WorldWideScience

Sample records for full-field flat panel

  1. Design and performance of the prototype full field breast tomosynthesis system with selenium based flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Baorui; Ruth, Chris; Stein, Jay; Smith, Andrew; Shaw, Ian; Jing, Zhenxue

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a breast tomosynthesis system utilizing a selenium-based direct conversion flat panel detector. This prototype system is a modification of Selenia, Hologic"s full field digital mammography system, using an add-on breast holding device to allow 3D tomosynthetic imaging. During a tomosynthesis scan, the breast is held stationary while the x-ray source and detector mounted on a c-arm rotate continuously around the breast over an angular range up to 30 degrees. The x-ray tube is pulsed to acquire 11 projections at desired c-arm angles. Images are reconstructed in planes parallel to the breastplate using a filtered backprojection algorithm. Processing time is typically 1 minute for a 50 mm thick breast at 0.1 mm in-plane pixel size, 1 mm slice-to-slice separation. Clinical studies are in progress. Performance evaluations were carried out at the system and the subsystem levels including spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, spectra optimization, imaging technique, and phantom and patient studies. Experimental results show that we have successfully built a tomosynthesis system with images showing less structure noise and revealing 3D information compared with the conventional mammogram. We introduce, for the first time, the definition of "Depth of Field" for tomosynthesis based on a spatial resolution study. This parameter is used together with Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) to evaluate 3D resolution of a tomosynthesis system as a function of system design, imaging technique, and reconstruction algorithm. Findings from the on-going clinical studies will help the design of the next generation tomosynthesis system offering improved performance.

  2. Flat panel display - Impurity doping technology for flat panel displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshiharu [Advanced Technology Planning, Sumitomo Eaton Nova Corporation, SBS Tower 9F, 10-1, Yoga 4-chome, Setagaya-ku, 158-0097 Tokyo (Japan)]. E-mail: suzuki_tsh@senova.co.jp

    2005-08-01

    Features of the flat panel displays (FPDs) such as liquid crystal display (LCD) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, etc. using low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistors (TFTs) are briefly reviewed comparing with other FPDs. The requirements for fabricating TFTs used for high performance FPDs and system on glass (SoG) are addressed. This paper focuses on the impurity doping technology, which is one of the key technologies together with crystallization by laser annealing, formation of high quality gate insulator and gate-insulator/poly-Si interface. The issues to be solved in impurity doping technology for state of the art and future TFTs are clarified.

  3. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  4. Phosphors for flat panel emissive displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.T.; Walko, R.J.; Phillips, M.L.F.

    1995-07-01

    An overview of emissive display technologies is presented. Display types briefly described include: cathode ray tubes (CRTs), field emission displays (FEDs), electroluminescent displays (ELDs), and plasma display panels (PDPs). The critical role of phosphors in further development of the latter three flat panel emissive display technologies is outlined. The need for stable, efficient red, green, and blue phosphors for RGB fall color displays is emphasized.

  5. Design scenarios for flat panel photobioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slegers, P.M.; Wijffels, R.H.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of the potential of algae production for biofuel and other products at various locations throughout the world requires assessment of algae productivity under varying light conditions and different reactor layouts. A model was developed to predict algae biomass production in flat panel

  6. [Present state and future of flat panel detector in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Yoshiharu

    2002-01-01

    In our country, the introduction of flat panel detector is carried out in the diagnosis region since before several years. In flat panel detector with the high image characteristic, large expectation is being placed. In this paper, image characteristic of flat panel detector and effectiveness of clinical application were reviewed. It is anticipated that flat panel detector with the excellent image characteristic gives large effect in the radiological diagnosis.

  7. Military market for flat panel displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1997-07-01

    This paper addresses the number, function and size of primary military displays and establishes a basis to determine the opportunities for technology insertion in the immediate future and into the next millennium. The military displays market is specified by such parameters as active area and footprint size, and other characteristics such as luminance, gray scale, resolution, color capability and night vision imaging system capability. A select grouping of funded, future acquisitions, planned and predicted cockpit kits, and form-fit-function upgrades are taken into account. It is the intent of this paper to provide an overview of the DoD niche market, allowing both government and industry a timely reference to insure meeting DoD requirements for flat-panel displays on schedule and in a cost-effective manner. The aggregate DoD market for direct view displays is presently estimated to be in excess of 157,000. Helmet/head mounted displays will add substantially to this total. The vanishing vendor syndrome for older display technologies is becoming a growing, pervasive problem throughout DoD, which consequently just leverage the more modern display technologies being developed for civil-commercial markets.

  8. Flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, technology, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajiv; Cheung, Arnold C; Bartling, Soenke H; Lisauskas, Jennifer; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Brady, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) systems have an innovative design that allows coverage of a large volume per rotation, fluoroscopic and dynamic imaging, and high spatial resolution that permits visualization of complex human anatomy such as fine temporal bone structures and trabecular bone architecture. In simple terms, flat-panel volume CT scanners can be thought of as conventional multidetector CT scanners in which the detector rows have been replaced by an area detector. The flat-panel detector has wide z-axis coverage that enables imaging of entire organs in one axial acquisition. Its fluoroscopic and angiographic capabilities are useful for intraoperative and vascular applications. Furthermore, the high-volume coverage and continuous rotation of the detector may enable depiction of dynamic processes such as coronary blood flow and whole-brain perfusion. Other applications in which flat-panel volume CT may play a role include small-animal imaging, nondestructive testing in animal survival surgeries, and tissue-engineering experiments. Such versatility has led some to predict that flat-panel volume CT will gain importance in interventional and intraoperative applications, especially in specialties such as cardiac imaging, interventional neuroradiology, orthopedics, and otolaryngology. However, the contrast resolution of flat-panel volume CT is slightly inferior to that of multidetector CT, a higher radiation dose is needed to achieve a comparable signal-to-noise ratio, and a slower scintillator results in a longer scanning time.

  9. [Flat-panel detectors in X-ray systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, M; Heer, V; Freytag, R

    2003-05-01

    For all application segments X-ray systems with flat-panel detectors increasingly enter the market. In digital radiography,mammography and cardiologic angiography flat-panel detectors are already well established while they are made ready for market introduction in general angiography and fluoroscopy. Two flat-panel detector technologies are available. One technology is based on an indirect conversion process of X-rays while the other one uses a direct conversion method. For radiography and dynamic applications the indirect method provides substantial advantages, while the direct method has some benefits for mammography. In radiography and mammography flat-panel detectors lead to clear improvements with respect to workflow, image quality and dose reduction potentials. These improvements are fostered by the immediate availability of the image, the large dynamic range and the high sensitivity to X-rays. New applications and the use of complex image processing algorithms have the potential to enlarge the present diagnostic range of applications. Up to now, image intensifiers are still the well-established technology for angiography and fluoroscopy. Nevertheless flat-panel detectors begin to enter this field, especially in cardiologic angiography. Characteristics of flat-panel detectors such as the availability of distortion-free images, the excellent contrast resolution, the large dynamic range, the high sensitivity to X-rays and the usability in magnetic fields provide the basis for improved and new diagnostic and interventional methods.

  10. Electroluminescent Polymers and Carbon Nanotubes for Flat Panel Displays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liming Dai; Limin Dong; Mei Gao; Shaoming Huang; Oddvar Johansen; Albert W.H.Mau,Zoran Vasic; Berthold Winkler; Yongyuang Yang

    2000-01-01

    polymeric light-emitting diodes(LEDs) with sufficient brightness. efficiencies, low driving voltages, and various interesting features have been reported. The relatively short device lifetime, however, still remains as a major problem to be solved before any commercial applications will be realized. In this regard,carbon nanotubes have recently been proposed as more robust electron field emitters for flat panel displays. We have synthesised large arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, from which micropatterns of the aligned nanotubes suitable for flat panel displays were fabricated on various substrates. In this paper, we summarise our work on the synthesis and microfabrication of electroluminescent polymers and carbon nanotubes for flat panel displays with reference to other complementary work as appropriate.

  11. Technical advances of interventional fluoroscopy and flat panel image receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul

    2008-11-01

    In the past decade, various radiation reducing devices and control circuits have been implemented on fluoroscopic imaging equipment. Because of the potential for lengthy fluoroscopic procedures in interventional cardiovascular angiography, these devices and control circuits have been developed for the cardiac catheterization laboratories and interventional angiography suites. Additionally, fluoroscopic systems equipped with image intensifiers have benefited from technological advances in x-ray tube, x-ray generator, and spectral shaping filter technologies. The high heat capacity x-ray tube, the medium frequency inverter generator with high performance switching capability, and the patient dose reduction spectral shaping filter had already been implemented on the image intensified fluoroscopy systems. These three underlying technologies together with the automatic dose rate and image quality (ADRIQ) control logic allow patients undergoing cardiovascular angiography procedures to benefit from "lower patient dose" with "high image quality." While photoconductor (or phosphor plate) x-ray detectors and signal capture thin film transistor (TFT) and charge coupled device (CCD) arrays are analog in nature, the advent of the flat panel image receptor allowed for fluoroscopy procedures to become more streamlined. With the analog-to-digital converter built into the data lines, the flat panel image receptor appears to become a digital device. While the transition from image intensified fluoroscopy systems to flat panel image receptor fluoroscopy systems is part of the on-going "digitization of imaging," the value of a flat panel image receptor may have to be evaluated with respect to patient dose, image quality, and clinical application capabilities. The advantage of flat panel image receptors has yet to be fully explored. For instance, the flat panel image receptor has its disadvantages as compared to the image intensifiers; the cost of the equipment is probably the most

  12. Reconstruction of Full-Field Wall Pressure Fluctuations on a Flat Plate in the Wake of a Step Cylinder: Applications of Linear Stochastic Estimation (LSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Di; Chen, Yujia; Wang, Shaofei; Liu, Yingzheng; Wang, Weizhe

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that it is possible to reconstruct the full flow field based on time-resolved measurements at discrete locations using linear stochastic estimation (LSE). The objective of this study is to develop and apply this technique to wall pressure fluctuation measurements in low speed flows. Time-resolved wall pressure fluctuations on a flat plate in the wake of a step cylinder at low speed (V PSP). The microphone arrays are arranged properly to capture the dominant features in the flow field at 10 kHz. The PSP is excited using a continuous UV-LED, and the luminescent signal is recorded by a high-speed camera at 2 kHz. The microphone data at discrete locations are used to reconstruct the full-field wall pressure fluctuations based on LSE. The PSP results serve as basis for improvement of the LSE scheme and also for validation of the reconstructed pressure field. Other data processing techniques including proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) are also used for analyzing the unsteady flow features. This LSE technique has great potential in real-time flow diagnostics and control.

  13. IMac G4/800 (Flat Panel)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Apple introduced the iMac G4/800 on January 7, 2002. The total cost was about $2000 (base price of $1799 plus RAM upgrade). The iMac G4/800 has an 800 MHz G4 processor. The G4/800 has the following ports: three USB 1.1 ports, two Fire Wire 400-Mbps ports, one RJ-45, 10/100BASE-T Ethernet port, one RJ-11 56K V.90 modem port, one Mini-VGA output port, one speaker jack, and one headphone jack. There is a built in microphone set on the front of the monitor in the bottom left corner. There is a single internal SuperDrive capable of reading and writing CDs and DVDs. The disk drive is on the front of the computer. It opens by pushing the disk drive button on the iMac's keyboard. The monitor size is 15 inches. The G4/800 has a NVIDIA GeForce2 MX graphics processor with AGP 2X support that provides 32 MB of dedicated Double Data Rate (DDR) video memory. Native resolution is 1024 x 768, but the built in monitor is also capable of 640 x 480 and 800 x 600. RAM can be changed by removing a panel on the bottom of the chas...

  14. Software Simulates Sight: Flat Panel Mura Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In the increasingly sophisticated world of high-definition flat screen monitors and television screens, image clarity and the elimination of distortion are paramount concerns. As the devices that reproduce images become more and more sophisticated, so do the technologies that verify their accuracy. By simulating the manner in which a human eye perceives and interprets a visual stimulus, NASA scientists have found ways to automatically and accurately test new monitors and displays. The Spatial Standard Observer (SSO) software metric, developed by Dr. Andrew B. Watson at Ames Research Center, measures visibility and defects in screens, displays, and interfaces. In the design of such a software tool, a central challenge is determining which aspects of visual function to include while accuracy and generality are important, relative simplicity of the software module is also a key virtue. Based on data collected in ModelFest, a large cooperative multi-lab project hosted by the Optical Society of America, the SSO simulates a simplified model of human spatial vision, operating on a pair of images that are viewed at a specific viewing distance with pixels having a known relation to luminance. The SSO measures the visibility of foveal spatial patterns, or the discriminability of two patterns, by incorporating only a few essential components of vision. These components include local contrast transformation, a contrast sensitivity function, local masking, and local pooling. By this construction, the SSO provides output in units of "just noticeable differences" (JND) a unit of measure based on the assumed smallest difference of sensory input detectable by a human being. Herein is the truly amazing ability of the SSO, while conventional methods can manipulate images, the SSO models human perception. This set of equations actually defines a mathematical way of working with an image that accurately reflects the way in which the human eye and mind behold a stimulus. The SSO is

  15. Flat Panel Space Based Space Surveillance Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, R.; Duncan, A.; Wilm, J.; Thurman, S. T.; Stubbs, D. M.; Ogden, C.

    2013-09-01

    limited telescope is, therefore, replaced by in-process integration and test as part of the PIC fabrication that substantially reduces associated schedule and cost. The low profile and low SWaP of a SPIDER system enables high resolution imaging with a payload that is similar in size and aspect ratio to a solar panel. This allows high resolution low cost options for space based space surveillance telescopes. The low SWaP design enables hosted payloads, cubesat designs as well as traditional bus options that are lower cost. We present a description of the concept and preliminary simulation and experimental data that demonstrate the imaging capabilities of the SPIDER technique.

  16. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection.

  17. Plasma technology and its use in flat panel digital radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Plasma DR technology is used to produce a cost effective flat panel x-ray detector that acquires digital x-ray images with excellent diagnostic quality. The detector is radiation hard and permanently zero defect, with a full virtual pixel matrix that has no dead lines, pixels, or dead pixel clusters. The technology also allows the full potential of large area amorphous Selenium imaging to finally be realized (see Figure 4).

  18. Unfolding X-ray spectra using a flat panel detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Sergio; Juste, Belén; Pozuelo, Fausto; Ródenas, José; Querol, Andrea; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to measure the energy spectrum of X-ray tubes due to the pile up effect produced by the high fluence of photons. Using attenuating materials, appropriate detector devices and the Monte Carlo method, primary X-ray spectrum of these devices can be estimated. In this work, a flat panel detector with a PMMA wedge has been used to obtain a dose curve corresponding to certain working conditions of a radiodiagnostic X-ray tube. The relation between the dose curve recorded by the flat panel and the primary X-ray spectrum is defined by a response function. Normally this function can be approximated by a matrix, which can be obtained by means of the Monte Carlo method. Knowing the measured dose curve and the response matrix, the primary X-ray spectrum can be unfolded. However, there are some problems that strongly affect the applicability of this method: i.e. technical features of the flat panel and inherent characteristics of the involved radiation physics (ill-posed problem). Both aspects are analyzed in this work, concluding that the proposed method can be applied with an acceptable accuracy for spectra without characteristic lines, for instance, tungsten anode in the 50-70 kVp range.

  19. Reconstruction of Spectra Using X-ray Flat Panel Detector; Reconstruccion de Espectros de Rayos X Utilizando un Detector Flat Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Pozuelo, F.; Juste, B.; Rodenas, J.; Verdu, G.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, we used a flat panel detector with a wedge of PMMA for absorbed dose curve for given working conditions of X-ray tube The relationship between absorbed dose curve recorded by the flat panel and primary X-ray spectrum is defined by a response function that can be obtained using the Monte Carlo method, namely the MCNP5 code. However there are some problems that affect the applicability of this method such as: flat panel characteristics and the characteristics of the physical process (ill-conditioned problem). Both aspects are discussed in this paper.

  20. [Clinical study with angiography system using a flat panel detecter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichida, Takao; Okusako, Kenji; Yokoyama, Kouji; Shougaki, Masachika; Ogawa, Takayoshi; Kawahata, Hideki; Nasu, Takehisa; Hosogai, Minoru; Okuyama, Kazuo; Hatagawa, Masakatsu

    2004-08-01

    We have been using an X-ray angiography system that incorporates a flat panel detector (FPD) since December 2001. This system is equipped with the scintillator-type FPD PaxScan 4030A from Varian Medical Systems, and for objective comparison of the image intensifier (I.I.) and FPD, the system is constructed so that these detectors can be used alternatively. Using this system and other X-ray angiography systems, visual studies have been conducted on the digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images acquired by FPD and I.I. We have found from the clinical images that the FPD is superior to the I.I. in depiction of fine blood vessels as well as of physical characteristics. Fluoroscopy images acquired by the FPD were not entirely satisfactory, however the improvement made in its performance now permits equal use of the FPD and I.I. systems.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Thin Film Transistors for Flat Panel Display Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xuelei; Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising materials for both high performance transistors for high speed computing and thin film transistors for macroelectronics, which can provide more functions at low cost. Among macroelectronics applications, carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFT) are expected to be used soon for backplanes in flat panel displays (FPDs) due to their superior performance. In this paper, we review the challenges of CNT-TFT technology for FPD applications. The device performance of state-of-the-art CNT-TFTs are compared with the requirements of TFTs for FPDs. Compatibility of the fabrication processes of CNT-TFTs and current TFT technologies are critically examined. Though CNT-TFT technology is not yet ready for backplane production line of FPDs, the challenges can be overcome by close collaboration between research institutes and FPD manufacturers in the short term.

  2. Optimized anti-scatter grids for flat panel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendl, Markus

    2007-03-01

    Anti-scatter grids are well established in the field of X-ray projection imaging. In general these grids consist of a large number of parallel lead lamellae separated by X-ray-transparent material. This regular structure defines the characteristic grid frequency. Modern X-ray imaging systems apply digital receptors, i.e. image intensifiers coupled to a CCD camera or solid state flat-panel detector. Combining a digital detector and an anti-scatter grid may lead to Moire artifacts. This results from sampling an analog X-ray image with signal components higher than half the sampling frequency. Especially in high dose DSA images (Digital Subtraction Angiography) these irritating artifacts may be visible to the user. In this paper we present a concept for minimizing these grid artifacts: Signal propagation in the detector is modeled by three steps, scintillator MTF, aperture MTF, and sampling. Since the scintillator MTF is irrelevant for the grid optimization process, we focus on aperture MTF and sampling. From the given geometry of the detector elements the corresponding 2D Fourier transform is calculated. An evaluation for typical grid frequencies, i.e. arcs around the origin of the 2D Fourier transform, results in profiles exhibiting pronounced minima. From the respective angle values for these minima, grid orientation can be optimized for minimum Moire disturbances. Simulation results for typical detector pixel geometries and for grid frequencies used in practice are validated by measurement for two different anti-scatter grids on a Siemens angiographic system with a digital flat-panel detector.

  3. Development of a flat-panel X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Edwin Joseph

    A novel flat-panel transmission type X-ray source was developed for both medical and industrial use. Depending on the geometry of the given situation, the flat-panel X-ray source could be used in tomography, radiography or tomosynthesis. Furthermore, the unit could be used as a portable X-ray scanner or an integral part of an existing detection system. The design incorporates a field emission cathode made of ultra-nanocrystalline diamonds (UNCD) doped with nitrogen. These field emitters show good electron output at low power and can be deposited over large areas as is the case with carbon nanotube "forest" (CNT) cathodes. This work presents the first generation of the UNCD based FEA prototype which was manufactured at the Center of Nanoscale Material, within Argonne National Laboratory, with standard microfabrication techniques. The prototype is a 3 x 3 pixel field emission array (FEA), with a pixel size of 225 mum by 225 mum and a pitch of 500 mum. The fabricated cathode was developed using a microfabrication process which allows for individual electrically addressable UNCD gated arrays on-chip which demonstrated monolithic integration of the electron extraction grid. The transmission target consists of tungsten for X-ray generation, which is sputtered directly upon a thin aluminum sheet as an X-ray filter. A low voltage power supply allows for electron extraction between the cathode and the grid; while a high voltage power supply accelerates the electrons towards the anode. A low energy X-ray high purity germanium detector (HPGe) is mounted outside of the vacuum chamber for X-ray detection and measurement.

  4. Solid-state flat panel imager with avalanche amorphous selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Howansky, Adrian; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Levéille, Sébastien; Tanioka, K.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI) have become the dominant detector technology for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. For low dose imaging, electronic noise from the amorphous silicon thin film transistor (TFT) array degrades imaging performance. We have fabricated the first prototype solid-state AMFPI using a uniform layer of avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor to amplify the signal to eliminate the effect of electronic noise. We have previously developed a large area solid-state avalanche a-Se sensor structure referred to as High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) capable of achieving gains of 75. In this work we successfully deposited this HARP structure onto a 24 x 30 cm2 TFT array with a pixel pitch of 85 μm. An electric field (ESe) up to 105 Vμm-1 was applied across the a-Se layer without breakdown. Using the HARP layer as a direct detector, an X-ray avalanche gain of 15 +/- 3 was achieved at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. In indirect mode with a 150 μm thick structured CsI scintillator, an optical gain of 76 +/- 5 was measured at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. Image quality at low dose increases with the avalanche gain until the electronic noise is overcome at a constant exposure level of 0.76 mR. We demonstrate the success of a solid-state HARP X-ray imager as well as the largest active area HARP sensor to date.

  5. Amorphous selenium flat panel detectors for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Hunt, D. C.; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Rowlands, J. A.

    2005-09-01

    Different technologies for making X-ray sensitive active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPI) are reviewed for applications in digital radiography and fluoroscopy. Aspects of imaging performance requiring improvement are identified and potential new detector concepts addressing these issues are briefly described. The rationale is given for the investigation of a new detector concept—an indirect conversion FPI with avalanche gain—for low-dose X-ray imaging. This detector consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor optically coupled to a structured cesium iodide (CsI) scintillator. Under an electric field ESe, the a-Se is sensitive to light and converts the optical photons emitted from CsI into electronic signal that can be stored and read out in the same fashion as in existing AMFPI. When ESe is increased to >90 V/μm, avalanche multiplication occurs. The avalanche gain ranges between 1-800 depending on ESe and the thickness of the a-Se layer. The avalanche a-Se photoconductor is referred to as High-gain Avalanche Rushing amorphous Photoconductor. The feasibility of two detector configurations based on avalanche gain, each using a different image readout method, are under investigation. Their advantages are compared to other AMPFI technologies for digital radiography and fluoroscopy.

  6. Light sharing in multi-flat-panel-PMT PEM detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Mayhugh, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Large are a detectors, such as those used in positron emission mammography (PEM) and scintimammography, utilize arrays of discrete semtillator elements mounted on arrays of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT). Scintillator elements can be packed very densely (minimizing area between elements), allowing good detection sensitivity and spatial resolution. And, while new flat panel PSPMTS have minimal inactive edges, when they are placed in arrays significant dead spaces where scintillation light is undetectable are created. To address this problem, a light guide is often placed between the detector and PSPMT array to spread scintillation light so that these gaps can be bridged. In this investigation we studied the effect of light guides of various thickness on system performance. A 10x10 element array of LYSO detector elements was coupled to the center of a 2x2 array of PSPMTs through varying thicknesses (1 to 4 mm) of UV glass. The spot size of the imaged elements and distortions in the regular square pattern of the imaged scintillator arrays were evaluated. Energy resolution was measured by placing single elements of LYSO at several locations of the PSPMT array. Spatial distortions in the images of the array were reduced by using thicker light guides (3-4 mm). Use of thicker light guides, however, resulted in reduced pixel resolution and slight degradation of energy resolution. Therefore, some loss of pixel and energy resolution will accompany the use of thick light guides (minimum of 3 mm) required for optimum identification of detector elements.

  7. Cryogenic flat-panel gas-gap heat switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanapalli, S.; Keijzer, R.; Buitelaar, P.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    A compact additive manufactured flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at cryogenic temperature is reported in this paper. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus has been developed to measure the thermal conductance of the heat switch with the heat sink temperature in the range of 100-180 K. The apparatus is cooled by a two-stage GM cooler and the temperature is controlled with a heater and a braided copper wire connection. A thermal guard is mounted on the hot side of the device to confine the heat flow axially through the sample. A gas handling system allows testing the device with different gas pressures in the heat switch. Experiments are performed at various heat sink temperatures, by varying gas pressure in the gas-gap and with helium, hydrogen and nitrogen gas. The measured off-conductance with a heat sink temperature of 115 K and the hot plate at 120 K is 0.134 W/K, the on-conductance with helium and hydrogen gases at the same temperatures is 4.80 W/K and 4.71 W/K, respectively. This results in an on/off conductance ratio of 37 ± 7 and 35 ± 6 for helium and hydrogen respectively. The experimental results matches fairly well with the predicted heat conductance at cryogenic temperatures.

  8. Focal spot measurements using a digital flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Panse, A.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Focal spot size is one of the crucial factors that affect the image quality of any x-ray imaging system. It is, therefore, important to measure the focal spot size accurately. In the past, pinhole and slit measurements of x-ray focal spots were obtained using direct exposure film. At present, digital detectors are replacing film in medical imaging so that, although focal spot measurements can be made quickly with such detectors, one must be careful to account for the generally poorer spatial resolution of the detector and the limited usable magnification. For this study, the focal spots of a diagnostic x-ray tube were measured with a 10-μm pinhole using a 194-μm pixel flat panel detector (FPD). The twodimensional MTF, measured with the Noise Response (NR) Method was used for the correction for the detector blurring. The resulting focal spot sizes based on the FWTM (Full Width at Tenth Maxima) were compared with those obtained with a very high resolution detector with 8-μm pixels. This study demonstrates the possible effect of detector blurring on the focal spot size measurements with digital detectors with poor resolution and the improvement obtained by deconvolution. Additionally, using the NR method for measuring the two-dimensional MTF, any non-isotropies in detector resolution can be accurately corrected for, enabling routine measurement of non-isotropic x-ray focal spots. This work presents a simple, accurate and quick quality assurance procedure for measurements of both digital detector properties and x-ray focal spot size and distribution in modern x-ray imaging systems.

  9. Performance comparison of flat static and adjustable angle solar panels for sunny weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Yaw Long; Yong, Yoon Kuang

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays solar panels are commonly used to collect sunlight so that it could convert solar energy into electrical energy. The power generated by the solar panels depends on the amount of sunlight collected on the solar panels. This paper presents a study that was carried out to study how changing the angle of the solar panels will impact the amount of electrical energy collected after conversion and the efficiencies of the solar panels. In this paper, the solar panels were placed at 30°, 35° and 40° angles throughout different days. The energy collected is then compared with energy collected by a flat static solar panel. It turns out that the solar panels with 40° angle performed best among the other angle solar panels.

  10. Image quality vs. radiation dose for a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijer, H; Beckman, K W; Andersson, T; Persliden, J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the image quality for a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector at various radiation dose settings and to compare the results with storage phosphor plates and a screen-film system. A CDRAD 2.0 contrast-detail phantom was imaged with a flat-panel detector (Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven, The Netherlands) at three different dose levels with settings for intravenous urography. The same phantom was imaged with storage phosphor plates at a simulated system speed of 200 and a screen-film system with a system speed of 160. Entrance surface doses were recorded for all images. At each setting, three images were read by four independent observers. The flat-panel detector had equal image quality at less than half the radiation dose compared with storage phosphor plates. The difference was even larger when compared with film with the flat-panel detector having equal image quality at approximately one-fifth the dose. The flat-panel detector has a very favourable combination of image quality vs radiation dose compared with storage phosphor plates and screen film.

  11. Image quality vs radiation dose for a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geijer, H.; Andersson, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Oerebro Medical Centre Hospital (Sweden); Beckman, K.W.; Persliden, J. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Oerebro Medical Centre Hospital (Sweden)

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the image quality for a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector at various radiation dose settings and to compare the results with storage phosphor plates and a screen-film system. A CDRAD 2.0 contrast-detail phantom was imaged with a flat-panel detector (Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven, The Netherlands) at three different dose levels with settings for intravenous urography. The same phantom was imaged with storage phosphor plates at a simulated system speed of 200 and a screen-film system with a system speed of 160. Entrance surface doses were recorded for all images. At each setting, three images were read by four independent observers. The flat-panel detector had equal image quality at less than half the radiation dose compared with storage phosphor plates. The difference was even larger when compared with film with the flat-panel detector having equal image quality at approximately one-fifth the dose. The flat-panel detector has a very favourable combination of image quality vs radiation dose compared with storage phosphor plates and screen film. (orig.)

  12. Recommendations for the performance rating of flat plate terrestrial photovoltaic solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treble, F. C.

    1976-01-01

    A review of recommendations for standardizing the performance rating of flat plate terrestrial solar panels is given to develop an international standard code of practice for performance rating. Required data to characterize the performance of a solar panel are listed. Other items discussed are: (1) basic measurement procedures; (2) performance measurement in natural sunlight and simulated sunlight; (3) standard solar cells; (4) the normal incidence method; (5) global method and (6) definition of peak power.

  13. Effect of Boundary Conditions on the Back Face Deformations of Flat UHMWPE Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Zhang [2] carried out a numerical study of the effects of clamping type and clamping pressure on the ballistic performance of woven Kevlar , and found...effects of composite size were also studied. Singletary [5] studied the effects of boundary conditions and panel sizes on V50 for Kevlar KM2 fabric. The...on the BFD in flat UHMWPE panels. UHMWPE possesses high tenacity and high strength compared to Kevlar , as a result of which it is the material of

  14. High-bandwidth remote flat panel display interconnect system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Darrel G.

    1999-08-01

    High performance electronic displays (CRT, AMLCD, TFEL, plasma, etc.) require wide bandwidth electrical drive signals to produce the desired display images. When the image generation and/or image processing circuitry is located within the same line replaceable unit (LRU) as the display media, the transmission of the display drive signals to the display media presents no unusual design problems. However, many aircraft cockpits are severely constrained for available space behind the instrument panel. This often forces the system designer to specify that only the display media and its immediate support circuitry are to be mounted in the instrument panel. A wide bandwidth interconnect system is then required to transfer image data from the display generation circuitry to the display unit. Image data transfer rates of nearly 1.5 Gbits/second may be required when displaying full motion video at a 60 Hz field rate. In addition to wide bandwidth, this interconnect system must exhibit several additional key characteristics: (1) Lossless transmission of image data; (2) High reliability and high integrity; (3) Ease of installation and field maintenance; (4) High immunity to HIRF and electrical noise; (5) Low EMI emissions; (6) Long term supportability; and (7) Low acquisition and maintenance cost. Rockwell Collins has developed an avionics grade remote display interconnect system based on the American National Standards Institute Fibre Channel standard which meets these requirements. Readily available low cost commercial off the shelf (COTS) components are utilized, and qualification tests have confirmed system performance.

  15. Beam-Steerable Flat-Panel Reflector Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choon Sae; Lee, Chanam; Miranda, Felix A.

    2005-01-01

    Many space applications require a high-gain antenna that can be easily deployable in space. Currently, the most common high-gain antenna for space-born applications is an umbrella-type reflector antenna that can be folded while being lifted to the Earth orbit. There have been a number of issues to be resolved for this type of antenna. The reflecting surface of a fine wire mesh has to be light in weight and flexible while opening up once in orbit. Also the mesh must be a good conductor at the operating frequency. In this paper, we propose a different type of high-gain antenna for easy space deployment. The proposed antenna is similar to reflector antennas except the curved main reflector is replaced by a flat reconfigurable surface for easy packing and deployment in space. Moreover it is possible to steer the beam without moving the entire antenna system.

  16. Volumetry of human molars with flat panel-based volume CT in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannig, C.; Krieger, E.; Dullin, C.; Merten, H.A.; Attin, T.; Grabbe, E.; Heidrich, G.

    2006-01-01

    The flat panel-based volume computed tomography (fpVCT) is a new CT device applicable for experimental, three-dimensional evaluation of teeth at a resolution of about 150 microm in the high contrast region. The aim of this study was to investigate whether fpVCT was suitable for quantification of the

  17. Photodiode forward bias to reduce temporal effects in a-Si based flat panel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollov, Ivan; Tognina, Carlo; Colbeth, Richard

    2008-03-01

    Lag and sensitivity modulation are well known temporal artifacts of a-Si photodiode based flat panel detectors. Both effects are caused by charge carriers being trapped in the semiconductor. Trapping and releasing of these carriers is a statistical process with time constants much longer than the frame time of flat panel detectors. One way to reduce these temporal artifacts is to keep the traps filled by applying a pulse of light over the entire detector area every frame before the x-ray exposure. This paper describes an alternative method, forward biasing the a-Si photodiodes and supplying free carriers to fill the traps. The array photodiodes are forward biased and then reversed biased again every frame between the panel readout and x-ray exposure. The method requires no change to the mechanical construction of the detector, only minor modifications of the detector electronics and no image post processing. An existing flat panel detector was modified and evaluated for lag and sensitivity modulation. The required changes of the panel configuration, readout scheme and readout timing are presented in this paper. The results of applying the new technique are presented and compared to the standard mode of operation. The improvements are better than an order of magnitude for both sensitivity modulation and lag; lowering their values to levels comparable to the scintillator afterglow. To differentiate the contribution of the a-Si array, from that of the scintillator, a large area light source was used. Possible implementations and applications of the method are discussed.

  18. Full dynamic resolution low lower DA-Converters for flat panel displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Saas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that stepwise charging can reduce the power dissipated in the source drivers of a flat panel display. However the solution presented only provided a dynamic resolution of 3 bits which is not sufficient for obtaining a full color resolution display. In this work a further development of the basic idea is presented. The stepwise charging is increased to 4 bits and supplemented by a current source to provide an output signal which represents an 8 bit value with sufficient accuracy. Within this work the application is an AM-OLED flat panel display, but the concept can easily be applied to other display technologies like TFT-LCD as well.

  19. Characterization and application of a GE amorphous silicon flat panel detector in a synchrotron light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.H. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States)], E-mail: jlee@aps.anl.gov; Almer, J. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Aydiner, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Bernier, J.; Chapman, K.; Chupas, P.; Haeffner, D. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Kump, K. [GE Healthcare (United States); Lee, P.L.; Lienert, U.; Miceli, A. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Vera, G. [GE Healthcare (United States)

    2007-11-11

    Characterization, in the language of synchrotron radiation, was performed on a GE Revolution 41RT flat panel detector using the X-ray light source at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The detector has an active area of 41x41 cm{sup 2} with 200x200 {mu}m{sup 2} pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured in terms of line spread function (LSF) using a 25 {mu}mx1 cm tungsten slit. Memory effects of the detector elements, called lag, were also measured. The large area and fast data capturing rate -8 fps in unbinned mode, 30 fps in binned or region of interest (ROI) mode-make the GE flat panel detector a unique and very versatile detector for synchrotron experiments. In particular, we present data from pair distribution function (PDF) measurements to demonstrate the special features of this detector.

  20. Qualification test results for DOE solar photovoltaic flat panel procurement - PRDA 38

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Twelve types of prototypes modules for the DOE Photovoltaic Flat Panel Procurement (PRDA 38) were subjected to qualification tests at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory according to a new specification. Environmental exposures were carried out separately and included temperature cycling, humidity, wind simulation, and hail. The most serious problems discovered were reduced insulation resistance to ground and ground continuity of the metal frames, electrical degradation, erratic power readings, and delamination. The electrical and physical characteristics of the newly received modules are also given.

  1. Study of DQE dependence with beam quality on GE essential mammography flat panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mollá, Rafael; Linares, Rafael; Ayala, Rafael

    2010-11-25

    This paper deals with the analysis of the behavior of objective image quality parameters for the new GE Senographe Essential FFDM system, in particular its dependence with beam quality. The detector consists of an indirect conversion a-Si flat panel coupled to a CsI:Tl scintillator. The system under study has gone through a series of relevant modifications in flat panel with respect to the previous model (GE Senographe DS 2000). These changes in the detector modify its performance and are intended to favor advanced applications like tomosynthesis, which uses harder beam spectra and lower doses per exposure than conventional FFDM. Although our system does not have tomosynthesis implemented, we noticed that most clinical explorations were performed by automatically selecting a harder spectrum than that of typical use in FFDM (Rh/Rh 28-30 kV instead of Mo/Mo 28 kV). Since flat-panel optimization for tomosynthesis influences the usual FFDM clinical performance, the new detector behavior needed to be investigated. Therefore, the aim of our study is evaluating the dependence of the detector performance for different beam spectra and exposure levels. In this way, we covered the clinical beam quality range (Rh/Rh 28-30 kV) and we extended the study to even harder spectra (Rh/Rh 34 kV). Detector performance is quantified by means of modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). We found that flat-panel optimization results in slightly - but statistically significant - higher DQE values as beam quality increases, which is contrary to the expected behavior. This positive correlation between beam quality and DQE is also diametrically opposite to that of the previous model by the same manufacturer. As a direct consequence, usual FFDM takes advantage of the changes in the detector, as less exposure is needed to achieve the same DQE if harder beams are used.

  2. Comparison of ring artifact removal methods using flat panel detector based CT images

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Ring artifacts are the concentric rings superimposed on the tomographic images often caused by the defective and insufficient calibrated detector elements as well as by the damaged scintillator crystals of the flat panel detector. It may be also generated by objects attenuating X-rays very differently in different projection direction. Ring artifact reduction techniques so far reported in the literature can be broadly classified into two groups. One category of the approac...

  3. Competing Technologies and Industry Evolution: The Benefits of Making Mistakes in the Flat Panel Display Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Eggers, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Managers at firms facing uncertain competing technologies evolving concurrently face a complex decision set, including options to invest in one technology or other, both technologies, or to wait to invest. This study investigates the role that experience, learning and timing play in affecting the firm-level pros and cons of each of these four strategies in a technological competition situation. Using a unique data set on the evolution of the global flat panel display industry, this study offe...

  4. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-03-13

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III-V or II-VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X-Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs.

  5. Attenuated phase-shift mask (PSM) blanks for flat panel display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Kagehiro; Mochizuki, Satoru; Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    The fine pattern exposure techniques are required for Flat Panel display applications as smart phone, tablet PC recently. The attenuated phase shift masks (PSM) are being used for ArF and KrF photomask lithography technique for high end pattern Semiconductor applications. We developed CrOx based large size PSM blanks that has good uniformity on optical characteristics for FPD applications. We report the basic optical characteristics and uniformity, stability data of large sized CrOx PSM blanks.

  6. High-performance flat-panel solar thermoelectric generators with high thermal concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Daniel; Poudel, Bed; Feng, Hsien-Ping; Caylor, J Christopher; Yu, Bo; Yan, Xiao; Ma, Yi; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Dezhi; Muto, Andrew; McEnaney, Kenneth; Chiesa, Matteo; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang

    2011-05-01

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity has been dominated by photovoltaic and solar thermal power generation. Photovoltaic cells are deployed widely, mostly as flat panels, whereas solar thermal electricity generation relying on optical concentrators and mechanical heat engines is only seen in large-scale power plants. Here we demonstrate a promising flat-panel solar thermal to electric power conversion technology based on the Seebeck effect and high thermal concentration, thus enabling wider applications. The developed solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) achieved a peak efficiency of 4.6% under AM1.5G (1 kW m(-2)) conditions. The efficiency is 7-8 times higher than the previously reported best value for a flat-panel STEG, and is enabled by the use of high-performance nanostructured thermoelectric materials and spectrally-selective solar absorbers in an innovative design that exploits high thermal concentration in an evacuated environment. Our work opens up a promising new approach which has the potential to achieve cost-effective conversion of solar energy into electricity.

  7. Rotational flat-panel computed tomography in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerfler, A.; Struffert, T.; Engelhorn, T.; Richter, C. [Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Originally aimed at improving standard radiography by providing higher absorption efficiency and a wider dynamic range than available with X-ray film or film-screen combinations, flat-panel detector technology has become widely accepted for neuroangiographic imaging. In particular flat-panel detector computed tomography (FD-CT) which uses rotational C-arm-mounted flat-panel detector technology is capable of volumetric imaging with high spatial resolution. As ''Angiographic CT'' FD-CT may be helpful during many diagnostic and neurointerventional procedures, i.e. intracranial stenting for cerebrovascular stenoses, stent-assisted coil embolization of wide-necked cerebral aneurysms and embolizations of arteriovenous malformations. By providing morphologic, CT-like images of the brain within the angio suite, FD-CT is able to rapidly visualize periprocedural hemorrhage and may thus improve rapid complication management without the need for patient transfer. In addition, myelography and postmyelographic FD-CT imaging can be carried out using a single machine. Spinal interventions, such as kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty might also benefit from FD-CT. This paper briefly reviews the technical principles of FD technology and then focuses on possible applications in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of image quality and dose on a flat-panel CT-scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasruck, M.; Suess, Ch.; Stierstorfer, K.; Popescu, S.; Flohr, T.

    2005-04-01

    We developed and evaluated a prototype flat-panel detector based Volume CT (VCT) scanner. We focused on improving the image quality using different detector settings and reducing x-ray scatter intensities. For the presented results we used a Varian 4030CB flat-panel detector mounted in a multislice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Systems). The scatter intensities may severely impair image quality in flat-panel detector CT systems. To reduce the impact of scatter we tested bowtie shaped filters, anti-scatter grids and post-processing correction algorithms. We evaluated the improvement of image quality by each method and also by a combination of the several methods. To achieve an extended dynamic range in the projection data, we implemented a novel dynamic gain-switching mode. The read out charge amplifier feedback capacitance is changing dynamically in this mode, depending on the signal level. For this scan mode dedicated corrections in the offset and gain calibration are required. We compared image quality in terms of low contrast for both, the dynamic mode and the standard fixed gain mode. VCT scanners require different types of dose parameters. We measured the dose in a 16 cm CTDI phantom and free air in the scanners iso-center and defined a new metric for a VCT dose index (VCTDI). The dose for a high quality VCT scan of this prototype scanner varied between 15 and 40 mGy.

  9. Resolution requirements for monitor viewing of digital flat-panel detector radiographs: a contrast detail analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peer, Siegfried; Giacomuzzi, Salvatore M.; Peer, Regina; Gassner, Eva; Steingruber, Iris; Jaschke, Werner [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2003-02-01

    With the introduction of digital flat-panel detector systems into clinical practice, the still unresolved question of resolution requirements for picture archiving communication system (PACS) workstation monitors has gained new momentum. This contrast detail analysis was thus performed to define the differences in observer performance in the detection of small low-contrast objects on clinical 1K and 2K monitor workstations. Images of the CDRAD 2.0 phantom were acquired at varying exposures on an indirect-type digital flat-panel detector. Three observers evaluated a total of 15 images each with respect to the threshold contrast for each detail size. The numbers of correctly identified objects were determined for all image subsets. No significant difference in the correct detection ratio was detected among the observers; however, the difference between the two types of workstations (1K vs 2K monitors) despite less than 3% was significant at a 95% confidence level. Slight but statistically significant differences exist in the detection of low-contrast nodular details visualized on 1K- and 2K-monitor workstations. Further work is needed to see if this result holds true also for comparison of clinical flat-panel detector images and may, for example, exert an influence on the diagnostic accuracy of chest X-ray readings. (orig.)

  10. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain: fundamental feasibility investigation for SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Reznik, Alla; Lui, B J M; Hunt, D C; Rowlands, J A; Ohkawa, Yuji; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2005-09-01

    An indirect flat-panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI(Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The final electronic image is read out using an active matrix array of thin film transistors (TFT). We call the proposed detector SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager). The advantage of the SHARP-AMFPI is its programmable gain, which can be turned on during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise, and turned off during high dose radiography to avoid pixel saturation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the important design considerations for SHARP-AMFPI such as avalanche gain, which depends on both the thickness d(Se) and the applied electric field E(Se) of the HARP layer. To determine the optimal design parameter and operational conditions for HARP, we measured the E(Se) dependence of both avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency of an 8 microm HARP layer. The results were used in a physical model of HARP as well as a linear cascaded model of the FPI to determine the following x-ray imaging properties in both the avalanche and nonavalanche modes as a function of E(Se): (1) total gain (which is the product of avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency); (2) linearity; (3) dynamic range; (4) gain nonuniformity resulting from thickness nonuniformity; and (5) effects of direct x-ray interaction in HARP. Our results showed that a HARP layer thickness of 8 microm can provide adequate avalanche gain and sufficient dynamic range for x-ray imaging applications to permit quantum limited operation over the range of exposures needed for radiography and fluoroscopy.

  11. Designing, Modeling, Constructing, and Testing a Flat Panel Speaker and Sound Diffuser for a Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design, model, build, and test a flat panel speaker and frame for a spherical dome structure being made into a simulator. The simulator will be a test bed for evaluating an immersive environment for human interfaces. This project focused on the loud speakers and a sound diffuser for the dome. The rest of the team worked on an Ambisonics 3D sound system, video projection system, and multi-direction treadmill to create the most realistic scene possible. The main programs utilized in this project, were Pro-E and COMSOL. Pro-E was used for creating detailed figures for the fabrication of a frame that held a flat panel loud speaker. The loud speaker was made from a thin sheet of Plexiglas and 4 acoustic exciters. COMSOL, a multiphysics finite analysis simulator, was used to model and evaluate all stages of the loud speaker, frame, and sound diffuser. Acoustical testing measurements were utilized to create polar plots from the working prototype which were then compared to the COMSOL simulations to select the optimal design for the dome. The final goal of the project was to install the flat panel loud speaker design in addition to a sound diffuser on to the wall of the dome. After running tests in COMSOL on various speaker configurations, including a warped Plexiglas version, the optimal speaker design included a flat piece of Plexiglas with a rounded frame to match the curvature of the dome. Eight of these loud speakers will be mounted into an inch and a half of high performance acoustic insulation, or Thinsulate, that will cover the inside of the dome. The following technical paper discusses these projects and explains the engineering processes used, knowledge gained, and the projected future goals of this project

  12. SAPHIRE: A New Flat-Panel Digital Mammography Detector With Avalanche Photoconductor and High-Resolution Field Emitter Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0554 TITLE: SAPHIRE : A New Flat-Panel Digital... SAPHIRE : A New Flat-Panel Digital Mammography Detector with Avalanche Photoconductor and High-Resolution Field Emitter Readout 5b. GRANT NUMBER w81xwh-04...CsI), and form a charge image that is read out by a high-resolution field emitter array (FEA). We call the proposed detector SAPHIRE (Scintillator

  13. Image performance of a new amorphous selenium flat panel x-ray detector designed for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, L. K.; Jing, Z.; Bogdanovich, S.; Golden, K.; Robinson, S.; Beliaevskaia, E.; Parikh, S.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to report the performance of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) based flat-panel x-ray imager under development for application in digital breast tomosynthesis. This detector is designed to perform both in the conventional Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) mode and the tomosynthesis mode. The large area 24 x 29 cm detector achieves rapid image acquisition rates of up to 4 frames per second with minimal trapped charge induced effects such as ghost or lag images of previously acquired objects. In this work, a new a-Se/TFT detector layer structure is evaluated. The design uses a top conductive layer in direct contact with the a-Se x-ray detection layer. The simple structure has few layers and minimal hole and electron trapping effects. Prototype detectors were built to investigate the basic image performance of this new a-Se/TFT detector. Image signal generation, image ghosting, image lag, and detector DQE were studied. For digital mammography applications, the residual image ghosting was less than 1% at 30 seconds elapsed time. DQE, measured at a field of 5.15 V/um, showed significantly higher values over previously reported data, especially at low exposure levels. For digital breast tomosynthesis, the image lag at dynamic readout rate was < 0.6 % at 0.5-second elapsed time. A prototype tomosynthesis system is being developed utilizing this new a-Se/TFT detector.

  14. Integration of flat panel X-ray detector for high resolution diagnostic medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Woo; Yun, Min-Seok; Kim, Yoon-Suk; Oh, Kyung-Min; Shin, Jung-Wook; Nam, Kyung-Tae; Nam, Sang-Hee

    2011-05-01

    In these days, flat panel X-ray image detectors have shown their potential for replacing traditional screen-film systems. To detect the X-ray photon energy, there are two main methods known as a direct method and an indirect method. The X-rays are converted immediately into electrical signal with the direct method. The indirect method has two conversion steps: the scintillator absorbs the X-rays and converts them to visible light. And then the visible light is converted to electrical signal (e.g. by photodiodes). In this work, the flat panel digital X-ray image detector based on direct method with a high atomic number material was designed and evaluated. The high atomic number material for X-ray conversion is deposited by a rubbing method with about 300 μm. The rubbing method is similar to the screen printing method. It consists of two elements: the screen and the squeegee. The method uses a proper stiff bar stretched tightly over a frame made of wood or metal. Proper tension is essential for proper laminated structure. The detector prototype has 139 μm pixel pitch, total 1280×1536 pixels and 86% fill factor. Twelve readout ICs are installed on digital X-ray detector and simultaneously operated to reach short readout time. The electronics integrated: the preamplifier to amplify generated signal, the Analog to Digital converter and the source of bias voltage (1 V/μm). The system board and interface use an NI-camera program. Finally, we achieved images from this flat panel X-ray image detector.

  15. Visual and ocular effects from the use of flat-panel displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Porcar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of eye symptoms in a non-presbyopic population of video display unit (VDU users with flat-panel displays. METHODS: One hundred and sixteen VDU users with flat-panel display from an urban population participated in the study; their ages ranging from 20 to 34y. There were 60 females and 56 males. An eye examination to rule out the presence of significant uncorrected refractive errors, general binocular dysfunctions and eye conditions was carried out. In order to determine and quantify the type and nature of eye symptoms, participants were asked to answer written questionnaire and the results were grouped by gender, age and number of hours a day spent using a VDU. RESULTS: Seventy-two percent of participants reported eye symptoms related to VDU use. Eye symptoms from moderate-to-severe were found in 23% of participants. The main symptom was moderate-to-severe tired eyes (14%; followed by sensitivity to bright lights (12%, blurred vision at far distances (10%, eyestrain or dry eye or irritated or burning eyes (9%, difficulty in refocusing from one distance to another or headache (8% and blurred vision at near or intermediate distances (<4%. Eye symptoms were greater among females (P=0.005 and increased with VDU use, markedly above 6h spent using a VDU in a typical day (P=0.01. CONCLUSION: Significant eye symptoms relate to VDU use often occur and should not be underestimated. The increasing use of electronic devices with flat-panel display should prompt users to take appropriate measures to prevent or to relieve the eye symptoms arising from their use.

  16. Dual-exposure technique for extending the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A; Abella, M; Desco, M; Vaquero, J J

    2014-01-20

    This work presents an approach to extend the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors by combining two acquisitions of the same sample taken with two different x-ray photon flux levels and the same beam spectral configuration. In order to combine both datasets, the response of detector pixels was modelled in terms of mean and variance using a linear model. The model was extended to take into account the effect of pixel saturation. We estimated a joint probability density function (j-pdf) of the pixel values by assuming that each dataset follows an independent Gaussian distribution. This j-pdf was used for estimating the final pixel value of the high-dynamic-range dataset using a maximum likelihood method. The suitability of the pixel model for the representation of the detector signal was assessed using experimental data from a small-animal cone-beam micro-CT scanner equipped with a flat panel detector. The potential extension in dynamic range offered by our method was investigated for generic flat panel detectors using analytical expressions and simulations. The performance of the proposed dual-exposure approach in realistic imaging environments was compared with that of a regular single-exposure technique using experimental data from two different phantoms. Image quality was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and analysis of profiles drawn on the images. The dynamic range, measured as the ratio between the exposure for saturation and the exposure equivalent to instrumentation noise, was increased from 76.9 to 166.7 when using our method. Dual-exposure results showed higher contrast-to-noise ratio and contrast resolution than the single-exposure acquisitions for the same x-ray dose. In addition, image artifacts were reduced in the combined dataset. This technique to extend the dynamic range of the detector without increasing the dose is particularly suited to image samples that contain both low and high attenuation regions.

