands was sufficient enough to remove all the pollutants. Principal components EFA 2D deformation plots show the distribution of the various nitrogenous species in the constructed wetlands along different components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of the electro-coagulation treatment process for the removal of total suspended solids and turbidity from municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Alaadin A

    2008-03-01

    In this work, raw municipal wastewater was electro-coagulated for the removal of total suspended solids (TSS), turbidity, and particulate BOD using stainless steel electrodes. The removal efficiency of TSS and turbidity is shown to depend on the amount of iron generated from the anode of the reactive electro