  17. Visual and ocular effects from the use of flat-panel displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcar, Esteban; Pons, Alvaro M; Lorente, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of eye symptoms in a non-presbyopic population of video display unit (VDU) users with flat-panel displays. One hundred and sixteen VDU users with flat-panel display from an urban population participated in the study; their ages ranging from 20 to 34y. There were 60 females and 56 males. An eye examination to rule out the presence of significant uncorrected refractive errors, general binocular dysfunctions and eye conditions was carried out. In order to determine and quantify the type and nature of eye symptoms, participants were asked to answer written questionnaire and the results were grouped by gender, age and number of hours a day spent using a VDU. Seventy-two percent of participants reported eye symptoms related to VDU use. Eye symptoms from moderate-to-severe were found in 23% of participants. The main symptom was moderate-to-severe tired eyes (14%); followed by sensitivity to bright lights (12%), blurred vision at far distances (10%), eyestrain or dry eye or irritated or burning eyes (9%), difficulty in refocusing from one distance to another or headache (8%) and blurred vision at near or intermediate distances (<4%). Eye symptoms were greater among females (P=0.005) and increased with VDU use, markedly above 6h spent using a VDU in a typical day (P=0.01). Significant eye symptoms relate to VDU use often occur and should not be underestimated. The increasing use of electronic devices with flat-panel display should prompt users to take appropriate measures to prevent or to relieve the eye symptoms arising from their use.

  18. Image blur in a flat-panel detector due to Compton scattering at its internal mountings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bub, A.; Gondrom, S.; Maisl, M.; Uhlmann, N.; Arnold, W.

    2007-05-01

    An image-blurring effect observable in digital x-ray flat-panel pixel detectors, used for x-ray computed tomography or radioscopy, has been studied. Our study indicates that the origin of this blurring effect is the Compton scattered radiation within the entrance window, the mounting of the detector scintillator and other parts of the detector. This effect becomes, in particular, noticeable in the presence of a sharp edge of a metallic component being tested, making the scattering in the detector asymmetric.

  19. Autostereoscopic 3D flat panel display using an LCD-pixel-associated parallax barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, En-guo; Guo, Tai-liang

    2014-05-01

    This letter reports an autostereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) flat panel display system employing a newly designed LCD-pixel-associated parallax barrier (LPB). The barrier's parameters can be conveniently determined by the LCD pixels and can help to greatly simplify the conventional design. The optical system of the proposed 3D display is built and simulated to verify the design. For further experimental demonstration, a 508-mm autostereoscopic 3D display prototype is developed and it presents good stereoscopic images. Experimental results agree well with the simulation, which reveals a strong potential for 3D display applications.

  20. RECYCLING RECOVERED WOOD-BASED MATERIALS. FLATNESS, MOR AND MOE OF PANELS MADE FROM RECOVERED WOODEN BASED MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea DEÁK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to study the mechanical properties of recovered solid wood and wood-based materials, to create new panels made of strips of recovered oak and spruce wood, particleboards and blockboards and to study their mechanical properties, feasibility and use. Flatness, MOR and MOE were determined for the solid wood and wood-based materials recovered from construction and demolition sites. Four types of experimental panels (PL1, PL2, PALL1 and PALL2 were manufactured from solid wood strips alternating with either particleboard or blockboard strips glued edge to edge. Some of their physical and mechanical properties were investigated. All new panels made from recovered materials fell within allowable limits specified in European standard requirements for panel flatness. Panels type PL2, PALL1 and PALL2 show better values for MoR and MoE parallel to the grain when compared to the respective values for the recovered wood-based materials of which they are made, but panels type PL1 show no change. Panels type PALL2 are preferable to panels type PALL1 due to better mechanical properties. Panels type PL1 and PL2 show no such differences in their structure. The results also show that these new panels can be used successfully in furniture production, provided panels type PL1, PL2 ad PALL1 do not bear loads perpendicular to the grain or receive reinforcing elements.

  1. AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: physics of flat-panel fluoroscopy systems: Survey of modern fluoroscopy imaging: flat-panel detectors versus image intensifiers and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickoloff, Edward Lee

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the design and operation of both flat-panel detector (FPD) and image intensifier fluoroscopy systems. The different components of each imaging chain and their functions are explained and compared. FPD systems have multiple advantages such as a smaller size, extended dynamic range, no spatial distortion, and greater stability. However, FPD systems typically have the same spatial resolution for all fields of view (FOVs) and are prone to ghosting. Image intensifier systems have better spatial resolution with the use of smaller FOVs (magnification modes) and tend to be less expensive. However, the spatial resolution of image intensifier systems is limited by the television system to which they are coupled. Moreover, image intensifier systems are degraded by glare, vignetting, spatial distortions, and defocusing effects. FPD systems do not have these problems. Some recent innovations to fluoroscopy systems include automated filtration, pulsed fluoroscopy, automatic positioning, dose-area product meters, and improved automatic dose rate control programs. Operator-selectable features may affect both the patient radiation dose and image quality; these selectable features include dose level setting, the FOV employed, fluoroscopic pulse rates, geometric factors, display software settings, and methods to reduce the imaging time.

  2. View-dependent geometric calibration for offset flat-panel cone beam computed tomography systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van-Giang

    2016-04-01

    Geometric parameters that define the geometry of imaging systems are crucial for image reconstruction and image quality in x-ray computed tomography (CT). The problem of determining geometric parameters for an offset flat-panel cone beam CT (CBCT) system, a recently introduced modality with a large field of view, with the assumption of an unstable mechanism and geometric parameters that vary in each view, is considered. To accurately and rapidly find the geometric parameters for each projection view, we use the projection matrix method and design a dedicated phantom that is partially visible in all projection views. The phantom consists of balls distributed symmetrically in a cylinder to ensure the inclusion of the phantom in all views, and a large portion of the phantom is covered in the projection image. To efficiently use calibrated geometric information in the reconstruction process and get rid of approximation errors, instead of decomposing the projection matrix into actual geometric parameters that are manually corrected before being used in reconstruction, as in conventional methods, we directly use the projection matrix and its pseudo-inverse in projection and backprojection operations of reconstruction algorithms. The experiments illustrate the efficacy of the proposed method with a real offset flat-panel CBCT system in dental imaging.

  3. Evaluation of stent visibility by flat panel detector CT in patients treated for intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarencon, Frederic [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Piotin, Michel; Pistocchi, Silvia; Blanc, Raphael [Fondation A. de Rothschild, Paris (France); Babic, Drazenko [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the visibility of stents using high-resolution computed tomography (CT) acquisitions acquired with flat panel detector (XperCT, Allura series, Philips Healthcare, The Netherlands) for endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. On a 24-month period, 48 patients endovascularly treated by coiling and stenting (59 stents) for intracranial aneurysms were explored by flat panel detector CT technique. A sequence of 620 2D images was acquired over an angle of 240 using a 1,024 x 1,024 pixel matrix detector within a 48-cm field of view. The images were retrospectively analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists. Evaluation criteria were percentage of visualization of the stents and stent deployment (kinking or unsatisfactory deployment of the stent). Evaluation of the stent was feasible for all the patients. Stent visibility by XperCT was overall estimated at 76% of the stent length. Difficulties to analyze the stents were related to coil artifacts but not to packing density or aneurysm location. Stent length visualization was higher when the acquisition was performed before additional coiling (P < 0.0001). Mild kinking/misdeployment was noticed in 22% of the cases. XperCT technique provides multiplanar and 3D reconstructions that allows for a satisfying visualization of intracranial stents. This CT-like acquisition should be performed after the stent deployment and before coiling, in order to obtain better stent visualization. (orig.)

  4. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun, E-mail: stscjun@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Li, Ziping [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Microelectronics, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  5. An iterative algorithm for soft tissue reconstruction from truncated flat panel projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, D.; Claus, B.; Edic, P.; Vaillant, R.; De Man, B.; Basu, S.; Iatrou, M.

    2006-03-01

    The capabilities of flat panel interventional x-ray systems continue to expand, enabling a broader array of medical applications to be performed in a minimally invasive manner. Although CT is providing pre-operative 3D information, there is a need for 3D imaging of low contrast soft tissue during interventions in a number of areas including neurology, cardiac electro-physiology, and oncology. Unlike CT systems, interventional angiographic x-ray systems provide real-time large field of view 2D imaging, patient access, and flexible gantry positioning enabling interventional procedures. However, relative to CT, these C-arm flat panel systems have additional technical challenges in 3D soft tissue imaging including slower rotation speed, gantry vibration, reduced lateral patient field of view (FOV), and increased scatter. The reduced patient FOV often results in significant data truncation. Reconstruction of truncated (incomplete) data is known an "interior problem", and it is mathematically impossible to obtain an exact reconstruction. Nevertheless, it is an important problem in 3D imaging on a C-arm to address the need to generate a 3D reconstruction representative of the object being imaged with minimal artifacts. In this work we investigate the application of an iterative Maximum Likelihood Transmission (MLTR) algorithm to truncated data. We also consider truncated data with limited views for cardiac imaging where the views are gated by the electrocardiogram(ECG) to combat motion artifacts.

  6. Perfusion analysis using a wide coverage flat-panel volume CT: feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Klotz, E.; Schmidt, B.; Flohr, T.

    2007-03-01

    We developed a Flat-panel detector based Volume CT (VCT) prototype scanner with large z-coverage. In that prototype scanner a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector was mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions) which provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at isocenter. The large volume covered in one rotation can be used for visualization of complete organs of small animals, e.g. rabbits. By implementing a mode with continuous scanning, we are able to reconstruct the complete volume at any point in time during the propagation of a contrast bolus. Multiple volumetric reconstructions over time elucidate the first pass dynamics of a bolus of contrast resulting in 4-D angiography and potentially allowing whole organ perfusion analysis. We studied to which extent pixel based permeability and blood volume calculation with a modified Patlak approach was possible. Experimental validation was performed by imaging evolution of contrast bolus in New Zealand rabbits. Despite the short circulation time of a rabbit, the temporal resolution was sufficient to visually resolve various phases of the first pass of the contrast bolus. Perfusion imaging required substantial spatial smoothing but allowed a qualitative discrimination of different types of parenchyma in brain and liver. If a true quantitative analysis is possible, requires further studies.

  7. Physical characteristics of a full-field digital mammography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman; Karellas, Andrew; Vedantham, Srinivasan

    2004-11-01

    The physical performance characteristics of a flat-panel clinical full-field digital mammography (FFDM) system were investigated for a variety of mammographic X-ray spectral conditions. The system was investigated using 26 kVp: Mo/Mo, 28 kVp: Mo/Rh, and 30 kVp: Rh/Rh, with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) "tissue equivalent material" of thickness 20, 45, and 60 mm for each of three X-ray spectra, resulting in nine different spectral conditions. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical cascaded linear systems-based model that has been developed independently by other investigators. The FFDM imager (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) uses an amorphous silicon (aSi:H) photodiode (100 μm pixel) array directly coupled to a cesium iodide (CsI) scintillator. The spatial resolution of the digital mammography system was determined by measuring the presampling modulation transfer function (MTF). The noise power spectra (NPS) of the system were measured under the different mammographic X-ray spectral conditions at an exposure of approximately 10 mR to the detector from which corresponding detective quantum efficiencies (DQE) were determined. The experimental results provide additional information on the performance of the mammographic system for a broader range of experimental conditions than have been reported in the past. The flat-panel imager exhibits favorable physical quality characteristics under the conditions investigated. The experimental results were compared with theoretical estimates under various spectral conditions and demonstrated good agreement.

  8. Comparison of flat-panel detector and image-intensifier detector for cone-beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Rika; Konno, Yasutaka; Ueda, Ken; Ikeda, Shigeyuki

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated a flat-panel detector (FPD) (scintillator screen and a-Si photo-sensor array) for use in a cone-beam computed tomography (CT) detector and compared it with an image-intensifier detector (IID). The FPD cone-beam CT system has a higher spatial resolution than the IID system. At equal pixel sizes, the standard deviation of noise intensity of the FPD system is equal to that of the IID system. However, the circuit noise of the FPD must be reduced, especially at low doses. Our evaluations show that the FPD system has a strong potential for use as a cone-beam CT detector because of high-spatial resolution.

  9. A typical flat-panel membrane bioreactor with a composite membrane for sulfur removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jian; Xiao, Yuan; Song, Jimin; Miao, Junhe

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work was to provide a concrete study to understand the effects of operation on biofilm morphology and microstructure and degradation efficiency for the disposal of sulfur dioxide produced by coal-fired power plants. For this purpose, a flat-panel reactor-membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a composite membrane consisting of a dense layer and a support layer was designed; the membrane bioreactors inoculated with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were further conducted for the removal of sulfur dioxide. Dry weight, active biomass, pressure drop, removal efficiency, morphology and structure of the formed biofilms were investigated and analyzed over period of biofilm formation. The results found that the dry weight, biomass, pressure drops and removal efficiency increased rapidly during biofilm formation, remained relatively stable in the stabilization period of biofilm growth, and finally reached 0.085 g, 7.00 μg, 180 Pa, and 78%, respectively. Our results suggested the MBR is available for flue-gas desulfurization.

  10. Data pre-processing for quantification in tomography and radiography with a digital flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkel, Jean; Gerfault, Laurent; Estève, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2006-03-01

    In order to obtain accurate quantitative results, flat panel detectors require specific calibration and correction of acquisitions. Main artefacts are due to bad pixels, variations of photodiodes characteristics and inhomogeneity of X-rays sensitivity of the scintillator layer. Other limitations for quantification are the non-linearity of the detector due to charge trapping in the transistors and the scattering generated inside the detector, called detector scattering. Based on physical models of artefacts generation, this paper presents an unified framework for the calibration and correction of these artefacts. The following specific algorithms have been developed to correct them. A new method for correction of deviation to linearity is based on the comparison between experimental and simulated data. A method of detector scattering correction is performed in two steps: off-line characterization of detector scattering by considering its spatial distribution through a convolution model and on-line correction based on a deconvolution approach. Radiographic results on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom imaged with a flat panel detector, that convert X-rays into visible light using scintillator coupled to an amorphous silicon transistor frame for photons to electrons conversion, demonstrate that experimental X-rays attenuation images are significantly improved qualitatively and quantitatively by applying non-linearity correction and detector scattering correction. Results obtained on tomographic reconstructions from pre-processed acquisitions of the phantom are in very good agreement with expected attenuation coefficients values obtained with a multi-slice CT scanner. Thus, this paper demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed pre-processings to perform accurate quantification on radiographies and tomographies.

  11. Modelling of scintillator based flat-panel detectors with Monte-Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reims, N.; Sukowski, F.; Uhlmann, N.

    2011-01-01

    Scintillator based flat panel detectors are state of the art in the field of industrial X-ray imaging applications. Choosing the proper system and setup parameters for the vast range of different applications can be a time consuming task, especially when developing new detector systems. Since the system behaviour cannot always be foreseen easily, Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations are keys to gain further knowledge of system components and their behaviour for different imaging conditions. In this work we used two Monte-Carlo based models to examine an indirect converting flat panel detector, specifically the Hamamatsu C9312SK. We focused on the signal generation in the scintillation layer and its influence on the spatial resolution of the whole system. The models differ significantly in their level of complexity. The first model gives a global description of the detector based on different parameters characterizing the spatial resolution. With relatively small effort a simulation model can be developed which equates the real detector regarding signal transfer. The second model allows a more detailed insight of the system. It is based on the well established cascade theory, i.e. describing the detector as a cascade of elemental gain and scattering stages, which represent the built in components and their signal transfer behaviour. In comparison to the first model the influence of single components especially the important light spread behaviour in the scintillator can be analysed in a more differentiated way. Although the implementation of the second model is more time consuming both models have in common that a relatively small amount of system manufacturer parameters are needed. The results of both models were in good agreement with the measured parameters of the real system.

  12. Development of next generation digital flat panel catheterization system: design principles and validation methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, B.; Betraoui, F.; Dhawale, P.; Gopinath, P.; Tegzes, Pal; Vagvolgyi, B.

    2006-03-01

    The design principles that drove the development of a new cardiovascular x-ray digital flat panel (DFP) detector system are presented, followed by assessments of imaging and dose performance achieved relative to other state of the art FPD systems. The new system (GE Innova 2100 IQ TM) incorporates a new detector with substantially improved DQE at fluoroscopic (73%@1μR) and record (79%@114uR) doses, an x-ray tube with higher continuous fluoro power (3.2kW), a collimator with a wide range of copper spectral filtration (up to 0.9mm), and an improved automatic x-ray exposure management system. The performance of this new system was compared to that of the previous generation GE product (Innova 2000) and to state-of-the art cardiac digital x-ray flat panel systems from two other major manufacturers. Performance was assessed with the industry standard Cardiac X-ray NEMA/SCA and I phantom, and a new moving coronary artery stent (MCAS) phantom, designed to simulate cardiac clinical imaging conditions, composed of an anthropomorphic chest section with stents moving in a manner simulating normal coronary arteries. The NEMA/SCA&I phantom results showed the Innova 2100 IQ to exceed or equal the Innova 2000 in all of the performance categories, while operating at 28% lower dose on average, and to exceed the other DFP systems in most of the performance categories. The MCAS phantom tests showed the Innova 2100 IQ to be significantly better (p Innova 2000, and significantly better than the other DFP systems in most cases at comparable or lower doses, thereby verifying excellent performance against design goals.

  13. Combination of CT scanning and fluoroscopy imaging on a flat-panel CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Suess, Ch.; Schmidt, B.; Stierstorfer, K.; Popescu, S.; Brady, T.; Flohr, T.

    2006-03-01

    We developed and evaluated a prototype flat-panel detector based Volume CT (fpVCT) scanner. The fpVCT scanner consists of a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions). It provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at the isocenter. In addition to the standard tomographic scanning, fpVCT allows two new scan modes: (1) fluoroscopic imaging from any arbitrary rotation angle, and (2) continuous, time-resolved tomographic scanning of a dynamically changing viewing volume. Fluoroscopic imaging is feasible by modifying the standard CT gantry so that the imaging chain can be oriented along any user-selected rotation angle. Scanning with a stationary gantry, after it has been oriented, is equivalent to a conventional fluoroscopic examination. This scan mode enables combined use of high-resolution tomography and real-time fluoroscopy with a clinically usable field of view in the z direction. The second scan mode allows continuous observation of a timeevolving process such as perfusion. The gantry can be continuously rotated for up to 80 sec, with the rotation time ranging from 3 to 20 sec, to gather projection images of a dynamic process. The projection data, that provides a temporal log of the viewing volume, is then converted into multiple image stacks that capture the temporal evolution of a dynamic process. Studies using phantoms, ex vivo specimens, and live animals have confirmed that these new scanning modes are clinically usable and offer a unique view of the anatomy and physiology that heretofore has not been feasible using static CT scanning. At the current level of image quality and temporal resolution, several clinical applications such a dynamic angiography, tumor enhancement pattern and vascularity studies, organ perfusion, and interventional applications are in reach.

  14. High-energy X-ray diffraction using the Pixium 4700 flat-panel detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, J E; Drakopoulos, M

    2009-07-01

    The Pixium 4700 detector represents a significant step forward in detector technology for high-energy X-ray diffraction. The detector design is based on digital flat-panel technology, combining an amorphous Si panel with a CsI scintillator. The detector has a useful pixel array of 1910 x 2480 pixels with a pixel size of 154 microm x 154 microm, and thus it covers an effective area of 294 mm x 379 mm. Designed for medical imaging, the detector has good efficiency at high X-ray energies. Furthermore, it is capable of acquiring sequences of images at 7.5 frames per second in full image mode, and up to 60 frames per second in binned region of interest modes. Here, the basic properties of this detector applied to high-energy X-ray diffraction are presented. Quantitative comparisons with a widespread high-energy detector, the MAR345 image plate scanner, are shown. Other properties of the Pixium 4700 detector, including a narrow point-spread function and distortion-free image, allows for the acquisition of high-quality diffraction data at high X-ray energies. In addition, high frame rates and shutterless operation open new experimental possibilities. Also provided are the necessary data for the correction of images collected using the Pixium 4700 for diffraction purposes.

  15. Investigation of time-resolved proton radiography using x-ray flat-panel imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, K.-W.; Zhang, R.; Bentefour, E. H.; Doolan, P. J.; Cascio, E.; Sharp, G.; Flanz, J.; Lu, H.-M.

    2017-03-01

    Proton beam therapy benefits from the Bragg peak and delivers highly conformal dose distributions. However, the location of the end-of-range is subject to uncertainties related to the accuracy of the relative proton stopping power estimates and thereby the water-equivalent path length (WEPL) along the beam. To remedy the range uncertainty, an in vivo measurement of the WEPL through the patient, i.e. a proton-range radiograph, is highly desirable. Towards that goal, we have explored a novel method of proton radiography based on the time-resolved dose measured by a flat panel imager (FPI). A 226 MeV pencil beam and a custom-designed range modulator wheel (MW) were used to create a time-varying broad beam. The proton imaging technique used exploits this time dependency by looking at the dose rate at the imager as a function of time. This dose rate function (DRF) has a unique time-varying dose pattern at each depth of penetration. A relatively slow rotation of the MW (0.2 revolutions per second) and a fast image acquisition (30 frames per second, ~33 ms sampling) provided a sufficient temporal resolution for each DRF. Along with the high output of the CsI:Tl scintillator, imaging with pixel binning (2  ×  2) generated high signal-to-noise data at a very low radiation dose (~0.1 cGy). Proton radiographs of a head phantom and a Gammex CT calibration phantom were taken with various configurations. The results of the phantom measurements show that the FPI can generate low noise and high spatial resolution proton radiographs. The WEPL values of the CT tissue surrogate inserts show that the measured relative stopping powers are accurate to ~2%. The panel did not show any noticeable radiation damage after the accumulative dose of approximately 3831 cGy. In summary, we have successfully demonstrated a highly practical method of generating proton radiography using an x-ray flat panel imager.

  16. Application of the Monte Carlo method to analyze materials used in flat panel detectors to obtain X-ray spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Sergio; Pozuelo, Fausto; Querol, Andrea; Ródenas, José; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2014-06-01

    An accurate knowledge of the photon spectra emitted by X-ray tubes in radiodiagnostic is essential to better estimate the imparted dose to patients and to improve the quality image obtained with these devices. In this work, it is proposed the use of a flat panel detector together with a PMMA wedge to estimate the actual X-ray spectrum using the Monte Carlo method and unfolding techniques. The MCNP5 code has been used to model different flat panels (based on indirect and direct methods to produce charge carriers from absorbed X-rays) and to obtain the dose curves and system response functions. Most of the actual flat panel devices use scintillator materials that present K-edge discontinuities in the mass energy-absorption coefficient, which strongly affect the response matrix. In this paper, the applicability of different flat panels for reconstructing X-ray spectra is studied. The effect of the mass energy-absorption coefficient of the scintillator material has been studied on the response matrix and consequently, in the reconstructed spectra. Different unfolding methods are tested to reconstruct the actual X-ray spectrum knowing the dose curve and the response function. It has been concluded that the regularization method MTSVD is appropriate to unfold X-ray spectra in all the scintillators studied.

  17. Comparison of low-contrast detail perception on storage phosphor radiographs and digital flat panel detector images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, S; Neitzel, U; Giacomuzzi, S M; Peer, R; Gassner, E; Steingruber, I; Jaschke, W

    2001-03-01

    A contrast detail analysis was performed to compare perception of low-contrast details on X-ray images derived from digital storage phosphor radiography and from a flat panel detector system based on a cesium iodide/amorphous silicon matrix. The CDRAD 2.0 phantom was used to perform a comparative contrast detail analysis of a clinical storage phosphor radiography system and an indirect type digital flat panel detector unit. Images were acquired at exposure levels comparable to film speeds of 50/100/200/400 and 800. Four observers evaluated a total of 50 films with respect to the threshold contrast for each detail size. The numbers of correctly identified objects were determined for all image subsets. The overall results show that low-contrast detail perception with digital flat panel detector images is better than with state of the art storage phosphor screens. This is especially true for the low-exposure setting, where a nearly 10% higher correct observation ratio is reached. Given its high detective quantum efficiency the digital flat panel technology based on the cesium iodide scintillator/amorphous silicon matrix is best suited for detection of low-contrast detail structures, which shows its high potential for clinical imaging.

  18. Effect of light concentration by flat mirror reflectors on the electrical power output of the photovoltaic panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathyanarayana P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy area is gaining more prominence in recent times. In particular, conversion of solar energy in to electricity by using PV Panel has attracted significant researchers. In this work, the effect of light concentration by reflectors and inclination of PV panel on power output of PV panel has been investigated. Flat mirror reflectors were fixed to PV panel to increase the light intensity. The panel was kept either horizontally or at 30° inclination to horizontal. The effect on I-V curve, power curve, fill factor and efficiency are discussed. A significant improvement in short circuit current, power and a small increase in efficiency is perceived with the introduction of reflectors.

  19. Comparison of ring artifact removal methods using flat panel detector based CT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Soo Y

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ring artifacts are the concentric rings superimposed on the tomographic images often caused by the defective and insufficient calibrated detector elements as well as by the damaged scintillator crystals of the flat panel detector. It may be also generated by objects attenuating X-rays very differently in different projection direction. Ring artifact reduction techniques so far reported in the literature can be broadly classified into two groups. One category of the approaches is based on the sinogram processing also known as the pre-processing techniques and the other category of techniques perform processing on the 2-D reconstructed images, recognized as the post-processing techniques in the literature. The strength and weakness of these categories of approaches are yet to be explored from a common platform. Method In this paper, a comparative study of the two categories of ring artifact reduction techniques basically designed for the multi-slice CT instruments is presented from a common platform. For comparison, two representative algorithms from each of the two categories are selected from the published literature. A very recently reported state-of-the-art sinogram domain ring artifact correction method that classifies the ring artifacts according to their strength and then corrects the artifacts using class adaptive correction schemes is also included in this comparative study. The first sinogram domain correction method uses a wavelet based technique to detect the corrupted pixels and then using a simple linear interpolation technique estimates the responses of the bad pixels. The second sinogram based correction method performs all the filtering operations in the transform domain, i.e., in the wavelet and Fourier domain. On the other hand, the two post-processing based correction techniques actually operate on the polar transform domain of the reconstructed CT images. The first method extracts the ring artifact template

  20. Implementation of a program of quality assurance of image in an imaging system of flat panel portal; Puesta en marcha de un programa de garantia de calidad de imagen en un sistema de imagen portal de panel plano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Barrado, A.; Sanchez Jimenez, E.; Benitez, J. A.; Sanchez-Reyes, A.

    2013-07-01

    (IGRT) image-guided radiation therapy is the one in which images are used to locate the area of treatment. Modern irradiation systems are equipped with different modalities for obtaining images, such as flat panel systems, systems conebeam, tomoimagen, etc. This paper describes the start-up and the experience of a quality assurance program based on a flat panel portal Imaging System. (Author)

  1. Parameter investigation and first results from a digital flat panel detector with forward bias capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starman, Jared; Tognina, Carlo; Virshup, Gary; Star-lack, Josh; Mollov, Ivan; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2008-03-01

    Digital flat panel a-Si x-ray detectors can exhibit image lag of several percent. The image lag can limit the temporal resolution of the detector, and introduce artifacts into CT reconstructions. It is believed that the majority of image lag is due to defect states, or traps, in the a-Si layer. Software methods to characterize and correct for the image lag exist, but they may make assumptions such as the system behaves in a linear time-invariant manner. The proposed method of reducing lag is a hardware solution that makes few additional hardware changes. For pulsed irradiation, the proposed method inserts a new stage in between the readout of the detector and the data collection stages. During this stage the photodiode is operated in a forward bias mode, which fills the defect states with charge. Parameters of importance are current per diode and current duration, which were investigated under light illumination by the following design parameters: 1.) forward bias voltage across the photodiode and TFT switch, 2.) number of rows simultaneously forward biased, and 3.) duration of the forward bias current. From measurements, it appears that good design criteria for the particular imager used are 8 or fewer active rows, 2.9V (or greater) forward bias voltage, and a row frequency of 100 kHz or less. Overall, the forward bias method has been found to reduce first frame lag by as much as 95%. The panel was also tested under x-ray irradiation. Image lag improved (94% reduction), but the temporal response of the scintillator became evident in the turn-on step response.

  2. Impact and Penetration of Thin Aluminum 2024 Flat Panels at Oblique Angles of Incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael; Emmerling, William; Queitzsch, Gilbert K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    under more extreme conditions, using a projectile with a more complex shape and sharp contacts, impacting flat panels at oblique angles of incidence.

  3. Reliability of myocardial perfusion quantification in angiography using a digital flat panel cardiac system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Muriel; Vaillant, Regis; Gavit-Houdant, Laurence; Lienard, Jean; Benali, Karim

    2002-04-01

    Discordance between lesion severity from angiocardiography and physiological effects has been reported elsewhere. Quantification of myocardial perfusion during the angiography procedure may supply additional information about short- and long-term outcomes and may be helpful for clinical decision making. In previous works, myocardial perfusion has been assessed using time density curves (TDC), which represent the contrast medium dilution over time in the myocardium. The mean transit time (MTT), derived from the TDC, has been reported as a good indicator of the regional myocardial perfusion. Our objective is to estimate the accuracy and reproducibility of MTT estimation on digital flat panel (DFP) images. We have simulated typical myocardium TDC obtained with a DFP cardiac system (Innova 2000, GE), taking into account scatter and noise. Logarithmic or linear subtractions have been applied to derive a contrast medium concentration proportional quantity from image intensity. A non-linear minimisation realises the model curve fitting. MTT estimates are more stable with linear subtraction in presence of scatter. However logarithmic subtraction presents smaller bias when scatter level is small. Both approaches are equally sensible to image noise. Linear subtraction should be preferred. Image noise has a high influence on MTT accuracy and we may reduce.

  4. Practical expressions describing detective quantum efficiency in flat-panel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. K.

    2011-11-01

    In radiology, image quality excellence is a balance between system performance and patient dose, hence x-ray systems must be designed to ensure the maximum image quality is obtained for the lowest consistent dose. The concept of detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is widely used to quantify, understand, measure, and predict the performance of x-ray detectors and imaging systems. Cascaded linear-systems theory can be used to estimate DQE based on the system design parameters and this theoretical DQE can be utilized for determining the impact of various physical processes, such as secondary quantum sinks, noise aliasing, reabsorption noise, and others. However, the prediction of DQE usually requires tremendous efforts to determine each parameter consisting of the cascaded linear-systems model. In this paper, practical DQE formalisms assessing both the photoconductor- and scintillator-based flat-panel detectors under quantum-noise-limited operation are described. The developed formalisms are experimentally validated and discussed for their limits. The formalisms described in this paper would be helpful for the rapid prediction of the DQE performances of developing systems as well as the optimal design of systems.

  5. [C-MOS flat-panel sensor for real time X-ray imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, K; Aoki, Y; Sasaki, Y; Akanuma, A; Mizuno, S

    1998-02-01

    Flat-panel, self-scanning, solid state diagnostic x-ray imaging devices using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (C-MOS) arrays are under investigation. A unit device with a 5 cm by 5 cm sensor area was developed and tested. The device consists of a CsI scintillator and C-MOS detector arrays. The detector arrays are composed of a regular arrangement of pixels (256 x 256), each of which is made of a C-MOS photodiode sensor coupled to a C-MOS FET (field effect transistor). A common FET gate line is connected to all the FET gates along each column. A common date line is connected to all the FET drains of each row. The source contact of each FET is connected to that of its corresponding photodiode. A positive gate pulse applied to a gate turns on all FETs connected to the date lines. The readout continues column by column. Correlated double sampling circuits and an offset variance compensation circuit were installed to reduce noise. A sampling speed of 15 frames per second and spatial resolution of 2.5 line per mm were achieved. Noise level and maximum signal were 1.5 mV rms and 1.8 V, respectively. Image quality was considered acceptable for clinical use. It is also discussed how to fabricate a large area sensor with the unit device.

  6. An asynchronous, pipelined, electronic acquisition system for Active Matrix Flat-Panel Imagers (AMFPIs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, W.; Antonuk, L.E. E-mail: antonuk@umich.edu; Berry, J.; Maolinbay, M.; Martelli, C.; Mody, P.; Nassif, S.; Yeakey, M

    1999-07-11

    The development of a full-custom electronic acquisition system designed for readout of large-area active matrix flat-panel imaging arrays is reported. The arrays, which comprise two-dimensional matrices of pixels utilizing amorphous silicon thin-film transistors, are themselves under development for a wide variety of X-ray imaging applications. The acquisition system was specifically designed to facilitate detailed, quantitative investigations of the properties of these novel imaging arrays and contains significant enhancements compared to a previously developed acquisition system. These enhancements include pipelined preamplifier circuits to allow faster readout speed, expanded addressing capabilities allowing a maximum of 4096 array data lines, and on-board summing of image frames. The values of many acquisition system parameters, including timings and voltages, may be specified and downloaded from a host computer. Once acquisition is enabled, the system operates asynchronously of its host computer. The system allows image capture in both radiographic mode (corresponding to the capture of individual X-ray images), and fluoroscopic mode (corresponding to the capture of a continual series of X-ray images). A detailed description of the system architecture and the underlying motivations for the design is reported in this paper. (author)

  7. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, A R; Kengyelics, S M; Davies, A G

    2008-05-01

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H.

  8. Effect of oblique X-ray incidence in flat-panel computed tomography of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badano, Aldo; Kyprianou, Iacovos S; Freed, Melanie; Jennings, Robert J; Sempau, Josep

    2009-05-01

    We quantify the variation in resolution due to anisotropy caused by oblique X-ray incidence in indirect flat-panel detectors for computed tomography breast imaging systems. We consider a geometry and detector type utilized in breast computed tomography (CT) systems currently being developed. Our methods rely on mantis, a combined X-ray, electron, and optical Monte Carlo transport open source code. The physics models are the most accurate available in general-purpose Monte Carlo packages in the diagnostic energy range. We consider maximum-obliquity angles of 10 ( degrees ) and 13 ( degrees ) at the centers of the 30 and 40 cm detector edges, respectively, and 16 ( degrees ) at the corner of the detector. Our results indicate that blur is asymmetric and that the resolution properties vary significantly with the angle (or location) of incidence. Our results suggest that the asymmetry can be as high as a factor of 2.6 between orthogonal directions. Anisotropy maps predicted by mantis provide an understanding of the effect that such variations have on the imaging system and allow more accurate modeling and optimization of breast CT systems. These maps of anisotropy across the detector could lead to improved reconstruction and help motivate physics-based strategies for computer detection of breast lesions.

  9. Continuous production of diatom Entomoneis sp. in mechanically stirred tank and flat-panel airlift photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viriyayingsiri, Thunyaporn; Sittplangkoon, Pantaporn; Powtongsook, Sorawit; Nootong, Kasidit

    2016-10-02

    Continuous production of diatom Entomonies sp. was performed in mechanically stirred tank and flat-panel airlift photobioreactors (FPAP). The maximum specific growth rate of diatom from the batch experiment was 0.98 d(-1). A series of dilution rate and macronutrient concentration adjustments were performed in a stirred tank photobioreactor and found that the dilution rate ranged from 0.7 to 0.8 d(-1) and modified F/2 growth media containing nitrate at 3.09 mg N/L, phosphate at 2.24 mg P/L, and silicate at 11.91 mg Si/L yielded the maximum cell number density. Finally, the continuous cultivation of Entomonies sp. was conducted in FPAP using the optimal conditions determined earlier, resulting in the maximum cell number density of 19.69 × 10(4) cells/mL, which was approximately 47 and 73% increase from the result using the stirred tank photobioreactor fed with modified and standard F/2 growth media, respectively.

  10. Astaxanthin induction in Microalga H. pluvialis with flat panel airlift photobioreactors under indoor and outdoor conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonkum, Woradej; Powtongsook, Sorawit; Pavasant, Prasert

    2015-01-01

    Astaxanthin was induced from Haematococcus pluvialis (NIES-144) under indoor and outdoor conditions using 17-, 50-, and 90-L flat-panel airlift photobioreactors (FP-APBRs). Preliminary experiments in 1.5-L bubble column photobioreactors (BC-PBRs) revealed that sterilized clean water with 3% CO2 aeration (1.47 cm(3) s(-1) CO2 loading) could best encourage astaxanthin accumulation at 18.21 g m(-3) (3.63% by weight). Operating 17-L FP-APBRs with these bubble column parameters under indoor conditions could further enhance astaxanthin to 26.63 g m(-3) (5.34% by weight). This was potentially due to the inherited up-lift force from the reactor that helped avoid cell precipitation by allowing the cells to be circulated within the reactor. In addition, the various sizes of FP-APBRs exhibited similar performance, implying a potential scale-up opportunity. However, similar operation under outdoor condition exhibited slightly poorer performance due to the light inhibition effect. The best outdoor performance was obtained with the FP-APBR covered with one layer of shading net, where 20.11 g m(-3) (4.47% by weight) of astaxanthin was resulted.

  11. An Output Channel Nonuniformity Compensation Driving Method in Flat Panel Display Driving Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Ho; Ahn, Soon-Sung; Kwon, Christine H.; Kim, Seon-Yung; Lee, Jae-Sic; Choi, Byong-Deok

    2006-12-01

    Modern flat panel displays, including thin-film transistor liquid crystal displays (TFT-LCDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), pursue more and more natural color expression. This requires the data driving system should produce very fine and accurate signal voltages or currents. Especially, the uniformity among channels of a driving system is critically important because the color or luminance differences among columns are easily noticeable. We propose a simple and efficient driving method for solving the artifacts caused by the existing nonuniformity among channels of a driving system, and confirms its impact by simulations using C-programming. The nonuniformity among channels mostly stem from the random offset of the output circuits of a driving system, which in turn is caused by the process variations. The proposed driving method shares N-output circuits between N-output channels such that the existing offsets of the channels are averaged out. Thus, the output signal error due to the offsets spreads out among the channels, improving the uniformity between the channels.

  12. Potential Applications of Flat-Panel Volumetric CT in Morphologic, Functional Small Animal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Greschus

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive radiologic imaging has recently gained considerable interest in basic, preclinical research for monitoring disease progression, therapeutic efficacy. In this report, we introduce flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT as a powerful new tool for noninvasive imaging of different organ systems in preclinical research. The three-dimensional visualization that is achieved by isotropic high-resolution datasets is illustrated for the skeleton, chest, abdominal organs, brain of mice. The high image quality of chest scans enables the visualization of small lung nodules in an orthotopic lung cancer model, the reliable imaging of therapy side effects such as lung fibrosis. Using contrast-enhanced scans, fpVCT displayed the vascular trees of the brain, liver, kidney down to the subsegmental level. Functional application of fpVCT in dynamic contrast-enhanced scans of the rat brain delivered physiologically reliable data of perfusion, tissue blood volume. Beyond scanning of small animal models as demonstrated here, fpVCT provides the ability to image animals up to the size of primates.

  13. Flat panel CT following stapes prosthesis insertion: an experimental and clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaoui, K. [University-Hospital Heidelberg, Ludwig-Karls-University Heidelberg, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Kromeier, J. [St.-Josefs-Hospital, RkK, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Neudert, M.; Zahnert, T. [University-Hospital Dresden, Technical-University Dresden, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Boedeker, C.C.; Laszig, R.; Offergeld, C. [University-Hospital Freiburg, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    Anatomical information of the middle and inner ear is becoming increasingly important in post-operative evaluation especially after stapesplasty with unsuccessful improvement of the air-bone gap (ABG). So far computed tomography (CT) has been the first choice for detection of reasons for recurrent hearing loss. CT has the disadvantage of metal-induced artefacts after insertion of middle ear implants and of a relatively high irradiation dose. Flat panel CT (fpCT) was performed in three temporal bone specimen after experimental insertion of different stapes prostheses, aiming to validate the accuracy of fpCT of the middle and inner ear. Additionally, 28 consecutive patients, supplied with different stapes prostheses underwent post-operative fpCT to compare the pre- and post-operative hearing results with the determined prosthesis position in the middle and inner ear. In all cases, fpCT showed a statistically significant correlation between hearing improvement and prosthesis position. This technique provided detailed post-operative information of the implant position in patients and temporal bone specimen. The new imaging technique of fpCT allows the immediate and almost artefact-free evaluation of surgical results following stapesplasty. Further benefits are a lower irradiation dose and higher isovolumetric resolution compared with standard CT. (orig.)

  14. Clinical investigation of flat panel CT following middle ear reconstruction: a study of 107 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaoui, K. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Ruprecht Karls University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Kromeier, J. [St. Josefs Hospital, RkK, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Neudert, M.; Beleites, T.; Zahnert, T. [University Hospital Dresden, Technical University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Laszig, R.; Offergeld, C. [University Hospital Freiburg, Albert Ludwigs University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    After middle ear reconstruction using partial or total ossicular replacement prostheses (PORP/TORP), an air-bone gap (ABG) may persist because of prosthesis displacement or malposition. So far, CT of the temporal bone has played the main role in the diagnosis of reasons for postoperative insufficient ABG improvement. Recent experimental and clinical studies have evaluated flat panel CT (fpCT) as an alternative imaging technique that provides images with high isovolumetric resolution, fewer metal-induced artefacts and lower irradiation doses. One hundred and seven consecutive patients with chronic otitis media with or without cholesteatoma underwent reconstruction by PORP (n = 52) or TORP (n = 55). All subjects underwent preoperative and postoperative audiometric testing and postoperative fpCT. Statistical evaluation of all 107 patients as well as the sole sub-assembly groups (PORP or TORP) showed a highly significant correlation between hearing improvement and fpCT-determined prosthesis position. FpCT enables detailed postoperative information on patients with middle ear reconstruction. FpCT is a new imaging technique that provides immediate feedback on surgical results after reconstructive middle ear surgery. Specific parameters evaluated by fpCT may serve as a predictive tool for estimated postoperative hearing improvement. Therefore this imaging technique is suitable for postoperative quality control in reconstructive middle ear surgery. (orig.)

  15. Development of patient collation system by kinetic analysis for chest dynamic radiogram with flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; Kodera, Yoshie

    2006-03-01

    In the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) environment, it is important that all images be stored in the correct location. However, if information such as the patient's name or identification number has been entered incorrectly, it is difficult to notice the error. The present study was performed to develop a system of patient collation automatically for dynamic radiogram examination by a kinetic analysis, and to evaluate the performance of the system. Dynamic chest radiographs during respiration were obtained by using a modified flat panel detector system. Our computer algorithm developed in this study was consisted of two main procedures, kinetic map imaging processing, and collation processing. Kinetic map processing is a new algorithm to visualize a movement for dynamic radiography; direction classification of optical flows and intensity-density transformation technique was performed. Collation processing consisted of analysis with an artificial neural network (ANN) and discrimination for Mahalanobis' generalized distance, those procedures were performed to evaluate a similarity of combination for the same person. Finally, we investigated the performance of our system using eight healthy volunteers' radiographs. The performance was shown as a sensitivity and specificity. The sensitivity and specificity for our system were shown 100% and 100%, respectively. This result indicated that our system has excellent performance for recognition of a patient. Our system will be useful in PACS management for dynamic chest radiography.

  16. MTF compensation for digital radiography system with indirect conversion flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Souchay, Henri; Yang, Chao

    2009-02-01

    The MTF (modulation transfer function) of digital radiography systems can be enhanced in the spatial frequency domain due to their high signal to noise ratio. A Wiener filter, which requires prior estimation of the noise and signal power spectrum of the images, was used to compensate MTF of the detector and thereby optimally restore the images details. We studied the noise characteristics of two flat panel detectors with structured columnar scintillator (CsI) and granular scintillator (Gd2O2S). A noise model formulating noise transfer process was applied to estimate the noise components for the filter. Signal model was based on dose of the application. We revisited the noise and signal model that was used in previous work by Souchay et al. for mammography application [1], considering the difference in detector characteristics and the applications (extremity x-ray) that we are specifically investigating. Starting with real clinical images, we used an observer study method to measure the visually optimal parameter for the Wiener filter. A set of clinical images was used to evaluate the radiologists' preferences to compensated images against the reference images. Statistical results from three experienced radiologists ranking results show that the compensated images are preferred over the reference images.

  17. Multi-cusp ion source for doping process of flat panel display manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inouchi, Yutaka, E-mail: inouchi-yutaka@nissin.co.jp; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Dohi, Shojiro; Tanii, Masahiro; Takahashi, Genki; Nishimura, Ippei; Tatemichi, Junichi; Konishi, Masashi; Naito, Masao [FPD Machine Business Center, Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., Shiga 528-0068 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    We developed a multi-cusp ion source for Nissin ion doping system iG5 which is used in low temperature poly-crystalline silicon processes for flat panel display (FPD) manufacturing. In this ion source, BF{sub 3} or PH{sub 3} diluted H{sub 2} plasmas are produced and large area ribbon ion beams are extracted. In general, ion ratio of B{sup +} in BF{sub 3} plasma is much smaller than BF{sub 2}{sup +} in multi-cusp ion sources. We developed a new method to increase B{sup +} ratio and obtained mass analyzed B{sup +} target current of 130 mA. We employed newly improved multi-slot type electrodes for the beam extraction system and obtained stable beams with the uniformity of below 3%. In BF{sub 3} plasmas, several undesirable metal fluorides are produced in the plasma chamber and deposited on the electrode system, which cause glitches and poor beam uniformity. We introduce several cleaning methods.

  18. Optimizing the tube potential for lumbar spine radiography with a flat-panel digital detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijer, H; Norrman, E; Persliden, J

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find the optimal settings for lumbar spine radiography with a flat-panel detector. A CDRAD contrast-detail phantom was imaged at various tube potentials, system speeds and filtration settings. Factorial experiments yielded a range of optimized exposure settings, which were submitted to visual grading analysis with images of an Alderson phantom. The first optimized settings involved a system speed increase from 400 to 800. For anteroposterior projection, the optimal tube potential was reduced from the default of 77 kV to 60 kV to give the best image quality without increasing the effective dose, or to 66 kV to give the lowest dose without reducing image quality. For lateral projection, the tube potential was similarly reduced from the default of 90 kV to 70 kV or 77 kV. Visual grading analysis confirmed the results, with significantly better image quality when optimizing for image quality. The study thus shows that the tube potential can be reduced as long as the system speed is increased simultaneously. This leads to a lower effective dose and/or increased image quality depending on the settings chosen. The factorial experiments provided a powerful way to evaluate several parameters concomitantly.

  19. Resolution requirements for monitor viewing of digital flat-panel detector radiographs: a contrast detail analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Siegfried; Steingruber, Iris; Gassner, Eva; Peer, Regina; Giacomuzzi, Salvatore M.

    2002-05-01

    Since the introduction of digital flat panel detectors into clinical routine the discussion on monitor specifications for primary soft copy reading has gained new impetus. Major concerns exist for viewing of tiny opacities such as pulmonary nodules. In this study CDRAD phantom images were acquired on a caesium iodid/amorphous silicon detector at varying exposure levels. Images were read three times by three observers on a clinical 1K and 2K monitor workstation. All typical workstation functions such as magnification and window/level setting were applied during image reading. Correct detection ratios were calculated according to the CDRAD evaluation manual. Observer ratings were highest for high dose exposure and 2K monitor reading. No significant difference was detected in the correct detection ratio of observers. However, the difference between the two types of workstations (1K versus 2K monitors) despite less than 3% was significant at a 95% confidence level. This is in good accordance with recently published clinical studies. However, further clinical work will be needed to strengthen this laboratory based impression. Given these subtle differences in low contrast detail detection on 1K and 2K clinical PACS workstation we should probably rethink the recommendations of various national boards for the use of 2K monitors.

  20. Dual-Energy Subtraction Imaging for Diagnosing Vocal Cord Paralysis with Flat Panel Detector Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machida, Haruhiko; Yoda, Keiko; Arai, Yasuko [Tokyo Women' s Medical University Medical Center East, Tokyo (Japan)] (and others)

    2010-06-15

    To investigate the clinical feasibility of dual energy subtraction (DES) imaging to improve the delineation of the vocal cord and diagnostic accuracy of vocal cord paralysis as compared with the anterior-posterior view of flat panel detector (FPD) neck radiography. For 122 consecutive patients who underwent both a flexible laryngoscopy and conventional/DES FPD radiography, three blinded readers retrospectively graded the radiographs during phonation and inspiration on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent) for the delineation of the vocal cord, and in consensus, reviewed the diagnostic accuracy of vocal cord paralysis employing the laryngoscopy as the reference. We compared vocal cord delineation scores and accuracy of vocal cord paralysis diagnosis by both conventional and DES techniques using ({kappa}statistics and assessing the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Vocal cord delineation scores by DES (mean, 4.2 {+-} 0.4) were significantly higher than those by conventional imaging (mean, 3.3 {+-} 0.5) (p < 0.0001). Sensitivity for diagnosing vocal cord paralysis by the conventional technique was 25%, whereas the specificity was 94%. Sensitivity by DES was 75%, whereas the specificity was 96%. The diagnostic accuracy by DES was significantly superior (({kappa}= 0.60, AUC = 0.909) to that by conventional technique ({kappa}= 0.18, AUC = 0.852) (p = 0.038). Dual energy subtraction is a superior method compared to the conventional FPD radiography for delineating the vocal cord and accurately diagnosing vocal cord paralysis.

  1. Standard practice for radiologic examination of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials used in aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice is intended to be used as a supplement to Practices E 1742, E 1255, and E 2033. 1.2 This practice describes procedures for radiologic examination of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials made entirely or in part from fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites. Radiologic examination is: a) radiographic (RT) with film, b) Computed Radiography (CR) with Imaging Plate, c) Digital Radiology (DR) with Digital Detector Array’s (DDA), and d) Radioscopic (RTR) Real Time Radiology with a detection system such as an Image Intensifier. The composite materials under consideration typically contain continuous high modulus fibers (> 20 GPa), such as those listed in 1.4. 1.3 This practice describes established radiological examination methods that are currently used by industry that have demonstrated utility in quality assurance of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials during product process design and optimization, process control, after manufacture inspection, in service exami...

  2. A flat-panel detector based micro-CT system: performance evaluation for small-animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Ho Kyung; Chun, In Kon; Cho, Myung Hye; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung

    2003-12-21

    A dedicated small-animal x-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) system has been developed to screen laboratory small animals such as mice and rats. The micro-CT system consists of an indirect-detection flat-panel x-ray detector with a field-of-view of 120 x 120 mm2, a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder and a parallel data processing system. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array fabricated by a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) process coupled to a CsI:T1 (thallium-doped caesium iodide) scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. Principal imaging performances of the micro-CT system have been evaluated in terms of image uniformity, voxel noise and spatial resolution. It has been found that the image non-uniformity mainly comes from the structural non-uniform sensitivity pattern of the flat-panel detector and the voxel noise is about 48 CT numbers at the voxel size of 100 x 100 x 200 microm3 and the air kerma of 286 mGy. When the magnification ratio is 2, the spatial resolution of the micro-CT system is about 14 1p/mm (line pairs per millimetre) that is almost determined by the flat-panel detector showing about 7 1p/mm resolving power. Through low-contrast phantom imaging studies, the minimum resolvable contrast has been found to be less than 36 CT numbers at the air kerma of 95 mGy. Some laboratory rat imaging results are presented.

  3. Full breast digital mammography with an amorphous silicon-based flat panel detector: Physical characteristics of a clinical prototype

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The physical characteristics of a clinical prototype amorphous silicon-based flat panel imager for full-breast digital mammography have been investigated. The imager employs a thin thallium doped CsI scintillator on an amorphous silicon matrix of detector elements with a pixel pitch of 100 μm. Objective criteria such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and noise equivalent quanta were employed for this evaluation. The presampling MT...

  4. A flat-panel detector based micro-CT system: performance evaluation for small-animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Ho Kyung; Chun, In Kon; Cho, Myung Hye; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seochun, Kiheung, Yongin, Kyungki 449-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-21

    A dedicated small-animal x-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) system has been developed to screen laboratory small animals such as mice and rats. The micro-CT system consists of an indirect-detection flat-panel x-ray detector with a field-of-view of 120 x 120 mm{sup 2}, a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder and a parallel data processing system. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array fabricated by a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) process coupled to a CsI:Tl (thallium-doped caesium iodide) scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. Principal imaging performances of the micro-CT system have been evaluated in terms of image uniformity, voxel noise and spatial resolution. It has been found that the image non-uniformity mainly comes from the structural non-uniform sensitivity pattern of the flat-panel detector and the voxel noise is about 48 CT numbers at the voxel size of 100 x 100 x 200 {mu}m{sup 3} and the air kerma of 286 mGy. When the magnification ratio is 2, the spatial resolution of the micro-CT system is about 14 lp/mm (line pairs per millimetre) that is almost determined by the flat-panel detector showing about 7 lp/mm resolving power. Through low-contrast phantom imaging studies, the minimum resolvable contrast has been found to be less than 36 CT numbers at the air kerma of 95 mGy. Some laboratory rat imaging results are presented.

  5. Multidetector-row CT with a 64-row amorphous silicon flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Edward G.; Colbeth, Richard E.; Daley, Earl T.; Job, Isaias D.; Mollov, Ivan P.; Mollov, Todor I.; Pavkovich, John M.; Roos, Pieter G.; Star-Lack, Josh M.; Tognina, Carlo A.

    2007-03-01

    A unique 64-row flat panel (FP) detector has been developed for sub-second multidetector-row CT (MDCT). The intent was to explore the image quality achievable with relatively inexpensive amorphous silicon (a-Si) compared to existing diagnostic scanners with discrete crystalline diode detectors. The FP MDCT system is a bench-top design that consists of three FP modules. Each module uses a 30 cm x 3.3 cm a-Si array with 576 x 64 photodiodes. The photodiodes are 0.52 mm x 0.52 mm, which allows for about twice the spatial resolution of most commercial MDCT scanners. The modules are arranged in an overlapping geometry, which is sufficient to provide a full-fan 48 cm diameter scan. Scans were obtained with various detachable scintillators, e.g. ceramic Gd IIO IIS, particle-in-binder Gd IIO IIS:Tb and columnar CsI:Tl. Scan quality was evaluated with a Catphan-500 performance phantom and anthropomorphic phantoms. The FP MDCT scans demonstrate nearly equivalent performance scans to a commercial 16-slice MDCT scanner at comparable 10 - 20 mGy/100mAs doses. Thus far, a high contrast resolution of 15 lp/cm and a low contrast resolution of 5 mm @ 0.3 % have been achieved on 1 second scans. Sub-second scans have been achieved with partial rotations. Since the future direction of MDCT appears to be in acquiring single organ coverage per scan, future efforts are planned for increasing the number of detector rows beyond the current 64- rows.

  6. Comparison measurements of DQE for two flat panel detectors: fluoroscopic detector vs. cone beam CT detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt Benítez, Ricardo; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David

    2006-03-01

    The physical performance of two flat panel detectors (FPD) has been evaluated using a standard x-ray beam quality set by IEC, namely RQA5. The FPDs evaluated in this study are based on an amorphous silicon photodiode array that is coupled to a thallium-doped Cesium Iodide scintillator and to a thin film transistor (TFT) array. One detector is the PaxScan 2520 that is designed for fluoro imaging, and has a small dynamic range and a large image lag. The other detector is the PaxScan 4030CB that is designed for cone beam CT, and has a large dynamic range (>16-bit), a reduced image lag and many imaging modes. Varian Medical Systems manufactured both detectors. The linearity of the FPDs was investigated by using an ionization chamber and aluminum filtration in order to obtain the beam quality. Since the FPDs are used in fluoroscopic mode, image lag of the FPD was measured in order to investigate its effect on this study, especially its effect on DQE. The spatial resolution of the FPDs was determined by obtaining the pre-sampling modulation transfer function for each detector. A sharp edge was used in accordance to IEC 62220-1. Next, the Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) was calculated for various exposures levels at RQA5 radiation quality. Finally, the DQE of each FPD was obtained with a modified version of the international standard set by IEC 62220-1. The results show that the physical performance in DQE and MTF of the PaxScan 4030CB is superior to that of PaxScan2520.

  7. The effect of discontinuous airlift mixing in outdoor flat panel photobioreactors on growth of Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leupold, Marco; Hindersin, Stefan; Kerner, Martin; Hanelt, Dieter

    2013-11-01

    Discontinuous airlift mixing was realized by injecting pressured air at time intervals with a frequency between 0.033 and 0.25 Hz (at 80 kPa; i.e., every 4-30 s; valve opening time 800 ms) into outdoor flat panel photobioreactors ([Formula: see text]). This caused a flow velocity between 2 and 20 cm s(-1) of the culture medium within the photobioreactor and the mixing time was between 38 and 103.5 s, requiring 0.175-1.340 L(gas volume) L(photobioreactor volume)(-1) min(-1) pressured air. In order to detect the effect on growth of Scenedesmus obliquus during outdoor experiments and to be able to compare obtained results, a batch run with an airlift frequency of 0.25 Hz was simultaneously used as control. Growth at different airlift frequencies was measured by the increase of cell dry weight (CDW) during 3-5 days and biomass yield on light energy was calculated. With increasing airlift frequencies, growth increased from 52 to 91 % compared to the control. When CDW was at around 1.0-1.5 g L(-1), airlift frequency had no effect on growth, indicating that mass transfer gradients of nutrients and gas were not the limiting factors of growth. Above 1.5 g CDW L(-1), growth increased with increasing airlift frequency and light limitation for a single cell occurred. This effect was observed during low and high irradiance and it is concluded that a higher mean flow causes a better light distribution, resulting in an enhanced growth. Biomass productivity and demand of pressured air are correlated logarithmically, which enables to save mixing energy during cultivation.

  8. Image quality assessment of a pre-clinical flat-panel volumetric micro-CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Louise Y.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W.

    2006-03-01

    Small animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. Current micro-CT systems are capable of achieving spatial resolution on the order of 10 μm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. However, the speed of data acquisition of these systems is relatively slow, when compared with clinical CT systems. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging has proven to be a powerful tool clinically in detecting and diagnosing cancer, stroke, pulmonary and ischemic heart diseases. In order to perform this technique in mice and rats, quantitative CT images must be acquired at a rate of at least 1 Hz. Recently, a research pre-clinical CT scanner (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare) has been designed specifically for dynamic perfusion imaging in small animals. Using an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector and a clinical slip-ring gantry, this system is capable of acquiring volumetric image data at a rate of 1 Hz, with in-plane resolution of 150 μm, while covering the entire thoracic region of a mouse or whole organs of a rat. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the principal imaging performance of the micro-CT system, in terms of spatial resolution, image uniformity, linearity, dose and voxel noise for the feasibility of imaging mice and rats. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.7 line pairs per mm and noise of 42 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 seconds at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  9. Do LCDs have a chance to keep a leading position on flat panel display market?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Jerzy; Olifierczuk, Marek

    2004-09-01

    A lot of significant discoveries and inventions in the field of technology of displays were made in the latter part of the twentieth century. Apart from well-known CRT, the plasma-, luminescence- and liquid crystal-displays are commercially available. One can notice that a leading position on that flat panel displays market belong to LCD. But the progress in Organic LED materials and devices is impressive. Threshold voltage for light emission have fallen from several thousands V to just 2 - 3 V for today's OLEDs (polymer and small molecule). Luminous efficiency has increased from 0,01 to more than 10 lm/W. These improvements have brought PLED technology to the point where serious consideration is being given to OLED graphic and video display product. The question given some years ago by Dr. M. E. Becker, [Display Metrology and Systems]: "...is the current OLED enthusiasm justified because OLED displays feature significant improvements in visual and ergonomic performance, and because they are much cheaper to manufacture; Or it is just another hope for those who missed the LCD train?...," is trite. During SID Conference in Baltimore in 2003 two companies claiming to have built the largest organic LED. International Display Technology demonstrated a 20 inch display driven by "super amorphous silicon" technology; Sony showed off its 24 inch screen, which consists of a 2x2 tiled array of OLED displays. The presented work will be oriented towards specifying the characteristic features of liquid crystal and electro luminescence organic compounds which make these groups of displays so attractive and prospective among other imagery systems devices existing nowadays.

  10. An animal PET scanner using flat-panel position-sensitive PMTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takashi; Ote, Kibou; Sakai, Koichi; Noda, Akihiro; Shimizu, Keiji; Masuda, Keisuke; Ohmura, Tomohide; Watanabe, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    To design, build, and evaluate an animal PET scanner, which can be used with non-human primates under conscious condition, incorporating flat-panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMTs). The system contains 30 detector modules, each having two PS-PMTs and 16×18 lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate scintillation crystal arrays. The system has 17,280 crystals (480 per ring) arranged in 36 rings, with a diameter of 508 mm and axial extent of 108 mm. The gantry tilt mechanism enables PET studies to be performed on a monkey in the sitting position. Data can be acquired in either the 2D or 3D mode, with the slice collimators being retracted in the 3D mode. At the center of the field-of-view, radial resolution is 2.7 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and tangential resolution is 2.4 mm FWHM, while axial resolution is 2.5 mm FWHM for direct slices and 2.7 mm FWHM for cross slices. Scatter fraction, count rate capability, and sensitivity were evaluated using a cylindrical phantom 10 cm in diameter. The noise equivalent count rate in the 3D mode is equivalent to that in the 2D mode at a three times higher radioactivity level. Total system sensitivity is 1.3 kcps/(kBq/mL) in 2D mode and 7.4 kcps/(kBq/mL) in the 3D mode. Animal studies with a monkey were performed to evaluate the imaging capabilities of the scanner. The new PET scanner will be a useful research tool with non-human primates for pre-clinical drug development.

  11. Assessment of the CO2 fixation capacity of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 outdoor cultures in vertical flat-panel reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clares, Marta E; Moreno, José; Guerrero, Miguel G; García-González, Mercedes

    2014-10-10

    The extent of biological CO2 fixation was evaluated for outdoor cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047. Culture conditions were optimized indoors in bubble-column photochemostats operating in continuous mode, subjected to irradiance cycles mimicking the light regime outdoors. Highest values achieved for CO2 fixation rate and biomass productivity were 1 and 0.6 g L(-1) day(-1), respectively. The comparison among different reactors operating simultaneously - open pond, horizontal tubular reactor and vertical flat-panel - allowed to assess their relative efficiency for the outdoor development of Anabaena cultures. Despite the higher volumetric CO2 fixation capacity (and biomass productivity) exhibited by the tubular photobioreactor, yield of the flat-panel reactor was 50% higher than that of the tubular option on a per area basis, reaching values over 35 g CO2 fixed m(-2) d(-1). The flat-panel reactor actually represents a most suitable system for CO2 capture coupled to the generation of valuable biomass by Anabaena cultures.

  12. Reducing dose in urography while maintaining image quality - a comparison of storage phosphor plates and a flat-panel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Margareta; Geijer, Haakan; Andersson, Torbjoern [Oerebro University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oerebro (Sweden); Persliden, Jan [Oerebro University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Oerebro (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of new flat-panel detector technology often forces us to accept too high dose levels as proposed by the manufacturers. We need a tool to compare the image quality of a new system with the accepted standard. The aim of this study was to obtain a comparable image quality for two systems - storage phosphor plates and a flat-panel system using intravenous urography (IVU) as a clinical model. The image quality figure was calculated using a contrast-detail phantom (CDRAD) for the two evaluated systems. This allowed us to set a dose for the flat-panel system that gave equivalent image quality to the storage phosphor plates. This reduced detector dose was used in an evaluation of clinical images to find out if the dose reduction from the phantom study indeed resulted in images of equal clinical image quality. The image quality was assessed using image criteria of the European guidelines for IVU with visual grading analysis. Equivalent image quality in image pairs was achieved at 30% of the dose. The CDRAD contrast-detail phantom makes it possible to find dose levels that give equal image quality using different imaging systems. (orig.)

  13. Effects of Tangential Edge Constraints on the Postbuckling Behavior of Flat and Curved Panels Subjected to Thermal and Mechanical Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W.; Librescu, L.; Nemeth, M. P.; Starnes, J. H. , Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of tangential edge constraints on the postbuckling response of flat and shallow curved panels subjected to thermal and mechanical loads is presented. The mechanical loads investigated are uniform compressive edge loads and transverse lateral pressure. The temperature fields considered are associated with spatially nonuniform heating over the panels, and a linear through-the-thickness temperature gradient. The structural model is based on a higher-order transverse-shear-deformation theory of shallow shells that incorporates the effects of geometric nonlinearities, initial geometric imperfections, and tangential edge motion constraints. Results are presented for three-layer sandwich panels made from transversely isotropic materials. Simply supported panels are considered in which the tangential motion of the unloaded edges is either unrestrained, partially restrained, or fully restrained. These results focus on the effects of the tangential edge restraint on the postbuckling response. The results of this study indicate that tangentially restraining the edges of a curved panel can make the panel insensitive to initial geometric imperfections in some cases.

  14. [Flat-panel detector technology -State-of-the-art and future prospects-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tatsuya

    2002-01-01

    A flat-panel detector (FPD) is a long-awaited technology to implement the digital X-ray imaging technology into the radiological department. This paper describes the state-of-the-art technology and future prospects on the FPD technology. State-of-the-art technology was reviewed taking the CXDI series as an example. Several FPD-based systems have been introduced into the Japanese market since CXDI-11 opened it in November 1998. Accompanying CXDI-C2 for control, CXDI-22 for table position and CXDI-31 for portable, the CXDI series fulfills the requirement of the radiography room being a fully digitalized room. The FPD on the CXDI series is comprised of a scintillator (Gd(2)O(2)S:Tb(3+)) as a primary sensor in which the X-ray is captured and an amorphous silicon detector (LANMIT) as a secondary sensor in which the fluorescent light is detected. Since the scintillator is identical to that of the screen-film systems, it can be said as proven, durable and chemically stable and it is expected to produce the same image quality as the screen-film systems. CXDI-31, a portable FPD-based system, was developed targeting thinner dimensions, lightweight, durability and high spatial resolution. Thoroughly re-designing the mechanical structure and reducing the power consumption at the readout IC realized thinner dimensions. Introducing the portable note PC technologies successfully combined lightweight with durability. Improving the sensor process and re-designing the layout made the sensor high resolution without compromising the signal-to-noise ratio. Future prospects were overviewed in the aspect of technology and applications. Sensitivity, spatial resolution, frame rate and portability were described as the upcoming technology. Increasing gain and reducing noise will realize higher sensitivity, especially by adopting the PbI(2), HgI(2) or such photoconductor materials as the primary sensor. Pixelized amplifier will also achieve higher sensitivity. Layered sensor designed such

  15. Amorphous and Polycrystalline Photoconductors for Direct Conversion Flat Panel X-Ray Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim S. Karim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last ten to fifteen years there has been much research in using amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors as x-ray photoconductors in various x-ray image sensor applications, most notably in flat panel x-ray imagers (FPXIs. We first outline the essential requirements for an ideal large area photoconductor for use in a FPXI, and discuss how some of the current amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors fulfill these requirements. At present, only stabilized amorphous selenium (doped and alloyed a-Se has been commercialized, and FPXIs based on a-Se are particularly suitable for mammography, operating at the ideal limit of high detective quantum efficiency (DQE. Further, these FPXIs can also be used in real-time, and have already been used in such applications as tomosynthesis. We discuss some of the important attributes of amorphous and polycrystalline x-ray photoconductors such as their large area deposition ability, charge collection efficiency, x-ray sensitivity, DQE, modulation transfer function (MTF and the importance of the dark current. We show the importance of charge trapping in limiting not only the sensitivity but also the resolution of these detectors. Limitations on the maximum acceptable dark current and the corresponding charge collection efficiency jointly impose a practical constraint that many photoconductors fail to satisfy. We discuss the case of a-Se in which the dark current was brought down by three orders of magnitude by the use of special blocking layers to satisfy the dark current constraint. There are also a number of polycrystalline photoconductors, HgI2 and PbO being good examples, that show potential for commercialization in the same way that multilayer stabilized a-Se x-ray photoconductors were developed for commercial applications. We highlight the unique nature of avalanche multiplication in a-Se and how it has led to the development of the commercial HARP video-tube. An all solid state version of the

  16. Amorphous and polycrystalline photoconductors for direct conversion flat panel x-ray image sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Safa; Frey, Joel B; Belev, George; Tousignant, Olivier; Mani, Habib; Greenspan, Jonathan; Laperriere, Luc; Bubon, Oleksandr; Reznik, Alla; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Karim, Karim S; Rowlands, John A

    2011-01-01

    In the last ten to fifteen years there has been much research in using amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors as x-ray photoconductors in various x-ray image sensor applications, most notably in flat panel x-ray imagers (FPXIs). We first outline the essential requirements for an ideal large area photoconductor for use in a FPXI, and discuss how some of the current amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors fulfill these requirements. At present, only stabilized amorphous selenium (doped and alloyed a-Se) has been commercialized, and FPXIs based on a-Se are particularly suitable for mammography, operating at the ideal limit of high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Further, these FPXIs can also be used in real-time, and have already been used in such applications as tomosynthesis. We discuss some of the important attributes of amorphous and polycrystalline x-ray photoconductors such as their large area deposition ability, charge collection efficiency, x-ray sensitivity, DQE, modulation transfer function (MTF) and the importance of the dark current. We show the importance of charge trapping in limiting not only the sensitivity but also the resolution of these detectors. Limitations on the maximum acceptable dark current and the corresponding charge collection efficiency jointly impose a practical constraint that many photoconductors fail to satisfy. We discuss the case of a-Se in which the dark current was brought down by three orders of magnitude by the use of special blocking layers to satisfy the dark current constraint. There are also a number of polycrystalline photoconductors, HgI(2) and PbO being good examples, that show potential for commercialization in the same way that multilayer stabilized a-Se x-ray photoconductors were developed for commercial applications. We highlight the unique nature of avalanche multiplication in a-Se and how it has led to the development of the commercial HARP video-tube. An all solid state version of the HARP has been

  17. Measurement of joint kinematics using a conventional clinical single-perspective flat-panel radiography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seslija, Petar; Teeter, Matthew G.; Yuan Xunhua; Naudie, Douglas D. R.; Bourne, Robert B.; MacDonald, Steven J.; Peters, Terry M.; Holdsworth, David W. [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada) and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada) and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada) and Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Western Ontario and London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Western Ontario and London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada) and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: The ability to accurately measure joint kinematics is an important tool in studying both normal joint function and pathologies associated with injury and disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, accuracy, precision, and clinical safety of measuring 3D joint motion using a conventional flat-panel radiography system prior to its application in an in vivo study. Methods: An automated, image-based tracking algorithm was implemented to measure the three-dimensional pose of a sparse object from a two-dimensional radiographic projection. The algorithm was tested to determine its efficiency and failure rate, defined as the number of image frames where automated tracking failed, or required user intervention. The accuracy and precision of measuring three-dimensional motion were assessed using a robotic controlled, tibiofemoral knee phantom programmed to mimic a subject with a total knee replacement performing a stair ascent activity. Accuracy was assessed by comparing the measurements of the single-plane radiographic tracking technique to those of an optical tracking system, and quantified by the measurement discrepancy between the two systems using the Bland-Altman technique. Precision was assessed through a series of repeated measurements of the tibiofemoral kinematics, and was quantified using the across-trial deviations of the repeated kinematic measurements. The safety of the imaging procedure was assessed by measuring the effective dose of ionizing radiation associated with the x-ray exposures, and analyzing its relative risk to a human subject. Results: The automated tracking algorithm displayed a failure rate of 2% and achieved an average computational throughput of 8 image frames/s. Mean differences between the radiographic and optical measurements for translations and rotations were less than 0.08 mm and 0.07 Degree-Sign in-plane, and 0.24 mm and 0.6 Degree-Sign out-of-plane. The repeatability of kinematics measurements performed

  18. An investigation of flat panel equipment variables on image quality with a dedicated cardiac phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragusin, O.; Bosmans, H.; Pappas, C.; Desmet, W.

    2008-09-01

    Image quality (IQ) evaluation plays a key role in the process of optimization of new x-ray systems. Ideally, this process should be supported by real clinical images, but ethical issues and differences in anatomy and pathology of patients make it impossible. Phantom studies might overcome these issues. This paper presents the IQ evaluation of 30 cineangiographic films acquired with a cardiac flat panel system. The phantom used simulates the anatomy of the heart and allows the circulation of contrast agent boluses through coronary arteries. Variables investigated with influence on IQ and radiation dose are: tube potential, detector dose, added Copper filters, dynamic density optimization (DDO) and viewing angle. The IQ evaluation consisted of scoring 4 simulated calcified lesions located on different coronary artery segments in terms of degree of visualization. Eight cardiologists rated the lesions using a five-point scale ((1) lesion not visible to (5) very good visibility). Radiation doses associated to the angiograms are expressed in terms of incident air kerma (IAK) and effective dose that has been calculated with PCXMX software (STUK, Finland) from the exposure settings assuming a standard sized patient of 70 Kg. Mean IQ scores ranged from 1.68 to 4.88. The highest IQ scores were obtained for the angiograms acquired with tube potential 80 kVp, no added Cu filters, DDO 60%, RAO and LAO views and the highest entrance detector dose that has been used in the present study, namely 0.17 μGy/im. Radiation doses (IAK ~40 mGy and effective dose of 1 mSv) were estimated for angiograms acquired at 15 frames s-1, detector field-of-view 20 cm, and a length of 5 s. The following parameters improved the IQ factor significantly: a change in tube potential from 96 to 80 kVp, detector dose from 0.10 μGy/im to 0.17 μGy/im, the absence of Copper filtration. DDO variable which is a post-processing parameter should be carefully evaluated because it alters the quality of the

  19. Calibration model of a dual gain flat panel detector for 2D and 3D x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidgunst, C; Ritter, D; Lang, E

    2007-09-01

    The continuing research and further development in flat panel detector technology have led to its integration into more and more medical x-ray systems for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging, such as fixed or mobile C arms. Besides the obvious advantages of flat panel detectors, like the slim design and the resulting optimum accessibility to the patient, their success is primarily a product of the image quality that can be achieved. The benefits in the physical and performance-related features as opposed to conventional image intensifier systems, (e.g., distortion-free reproduction of imaging information or almost linear signal response over a large dynamic range) can be fully exploited, however, only if the raw detector images are correctly calibrated and postprocessed. Previous procedures for processing raw data contain idealizations that, in the real world, lead to artifacts or losses in image quality. Thus, for example, temperature dependencies or changes in beam geometry, as can occur with mobile C arm systems, have not been taken into account up to this time. Additionally, adverse characteristics such as image lag or aging effects have to be compensated to attain the best possible image quality. In this article a procedure is presented that takes into account the important dependencies of the individual pixel sensitivity of flat panel detectors used in 2D or 3D imaging and simultaneously minimizes the work required for an extensive recalibration. It is suitable for conventional detectors with only one gain mode as well as for the detectors specially developed for 3D imaging with dual gain read-out technology.

  20. Monte Carlo calculation of the spatial response (Modulated Transfer Function) of a scintillation flat panel and comparison with experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste, Belén; Miró, Rafael; Monasor, Paula; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-11-01

    Phosphor screens are commonly used in many X-ray imaging applications. The design and optimization of these detectors can be achieved using Monte Carlo codes to simulate radiation transport in scintillation materials and to improve the spatial response. This work presents an exhaustive procedure to measure the spatial resolution of a scintillation flat panel image and to evaluate the agreement with data obtained by simulation. To evaluate the spatial response we have used the Modulated Transfer Function (MTF) parameter. According to this, we have obtained the Line Spread Function (LSF) of the system since the Fourier Transform (FT) of the LSF gives the MTF. The experimental images were carried out using a medical X-ray tube (Toshiba E7299X) and a flat panel (Hammamatsu C9312SK). Measurements were based on the slit methodology experimental implementation, which measures the response of the system to a line. LSF measurements have been performed using a 0.2 mm wide lead slit superimposed over the flat panel. The detector screen was modelled with MCNP (version 6) Monte Carlo simulation code in order to analyze the effect of the acquisition setup configuration and to compare the response of scintillator screens with the experimental results. MCNP6 offers the possibility of studying the optical physics parameters (optical scattering and absorption coefficients) that occur in the phosphor screen. The study has been tested for different X-ray tube voltages, from 100 to 140 kV. An acceptable convergence between the MTF results obtained with MCNP6 and the experimental measurements have been obtained.

  1. Compact muon solenoid magnet reaches full field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Scientist of the U.S. Department of Energy in Fermilab and collaborators of the US/CMS project announced that the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet has reached full field in tests at CERN. (1 apge)

  2. Volumetric soft tissue brain imaging on xCAT, a mobile flat-panel x-ray CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2009-02-01

    We discuss the ongoing development of soft-tissue imaging capabilities on xCAT, a highly portable, flat-panel based cone-beam X-ray CT platform. By providing the ability to rapidly detect intra-cranial bleeds and other symptoms of stroke directly at the patient's bedside, our new system can potentially significantly improve the management of neurological emergency and intensive care patients. The paper reports on the design of our system, as well as on the methods used to combat artifacts due to scatter, non-linear detector response and scintillator glare. Images of cadaveric head samples are also presented and compared with conventional CT scans.

  3. Radiation dose reduction using a CdZnTe-based computed tomography system: Comparison to flat-panel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Although x-ray projection mammography has been very effective in early detection of breast cancer, its utility is reduced in the detection of small lesions that are occult or in dense breasts. One drawback is that the inherent superposition of parenchymal structures makes visualization of small lesions difficult. Breast computed tomography using flat-panel detectors has been developed to address this limitation by producing three-dimensional data while at the same time providing more comfort to the patients by eliminating breast compression. Flat panels are charge integrating detectors and therefore lack energy resolution capability. Recent advances in solid state semiconductor x-ray detector materials and associated electronics allow the investigation of x-ray imaging systems that use a photon counting and energy discriminating detector, which is the subject of this article. Methods: A small field-of-view computed tomography (CT) system that uses CdZnTe (CZT) photon counting detector was compared to one that uses a flat-panel detector for different imaging tasks in breast imaging. The benefits afforded by the CZT detector in the energy weighting modes were investigated. Two types of energy weighting methods were studied: Projection based and image based. Simulation and phantom studies were performed with a 2.5 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylinder filled with iodine and calcium contrast objects. Simulation was also performed on a 10 cm breast specimen. Results: The contrast-to-noise ratio improvements as compared to flat-panel detectors were 1.30 and 1.28 (projection based) and 1.35 and 1.25 (image based) for iodine over PMMA and hydroxylapatite over PMMA, respectively. Corresponding simulation values were 1.81 and 1.48 (projection based) and 1.85 and 1.48 (image based). Dose reductions using the CZT detector were 52.05% and 49.45% for iodine and hydroxyapatite imaging, respectively. Image-based weighting was also found to have the least beam

  4. Measurements of the modulation transfer function, normalized noise power spectrum and detective quantum efficiency for two flat panel detectors: a fluoroscopic and a cone beam computer tomography flat panel detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Ricardo Betancourt; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Liu, Shaohua

    2009-01-01

    The physical performance of two Flat Panel Detectors has been evaluated. The first Flat Panel Detector is for Fluoroscopic applications, Varian PaxScan 2520, and the second is for Cone Beam Computer Tomography applications, Varian PaxScan 4030CB. First, the spectrum of the X-ray source was measured. Second, the linearity of the detectors was investigated by using an ionization chamber and the average ADU values of the detectors. Third, the temporal resolution was characterized by evaluating their image lag. Fourth, their spatial resolution was characterized by the pre-sampling Modulation Transfer Function. Fifth, the Normalized Noise Power Spectrum was calculated for various exposures levels. Finally, the Detective Quantum Efficiency was obtained as a function of spatial frequency and entrance exposure. The results illustrate that the physical performance in Detective Quantum Efficiency and Normalized Noise Power Spectrum of the Cone Beam Computer Tomography detector is superior to that of the fluoroscopic detector whereas the latter detector has a higher spatial resolution as demonstrated by larger values of its Modulation Transfer Function at large spatial frequencies.

  5. Dynamic modeling of the microalgae cultivation phase for energy production in open raceway ponds and flat panel photobioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo eMarsullo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic model of microalgae cultivation phase is presented in this work. Two cultivation technologies are taken into account: the open raceway pond and the flat panel photobioreactor. For each technology, the model is able to evaluate the microalgae areal and volumetric productivity and the energy production and consumption. Differently from the most common existing models in literature, which deal with a specific part of the overall cultivation process, the model presented here includes all physical and chemical quantities that mostly affect microalgae growth: the equation of the specific growth rate for the microalgae is influenced by CO2 and nutrients concentration in the water, light intensity, temperature of the water in the reactor and by the microalgae species being considered. All these input parameters can be tuned to obtain reliable predictions. A comparison with experimental data taken from the literature shows that the predictions are consistent, slightly overestimating the productivity in case of closed photobioreactor. The results obtained by the simulation runs are consistent with those found in literature, being the areal productivity for the open raceway pond between 50 and 70 t/(ha*year in Southern Spain (Sevilla and Brazil (Petrolina and between 250 and 350 t/(ha*year for the flat panel photobioreactor in the same locations.

  6. Use of personal digital assistants for retrieval of medical images and data on high-resolution flat panel displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman; McCoy, J Michael; McGill, D Ric; Li, Minglin; Brown, Allen

    2003-01-01

    For its new acute care hospital, the University of California at Los Angeles is evaluating innovative technology involving high-resolution flat panel display devices configured as "network appliances" that can be wall mounted for use in the retrieval and display of medical images and data. Physicians and healthcare providers can log on with wireless handheld computers, which can serve as an identification device as well as a navigational tool for selecting patient records and data. These data are displayed and manipulated on the flat panel display without the need for a keyboard or mouse. A prototype was developed with commercially available image display software, which was modified to allow the remote control of software functions from a handheld device through an infrared communication port. The system also allows navigation through the patient data in a World Wide Web-based electronic patient record. This prototype illustrates the evolution of radiologic facilities toward "shareable" high-quality display devices that allow more convenient and cost-effective access to medical images and related data in complex clinical environments, resulting in a paradigm shift in data navigation and accessibility.

  7. Three-Dimensional Exact Free Vibration Analysis of Spherical, Cylindrical, and Flat One-Layered Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Brischetto

    2014-01-01

    equilibrium written in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates for the free vibrations of simply supported structures. These equations consider an exact geometry for shells without simplifications. The main novelty is the possibility of a general formulation for different geometries. The equations written in general orthogonal curvilinear coordinates allow the analysis of spherical shell panels and they automatically degenerate into cylindrical shell panel, cylindrical closed shell, and plate cases. Results are proposed for isotropic and orthotropic structures. An exhaustive overview is given of the vibration modes for a number of thickness ratios, imposed wave numbers, geometries, embedded materials, and angles of orthotropy. These results can also be used as reference solutions to validate two-dimensional models for plates and shells in both analytical and numerical form (e.g., closed solutions, finite element method, differential quadrature method, and global collocation method.

  8. Laser Resurfacing: Full Field and Fractional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozner, Jason N; DiBernardo, Barry E

    2016-07-01

    Laser resurfacing is a very popular procedure worldwide. Full field and fractional lasers are used in many aesthetic practices. There have been significant advances in laser resurfacing in the past few years, which make patient treatments more efficacious and with less downtime. Erbium and carbon dioxide and ablative, nonablative, and hybrid fractional lasers are all extremely effective and popular tools that have a place in plastic surgery and dermatology offices.

  9. Monitoring of experimental rat lung transplants by high-resolution flat-panel volumetric computer tomography (fpVCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greschus, Susanne; Kuchenbuch, Tim; Plötz, Christian; Obert, Martin; Traupe, Horst; Padberg, Winfried; Grau, Veronika; Hirschburger, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive assessment of experimental lung transplants with high resolution would be favorable to exclude technical failure and to follow up graft outcome in the living animal. Here we describe a flat-panel Volumetric Computed Tomography (fpVCT) technique using a prototype scanner. Lung transplantation was performed in allogeneic as well as in corresponding syngeneic rat strain combinations. At different time points post-transplantation, fpVCT was performed. Lung transplants can be visualized in the living rat with high-spatial resolution. FpVCT allows a detailed analysis of the lung and the bronchi. Infiltrates developing during rejection episodes can be diagnosed and follow-up studies can easily be performed. With fpVCT it is possible to control the technical success of the surgical procedure. Graft rejection can be visualized individually in the living animal noninvasively, which is highly advantageous for studying the pathogenesis of chronic rejection or to monitor new therapies.

  10. Evaluation of imaging quality for flat-panel detector based low dose C-arm CT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chang-Woo; Cha, Bo Kyung; Jeon, Sungchae; Huh, Young [Converged Medical Device Research Center, Advanced Medical Device Research Division, KERI, Gyeonggido 426-910 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    The image quality associated with the extent of the angle of gantry rotation, the number of projection views, and the dose of X-ray radiation was investigated in flat-panel detector (FPD) based C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system for medical applications. A prototype CBCT system for the projection acquisition used the X-ray tube (A-132, Varian inc.) having rhenium-tungsten molybdenum target and flat panel a-Si X-ray detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian inc.) having a 397 x 298 mm active area with 388 μm pixel pitch and 1024 x 768 pixels in 2 by 2 binning mode. The performance comparison of X-ray imaging quality was carried out using the Feldkamp, Davis, and Kress (FDK) reconstruction algorithm between different conditions of projection acquisition. In this work, head-and-dental (75 kVp/20 mA) and chest (90 kVp/25 mA) phantoms were used to evaluate the image quality. The 361 (30 fps x 12 s) projection data during 360 deg. gantry rotation with 1 deg. interval for the 3D reconstruction were acquired. Parke weighting function were applied to handle redundant data and improve the reconstructed image quality in a mobile C-arm system with limited rotation angles. The reconstructed 3D images were investigated for comparison of qualitative image quality in terms of scan protocols (projection views, rotation angles and exposure dose). Furthermore, the performance evaluation in image quality will be investigated regarding X-ray dose and limited projection data for a FPD based mobile C-arm CBCT system. (authors)

  11. Human health and ecological toxicity potentials due to heavy metal content in waste electronic devices with flat panel displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Schoenung, Julie M

    2010-05-15

    Display devices such as cathode-ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer monitors are known to contain toxic substances and have consequently been banned from disposal in landfills in the State of California and elsewhere. New types of flat panel display (FPD) devices, millions of which are now purchased each year, also contain toxic substances, but have not previously been systematically studied and compared to assess the potential impact that could result from their ultimate disposal. In the current work, the focus is on the evaluation of end-of-life toxicity potential from the heavy metal content in select FPD devices with the intent to inform material selection and design-for-environment (DfE) decisions. Specifically, the metals antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, vanadium, and zinc in plasma TVs, LCD (liquid crystal display) TVs, LCD computer monitors and laptop computers are considered. The human health and ecotoxicity potentials are evaluated through a life cycle assessment perspective by combining data on the respective heavy metal contents, the characterization factors in the U.S. EPA Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI), and a pathway and impact model. Principal contributors to the toxicity potentials are lead, arsenic, copper, and mercury. Although the heavy metal content in newer flat panel display devices creates less human health toxicity potential than that in CRTs, for ecological toxicity, the new devices are worse, especially because of the mercury in LCD TVs and the copper in plasma TVs.

  12. Robot arm based flat panel CT-guided electromagnetic tracked spine interventions: phantom and animal model experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Mahnken, Andreas H. [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen, Aachen (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); Wiemann, Christian; Guenther, Rolf W. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kalender, Willi A. [Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate accuracy and procedure times of electromagnetic tracking (EMT) in a robotic arm mounted flat panel setting using phantom and animal cadaveric models. A robotic arm mounted flat panel (RMFP) was used in combination with EMT to perform anthropomorphic phantom (n = 90) and ex vivo pig based punctures (n = 120) of lumbar facet joints (FJ, n = 120) and intervertebral discs (IVD, n = 90). Procedure accuracies and times were assessed and evaluated. FJ punctures were carried out with a spatial accuracy of 0.8 {+-} 0.9 mm (phantom) and 0.6 {+-} 0.8 mm (ex vivo) respectively. While IVD punctures showed puncture deviations of 0.6 {+-} 1.2 mm (phantom) and 0.5 {+-} 0.6 mm (ex vivo), direct and angulated phantom based punctures had accuracies of 0.8 {+-} 0.9 mm and 1.0 {+-} 1.3 mm. Planning took longer for ex vivo IVD punctures compared to phantom model interventions (39.3 {+-} 17.3 s vs. 20.8 {+-} 5.0 s, p = 0.001) and for angulated vs. direct phantom FJ punctures (19.7 {+-} 5.1 s vs. 28.6 {+-} 7.8 s, p < 0.001). Puncture times were longer for ex vivo procedures when compared to phantom model procedures in both FJ (37.9 {+-} 9.0 s vs. 23.6 {+-} 7.2 s, p = 0.001) and IVD punctures (43.9 {+-} 16.1 s vs. 31.1 {+-} 6.4 s, p = 0.026). The combination of RMFP with EMT provides an accurate method of navigation for spinal interventions such as facet joint punctures and intervertebral disc punctures. (orig.)

  13. Human health and ecological toxicity potentials due to heavy metal content in waste electronic devices with flat panel displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seong-Rin [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, 2017 Kemper Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Schoenung, Julie M., E-mail: jmschoenung@ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, 2017 Kemper Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Display devices such as cathode-ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer monitors are known to contain toxic substances and have consequently been banned from disposal in landfills in the State of California and elsewhere. New types of flat panel display (FPD) devices, millions of which are now purchased each year, also contain toxic substances, but have not previously been systematically studied and compared to assess the potential impact that could result from their ultimate disposal. In the current work, the focus is on the evaluation of end-of-life toxicity potential from the heavy metal content in select FPD devices with the intent to inform material selection and design-for-environment (DfE) decisions. Specifically, the metals antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, vanadium, and zinc in plasma TVs, LCD (liquid crystal display) TVs, LCD computer monitors and laptop computers are considered. The human health and ecotoxicity potentials are evaluated through a life cycle assessment perspective by combining data on the respective heavy metal contents, the characterization factors in the U.S. EPA Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI), and a pathway and impact model. Principal contributors to the toxicity potentials are lead, arsenic, copper, and mercury. Although the heavy metal content in newer flat panel display devices creates less human health toxicity potential than that in CRTs, for ecological toxicity, the new devices are worse, especially because of the mercury in LCD TVs and the copper in plasma TVs.

  14. Signal and noise transfer properties of CMOS based active pixel flat panel imager coupled to structured CsI:Tl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, C D; Bohndiek, S E; Blakesley, J; Olivo, A; Speller, R D

    2009-01-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) active pixel sensors can be optically coupled to CsI:Tl phosphors forming a indirect active pixel flat panel imager (APFPI) for high performance medical imaging. The aim of this work is to determine the x-ray imaging capabilities of CMOS-based APFPI and study the signal and noise transfer properties of CsI:Tl phosphors. Three different CsI:Tl phosphors from two different vendors have been used to produce three system configurations. The performance of each system configuration has been studied in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) in the mammographic energy range. A simple method to determine quantum limited systems in this energy range is also presented. In addition, with aid of monochromatic synchrotron radiation, the effect of iodine characteristic x-rays of the CsI:Tl on the MTF has been determined. A Monte Carlo simulation of the signal transfer properties of the imager is also presented in order to study the stages that degrade the spatial resolution of our current system. The effect of using substrate patterning during the growth of CsI:Tl columnar structure was also studied, along with the effect of CsI:Tl fixed pattern noise due to local variations in the scintillation light. CsI:Tl fixed pattern noise appears to limit the performance of our current system configurations. All the system configurations are quantum limited at 0.23 microC/kg with two of them having DQE (0) equal to 0.57. Active pixel flat panel imagers are shown to be digital x-ray imagers with almost constant DQE throughout a significant part of their dynamic range and in particular at very low exposures.

  15. Performance quantification of a flat-panel imager in industrial mega-voltage X-ray imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritt, Carina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Hofmann, Jürgen; Flisch, Alexander; Sennhauser, Urs

    2017-03-01

    Active matrix flat-panel detectors have gained popularity amongst X-ray imaging systems due to their speed, resolution and high dynamic range. With appropriate shielding modern flat-panel imagers can even be used in high energy Computed Tomography (CT) systems of energies up to several mega-electronvolt (MeV). However, the performance of a digital detector is not independent of the rest of the radiographic system but depends on all other components of the system. Signal and noise transfer properties highly depend on all parameters of an imaging chain. This work focuses on quantifying the resolution capabilities and the noise in the signals of a MeV X-ray imaging system. The performance quantification is done by computing the modulation transfer function (MTF) using the standard edge method as well as the noise power spectrum (NPS) of the imaging system. We performed Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in order to understand the influence of scattered radiation on the measurements. A comparison of the horizontal and vertical MTF showed that the imaging behaviour of the detector is isotropic. Moreover, an additional investigation of the noise performance of the system showed that there is no measurable noise correlation present in the system. It was shown that the thickness of the edge device does not have a significant influence on the resulting system MTF. A rapid drop in the visibility could be observed resulting in a value of 1.2 line pairs per mm at 50% MTF. The visibility limit of line pair patterns was found to be at 2.3 line pairs per mm given by the 10% MTF value.

  16. Edge-Spread Functions Expected for Several Changes in a Commercial Flat-Panel System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schach von Wittenau, A E

    2002-02-25

    The Bldg. 239 radiography facility uses a 9 MeV bremsstrahlung linac and a commercially available fiat-panel detector system. Ref. [1] discusses the facility in detail. Ref. [1] furthermore discusses the imaging quality of the fiat-panel system, and identifies several sources of image blur for the system in question. The maim'' contributors to the imaging blur are radiation scattered from the front cover of the detector housing, radiation scattered from the back cover of the detector housing, and radiation scattered from the aluminum plate that supports the amorphous-Si detector within the detector housing. The manufacturer of one such fiat-panel system seems willing to modify one of their products as requested, if such modifications may be made easily. Easy modifications would include making the detector housing thinner, decreasing the sizes of air gaps inside tile detector system, etc. Removing the aluminum support plate is considered to be a difficult modification. This memo reports the results of a set of Monte Carlo simulations that were performed to predict the changes in imaging quality, compared to that of the current system, if the detector is modified as suggested above. In particular, the edge-spread function (ESF) was calculated for each modification. ESFs were calculated for three photon energies: 100 keV, 450 keV, and 3 MeV. The results suggest that thinning and moving tile front and back covers of the detector housing should result in improved image quality for all of the photon energies considered. Interestingly, the results also suggest that removing the aluminum support plate would improve tim imaging performance at 100 keV and 450 keV, but that removing the plate has no additional benefit for imaging with 3 MeV photons.

  17. Impact Testing on Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Flat Panels with Ice Projectiles for the Space Shuttle Return to Flight Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, Michael J.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2009-01-01

    Following the tragedy of the Orbiter Columbia (STS-107) on February 1, 2003, a major effort commenced to develop a better understanding of debris impacts and their effect on the space shuttle subsystems. An initiative to develop and validate physics-based computer models to predict damage from such impacts was a fundamental component of this effort. To develop the models it was necessary to physically characterize reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) along with ice and foam debris materials, which could shed on ascent and impact the orbiter RCC leading edges. The validated models enabled the launch system community to use the impact analysis software LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corp.) to predict damage by potential and actual impact events on the orbiter leading edge and nose cap thermal protection systems. Validation of the material models was done through a three-level approach: Level 1--fundamental tests to obtain independent static and dynamic constitutive model properties of materials of interest, Level 2--subcomponent impact tests to provide highly controlled impact test data for the correlation and validation of the models, and Level 3--full-scale orbiter leading-edge impact tests to establish the final level of confidence for the analysis methodology. This report discusses the Level 2 test program conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Ballistic Impact Laboratory with ice projectile impact tests on flat RCC panels, and presents the data observed. The Level 2 testing consisted of 54 impact tests in the NASA GRC Ballistic Impact Laboratory on 6- by 6-in. and 6- by 12-in. flat plates of RCC and evaluated three types of debris projectiles: Single-crystal, polycrystal, and "soft" ice. These impact tests helped determine the level of damage generated in the RCC flat plates by each projectile and validated the use of the ice and RCC models for use in LS-DYNA.

  18. Full-field wafer warpage measurement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, H. L.; Lee, J. Y.; Huang, Y. G.; Liang, A. J.; Sun, B. Y.

    2017-06-01

    An innovative moiré technique for full-field wafer warpage measurement is proposed in this study. The wafer warpage measurement technique is developed based on moiré method, Talbot effect, scanning profiling method, stroboscopic, instantaneous phase-shift method, as well as four-step phase shift method, high resolution, high stability and full-field measurement capabilities can be easily achieved. According to the proposed full-field optical configuration, a laser beam is expanded into a collimated beam with a 2-inch diameter and projected onto the wafer surface. The beam is reflected by the wafer surface and forms a moiré fringe image after passing two circular gratings, which is then focused and captured on a CCD camera for computation. The corresponding moiré fringes reflected from the wafer surface are obtained by overlapping the images of the measuring grating and the reference grating. The moiré fringes will shift when wafer warpage occurs. The phase of the moiré fringes will change proportionally to the degree of warpage in the wafer, which can be measured by detecting variations in the phase shift of the moiré fringes in each detection points on the surface of the entire wafer. The phase shift variations of each detection points can be calculated via the instantaneous phase-shift method and the four-step phase-shift method. By adding up the phase shift variations of each detection points along the radii of the circular gratings, the warpage value and surface topography of the wafer can be obtained. Experiments show that the proposed method is capable of obtaining test results similar to that of a commercial sensor, as well as performing accurate measurements under high speed rotation of 1500rpm. As compared to current warpage measurement methods such as the beam optical method, confocal microscopy, laser interferometry, shadow moiré method, and structured light method, this proposed technique has the advantage of full-field measurement, high

  19. SU-E-J-45: The Correlation Between CBCT Flat Panel Misalignment and 3D Image Guidance Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenton, O; Valdes, G; Yin, L; Teo, B [The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brousmiche, S; Wikler, D [Ion Beam Application, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To simulate the impact of CBCT flat panel misalignment on the image quality, the calculated correction vectors in 3D image guided proton therapy and to determine if these calibration errors can be caught in our QA process. Methods The X-ray source and detector geometrical calibration (flexmap) file of the CBCT system in the AdaPTinsight software (IBA proton therapy) was edited to induce known changes in the rotational and translational calibrations of the imaging panel. Translations of up to ±10 mm in the x, y and z directions (see supplemental) and rotational errors of up to ±3° were induced. The calibration files were then used to reconstruct the CBCT image of a pancreatic patient and CatPhan phantom. Correction vectors were calculated for the patient using the software’s auto match system and compared to baseline values. The CatPhan CBCT images were used for quantitative evaluation of image quality for each type of induced error. Results Translations of 1 to 3 mm in the x and y calibration resulted in corresponding correction vector errors of equal magnitude. Similar 10mm shifts were seen in the y-direction; however, in the x-direction, the image quality was too degraded for a match. These translational errors can be identified through differences in isocenter from orthogonal kV images taken during routine QA. Errors in the z-direction had no effect on the correction vector and image quality.Rotations of the imaging panel calibration resulted in corresponding correction vector rotations of the patient images. These rotations also resulted in degraded image quality which can be identified through quantitative image quality metrics. Conclusion Misalignment of CBCT geometry can lead to incorrect translational and rotational patient correction vectors. These errors can be identified through QA of the imaging isocenter as compared to orthogonal images combined with monitoring of CBCT image quality.

  20. Hydrometallurgical Recovery of Indium from Flat-Panel Displays of Spent Liquid Crystal Televisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi; Alam, Shafiq

    2015-02-01

    A recovery process for indium from waste liquid crystal display panels was developed on the basis of hydrometallurgical technology. The powdered sample was leached with 3 M HCl to extract its various metal constituents (indium, aluminum, tin, etc.). The mutual separation and subsequent recovery of the dissolved metals was achieved using two column adsorption tests: The first column was packed with a porous resin impregnated with Aliquat 336, a commercially available solvent extraction reagent based on a quaternary ammonium compound, and the resin contained in the second column was impregnated with Cyanex 923, also a commercially available solvent extraction reagent based on trialkylphosphine oxide. In the first column, tin, iron, and zinc were removed from the leach liquor. In the second column, only indium was selectively recovered. The metal ions trapped in these columns were eluted with 0.1 M H2SO4, yielding a solution purified indium solution with a concentration 10 times that of the feed solution.

  1. Cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS flat panel detector: Visibility of simulated microcalcifications

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer).

  2. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O’Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC’s active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4 × 4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16 × 16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92 × 0.92 × 3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8 × 16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4 × 8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm × 14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with Ge-68 source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module’s mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, +/−0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules. PMID:26085702

  3. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wangqiang@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O' Sullivan, Andrew W. [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Catherall, David [Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO 63103 (United States); Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Tai, Yuan-Chuan, E-mail: taiy@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2015-09-11

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm{sup 3} with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm{sup 2}. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with {sup 68}Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  4. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O`Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with 68Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  5. Clinical evaluation of digital angiographic system equipped with the Safire' flat-panel detector of a direct conversion type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Yoshiaki; Miura, Yusuke; Goto, Keiichi [Shimadzu Corporation, Medical Systems Division, Research and Development, Kyoto (JP)] [and others

    2003-06-01

    This report presents a report on clinical evaluation of our newly developed flat-panel X-ray detector of a direct conversion type, designed to provide images of a resolution higher than, or at least equal to, that ensured by X-ray photographic films, in clinical digital X-ray cinematography. This new detector was named 'Safire' the acronym of 'Shimadzu advanced flat imaging receptor', emphasizing its high technological level, such as the capability to ensure high quality of images. The clinical evaluation of Shimadzu DIGITEX Premier digital angiography system, equipped with this new flat-panel X-ray detector of a direct conversion type, has been started in March, 2003, at the Kokura Memorial Hospital in Kyushu, Japan. (author)

  6. Blurring artifacts in megavoltage radiography with a flat-panel imaging system: comparison of Monte Carlo simulations with measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schach von Wittenau, A E; Logan, C M; Aufderheide, M B; Slone, D M

    2002-11-01

    Originally designed for use at medical-imaging x-ray energies, imaging systems comprising scintillating screens and amorphous Si detectors are also used at the megavoltage photon energies typical of portal imaging and industrial radiography. While image blur at medical-imaging x-ray energies is strongly influenced both by K-shell fluorescence and by the transport of optical photons within the scintillator layer, at higher photon energies the image blur is dominated by radiation scattered from the detector housing and internal support structures. We use Monte Carlo methods to study the blurring in a notional detector: a series of semi-infinite layers with material compositions, thicknesses, and densities similar to those of a commercially available flat-panel amorphous Si detector system comprising a protective housing, a gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screen, and associated electronics. We find that the image blurring, as described by a point-spread function (PSF), has three length scales. The first component, with a submillimeter length scale, arises from electron scatter within the scintillator and detection electronics. The second component, with a millimeter-to-centimeter length scale, arises from electrons produced in the front cover of the detector. The third component, with a length scale of tens of centimeters, arises from photon scatter by the back cover of the detector. The relative contributions of each of these components to the overall PSF vary with incident photon energy. We present an algorithm that includes the energy-dependent sensitivity and energy-dependent PSF within a ray-tracing formalism. We find quantitative agreement (approximately 2%) between predicted radiographs with radiographs of copper step wedges, taken with a 9 MV bremsstrahlung source and a commercially available flat-panel system. The measured radiographs show the blurring artifacts expected from both the millimeter-scale electron transport and from the tens

  7. Pancreatic cancer study based on full field OCT and dynamic full field OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelian, Clement; Camus, Marine; Prat, Frederic; Boccara, A. Claude

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most feared cancer types due to high death rates and the difficulty to perform surgery. This cancer outcome could benefit from recent technological developments for diagnosis. We used a combination of standard Full Field OCT and Dynamic Full Field OCT to capture both morphological features and metabolic functions of rodents pancreas in normal and cancerous conditions with and without chemotherapy. Results were compared to histology to evaluate the performances and the specificities of the method. The comparison highlighted the importance of a number of endogenous markers like immune cells, fibrous development, architecture and more.

  8. Full breast digital mammography with an amorphous silicon-based flat panel detector: physical characteristics of a clinical prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, S; Karellas, A; Suryanarayanan, S; Albagli, D; Han, S; Tkaczyk, E J; Landberg, C E; Opsahl-Ong, B; Granfors, P R; Levis, I; D'Orsi, C J; Hendrick, R E

    2000-03-01

    The physical characteristics of a clinical prototype amorphous silicon-based flat panel imager for full-breast digital mammography have been investigated. The imager employs a thin thallium doped CsI scintillator on an amorphous silicon matrix of detector elements with a pixel pitch of 100 microm. Objective criteria such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and noise equivalent quanta were employed for this evaluation. The presampling MTF was found to be 0.73, 0.42, and 0.28 at 2, 4, and 5 cycles/mm, respectively. The measured DQE of the current prototype utilizing a 28 kVp, Mo-Mo spectrum beam hardened with 4.5 cm Lucite is approximately 55% at close to zero spatial frequency at an exposure of 32.8 mR, and decreases to approximately 40% at a low exposure of 1.3 mR. Detector element nonuniformity and electronic gain variations were not significant after appropriate calibration and software corrections. The response of the imager was linear and did not exhibit signal saturation under tested exposure conditions.

  9. Aging of imaging properties of a CMOS flat-panel detector for dental cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. W.; Han, J. C.; Yun, S.; Kim, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the long-term stability of imaging properties of a flat-panel detector in conditions used for dental x-ray imaging. The detector consists of a CsI:Tl layer and CMOS photodiode pixel arrays. Aging simulations were carried out using an 80-kVp x-ray beam at an air-kerma rate of approximately 5 mGy s-1 at the entrance surface of the detector with a total air kerma of up to 0.6 kGy. Dark and flood-field images were periodically obtained during irradiation, and the mean signal and noise levels were evaluated for each image. We also evaluated the modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The aging simulation showed a decrease in both the signal and noise of the gain-offset-corrected images, but there was negligible change in the signal-to-noise performance as a function of the accumulated dose. The gain-offset correction for analyzing images resulted in negligible changes in MTF, NPS, and DQE results over the total dose. Continuous x-ray exposure to a detector can cause degradation in the physical performance factors such the detector sensitivity, but linear analysis of the gain-offset-corrected images can assure integrity of the imaging properties of a detector during its lifetime.

  10. Percutaneous Glycerol Rhizotomy for Trigeminal Neuralgia Using a Single-Plane, Flat Panel Detector Angiography System: Technical Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARISHIMA, Hidetaka; KAWAJIRI, Satoshi; ARAI, Hiroshi; HIGASHINO, Yoshifumi; KODERA, Toshiaki; KIKUTA, Ken-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous treatments for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) including glycerol rhizotomy (GR), radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RT), and balloon compression (BC) are effective for patients with medical comorbidities and risk factors of microvascular decompression (MVD). These procedures are usually performed under fluoroscopy. Surgeons advance the needle to the trigeminal plexus through the foramen ovale while observing landmarks of fluoroscopic images; however, it is sometimes difficult to appropriately place the needle tip in Meckel’s cave. We present the technical details of percutaneous GR using a single-plane, flat panel detector angiography system to check the needle positioning. When the needle tip may be located near the trigeminal cistern, three-dimensional (3-D) bone images are taken with cone-beam computed tomography (CT). These images clearly show the position of the needle tip in Meckel’s cave. If it is difficult to place it through the foramen ovale, surgeons perform cone beam CT to observe the actual position of the needle tip at the skull base. After confirming the positional relation between the needle tip and foramen ovale, surgeons can advance it in the precise direction. In 10 procedures, we could place the nerve-block needle in about 14.5 minutes on average without complications. We think that our method is simple and convenient for percutaneous treatments for TN, and it may be helpful for surgeons to perform such treatments. PMID:27041633

  11. Development and evaluation of a digital radiography system using a large-area flat-panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Katsumi; Ikeda, Shigeyuki; Ishikawa, Ken; Iinuma, Gen; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Konno, Yasutaka

    2002-05-01

    A new DR system using a large-area flat panel detector (FPD) with a 40 by 30 cm active area and a 194 micrometers pixel pitch, has been developed to compare with a conventional image intensifier and charge-coupled device camera type DR system. After measuring basic characteristics of the new DR system such as signal-to-noise ratio, modulation transfer function, and detective quantum efficiency, we applied the FPD to a Gastro-Intestinal study with contrast media, and discussed its potential for clinical use with a medical doctor. In radiography mode, the new DR system with a large-are FPD has superior image quality compared with the conventional I.I.- CCD camera type DR system because of high SNR and DQE. In fluoroscopy mode, the SNR of the new DR system at the exposure range of over 2(mu) R/frame is similar with the conventional I.I.-CCD camera type DR system. As a result, we considered that new DR system with a large-area FPD could be applied to a clinical study replacing an I.I.-CCD camera type. In the evaluation using various clinical images taken with the new DR system by a medical doctor, the new DR system with a large-are FPD performed sufficiently for a GI study.

  12. Circular tomosynthesis implemented with a clinical interventional flat-panel based C-Arm: initial performance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nett, Brian E.; Zambelli, Joseph; Riddell, Cyril; Belanger, Barry; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2007-03-01

    There exists a strong desire for a platform in which researchers may investigate planar tomosynthesis (i.e. all source positions reside in a single plane that is parallel to the reconstructed image planes) trajectories directly on an interventional C-arm system. In this work we describe an experimental system designed to accomplish this aim, as well as the potential of this system for testing multiple aspects of the tomosynthetic image acquisition process. The system enables one to evaluate the effect of the physical imaging parameters on the image quality, as well as the effect of the reconstruction algorithm utilized. The experimental data collection for this work is from the Innova 4100 (Flat-panel based interventional C-arm system manufactured by GE Healthcare). The system is calibrated using a phantom with known geometrical placement of multiple small metallic spheres. Initial performance was assessed with three physical phantoms and performance was assessed by varying: the reconstruction algorithm (backprojection, filtered backprojection), the half tomographic angle (15°, 25°, 35°), and the angular sampling (20,40,80 views / acquisition). Initial results demonstrate the ability to well differentiate simulated vessels separated by 1 cm, even with the modest half tomographic angle of 15° and modest sampling of 20 views/acquisition.

  13. Feasibility and potential value of flat-panel detector-based computed tomography in myelography after spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kau, Thomas; Rabitsch, Egon; Celedin, Stefan; Jeschofnig, Barbara; Illiasch, Herbert; Eicher, Wolfgang; Uhl, Eberhard; Honl, Matthias; Hausegger, Klaus Armin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of myelography using flat-panel detector-based computed tomography (fpCT) in 5 patients in whom the image quality of multislice CT (MSCT) or MR imaging was limited by metal artifacts. The application of fpCT to myelographic imaging of the lumbar spine and cervicothoracic junction after surgery was feasible. Multiplanar, preferably sagittal, and 3D reconstructions adequately depicted disc space implants and provided high resolution images of osseous structures. The images obtained with fpCT allowed evaluation of anatomical details such as single nerve roots and proved especially valuable in a patient with impaired MR imaging results caused by metal artifacts from an intraoperative abrasion. In a case of recurrent disc herniation, imaging results of myelographic fpCT and MSCT scanning were in good agreement. The novel imaging technique the authors describe yielded adequate results in patients with a history of spinal surgery, may be superior to MSCT scanning in depicting osseous structures and metallic implants, and has the potential to provide multilevel spinal images. Myelographic fpCT scanning may be the preferred modality in patients with expected or known metal artifacts on myelographic MSCT scans and/or MR images.

  14. Image quality and effective dose of a robotic flat panel 3D C-arm vs computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Michael; Fischer, Eric; Gebhard, Florian; Richter, Peter H

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effective dose and corresponding image quality of different imaging protocols of a robotic 3D flat panel C-arm in comparison to computed tomography (CT). Dose measurements were performed using a Rando-Alderson Phantom. The phantom was exposed to different scanning protocols of the 3D C-arm and the CT. Pedicle screws were inserted in a fresh swine cadaver. Images were obtained using the same scanning protocols. At the thoracolumbar junction, the effective dose was comparable for 3D high-dose protocols, with (4.4 mSv) and without (4.3 mSv) collimation and routine CT (5 mSv), as well as a dose-reduction CT (4.0 mSv). A relevant reduction was achieved with the 3D low-dose protocol (1.0 mSv). Focusing on Th6, a similar reduction with the 3D low-dose protocol was achieved. The image quality of the 3D protocols using titanium screws was rated as 'good' by all viewers, with excellent correlation. Modern intra-operative 3D-C-arms produce images of CT-like quality with low-dose radiation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. High-resolution dynamic angiography using flat-panel volume CT: feasibility demonstration for neuro and lower limb vascular applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehndiratta, Amit [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); University of Oxford, Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Keble College, Oxford (United Kingdom); Indian Institute of Technology Delhi and All India Institute of Medical Science, Centre for Biomedical Engineering, New Delhi (India); Rabinov, James D. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Interventional Neuroradiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Grasruck, Michael [Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany); Liao, Eric C. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Center for Regenerative Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Crandell, David [Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA (United States); Gupta, Rajiv [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    This paper evaluates a prototype flat-panel volume CT (fpVCT) for dynamic in vivo imaging in a variety of neurovascular and lower limb applications. Dynamic CTA was performed on 12 patients (neuro = 8, lower limb = 4) using an fpVCT with 120 kVp, 50 mA, rotation time varying from 8 to 19 s, and field of view of 25 x 25 x 18 cm{sup 3}. Four-dimensional data sets (i.e. 3D images over time) were reconstructed and reviewed. Dynamic CTA demonstrated sufficient spatio-temporal resolution to elucidate first-pass and recirculation dynamics of contrast bolus through neurovasclar pathologies and phasic blood flow though lower-limb vasculature and grafts. The high spatial resolution of fpVCT resulted in reduced partial volume and metal beam-hardening artefacts. This facilitated assessment of vascular lumen in the presence of calcified plaque and evaluation of fractures, especially in the presence of fixation hardware. Evaluation of arteriovenous malformation using dynamic fpVCT angiography was of limited utility. Dynamic CTA using fpVCT can visualize time-varying phenomena in neuro and lower limb vascular applications and has sufficient diagnostic imaging quality to evaluate a number of pathologies affecting these regions. (orig.)

  16. Visualization of novel microstents in patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms with contrast-enhanced flat panel detector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncyljusz, Wojciech, E-mail: wponcyl@poczta.onet.pl [Departament of Interventional Radiology, Pomeranian Medical University, Neurointerventional Cath Lab MSW Hospital, Al. Powst. Wielkopolskich 72, 70-111 Szczecin (Poland); Zwarzany, Łukasz, E-mail: zwarzany@gmail.com [Departament of Interventional Radiology, Pomeranian Medical University, Neurointerventional Cath Lab MSW Hospital, Al. Powst. Wielkopolskich 72, 70-111 Szczecin (Poland); Safranow, Krzysztof, E-mail: chrissaf@mp.pl [Department of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Pomeranian Medical University, Al. Powst. Wielkopolskich 72, 70-111 Szczecin (Poland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We examine the feasibility of FPDCT for visualizing intracranial microstents. • Stent deployment and its apposition to the vessel wall are easily assessable. • Coil streaking artifacts hamper the assessment of stent visibility. - Abstract: Objectives: The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of contrast-enhanced flat panel detector CT (FPDCT) for visualizing the novel microstents implanted in patients with unruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Forty-four cases of patients who underwent stent assisted coiling at our department were retrospectively analyzed. In each case, FPDCT images were performed after stent and coils deployment and then assessed in the terms of stent struts and all radiopaque markers and tantalum strands visibility separately using a 3-grade scale (1 – inadequate, 2 – good, 3 – excellent). Results: Stent struts visibility was assessed to be inadequate for evaluation in all cases. All radiopaque markers and tantalum strands visibility was excellent in 61.4% and good in 38.6% of cases. We observed 4 (9.09%) cases of incomplete stent opening. Treated aneurysm size <10 mm was an independent predictor of excellent stent all radiopaque markers and tantalum strands visibility (ρ = 0.014). Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced FPDCT is feasible for visualizing stents implanted in patients with intracranial aneurysms as it gives precise visualization of the relationships between the stent tantalum strands and the vessel wall. Stents used in the treatment of aneurysms ≥10 mm in size are worse visualized because of the coil streaking artifacts.

  17. Percutaneous Glycerol Rhizotomy for Trigeminal Neuralgia Using a Single-Plane, Flat Panel Detector Angiography System: Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Kawajiri, Satoshi; Arai, Hiroshi; Higashino, Yoshifumi; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-05-15

    Percutaneous treatments for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) including glycerol rhizotomy (GR), radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RT), and balloon compression (BC) are effective for patients with medical comorbidities and risk factors of microvascular decompression (MVD). These procedures are usually performed under fluoroscopy. Surgeons advance the needle to the trigeminal plexus through the foramen ovale while observing landmarks of fluoroscopic images; however, it is sometimes difficult to appropriately place the needle tip in Meckel's cave. We present the technical details of percutaneous GR using a single-plane, flat panel detector angiography system to check the needle positioning. When the needle tip may be located near the trigeminal cistern, three-dimensional (3-D) bone images are taken with cone-beam computed tomography (CT). These images clearly show the position of the needle tip in Meckel's cave. If it is difficult to place it through the foramen ovale, surgeons perform cone beam CT to observe the actual position of the needle tip at the skull base. After confirming the positional relation between the needle tip and foramen ovale, surgeons can advance it in the precise direction. In 10 procedures, we could place the nerve-block needle in about 14.5 minutes on average without complications. We think that our method is simple and convenient for percutaneous treatments for TN, and it may be helpful for surgeons to perform such treatments.

  18. Evaluation of bone substitute materials: comparison of flat-panel based volume CT to conventional multidetector CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbier, Sebastian; Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Sachlos, Elefterios; Haberstroh, Jörg; Scheifele, Christian; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Voss, Pit Jacob; Veigel, Egle; Smedek, Jörg; Ganter, Philip; Tuna, Taskin; Gutwald, Ralf; Palmowski, Moritz

    2013-10-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a key factor in bone regeneration within the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Despite this in vivo analysis of tissue-engineered-constructs to monitor bone rehabilitation are difficult to conduct. Novel high-resolving flat-panel based volume CTs (fp-VCT) are increasingly used for imaging bone structures. This study compares the potential value of novel fp-VCT with conventional multidetector CT (MDCT) based on a sheep sinus floor elevation model. Calcium-hydroxyapatite reinforced collagen scaffolds were populated with autologous osteoblasts and implanted into sheep maxillary sinus. After 8, 16 and 24 weeks MDCT and fp-VCT scans were performed to investigate the volume of the augmented area; densities of cancellous and compact bone were assessed as comparative values. fp-VCT imaging resulted in higher spatial resolution, which was advantageous when separating closely related anatomical structures (i.e. trabecular and compact bone, biomaterials). Fp-VCT facilitated imaging of alterations occurring in test specimens over time. fp-VCTs therefore displayed high volume coverage, dynamic imaging potential and superior performance when investigating superfine bone structures and bone remodelling of biomaterials. Thus, fp-VCTs may be a suitable instrument for intraoperative imaging and future in vivo tissue-engineering studies.

  19. Development of CT and 3D-CT Using Flat Panel Detector Based Real-Time Digital Radiography System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, V. R.; Sreelakshmi, C.; Vibin, Vibin

    2008-09-01

    The application of Digital Radiography in the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of space vehicle components is a recent development in India. A Real-time DR system based on amorphous silicon Flat Panel Detector has been developed for the NDE of solid rocket motors at Rocket Propellant Plant of VSSC in a few years back. The technique has been successfully established for the nondestructive evaluation of solid rocket motors. The DR images recorded for a few solid rocket specimens are presented in the paper. The Real-time DR system is capable of generating sufficient digital X-ray image data with object rotation for the CT image reconstruction. In this paper the indigenous development of CT imaging based on the Realtime DR system for solid rocket motor is presented. Studies are also carried out to generate 3D-CT image from a set of adjacent CT images of the rocket motor. The capability of revealing the spatial location and characterisation of defect is demonstrated by the CT and 3D-CT images generated.

  20. Morphologic Changes of Mammary Carcinomas in Mice over Time as Monitored by Flat-Panel Detector Volume Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannine Missbach-Guentner

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive methods are strongly needed to detect and quantify not only tumor growth in murine tumor models but also the development of vascularization and necrosis within tumors. This study investigates the use of a new imaging technique, flat-panel detector volume computed tomography (fpVCT, to monitor in vivo tumor progression and structural changes within tumors of two murine carcinoma models. After tumor cell inoculation, single fpVCT scans of the entire mice were performed at different time points. The acquired isotropic, high-resolution volume data sets enable an accurate real-time assessment and precise measurements of tumor volumes. Spreading of contrast agent-containing blood vessels around and within the tumors was clearly visible over time. Furthermore, fpVCT permits the identification of differences in the uptake of contrast media within tumors, thus delineating necrosis, tumor tissues, and blood vessels. Classification of tumor tissues based on the decomposition of the underlying mixture distribution of tissue-related Hounsfield units allowed the quantitative acquisition of necrotic tissues at each time point. Morphologic alterations of the tumor depicted by fpVCT were confirmed by histopathologic examination. Concluding, our data show that fpVCT may be highly suitable for the noninvasive evaluation of tumor responses to anticancer therapies during the course of the disease.

  1. C-arm flat-panel CT arthrography of the shoulder: Radiation dose considerations and preliminary data on diagnostic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggenberger, Roman; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Kaelin, Pascal; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem; Andreisek, Gustav [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Dietrich, Tobias J. [Balgrist University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Scholz, Rosemarie; Koehler, Christoph; Elsaesser, Thilo [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Business Area Advanced Therapies, Forchheim (Germany); Le Corroller, Thomas [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, ISM UMR 7287, Marseille (France); Radiology Department, APHM, Marseille (France)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate radiation dose and diagnostic performance of C-arm flat-panel CT (FPCT) versus standard multi-detector CT (MDCT) shoulder arthrography using MRI-arthrography as reference standard. Radiation dose of two different FPCT acquisitions (5 and 20 s) and standard MDCT of the shoulder were assessed using phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. FPCT arthrographies were performed in 34 patients (mean age 44 ± 15 years). Different joint structures were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed by two independent radiologists. Inter-reader agreement and diagnostic performance were calculated. Effective radiation dose was markedly lower in FPCT 5 s (0.6 mSv) compared to MDCT (1.7 mSv) and FPCT 20 s (3.4 mSv). Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in FPCT 20-s versus 5-s protocols. Inter-reader agreements of qualitative ratings ranged between κ = 0.47-1.0. Sensitivities for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies were low for FPCT 5-s (40 % and 20 %) and moderate for FPCT 20-s protocols (75 % and 73 %). FPCT showed high sensitivity (81-86 % and 89-99 %) for bone and acromioclavicular-joint pathologies. Using a 5-s protocol FPCT shoulder arthrography provides lower radiation dose compared to MDCT but poor sensitivity for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies. FPCT 20-s protocol is moderately sensitive for cartilage and rotator cuff tendon pathology with markedly higher radiation dose compared to MDCT. (orig.)

  2. Varied tube potential with constant effective dose at lumbar spine radiography using a flat-panel digital detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijer, Håkan; Persliden, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the image quality at different tube potential (kV) settings using anteroposterior lumbar spine radiography as a model. An Alderson phantom was used with a flat-panel detector. The tube potential varied between 48 and 125 kV while the tube charge (mAs) was adjusted to keep an effective dose of 0.11 mSv. Image quality was assessed with a visual grading analysis and with a CDRAD contrast-detail phantom together with a computer program. The VGA showed inferior image quality for the higher kV settings, > or =96 kVwith similar results for the contrast-detail phantom. When keeping the effective dose fixed, it seems beneficial to reduce kV to get the best image quality despite the fact that the mAs is not as high as with automatic exposure. However, this cannot be done with automatic exposure, which is set for a constant detector dose.

  3. Cross Talk Study to the Single Photon Response of a Flat Panel PMT for the RICH Upgrade at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Arnaboldi, C; Calvi, M; Fanchini, E; Gotti, C; Maino, M; Matteuzzi, C; Perego, D L; Pessina, G; Wang, J C

    2009-01-01

    The Ring Imaging CHerenkov, RICH, detector at LHCb is now readout by Hybrid Photon Detectors. In view of its upgrade a possible option is the adoption of the flat panel Photon Multipliers Tubes, PMT. An important issue for the good determination of the rings produced in the sensitive media is a negligible level of cross talk. We have experimentally studied the cross talk from the 64x64 pixels of the H9500 PMT from Hamamatsu. Results have shown that at the single photon signal level, as expected at LHCb, the statistics applied to the small number of electrons generated at the first dynode of the PMT chain leads to a cross talk mechanism that must be interpreted in term of the percentage of the number of induced signals rather than on the amplitude of the induced signals. The threshold to suppress cross talk must be increased to a significant fraction of the single photon signal for the worst case. The number of electrons generated at the first dynode is proportional to the biasing voltage. Measurements have sh...

  4. Comparative study of two flat-panel x-ray detectors applied to small-animal imaging cone-beam micro-CT

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Proceeding of: 2008 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (NSS '08), Dresden, Germany, 19-25 Oct. 2008 This work compares two different X-ray flat-panel detectors for its use in high-speed, cone-beam CT applied to small-animal imaging. The main differences between these two devices are the scintillators and the achievable frame rate. Both devices have been tested in terms of system linearity, sensitivity, resolution, stability and noise properties, taking into account the dif...

  5. DR静态平板去除错层伪影的研究%Research on Elimination of Truncation Artifacts with Digital Radiography Static Flat Panel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王克枢

    2016-01-01

    This paper researched the occasional truncation artifacts during the application of Shimadzu D-vision digital radiography (DR) photographic system. Through analysis of features of abnormal image and design features of the DR equipment, the research found out that truncation artifacts were directly caused by premature movement of the flat panel detector. Based on the finding, the research proposed a resolution plan in which a flat panel detector delay return control circuit was added. Clinical results showed that the flat panel detector delay return control circuit integrated with D-vision DR photographic system could eliminate truncation artifacts caused by flat panel detector motion and improve DR image quality without decreasing examination efficiency, which allowed the design to be used in the improvement of related equipments.%本文对岛津D-vision平板摄影透视系统偶发的图像错层伪影现象进行了研究,通过对异常图像和设备自身设计特点进行分析,发现曝光后平板的过早运动是导致图像伪影的直接原因,基于此提出了加配平板延时返回控制电路的解决方案。改进后结果表明,在平板摄影透视系统加装平板延时返回功能后,图像错层现象消失,DR摄影图像质量得到提升,且改进不会影响检查效率,可应用推广至相关设备的改进。

  6. Use and imaging performance of CMOS flat panel imager with LiF/ZnS(Ag) and Gadox scintillation screens for neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, B. K.; kim, J. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Sim, C.; Cho, G.; Lee, D. H.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2011-01-01

    In digital neutron radiography system, a thermal neutron imaging detector based on neutron-sensitive scintillating screens with CMOS(complementary metal oxide semiconductor) flat panel imager is introduced for non-destructive testing (NDT) application. Recently, large area CMOS APS (active-pixel sensor) in conjunction with scintillation films has been widely used in many digital X-ray imaging applications. Instead of typical imaging detectors such as image plates, cooled-CCD cameras and amorphous silicon flat panel detectors in combination with scintillation screens, we tried to apply a scintillator-based CMOS APS to neutron imaging detection systems for high resolution neutron radiography. In this work, two major Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillation screens with various thickness were fabricated by a screen printing method. These neutron converter screens consist of a dispersion of Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillating particles in acrylic binder. These scintillating screens coupled-CMOS flat panel imager with 25x50mm2 active area and 48μm pixel pitch was used for neutron radiography. Thermal neutron flux with 6x106n/cm2/s was utilized at the NRF facility of HANARO in KAERI. The neutron imaging characterization of the used detector was investigated in terms of relative light output, linearity and spatial resolution in detail. The experimental results of scintillating screen-based CMOS flat panel detectors demonstrate possibility of high sensitive and high spatial resolution imaging in neutron radiography system.

  7. The line-noise-reduction for low dose x-ray fluoroscopy with the flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tadashi; Ikeda, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Katsumi; Takenouchi, Shinobu

    2006-03-01

    A scintillator type Flat Panel Detector (FPD)1 has a good noise performance especially in Fluoroscopic images because of high DQE. Almost same dose as I.I. and CCD system is accepted in clinical use. According to the clinical study, the dose in fluoroscopy will be decreased if we can reduce the line noise coming from gate line of the Thin Film Transistor (TFT). The purpose of this study is to detect and reduce this line noise from the fluoroscopic images making it possible to perform a lower dose of fluoroscopy imaging. We detected the line noise by acquiring a dark image (without exposure) and then comparing the average of the line data along to the gate line to the neighborhood lines. We have applied this method to the dark area taken by the collimator of the Lucite phantom image and detected it. The detected line will be compensated by interpolation with neighborhood lines. The FPD of our system2 has a big detecting area (40cm x 30cm) and a zoom mode is selected in fluoroscopy because the doctor is watching an edge of the guide-wire and a contrast medium. The collimated area of the detector is displayed in a monitor after the zooming process and we can take a collimated dark area for detecting the line noise. As we applied this method to the dark image (1024pixels x 1024lines) including 54 lines with noise, we can improve 10% of SD. Visible line noise of chest phantom image was reduced with this method. It will help to lower the fluoroscopy dose.

  8. Performance of a 41X41-cm2 amorphous silicon flat panel x-ray detector for radiographic imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granfors, P R; Aufrichtig, R

    2000-06-01

    We report the performance of a 41 X 41-cm2 amorphous silicon-based flat panel detector designed for radiographic imaging applications. The detector consists of an array of photodiodes and thin film transistor switches on a 0.2-mm pitch with an overlying thallium-doped cesium iodide scintillator. The performance of the detector was evaluated through measurement of the frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency [DQE(f)]. Measurements of the characteristic curve and modulation transfer function (MTF) are also reported. All measurements were made in a radiographic imaging mode with a readout time of 125 ms. We evaluated a total of 15 detectors. One detector was characterized at a range of exposures and at three different electronic gain settings. Measurements of DQE(f) and MTF were also performed as a function of position on one detector. The measured DQE at an exposure of about 1 mR was 0.66 at zero spatial frequency and fell smoothly with frequency to a value of 0.24 at the Nyquist frequency, 2.5 cycles/mm. The DQE is independent of exposure for exposures in the upper 80% of each gain range, but is reduced somewhat at lower exposures because of the influence of additive system noise. The reduction can be controlled by adjusting the electronic gain. For a gain that allows a maximum exposure of 5 mR, the DQE at 0.056 mR was 0.64 at zero frequency and 0.19 at 2.5 cycles/mm. The standard deviation in DQE among measurements on different detectors was less than 0.02 at any frequency. The presampling MTF was 0.26 at 2.5 cycles/mm. The standard deviation in MTF among measurements on different detectors was less than 0.01 at any frequency. Both MTF and DQE were substantially independent of position on the detector.

  9. Nonlinear statistical reconstruction for flat-panel cone-beam CT with blur and correlated noise models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-03-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) is a promising imaging modality, partly due to its potential for high spatial resolution reconstructions in relatively compact scanners. Despite this potential, FP-CBCT can face difficulty resolving important fine scale structures (e.g, trabecular details in dedicated extremities scanners and microcalcifications in dedicated CBCT mammography). Model-based methods offer one opportunity to improve high-resolution performance without any hardware changes. Previous work, based on a linearized forward model, demonstrated improved performance when both system blur and spatial correlations characteristics of FP-CBCT systems are modeled. Unfortunately, the linearized model relies on a staged processing approach that complicates tuning parameter selection and can limit the finest achievable spatial resolution. In this work, we present an alternative scheme that leverages a full nonlinear forward model with both system blur and spatially correlated noise. A likelihood-based objective function is derived from this forward model and we derive an iterative optimization algorithm for its solution. The proposed approach is evaluated in simulation studies using a digital extremities phantom and resolution-noise trade-offs are quantitatively evaluated. The correlated nonlinear model outperformed both the uncorrelated nonlinear model and the staged linearized technique with up to a 86% reduction in variance at matched spatial resolution. Additionally, the nonlinear models could achieve finer spatial resolution (correlated: 0.10 mm, uncorrelated: 0.11 mm) than the linear correlated model (0.15 mm), and traditional FDK (0.40 mm). This suggests the proposed nonlinear approach may be an important tool in improving performance for high-resolution clinical applications.

  10. Novel Na(+) doped Alq3 hybrid materials for organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices and flat panel displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, S A; Borghate, S V; Kalyani, N Thejo; Dhoble, S J

    2015-05-01

    Pure and Na(+) -doped Alq3 complexes were synthesized by a simple precipitation method at room temperature, maintaining a stoichiometric ratio. These complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The X-ray diffractogram exhibits well-resolved peaks, revealing the crystalline nature of the synthesized complexes, FTIR confirms the molecular structure and the completion of quinoline ring formation in the metal complex. UV/Vis absorption and PL spectra of sodium-doped Alq3 complexes exhibit high emission intensity in comparison with Alq3 phosphor, proving that when doped in Alq3 , Na(+) enhances PL emission intensity. The excitation spectra of the synthesized complexes lie in the range 242-457 nm when weak shoulders are also considered. Because the sharp excitation peak falls in the blue region of visible radiation, the complexes can be employed for blue chip excitation. The emission wavelength of all the synthesized complexes lies in the bluish green/green region ranging between 485 and 531 nm. The intensity of the emission wavelength was found to be elevated when Na(+) is doped into Alq3 . Because both the excitation and emission wavelengths fall in the visible region of electromagnetic radiation, these phosphors can also be employed to improve the power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells by using the solar spectral conversion principle. Thus, the synthesized phosphors can be used as bluish green/green light-emitting phosphors for organic light-emitting diodes, flat panel displays, solid-state lighting technology - a step towards the desire to reduce energy consumption and generate pollution free light.

  11. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Traylor Building, Room 718, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2011-08-21

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions-for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  12. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-08-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions—for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in

  13. Semi-automatic classification of skeletal morphology in genetically altered mice using flat-panel volume computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dullin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid progress in exploring the human and mouse genome has resulted in the generation of a multitude of mouse models to study gene functions in their biological context. However, effective screening methods that allow rapid noninvasive phenotyping of transgenic and knockout mice are still lacking. To identify murine models with bone alterations in vivo, we used flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT for high-resolution 3-D imaging and developed an algorithm with a computational intelligence system. First, we tested the accuracy and reliability of this approach by imaging discoidin domain receptor 2- (DDR2- deficient mice, which display distinct skull abnormalities as shown by comparative landmark-based analysis. High-contrast fpVCT data of the skull with 200 microm isotropic resolution and 8-s scan time allowed segmentation and computation of significant shape features as well as visualization of morphological differences. The application of a trained artificial neuronal network to these datasets permitted a semi-automatic and highly accurate phenotype classification of DDR2-deficient compared to C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Even heterozygous DDR2 mice with only subtle phenotypic alterations were correctly determined by fpVCT imaging and identified as a new class. In addition, we successfully applied the algorithm to classify knockout mice lacking the DDR1 gene with no apparent skull deformities. Thus, this new method seems to be a potential tool to identify novel mouse phenotypes with skull changes from transgenic and knockout mice on the basis of random mutagenesis as well as from genetic models. However for this purpose, new neuronal networks have to be created and trained. In summary, the combination of fpVCT images with artificial neuronal networks provides a reliable, novel method for rapid, cost-effective, and noninvasive primary screening tool to detect skeletal phenotypes in mice.

  14. X-ray performance of a wafer-scale CMOS flat panel imager for applications in medical imaging and nondestructive testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Jeon, Seongchae; Seo, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a wafer-scale complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based X-ray flat panel detector for medical imaging and nondestructive testing applications. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS flat panel imager has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1-poly/4-metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 1200×1200 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 120mm×120 mm. The 14.3-bit extended counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. The different screens such as thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and terbium gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillators were used as conversion materials for X-rays to visible light photons. The X-ray imaging performance such as X-ray sensitivity as a function of X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution, image lag and X-ray images of various objects were measured under practical medical and industrial application conditions. This paper results demonstrate that our prototype CMOS-based X-ray flat panel imager has the significant potential for medical imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications with high-resolution and high speed rate.

  15. X-ray performance of a wafer-scale CMOS flat panel imager for applications in medical imaging and nondestructive testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Bo Kyung, E-mail: goldrain99@kaist.ac.kr [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seongchae [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Chang-Woo [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-21

    This paper presents a wafer-scale complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based X-ray flat panel detector for medical imaging and nondestructive testing applications. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS flat panel imager has been fabricated by using a 0.35 µm 1-poly/4-metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 µm×100 µm and the pixel array format is 1200×1200 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 120mm×120 mm. The 14.3-bit extended counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. The different screens such as thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and terbium gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb) scintillators were used as conversion materials for X-rays to visible light photons. The X-ray imaging performance such as X-ray sensitivity as a function of X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution, image lag and X-ray images of various objects were measured under practical medical and industrial application conditions. This paper results demonstrate that our prototype CMOS-based X-ray flat panel imager has the significant potential for medical imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications with high-resolution and high speed rate.

  16. Flat-Panel Computed Tomography (DYNA-CT) in Neuroradiology. From High-Resolution Imaging of Implants to One-Stop-Shopping for Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, A; Gölitz, P; Engelhorn, T; Kloska, S; Struffert, T

    2015-10-01

    Originally aimed at improving standard radiography by providing higher absorption efficiency and a wider dynamic range, flat-panel detector technology has meanwhile got widely accepted in the neuroradiological community. Especially flat-panel detector computed tomography (FD-CT) using rotational C-arm mounted flat-panel detector technology is capable of volumetric imaging with a high spatial resolution. By providing CT-like images of the brain within the angio suite, FD-CT is able to rapidly visualize hemorrhage and may thus improve complication management without the need of patient transfer. As "Angiographic CT" FD-CT may be helpful during many diagnostic and neurointerventional procedures and for noninvasive monitoring and follow-up. In addition, spinal interventions and high-resolution imaging of the temporal bone might also benefit from FD-CT. Finally, using novel dynamic perfusion and angiographic protocols, FD-CT may provide functional information on brain perfusion and vasculature with the potential to replace standard imaging in selected acute stroke patients.

  17. Reducing dose in urography while maintaining image quality-a comparison of storage phosphor plates and a flat-panel detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Margareta; Geijer, Håkan; Persliden, Jan; Andersson, Torbjörn

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of new flat-panel detector technology often forces us to accept too high dose levels as proposed by the manufacturers. We need a tool to compare the image quality of a new system with the accepted standard. The aim of this study was to obtain a comparable image quality for two systems-storage phosphor plates and a flat-panel system using intravenous urography (IVU) as a clinical model. The image quality figure was calculated using a contrast-detail phantom (CDRAD) for the two evaluated systems. This allowed us to set a dose for the flat-panel system that gave equivalent image quality to the storage phosphor plates. This reduced detector dose was used in an evaluation of clinical images to find out if the dose reduction from the phantom study indeed resulted in images of equal clinical image quality. The image quality was assessed using image criteria of the European guidelines for IVU with visual grading analysis. Equivalent image quality in image pairs was achieved at 30% of the dose. The CDRAD contrast-detail phantom makes it possible to find dose levels that give equal image quality using different imaging systems.

  18. Performance of a flat-panel detector in the detection of artificial erosive changes: comparison with conventional screen-film and storage-phosphor radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Karl; Henschel, Andreas; Bernhardt, Thomas M.; Lenzen, Horst; Wormanns, Dag; Diederich, Stefan; Heindel, Walter [Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Muenster, Albert-Schweitzer-Strasse 33, 48129, Muenster (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    Heading Abstract.The purpose of this study was to compare a large-area, direct-readout, flat-panel detector system with a conventional screen-film system, a storage-phosphor system, and a mammography screen-film system with regard to the detection of artificial bone erosions simulating rheumatoid disease, and to assess its diagnostic performance with decreasing exposure dose. Six hundred forty regions were defined in 160 metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joint specimens from 20 monkey paws (4 regions per joint). Artificial bone erosions were created in 320 of these 640 regions. Specimens were enclosed in containers filled with water to obtain absorption and scatter radiation conditions similar to those of a human hand. Imaging was performed using a flat-panel system, a speed class 200 screen-film system, a mammography screen-film system, and a storage-phosphor system under exactly matched conditions. Different exposure doses equivalent to speed classes of S=100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, and 3200 were used. In all images the presence or absence of a lesion was assessed by three radiologists using a five-level confidence scale. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed for a total of 21,120 observations (1920 for each imaging modality and exposure level) and diagnostic performance estimated by the area under the ROC curve (A{sub z}). The significance of differences in diagnostic performance was tested with analysis of variance. The ROC analysis showed A{sub z} values of 0.809 (S=200), 0.768 (S=400), 0.737 (S=800), 0.710 (S=1600), and 0.685 (S=3200) for the flat-panel system, 0.770 for the speed class 200 screen-film system, 0.781 (S=200), 0.739 (S=400), 0.724 (S=800), 0.680 (S=1600) for the storage-phosphor system, and 0.798 for the mammography screen-film system. Analysis of variance showed significant differences between different combinations of imaging modalities and exposure doses (p <0.05). The diagnostic performance of the flat-panel

  19. Flat-panel cone-beam CT on a mobile isocentric C-arm for image-guided brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffray, David A.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Wong, John W.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2002-05-01

    Flat-panel imager (FPI) based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a strong candidate technology for intraoperative imaging in image-guided procedures such as brachytherapy. The soft-tissue imaging performance and potential navigational utility have been investigated using a computer-controlled benchtop system. These early results have driven the development of an isocentric C-arm for intraoperative FPI-CBCT, capable of collecting 94 projections over 180 degrees in 110 seconds. The C-arm system employs a large-area FPI with 400 micron pixel pitch and Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator. Image acquisition, processing and reconstruction are orchestrated under a single Windows-based application. Reconstruction is performed by a modified Feldkamp algorithm implemented on a high-speed reconstruction engine. Non-idealities in the source and detector trajectories during orbital motion has been quantified and tested for stability. Cone-beam CT imaging performance was tested through both quantitative and qualitative methods. The system MTF was measured using a wire phantom and demonstrated frequency pass out to 0.6 mm-1. Voxel noise was measured at 2.7 percent in a uniform 12 cm diameter water bath. Anatomical phantoms were employed for qualitative evaluation of the imaging performance. Images of an anaesthetized rabbit demonstrated the capacity of the system to discern soft-tissue structures within a living subject while offering sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The dose delivered in each of the imaging procedures was estimated from in-air exposure measurements to be approximately 0.1 cGy. Imaging studies of an anthropomorphic prostate phantom were performed with and without radioactive seeds. Soft-tissue imaging performance and seed detection appear to satisfy the imaging and navigation requirements for image-guided brachytherapy. These investigations advance the development and evaluation of such technology for image-guided surgical procedures, including brachytherapy

  20. A ghost story: spatio-temporal response characteristics of an indirect-detection flat-panel imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, J H; Jaffray, D A

    1999-08-01

    Spatial and temporal imaging characteristics of an amorphous silicon flat-panel imager (FPI) were investigated in terms relevant to the application of such devices in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and other x-ray imaging modalities, including general radiography, fluoroscopy, mammography, radiotherapy portal imaging, and nondestructive testing. Specifically, issues of image lag (including the magnitude, spatial uniformity, temporal-frequency characteristics, and dependence upon exposure and frame time) and long-term image persistence ("ghosts") were investigated. As part of the basic characterization of the FPI, pixel dark signal and noise (magnitude, temporal stability, and spatial uniformity) as well as radiation response (signal size, linearity, gain, and reciprocity) were also measured. Image lag was analyzed as a function of frame time and incident exposure. First-frame lag (i.e., the relative residual signal in the first frame following readout of an exposure) was approximately 2-10%, depending upon incident exposure and was spatially nonuniform to a slight degree across the FPI; second-, third-, and fourth-frame lag were approximately 0.7%, 0.4%, and 0.3%, respectively (at 25% sensor saturation). Image lag was also analyzed in terms of the temporal-frequency-dependent transfer function derived from the radiation response, allowing a quantitative description of system components contributing to lag. Finally, the contrast of objects as a function of time following an exposure was measured in order to examine long-term image persistence ("ghosts"). Ghosts were found to persist up to 30 min or longer, depending upon the exposure and frame time. Two means of reducing the apparent contrast of ghost images were tested: (i) rapid scanning of the FPI at maximum frame rate, and (ii) flood-field exposure of the FPI; neither was entirely satisfactory. These results pose important considerations for application of FPIs in CBCT as well as other x-ray imaging

  1. Design and construction of a flat-panel-based cone beam volume computed tomography (FPD-CBVCT) imaging system through the adaptation of a commercially available CT system: work in progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Zhong, Junmei

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how a commercially available spiral CT can be modified for use as the electro-mechanical scanner hardware for a prototype flat panel detector-based cone beam volume computed tomography (FPD-CBVCT) imaging system. FPD-CBVCT has the benefits of isotropic high resolution, low contrast sensitivity and 3D visualization. In contrast to spiral CT, which acquires a series of narrow slices, FPD-CBVCT acquires a full volume of data (limited by the cone angle and the FPD active area) in one radiographic subsystems to be controlled include: gantry rotation and tilt, patient table positioning, rotor control, mA control, the high frequency generator (kVp, exposure time, repetition rate) and image data acquisition. Also, a 2D full field FPD needs to replace the 1D detector, as well as the existing slit collimator needs to be retrofitted to a full field collimator to allow x-ray exposure over the entire active area of the FPD. In addition, x-ray projection data acquisition needs to be performed at >=30 fps. Power and communication signals to control modules on the rotating part of the gantry will be through integrated slip rings on the gantry. Through the synchronized control of the pulsed x-ray exposures, data acquisition, gantry rotation and tilt, as well as the position and translation speed of the patient table, the system will be able to achieve spiral cone beam and circle-plus-arc cone beam image acquisition protocols. Performance will be evaluated with optical encoders, standard dosimetry equipment and phantom studies.

  2. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose between an image-intensifier system and a newer-generation flat-panel detector system - technical phantom measurements and evaluation of clinical imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Meike; Hagelstein, Claudia; Diehm, Theo; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Neff, K.W. [University Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Many image-intensifier fluoroscopy systems have been replaced by flat-panel detectors in recent years. To compare the level of contrast, image resolution and radiation dose between an image-intensifier and a newer-generation flat-panel detector system in a pediatric radiology unit. We compared two systems - a conventional image intensifier and a newer-generation flat-panel system. We measured image quality and radiation dose using a technical phantom. Additionally, we retrospectively compared age-matched fluoroscopic pediatric voiding cystourethrography (n = 15) and upper gastrointestinal investigations (n = 25). In phantom studies image contrast was equal while image resolution was higher and mean radiation dose lower using the flat-panel system (P < 0.0001). In pediatric investigations, mean dose area product was significantly reduced on the flat-panel system for upper gastrointestinal investigation (45 ± 38 μGy*m{sup 2} vs. 11 ± 9 μGy*m{sup 2}; P < 0.0001) and for voiding cystourethrography (18 ± 20 μGy*m{sup 2} vs. 10 ± 12 μGy*m{sup 2}; P = 0.04). The newer flat-panel system performs at lower dose levels with equal to better image quality and therefore seems to be the more suitable technique for pediatric fluoroscopy in comparison to image-intensifier systems. (orig.)

  3. High-performance low-noise 128-channel readout-integrated circuit for flat-panel x-ray detector systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuville, Eric J.; Belding, Mark; Costello, Adrienne N.; Hansen, Randy; Petronio, Susan M.

    2004-05-01

    A silicon mixed-signal integrated circuit is needed to extract and process x-ray induced signals from a coated flat panel thin film transistor array (TFT) in order to generate a digital x-ray image. Indigo Systems Corporation has designed, fabricated, and tested such a readout integrated circuit (ROIC), the ISC9717. This off-the-shelf, high performance, low-noise, 128-channel device is fully programmable with a multistage pipelined architecture and a 9 to 14-bit programmable A/D converter per channel, making it suitable for numerous X-ray medical imaging applications. These include high-resolution radiography in single frame mode and fluoroscopy where high frame rates are required. The ISC9717 can be used with various flat panel arrays and solid-state detectors materials: Selenium (Se), Cesium Iodide (CsI), Silicon (Si), Amorphous Silicon, Gallium Arsenide (GaAs), and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe). The 80-micron pitch ROIC is designed to interface (wire bonding or flip-chip) along one or two sides of the x-ray panel, where ROICs are abutted vertically, each reading out charge from pixels multiplexed onto 128 horizontal read lines. The paper will present the design and test results of the ROIC, including the mechanical and electrical interface to a TFT array, system performance requirements, output multiplexing of the digital signals to an off-board processor, and characterization test results from fabricated arrays.

  4. Radiation dose to patients and radiologists during transcatheter arterial embolization: comparison of a digital flat-panel system and conventional unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Furui, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Ikuo; Yamauchi, Teiyu; Kohtake, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Koji; Takada, Koichi; Yamagishi, Masafumi

    2005-10-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the exposure doses to patients and radiologists during transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using a new angiographic unit with a digital flat-panel system. Doses were assessed for 24 procedures: 12 using a new unit with a digital flat-panel system and 12 using a conventional unit. Doses to patients' skin were evaluated with thermoluminescent dosimeters behind the left, middle, and right portions of the liver. The doses to the radiologists were measured by an electronic personal dosimeter placed on the chest outside a lead protector. The maximal skin doses to the patients and the dose equivalents, Hp(0.07), to the radiologists were compared between the two procedure groups with each angiographic unit. For procedures with the new unit, the mean maximal skin dose to the patients was 284 +/- 127 (SD) mGy (range, 130-467 mGy), and Hp(0.07) to the radiologists was 62.8 +/- 17.4 muSv. For procedures with the conventional unit, the maximal skin dose to the patients was 1,068 +/- 439 mGy (range, 510-1,882 mGy), and Hp(0.07) to the radiologists was 68.4 +/- 25.7 muSv. The maximal skin dose to the patients was significantly lower with the new unit than with the conventional unit (p < 0.0005). There was no significant difference in the Hp(0.07) to the radiologists between the two procedure groups. The new digital flat-panel system for angiographic imaging can reduce the radiation dose to patients' skin during TAE for HCC as compared with the conventional system.

  5. 激光切割平板夹具的改进%The improvement of laser cutting flat-panel clamp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌修; 贺敬地

    2011-01-01

    The paper designs a new type of cutting workmanship facility through analyzing domestic laser cutting flat -panel workmanship facility, and points out the shortcomings.The new workmanship facility can be disassembled so that it increases using efficiency greatly.%通过对国内激光平面切割工装的分析对比,指出了现有工装的缺点,设计了一套新型的切割工装.该工装可拆卸,极大地提高了使用效率.

  6. Performance Study of an aSi Flat Panel Detector for Fast Neutron Imaging of Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, M.; Mauerhofer, E. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Engels, R.; Kemmerling, G. [Central Institute for Engineering, Electronics and Analytics - Electronic Systems, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Frank, M. [MATHCCES - Department of Mathematics, RWTH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen (Germany); Havenith, A.; Kettler, J.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, T. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology Transfer, RWTH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen (Germany); Schitthelm, O. [Corporate Technology, Siemens AG, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Radioactive waste must be characterized to check its conformance for intermediate storage and final disposal according to national regulations. For the determination of radio-toxic and chemo-toxic contents of radioactive waste packages non-destructive analytical techniques are preferentially used. Fast neutron imaging is a promising technique to assay large and dense items providing, in complementarity to photon imaging, additional information on the presence of structures in radioactive waste packages. Therefore the feasibility of a compact Neutron Imaging System for Radioactive waste Analysis (NISRA) using 14 MeV neutrons is studied in a cooperation framework of Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, RWTH Aachen University and Siemens AG. However due to the low neutron emission of neutron generators in comparison to research reactors the challenging task resides in the development of an imaging detector with a high efficiency, a low sensitivity to gamma radiation and a resolution sufficient for the purpose. The setup is composed of a commercial D-T neutron generator (Genie16GT, Sodern) with a surrounding shielding made of polyethylene, which acts as a collimator and an amorphous silicon flat panel detector (aSi, 40 x 40 cm{sup 2}, XRD-1642, Perkin Elmer). Neutron detection is achieved using a general propose plastic scintillator (EJ-260, Eljen Technology) linked to the detector. The thermal noise of the photodiodes is reduced by employing an entrance window made of aluminium. Optimal gain and integration time for data acquisition are set by measuring the response of the detector to the radiation of a 500 MBq {sup 241}Am-source. Detector performance was studied by recording neutron radiography images of materials with various, but well known, chemical compositions, densities and dimensions (Al, C, Fe, Pb, W, concrete, polyethylene, 5 x 8 x 10 cm{sup 3}). To simulate gamma-ray emitting waste radiographs in presence of a gamma-ray sources ({sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241

  7. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbijewski, W., E-mail: wzbijewski@jhu.edu; Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  8. Prototype of a flat-panel photoreactor using TiO2 nanoparticles coated on transparent granules for the degradation of Methylene Blue under solar illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutisna

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to design a prototype of a flat-panel (FP photoreactor for wastewater treatment via solar illumination using TiO2 nano-photocatalysts. The TiO2 nanoparticles are initially coated on transparent plastic granules to avoid the difficulties associated with the recovery of nanoparticles after completing the treatment process. The coated granules were distributed in the space inside the reactor panel. The upper cover of the reactor is a transparent material that allows light penetration to activate the catalyst. Wastewater is circulated into the spaces between the coated granules. When exposed to solar illumination, photocatalytic reactions occur on nearly the entire surface of the coated granules. To test the reactor viability, we used technical grade TiO2 (for affordability and a solution of Methylene Blue (MB as a sample of wastewater. The photoreactor was tested for treating 30 L of MB solution with an initial concentration of 25 mg L−1. We observed that the reactor was able to degrade more than 98% of the MB in the solution after 48 h of solar illumination. The performance of the FP photoreactor was also improved by arranging several reactor panels in series. Using four panels, we observed that the complete decomposition of the same MB solution can be achieved within 10 h. The proposed FP photoreactor is a very promising alternative for use in decomposing recalcitrant organic pollutants in wastewater.

  9. Daily quality control of collimator multi-leaf for IMRT static through flat panel (EPID); Control de calidad diario del colimador multilamina para IMRT estatica mediante panel plano (EPID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Barrado, A.; Benitez Serrano, J. A.; Sanchez Jimenez, E.; Sanchez-Reyes, A.

    2013-07-01

    When techniques are employed such as radiotherapy for intensity modulated (IMRT) is necessary to establish a proper quality assurance program. According to national and international recommendations, such a program must include, in addition to verification of treatment for each patient, a multi-leaf collimator quality control daily, easy to perform and analyze, to ensure the quality of the given treatments daily. This paper intends to make such quality control through the irradiation of a number of fields in the imaging system flat panel portal and its subsequent analysis. (Author)

  10. Clinical application of flat-panel CT in the angio suite; Klinische Anwendung der Flachdetektor-CT im Angio-OP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausegger, K.A.; Fuerstner, M.; Hauser, M.; Smetana, F.; Kau, T. [Landeskrankenhaus Klagenfurt (Austria). Roentgendiagnostisches Zentralinstitut; Klinikum Klagenfurt (Austria). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-12-15

    The introduction of flat-panel detectors in modern angiographic C-arm systems makes it possible to acquire CT-like images in the angiographic suite (flat-panel CT; FD-CT). In this review, after a short technical introduction of FD-CT including the discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of this new imaging modality, the most commonly and best evaluated indications for FD-CT will be described. FD-CT has become an important adjunctive imaging modality in neurointerventional procedures and embolizations, especially during liver embolization. Another attractive indication for FD-CT is musculoskeletal interventions. FD-CT may provide important additional information in complicated peripheral vascular interventions and stent-graft procedures. FD-CT has a broad spectrum of possible applications, which finally depends on the experience and innovative thinking of the operator. However, it has to be kept in mind that FD-CT causes additional radiation exposure. Roughly, it can be assumed that currently one FD-CT sequence causes at least the same radiation exposure as one spiral CT sequence of the corresponding body region. (orig.)

  11. Image Quality of Digital Direct Flat-Panel Mammography Versus an Indirect Small-Field CCD Technique Using a High-Contrast Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Barbara Krug

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the detection of microcalcifications on mammograms of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired by a direct digital flat-panel detector mammography system (FPM versus a stereotactic breast biopsy system utilizing CCD (charge-coupled device technology with either a 1024 or 512 acquisition matrix (1024 CCD and 512 CCD. Materials and Methods. Randomly distributed silica beads (diameter 100–1400 m and anthropomorphic scatter bodies were applied to 48 transparent films. The test specimens were radiographed on a direct digital FPM and by the indirect 1024 CCD and 512 CCD techniques. Four radiologists rated the monitor-displayed images independently of each other in random order. Results. The rate of correct positive readings for the “number of detectable microcalcifications” for silica beads of 100–199 m in diameter was 54.2%, 50.0% and 45.8% by FPM, 1024 CCD and 512 CCD, respectively. The inter-rater variability was most pronounced for silica beads of 100–199 m in diameter. The greatest agreement with the gold standard was observed for beads >400 m in diameter across all methods. Conclusion. Stereotactic spot images taken by 1024 matrix CCD technique are diagnostically equivalent to direct digital flat-panel mammograms for visualizing simulated microcalcifications >400 m in diameter.

  12. Theoretical and Monte Carlo optimization of a stacked three-layer flat-panel x-ray imager for applications in multi-spectral diagnostic medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Maurino, Sebastian; Badano, Aldo; Cunningham, Ian A.; Karim, Karim S.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new design of a stacked three-layer flat-panel x-ray detector for dual-energy (DE) imaging. Each layer consists of its own scintillator of individual thickness and an underlying thin-film-transistor-based flat-panel. Three images are obtained simultaneously in the detector during the same x-ray exposure, thereby eliminating any motion artifacts. The detector operation is two-fold: a conventional radiography image can be obtained by combining all three layers' images, while a DE subtraction image can be obtained from the front and back layers' images, where the middle layer acts as a mid-filter that helps achieve spectral separation. We proceed to optimize the detector parameters for two sample imaging tasks that could particularly benefit from this new detector by obtaining the best possible signal to noise ratio per root entrance exposure using well-established theoretical models adapted to fit our new design. These results are compared to a conventional DE temporal subtraction detector and a single-shot DE subtraction detector with a copper mid-filter, both of which underwent the same theoretical optimization. The findings are then validated using advanced Monte Carlo simulations for all optimized detector setups. Given the performance expected from initial results and the recent decrease in price for digital x-ray detectors, the simplicity of the three-layer stacked imager approach appears promising to usher in a new generation of multi-spectral digital x-ray diagnostics.

  13. Thermo-enhanced field emission from ZnO nanowires: Role of defects and application in a diode flat panel X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Daokun; Chen, Wenqing; Chen, Yicong; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhan, Runze; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2017-03-01

    A thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon was observed from ZnO nanowires. The field emission current increased by almost two orders of magnitude under a constant applied electric field, and the turn-on field decreased from 6.04 MV/m to 5.0 MV/m when the temperature increased from 323 to 723 K. The Poole-Frenkel electron excitation from the defect-induced trapping centers to the conduction band under high electric fields is believed to be the primary cause of the observed phenomenon. The experimental results fit well with the proposed physical model. The field emission from ZnO nanowires with different defect concentrations further confirmed the role of defects. Using the thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon, a diode flat panel X-ray source was demonstrated, for which the energy and dose can be separately tuned. The thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon observed from ZnO nanowires could be an effective way to realize a large area flat panel multi-energy X-ray source.

  14. High-quality 3D correction of ring and radiant artifacts in flat panel detector-based cone beam volume CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Kim, Jae Gon; Lee, Soo Yeol; Hasan, Md Kamrul

    2011-10-07

    The use of an x-ray flat panel detector is increasingly becoming popular in 3D cone beam volume CT machines. Due to the deficient semiconductor array manufacturing process, the cone beam projection data are often corrupted by different types of abnormalities, which cause severe ring and radiant artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image, and as a result, the diagnostic image quality is degraded. In this paper, a novel technique is presented for the correction of error in the 2D cone beam projections due to abnormalities often observed in 2D x-ray flat panel detectors. Template images are derived from the responses of the detector pixels using their statistical properties and then an effective non-causal derivative-based detection algorithm in 2D space is presented for the detection of defective and mis-calibrated detector elements separately. An image inpainting-based 3D correction scheme is proposed for the estimation of responses of defective detector elements, and the responses of the mis-calibrated detector elements are corrected using the normalization technique. For real-time implementation, a simplification of the proposed off-line method is also suggested. Finally, the proposed algorithms are tested using different real cone beam volume CT images and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods can effectively remove ring and radiant artifacts from cone beam volume CT images compared to other reported techniques in the literature.

  15. A novel potential source of β-carotene: Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and pilot β-carotene production in bubble column and flat panel photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Ma, Xiaoqin; Li, Aifen; Zhang, Chengwu

    2012-08-01

    Carotenoids profile of the unicellular Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and β-carotene production of the microalga in bubble column and large flat panel bioreactors were studied. The microalga which contained β-carotene, violaxanthin and vaucheriaxanthin as the major carotenoids accumulated large amount of β-carotene. The β-carotene production of this microalga in the bubble column bioreactor was considerable, with the maximum intracellular β-carotene content reaching 60.76 mg g(-1), biomass reaching 9.2 g L(-1), and β-carotene yield up to 470.2 mg L(-1). The β-carotene productions in two large flat panel bioreactors were relatively lower, whereas over 100 mg β-carotene L(-1) was achieved. Besides, high light intensity helped to accumulate intracellular β-carotene and biomass. Deficient nitrate supply inhibited biomass growth, though it helped to accumulate β-carotene. Our results first proved that E. cf. polyphem was a potential source and producer of β-carotene, making it an interesting subject for further β-carotene study or commercial exploration.

  16. High-quality 3D correction of ring and radiant artifacts in flat panel detector-based cone beam volume CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Hasan, Md Kamrul [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Kim, Jae Gon; Lee, Soo Yeol, E-mail: khasan@eee.buet.ac.b [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Kyungki 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-07

    The use of an x-ray flat panel detector is increasingly becoming popular in 3D cone beam volume CT machines. Due to the deficient semiconductor array manufacturing process, the cone beam projection data are often corrupted by different types of abnormalities, which cause severe ring and radiant artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image, and as a result, the diagnostic image quality is degraded. In this paper, a novel technique is presented for the correction of error in the 2D cone beam projections due to abnormalities often observed in 2D x-ray flat panel detectors. Template images are derived from the responses of the detector pixels using their statistical properties and then an effective non-causal derivative-based detection algorithm in 2D space is presented for the detection of defective and mis-calibrated detector elements separately. An image inpainting-based 3D correction scheme is proposed for the estimation of responses of defective detector elements, and the responses of the mis-calibrated detector elements are corrected using the normalization technique. For real-time implementation, a simplification of the proposed off-line method is also suggested. Finally, the proposed algorithms are tested using different real cone beam volume CT images and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods can effectively remove ring and radiant artifacts from cone beam volume CT images compared to other reported techniques in the literature.

  17. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyung Cha, Bo [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Chang-Woo [Department of Radiation Convergence Engineering, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Keedong [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seongchae, E-mail: sarim@keri.re.kr [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Young [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80–120 kVp, and different current (10–50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally.

  18. Signal and noise analysis of flat-panel sandwich detectors for single-shot dual-energy x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Ho Kyung; Youn, Hanbean; Yun, Seungman; Han, Jong Chul; Kim, Junwoo; Kam, Soohwa; Tanguay, Jesse; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a novel sandwich-style single-shot (single-kV) detector by stacking two indirect-conversion flat-panel detectors for preclinical mouse imaging. In the sandwich detector structure, extra noise due to the direct x-ray absorption in photodiode arrays is inevitable. We develop a simple cascaded linear-systems model to describe signal and noise propagation in the flat-panel sandwich detector considering direct x-ray interactions. The noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) obtained from the front and rear detectors are analyzed by using the cascaded-systems model. The NPS induced by the absorption of direct x-ray photons that are unattenuated within the photodiode layers is white in the spatial-frequency domain like the additive readout noise characteristic; hence that is harmful to the DQE at higher spatial frequencies at which the number of secondary quanta lessens. The model developed in this study will be useful for determining the optimal imaging techniques with sandwich detectors and their optimal design.

  19. [Correlation between basic imaging properties and subjective evaluations of two digital radiographic X-ray systems based on direct-conversion flat panel detector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Taro; Katayama, Reiji; Morishita, Junji; Sakai, Shinji; Kuroki, Hidefumi; Ohkubo, Seiji; Maeda, Takashi; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2010-11-20

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the basic imaging properties of two digital radiographic X-ray systems with a direct conversion flat-panel detector and their image qualities, which were evaluated by the observer in hard copy and soft copy studies. The subjective image quality was evaluated and compared in terms of the low-contrast detectability and image sharpness in the two digital radiographic X-ray systems. We applied the radiographs of a contrast detail phantom to the evaluation of low-contrast detectability and analyzed the contrast detail diagrams. Finally, low-contrast detectability was evaluated by the image quality figure (IQF) calculated from the contrast detail diagrams. Also, the subjective image sharpness of human dry bones of two systems was examined and evaluated by the normalized-rank method. The results indicated that System A tended to provide superior subjective image quality compared to System B in both observer studies. We also found high correlations between IQFs and basic imaging properties, such as the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the noise equivalent quantum (NEQ). In conclusion, the low-contrast detectability of the two digital radiographic X-ray systems with a direct conversion flat-panel detector corresponded to the NPS and the NEQ in both outputs (soft copy and hard copy). On the other hand, the subjective image sharpness of human dry bones was affected by their noise properties.

  20. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyung Cha, Bo; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Jeon, Seongchae; Huh, Young

    2015-06-01

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80-120 kVp, and different current (10-50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally.

  1. 数字平板探测器的原理及应用%Principle and Application of Flat Panel Detectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建华

    2011-01-01

    Digital radiographic testing is a hot research direction at present, in which the development process of the digital detector will determine the development direction of digital radiographic testing. The developing history, structure, imaging process, image quality and application advantages of digital flat panel detector were described. By the practical measurement, it was confirmed that flat-panel detector test was expected to replace traditional film imaging and image intensifier mode, and it showed a very broad application prospects.%数字射线检测是当前射线检测的热点研究方向,其中探测器的发展进程直接决定了数字射线检测的发展方向。介绍了目前应用较广的平板探测器的发展历史、平板结构、成像过程、成像质量以及应用优势等。通过实测试验,证实了平板探测器有望取代传统的胶片成像以及图像增强器方式成像,应用前景非常广阔。

  2. Indirect Vision Driving with Fixed Flat Panel Displays for Near Unity, Wide, and Extended Fields of Camera View

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    is needed to avoid obstacles. This is true since the scene will appear to be biocular instead of the binocular needed for stereopsis (i.e...experimentation site was closed to other vehicular and foot traffic during the study. In all exercises with the participant driving, the experimenter... traffic . When the right 78 side panel stopped working during a training run, he thought that he could continue with only minor difficulty. The next

  3. Design and construction of a flat-panel-based cone-beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system through the adaptation of a commercially available CT system: recent data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how a commercially available spiral CT has been modified for use as the electro-mechanical scanner hardware for a prototype flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system. FPD-CBCT has the benefits of isotropic high resolution, low contrast sensitivity and 3D visualization. In contrast to spiral CT, which acquires a series of narrow slices, FPD-CBCT acquires a full volume of data (limited by the cone angle and the FPD active area) in one radiographic subsystems controlled include: gantry rotation and tilt, patient table positioning, rotor control, mA control, the high frequency generator (kVp, exposure time, repetition rate) and image data acquisition. Also, a 2D full field FPD replaced the 1D detector, as well as the existing slit collimator was retrofitted to a full field collimator to allow x-ray exposure over the entire active area of the FPD. In addition, x-ray projection data was acquired at 30 fps. Power and communication signals to control modules on the rotating part of the gantry were transmitted through integrated slip rings on the gantry. A stationary host computer controlled mechanical motion of the gantry and sent trigger signals to on-board electronic interface modules to control data acquisition and radiographic functions. Acquired image data was grabbed to the system memory of an on-board industrial computer, saved to hard disk and downloaded through a network connection to the stationary computer for 3D reconstruction. Through the synchronized control of the pulsed x-ray exposures, data acquisition, and gantry rotation the system achieved a circle cone beam image acquisition protocol. With integrated control of the gantry tilt and of the position and translation speed of the patient table, spiral cone beam and circle-plus-arc cone beam image acquisition protocols will also be achieved. Performance is being evaluated with optical encoders, standard dosimetry equipment

  4. Studies of the performance of different front-end systems for flat-panel multi-anode PMTs with CsI(Tl) scintillator arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Sekiya, H; Kubo, H; Miuchi, K; Nagayoshi, T; Nishimura, H; Okada, Y; Orito, R; Takada, A; Takeda, A; Tanimori, T; Ueno, K

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the performance of two different types of front-end systems for our gamma camera based on Hamamatsu H8500 (flat-panel 64 channels multi-anode PSPMT) with a CsI(Tl) scintillator array. The array consists of 64 pixels of $6\\times6\\times20{\\rm mm}^3$ which corresponds to the anode pixels of H8500. One of the system is based on commercial ASIC chips in order to readout every anode. The others are based on resistive charge divider network between anodes to reduce readout channels. In both systems, each pixel (6mm) was clearly resolved by flood field irradiation of $^{137}$Cs. We also investigated the energy resolution of these systems and showed the performance of the cascade connection of resistive network between some PMTs for large area detectors.

  5. Studies of the performance of different front-end systems for flat-panel multi-anode PMTs with CsI(Tl) scintillator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, H.; Hattori, K.; Kubo, H.; Miuchi, K.; Nagayoshi, T.; Nishimura, H.; Okada, Y.; Orito, R.; Takada, A.; Takeda, A.; Tanimori, T.; Ueno, K.

    2006-07-01

    We have studied the performance of two different types of front-end systems for our gamma camera based on Hamamatsu H8500 (flat-panel 64 channels multi-anode PSPMT) with a CsI(Tl) scintillator array. The array consists of 64 pixels of 6×6×20 mm3 which corresponds to the anode pixels of H8500. One of the system is based on commercial ASIC chips in order to read out every anode. The others are based on resistive charge divider network between anodes to reduce readout channels. In both systems, each pixel (6 mm) was clearly resolved by flood field irradiation of 137Cs. We also investigated the energy resolution of these systems and showed the performance of the cascade connection of resistive network between some PMTs for large area detectors.

  6. Close-Spaced Sublimation Growth and Characterization of Polycrystalline Cd1-xZnxTe Thick Films for Flat-Panel X-ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Tamotsu; Kono, Makoto; Jibiki, Takayuki; Imai, Kiyokazu; Kishihara, Hiroyuki; Kaino, Masatomo; Tokuda, Satoshi; Sato, Toshiyuki

    2008-04-01

    Polycrystalline Cd1-xZnxTe thick films (x ˜0.05) with thicknesses above 400 µm were prepared by the close-spaced sublimation (CSS) as a conversion layer for next-generation highly efficient flat-panel X-ray detectors. The effects of the substrate temperature on the properties of the Cd1-xZnxTe layer were investigated, and it was found that the surface morphology and preferred crystallographic orientation depended on the substrate temperature. Furthermore, the control of the initial stage of deposition of Cd1-xZnxTe films was attempted, and high-quality Cd1-xZnxTe thick films were obtained by deposition after removing the surface layer of the sintered CdTe and ZnTe powder source.

  7. Studies of the performance of different front-end systems for flat-panel multi-anode PMTs with CsI(Tl) scintillator arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiya, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: sekiya@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Hattori, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kubo, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Miuchi, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nagayoshi, T. [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 17 Kikui-cho, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0044 (Japan); Nishimura, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Okada, Y. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Orito, R. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkoudai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Takada, A. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Takeda, A. [Kamioka Observatory, ICRR, University of Tokyo, 456 Higasi-mozumi, Hida-shi, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Tanimori, T. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ueno, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    We have studied the performance of two different types of front-end systems for our gamma camera based on Hamamatsu H8500 (flat-panel 64 channels multi-anode PSPMT) with a CsI(Tl) scintillator array. The array consists of 64 pixels of 6x6x20mm{sup 3} which corresponds to the anode pixels of H8500. One of the system is based on commercial ASIC chips in order to read out every anode. The others are based on resistive charge divider network between anodes to reduce readout channels. In both systems, each pixel (6mm) was clearly resolved by flood field irradiation of {sup 137}Cs. We also investigated the energy resolution of these systems and showed the performance of the cascade connection of resistive network between some PMTs for large area detectors.

  8. Alternating-direction method of multipliers estimation of attenuation and activity distributions in time-of-flight flat-panel positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Yueh; Chou, Cheng-Ying [National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-18

    A quantitative reconstruction of radiotracer activity distribution in positron emission tomography (PET) requires correction of attenuation, which was typically estimated through transmission measurements. The advancement in hardware development has prompted the use of time-of-flight (TOF) to improve PET imaging. Recently, the application of TOF-PET has been further extended to obtain attenuation map in addition to activity distribution simultaneously by use of iterative algorithms. Two flat-panel detectors are employed thus many transaxial lines of response are not detected. In this work, we applied the alternating-direction method of multipliers (ADMM) to simultaneously reconstruct TOF-PET and attenuation estimation in a dualhead small-animal PET system. The results were compared with those obtained by use of the maximum-likelihood algorithm. The computer simulation results showed that the application of the ADMM algorithm could greatly improve the image quality and reduce noisy appearance.

  9. Model-based iterative reconstruction for flat-panel cone-beam CT with focal spot blur, detector blur, and correlated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Steven, II; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Webster Stayman, J.

    2016-01-01

    While model-based reconstruction methods have been successfully applied to flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) systems, typical implementations ignore both spatial correlations in the projection data as well as system blurs due to the detector and focal spot in the x-ray source. In this work, we develop a forward model for flat-panel-based systems that includes blur and noise correlation associated with finite focal spot size and an indirect detector (e.g. scintillator). This forward model is used to develop a staged reconstruction framework where projection data are deconvolved and log-transformed, followed by a generalized least-squares reconstruction that utilizes a non-diagonal statistical weighting to account for the correlation that arises from the acquisition and data processing chain. We investigate the performance of this novel reconstruction approach in both simulated data and in CBCT test-bench data. In comparison to traditional filtered backprojection and model-based methods that ignore noise correlation, the proposed approach yields a superior noise-resolution tradeoff. For example, for a system with 0.34 mm FWHM scintillator blur and 0.70 FWHM focal spot blur, using the correlated noise model instead of an uncorrelated noise model increased resolution by 42% (with variance matched at 6.9  ×  10-8 mm-2). While this advantage holds across a wide range of systems with differing blur characteristics, the improvements are greatest for systems where source blur is larger than detector blur.

  10. The Usage of Flat Panel Solar Heater Balcony Style%平板式阳台壁挂太阳能应用浅析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张子涵

    2014-01-01

    随着世界范围内的能源短缺和人们环保意识的增强,新能源和可再生能源技术将是21世纪世界经济发展中最具有决定性影响的技术领域之一,而太阳能作为取之不尽、生态学上纯净的和不改变地球上燃料平衡的能源,有着能源总量大,又容易实现小型化的优点,被认为是21世纪最重要的新能源。太阳能热水器将会成为改变人们生活的一大重要产品。平板式阳台壁挂太阳能成功解决了传统太阳能热水器安装中存在的瓶颈问题,成功实现了建筑一体化。本文就平板式阳台壁挂太阳能的应用方面做了一些探索研究。%Along with the shortage of energy and enhance of environment protection, renewable energy industry has become one of the most effective ones in the new century which can greatly affect people's life. As a clean and renewable energy, solar energy has been consid-ered as the most important new energy with the characteristics of renewable, endless and easy to reach. Flat panel solar heater greatly im-proved the traditional solar heaters shortcomings and realized the perfect combination with tal buildings. In this text, we have some study of the usage of flat panel solar heaters.

  11. The influence of liquid crystal display monitors on observer performance for the detection of interstitial lung markings on both storage phosphor and flat-panel-detector chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Yon Mi [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Hospital, 1198, Guwol-dong, Namdong-gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Myung Jin [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: mj1.chung@samsung.com; Lee, Kyung Soo [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bong-Keun [Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To compare observer performance with a flat-panel liquid crystal display (LCD) monitor and with a high-resolution gray-scale cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor in the detection of interstitial lung markings using a silicon flat-panel-detector direct radiography (DR) and storage phosphor computed radiography (CR) in a clinical setting. Materials and methods: We displayed 39 sets of posteroanterior chest radiographs from the patients who were suspected of interstitial lung disease. Each sets consisted of DR, CR and thin-section CT as the reference standard. Image identities were masked, randomly sorted, and displayed on both five mega pixel (2048 x 2560 x 8 bits) LCD and CRT monitors. Ten radiologists independently rated their confidence in detection for the presence of linear opacities in the four fields of the lungs; right upper, left upper, right lower, and left lower quadrant. Performance of a total 6240 (39 sets x 2 detector systems x 2 monitor system x 4 fields x 10 observers) observations was analyzed by multi-reader multi-case receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Differences between monitor systems in combinations of detector systems were compared using ANOVA and paired-samples t-test. Results: Area under curves (AUC) for the presence of linear opacities measured by ROC analysis was higher on the LCDs than CRTs without statistical significance (p = 0.082). AUC was significantly higher on the DR systems than CR systems (p = 0.006). AUC was significantly higher on the LCDs than CRTs for DR systems (p = 0.039) but not different for CR systems (p = 0.301). Conclusion: In clinical conditions, performance of the LCD monitor appears to be better for detecting interstitial lung markings when interfaced with DR systems.

  12. Impact Testing on Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Flat Panels With BX-265 and PDL-1034 External Tank Foam for the Space Shuttle Return to Flight Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, Michael J.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2009-01-01

    Following the tragedy of the Orbiter Columbia (STS-107) on February 1, 2003, a major effort commenced to develop a better understanding of debris impacts and their effect on the space shuttle subsystems. An initiative to develop and validate physics-based computer models to predict damage from such impacts was a fundamental component of this effort. To develop the models it was necessary to physically characterize reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) along with ice and foam debris materials, which could shed on ascent and impact the orbiter RCC leading edges. The validated models enabled the launch system community to use the impact analysis software LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corp.) to predict damage by potential and actual impact events on the orbiter leading edge and nose cap thermal protection systems. Validation of the material models was done through a three-level approach: Level 1-fundamental tests to obtain independent static and dynamic constitutive model properties of materials of interest, Level 2-subcomponent impact tests to provide highly controlled impact test data for the correlation and validation of the models, and Level 3-full-scale orbiter leading-edge impact tests to establish the final level of confidence for the analysis methodology. This report discusses the Level 2 test program conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Ballistic Impact Laboratory with external tank foam impact tests on flat RCC panels, and presents the data observed. The Level 2 testing consisted of 54 impact tests in the NASA GRC Ballistic Impact Laboratory on 6- by 6-in. and 6- by 12-in. flat plates of RCC and evaluated two types of debris projectiles: BX-265 and PDL-1034 external tank foam. These impact tests helped determine the level of damage generated in the RCC flat plates by each projectile and validated the use of the foam and RCC models for use in LS-DYNA.

  13. Standard practice for acoustic emission examination of plate-like and flat panel composite structures used in aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers acoustic emission (AE) examination or monitoring of panel and plate-like composite structures made entirely of fiber/polymer composites. 1.2 The AE examination detects emission sources and locates the region(s) within the composite structure where the emission originated. When properly developed AE-based criteria for the composite item are in place, the AE data can be used for nondestructive examination (NDE), characterization of proof testing, documentation of quality control or for decisions relative to structural-test termination prior to completion of a planned test. Other NDE methods may be used to provide additional information about located damage regions. For additional information see Appendix X1. 1.3 This practice can be applied to aerospace composite panels and plate-like elements as a part of incoming inspection, during manufacturing, after assembly, continuously (during structural health monitoring) and at periodic intervals during the life of a structure. 1.4 This pra...

  14. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium energy field/R and D high performance flat panel display technology (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium energy bun`ya / koseino flat panel display gijutsu no sogo kaihatsu kenkyu (daiichi nendo ) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    One of the subjects in technology supporting the highly information-oriented society which will develop and diversify toward the 21st century is the construction of high grade man/machine interface. For it, high precision/high luminance/energy saving/thin plane displays are strongly requested. This R and D is to indicate models of systematical development in the region of element technology individually existing in the Shikoku area by forming a regional consortium in the industry/universities/government. Creation of new industries by gathering display related enterprises is a first step in a plan to realize `Display Island Shikoku.` As a concrete target, with the use of high-tech diamond semiconducting technology, a development is conducted of the high performance flat panel display using the negative electron affinity (NEA) electron emitter which drastically solves the problems such as luminance, visibility angle and response speed, the subjects on the commercialized liquid crystal flat panel display. 16 refs., 45 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Large area full-field optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shoude; Sherif, Sherif; Flueraru, Costel

    2006-09-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a fundamentally new type of optical imaging technology. OCT performs high resolution, cross-sectional tomographic imaging of the internal structure in materials and biological systems. The biomedical applications of the OCT imaging systems have been developed for diagnostics of ophthalmology, dermatology, dentistry and cardiology. Most of existing OCT systems use point-scanning based technology, however, the 3-axis scanning makes the system slow and cumbersome. A few OCT systems working directly on 2D full-field images were reported, however, they are designed to work in a relatively small area, around couple of hundred microns square. In this paper, we present a design and implementation of a full-field OCT imaging system for acquiring tomography and with a working area around 15mm by 15 mm. The problems rising from full-field OCT are addressed and analyzed. The algorithms to extract the tomography are proposed. Two applications of multilayer information retrieval and 3D object imaging using full-field OCT are described.

  16. Calibration and validation of full-field techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalmann R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We review basic metrological terms related to the use of measurement equipment for verification of numerical model calculations. We address three challenges that are faced when performing measurements in experimental mechanics with optical techniques: the calibration of a measuring instrument that (i measures strain values, (ii provides full-field data, and (iii is dynamic.

  17. Volumetric breast density estimation from full-field digital mammograms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engeland, S. van; Snoeren, P.R.; Huisman, H.J.; Boetes, C.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2006-01-01

    A method is presented for estimation of dense breast tissue volume from mammograms obtained with full-field digital mammography (FFDM). The thickness of dense tissue mapping to a pixel is determined by using a physical model of image acquisition. This model is based on the assumption that the breast

  18. SU-C-16A-01: In Vivo Source Position Verification in High Dose Rate (HDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Flat Panel Imager: Initial Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franich, R; Smith, R; Millar, J [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Haworth, A [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Taylor, M [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Australian Federal Police, Canberra, ACT (Australia); McDermott, L [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We report our initial clinical experience with a novel position-sensitive source-tracking system based on a flat panel imager. The system has been trialled with 4 prostate HDR brachytherapy patients (8 treatment fractions) in this initial study. Methods: The flat panel imaging system was mounted under a customised carbon fibre couch top assembly (Figure 1). Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate of each patient at the time of catheter placement. X-ray dwell position markers were inserted into three catheters and a radiograph acquired to locate the implant relative to the imaging device. During treatment, as the HDR source dwells were delivered, images were acquired and processed to determine the position of the source in the patient. Source positions measured by the imaging device were compared to the treatment plan for verification of treatment delivery. Results: Measured dwell positions provided verification of relative dwell spacing within and between catheters, in the coronal plane. Measurements were typically within 2.0mm (0.2mm – 3.3mm, s.d. 0.8mm) of the planned positions over 60 dwells (Figure 2). Discrimination between larger dwell intervals and catheter differentiation were clear. This confirms important delivery attributes such as correct transfer tube connection, source step size, relative catheter positions and therefore overall correct plan selection and delivery. The fiducial markers, visible on the radiograph, provided verification of treatment delivery to the correct anatomical location. The absolute position of the dwells was determined by comparing the measured dwell positions with the x-ray markers from the radiograph, validating the programmed treatment indexer length. The total impact on procedure time was less than 5 minutes. Conclusion: The novel, noninvasive HDR brachytherapy treatment verification system was used clinically with minor impact on workflow. The system allows verification of correct treatment

  19. Hydrogen production by the engineered cyanobacterial strain Nostoc PCC 7120 ΔhupW examined in a flat panel photobioreactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Marcus; Heidorn, Thorsten; Lindblad, Peter

    2015-12-10

    Nitrogenase based hydrogen production was examined in a ΔhupW strain of the filamentous heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC 7120, i.e., cells lacking the last step in the maturation system of the large subunit of the uptake hydrogenase and as a consequence with a non-functional uptake hydrogenase. The cells were grown in a developed flat panel photobioreactor system with 3.0L culture volume either aerobically (air) or anaerobically (Ar or 80% N2/20% Ar) and illuminated with a mixture of red and white LED. Aerobic growth of the ΔhupW strain of Nostoc PCC 7120 at 44μmolar photons m(-2)s(-1) PAR gave the highest hydrogen production of 0.7mL H2 L(-1)h(-1), 0.53mmol H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 1.2%. Anaerobic growth using 100% argon showed a maximal hydrogen production of 1.7mLL(-1)h(-1), 0.85mmol per mg chlorophyll a(-1) h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 2.7%. Altering between argon/N2 (20/80) and 100% argon phases resulted in a maximal hydrogen production at hour 128 (100% argon phase) with 6.2mL H2L(-1)h(-1), 0.71mL H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy efficiency conversion of 4.0%. The highest buildup of hydrogen gas observed was 6.89% H2 (100% argon phase) of the total photobioreactor system with a maximal production of 4.85mL H2 L(-1)h(-1). The present study clearly demonstrates the potential to use purpose design cyanobacteria in developed flat panel photobioreactor systems for the direct production of the solar fuel hydrogen. Further improvements in the strain used, environmental conditions employed, and growth, production and collection systems used, are needed before a sustainable and economical cyanobacterial based hydrogen production can be realized.

  20. Full-field digital image correlation with Kriging regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dezhi; DiazDelaO, F. A.; Wang, Weizhuo; Mottershead, John E.

    2015-04-01

    A full-field Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method with integrated Kriging regression is presented in this article. The displacement field is formulated as a best linear unbiased model that includes the correlations between all the locations in the Region of Interest (RoI). A global error factor is employed to extend conventional Kriging interpolation to quantify displacement errors of the control points. An updating strategy for the self-adaptive control grid is developed on the basis of the Mean Squared Error (MSE) determined from the Kriging model. Kriging DIC is shown to outperform several other full-field DIC methods when using open-access experimental data. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the robustness of Kriging DIC to different choices of initial control points and to speckle pattern variability. Finally Kriging DIC is tested on an experimental example.

  1. Mammographic Artifacts on Full-Field Digital Mammography

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jae Jeong; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Choi, Byung Gil; Song, ByungJoo; Jung, Haijo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the incidence of full-field digital mammographic (FFDM) artifacts with three systems at two institutions and compares the artifacts between two detector types and two grid types. A total of 4,440 direct and 4,142 indirect FFDM images were reviewed by two radiologists, and artifacts were classified as patient related, hardware related, and software processing. The overall incidence of FFDM artifacts was 3.4 % (292/8,582). Patient related artifacts (motion artifacts and ...

  2. A Ring Artifact Correction Method: Validation by Micro-CT Imaging with Flat-Panel Detectors and a 2D Photon-Counting Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elsayed Eldib

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce an efficient ring artifact correction method for a cone-beam computed tomography (CT. In the first step, we correct the defective pixels whose values are close to zero or saturated in the projection domain. In the second step, we compute the mean value at each detector element along the view angle in the sinogram to obtain the one-dimensional (1D mean vector, and we then compute the 1D correction vector by taking inverse of the mean vector. We multiply the correction vector with the sinogram row by row over all view angles. In the third step, we apply a Gaussian filter on the difference image between the original CT image and the corrected CT image obtained in the previous step. The filtered difference image is added to the corrected CT image to compensate the possible contrast anomaly that may appear due to the contrast change in the sinogram after removing stripe artifacts. We applied the proposed method to the projection data acquired by two flat-panel detectors (FPDs and a silicon-based photon-counting X-ray detector (PCXD. Micro-CT imaging experiments of phantoms and a small animal have shown that the proposed method can greatly reduce ring artifacts regardless of detector types. Despite the great reduction of ring artifacts, the proposed method does not compromise the original spatial resolution and contrast.

  3. Modeling shift-variant X-ray focal spot blur for high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam CT

    CERN Document Server

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Stayman, J Webster

    2016-01-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been applied clinically in a number of high-resolution applications. Increasing geometric magnification can potentially improve resolution, but also increases blur due to an extended x-ray focal-spot. We present a shift-variant focal-spot blur model and incorporate it into a model-based iterative-reconstruction algorithm. We apply this algorithm to simulation and CBCT test-bench data. In a trabecular bone simulation study, we find traditional reconstruction approaches without a blur model exhibit shift-variant resolution properties that depend greatly on the acquisition protocol (e.g. short vs. full scans) and the anode angles of the rays used to reconstruct a particular region. For physical CBCT experiments focal spot blur was characterized and a spatial resolution phantom was scanned and reconstructed. In both experiments image quality using the shift-variant model was significantly improved over approaches that modeled no blur or only a shift-invariant blur, suggesting a ...

  4. Basic imaging properties of an indirect flat-panel detector system employing irradiation side sampling (ISS) technology for chest radiography: comparison with a computed radiographic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobukazu; Yano, Yuki; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Akasaka, Tsutomu; Sasaki, Masayuki; Ohki, Masafumi; Morishita, Junji

    2013-01-01

    The image quality and potential usefulness for patient skin-dose reduction of a newly developed flat-panel detector (FPD) system employing irradiation side sampling (ISS) were investigated and compared to a conventional computed radiography (CR) system. We used the X-ray beam quality of RQA 9 as noted in the standard evaluation method by the International Electrotechnical Commission 62220-1 to evaluate the image quality of the detector for chest radiography. The presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) of the ISS-FPD system was slightly higher than that of the CR system in the horizontal direction at more than 2.2 cycles/mm. However, the presampled MTF of the ISS-FPD system was slightly lower than that of the CR system in the vertical direction. The Wiener spectrum of the ISS-FPD system showed a 50-65 % lesser noise level than that of the CR system under the same exposure condition. The detective quantum efficiency of the ISS-FPD system was at least twice as great as that of the CR system. We conclude that the ISS-FPD system has the potential to reduce the patient skin dose compared to a conventional CR system for chest radiography.

  5. Does Preinterventional Flat-Panel Computer Tomography Pooled Blood Volume Mapping Predict Final Infarct Volume After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Marlies, E-mail: marlies.wagner@kgu.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany); Kyriakou, Yiannis, E-mail: yiannis.kyriakou@siemens.com [Siemens AG, Health Care Sector (Germany); Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard du, E-mail: mesnil@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany); Singer, Oliver C., E-mail: o.singer@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Department of Neurology (Germany); Berkefeld, Joachim, E-mail: berkefeld@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeDecreased cerebral blood volume is known to be a predictor for final infarct volume in acute cerebral artery occlusion. To evaluate the predictability of final infarct volume in patients with acute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or the distal internal carotid artery (ICA) and successful endovascular recanalization, pooled blood volume (PBV) was measured using flat-panel detector computed tomography (FPD CT).Materials and MethodsTwenty patients with acute unilateral occlusion of the MCA or distal ACI without demarcated infarction, as proven by CT at admission, and successful Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score (TICI 2b or 3) endovascular thrombectomy were included. Cerebral PBV maps were acquired from each patient immediately before endovascular thrombectomy. Twenty-four hours after recanalization, each patient underwent multislice CT to visualize final infarct volume. Extent of the areas of decreased PBV was compared with the final infarct volume proven by follow-up CT the next day.ResultsIn 15 of 20 patients, areas of distinct PBV decrease corresponded to final infarct volume. In 5 patients, areas of decreased PBV overestimated final extension of ischemia probably due to inappropriate timing of data acquisition and misery perfusion.ConclusionPBV mapping using FPD CT is a promising tool to predict areas of irrecoverable brain parenchyma in acute thromboembolic stroke. Further validation is necessary before routine use for decision making for interventional thrombectomy.

  6. Flat-Panel Detector—Based Volume Computed Tomography: A Novel 3D Imaging Technique to Monitor Osteolytic Bone Lesions in a Mouse Tumor Metastasis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannine Missbach-Guentner

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal metastasis is an important cause of mortality in patients with breast cancer. Hence, animal models, in combination with various imaging techniques, are in high demand for preclinical assessment of novel therapies. We evaluated the applicability of flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT to noninvasive detection of osteolytic bone metastases that develop in severe immunodeficient mice after intracardial injection of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. A single fpVCT scan at 200-wm isotropic resolution was employed to detect osteolysis within the entire skeleton. Osteolytic lesions identified by fpVCT correlated with Faxitron X-ray analysis and were subsequently confirmed by histopathological examination. Isotropic three-dimensional image data sets obtained by fpVCT were the basis for the precise visualization of the extent of the lesion within the cortical bone and for the measurement of bone loss. Furthermore, fpVCT imaging allows continuous monitoring of growth kinetics for each metastatic site and visualization of lesions in more complex regions of the skeleton, such as the skull. Our findings suggest that fpVCT is a powerful tool that can be used to monitor the occurrence and progression of osteolytic lesions in vivo and can be further developed to monitor responses to antimetastatic therapies over the course of the disease.

  7. Intraparenchymal Hyperattenuations on Flat-Panel CT Directly After Mechanical Thrombectomy are Restricted to the Initial Infarct Core on Diffusion-Weighted Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tanja; Mahraun, Tobias; Schroeder, Julian; Frölich, Andreas; Hoelter, Philip; Wagner, Marlies; Darcourt, Jean; Cognard, Christophe; Bonafé, Alain; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne; Buhk, Jan-Hendrik

    2016-09-16

    The presence of intraparenchymal hyperattenuations (IPH) on flat-panel computed tomography (FP-CT) after endovascular recanalization in stroke patients is a common phenomenon. They are thought to occur in ischemic areas with breakdown of the blood-brain barrier but previous studies that investigated a mutual interaction are scarce. We aimed to assess the relationship of IPH localization with prethrombectomy diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesions. This retrospective multicenter study included 27 acute stroke patients who underwent DWI prior to FP-CT following mechanical thrombectomy. After software-based coregistration of DWI and FP-CT, lesion volumetry was conducted and overlapping was analyzed. Two different patterns were observed: IPH corresponding to the DWI lesion and IPH exceeding the DWI lesion. The latter showed demarcated infarction of DWI exceeding IPH at 24 h. No major hemorrhage following IPH was observed. Most IPH were manifested within the basal ganglia and insular cortex. The IPH primarily appeared within the initial ischemic core and secondarily within the penumbral tissue that progressed to infarction. The IPH represent the minimum final infarct volume, which may help in periinterventional decision making.

  8. Cascaded-Systems Analysis of Flat-Panel Sandwich Detectors for Single-Shot Dual-Energy X-ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Kyung; Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Junwoo; Youn, Hanbean [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    We have developed the cascaded-systems model to investigate the signal and noise characteristics in the flat-panel sandwich detector which was developed for the preclinical single-shot dual-energy x-ray imaging. The model incorporates parallel branches to include direct interaction of x-rays in photodiode that is unavoidable in the sandwich structure with a corresponding potential increase in image noise. The model has been validated in comparison with the experimental. The cascaded-systems analysis shows that direct x-ray interaction noise behaves as additive electronic noise that is white in the frequency domain; hence it is harmful to the DQE at higher frequencies where the number of secondary quanta lessens. Even at zero frequency, the direct x-ray interaction noise can reduce the DQE of the detectors investigated in this study by ∼20% for the 60 kV x-ray spectrum. The DQE of rear detector in the sandwich structure is sensitive to additive electronic noise because of the enhancement in the number of electronic noise quanta relative to that of x-ray quanta that are attenuated through the front layers including the intermediate filter layer (i.e. incident photon fluence times transmission factor)

  9. Comparison of intraoperative flat panel imaging and postoperative plain radiography for the detection of intraarticular screw displacement in volar distal radius plate ostheosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borggrefe, J; Bolte, H; Worms, W; Mahlke, L; Seekamp, A; Menzdorf, L; Varoga, D; Müller, M; Weuster, M; Zorenkov, D; Wedel, T; Lippross, S

    2015-12-01

    To investigate if intraoperative 3D flat panel imaging improves the detection of radiocarpal intraarticular screw misplacement (RCSM) in comparison to standard postoperative x-ray. In a study on cadaver specimens, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity to detect RCSM using X-ray, intraoperative 3D-fluoroscopy as well as the digital volume tomography. The gold standard reference was computed tomography. Sensitivity for the detection of RCSM for X-ray was 58% and specificity 88%. For DVT, the sensitivity to detect RCSM was 88% and the specificity 53%. For 3D-fluoroscopy, the sensitivity for RCSM was 68% and specificity 95%. When combining the methods, the best performance was found, when combining the two intraoperative imaging methods, with a resulting sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 73%. Intraoperative 3D fluoroscopy and digital volume tomography appear to be at least as sensitive and specific to detect RCSM than the regular postoperative radiography in two planes. However, especially discrete screw misplacements can be missed with either method. Level IV. Diagnostic device study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. A Ring Artifact Correction Method: Validation by Micro-CT Imaging with Flat-Panel Detectors and a 2D Photon-Counting Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldib, Mohamed Elsayed; Hegazy, Mohamed; Mun, Yang Ji; Cho, Myung Hye; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an efficient ring artifact correction method for a cone-beam computed tomography (CT). In the first step, we correct the defective pixels whose values are close to zero or saturated in the projection domain. In the second step, we compute the mean value at each detector element along the view angle in the sinogram to obtain the one-dimensional (1D) mean vector, and we then compute the 1D correction vector by taking inverse of the mean vector. We multiply the correction vector with the sinogram row by row over all view angles. In the third step, we apply a Gaussian filter on the difference image between the original CT image and the corrected CT image obtained in the previous step. The filtered difference image is added to the corrected CT image to compensate the possible contrast anomaly that may appear due to the contrast change in the sinogram after removing stripe artifacts. We applied the proposed method to the projection data acquired by two flat-panel detectors (FPDs) and a silicon-based photon-counting X-ray detector (PCXD). Micro-CT imaging experiments of phantoms and a small animal have shown that the proposed method can greatly reduce ring artifacts regardless of detector types. Despite the great reduction of ring artifacts, the proposed method does not compromise the original spatial resolution and contrast. PMID:28146088

  11. 聚合物发光二极管面光源的光热特性%Optical and Thermal Analysis for Polymer Light-emitting Diode as A Flat Panel Light Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂宇畅; 林昊天; 刘艳梅; 张剑平; 文尚胜

    2011-01-01

    运用传输矩阵法及MATLAB软件模拟计算了以MEH-PPV为发光材料的PLED面光源出光率,分析了发光层、PEDOT层、ITO层对器件出光率的影响.模拟分析了玻璃表面半球形、圆台形、圆锥形3种微形貌对器件出光率的影响.仿真结果表明,玻璃表面为圆锥形微散射层对提高器件出光率最有利,且出光均匀性最好.最后分析了PLED面光源工作状态下的热特性,发现发光层的热量容易积聚不易导出.该研究为大面积有机发光照明的优化设计提供了理论依据.%The light out-coupling efficiency of polymer light-emitting devices (PLED) flat panel based on poly [2-me-thoxy-5-(2-ethyl-hexyloxy )-l, 4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) was simulated by applying the transfer matrix method and software MATLAB. The influence of emitting layer, PEDOT layer, ITO layer on the performance of the PLED flat panel' s out-coupling efficiency was studied. The influence of different micro shapes on glass surface, such as flat panel, hemispherical shape,circular mesa,and conical shape, is simulated by software TRACEPRO. The results show that the light out-coupling efficiency is the largest and the uniformity of flat panel light output is the best when the glass surface is with micro conical shape. At last, the thermal properties were studied during the working of PLED flat panel. A great quantity of heat in emitting layer can not be diffused quickly. These results provided a basis for the optical and thermal optimization of PLED flat panel light source.

  12. Calibration of aero-structural reduced order models using full-field experimental measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, R.; Bartram, G.; Beberniss, T.; Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.

    2017-03-01

    The structural response of hypersonic aircraft panels is a multi-disciplinary problem, where the nonlinear structural dynamics, aerodynamics, and heat transfer models are coupled. A clear understanding of the impact of high-speed flow effects on the structural response, and the potential influence of the structure on the local environment, is needed in order to prevent the design of overly-conservative structures, a common problem in past hypersonic programs. The current work investigates these challenges from a structures perspective. To this end, the first part of this investigation looks at the modeling of the response of a rectangular panel to an external heating source (thermo-structural coupling) where the temperature effect on the structure is obtained from forward looking infrared (FLIR) measurements and the displacement via 3D-digital image correlation (DIC). The second part of the study uses data from a previous series of wind-tunnel experiments, performed to investigate the response of a compliant panel to the effects of high-speed flow, to train a pressure surrogate model. In this case, the panel aero-loading is obtained from fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurements, both directly and from the pressure surrogate model. The result of this investigation is the use of full-field experimental measurements to update the structural model and train a computational efficient model of the loading environment. The use of reduced order models, informed by these full-field physical measurements, is a significant step toward the development of accurate simulation models of complex structures that are computationally tractable.

  13. Establishment of action levels for quality control of IMRT flat panel: experience with the algorithm iGRiMLO; Establecimiento de niveles de accion para el control de calidad de IMRT con panel plano: experiencia con el algoritmo iGRiMLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, V.; Dolores, VV. de los; Pastor, V.; Martinez, J.; Gimeno, J.; Guardino, C.; Crispin, V.

    2011-07-01

    Algorithm has been used at our institution iGRiMLO scheduled for individual verification of treatment plans for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) step and shoot through portal dosimetry pretreatment of non-transmission, triggering the plan directly to a portal imaging device (EPID) of an amorphous silicon flat panel.

  14. A high-resolution full-field range imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, D. A.; Cree, M. J.; Dorrington, A. A.

    2005-08-01

    There exist a number of applications where the range to all objects in a field of view needs to be obtained. Specific examples include obstacle avoidance for autonomous mobile robots, process automation in assembly factories, surface profiling for shape analysis, and surveying. Ranging systems can be typically characterized as being either laser scanning systems where a laser point is sequentially scanned over a scene or a full-field acquisition where the range to every point in the image is simultaneously obtained. The former offers advantages in terms of range resolution, while the latter tend to be faster and involve no moving parts. We present a system for determining the range to any object within a camera's field of view, at the speed of a full-field system and the range resolution of some point laser scans. Initial results obtained have a centimeter range resolution for a 10 second acquisition time. Modifications to the existing system are discussed that should provide faster results with submillimeter resolution.

  15. Full-field laser vibration measurement in NDT techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kaiduan; Li, Zhongke; Yi, Yaxing; Zhang, Fei

    2008-12-01

    Research of Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methodology has developed rapidly in recent years[1][2]. But it is rarely used for small objects such as Micro-electronic Mechanics System. Due to the small size of the MEMS, the traditional method of contact measurement seriously affects the parameter of the object measured. So a high accuracy non-contact measurement is required for optimization of MEMS designs and improvement of its reliability[3][4]. With recent advances in photonics, electronics, and computer technology, a Non Destructive Testing (NDT) laser time average interferometry is proposed in the paper. Laser interferometry has the advantages of non-contact, high accuracy, full-field and fast speed, so it can be used to detect cracks in MEMS. A time average measurement method of digital speckle pattern interferometry is proposed to measure the vibration mode of the MEMS in the paper. According to the sudden change of amplitude of vibration mode, a crack can be measured. With the speckle average technology, high accuracy phase-shift, continuous phase scanning technology, combined with optical amplification technology, the resolution of the amplitude reaches 1nm, and the resolution of the crack reaches 5μm. The measurement system being full-field, the measuring speed of the measurement system can reach 512*512 points per one minute.

  16. MTF characterization in 2D and 3D for a high resolution, large field of view flat panel imager for cone beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jainil; Mann, Steve D.; Tornai, Martin P.; Richmond, Michelle; Zentai, George

    2014-03-01

    The 2D and 3D modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of a custom made, large 40x30cm2 area, 600- micron CsI-TFT based flat panel imager having 127-micron pixellation, along with the micro-fiber scintillator structure, were characterized in detail using various techniques. The larger area detector yields a reconstructed FOV of 25cm diameter with an 80cm SID in CT mode. The MTFs were determined with 1x1 (intrinsic) binning. The 2D MTFs were determined using a 50.8 micron tungsten wire and a solid lead edge, and the 3D MTF was measured using a custom made phantom consisting of three nearly orthogonal 50.8 micron tungsten wires suspended in an acrylic cubic frame. The 2D projection data was reconstructed using an iterative OSC algorithm using 16 subsets and 5 iterations. As additional verification of the resolution, along with scatter, the Catphan® phantom was also imaged and reconstructed with identical parameters. The measured 2D MTF was ~4% using the wire technique and ~1% using the edge technique at the 3.94 lp/mm Nyquist cut-off frequency. The average 3D MTF measured along the wires was ~8% at the Nyquist. At 50% MTF, the resolutions were 1.2 and 2.1 lp/mm in 2D and 3D, respectively. In the Catphan® phantom, the 1.7 lp/mm bars were easily observed. Lastly, the 3D MTF measured on the three wires has an observed 5.9% RMSD, indicating that the resolution of the imaging system is uniform and spatially independent. This high performance detector is integrated into a dedicated breast SPECT-CT imaging system.

  17. Performance analysis of a CsI-based flat panel detector in a cone beam variable resolution x-ray system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahi, Bahram; Keyes, Gary S.; Rendon, David A.; DiBianca, Frank A.

    2007-03-01

    A new Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) system is introduced that uses the concept of Variable Resolution X-ray (VRX) detection, which has previously been demonstrated to significantly increase spatial resolution for small objects. An amorphous silicon Flat Panel Detector (FPD) with a CsI scintillator (PaxScan 2020, Varian, Salt Lake City, UT) is coupled with a micro-focus x-ray tube (35 - 80 kVp, 10 - 250 μA) to form a CBCT. The FPD is installed on a rotating arm that can be adjusted to any angle θ, called the VRX angle, between 90° and 0° with respect to the x-ray direction. A VRX angle of 90° for the detector corresponds to a conventional CBCT whereas a VRX angle of 30° means that the detector is tilted 90° - 30° = 60° from its perpendicular position. Tilting the FPD in this manner reduces both the line-spread function width and the sampling distance by a factor of sin(θ), thereby increasing detector spatial resolution proportionately. An in-house phantom is used to measure the MTF of the reconstructed CT images using different VRX angles. An increase by a factor of 1.67 +/- 0.007 is observed in the MTF cutoff frequency at 30° compared to 90° in images acquired at 75 kVp. Expected theoretical value for this case is 2.0. The new Cone-Beam Variable Resolution X-ray (CB-VRX) CT system is expected to significantly improve the images acquired from small objects - such as small animals - while exploiting the opportunities offered by a conventional CBCT.

  18. Effect of x-ray incident direction and scintillator layer design on image quality of indirect-conversion flat-panel detector with GOS phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Nariyuki, F.; Nomura, H.; Takasu, A.; Fukui, S.; Nakatsu, M.; Okada, Y.; Nabeta, T.; Hosoi, Y.

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we characterized the image quality of two types of indirect-conversion flat-panel detectors: an X-ray incident-side photo-detection system (IS) and an X-ray penetration-side photo-detection system (PS). These detectors consist of a Gd2O2S:Tb (GOS) scintillator coupled with a photodiode thin film transistor (PD-TFT) array on a glass substrate. The detectors have different X-ray incident directions, glass substrates, and scintillators. We also characterized the effects of layered scintillator structures on the image quality by using a single-layered scintillator containing large phosphor grains and a double-layered scintillator consisting of a layer of large phosphor grains and a layer of small phosphor grains. The IS system consistently demonstrated a higher MTF than the PS system for a scintillator of the same thickness. Moreover, the IS system showed a higher DQE than the PS system when a thick scintillator was used. While the double-layered scintillators were useful for improving the MTF in both systems, a thick single-layered scintillator was preferable for obtaining a high DQE when the IS system was applied. These results indicate that an IS system can efficiently utilize the light emitted from the phosphor at the far side of the PD without the occurrence of blurring. The use of IS systems makes it possible to increase the thickness of the scintillator layer for improving the sensitivity without reducing the MTF, which increases the DQE. The DQE of the IS system was 1.2 times that of the PS system, despite the absorption of X-rays at the glass substrate before entering the phosphor.

  19. Imaging responses of on-site CsI and Gd2O2S flat-panel detectors: Dependence on the tube voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hosang; Chung, Myung Jin; Youn, Seungman; Nam, Jiho; Lee, Jayoung; Park, Dahl; Kim, Wontaek; Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2015-07-01

    One of the emerging issues in radiography is low-dose imaging to minimize patient's exposure. The scintillating materials employed in most indirect flat-panel detectors show a drastic change of X-ray photon absorption efficiency around their K-edge energies that consequently affects image quality. Using various tube voltages, we investigated the imaging performance of most popular scintillators: cesium iodide (CsI) and gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S). The integrated detective quantum efficiencies (iDQE) of four detectors installed in the same hospital were evaluated according to the standardized procedure IEC 62220-1 at tube voltages of 40 - 120 kVp. The iDQE values of the Gd2O2S detectors were normalized by those of CsI detectors to exclude the effects of image postprocessing. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were also evaluated by using an anthropomorphic chest phantom. The iDQE of the CsI detector outperformed that of the Gd2O2S detector over all tube voltages. Moreover, we noted that the iDQE of the Gd2O2S detectors quickly rolled off with decreasing tube voltage under 70 kVp. The CNRs of the two scintillators were similar at 120 kVp. At 60 kVp, however, the CNR of Gd2O2S was about half that of CsI. Compared to the Gd2O2S detectors, variations in the DQE performance of the CsI detectors were relatively immune to variations in the applied tube voltages. Therefore, we claim that Gd2O2S detectors are inappropriate for use in low-tube-voltage imaging (e.g., extremities and pediatrics) with low patient exposure.

  20. The design and imaging characteristics of dynamic, solid-state, flat-panel x-ray image detectors for digital fluoroscopy and fluorography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, A R; Davies, A G; Sivananthan, M U

    2008-10-01

    Dynamic, flat-panel, solid-state, x-ray image detectors for use in digital fluoroscopy and fluorography emerged at the turn of the millennium. This new generation of dynamic detectors utilize a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material superimposed upon an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Dynamic solid-state detectors come in two basic designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor based). This review explains the underlying principles and enabling technologies associated with these detector designs, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing their performance against the long established x-ray image intensifier television (TV) system. Solid-state detectors afford a number of physical imaging benefits compared with the latter. These include zero geometrical distortion and vignetting, immunity from blooming at exposure highlights and negligible contrast loss (due to internal scatter). They also exhibit a wider dynamic range and maintain higher spatial resolution when imaging over larger fields of view. The detective quantum efficiency of indirect-conversion, dynamic, solid-state detectors is superior to that of both x-ray image intensifier TV systems and direct-conversion detectors. Dynamic solid-state detectors are playing a burgeoning role in fluoroscopy-guided diagnosis and intervention, leading to the displacement of x-ray image intensifier TV-based systems. Future trends in dynamic, solid-state, digital fluoroscopy detectors are also briefly considered. These include the growth in associated three-dimensional (3D) visualization techniques and potential improvements in dynamic detector design.

  1. Quantitative comparison using generalized relative object detectability (G-ROD) metrics of an amorphous selenium detector with high resolution microangiographic fluoroscopes (MAF) and standard flat panel detectors (FPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, M.; Shankar, A.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Ionita, C. N.; Scott, C.; Karim, K. S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    A novel amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detector with CMOS readout has been designed, and relative detector performance investigated. The detector features include a 25μm pixel pitch, and 1000μm thick a-Se layer operating at 10V/μm bias field. A simulated detector DQE was determined, and used in comparative calculations of the Relative Object Detectability (ROD) family of prewhitening matched-filter (PWMF) observer and non-pre-whitening matched filter (NPWMF) observer model metrics to gauge a-Se detector performance against existing high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscopic (MAF) detectors and a standard flat panel detector (FPD). The PWMF-ROD or ROD metric compares two x-ray imaging detectors in their relative abilities in imaging a given object by taking the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier transform of the detector DQE weighted by an object function, divided by the comparable integral for a different detector. The generalized-ROD (G-ROD) metric incorporates clinically relevant parameters (focal- spot size, magnification, and scatter) to show the degradation in imaging performance for detectors that are part of an imaging chain. Preliminary ROD calculations using simulated spheres as the object predicted superior imaging performance by the a-Se detector as compared to existing detectors. New PWMF-G-ROD and NPWMF-G-ROD results still indicate better performance by the a-Se detector in an imaging chain over all sphere sizes for various focal spot sizes and magnifications, although a-Se performance advantages were degraded by focal spot blurring. Nevertheless, the a-Se technology has great potential to provide break- through abilities such as visualization of fine details including of neuro-vascular perforator vessels and of small vascular devices.

  2. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Safafar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nannochloropsis salina was grown on a mixture of standard growth media and pre-gasified industrial process water representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched growth media and cultivation time on nutritional composition of Nannochloropsis salina biomass, with a focus on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA. Variations in fatty acid composition, lipids, protein, amino acids, tocopherols and pigments were studied and results compared to algae cultivated on F/2 media as reference. Mixed growth media and process water enhanced the nutritional quality of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scale using a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large-scale cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina at these conditions could improve the nutritional properties such as EPA, tocopherol, protein and carotenoids compared to laboratory-scale cultivated microalgae. EPA reached 44.2% ± 2.30% of total fatty acids, and α-tocopherol reached 431 ± 28 µg/g of biomass dry weight after 21 days of cultivation. Variations in chemical compositions of Nannochloropsis salina were studied during the course of cultivation. Nannochloropsis salina can be presented as a good candidate for winter time cultivation in Denmark. The resulting biomass is a rich source of EPA and also a good source of protein (amino acids, tocopherols and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry.

  3. Clinical evaluation of flat-panel detector compared with multislice computed tomography in 65 patients with acute intracranial hemorrhage: initial results. Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struffert, Tobias; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y; Huttner, Hagen B; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doelken, Marc; Saake, Marc; Ganslandt, Oliver; Doerfler, Arnd

    2010-10-01

    The goal in this study was to compare flat-panel detector (FD) CT with multislice (MS) CT in the visualization of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), intraventricular hemorrhage, and external ventricular drains (EVDs) to evaluate the diagnostic quality and limitations of the new FD CT imaging modality. Neuroimages obtained in 65 patients, including 24 with EVDs, were reviewed by 2 independent, experienced clinicians. Lesions in all patients were investigated with FD CT and MS CT. The numbers of slices positive for ICH and SAH were counted, and for ICH the diameter and area of the lesion was measured. The positioning of drains was assessed. The presence of ventricular blood was noted. Statistical analysis was performed by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient (r) to evaluate the level of inter- and intraobserver agreement, and linear regression analysis was done to visualize the results of the numbers of ICH- and SAH-positive slices. The authors found high interobserver agreement regarding the number of slices with evidence of ICH (r = 0.89 for MS CT, r = 0.78 for FD CT) and SAH (r = 0.88 for MS CT, r = 0.9 for FD CT). Thin layers of blood in the ventricles were not detected on FD CT in 36.4% of cases. Six of 7 perimesencephalic SAHs were not seen on FD CT scans. The EVDs could be assessed with both modalities in 83.3% of cases, but the position of the drain could not be determined with FD CT in 16.7% (4 of 24 cases). In some respects, FD CT is of limited use for the visualization of intracranial hemorrhage. However, despite limited contrast resolution, ICH and EVDs can be reliably demonstrated. Perimesencephalic SAH and thin layers of blood in the occipital horns may not be detected using FD CT. Further evaluation and improvement of the image quality is necessary before FD CT will provide identical quality in comparison with MS CT.

  4. Influence of different reconstruction parameters in the visualization of intracranial stents using C-arm flat panel CT angiography: experience in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Sabine; Struffert, Tobias; Saake, Marc; Gölitz, Philipp; Adamek, Edyta; Doerfler, Arnd

    2016-02-01

    C-arm flat panel computed tomography angiography (CA-CTA) is a relatively new imaging modality. Consequently, knowledge about postprocessing parameters and their influence on image quality is still limited, especially for the visualization of implanted microstents. To optimize reconstruction parameters by evaluating the influence of these different parameters for CA-CTA visualization of microstents in an animal model. Eleven microstents were implanted within the left common carotid artery of 11 New Zealand white rabbits. Both CA-CTA, using intra-venous delivery of contrast material, and conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed. CA-CTA datasets were reconstructed using three different image characteristics (normal, sharp, smooth). Two experienced neuroradiologists evaluated the image quality and performed measurements of inner and outer stent diameters as well as measurements of the lumen area. Stent deployment was performed successfully in all animals. Inter-observer correlation coefficient for all measurements was high (r = 0.87-0.92). Lumen area and inner stent diameter were significantly smaller in image characteristic "smooth" (P < 0.01) than in "sharp" and "normal". Outer stent diameter was larger in "smooth" than in "sharp" and "normal" (P < 0.01). Stent strut size was significantly wider using image characteristic "smooth". "Sharp" and "normal" compared best to DSA, with "sharp" providing the closest match to DSA measurements, with the trade-off of significantly more noise than in the "normal" reconstructions. The use of different image characteristics in the postprocessing of CA-CTA datasets has an influence on the visualization of implanted stents. Image characteristic "sharp" and "normal" compared best to DSA. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  5. Radiation doses to operators performing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt using a flat-panel detector-based system and ultrasound guidance for portal vein targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraglia, Roberto; Gerasia, Roberta; Maruzzelli, Luigi; D'Amico, Mario; Luca, Angelo

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate effective dose (E) of operators performing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) in a single centre. Patients' radiation exposure was also collected. Between 8/2015 and 6/2016, 45 consecutive TIPS were performed in adult patients using a flat-panel detector-based system (FPDS) and real-time ultrasound guidance (USG) for portal vein targeting. Electronic personal dosimeters were used to measure radiation doses to the primary and assistant operators, anaesthesia nurse and radiographer. Patients' radiation exposure was measured with dose area product (DAP); fluoroscopy time (FT) was also collected. Mean E for the primary operator was 1.40 μSv (SD 2.68, median 0.42, range 0.12 - 12.18), for the assistant operator was 1.29 μSv (SD 1.79, median 0.40, range 0.10 - 4.89), for the anaesthesia nurse was 0.21 μSv (SD 0.67, median 0.10, range 0.03 - 3.99), for the radiographer was 0.42 μSv (SD 0.71, median 0.25, range 0.03 - 2.67). Mean patient DAP was 59.31 GyCm(2) (SD 56.91, median 31.58, range 7.66 - 281.40); mean FT was 10.20 min (SD 7.40, median 10.40, range 3.8 - 31.8). The use of FPDS and USG for portal vein targeting allows a reasonably low E to operators performing TIPS. • The operators' E vary according to the complexity of the procedure. • FPDS and USG allow a reasonably low E to TIPS operators. • FPDS and USG have an important role in reducing the occupational exposure.

  6. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector on a mobile C-arm: preclinical investigation in image-guided surgery of the head and neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Chan, Y.; Rafferty, M. A.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.; Irish, J. C.

    2005-04-01

    A promising imaging platform for combined low-dose fluoroscopy and cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance of interventional procedures has been developed in our laboratory. Based on a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil) incorporating a high-performance flat-panel detector (Varian PaxScan 4030CB), the system demonstrates sub-mm 3D spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility with field of view sufficient for head and body sites. For pre-clinical studies in head neck tumor surgery, we hypothesize that the 3D intraoperative information provided by CBCT permits precise, aggressive techniques with improved avoidance of critical structures. The objectives include: 1) quantify improvement in surgical performance achieved with CBCT guidance compared to open and endoscopic techniques; and 2) investigate specific, challenging surgical tasks under CBCT guidance. Investigations proceed from an idealized phantom model to cadaveric specimens. A novel surgical performance evaluation method based on statistical decision theory is applied to excision and avoidance tasks. Analogous to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in medical imaging, the method quantifies surgical performance in terms of Lesion-Excised (True-Positve), Lesion-Remaining (False-Negative), Normal-Excised (False-Positive), and Normal-Remaining (True-Negative) fractions. Conservative and aggressive excision and avoidance tasks are executed in 12 cadaveric specimens with and without CBCT guidance, including: dissection through dura, preservation of posterior lamina, ethmoid air cells removal, exposure of peri-orbita, and excision of infiltrated bone in the skull base (clivus). Intraoperative CBCT data was found to dramatically improve surgical performance and confidence in the execution of such tasks. Pre-clinical investigation of this platform in head and neck surgery, as well as spinal, trauma, biopsy, and other nonvascular procedures, is discussed.

  7. Radiation dose reduction in scoliosis patients. Low-dose full-spine radiography with digital flat panel detector and image stitching system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieser, T. [Klinikum Augsburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Baldauf, A.Q. [Theresienkrankenhaus Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologie; Ludwig, K. [Klinikum Herford (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the exposure dose reduction with a digital flat panel detector (FPD) and an image stitching system (ISS) in full-spine radiography for scoliosis patients. Materials and Methods: During a 6-month period, all consecutive scoliosis patients with a clinical indication for full-spine radiography (n = 50) were examined with an FPD and ISS. Automatic exposure control adjusted to speed class 1600 was used together with age-adjusted tube voltage and filtration. Dose area products were recorded for all images (antero-posterior n = 50, lateral n = 18). Images were evaluated by two radiologists for the possibility (possible, impossible) of typical scoliosis measurements (Cobb angle, Stagnara angle, lateral deviation, Risser stage). All measurements assessed as impossible underwent a second evaluation categorizing the reason why a measurement was impossible (underlying pathology, projection, image quality). Patient characteristics influencing exposure were recorded (sex, age, weight, height). Mean dose area products were compared to the literature with consideration of patient group and image quality. Results: The mean dose area product was 16.8 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for antero-posterior images and 26.6 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for lateral images. A comparison to published values showed an exposure dose reduction of 47 % to 93 %. Measurement of the Cobb and Stagnara angle, lateral deviation and Risser stage was possible in 96 % (n = 50), 83 % (n = 18), 100 % (n = 50) and 100 % (n = 50) of cases. The reasons for impossible measurements were independent of image quality (underlying pathologies, projection). Conclusion: When imaging scoliosis patients, an FPD combined with an ISS can substantially reduce the exposure dose. (orig.)

  8. Full-field measurements and identification in solid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Grediac, Michel

    2008-01-01

    This timely book presents cutting-edge developments by experts in the field on the rapidly developing and scientifically challenging area of full-field measurement techniques used in solid mechanics - including photoelasticity, grid methods, deflectometry, holography, speckle interferometry and digital image correlation. The evaluation of strains and the use of the measurements in subsequent parameter identification techniques to determine material properties are also presented. Since parametric identification techniques require a close coupling of theoretical models and experimental measurements, the book focuses on specific modeling approaches that include finite element model updating, the equilibrium gap method, constitutive equation gap method, virtual field method and reciprocity gap method. In the latter part of the book, the authors discuss two particular applications of selected methods that are of special interest to many investigators: the analysis of localized phenomenon and connections between mi...

  9. Mammographic artifacts on full-field digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Jeong; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Choi, Byung Gil; Song, ByungJoo; Jung, Haijo

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the incidence of full-field digital mammographic (FFDM) artifacts with three systems at two institutions and compares the artifacts between two detector types and two grid types. A total of 4,440 direct and 4,142 indirect FFDM images were reviewed by two radiologists, and artifacts were classified as patient related, hardware related, and software processing. The overall incidence of FFDM artifacts was 3.4% (292/8,582). Patient related artifacts (motion artifacts and skin line artifacts) were the most commonly detected types (1.7%). Underexposure among hardware related artifacts and high-density artifacts among software processing artifacts also were common (0.7 and 0.5%, respectively). These artifacts, specific to digital mammography, were more common with the direct detector type and the crossed air grid type than with the indirect type and linear grid type (p artifacts on FFDM were patient related, which might be controlled by the instruction of a patient and technologist. Underexposure and high-density artifacts were more common with direct detector and crossed air type of grid.

  10. Full-field optical coherence tomography apply in sphere measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Li, Weiwei; li, Juncheng; Wang, Jingyu; Wang, Jianguo

    2016-10-01

    The geometry of a spherical surface, for example that of a precision optic, is completely determined by the radius -of-curvature at one point and the deviation from the perfect spherical form at all other points of the sphere. Full-field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) is a parallel detection OCT technique that utilizes a 2D detector array. This technique avoids mechanical scanning in imaging optics, thereby speeding up the imaging process and enhancing the quality of images. The current paper presents an FF-OCT instrument that is designed to be used in sphere measurement with the principle of multiple delays (MD) OCT to evaluate the curvature and radius of curved objects in single-shot imaging. The optimum combination of the MD principle with the FF-OCT method was evaluated, and the radius of a metal ball was measured with this method. The generated 2n-1 contour lines were obtained by using an MDE with n delays in a single en-face OCT image. This method of measurement, it engaged in the measurement accuracy of spherical and enriches the means of measurement, to make a spherical scan techniques flexible application.

  11. Technology evaluation center assessment synopsis: full-field digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Barbara M; Ziegler, Kathleen M; Aronson, Naomi

    2006-08-01

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) is proposed as an alternative to screen-film mammography (SFM). The ability to separate and optimize the acquisition, storage, and display of images may allow greater visualization of breast cancers at equal or lower radiation doses, especially in younger women and those with denser breasts. This is a synopsis of a systematic review by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Technology Evaluation Center. This updated systematic review primarily incorporated the results of the ACR Imaging Network(R) Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST), which provided results on 42,760 asymptomatic women who underwent both FFDM and SFM and showed with reasonable certainty that there was no difference in the accuracy of the 2 modalities for asymptomatic women in general, with some advantages of FFDM in certain subgroups. There were no strong, new studies on the use of digital mammography compared with film mammography in a diagnostic population. However, the DMIST results indicated that tumors detected by FFDM, but not by SFM, were likely to be invasive carcinomas or medium-grade to high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ. On the basis of the suppositions that these are the cancers of greatest interest and the ones more likely to be found in a diagnostic population and that the diagnostic population may be younger on average than the screening population, it was concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the use of FFDM for diagnostic purposes.

  12. SU-E-I-11: Cascaded Linear System Model for Columnar CsI Flat Panel Imagers with Depth Dependent Gain and Blur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, B; Lubinsky, A; Zheng, H; Zhao, W [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Teymurazyan, A [Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To implement a depth dependent gain and blur cascaded linear system model (CLSM) for optimizing columnar structured CsI indirect conversion flat panel imager (FPI) for advanced imaging applications. Methods: For experimental validation, depth dependent escape efficiency, e(z), was extracted from PHS measurement of different CsI scintillators (thickness, substrate and light output). The inherent MTF and DQE of CsI was measured using high resolution CMOS sensor. For CLSM, e(z) and the depth dependent MTF(f,z), were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation (Geant4) of optical photon transport through columnar CsI. Previous work showed that Monte Carlo simulation for CsI was hindered by the non-ideality of its columnar structure. In the present work we allowed variation in columnar width with depth, and assumed diffusive reflective backing and columns. Monte Carlo simulation was performed using an optical point source placed at different depth of the CsI layer, from which MTF(z,f) and e(z) were computed. The resulting e(z) with excellent matching with experimental measurements were then applied to the CLSM, Monte Carlo simulation was repeated until the modeled MTF, DQE(f) also match experimental measurement. Results: For a 150 micron FOS HL type CsI, e(z) varies between 0.56 to 0.45, and the MTF at 14 cycles/mm varies between 62.1% to 3.9%, from the front to the back of the scintillator. The overall MTF and DQE(f) at all frequencies are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements at all frequencies. Conclusion: We have developed a CLSM for columnar CsI scintillators with depth dependent gain and MTF, which were estimated from Monte Carlo simulation with novel optical simulation settings. Preliminary results showed excellent agreement between simulation results and experimental measurements. Future work is aimed at extending this approach to optimize CsI screen optic design and sensor structure for achieving higher DQE(f) in cone-beam CT, which uses

  13. A method for verification of treatment delivery in HDR prostate brachytherapy using a flat panel detector for both imaging and source tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Ryan L., E-mail: ryan.smith@wbrc.org.au; Millar, Jeremy L.; Franich, Rick D. [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia and School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000 (Australia); Haworth, Annette [School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia and Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC 3002 (Australia); Panettieri, Vanessa [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3004 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment delivery is an important step, but is generally difficult to achieve. A technique is required to monitor the treatment as it is delivered, allowing comparison with the treatment plan and error detection. In this work, we demonstrate a method for monitoring the treatment as it is delivered and directly comparing the delivered treatment with the treatment plan in the clinical workspace. This treatment verification system is based on a flat panel detector (FPD) used for both pre-treatment imaging and source tracking. Methods: A phantom study was conducted to establish the resolution and precision of the system. A pretreatment radiograph of a phantom containing brachytherapy catheters is acquired and registration between the measurement and treatment planning system (TPS) is performed using implanted fiducial markers. The measured catheter paths immediately prior to treatment were then compared with the plan. During treatment delivery, the position of the {sup 192}Ir source is determined at each dwell position by measuring the exit radiation with the FPD and directly compared to the planned source dwell positions. Results: The registration between the two corresponding sets of fiducial markers in the TPS and radiograph yielded a registration error (residual) of 1.0 mm. The measured catheter paths agreed with the planned catheter paths on average to within 0.5 mm. The source positions measured with the FPD matched the planned source positions for all dwells on average within 0.6 mm (s.d. 0.3, min. 0.1, max. 1.4 mm). Conclusions: We have demonstrated a method for directly comparing the treatment plan with the delivered treatment that can be easily implemented in the clinical workspace. Pretreatment imaging was performed, enabling visualization of the implant before treatment delivery and identification of possible catheter displacement. Treatment delivery verification was performed by measuring the

  14. High-performance dual-energy imaging with a flat-panel detector: imaging physics from blackboard to benchtop to bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Shkumat, N. A.; Dhanantwari, A. C.; Williams, D. B.; Richard, S.; Daly, M. J.; Paul, N. S.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.; Yorkston, J.; Van Metter, R.

    2006-03-01

    The application of high-performance flat-panel detectors (FPDs) to dual-energy (DE) imaging offers the potential for dramatically improved detection and characterization of subtle lesions through reduction of "anatomical noise," with applications ranging from thoracic imaging to image-guided interventions. In this work, we investigate DE imaging performance from first principles of image science to preclinical implementation, including: 1.) generalized task-based formulation of NEQ and detectability as a guide to system optimization; 2.) measurements of imaging performance on a DE imaging benchtop; and 3.) a preclinical system developed in our laboratory for cardiac-gated DE chest imaging in a research cohort of 160 patients. Theoretical and benchtop studies directly guide clinical implementation, including the advantages of double-shot versus single-shot DE imaging, the value of differential added filtration between low- and high-kVp projections, and optimal selection of kVp pairs, filtration, and dose allocation. Evaluation of task-based NEQ indicates that the detectability of subtle lung nodules in double-shot DE imaging can exceed that of single-shot DE imaging by a factor of 4 or greater. Filter materials are investigated that not only harden the high-kVp beam (e.g., Cu or Ag) but also soften the low-kVp beam (e.g., Ce or Gd), leading to significantly increased contrast in DE images. A preclinical imaging system suitable for human studies has been constructed based upon insights gained from these theoretical and experimental studies. An important component of the system is a simple and robust means of cardiac-gated DE image acquisition, implemented here using a fingertip pulse oximeter. Timing schemes that provide cardiac-gated image acquisition on the same or successive heartbeats is described. Preclinical DE images to be acquired under research protocol will afford valuable testing of optimal deployment, facilitate the development of DE CAD, and support

  15. COCHLEAR LENGTH DETERMINATION IN TEMPORAL BONE SPECIMENS USING HISTOLOGICAL SERIAL MICRO GRINDING IMAGING, MICRO COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND FLAT-PANEL VOLUMETRIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Würfel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The cochlear length virtually describes the length of the cochlea in a straight line. Several theoretical options for measuring the length of the cochlea are conceivable. In choosing the type of cochlear implant electrode, this can play a crucial role. A wide range of electrodes is available, especially among the models designed to preserve residual hearing and structural integrity. It is believed that the depth of cochlear implant electrode insertion has an influence on the functional hearing based on the area of the cochlea that is electrically stimulated. Method: Imaging of nine human temporal bone specimens was performed using histological serial microgrinding imaging, micro computed tomography (microCT and experimental flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT. Measurements were then performed by outlining the cochlea in OsiriX (Pixmeo, Los Angeles USA. Results: The cochlear length of 9 human temporal bones was determined in each histological serial microgrinding imaging, fpVCT and microCT. Cochlear length ranges in histological serial grinding imaging from 45.3 mm to 38.7 mm, in microCT from 46.1 mm to 39.3 mm and in fpVCT from 45.8 mm to 39.8 mm. Significant inter- and intraindividual differences in the cochlear length were observed. The presented methodology is capable of determining the cochlear length in each imaging modality. Discussion: A methodology to experimentally determine the cochlear length is interesting from both clinical and preclinical perspectives. Insertion studies are highly relevant to the development and evaluation of new electrode arrays. This study presents a measurement methodology that allows for individualized cochlear length measurement based on three established imaging modalities. The data presented here confirm differences in cochlear length. The method described here can be used to evaluate a cochlea in an experimental setting. This allows an individualized, pre-interventional evaluation of the

  16. Psychophysical evaluation of the image quality of a dynamic flat-panel digital x-ray image detector using the threshold contrast detail detectability (TCDD) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Andrew G.; Cowen, Arnold R.; Bruijns, Tom J. C.

    1999-05-01

    We are currently in an era of active development of the digital X-ray imaging detectors that will serve the radiological communities in the new millennium. The rigorous comparative physical evaluations of such devices are therefore becoming increasingly important from both the technical and clinical perspectives. The authors have been actively involved in the evaluation of a clinical demonstration version of a flat-panel dynamic digital X-ray image detector (or FDXD). Results of objective physical evaluation of this device have been presented elsewhere at this conference. The imaging performance of FDXD under radiographic exposure conditions have been previously reported, and in this paper a psychophysical evaluation of the FDXD detector operating under continuous fluoroscopic conditions is presented. The evaluation technique employed was the threshold contrast detail detectability (TCDD) technique, which enables image quality to be measured on devices operating in the clinical environment. This approach addresses image quality in the context of both the image acquisition and display processes, and uses human observers to measure performance. The Leeds test objects TO[10] and TO[10+] were used to obtain comparative measurements of performance on the FDXD and two digital spot fluorography (DSF) systems, one utilizing a Plumbicon camera and the other a state of the art CCD camera. Measurements were taken at a range of detector entrance exposure rates, namely 6, 12, 25 and 50 (mu) R/s. In order to facilitate comparisons between the systems, all fluoroscopic image processing such as noise reduction algorithms, were disabled during the experiments. At the highest dose rate FDXD significantly outperformed the DSF comparison systems in the TCDD comparisons. At 25 and 12 (mu) R/s all three-systems performed in an equivalent manner and at the lowest exposure rate FDXD was inferior to the two DSF systems. At standard fluoroscopic exposures, FDXD performed in an equivalent

  17. Application of GEM-based detectors in full-field XRF imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, W.; Fiutowski, T.; Frączek, P.; Koperny, S.; Lankosz, M.; Mendys, A.; Mindur, B.; Świentek, K.; Wiącek, P.; Wróbel, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) is a commonly used technique for non-destructive elemental analysis of cultural heritage objects. It can be applied to investigations of provenance of historical objects as well as to studies of art techniques. While the XRF analysis can be easily performed locally using standard available equipment there is a growing interest in imaging of spatial distribution of specific elements. Spatial imaging of elemental distrbutions is usually realised by scanning an object with a narrow focused X-ray excitation beam and measuring characteristic fluorescence radiation using a high energy resolution detector, usually a silicon drift detector. Such a technique, called macro-XRF imaging, is suitable for investigation of flat surfaces but it is time consuming because the spatial resolution is basically determined by the spot size of the beam. Another approach is the full-field XRF, which is based on simultaneous irradiation and imaging of large area of an object. The image of the investigated area is projected by a pinhole camera on a position-sensitive and energy dispersive detector. The infinite depth of field of the pinhole camera allows one, in principle, investigation of non-flat surfaces. One of possible detectors to be employed in full-field XRF imaging is a GEM based detector with 2-dimensional readout. In the paper we report on development of an imaging system equipped with a standard 3-stage GEM detector of 10 × 10 cm2 equipped with readout electronics based on dedicated full-custom ASICs and DAQ system. With a demonstrator system we have obtained 2-D spatial resolution of the order of 100 μm and energy resolution at a level of 20% FWHM for 5.9 keV . Limitations of such a detector due to copper fluorescence radiation excited in the copper-clad drift electrode and GEM foils is discussed and performance of the detector using chromium-clad electrodes is reported.

  18. Design, development, manufacture, testing, and delivery of devices for connection of solar cell panel circuitry to flat conductor cable solar cell array harness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, P. A.; Waddington, D.

    1971-01-01

    The technology status and problem areas which exist for the application of flat conductor cabling to solar cell arrays are summarized. Details covering the design, connector manufacture, and prototype test results are also summarized.

  19. Comparison of dose and image quality of a Flat-panel detector and an image intensifier; Comparacao da dose e qualidade da imagem de um detector Flatpanel e um intensificador de imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, M.; Friedrich, B.Q.; Luz, R.M. da; Silva, A.M.M. da, E-mail: marcos.lazzaro@acad.pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    With the development of new technologies, have emerged new conversion methods of X-ray image, such as flat panel detectors. The aim of this work is the comparison of entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality between an image intensifier type of detector (A) and a flat panel (B). The ESAK was obtained by placing a ionization chamber under PMMA simulators of 10, 20 and 30 cm and the image quality was obtained by using the TOR {sup 18}FG simulator. The ESAK to the equipment A is higher when compared to the equipment B. The high contrast resolution is better for the equipment A for all thicknesses of simulators. The equipment A has low contrast resolution with a better viewing threshold for thicknesses of 10 and 20 cm, and a worse performance for 30 cm. It is concluded that the equipment B has ESAK smaller and despite having lower resolution, in almost all cases, have appropriate image quality for diagnosis. (author)

  20. Flat-Panel CT as a new perinterventional imaging modality in aortic stentgraft procedures. Work in progress; Flachdetektor-CT als ergaenzende Untersuchung bei der endoluminalen Behandlung von thorakalen und abdominellen Aortenaneurysmen. Erste klinische Erfahrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabitsch, E.; Celedin, S.; Kau, T.; Illiasch, H.; Hausegger, K. [Inst. fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2008-02-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the value of flat-panel CT (FP-CT) as a new perinterventional imaging modality in aortic stentgraft procedures. Materials and methods: FP-CT was performed in 21 patients (19 males, mean age 77, range 54 to 90) from June 2005 to February 2007 immediately after endovascular treatment of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms on the angiographic table. Nine thoracic aortic aneurysms were treated with Zenith trademark -endoprosthesis. Nine of twelve abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated with Zenith trademark -Endoprosthesis and three with an Excluder trademark -Endoprosthesis. Images were acquired with a rotating C-arm and the following parameters: during an acquisition time of 20 seconds and at a rotation of 217 degrees, 538 projections were acquired. Contrast agent was administered in 14 patients. Images were displayed in MIP, MPR and VRT mode. Results: in all patients the stentgraft was shown exactly and the alignment of the prosthesis along the landing zones was well displayed. The aneurismal sack was well shown in all patients. 1 x an endoleak II was detected, 1 x an angiographically verified endoleak I was not detected. In one patient distal extension was considered due to suspected short stentgraft at the distal neck. Flat-panel CT showed sufficient neck coverage and no extension was inserted. Due to artifacts of the prosthesis, the platinum markers and the guide wire as well as due to pulsation of the aorta, the resolution of detail decreased and reduced the visualization of the alignment. (orig.)

  1. Dose reduction of radiographs of the pediatric pelvis for diagnosing hip dysplasia using a digital flat-panel detector system; Dosisreduktion bei Roentgenaufnahmen des kindlichen Beckenskelettes zur Diagnostik der Hueftgelenksdysplasie unter Verwendung eines digitalen Flachdetektorsystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, K.; Ahlers, K.; Kloska, S.; Vieth, V.; Meier, N.; Heindel, W. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Univ. Muenster (Germany); Sandmann, C.; Gosheger, G. [Orthopaedische Klinik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a possible dose reduction in pediatric pelvic radiographs in congenital hip dysplasia using a digital flat-panel system instead of a phosphor-storage system. Materials and Methods: During a six-month period, all pediatric patients referred for pelvic radiography for the evaluation of congenital hip dysplasia were randomely assigned to be examined by either a phosphor-storage system or a digital flat-panel system, whereby the latter system was operated with half the radiation dose. Thirty pairs of radiographs were assessed for the visibility of 16 anatomic details and for 5 orthopedic-radiographic measurements (5-point scale with 1 = excellent; three independent observers). The projection indices of Ball and Kommenda and of Toennis and Brunken were calculated for all radiographs. The Student's t-test was used to compare the flat-panel and the phosphor-storage radiographs for observers' assessments, patients' age and projection indices. Results: In a total of 7560 observations, the scores for the visibility of anatomic details and orthopedic-radiographic measurements were respectively 2.72 and 2.64 for the flat-panel system and 2.93 and 2.79 for the phosphor-storage system. No significant differences were found between both systems (p > 0.05) and between patient age and projection indices (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Pediatric pelvic radiographs can be obtained with a digital flat-panel system using half the radiation dose instead of a phosphor-storage system without sacrificing relevant information in the diagnosis of congenital hip dysplasia. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung: Evaluation einer moeglichen Dosisreduktion bei kindlichen Beckenroentgenaufnahmen zur Diagnostik der Hueftgelenksdysplasie mit einem digitalen Flachdetektorsystem im Vergleich zu einem digitalen Speicherfoliensystem. Material und Methoden: Prospektiv wurden alle ueber einen Zeitraum von 6 Monaten zur Roentgenaufnahme des Beckenskelettes im Rahmen der Diagnostik der

  2. Comparative Analysis between Two Amorphous Silicon Flat-panel Detector:Radiation Dose and Image Quality%碘化铯和硫氯化钆在DR系统中剂量与图像质量的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志奎; 梁吉

    2014-01-01

    目的:比较碘化铯和硫氧化钆2种闪烁体材料平板探测器的DR系统在不同成像剂量条件下图像质量的差别。方法:以碘化铯为闪烁体材料的平板探测器系统和以硫氧化钆为闪烁体材料的平板探测器系统分别摄取对比度-细节体模(CDRAD 2.0)在相近成像剂量条件下的X射线图像,计算所对应的成像剂量下图像质量因子反数值(image quality figure inverse,IQFinv),应用ANOVA分析2平板探测器对比度及细节检测能力,应用Wilcoxon检验分析、比较2种平板探测器的图像信息检测能力的差别。结果:在一定剂量范围内,2种平板探测器的图像质量均随着成像剂量的增加而增加(P<0.001)。在管电流量不同mAs时,2种非晶硅DR平板探测器的IQFinv值差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论:成像剂量相同时,2种非晶硅平板探测器具有近似的图像质量,图像质量的提高与成像剂量的增加并不成线性关系。%Objective:To assess and compare the image quality at different exposures ettings using cesium iodide (CsI) flat-panel detector digital radiography system and GOS flat-panel detector digital radiography system. Methods: The images of contrast-detail phantom (CDRAD2.0) were taken at different exposure settings for two flat-panel detector systems. The image quality figure inverse (IQFinv) for different dose settings was calculated. The detectability of two system in contrast and detail was analysed using ANOVA. The statistical significance was evaluated using the Wilcoxon test between two system. Results: At certain dose range, the image quality improved with radiation dose increased for two amorphous silicon flat-panel detector system(P0.05). Conclusion:At the same radiation dose, two flat-panel detector systems have approximately image quality. There is not linear relevance between image quality improvement and radiation dose augment.

  3. Comparative Analysis between Two Amorphous Silicon Flat-panel Detector: Radiation Dose and Image Quality%2种非晶硅DR平板探测器成像剂量与图像质量的比较分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹国全; 许化致; 潘克华; 孙厚长

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess and compare the image quality at different exposure settings using cesium iodide (CsI) flat-panel detector digital radiography system and GOS flat-panel detector digital radiography system. Methods The images of contrast-detail phantom (CDRAD2. 0) were taken at different exposure settings for two flat-panel detector systems. The image quality figure inverse(IQFinv) for different dose settings was calculated. The detectability of two system in contrast and detail was analysed using ANOVA . The statistical significance was evaluated using the Wilcoxon test between two system. Results At certain dose range, the image quality improved with radiation dose increased for two amorphous silicon flat-panel detector system(P<O. 001). At different mAs value of tube current dosage,the IQFinv was no of statistical significance between two system(P>O. 05). Conclusion At the same radiation dose,two flat-panel detector systems have approximately image quality. There is not linear relevance between image quality improvement and radiation dose augment.%目的 比较碘化铯和硫氧化钆2种闪烁体材料平板探测器的DR系统在不同成像剂量条件下图像质量的差别.方法 以碘化铯为闪烁体材料的平板探测器系统和以硫氧化钆为闪烁体材料的平板探测器系统分别摄取对比度-细节体模(CDRAD 2.0)在相近成像剂量条件下的X射线图像,计算所对应的成像剂量下图像质量因子反数值(image quality figure inverse,IQFinv),应用ANOVA 分析2平板探测器对比度及细节检测能力,应用Wilcoxon检验分析、比较2种平板探测器的图像信息检测能力的差别.结果 在一定剂量范围内,2种平板探测器的图像质量均随着成像剂量的增加而增加(P<0.001).在管电流量不同mAs时,2种非晶硅DR平板探测器的IQFinv值差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 成像剂量相同时,2种非晶硅平板探测器具有近似的图像质量,图像质量的

  4. Aging and characterization of PVC compound used as flat-panel of a low cost solar collector; Envelhecimento e caracterizacao de compostos de PVC usado em placas de coletores solares de baixo custo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Bruna R.; Pinto, Tatiana T.; Bartoli, Julio R. [Depto. de Tecnologia de Polimeros, Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica/Universidade Estadual de Campinas. FEQ/UNICAMP, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: bartoli@feq.unicamp.br; Fernandes, Elizabeth G. [Tezca P and D Celulas Solares (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Regardless the excellent amount of solar irradiation in Brazil, the development and production of solar water heating systems did not reach the low-income families yet. The relatively high cost of conventional solar water heaters is still the main reason to prevent it. The development of a low cost solar water heater (around US$ 200), easy technology, was the scope of previous work. All-plastic solar collector prototypes were developed using unplasticized Poly (vinyl chloride) ceiling panels and tubes, commodities from building engineering. Nevertheless, the main thermal and photo degradation mechanisms for PVC are well known; the unusual application of PVC as solar collector materials should need a specific investigation on environmental aging. This work presents a study on outdoor aging and characterization of PVC flat-plate absorber of solar collectors after 5 years on use. (author)

  5. ELA-beam shaping systems for flat panel display prepared by LTPS%用于平板显示 LTPS制备的 ELA光束整形系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹广玥; 游利兵; 方晓东

    2016-01-01

    介绍了多晶硅薄膜较非晶硅薄膜在平板显示领域的优势以及准分子激光晶化制备多晶硅膜的结晶过程。介绍了透镜阵列实现匀光的原理。阐述了典型的准分子激光退火线型光束整形系统的扩束、匀光、投影等结构。并介绍了连续横向固化技术在准分子激光制备低温多晶硅领域的应用。讨论了准分子激光退火光学系统的发展现状,指出了其在平板显示行业的重要意义。%The advantages to poly silicon film instead of amorphous silicon film in the field of flat panel display were introduced .Crystallization process of poly silicon film by using excimer laser crystallization system was studied .The principle of how lens array achieve the uniformity of output laser energy density was described .The structure of typical excimer laser annealing(ELA) line beam shaping system, which included beam expanding unit , beam energy homogenizing unit , projection unit and so on was focused on .Finally the application of sequential lateral solidification technology in the area of low temperature poly silicon ( LTPS ) using excimer laser nnealing was introduced .The status of ELA optical system was discussed and its significance in flat panel display industry was pointed out .

  6. Comparison between radiation exposure levels using an image intensifier and a flat-panel detector-based system in image-guided central venous catheter placement in children weighing less than 10 kg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Cortis, Kelvin; Gerasia, Roberta; Maggio, Simona; Luca, Angelo [Diagnostic and Therapeutic Services, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo (Italy); Piazza, Marcello [Department of Anesthesia, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo (Italy); Tuzzolino, Fabio [Department of Information Technology, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo (Italy)

    2014-09-10

    Ultrasound-guided central venous puncture and fluoroscopic guidance during central venous catheter (CVC) positioning optimizes technical success and lowers the complication rates in children, and is therefore considered standard practice. The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation exposure levels recorded during CVC placement in children weighing less than 10 kg in procedures performed using an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS) to those performed in a flat-panel detector-based interventional suite (FPDS). A retrospective review of 96 image-guided CVC placements, between January 2008 and October 2013, in 49 children weighing less than 10 kg was performed. Mean age was 8.2 ± 4.4 months (range: 1-22 months). Mean weight was 7.1 ± 2.7 kg (range: 2.5-9.8 kg). The procedures were classified into two categories: non-tunneled and tunneled CVC placement. Thirty-five procedures were performed with the IIDS (21 non-tunneled CVC, 14 tunneled CVC); 61 procedures were performed with the FPDS (47 non-tunneled CVC, 14 tunneled CVC). For non-tunneled CVC, mean DAP was 113.5 ± 126.7 cGy cm{sup 2} with the IIDS and 15.9 ± 44.6 cGy . cm{sup 2} with the FPDS (P < 0.001). For tunneled CVC, mean DAP was 84.6 ± 81.2 cGy . cm{sup 2} with the IIDS and 37.1 ± 33.5 cGy cm{sup 2} with the FPDS (P = 0.02). The use of flat-panel angiographic equipment reduces radiation exposure in small children undergoing image-guided CVC placement. (orig.)

  7. Flat semimodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Mohammed J. Al-Thani

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and investigate flat semimodules and k-flat semimodules .We hope these concepts will have the same importance in semimodule theory as in the theory of rings and modules.

  8. An indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain for low dose x-ray imaging: SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Rowlands, J. A.; Egami, N.; Takiguchi, Y.; Nanba, M.; Honda, Y.; Ohkawa, Y.; Kubota, M.; Tanioka, K.; Suzuki, K.; Kawai, T.

    2008-03-01

    An indirect flat-imager with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging with high resolution. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI (Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The charge image created by HARP is read out by electron beams generated by the FEA. The proposed detector is called SAPHIRE (Scintillator Avalanche Photoconductor with HIgh Resolution Emitter readout). The avalanche gain of HARP depends on both a-Se thickness and applied electric field E Se. At E Se of > 80 V/μm, the avalanche gain can enhance the signal at low dose (e.g. fluoroscopy) and make the detector x-ray quantum noise limited down to a single x-ray photon. At high exposure (e.g. radiography), the avalanche gain can be turned off by decreasing E Se to < 70 V/μm. In this paper the imaging characteristics of the FEA readout method, including the spatial resolution and noise, were investigated experimentally using a prototype optical HARP-FEA image sensor. The potential x-ray imaging performance of SAPHIRE, especially the aspect of programmable gain to ensure wide dynamic range and x-ray quantum noise limited performance at the lowest exposure in fluoroscopy, was investigated.

  9. Image lag modeling and correction method for flat panel detector in cone-beam CT%锥束CT平板探测器成像的余晖建模与校正方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄魁东; 张定华; 李明君; 张华

    2013-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has the notable features, viz high efficiency and high precision, and is widely used in the areas such as medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing, but the presence of image lag reduces the quality of CT images. By referencing the multi-exponential decay model for the image lag and combining with the actual decay rule of the flat panel detector output signal, a new decay modeling and correction method for the image lag based on multi-exponential fitting is proposed. Firstly, an imaging experiment using cone-beam CT based on flat panel detector is carried out;the results show that the image lag decay of the pixels in the flat panel detector has a good consistency, and is irrelevant to the initial gray value. Then, the rapid image lag correction is achieved according to the image lag decay model, and the comparison of image quality of the projected images and slice images before and after image lag correction indicates that the edge sharpness of the part has been significantly improved after the lag correction. This method does not need to obtain the scintillation compositions and the decay time constants of the detector, and is easily applied to the practical cone-beam CT imaging systems for image lag detection and correction.%锥束CT具有高效率和高精度的显著特点,在医学成像与工业无损检测等领域已得到广泛应用,但余晖的存在降低了CT图像的质量。本文借鉴余晖多指数衰减模型的思想,结合平板探测器输出信号的实际衰减规律,提出了一种新的基于多指数拟合的余晖衰减建模及校正方法。首先进行了基于平板探测器的锥束CT成像实验,结果表明平板探测器各像素的余晖衰减规律具有良好的一致性,且余晖衰减规律与初始灰度的大小无关;其后根据建立的余晖衰减模型实现了余晖的快速校正,并分析比较了余晖校正前后投影图像和切片图像质量,

  10. Digital flat-panel X-ray technology based on cesium iodide and amorphous silicon: experimental studies and preliminary clinical results; Digitale Flachbilddetektortechnik basierend auf Caesiumjodid und amorphem Silizium: Experimentelle Untersuchungen und erste klinische Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strotzer, M.; Gmeinwieser, J.; Voelk, M.; Fruend, R.; Feuerbach, S. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Experimental and clinical evaluation of a digital flat-panel X-ray system based on cesium iodide (CsI) and amorphous silicon (a-Si). Methods: Performance of a prototype detector was compared with conventional screen-film radiography (SFR) using several phantom studies. Foreign bodies, fractures, osteolyses, and pulmonary lesions were analyzed. Additionally, 120 patients were studied prospectively, resulting in 400 comparative X-ray studies. The flat-panel detector was exposed with standard dose and with a dose reduction of up to 75%. Detector size was 15x15 cm, pixel matrix was 1x1 k with a pixel size of 143 {mu}m. Modulation-transfer function was determined to be 18% at the maximum spatial resolution of 3.5 Ip/mm. Results: The diagnostic results achieved with the digital detector were similar to those of conventional SFR, even at reduced radiation exposure. A potential for dose reduction was observed: 50% with respect to osteoarthrosis and fractures, and 75% for determining bony alignment. Discussion: This new technology can be used in thoracic and skeletal radiography. A significant dose reduction is possible, depending on the suspected disease. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Experimentelle und klinische Pruefung eines digitalen Flachbilddetektors aus Caesiumjodid (CsJ) und amorphem Silizium (a-Si). Methoden: Mit Hilfe verschiedener Phantommodelle wurde ein Detektor-Prototyp mit konventionellen Folien-Filmsystemen (FFS) verglichen. Untersucht wurden die Nachweisbarkeit von Fremdkoerpern, Frakturen, Osteolysen und artefiziellen pulmonalen Laesionen. Zusaetzlich erfolgten prospektiv an 120 Patienten insgesamt 400 vergleichende Skelettuntersuchungen. Der Flachbilddetektor wurde mit identischer Dosis bzw. mit um bis zu 75% reduzierter Dosis belichtet. Seine aktive Flaeche betrug ca. 15x15 cm bei einer Pixelmatrix von 1x1 k und eine Pixelgroesse von 143 {mu}m. Bei der Grenzaufloesung von 3,5 Lp/mm betrug der Wert der Modulationsuebertragungsfunktion 18%. Ergebnisse

  11. Semiautomatic Landmark-Based Two-Dimensional—Three-Dimensional Image Fusion in Living Mice: Correlation of Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Cy5.5-Labeled Antibodies with Flat-Panel Volume Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dullin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Connecting fluorescence signals with anatomic structures enhances our ability to monitor biologic processes in mice. Here, we present a semiautomated approach to correlate two-dimensional (2D noninvasive near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF imaging with three-dimensional (3D, high-resolution, flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT. We developed an algorithm to colocalize fluorescence signals of NIRF-labeled antibodies directed against matriptase and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR to orthotopic carcinomas in mice visualized by fpVCT. For this purpose, mice were anesthetized and fixed on a multimodality animal bed containing fiducial markers filled with iodine-containing contrast agent and fluorescent dye. After intravenous administration of contrast agent and Cy5.5-labeled antibodies, NIRF and fpVCT images were obtained, without repositioning the mice. Binding of Cy5.5-labeled matriptase-specific antibody to pancreatic tumors and Cy5.5-labeled uPAR-specific antibody to mammary carcinomas was assessed by time-domain NIRF imaging measuring the location of fluorescence intensity and its lifetime. In summary, we developed a novel 2D-3D registration technique for image fusion with NIRF imaging and fpVCT to provide complementary information in tumor models on the in vivo association of functional information with anatomic structures. The combination of fpVCT with NIRF imaging will now allow targeted and effective monitoring of preclinical tumor therapies.

  12. 不同结构的平板式阳台壁挂太阳能热水系统性能分析%Performance analysis of balcony hanging flat panel solar water heaters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高立峰; 孙艺霞; 张敏; 何茂涛; 杨荣昆

    2012-01-01

    We perform comparative tests for vertical and horizontal flow solar collectors. We further calculate and comparatively analyze the heat performance of these two water heaters. Results show that the horizontal flat panel solar water heater is superior to the vertical one in instantaneous efficiency, average daily efficiency, daily useful energy and warming performance.%针对竖直式和水平式两种流道结构的集热器进行对比试验,根据相关参数对两种热水系统的热性能进行了计算和对比分析,结果表明水平式流道的平板热水系统在瞬时效率、El平均效率、El有用得热量和升温性能4个方面均优于竖直式流道的平板太阳能热水系统。

  13. Non-destructive, preclinical evaluation of root canal anatomy of human teeth with flat-panel detector volume CT (FD-VCT); Zerstoerungsfreie praeklinische Evaluation der Wurzelkanalanatomie menschlicher Zaehne mittels Flaechendetektor-Volumen-CT (FD-VCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich, G.; Hassepass, F.; Dullin, C.; Grabbe, E. [Universitaetsklinikum Goettingen, Abt. Diagnostische Radiologie (Germany); Attin, T.; Hannig, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Goettingen, Abt. fuer Zahnerhaltung, Praeventive Zahnheilkunde und Paradontologie (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Purpose: Successful endodontic diagnostics and therapy call for adequate depiction of the root canal anatomy with multimodal diagnostic imaging. The aim of the present study is to evaluate visualization of the endodont with flat-panel detector volume CT (FD-VCT). Materials and methods: 13 human teeth were examined with the prototype of a FD-VCT. After data acquisition and generation of volume data sets in volume rendering technology (VRT), the findings obtained were compared to conventional X-rays and cross-section preparations of the teeth. Results: The anatomical structures of the endodont such as root canals, side canals and communications between different root canals as well as dentricles could be detected precisely with FD-VCT. The length of curved root canals was also determined accurately. The spatial resolution of the system is around 140 {mu}m. Only around 73% of the main root canals detected with FD-VCT and 87% of the roots could be visualized with conventional dental X-rays. None of the side canals, shown with FD-VCT, was detectable on conventional X-rays. In all cases the enamel and dentin of the teeth could be well delineated. No differences in image quality could be discerned between stored and freshly extracted teeth, or between primary and adult teeth. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of Photopic Negative Response of Full-Field and Focal Electroretinograms in Detecting Glaucomatous Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Machida

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the photopic negative response (PhNR of the full-field electroretinogram (ERG to the PhNR of the focal ERGs in detecting glaucoma. Methods. One hundred and three eyes with glaucoma and 42 normal eyes were studied. Full-field ERGs were elicited by red stimuli on a blue background. The focal ERGs were elicited by a 15∘ white stimulus spot centered on the macula, the superotemporal or the inferotemporal areas of the macula. Results. In early glaucoma, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs were significantly larger for the focal PhNR (0.863–0.924 than those for the full-field PhNR (0.666–0.748 (P<.05. The sensitivity was significantly higher for the focal PhNR than for the full-field PhNR in early (P<.01 and intermediate glaucoma (P<.05. In advanced glaucoma, there was no difference in the AUCs and sensitivities between the focal and full-field PhNRs. Conclusions. The focal ERG has the diagnostic ability with higher sensitivity in detecting early and intermediate glaucoma than the full-field ERG.

  15. Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) versus CMOS Technology, Specimen Radiography System (SRS) and Tomosynthesis (DBT) - Which System Can Optimise Surgical Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Wendtland, R; Dilbat, G; Bani, M; Fasching, P A; Heusinger, K; Lux, M P; Loehberg, C R; Brehm, B; Hammon, M; Saake, M; Dankerl, P; Jud, S M; Rauh, C; Bayer, C M; Beckmann, M W; Uder, M; Meier-Meitinger, M

    2013-05-01

    Aim: This prospective clinical study aimed to evaluate whether it would be possible to reduce the rate of re-excisions using CMOS technology, a specimen radiography system (SRS) or digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) compared to a conventional full field digital mammography (FFDM) system. Material and Method: Between 12/2012 and 2/2013 50 patients were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer (BI-RADS™ 5). After histological verification, all patients underwent breast-conserving therapy with intraoperative imaging using 4 different systems and differing magnifications: 1. Inspiration™ (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), amorphous selenium, tungsten source, focus 0.1 mm, resolution 85 µm pixel pitch, 8 lp/mm; 2. BioVision™ (Bioptics, Tucson, AZ, USA), CMOS technology, photodiode array, flat panel, tungsten source, focus 0.05, resolution 50 µm pixel pitch, 12 lp/mm; 3. the Trident™ specimen radiography system (SRS) (Hologic, Bedford, MA, USA), amorphous selenium, tungsten source, focus 0.05, resolution 70 µm pixel pitch, 7.1 lp/mm; 4. tomosynthesis (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), amorphous selenium, tungsten source, focus 0.1 mm, resolution 85 µm pixel pitch, 8 lp/mm, angular range 50 degrees, 25 projections, scan time > 20 s, geometry: uniform scanning, reconstruction: filtered back projection. The 600 radiographs were prospectively shown to 3 radiologists. Results: Of the 50 patients with histologically proven breast cancer (BI-RADS™ 6), 39 patients required no further surgical therapy (re-excision) after breast-conserving surgery. A retrospective analysis (n = 11) showed a significant (p < 0.05) increase of sensitivity with the BioVision™, the Trident™ and tomosynthesis compared to the Inspiration™ at a magnification of 1.0 : 2.0 or 1.0 : 1.0 (tomosynthesis) (2.6, 3.3 or 3.6 %), i.e. re-excision would not have been necessary in 2, 3 or 4 patients, respectively, compared to findings obtained with a standard

  16. Precise full-field distortion rectification and evaluation method for a digital projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhangying; Liu, Miao; Yang, Shourui; Huang, Shujun; Bai, Xuefei; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Jigui; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Zonghua

    2016-10-01

    Digital projectors have been widely used in many accuracy-sensitive fields. Although some calibration methods have been proposed to obtain the intrinsic parameters for a digital projector, especially the radial and tangential distortion, there are few studies on how to rectify the projected image to obtain an ideal projection pattern and further evaluate the results. In this paper, a precise full-field image rectification technique is proposed based on the principle of projector calibration. The pixel remapping and interpolation techniques are detailed step by step. All of the method's steps maintain subpixel accuracy. Moreover, a full-field verification method is presented to evaluate the effectiveness of the projector distortion procedure using a full-field phase map. A full-field non-linear distortion distribution map can be generated to represent distortion characteristics of nearly all the pixels of a projector in a very intuitive way. The experimental results validate and show the effectiveness of the proposed full-field rectification technique and evaluation method.

  17. Increase of brightness and transmission efficiency in flat panel display through serial synchronous scanning mode with double buffers%串行同步双缓冲扫描提高平板显示器的显示亮度和传送利用率

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈章进; 陈峰; 冉峰; 徐美华; 郑方

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a serial synchronous scanning mode in flat panel display(FPD)by adding a latch buffer between the seriaiizer and the driving buffer.Comparing with conventional techniques,the proposed structure can efficiently reduce the brightness loss and improve the transmission performance.Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the ratio between the lightest weight display time and the relative transmission time is a tradeoff between brightness loss and transmission efficiency.

  18. Flat-Panel Cone-Beam Ct-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Very Small (≤1.5 cm) Liver Tumors: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: r.cazzato@unicampus.it; Buy, Xavier, E-mail: x.buy@bordeaux.unicancer.fr; Alberti, Nicolas, E-mail: nicoalbertibdx@gmail.com; Fonck, Mariane, E-mail: m.fonk@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié 229 Cours de l’Argonne, Department of Radiology (France); Grasso, Rosario Francesco, E-mail: r.grasso@unicampus.it [Università “Campus Bio-Medico di Roma”, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Italy); Palussière, Jean, E-mail: j.palussiere@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié 229 Cours de l’Argonne, Department of Radiology (France)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThe aim of the present study was to investigate the technical feasibility of flat-panel cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of very small (<1.5 cm) liver tumors.Materials and MethodsPatients included were candidates for hepatic percutaneous RFA as they had single biopsy-proven hepatic tumors sized ≤1.5 cm and poorly defined on ultrasonography. Following apnea induction, unenhanced CBCT scans were acquired and used to deploy the RF electrode with the aid of a virtual navigation system. If the tumor was not clearly identified on the unenhanced CBCT scan, a right retrograde arterial femoral access was established to carry out hepatic angiography and localize the tumor. Patients’ lesions and procedural variables were recorded and analyzed.ResultsThree patients (2 male and 1 female), aged 68, 76, and 87 years were included; 3 lesions (2 hepato-cellular carcinoma and 1 metastasis from colorectal cancer) were treated. One patient required hepatic angiography. Cycles of apnea used to acquire CBCT images and to deploy the electrode lasted <120 s. Mean fluoroscopic time needed to deploy the electrode was 36.6 ± 5.7 min. Mean overall procedural time was 66.0 ± 22.9 min. No peri- or post-procedural complications were noted. No cases of incomplete ablation were noted at 1-month follow-up.ConclusionPercutaneous CBCT-guided liver RFA with or without arterial hepatic angiography is technically feasible.

  19. 平板DR数字成像技术在焊管行业中的应用%Application of Flat Panel Digital Radiography Imaging Technology in Welded Pipe Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王长安; 余国民; 魏雅博

    2014-01-01

    In this article, it introduced the working principle of digital radiography(DR) imaging technology and its application in welded pipe industry. Compared with the detection effect of traditional X-ray industrial TV from sensitivity detection, image resolution, residual magnetization, radiation dose etc. The result showed that the flat panel DR imaging technology is with some advantages, such as high sensitivity of detection, high efficiency, low labour tension, little doses of radiation and so on. It ensures the weld quality, greatly reduces the accident rate of pipeline, and can replace X-ray industrial TV detecting technology. At present, this technology is widely applied in welded pipe industry.%介绍了DR数字成像技术的工作原理及其在焊管行业检测中的应用。在灵敏度检测、图像分辨率、剩磁影响和辐射剂量等方面与传统的X射线工业电视的检测效果进行了比较分析。结果表明, DR数字成像技术具有检测灵敏度和检测效率较高、劳动强度小、辐射剂量小等优点,保证了焊缝质量,大大降低了管线的事故发生率,可以替代传统X射线工业电视检测技术在焊管行业的应用。

  20. A study on 100 MeV O{sup 7+} irradiated SnO{sub 2}/Ag/SnO{sub 2} multilayer as transparent electrode for flat panel display application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Vikas [Department of Physics, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur 302017 (India); Singh, Satyavir, E-mail: satyavir84@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur 302017 (India); Asokan, K. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Road, New Delhi 110067 (India); Sachdev, Kanupriya [Department of Physics, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur 302017 (India); Materials Research Centre, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur 302017 India (India)

    2016-07-15

    The multilayer thin films of SnO{sub 2}/Ag/SnO{sub 2} were deposited using electron-beam and thermal evaporation for flat panel display application. The as-prepared SnO{sub 2}/Ag/SnO{sub 2} specimen was irradiated with 100 MeV O{sup 7+} ions by varying the fluences 1 × 10{sup 12} and 5 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The pristine and irradiated films were investigated using XRD, SEM, AFM and Raman to find out modification in the structure and surface morphology of the films. UV–Vis and Hall measurement techniques were used to investigate the optical and electrical properties respectively. It was observed that the roughness of the film after irradiation (for the fluence of 1 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) ​ decreased to 0.68 nm from 1.6 nm and showed an increase in roughness to 1.35 nm on increasing the fluence to 5 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. This oxide/metal/oxide structure fulfills the basic requirements of a TCE, like high-transmittance >75% for pristine and >80% for the fluence of 1 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} over a broad spectrum of visible light for practical applications. The multilayer structure shows change in the electrical resistivity from 1.6 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm to 6.3 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm after irradiation.

  1. Medical devices; radiology devices; reclassification of full-field digital mammography system. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the reclassification of the full-field digital mammography (FFDM) system from class III (premarket approval) to class II (special controls). The device type is intended to produce planar digital x-ray images of the entire breast; this generic type of device may include digital mammography acquisition software, full-field digital image receptor, acquisition workstation, automatic exposure control, image processing and reconstruction programs, patient and equipment supports, component parts, and accessories. The special control that will apply to the device is the guidance document entitled "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Full-Field Digital Mammography System." FDA is reclassifying the device into class II (special controls) because general controls along with special controls will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance document that will serve as the special control for this device.

  2. The Virtual Fields Method Extracting Constitutive Mechanical Parameters from Full-field Deformation Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pierron, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    The Virtual Fields Method: Extracting Constitutive Mechanical Parameters from Full-field Deformation Measurements is the first book on the Virtual Fields Method (VFM), a technique to identify materials mechanical properties from full-field measurements. Firmly rooted with extensive theoretical description of the method, the book presents numerous examples of application to a wide range of materials (composites, metals, welds, biomaterials) and situations (static, vibration, high strain rate). The authors give a detailed training section with examples of progressive difficulty to lead the reader to program the VFM and include a set of commented Matlab programs as well as GUI Matlab-based software for more general situations. The Virtual Fields Method: Extracting Constitutive Mechanical Parameters from Full-field Deformation Measurements is an ideal book for researchers, engineers, and students interested in applying the VFM to new situations motivated by their research.  

  3. Composite NDE using full-field pulse-echo ultrasonic propagation imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Chan; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Park, Jongwoon

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a novel ultrasonic propagation imaging system, called a full-field pulse-echo ultrasonic propagation imaging (FF PE UPI) system is presented. The coincided laser beams for ultrasonic sensing and generation are scanned and pulse-echo mode laser ultrasounds are captured. This procedure makes it possible to generate full-field ultrasound in through-the-thickness direction as large as the scan area. The system nondestructively inspected targets with two-axis translation stages. Various structural inspection results in the form of full-field ultrasonic wave propagation videos are introduced, which are an aluminum honeycomb sandwich, ailerons and carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) honeycomb sandwich structures including various defects.

  4. Flat panel display characterization: a perceptual approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, C.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, consumer television sets have substantially increased in screen size, with screen diagonals up to 65-inch and beyond. At the same time, their thickness has decreased to only a few centimeters. Right from the start, this combination has been highly appreciated by consumers, resu

  5. 波形隔板对平板式生物反应器传质及混合性能的影响%Effect of Waved Baffle Panel on Mass Transfer and Mixing Performance of Flat Plate Photobioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王淋淋; 尤学一

    2012-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics was applied to simulate the flow field of a flat plate photobioreactor (PBR) with waved baffle panel. After the reliability of model was validated, the effects of two structural parameters of waved baffles, i.e. the ratio of waved baffles height to wave length (L/λX) and ratio of wave amplitude to wave length (A/λ) on the mass transfer and mixing performance were systematically analyzed. The results showed that when L/λ=12, better mass transfer and mixing performance were obtained and those related parameters such as the liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa), ratio of cycle time of the downcomer to that of PBR (ff) and averaged turbulence kinetic energy (Em) were higher. Besides, the obtained liquid velocity was close to the optimum value being most favorable to microalgal growth. When L/λ12 and A/λ=0.8, the mass transfer performance was the best and the value of kLa was increased by about 10% compared with that of bioreactor with flat baffles. As L//b=l2 and A/λ0.4, the mixing performance of the reactor was the best and the value of Em was increased by 14.7% compared with that of bioreactor with flat baffles.%对带波纹隔板的平板式生物反应器,利用计算流体动力学进行流场模拟,验证模型可靠性后,系统分析波纹隔板高/波长(L/λ)和波幅/波长(A/λ)两个波纹隔板结构参数对反应器传质及流动混合特性的影响.结果表明,当L/λ=12时,传质及流动混合性能较好,液相体积传质系数(kLa)、平均湍动能(Em)、下降区停留时间占循环一周时间之比(θ)等表征传质及混合的参数值均较大,得到的液体流速在微藻生长的最佳流速附近.当A/λ=0.8时,反应器的传质性能最优,kLa比采用平直隔板时增加了约10%;当A/λ=0.4时,反应器的混合效果最佳,Em比采用平直隔板时增加14.7%.

  6. Standardized Full-Field Electroretinography in the Green Monkey (Chlorocebus sabaeus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Palmour, Roberta M

    2014-01-01

    Full-field electroretinography is an objective measure of retinal function, serving as an important diagnostic clinical tool in ophthalmology for evaluating the integrity of the retina. Given the similarity between the anatomy and physiology of the human and Green Monkey eyes, this species has......). Photopic and scotopic ERG recordings were obtained by full-field stimulation over a range of 6 log units of intensity in dark-adapted or light-adapted eyes of adult Green Monkeys (Chlorocebus sabaeus). Intensity, duration, and interval of light stimuli were varied separately. Reproducible values...

  7. Combined full field stress and strain measurement methods for granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, J.; Broere, W.

    2010-01-01

    The current paper re-introduces the photoelastic measurement method in experimental geomechanics. A full-field phase stepping polariscope suitable for geomechanical model tests has been developed. Additional constraints on the measurement and mechanical setup arising from geomechanical test conditio

  8. Full-field hard x-ray microscopy with interdigitated silicon lenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simons, Hugh; Stöhr, Frederik; Michael-Lindhard, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Full-field x-ray microscopy using x-ray objectives has become a mainstay of the biological and materials sciences. However, the inefficiency of existing objectives at x-ray energies above 15 keV has limited the technique to weakly absorbing or two-dimensional (2D) samples. Here, we show...

  9. A full-field transmission x-ray microscope for time-resolved imaging of magnetic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewald, J.; Nisius, T.; Abbati, G.; Baumbach, S.; Overbuschmann, J.; Wilhein, T. [Institute for X-Optics (IXO), Hochschule Koblenz, Joseph-Rovan-Allee 2, 53424 Remagen (Germany); Wessels, P.; Wieland, M.; Drescher, M. [The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging (CUI), University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Experimentalphysik, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Vogel, A. [Institut für Angewandte Physik, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Viefhaus, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Meier, G. [The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging (CUI), University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    Sub-nanosecond magnetization dynamics of small permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) elements has been investigated with a new full-field transmission microscope at the soft X-ray beamline P04 of the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source PETRA III. The soft X-ray microscope generates a flat-top illumination field of 20 μm diameter using a grating condenser. A tilted nanostructured magnetic sample can be excited by a picosecond electric current pulse via a coplanar waveguide. The transmitted light of the sample plane is directly imaged by a micro zone plate with < 65 nm resolution onto a 2D gateable X-ray detector to select one particular bunch in the storage ring that probes the time evolution of the dynamic information successively via XMCD spectromicroscopy in a pump-probe scheme. In the experiments it was possible to generate a homogeneously magnetized state in patterned magnetic layers by a strong magnetic Oersted field pulse of 200 ps duration and directly observe the recovery to the initial flux-closure vortex patterns.

  10. A comparison between magnetic resonance angiography at 3 teslas (time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced and flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of embolized brain aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme S. Nakiri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced- magnetic resonance angiography techniques in a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance unit with digital subtraction angiography with the latest flat-panel technology and 3D reconstruction in the evaluation of embolized cerebral aneurysms. INTRODUCTION: Many embolized aneurysms are subject to a recurrence of intra-aneurismal filling. Traditionally, imaging surveillance of coiled aneurysms has consisted of repeated digital subtraction angiography. However, this method has a small but significant risk of neurological complications, and many authors have advocated the use of noninvasive imaging methods for the surveillance of embolized aneurysms. METHODS: Forty-three aneurysms in 30 patients were studied consecutively between November 2009 and May 2010. Two interventional neuroradiologists rated the time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography, the contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, and finally the digital subtraction angiography, first independently and then in consensus. The status of aneurysm occlusion was assessed according to the Raymond scale, which indicates the level of recanalization according to degrees: Class 1: excluded aneurysm; Class 2: persistence of a residual neck; Class 3: persistence of a residual aneurysm. The agreement among the analyses was assessed by applying the Kappa statistic. RESULTS: Inter-observer agreement was excellent for both methods (K = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.84-1. Inter-technical agreement was almost perfect between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography (K = 0.98; 95 % CI: 0.93-1 and between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography (K = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1. Disagreement occurred in only one case (2.3%, which was classified as Class I by time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and Class II by digital subtraction angiography. The agreement between

  11. Feasibility of flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT) in experimental small animal imaging of osteoporosis - initial experience; Erste Erfahrungen mit einem Flaechendetektor-Volumen-CT (fpVCT) in der experimentellen Osteoporosediagnostik am Kleintiermodell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, R.; Dullin, C.; Herrmann, K.P.; Kluever, I.; Zaroban, A.; Knollmann, F. [Universitaetsklinikum Goettingen (Germany). Abteilung Diagnostische Radiologie, Goettingen; Stuermer, E.K.; Sehmisch, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Goettingen (Germany). Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Plastische und Wiederherstellungschirurgie; Funke, M. [Klinikum Mittelbaden, Baden-Baden (Germany). Radiologische Klinik an der Stadtklinik

    2006-10-15

    Flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT) is a new, noninvasive CT imaging modality with increased isotropic resolution. Technical details, potential applications, and our initial experience with a fpVCT prototype scanner in the imaging of osteoporosis in a rat model are presented. To date, 21 rats have been investigated in vivo with fpVCT. Pharmacologic effects on bone mineral density (BMD) and structure were of special interest. Image evaluation focussed on the second lumbar vertebra and the left femoral bone. To validate measurement results, BMD values calculated with fpVCT were correlated with results of BMD measurements from ashing of the second lumbar vertebra and femoral bones. Our initial results show that fpVCT is capable of detecting differences in BMD between ovariectomized rats treated with estradiol and a control group with high statistical significance (p<0.05), corresponding to ashing as the gold standard. In a rat model, fpVCT imaging is especially useful in longitudinal in vivo investigations of BMD measures. Spatial resolution of up to 150 {mu}m allows imaging of the trabecular structure only in human cadaveric bones. (orig.) [German] Die Flaechendetektor-Volumen-Computertomographie (fpVCT) ist eine neuartige CT-Bildgebungstechnik, die eine gesteigerte isotrope Ortsaufloesung ermoeglicht. In dieser Arbeit wird ueber Technik, Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten und erste Erfahrungen beim Einsatz eines fpVCT-Prototyps in der experimentellen Diagnostik der Osteoporose am Rattenmodell berichtet. Bisher konnten 21 Ratten in vivo am fpVCT untersucht werden. Von besonderem Interesse waren Medikamentenwirkungen auf Knochendichte (''bone mineral density'', BMD) und -struktur. Die Auswertung der gewonnenen Bilddaten fokussierte sich auf den 2. Lendenwirbelkoerper und das linke Femur. Um die Messergebnisse zu ueberpruefen, wurden die mittels fpVCT errechneten BMD-Werte mit den Ergebnissen der Dichtemessung der veraschten 2. LWK und Femora

  12. SU-E-I-53: Comparison of Kerma-Area-Product Between the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and a Flat Panel Detector (FPD) as Used in Neuro-Endovascular Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayan, S; Rana, V; Nagesh, S Setlur; Xiong, Z; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the reduction of integral dose to the patient when using the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) compared to when using the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) for the techniques used during neurointerventional procedures. Methods: The MAF is a small field-of-view, high resolution x-ray detector which captures 1024 x 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35μm and is capable of real-time imaging up to 30 frames per second. The MAF was used in neuro-interventions during those parts of the procedure when high resolution was needed and the FPD was used otherwise. The technique parameters were recorded when each detector was used and the kerma-area-product (KAP) per image frame was determined. KAP values were calculated for seven neuro interventions using premeasured calibration files of output as a function of kVp and beam filtration and included the attenuation of the patient table for the frontal projections to be more representative of integral patient dose. The air kerma at the patient entrance was multiplied by the beam area at that point to obtain the KAP values. The ranges of KAP values per frame were determined for the range of technique parameters used during the clinical procedures. To appreciate the benefit of the higher MAF resolution in the region of interventional activity, DA technique parameters were generally used with the MAF. Results: The lowest and highest values of KAP per frame for the MAF in DA mode were 4 and 50 times lower, respectively, compared to those of the FPD in pulsed fluoroscopy mode. Conclusion: The MAF was used in those parts of the clinical procedures when high resolution and image quality was essential. The integral patient dose as represented by the KAP value was substantially lower when using the MAF than when using the FPD due to the much smaller volume of tissue irradiated. This research was supported in part by Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation and NIH Grant R01EB002873.

  13. Modelling and structure optimization of flat-panel thermal concentrated solar thermoelectric device∗%平板集热太阳热电器件建模及结构优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘磊†; 张锁良; 马亚坤; 吴国浩; 郑树凯; 王永青

    2013-01-01

    Solar thermoelectric conversion is another way to convert solar radiation directly into electricity besides photovoltaic technology, and has become a new hot spot of solar energy utilization in recent years. In this paper a model of flat-panel thermal concentrated solar thermoelectric device is built based on the material of Bi2Te3. And finite element analysis is used to analyze the temperature distribution of the device under AM1.5 illumination. Furthermore, the influences of thermal concentration, cross section area and length of thermal legs on open voltage, maximum output power and conversion efficiency of the device are calculated based on temperature-dependent physical parameters. The results indicate that thermal concentration and length of thermal legs haved a significant influence on device performance, while the cross section area changes the conversion efficiency of device relatively weakly, and the conversion efficiency of the device reaches 1.56%in this model.%  太阳能热电转换是光伏效应外另一种直接将太阳辐射转变为电能的途径,近年来已经成为太阳能利用的热点之一.本文以Bi2Te3材料为基础构建平板集热太阳热电器件模型,采用有限元法分析AM1.5辐射条件下器件温度分布情况,并结合基于温度的物性参数计算集热比、热臂截面积与长度变化等因素对器件的开路电压、最大输出功率及转化效率的影响.研究发现:集热比与热臂长度的变化对器件性能有显著影响,热臂截面积的变化对器件转化效率影响相对较弱;在这一模型中,平板集热太阳热电器件的转化效率达到1.56%.

  14. SU-D-204-05: Quantitative Comparison of a High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detector with a Standard Flat Panel Detector (FPD) Using the New Metric of Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, M; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In endovascular image-guided neuro-interventions, visualization of fine detail is paramount. For example, the ability of the interventionist to visualize the stent struts depends heavily on the x-ray imaging detector performance. Methods: A study to examine the relative performance of the high resolution MAF-CMOS (pixel size 75µm, Nyquist frequency 6.6 cycles/mm) and a standard Flat Panel Detector (pixel size 194µm, Nyquist frequency 2.5 cycles/mm) detectors in imaging a neuro stent was done using the Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD) metric. Low quantum noise images of a deployed stent were obtained by averaging 95 frames obtained by both detectors without changing other exposure or geometric parameters. The square of the Fourier transform of each image is taken and divided by the generalized normalized noise power spectrum to give an effective measured task-specific signal-to-noise ratio. This expression is then integrated from 0 to each of the detector’s Nyquist frequencies, and the GM-ROD value is determined by taking a ratio of the integrals for the MAF-CMOS to that of the FPD. The lower bound of integration can be varied to emphasize high frequencies in the detector comparisons. Results: The MAF-CMOS detector exhibits vastly superior performance over the FPD when integrating over all frequencies, yielding a GM-ROD value of 63.1. The lower bound of integration was stepped up in increments of 0.5 cycles/mm for higher frequency comparisons. As the lower bound increased, the GM-ROD value was augmented, reflecting the superior performance of the MAF-CMOS in the high frequency regime. Conclusion: GM-ROD is a versatile metric that can provide quantitative detector and task dependent comparisons that can be used as a basis for detector selection. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  15. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong; Glorieux, Christ; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-01

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz.

  16. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Jichuan [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Electronic and Optical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, 200 Xiaolingwei, Nanjing 210094 (China); Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Xu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdxu@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Glorieux, Christ, E-mail: xdxu@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be [Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Matsuda, Osamu [Division of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Cheng, Liping [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-05-15

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz.

  17. Direct Strain Tensor Approximation for Full-Field Strain Measurement Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    of grating coordinates using correlation filter techniques. Optik 1988; 80:76–79. 3. Bruck H, McNeill S, Sutton M, Peters W. Digital image correlation...record.url?eid=2-s2.0-46949097860&partnerID=40&md5= 25dddce389c9640db7cf8fbf3c50dc4e. 27. Cheng P, Sutton M, Schreier H, McNeill S. Full-field speckle

  18. Flat pyramid

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Kevin Andrew

    2017-01-01

    'Flat pyramid' is a multi-channel video installation. The project employs appropriated promotional and instructional video from a defunct pyramid scheme as the source material for fictionalized reenactment. The footage primarily consists of presentation documentation, testimonial interviews, and product photography—throughout all of which cutting rarely occurs between takes. Perpetrators and victims are seen moving in and out of their promotional personas, inadvertently making their disquieti...

  19. Standardized full-field electroretinography in the Green Monkey (Chlorocebus sabaeus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Bouskila

    Full Text Available Full-field electroretinography is an objective measure of retinal function, serving as an important diagnostic clinical tool in ophthalmology for evaluating the integrity of the retina. Given the similarity between the anatomy and physiology of the human and Green Monkey eyes, this species has increasingly become a favorable non-human primate model for assessing ocular defects in humans. To test this model, we obtained full-field electroretinographic recordings (ERG and normal values for standard responses required by the International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV. Photopic and scotopic ERG recordings were obtained by full-field stimulation over a range of 6 log units of intensity in dark-adapted or light-adapted eyes of adult Green Monkeys (Chlorocebus sabaeus. Intensity, duration, and interval of light stimuli were varied separately. Reproducible values of amplitude and latency were obtained for the a- and b-waves, under well-controlled adaptation and stimulus conditions; the i-wave was also easily identifiable and separated from the a-b-wave complex in the photopic ERG. The recordings obtained in the healthy Green Monkey matched very well with those in humans and other non-human primate species (Macaca mulatta and Macaca fascicularis. These results validate the Green Monkey as an excellent non-human primate model, with potential to serve for testing retinal function following various manipulations such as visual deprivation or drug evaluation.

  20. Full-field Measurement of Deformation and Vibration using Digital Image Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Chih Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The main intention of this study was to investigate the full-field measurement of de-formation and vibration using a program we developed for digital image correlation. Digital image correlation is a measuring method that can calculate the displacement of each point on an object by using recorded images. By capturing continuous images of the object in deformation or in motion, the displacements of feature points on the object can be tracked and used in calculations to determine the full-field deformation, strain and vibration of the object. We used the fast and simple algorithm in our program as the core, and conducted non-contact full-field displacement measurement by tracking feature points from images taken after motion. The measuring accuracy can be up to 0.1 pixel. Our experimental results show the technique to be very accurate and useful. We also applied this technique under conditions where an ordinary sensor could not be used.

  1. Usefulness of DICOM headers in the analysis of two biplane X-ray systems setting (image intensifier and flat panel) used in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile;Utilidad de las cabeceras DICOM en el analisis de la configuracion de dos sistemas de rayos X biplano (intensificador de imagen y panel plano) utilizados en cardiologia intervencionista pediatrica en Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubeda, C.; Vergara, F. [Universidad de Tarapaca, Arica (Chile). Dept. de Ciencias Clinicas; Vano, E. [Universidad Complutense, Madrid, (Spain). Hospital Clinico San Carlos. Dept. de Radiologia; Miranda, P. [Hospital Luis Calvo Mackenna, Santiago (Chile). Dept. de Hemodinamia; Valenzuela, E. [Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Hospital Clinico. Servicio de Hemodinamia; Leyton, F. [Instituto de Salud Publica de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2009-07-01

    The setting of two biplane X ray systems were evaluated (image intensifier (II) and flat panel (PP)), through DICOM tags from 32 images created during the characterization of both systems. The technical parameters adjusted for systems were: 63,8 to 80,0 kV and 15,0 to 388,0 mA, for the system with II and 52,0 to 77,0 kV and 25,0 to 476,0 mA, for the system with PP detector. Both equipment presented a different mA adjustment, when moving from fluoroscopy modes low dose (FL), medium dose (FM) and high dose (FH) to cine mode (CI). Two dosimetric quantities were evaluated, the first one was the dose-area product (DAP) which gave as a result for FB mode, between 0,03 to 0,35 uGycm{sup 2}/image (II) and from 0,05 a 0,69 uGycm{sup 2}/image (PP), when the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) thickness was incremented from 4 to 16 cm. In cine mode the DAP quantity showed, percentage values from 24 to -1 % for the same PMMA increment. Skin cumulative dose was the second quantity evaluated and showed an increment of incident air kerma (KAI)/image in factors from 17 to 35 (II) and 15 to 28 (PP) when used in CI mode instead of FB mode, to the different PMMA thicknesses used. This dose increment for CI mode must be considered by cardiologists, to use the fluoroscopic run as an alternative to document part of the procedures when there is no need to use a high quality image (author)

  2. 无线平板探测器在四肢小关节X线摄影中的临床应用%Clinical Application of Wireless Flat-panel Detector in X-ray Photography in the Small Joints of the Limbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴慧钊; 张泽坤; 吴文娟

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the wireless flat-panel detector with gadolinium oxide coating in X-ray photography in the small joints of the limbs compared with conventional flat panel detector with cesium iodide coating. Materials and Methods Comparison was randomly performed between gadolinium oxide coated sulfur wireless flat-panel detector and cesium iodide coated conventional flat-panel detector for 80 patients who received routine X-ray photography, and scoring data were applied with statistical analysis. Results There was no significant difference between the scoring data from two film-reading people (P>0.05). The resolution of anatomical structure of small joint of limbs and tube current showed no significant difference for two types of imaging systems (P>0.05). Conclusion Wireless flat panel detector sulfur with gadolinium oxide coatings can obtain satisfactory image quality at a reasonable inspection doses in the X-ray photography of small joint of limbs. The imaging quality and inspection doses are similar to conventional flat panel detector device with cesium iodide coating, but the posture is more convenient.%目的对硫氧化钆涂层的无线平板探测器与碘化铯涂层的常规平板探测器进行对比,探讨硫氧化钆涂层的无线平板探测器在四肢小关节X线摄影中的应用价值。资料与方法80例行四肢小关节X线摄影患者随机分别使用硫氧化钆涂层的无线平板探测器和碘化铯涂层的常规平板探测器进行检查,对评分数据进行统计学分析。结果2名阅片人评分比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。两种成像系统的四肢小关节解剖结构的显示清晰度差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。两种成像系统管电流值的差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论在合理的检查剂量下,硫氧化钆涂层的无线平板探测器应用于四肢小关节X线摄影可以获得较满意的图像质量,其成像质量和检查剂量近似于碘化铯涂层

  3. Fingerprint imaging from the inside of a finger with full-field optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auksorius, Egidijus; Boccara, A. Claude

    2015-01-01

    Imaging below fingertip surface might be a useful alternative to the traditional fingerprint sensing since the internal finger features are more reliable than the external ones. One of the most promising subsurface imaging technique is optical coherence tomography (OCT), which, however, has to acquire 3-D data even when a single en face image is required. This makes OCT inherently slow for en face imaging and produce unnecessary large data sets. Here we demonstrate that full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) can be used to produce en face images of sweat pores and internal fingerprints, which can be used for the identification purposes. PMID:26601009

  4. Focus defect and dispersion mismatch in full-field optical coherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Arnaud

    2017-03-20

    Full-field optical coherence microscopy (FFOCM) is an optical technique, based on low-coherence interference microscopy, for tomographic imaging of semi-transparent samples with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. The differences in refractive index between the sample and the immersion medium of the microscope objectives may degrade the FFOCM image quality because of focus defect and optical dispersion mismatch. These phenomena and their consequences are discussed in this theoretical paper. Experimental methods that have been implemented in FFOCM to minimize the adverse effects of these phenomena are summarized and compared.

  5. En-face full-field optical coherence tomography for fast and efficient fingerprints acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Fabrice; Dalimier, Eugénie; Boccara, A. Claude

    2014-05-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been recently proposed by a number of laboratories as a promising tool for fingerprints acquisitions and for fakes discrimination. Indeed OCT being a non-contact, non-destructive optical method that virtually sections the volume of biological tissues that strongly scatter light it appears obvious to use it for fingerprints. Nevertheless most of the OCT setups have to go through the long acquisition of a full 3D image to isolate an "en-face" image suitable for fingerprint analysis. A few "en-face" OCT approaches have been proposed that use either a complex 2D scanning setup and image processing, or a full-field illumination using a camera and a spatially coherent source that induces crosstalks and degrades the image quality. We show here that Full Field OCT (FFOCT) using a spatially incoherent source is able to provide "en-face" high quality optical sectioning of the fingers skin. Indeed such approach shows a unique spatial resolution able to reveal a number of morphological details of fingerprints that are not seen with competing OCT setups. In particular the cellular structure of the stratum corneum and the epidermis-dermis interface appear clearly. We describe our high-resolution (1 micrometer, isotropic) setup and show our first design to get a large field of view while keeping a good sectioning ability of about 3 micrometers. We display the results obtained using these two setups for fingerprints examination.

  6. Homodyne full-field interferometer for measuring dynamic surface phenomena in microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiäinen, Lauri; Kokkonen, Kimmo; Kaivola, Matti

    2017-01-01

    We describe a stabilized homodyne full-field interferometer capable of measuring vertical surface deformations of microstructures in the time domain. The interferometer is stabilized to a chosen operation point by obtaining a feedback signal from a non-moving, freely selectable, reference region on the sample surface. The stabilized full-field interferometer enables detection of time-dependent changes in the surface profile with nanometer scale vertical resolution, while the temporal resolution of the measurement is ultimately limited by the refresh rate of the camera only. The lateral resolution of the surface deformation is determined by the combination of the imaging optics together with the pixel size of the camera. The setup is used to measure the deformation of an Aluminum nitride membrane as a function of time-dependent pressure change. The data analysis allows for unambiguous determination of surface deformations over multiple fringes of the interferogram, hence enabling the study of a wide range of physical phenomena with varying magnitude of vertical surface movement.

  7. Full-field micro surface profilometry using digital fringe projection with spatial encoding principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L-C [Graduate Institute of Automation Technology, National Taipei University of Technology, 1 Sec. 3 Chung-Hsiao East Rd, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Liao, C-C [Graduate Institute of Mechatronics, National Taipei University of Technology, 1 Sec. Chung-Hsiao East Rd, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Lai, M-J [Graduate Institute of Mechatronics, National Taipei University of Technology, 1 Sec. Chung-Hsiao East Rd, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China)

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an effective full-field three-dimensional micro surface profilometer using digital fringe projection with digital micromirror device (DMD) technology and triangulation measurement principle. Fast and accurate three-dimensional measurement techniques with full-field measurement capability are thus highly demanded for sharpening product competitiveness. Traditional laser triangulation methods have difficulty in detecting the accurate centre position of projected points or lines when encountered with light scattering problems caused by the object's geometric discontinuities, such as surface boundaries or edges. The newly developed profilometer deploys a DMD to project flexible digital structured light patterns of white light onto the object to suit various inspection requirements, such as the object's size and surface condition. Micro structured light patterns can be generated by using optical zoom and collimating lens sets. Accurate system parameters of 3-D surface profilometry can be obtained by developing a calibration process based on least squares minimization. Micro 3-D contours with a large surface gradient can be reconstructed accurately and efficiently.

  8. [Full-field and automatic methodology of spectral calibration for PGP imaging spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ci; Bayanheshig; Cui, Ji-cheng; Pan, Ming-zhong; Li, Xiao-tian; Tang, Yu-guo

    2014-08-01

    In order to analyze spectral data quantitatively which is obtained by prism-grating-prism imaging spectrometer, spectral calibration is required in order to determine spectral characteristics of PGP imaging spectrometer, such as the center wavelength of every spectral channel, spectral resolution and spectral bending. A spectral calibration system of full field based on collimated monochromatic light method is designed. Spherical mirror is used to provide collimated light, and a freely sliding and rotating folding mirror is adopted to change the angle of incident light in order to realize full field and automatic calibration of imaging spectrometer. Experiments of spectral calibration have been done for PGP imaging spectrometer to obtain parameters of spectral performance, and accuracy analysis combined with the structural features of the entire spectral calibration system have been done. Analysis results indicate that spectral calibration accuracy of the calibration system reaches 0.1 nm, and the bandwidth accuracy reaches 1.3%. The calibration system has merits of small size, better commonality, high precision and so on, and because of adopting the control of automation, the additional errors which are caused by human are avoided. The calibration system can be used for spectral calibration of other imaging spectrometers whose structures are similar to PGP.

  9. Rat brain imaging using full field optical coherence microscopy with short multimode fiber probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Manabu; Saito, Daisuke; Kurotani, Reiko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Nishidate, Izumi

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrated FF OCM(full field optical coherence microscopy) using an ultrathin forward-imaging SMMF (short multimode fiber) probe of 50 μm core diameter, 125 μm diameter, and 7.4 mm length, which is a typical graded-index multimode fiber for optical communications. The axial resolution was measured to be 2.20 μm, which is close to the calculated axial resolution of 2.06 μm. The lateral resolution was evaluated to be 4.38 μm using a test pattern. Assuming that the FWHM of the contrast is the DOF (depth of focus), the DOF of the signal is obtained at 36 μm and that of the OCM is 66 μm. The contrast of the OCT images was 6.1 times higher than that of the signal images due to the coherence gate. After an euthanasia the rat brain was resected and cut at 2.6mm tail from Bregma. Contacting SMMF to the primary somatosensory cortex and the agranular insular cortex of ex vivo brain, OCM images of the brain were measured 100 times with 2μm step. 3D OCM images of the brain were measured, and internal structure information was obtained. The feasibility of an SMMF as an ultrathin forward-imaging probe in full-field OCM has been demonstrated.

  10. Monitoring bolt torque levels through signal processing of full-field ultrasonic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Colin; Yeager, Michael; Todd, Michael; Lee, Jung-Ryul

    2014-03-01

    Using full-field ultrasonic guided wave data can provide a wealth of information on the state of a structure through a detailed characterization of its wave propagation properties. However, the need for appropriate feature selection and quantified metrics for making rigorous assessments of the structural state is in no way lessened by the density of information. In this study, a simple steel bolted connection with two bolts is monitored for bolt loosening. The full-field data were acquired using a scanning-laser-generated ultrasound system with a single surface-mounted sensor. Such laser systems have many advantages that make them attractive for nondestructive evaluation, including their high-speed, high spatial resolution, and the ability to scan large areas of in-service structures. In order to characterize the relationship between bolt torque and the resulting wavefield in this specimen, the bolt torque in each of the bolts is independently varied from fully tightened to fully loosened in several steps. First, qualitative observations about the changes in the wavefield are presented. Next, an approach to quantifying the wave transmission through the bolted joint is discussed. Finally, a method of monitoring the bolt torque using the ultrasonic data is demonstrated.

  11. Robust full-field measurement considering rotation using digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rong; Qian, Hao; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2016-10-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) has been widely accepted as a method for displacement and strain measurement and is applied in a variety of engineering fields. Most DIC algorithms encounter errors in measuring the deformation in conditions that involve rotation since they are designed without considering rotation of the deformed object. In this paper, a robust and automated DIC method capable of determining full-field displacement and strain components with random rotations has been presented. The algorithm starts with the determination of the initial position of the seed point in the integer-pixel domain. An approximate rotational angle between the reference and the deformed subset is estimated using an automated feature matching technology. A two-step Newton-Raphson algorithm has been developed for optimizing a suite of variables including displacement, strain and the rotational angle to achieve subpixel accuracy. A reliable propagation scheme, which enables rapid determination of the initial guess for full-field analysis is also proposed. Results from numerical simulations are used to validate the feasibility of the proposed DIC method. An application to 3-point bending with large deflection shows that the algorithm can be employed to measure displacement or strain parameters of the deformed object with arbitrary angles of rotation.

  12. Surface mapping of field-induced piezoelectric strain at elevated temperature employing full-field interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Tim; Quast, Tatjana; Bartl, Guido; Schmitz-Kempen, Thorsten; Weaver, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric actuators and sensors are widely used for flow control valves, including diesel injectors, ultrasound generation, optical positioning, printing, pumps, and locks. Degradation and failure of material and electrical properties at high temperature typically limits these applications to operating temperatures below 200°C, based on the ubiquitous Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 ceramic. There are, however, many applications in sectors such as automotive, aerospace, energy and process control, and oil and gas, where the ability to operate at higher temperatures would open up new markets for piezoelectric actuation. Presented here is a review of recent progress and initial results toward a European effort to develop measurement techniques to characterize high-temperature materials. Full-field, multi-wavelength absolute length interferometry has, for the first time, been used to map the electric-field-induced piezoelectric strain across the surface of a PZT ceramic. The recorded variation as a function of temperature has been evaluated against a newly developed commercial single-beam system. Conventional interferometry allows measurement of the converse piezoelectric effect with high precision and resolution, but is often limited to a single point, average measurement and to limited sample environments because of optical aberrations in varying atmospheres. Here, the full-field technique allows the entire surface to be analyzed for strain and, in a bespoke sample chamber, for elevated temperatures.

  13. High-Bandwidth Dynamic Full-Field Profilometry for Nano-Scale Characterization of MEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L-C [Graduate Institute of Automation Technology, National Taipei University of Technology, 1 Sec. 3 Chung-Hsiao East Rd., Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y-T [Graduate Institute of Automation Technology, National Taipei University of Technology, 1 Sec. 3 Chung-Hsiao East Rd., Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Chang, P-B [Graduate Institute of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, 1 Sec. 3 Chung-Hsiao East Rd., Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China)

    2006-10-15

    The article describes an innovative optical interferometric methodology to delivery dynamic surface profilometry with a measurement bandwidth up to 10MHz or higher and a vertical resolution up to 1 nm. Previous work using stroboscopic microscopic interferometry for dynamic characterization of micro (opto)electromechanical systems (M(O)EMS) has been limited in measurement bandwidth mainly within a couple of MHz. For high resonant mode analysis, the stroboscopic light pulse is insufficiently short to capture the moving fringes from dynamic motion of the detected structure. In view of this need, a microscopic prototype based on white-light stroboscopic interferometry with an innovative light superposition strategy was developed to achieve dynamic full-field profilometry with a high measurement bandwidth up to 10MHz or higher. The system primarily consists of an optical microscope, on which a Mirau interferometric objective embedded with a piezoelectric vertical translator, a high-power LED light module with dual operation modes and light synchronizing electronics unit are integrated. A micro cantilever beam used in AFM was measured to verify the system capability in accurate characterisation of dynamic behaviours of the device. The full-field seventh-mode vibration at a vibratory frequency of 3.7MHz can be fully characterized and nano-scale vertical measurement resolution as well as tens micrometers of vertical measurement range can be performed.

  14. Digital image correlation for full-field time-resolved assessment of arterial stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Adriaan; Soons, Joris; Heuten, Hilde; Ennekens, Guy; Goovaerts, Inge; Vrints, Christiaan; Lava, Pascal; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arterial system is a very important parameter to evaluate cardiovascular health. Currently, however, there is no golden standard for PWV measurement. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used for full-field time-resolved assessment of displacement, velocity, acceleration, and strains of the skin in the neck directly above the common carotid artery. By assessing these parameters, propagation of the pulse wave could be tracked, leading to a new method for PWV detection based on DIC. The method was tested on five healthy subjects. As a means of validation, PWV was measured with ultrasound (US) as well. Measured PWV values were between 3.68 and 5.19 m/s as measured with DIC and between 5.14 and 6.58 m/s as measured with US, with a maximum absolute difference of 2.78 m/s between the two methods. DIC measurements of the neck region can serve as a test base for determining a robust strategy for PWV detection, they can serve as reference for three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models, or they may even evolve into a screening method of their own. Moreover, full-field, time-resolved DIC can be adapted for other applications in biomechanics.

  15. Full-field dye concentration measurement within saturated/unsaturated thin slabs of porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, D.L. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Hydrology; Glass, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents a full-field dye concentration measurement technique that extends our experimental capabilities to the measurement of transient dye concentration fields within steady state flow fields under unsaturated or saturated conditions. Simple light absorption theory provides a basis for translating images into high resolution dye concentration fields. A series of dye pulse experiments that demonstrate the combined use of the full-field saturation and dye concentration techniques was conducted at four different degrees of saturation. Each of these experimental sequences was evaluated with respect to mass balance, the results being within 5% of the known dye mass input. An image windowing technique allowed us to see increased dispersion due to decreasing moisture content, tailing of concentration at the rear of the dye pulse and slight velocity changes of the dispersive front due to changes in moisture content. The exceptional resolution of dye concentration in space and time provided by this laboratory technique allows systematic experimentation for examining basic processes affecting solute transport within saturated/unsaturated porous media. Future challenges for this work will be to use these techniques to analyze more complex systems involving heterogeneities, scaling laws, and detailed investigations of the relationship between transverse and longitudinal dispersion in unsaturated media.

  16. Reconstructing material properties by deconvolution of full-field measurement images: The conductivity case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellis, Cédric; Trabelsi, Manel; Frémy, Flavien

    2017-03-01

    This study concerns the reconstruction of material parameters from full-field measurements. In this context the typical available data is a set of digital images that is seldom handled as such when solving the inverse problem. Therefore, this work investigates a direct method to compute constitutive parameter maps from full-field measurement images. Within the prototypical framework of the periodic conductivity model, the starting point for the proposed approach is the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, which is satisfied by the fields measured internally. This integral equation is reinterpreted as a linear convolution model for the sought conductivity field. Considering that multiple experiments might be available and then combined, this problem is solved in the least-square sense. To do so, the Krylov subspace-based LSQR algorithm is employed. Full advantage is taken of the convenient expression of the featured Green’s function in Fourier space and of the intensive use of the fast Fourier transform (FFT). Moreover, a spectral-based filtering regularization scheme is implemented to tackle noisy data. Overall, the proposed reconstruction algorithm only handles image-like quantities in an efficient mesh-free approach. The performance of the method is assessed on a set of synthetic 2D numerical examples both for isotropic and anisotropic material configurations.

  17. Origami of thick panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Peng, Rui; You, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    Origami patterns, including the rigid origami patterns in which flat inflexible sheets are joined by creases, are primarily created for zero-thickness sheets. In order to apply them to fold structures such as roofs, solar panels, and space mirrors, for which thickness cannot be disregarded, various methods have been suggested. However, they generally involve adding materials to or offsetting panels away from the idealized sheet without altering the kinematic model used to simulate folding. We develop a comprehensive kinematic synthesis for rigid origami of thick panels that differs from the existing kinematic model but is capable of reproducing motions identical to that of zero-thickness origami. The approach, proven to be effective for typical origami, can be readily applied to fold real engineering structures.

  18. A domain decomposition approach for full-field measurements based identification of local elastic parameters

    KAUST Repository

    Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-03-01

    We propose a domain decomposition formalism specifically designed for the identification of local elastic parameters based on full-field measurements. This technique is made possible by a multi-scale implementation of the constitutive compatibility method. Contrary to classical approaches, the constitutive compatibility method resolves first some eigenmodes of the stress field over the structure rather than directly trying to recover the material properties. A two steps micro/macro reconstruction of the stress field is performed: a Dirichlet identification problem is solved first over every subdomain, the macroscopic equilibrium is then ensured between the subdomains in a second step. We apply the method to large linear elastic 2D identification problems to efficiently produce estimates of the material properties at a much lower computational cost than classical approaches.

  19. Numerical correction of coherence gate in full-field swept-source interference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenyuk, Anton A; Ryabukho, Vladimir P

    2012-07-01

    A big problem in low-coherence interference microscopy is the degradation of the coherence signal caused by shift of the angular and temporal spectrum gates. It limits the depth of field in confocal optical coherence microscopy and degrades images of sample inner structure in most interference microscopy techniques. To overcome this problem we propose numerical correction of the coherence gate in application to full-field swept-source interference microscopy. The proposed technique allows three-dimensional sample imaging without mechanical movement of the microscope components and is also capable of determining separately the geometrical thickness and the refractive index of the sample layers, when the sample contains a transversal pattern. The applicability of the proposed technique is verified with numerical simulation.

  20. Classification and analysis of human ovarian tissue using full field optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Sreyankar; Sanders, Melinda; Zhu, Quing

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a full field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) system was used to analyze and classify normal and malignant human ovarian tissue. 14 ovarian tissue samples (7 normal, 7 malignant) were imaged with the FFOCT system and five features were extracted by analyzing the normalized image histogram from 56 FFOCT images, based on the differences in the morphology of the normal and malignant tissue samples. A generalized linear model (GLM) classifier was trained using 36 images, and sensitivity of 95.3% and specificity of 91.1% was obtained. 20 images were used to test the model, and a sensitivity of 91.6% and specificity of 87.7% was obtained.

  1. Applications of Hard X-ray Full-Field Transmission X-ray Microscopy at SSRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Andrews, J. C.; Meirer, F.; Mehta, A.; Gil, S. Carrasco; Sciau, P.; Mester, Z.; Pianetta, P.

    2011-09-01

    State-of-the-art hard x-ray full-field transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) at beamline 6-2C of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource has been applied to various research fields including biological, environmental, and material studies. With the capability of imaging a 32-micron field-of-view at 30-nm resolution using both absorption mode and Zernike phase contrast, the 3D morphology of yeast cells grown in gold-rich media was investigated. Quantitative evaluation of the absorption coefficient was performed for mercury nanoparticles in alfalfa roots exposed to mercury. Combining XANES and TXM, we also performed XANES-imaging on an ancient pottery sample from the Roman pottery workshop at LaGraufesenque (Aveyron).

  2. Full-field hard x-ray microscopy with interdigitated silicon lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Simons, Hugh; Michael-Lindhard, Jonas; Jensen, Flemming; Hansen, Ole; Detlefs, Carsten; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2015-01-01

    Full-field x-ray microscopy using x-ray objectives has become a mainstay of the biological and materials sciences. However, the inefficiency of existing objectives at x-ray energies above 15 keV has limited the technique to weakly absorbing or two-dimensional (2D) samples. Here, we show that significant gains in numerical aperture and spatial resolution may be possible at hard x-ray energies by using silicon-based optics comprising 'interdigitated' refractive silicon lenslets that alternate their focus between the horizontal and vertical directions. By capitalizing on the nano-manufacturing processes available to silicon, we show that it is possible to overcome the inherent inefficiencies of silicon-based optics and interdigitated geometries. As a proof-of-concept of Si-based interdigitated objectives, we demonstrate a prototype interdigitated lens with a resolution of ~255 nm at 17 keV.

  3. A high-speed full-field profilometry with coded laser strips projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanliang; Zhou, Xiang; Jin, Rui; Xu, Changda; Li, Dong

    2017-06-01

    Line structure light measurement needs accurate mechanical movement device and high -frame-rate camera, which is difficult to realize. We propose a high-speed full-field profilometry to solve these difficult ies, using coded laser strips projected by a MEMS scanning mirror. The mirror could take place of the mechanical movement device with its high speed and accurate. Besides, a method with gray code and color code is used to decrease the frames number of projection, retaining the advantage of line structure light measurement. In the experiment, we use a laser MEMS scanner and two color cameras. The laser MEMS scanner projects coded stripes, with two color cameras collecting the modulated pattern on the measured object. The color cameras compose a stereo vision system so that the three-dimensional data is reconstructed according to triangulation.

  4. Full-field implementation of a perfect eavesdropper on a quantum cryptography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Ilja; Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Skaar, Johannes; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Makarov, Vadim

    2011-06-14

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows two remote parties to grow a shared secret key. Its security is founded on the principles of quantum mechanics, but in reality it significantly relies on the physical implementation. Technological imperfections of QKD systems have been previously explored, but no attack on an established QKD connection has been realized so far. Here we show the first full-field implementation of a complete attack on a running QKD connection. An installed eavesdropper obtains the entire 'secret' key, while none of the parameters monitored by the legitimate parties indicate a security breach. This confirms that non-idealities in physical implementations of QKD can be fully practically exploitable, and must be given increased scrutiny if quantum cryptography is to become highly secure.

  5. Study of Wood Plastic Composites elastic behaviour using full field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mbarek, T.; Robert, L.; Hugot, F.; Orteu, J. J.; Sammouda, H.; Graciaa, A.; Charrier, B.

    2010-06-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties and microstructure of HDPE/wood fibre composites are investigated. The four-point bending and tensile behaviour of Wood Plastic Composite (WPC) with or without additive are studied by using full-field strain measurements by 3-D Digital Image Correlation (3-D DIC). A non-linear behaviour is shown. The modulus of elasticity (MOE) is calculated as the tangent at zero strain of a Maxwell-Bingham model fitted onto experimental data. Four-point bending tests are analyzed thanks to the spatial standard deviation of the longitudinal strain field to determine the degree of heterogeneity. Cyclic tensile tests have been performed in order to analyze the damage of the material. Moreover, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is used to characterize the morphology of the wood fibre/HDPE matrix interface for specimens with maleic anhydride modified polyethylene additive (MAPE).

  6. Study of Wood Plastic Composites elastic behaviour using full field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciaa A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the mechanical properties and microstructure of HDPE/wood fibre composites are investigated. The four-point bending and tensile behaviour of Wood Plastic Composite (WPC with or without additive are studied by using full-field strain measurements by 3-D Digital Image Correlation (3-D DIC. A non-linear behaviour is shown. The modulus of elasticity (MOE is calculated as the tangent at zero strain of a Maxwell-Bingham model fitted onto experimental data. Four-point bending tests are analyzed thanks to the spatial standard deviation of the longitudinal strain field to determine the degree of heterogeneity. Cyclic tensile tests have been performed in order to analyze the damage of the material. Moreover, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM is used to characterize the morphology of the wood fibre/HDPE matrix interface for specimens with maleic anhydride modified polyethylene additive (MAPE.

  7. Full-field laser Doppler imaging and its physiological significance for tissue blood perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binzoni, T.; Van DeVille, D.

    2008-12-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations for a semi-infinite medium representing a skeletal muscle tissue, it is demonstrated that the zero- and first-order moments of the power spectrum for a representative pixel of a full-field laser-Doppler imager behave differently from classical laser-Doppler flowmetry. In particular, the zero-order moment has a very low sensitivity to tissue blood volume changes, and it becomes completely insensitive if the probability for a photon to interact with a moving red blood cell is above 0.05. It is shown that the loss in sensitivity is due to the strong forward scatter of the propagating photons in biological tissues (i.e., anisotropy factor g = 0.9). The first-order moment is linearly related to the root mean square of the red blood cell velocity (the Brownian component), and there is also a positive relationship with tissue blood volume. The most common physiological interpretation of the first-order moment is as tissue blood volume times expectation of the blood velocity (in probabilistic terms). In this sense, the use of the first-order moment appears to be a reasonable approach for qualitative real-time blood flow monitoring, but it does not allow us to obtain information on blood velocity or volume independently. Finally, it is shown that the spatial and temporal resolution trade-off imposed by the CMOS detectors, used in full-field laser-Doppler hardware, may lead to measurements that vary oppositely with the underlying physiological quantities. Further improvements on detectors' sampling rate will overcome this limitation.

  8. Multimodal full-field optical coherence tomography on biological tissue: toward all optical digital pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, F.; Dalimier, E.; Vermeulen, P.; Fragola, A.; Boccara, A. C.

    2012-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an efficient technique for in-depth optical biopsy of biological tissues, relying on interferometric selection of ballistic photons. Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) is an alternative approach to Fourier-domain OCT (spectral or swept-source), allowing parallel acquisition of en-face optical sections. Using medium numerical aperture objective, it is possible to reach an isotropic resolution of about 1x1x1 ìm. After stitching a grid of acquired images, FF-OCT gives access to the architecture of the tissue, for both macroscopic and microscopic structures, in a non-invasive process, which makes the technique particularly suitable for applications in pathology. Here we report a multimodal approach to FF-OCT, combining two Full-Field techniques for collecting a backscattered endogeneous OCT image and a fluorescence exogeneous image in parallel. Considering pathological diagnosis of cancer, visualization of cell nuclei is of paramount importance. OCT images, even for the highest resolution, usually fail to identify individual nuclei due to the nature of the optical contrast used. We have built a multimodal optical microscope based on the combination of FF-OCT and Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM). We used x30 immersion objectives, with a numerical aperture of 1.05, allowing for sub-micron transverse resolution. Fluorescent staining of nuclei was obtained using specific fluorescent dyes such as acridine orange. We present multimodal images of healthy and pathological skin tissue at various scales. This instrumental development paves the way for improvements of standard pathology procedures, as a faster, non sacrificial, operator independent digital optical method compared to frozen sections.

  9. Full-field laser-Doppler imaging and its physiological significance for tissue blood perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binzoni, T [Departement des Neurosciences Fondamentales, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Ville, D van de [Biomedical Imaging Group, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland)], E-mail: Tiziano.Binzoni@medecine.unige.ch

    2008-12-07

    Using Monte Carlo simulations for a semi-infinite medium representing a skeletal muscle tissue, it is demonstrated that the zero- and first-order moments of the power spectrum for a representative pixel of a full-field laser-Doppler imager behave differently from classical laser-Doppler flowmetry. In particular, the zero-order moment has a very low sensitivity to tissue blood volume changes, and it becomes completely insensitive if the probability for a photon to interact with a moving red blood cell is above 0.05. It is shown that the loss in sensitivity is due to the strong forward scatter of the propagating photons in biological tissues (i.e., anisotropy factor g = 0.9). The first-order moment is linearly related to the root mean square of the red blood cell velocity (the Brownian component), and there is also a positive relationship with tissue blood volume. The most common physiological interpretation of the first-order moment is as tissue blood volume times expectation of the blood velocity (in probabilistic terms). In this sense, the use of the first-order moment appears to be a reasonable approach for qualitative real-time blood flow monitoring, but it does not allow us to obtain information on blood velocity or volume independently. Finally, it is shown that the spatial and temporal resolution trade-off imposed by the CMOS detectors, used in full-field laser-Doppler hardware, may lead to measurements that vary oppositely with the underlying physiological quantities. Further improvements on detectors' sampling rate will overcome this limitation.

  10. High-resolution imaging of biological tissue with full-field optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yue; Gao, Wanrong

    2015-03-01

    A new full-field optical coherence tomography system with high-resolution has been developed for imaging of cells and tissues. Compared with other FF-OCT (Full-field optical coherence tomography, FF-OCT) systems illuminated with optical fiber bundle, the improved Köhler illumination arrangement with a halogen lamp was used in the proposed FF-OCT system. High numerical aperture microscopic objectives were used for imaging and a piezoelectric ceramic transducer (PZT) was used for phase-shifting. En-face tomographic images can be obtained by applying the five-step phase-shifting algorithm to a series of interferometric images which are recorded by a smart camera. Three-dimensional images can be generated from these tomographic images. Imaging of the chip of Intel Pentium 4 processor demonstrated the ultrahigh resolution of the system (lateral resolution is 0.8μm ), which approaches the theoretical resolution 0.7 μm× 0.5 μm (lateral × axial). En-face images of cells of onion show an excellent performance of the system in generating en-face images of biological tissues. Then, unstained pig stomach was imaged as a tissue and gastric pits could be easily recognized using FF-OCT system. Our study provides evidence for the potential ability of FFOCT in identifying gastric pits from pig stomach tissue. Finally, label-free and unstained ex vivo human liver tissues from both normal and tumor were imaged with this FFOCT system. The results show that the setup has the potential for medical diagnosis applications such liver cancer diagnosis.

  11. Optical biopsy on head and neck tissue using full-field OCT: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leeuw, Frédéric; Latrive, Anne; Casiraghi, Odile; Ferchiou, Malek; Harms, Fabrice; Boccara, Claude; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne

    2014-03-01

    Here we evaluate the clinical value of Full-Field OCT imaging in the management of patients with Head and Neck cancers by making a reliable histological diagnosis on FFOCT images produced during preoperative procedure. FFOCT performs a true "virtual extemporaneous exam" that we want to compare to the gold standard (extemporaneous and conventional histology with H and E staining). This new optical technology could be useful when diagnosing a lesion, cancerous or precancerous, or at the time of its surgical management. Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography virtually slices the tissue using white light interferometry to produce in-depth 2D images with an isotropic resolution around 1 micrometer. With such a high resolution FFOCT systems produce "optical biopsy" images that are similar to that obtained with classical histology procedures, but without any staining and in only a few minutes. We imaged freshly excised samples from patients, of mouth, tongue, epiglottis and larynx tissues, both healthy and cancerous. FFOCT images were acquired and later compared with histology of the same samples. Common features were identified and characteristics of each tissue type were matched in order to form an image atlas for pathologist training. We were able to identify indicators of tumors such as heterogeneities in cell distribution, surrounding stroma, anomalous keratinization… In conclusion, FFOCT is a fast, non-invasive, non-destructive imaging tool that can be inserted into the pathology lab workflow and can provide a quick assessment of microscopic tissue architecture and content. Furthermore we are developing a similar system with a rigid endoscopic probe in order to do in vivo and in situ high-resolution imaging. Our probe could thus guide the surgeon in real time before and during excision and ensure a more precise gesture.

  12. Extracting full-field dynamic strain response of a rotating wind turbine using photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqersad, Javad; Poozesh, Peyman; Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Health monitoring of wind turbines is typically performed using conventional sensors (e.g. strain-gages and accelerometers) that are usually mounted to the nacelle or gearbox. Although many wind turbines stop operating due to blade failures, there are typically few to no sensor mounted on the blades. Placing sensors on the rotating parts of the structure is a challenge due to the wiring and data transmission constraints. Within the current work, an approach to monitor full-field dynamic response of rotating structures (e.g. wind turbine blades or helicopter rotors) is developed and experimentally verified. A wind turbine rotor was used as the test structure and was mounted to a block and horizontally placed on the ground. A pair of bearings connected to the rotor shaft allowed the turbine to freely spin along the shaft. Several optical targets were mounted to the blades and a pair of high-speed cameras was used to monitor the dynamics of the spinning turbine. Displacements of the targets during rotation were measured using three-dimensional point tracking. The point tracking technique measured both rigid body displacement and flexible deformation of the blades at target locations. While the structure is rotating, only flap displacements of optical targets (displacements out of the rotation plane) were used in strain prediction process. The measured displacements were expanded and applied to the finite element model of the turbine to extract full-field dynamic strain on the structure. The proposed approach enabled the prediction of dynamic response on the outer surface as well as within the inner points of the structure where no other sensor could be easily mounted. In order to validate the proposed approach, the predicted strain was compared to strain measured at four locations on the spinning blades using a wireless strain-gage system.

  13. Correlation between full-field and multifocal VEPs in optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klistorner, Alexander; Fraser, Clare; Garrick, Raymond; Graham, Stuart; Arvind, Hemamalini

    2008-01-01

    To compare performance of multi-focal and full-field Visual Evoked Potentials (VEP) in patients with optic neuritis (ON). 26 patients with unilateral ON were enrolled. Multi-focal VEP (MF VEP) was recorded using AccuMaptrade mark system. Four bipolar channels were analysed. Full-field VEP (FF VEP) was performed according to ISCEV standard using ESPION with frontal-occipital electrode placement. Pattern-reversal protocol was implemented with check size of 60' and field of view of 30 degrees . For both tests amplitude and latency of affected eye were statistically different from non-affected eye. The asymmetry of amplitude and latency between two eyes was also very similar for both tests. Averaged Relative Asymmetry Coefficient of amplitude (RAC) for the FF VEP was 0.10 +/- 0.15 and for the MF VEP was 0.12 +/- 0.12 (P = 0.21, paired t-test). Averaged latency difference between affected and non-affected eyes was 13.0 +/- 12 ms for FF and 14.1 +/- 11.1 ms for MF VEPs (P = 0.14, paired t-test). Coefficient of correlation (r) of p100 component of the FF VEP and averaged MF VEP was 0.60 (P < 0.0001) for amplitude and 0.79 (P < 0.0001) for latency. Correlation improved when amplitude and latency asymmetry between two eyes was analysed (r = 0.81 and r = 0.92 respectively). Overall 73% of affected eyes were identified as abnormal by amplitude and/or latency of the FF VEP and 89% was considered abnormal when MF VEP was used. Analysis of individual cases revealed superior performance of MF VEP in detecting small or peripheral defects.

  14. Applying a Bayesian Approach to Identification of Orthotropic Elastic Constants from Full Field Displacement Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogu, C.; Yin, W.; Haftka, R.; Ifju, P.; Molimard, J.; Le Riche, R.; Vautrin, A.

    2010-06-01

    A major challenge in the identification of material properties is handling different sources of uncertainty in the experiment and the modelling of the experiment for estimating the resulting uncertainty in the identified properties. Numerous improvements in identification methods have provided increasingly accurate estimates of various material properties. However, characterizing the uncertainty in the identified properties is still relatively crude. Different material properties obtained from a single test are not obtained with the same confidence. Typically the highest uncertainty is associated with respect to properties to which the experiment is the most insensitive. In addition, the uncertainty in different properties can be strongly correlated, so that obtaining only variance estimates may be misleading. A possible approach for handling the different sources of uncertainty and estimating the uncertainty in the identified properties is the Bayesian method. This method was introduced in the late 1970s in the context of identification [1] and has been applied since to different problems, notably identification of elastic constants from plate vibration experiments [2]-[4]. The applications of the method to these classical pointwise tests involved only a small number of measurements (typically ten natural frequencies in the previously cited vibration test) which facilitated the application of the Bayesian approach. For identifying elastic constants, full field strain or displacement measurements provide a high number of measured quantities (one measurement per image pixel) and hence a promise of smaller uncertainties in the properties. However, the high number of measurements represents also a major computational challenge in applying the Bayesian approach to full field measurements. To address this challenge we propose an approach based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of the full fields in order to drastically reduce their dimensionality. POD is

  15. Applying a Bayesian Approach to Identification of Orthotropic Elastic Constants from Full Field Displacement Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Riche R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in the identification of material properties is handling different sources of uncertainty in the experiment and the modelling of the experiment for estimating the resulting uncertainty in the identified properties. Numerous improvements in identification methods have provided increasingly accurate estimates of various material properties. However, characterizing the uncertainty in the identified properties is still relatively crude. Different material properties obtained from a single test are not obtained with the same confidence. Typically the highest uncertainty is associated with respect to properties to which the experiment is the most insensitive. In addition, the uncertainty in different properties can be strongly correlated, so that obtaining only variance estimates may be misleading. A possible approach for handling the different sources of uncertainty and estimating the uncertainty in the identified properties is the Bayesian method. This method was introduced in the late 1970s in the context of identification [1] and has been applied since to different problems, notably identification of elastic constants from plate vibration experiments [2]-[4]. The applications of the method to these classical pointwise tests involved only a small number of measurements (typically ten natural frequencies in the previously cited vibration test which facilitated the application of the Bayesian approach. For identifying elastic constants, full field strain or displacement measurements provide a high number of measured quantities (one measurement per image pixel and hence a promise of smaller uncertainties in the properties. However, the high number of measurements represents also a major computational challenge in applying the Bayesian approach to full field measurements. To address this challenge we propose an approach based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD of the full fields in order to drastically reduce their

  16. Metabolic Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... basic metabolic panel (BMP) and comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). The BMP checks your blood sugar, calcium, and ... as creatinine to check your kidney function. The CMP includes all of those tests, as well as ...

  17. Panel Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brænder, Morten; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh

    2014-01-01

    Based on our 2013-article, ”Does Deployment to War Affect Soldiers' Public Service Motivation – A Panel Study of Soldiers Before and After their Service in Afghanistan”, we present Panel Analysis as a methodological discipline. Panels consist of multiple units of analysis, observed at two or more...

  18. 20-kW solar photovoltaic flat-panel power system for an uninterruptible power-system load in El Paso, Texas. Phase II. System fabrication. Final report October 1, 1979-May 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risser, V.V.

    1981-12-01

    The system plans, construction, integration and test, and performance evaluation are discussed for the photovoltaic power supply at the Newman Power Station in El Paso, Texas. The system consists of 64 parallel-connected panels, each panel containing nine series-connected photovoltaic modules. The system is connected, through power monitoring equipment, to an existing DC bus that supplies uninterruptible power to a computer that controls the power generating equipment. The site is described and possible environmental hazards are assessed. Site preparation and the installation of the photovoltaic panels, electrical cabling, and instrumentation subsystems are described. System testing includes initial system checkout, module performance test, control system test. A training program for operators and maintenance personnel is briefly described, including visual aids. Performance data collection and analysis are described, and actual data are compared with a computer simulation. System drawings are included. (LEW)

  19. Panel Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brænder, Morten; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh

    2014-01-01

    Based on our 2013-article, ”Does Deployment to War Affect Soldiers' Public Service Motivation – A Panel Study of Soldiers Before and After their Service in Afghanistan”, we present Panel Analysis as a methodological discipline. Panels consist of multiple units of analysis, observed at two or more...... in research settings where it is not possible to distribute units of analysis randomly or where the independent variables cannot be manipulated. The greatest disadvantage in regard to using panel studies is that data may be difficult to obtain. This is most clearly vivid in regard to the use of panel surveys...

  20. Full-field OCT for fast diagnostic of head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leeuw, Frederic; Casiraghi, Odile; Ben Lakhdar, Aïcha; Abbaci, Muriel; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne

    2015-02-01

    Full-Field OCT (FFOCT) produces optical slices of tissue using white light interferometry providing in-depth 2D images, with an isotropic resolution around 1 micrometer. These optical biopsy images are similar to those obtained with established histological procedures, but without tissue preparation and within few minutes. This technology could be useful when diagnosing a lesion or at the time of its surgical management. Here we evaluate the clinical value of FFOCT imaging in the management of patients with Head and Neck cancers by assessing the accuracy of the diagnosis done on FFOCT images from resected specimen. FFOCT images from Head and Neck samples were first compared to the gold standard (HES-conventional histology). An image atlas dedicated to the training of pathologists was built and diagnosis criteria were identified. Then, we performed a morphological correlative study: both healthy and cancerous samples from patients who undergo Head and Neck surgery of oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx were imaged. Images were interpreted in a random way by two pathologists and the FFOCT based diagnostics were compared with HES (gold standard) of the same samples. Here we present preliminary results showing that FFOCT provides a quick assessment of tissue architecture at microscopic level that could guide surgeons for tumor margin delineation during intraoperative procedure.

  1. Quality assessment of reverse engineering process based on full-field true-3D optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Sitnik, Robert

    2000-08-01

    In the paper the sequential steps of reverse engineering based on the data gathered by full-field optical system are discussed. Each step is concerned from the point of view of its influence on the final quality of the shape of manufactured object. At first the modern shape measurement system based on the combination of fringe projection, Grey code and experimental calibration is presented. The system enables the determination of absolute coordinates of the object measured from many directions. The dependence of the quality of the cloud of points on the type of object and the measurement procedure is discussed. Then the methods of transferring the experimental data into CAD/CAM/CAE system are presented. The quality of the virtual object in the form of closed triangular mesh is analyzed. Basing on this virtual object the copy of initial body is produced and measured. The accuracy of the object manufactured is determined and the main sources of errors are discussed. The modifications of the system and algorithms that minimize the errors are proposed. The reverse engineering sequence is presented is illustrated by several examples.

  2. Actinic imaging of native and programmed defects on a full-field mask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.; Fontaine, B. La; Tchikoulaeva, A.; Holfeld, C.

    2010-03-12

    We describe the imaging and characterization of native defects on a full field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask, using several reticle and wafer inspection modes. Mask defect images recorded with the SEMA TECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), an EUV-wavelength (13.4 nm) actinic microscope, are compared with mask and printed-wafer images collected with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and deep ultraviolet (DUV) inspection tools. We observed that defects that appear to be opaque in the SEM can be highly transparent to EUV light, and inversely, defects that are mostly transparent to the SEM can be highly opaque to EUV. The nature and composition of these defects, whether they appear on the top surface, within the multilayer coating, or on the substrate as buried bumps or pits, influences both their significance when printed, and their detectability with the available techniques. Actinic inspection quantitatively predicts the characteristics of printed defect images in ways that may not be possible with non-EUV techniques. As a quantitative example, we investigate the main structural characteristics of a buried pit defect based on EUV through-focus imaging.

  3. Numerical focusing methods for full field OCT: a comparison based on a common signal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Drexler, Wolfgang; Leitgeb, Rainer A

    2014-06-30

    In this paper a theoretical model of the full field swept source (FF SS) OCT signal is presented based on the angular spectrum wave propagation approach which accounts for the defocus error with imaging depth. It is shown that using the same theoretical model of the signal, numerical defocus correction methods based on a simple forward model (FM) and inverse scattering (IS), the latter being similar to interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM), can be derived. Both FM and IS are compared quantitatively with sub-aperture based digital adaptive optics (DAO). FM has the least numerical complexity, and is the fastest in terms of computational speed among the three. SNR improvement of more than 10 dB is shown for all the three methods over a sample depth of 1.5 mm. For a sample with non-uniform refractive index with depth, FM and IS both improved the depth of focus (DOF) by a factor of 7x for an imaging NA of 0.1. DAO performs the best in case of non-uniform refractive index with respect to DOF improvement by 11x.

  4. Adaptive automatic data analysis in full-field fringe-pattern-based optical metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusiak, Maciej; Patorski, Krzysztof; Sluzewski, Lukasz; Pokorski, Krzysztof; Sunderland, Zofia

    2016-12-01

    Fringe pattern processing and analysis is an important task of full-field optical measurement techniques like interferometry, digital holography, structural illumination and moiré. In this contribution we present several adaptive automatic data analysis solutions based on the notion of Hilbert-Huang transform for measurand retrieval via fringe pattern phase and amplitude demodulation. The Hilbert-Huang transform consists of 2D empirical mode decomposition algorithm and Hilbert spiral transform analysis. Empirical mode decomposition adaptively dissects a meaningful number of same-scale subimages from the analyzed pattern - it is a data-driven method. Appropriately managing this set of unique subimages results in a very powerful fringe pre-filtering tool. Phase/amplitude demodulation is performed using Hilbert spiral transform aided by the local fringe orientation estimator. We describe several optical measurement techniques for technical and biological objects characterization basing on the especially tailored Hilbert-Huang algorithm modifications for fringe pattern denoising, detrending and amplitude/phase demodulation.

  5. Imaging of non tumorous and tumorous human brain tissue with full-field optical coherence tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Assayag, Osnath; Devaux, Bertrand; Harms, Fabrice; Pallud, Johan; Chretien, Fabrice; Boccara, Claude; Varlet, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on neurosurgical samples from 18 patients to evaluate the use of Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) in brain tumor diagnosis. FF-OCT captures en face slices of tissue samples at 1\\mum resolution in 3D with a typical 200\\mum imaging depth. A 1cm2 specimen is scanned at a single depth and processed in about 5 minutes. This rapid imaging process is non-invasive and 30 requires neither contrast agent injection nor tissue preparation, which makes it particularly well suited to medical imaging applications. Temporal chronic epileptic parenchyma and brain tumors such as meningiomas, low- grade and high-grade gliomas, and choroid plexus papilloma were imaged. A subpopulation of neurons, myelin fibers and CNS vasculature were clearly identified. Cortex could be discriminated from white matter, but individual glial cells as astrocytes (normal or reactive) or oligodendrocytes were not observable. This study reports for the first time on the feasibility of using FF-OCT in a...

  6. Full-field AO-assisted OCT for high-resolution tomographic imaging of the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanc, M.; Lafaille, D.; Puget, P.; Lacombe, F.; Vabre, L.; Levecq, X.; Chateau, N.

    2006-02-01

    Since the advent of Adaptive Optics in ophthalmic instrumentation, several attempts for improving the performances of the existing observing techniques, either in imaging or tomography, have been made. For long, Adaptive Optics have proven its ability to restore high lateral resolution with the SLO or flood imaging, or more recently to enhance the interferometric contrast and hence, the sensitivity, of OCT. Nevertheless, the direct acquisition of en face tomographic images equivalent to horizontal optical sections of the retinal tissue is still the objective of intensive developments. We report here a new instrumental approach where a time domain full field OCT setup has been coupled with a double pass adaptive optics system, providing 300 x 300 x 4 m instantaneous optical sections of biological tissues. We will describe how the interferometric contrast is derived without any modulation of the optical path, thus giving access to targets as critical, because unstable, as the retinal tissue during in vivo ophthalmic examinations. The advantages of this new design, which benefits from the implementation of very recent deformable mirrors, featuring simultaneously a higher actuators density and a much larger stroke, will be discussed, and the ability of the system to accommodate for variable pupil sizes, thanks to wavefront sensing techniques optimized for ophthalmology, are commented. The performances of the system, in terms of X,Y,Z resolution, sensitivity, registration capability and / or image stabilisation are discussed and illustrated with results obtained in the laboratory and in clinical environment.

  7. Rapid full-field OCT assessment of clinical tissue specimens (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalimier, Eugénie; Harms, Fabrice; Brossollet, Charles; Benoit, Emilie; Martins, Franck; Boccara, Claude A.

    2016-03-01

    FFOCT (Full Field Optical Coherence Tomography) is a novel optical technology that gives access to very high resolution tomography images of biological tissues within minutes, non-invasively. This makes it an attractive tool to bridge the gap between medical imaging modalities (MRI, ultrasound, CT) used for cancer lesion identification or targeting and histological diagnosis. Clinical tissue specimens, such as surgical cancer margins or biopsies, can potentially be assessed rapidly, by the clinician, in the aim to help him decide on the course of action. A fast FFOCT prototype was built, that provides 1cm2 images with 1 µm resolution in 1 minute, and can accommodate samples up to 50mm diameter. Specific work was carried out to implement a large sample holder, high-speed image acquisition system, optimized scanning, and accelerated GPU tiles stitching. Results obtained on breast, urology, and digestive tissues show the efficiency of the technique for the detection of cancer on clinical tissue specimens, and reinforce the clinical relevance of the technique. The technical and clinical results show that the fast FFOCT system can successfully be used for a fast assessment of cancer excision margins or biopsies providing a very valuable tool in the clinical environment.

  8. Fast full-field OCT assessment of clinical tissue specimens (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalimier, Eugénie; Harms, Fabrice; Brossolet, Charles; Benoit, Emilie; Martins, Franck; Boccara, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) offers a non-invasive method of obtaining images of biological tissues at ultrahigh resolution (1µm in all 3 directions) approaching traditional histological sections. Previous clinical studies have shown the high efficiency of this imaging technique for the detection of cancer on various organs. This promises great potential of the technique for an ex-vivo quick analysis of surgical resections or biopsy specimens, in the aim to help the surgeon/radiologist decide on the course of action. Here we will present some of the latest technical developments on a FFOCT system which can produce 1cm2 images with 1 µm resolution in 1 minute. Larger samples, up to 50mm diameter, can also be imaged. Details on the large sample handling, high-speed image acquisition, optimized scanning, and accelerated GPU tiles stitching will be given. Results on the clinical applications for breast, urology, and digestive tissues will also be given. They highlight the relevance of the system characteristics for the detection of cancer on ex-vivo specimens. FFOCT now appears clearly as a very fast and non-destructive imaging technique that provides a quick assessment of the tissue morphology. With the benefit of both new technical developments and clinical validation, it turned into a mature technique to be implemented in the clinical environment. In particular, the technique holds potential for the fast ex-vivo analysis of excision margins or biopsies in the operating room.

  9. Hard X-ray Full Field Nano-imaging of Bone and Nanowires at SSRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Joy C.; Pianetta, Piero; Meirer, Florian; Chen, Jie; Almeida, Eduardo; van der Meulen, Marjolein C. H.; Alwood, Joshua S.; Lee, Cathy; Zhu, Jia; Cui, Yi

    2010-01-01

    A hard X-ray full field microscope from Xradia Inc. has been installed at SSRL on a 54-pole wiggler end station at beam line 6-2. It has been optimized to operate from 5–14 keV with resolution as high as 30 nm. High quality images are achieved using a vertical beam stabilizer and condenser scanner with high efficiency zone plates with 30 nm outermost zone width. The microscope has been used in Zernike phase contrast, available at 5.4 keV and 8 keV, as well as absorption contrast to image a variety of biological, environmental and materials samples. Calibration of the X-ray attenuation with crystalline apatite enabled quantification of bone density of plate-like and rod-like regions of mouse bone trabecula. 3D tomography of individual lacuna revealed the surrounding cell canaliculi and processes. 3D tomography of chiral branched PbSe nanowires showed orthogonal branches around a central nanowire. PMID:20871736

  10. From supersonic shear wave imaging to full-field optical coherence shear wave elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahas, Amir; Tanter, Mickaël; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Fink, Mathias; Claude Boccara, A.

    2013-12-01

    Elasticity maps of tissue have proved to be particularly useful in providing complementary contrast to ultrasonic imaging, e.g., for cancer diagnosis at the millimeter scale. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers an endogenous contrast based on singly backscattered optical waves. Adding complementary contrast to OCT images by recording elasticity maps could also be valuable in improving OCT-based diagnosis at the microscopic scale. Static elastography has been successfully coupled with full-field OCT (FF-OCT) in order to realize both micrometer-scale sectioning and elasticity maps. Nevertheless, static elastography presents a number of drawbacks, mainly when stiffness quantification is required. Here, we describe the combination of two methods: transient elastography, based on speed measurements of shear waves induced by ultrasonic radiation forces, and FF-OCT, an en face OCT approach using an incoherent light source. The use of an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner and an ultrafast camera working at 10,000 to 30,000 images/s made it possible to follow shear wave propagation with both modalities. As expected, FF-OCT is found to be much more sensitive than ultrafast ultrasound to tiny shear vibrations (a few nanometers and micrometers, respectively). Stiffness assessed in gel phantoms and an ex vivo rat brain by FF-OCT is found to be in good agreement with ultrasound shear wave elastography.

  11. Phase defect analysis with actinic full-field EUVL mask blank inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Suga, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    We had developed an actinic full-field inspection system to detect multilayer phase-defects with dark field imaging. Regarding the actinic inspection of native defects, the influence of the defect's surface dimension and multilayer structure, on the intensity-signal obtained from the inspection was analyzed. Three mask blanks were inspected from which 55 defects, observed with AFM and SEM, were classified as amplitude-defects or phase-defects. The surface dimensions and SEVDs (sphere equivalent volume diameters) of the defects were measured with the AFM. In the case where their SEVDs were same as of the programmed phase-defects, they were found to produce stronger intensitysignals in comparison to the ones from the programmed phase-defects. Cross-sectional multilayer structures of two native phase-defects were observed with TEM, and those defects formed non-conformal structures in the multilayer. This result means that most of the native phase-defects tend to form a non-conformal structure, and can make large impact on the wafer image in comparison to the ones from a conformal structure. Besides phase-defects, the actinic inspection also detected amplitude-defects. Although the sensitivities of the amplitude-defects were found to be lower than those of the phase-defects, an amplitude-defect higher than 30 nm could be detected with high probability.

  12. Full-field speckle interferometry for non-contact photoacoustic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Jens; Spahr, Hendrik; Buj, Christian; Münter, Michael; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2015-05-21

    A full-field speckle interferometry method for non-contact and prospectively high speed Photoacoustic Tomography is introduced and evaluated as proof of concept. Thermoelastic pressure induced changes of the objects topography are acquired in a repetitive mode without any physical contact to the object. In order to obtain high acquisition speed, the object surface is illuminated by laser pulses and imaged onto a high speed camera chip. In a repetitive triple pulse mode, surface displacements can be acquired with nanometre sensitivity and an adjustable sampling rate of e.g. 20 MHz with a total acquisition time far below one second using kHz repetition rate lasers. Due to recurring interferometric referencing, the method is insensitive to thermal drift of the object due to previous pulses or other motion. The size of the investigated area and the spatial and temporal resolution of the detection are scalable. In this study, the approach is validated by measuring a silicone phantom and a porcine skin phantom with embedded silicone absorbers. The reconstruction of the absorbers is presented in 2D and 3D. The sensitivity of the measurement with respect to the photoacoustic detection is discussed. Potentially, Photoacoustic Imaging can be brought a step closer towards non-anaesthetized in vivo imaging and new medical applications not allowing acoustic contact, such as neurosurgical monitoring or burnt skin investigation.

  13. Full-field dynamic characterization of superhydrophobic condensation on biotemplated nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ölçeroğlu, Emre; Hsieh, Chia-Yun; Rahman, Md Mahamudur; Lau, Kenneth K S; McCarthy, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    While superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces have been shown to promote condensation heat transfer, the successful implementation of these coatings relies on the development of scalable manufacturing strategies as well as continued research into the fundamental physical mechanisms of enhancement. This work demonstrates the fabrication and characterization of superhydrophobic coatings using a simple scalable nanofabrication technique based on self-assembly of the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) combined with initiated chemical vapor deposition. TMV biotemplating is compatible with a wide range of surface materials and applicable over large areas and complex geometries without the use of any power or heat. The virus-structured coatings fabricated here are macroscopically superhydrophobic (contact angle >170°) and have been characterized using environmental electron scanning microscopy showing sustained and robust coalescence-induced ejection of condensate droplets. Additionally, full-field dynamic characterization of these surfaces during condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases is reported. This technique uses optical microscopy combined with image processing algorithms to track the wetting and growth dynamics of 100s to 1000s of microscale condensate droplets simultaneously. Using this approach, over 3 million independent measurements of droplet size have been used to characterize global heat transfer performance as a function of nucleation site density, coalescence length, and the apparent wetted surface area during dynamic loading. Additionally, the history and behavior of individual nucleation sites, including coalescence events, has been characterized. This work elucidates the nature of superhydrophobic condensation and its enhancement, including the role of nucleation site density during transient operation.

  14. Fractal analysis of en face tomographic images obtained with full field optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Wanrong; Zhu, Yue [Department of Optical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-03-15

    The quantitative modeling of the imaging signal of pathological areas and healthy areas is necessary to improve the specificity of diagnosis with tomographic en face images obtained with full field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT). In this work, we propose to use the depth-resolved change in the fractal parameter as a quantitative specific biomarker of the stages of disease. The idea is based on the fact that tissue is a random medium and only statistical parameters that characterize tissue structure are appropriate. We successfully relate the imaging signal in FFOCT to the tissue structure in terms of the scattering function and the coherent transfer function of the system. The formula is then used to analyze the ratio of the Fourier transforms of the cancerous tissue to the normal tissue. We found that when the tissue changes from the normal to cancerous the ratio of the spectrum of the index inhomogeneities takes the form of an inverse power law and the changes in the fractal parameter can be determined by estimating slopes of the spectra of the ratio plotted on a log-log scale. The fresh normal and cancer liver tissues were imaged to demonstrate the potential diagnostic value of the method at early stages when there are no significant changes in tissue microstructures. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Development of PZT-excited stroboscopic shearography for full-field nondestructive evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemani, Hamidreza; Park, Jinwoo; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Soltani, Nasser

    2017-05-01

    Nondestructive evaluation using shearography requires a way to stress the inspection target. This technique is able to directly measure the displacement gradient distribution on the object surface. Shearography visualizes the internal structural damages as the anomalous pattern in the shearograpic fringe pattern. A piezoelectric (PZT) excitation system is able to generate loadings in the vibrational, acoustic, and ultrasonic regimes. In this paper, we propose a PZT-excited stroboscopic shearography. The PZT excitation could generate vibrational loading, a stationary wavefield, and a nonstationary propagation wave to fulfill the external loading requirement of shearography. The sweeping of the PZT excitation frequency, the formation of a standing wave, and a small shearing to suppress the incident wave were powerful controllable tools to detect the defects. The sweeping of the PZT excitation frequency enabled us to determine one of the defect-sensitive frequencies almost in real time. In addition, because the defect sensitive frequencies always existed in wide and plural ranges, the risk of the defect being overlooked by the inspector could be alleviated. The results of evaluation using stroboscopic shearography showed that an artificial 20 mm-diameter defect could be visualized at the excitation frequencies of 5-8 kHz range and 12.5-15.5 kHz range. This technique provided full field reliable and repeatable inspection results. Additionally, the proposed method overcame the important drawback of the time-averaged shearography, being required to identify the resonance vibration frequency sensitive to the defect.

  16. The SLcam: A full-field energy dispersive X-ray camera

    CERN Document Server

    Bjeoumikhov, A; Langhoff, N; Ordavo, I; Radtke, M; Reinholz, U; Riesemeier, H; Scharf, O; Soltau, H; Wedell, R

    2012-01-01

    The color X-ray camera (SLcam) is a full-field single photon imager. As stand-alone camera, it is applicable for energy and space-resolved X-ray detection measurements. The exchangeable poly-capillary optics in front of a beryllium entrance window conducts X-ray photons from the probe to distinguished energy dispersive pixels on a pnCCD. The dedicated software enables the acquisition and the online processing of the spectral data for all 69696 pixels, leading to a real-time visualization of the element distribution in a sample. No scanning system is employed. A first elemental composition image of the sample is visible within minutes while statistics is improving in the course of time. Straight poly-capillary optics allows for 1:1 imaging with a space resolution of 50 um and no limited depth of sharpness, ideal to map uneven objects. Using conically shaped optics, a magnification of 6 times was achieved with a space resolution of 10 um. We present a measurement with a laboratory source showing the camera capa...

  17. High-resolution handheld rigid endomicroscope based on full-field optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit a la Guillaume, Emilie; Martins, Franck; Boccara, Claude; Harms, Fabrice

    2016-02-01

    Full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) is a powerful tool for nondestructive assessment of biological tissue, i.e., for the structural examination of tissue in depth at a cellular resolution. Mostly known as a microscopy device for ex vivo analysis, FF-OCT has also been adapted to endoscopy setups since it shows good potential for in situ cancer diagnosis and biopsy guidance. Nevertheless, all the attempts to perform endoscopic FF-OCT imaging did not go beyond lab setups. We describe here, to the best of our knowledge, the first handheld FF-OCT endoscope based on a tandem interferometry assembly using incoherent illumination. A common-path passive imaging interferometer at the tip of an optical probe makes it robust and insensitive to environmental perturbations, and a low finesse Fabry-Perot processing interferometer guarantees a compact system. A good resolution (2.7 μm transverse and 6 μm axial) is maintained through the long distance, small diameter relay optics of the probe, and a good signal-to-noise ratio is achieved in a limited 100 ms acquisition time. High-resolution images and a movie of a rat brain slice have been recorded by moving the contact endoscope over the surface of the sample, allowing for tissue microscopic exploration at 20 μm under the surface. These promising ex vivo results open new perspectives for in vivo imaging of biological tissue, in particular, in the field of cancer and surgical margin assessment.

  18. Skin cancer margin analysis within minutes with full-field OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalimier, Eugénie; Ogrich, Lauren; Morales, Diego; Cusack, Carrie Ann; Abdelmalek, Mark; Boccara, Claude; Durkin, John

    2017-02-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer. Treatment consists of surgical removal of the skin cancer. Traditional excision involves the removal of the visible skin cancer with a significant margin of normal skin. On cosmetically sensitive areas, Mohs micrographic tissue is the standard of care. Mohs uses intraoperative microscopic margin assessment which minimizes the surgical defect and can help reduce the recurrence rate by a factor of 3. The current Mohs technique relies on frozen section tissue slide preparation which significantly lengthens operative time and requires on-site trained histotechnicians. Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FFOCT) is a novel optical imaging technique which provides a quick and efficient method to visualize cancerous areas in minutes, without any preparation or destruction of the tissue. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of FFOCT for the analysis of skin cancer margins during Mohs surgery. Over 150 images of Mohs specimens were acquired intraoperatively with FFOCT before frozen section analysis. The imaging procedure took less than 5 minutes for each specimen. No artifacts on histological preparation were found arising from FFOCT manipulation; however frozen section artifact was readily seen on FFOCT. An atlas was established with FFOCT images and corresponding histological slides to reveal FFOCT reading criteria of normal and cancerous structures. Blind analysis showed high concordance between FFOCT and histology. FFOCT can potentially reduce recurrence rates while maintaining short surgery times, optimize clinical workflow, and decrease healthcare costs. For the patient, this translates into smaller infection risk, decreased stress, and better comfort.

  19. Application of digital image correlation to full-field measurement of shrinkage strain of dental composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-ying LI; Andrew LAU; Alex S.L.FOK

    2013-01-01

    Objectives:Polymerization shrinkage of dental composites remains a major concern in restorative dentistry because it can lead to micro-cracking of the tooth and debonding at the tooth-restoration interface.The aim of this study was to measure the full-field polymerization shrinkage of dental composites using the optical digital image correlation (DIC) method and to evaluate how the measurement is influenced by the factors in experiment setup and image analysis.Methods:Four commercial dental composites,Premise Dentine,Z100,Z250 and Tetric EvoCeram,were tested.Composite was first placed into a slot mould to form a bar specimen with rectangular-section of 4 mm×2 mm,followed by the surface painting to create irregular speckles.Curing was then applied at one end of the specimen while the other part were covered against curing light for simulating the clinical curing condition of composite in dental cavity.The painted surface was recorded by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera before and after curing.Subsequently,the volumetric shrinkage of the specimen was calculated with specialist DIC software based on image cross correlation.In addition,a few factors that may influence the measuring accuracy,including the subset window size,speckle size,illumination light and specimen length,were also evaluated.Results:The volumetric shrinkage of the specimen generally decreases with increasing distance from the irradiated surface with a conspicuous exception being the composite Premise Dentine as its maximum shrinkage occurred at a subsurface distance of about 1 mm instead of the irradiated surface.Zl00 had the greatest maximum shrinkage strain,followed by Z250,Tetric EvoCeram and then Premise Dentine.Larger subset window size made the shrinkage strain contour smoother.But the cost was that some details in the heterogeneity of the material were lost.Very small subset window size resulted in a lot of noise in the data,making it difficult to discern the general pattern in the strain

  20. Full field reservoir modeling of shale assets using advanced data-driven analytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soodabeh Esmaili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbon production from shale has attracted much attention in the recent years. When applied to this prolific and hydrocarbon rich resource plays, our understanding of the complexities of the flow mechanism (sorption process and flow behavior in complex fracture systems - induced or natural leaves much to be desired. In this paper, we present and discuss a novel approach to modeling, history matching of hydrocarbon production from a Marcellus shale asset in southwestern Pennsylvania using advanced data mining, pattern recognition and machine learning technologies. In this new approach instead of imposing our understanding of the flow mechanism, the impact of multi-stage hydraulic fractures, and the production process on the reservoir model, we allow the production history, well log, completion and hydraulic fracturing data to guide our model and determine its behavior. The uniqueness of this technology is that it incorporates the so-called “hard data” directly into the reservoir model, so that the model can be used to optimize the hydraulic fracture process. The “hard data” refers to field measurements during the hydraulic fracturing process such as fluid and proppant type and amount, injection pressure and rate as well as proppant concentration. This novel approach contrasts with the current industry focus on the use of “soft data” (non-measured, interpretive data such as frac length, width, height and conductivity in the reservoir models. The study focuses on a Marcellus shale asset that includes 135 wells with multiple pads, different landing targets, well length and reservoir properties. The full field history matching process was successfully completed using this data driven approach thus capturing the production behavior with acceptable accuracy for individual wells and for the entire asset.

  1. Full-field characterization of thermal diffusivity in continuous- fiber ceramic composite materials and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steckenrider, J.S.; Ellingson, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rothermel, S.A. [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCCs) are currently being developed for various high-temperature applications, including use in advanced heat engines. Among the material classes of interest for such applications are silicon carbide (SiC)-fiber-reinforced SiC (SiC{sub (f)}/SiC), SiC-fiber-reinforced silicon nitride (SiC {sub (f)}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})-fiber-reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sub (f)}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and others. In such composites, the condition of the interfaces (between the fibers and matrix) are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component (as are conventional mechanical defects such as cracks, porosity, etc.). For example, oxidation of this interface (especially on carbon coated fibers) can seriously degrade both mechanical and thermal properties. Furthermore, thermal shock damage can degrade the matrix through extensive crack generation. A nondestructive evaluation method that could be used to assess interface condition, thermal shock damage, and to detect other ``defects`` would thus be very beneficial, especially if applicable to full-scale components. One method under development uses infrared thermal imaging to provide ``single-shot`` full-field assessment of the distribution of thermal properties in large components by measuring thermal diffusivity. By applying digital image filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques for noise reduction, we can achieve acquisition and analysis times of minutes or less with submillimeter spatial resolution. The system developed at Argonne has been used to examine the effects of thermal shock, oxidation treatment, density variations, and variations in oxidation resistant coatings in a full array of test specimens. Subscale CFCC components with nonplanar geometries have also been studied for manufacturing-induced variations in thermal properties.

  2. Modified full-field optical coherence tomography: A novel tool for rapid histology of tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Here, we report the first use of a commercial prototype of full-field optical coherence tomography called Light-CT TM . Based on the principle of white light interferometry, Light-CT TM generates quick high-resolution three-dimensional tomographic images from unprocessed tissues. Its advantage over the current intra-surgical diagnostic standard, i.e. frozen section analysis, lies in the absence of freezing artifacts, which allows real-time diagnostic impressions, and/or for the tissues to be triaged for subsequent conventional histopathology. Materials and Methods: In this study, we recapitulate known normal histology in nine formalin fixed ex vivo rat organs (skin, heart, lung, liver, stomach, kidney, prostate, urinary bladder, and testis. Large surface and virtually sectioned stacks of images at varying depths were acquired by a pair of 10x/0.3 numerical aperture water immersion objectives, processed and visualized in real time. Results: Normal histology of the following organs was recapitulated by identifying various tissue microstructures. Skin: epidermis, dermal-epidermal junction and hair follicles with surrounding sebaceous glands in the dermis. Stomach: mucosa with surface pits, submucosa, muscularis propria and serosa. Liver: hepatocytes separated by sinusoidal spaces, central veins and portal triad. Kidney: convoluted tubules, medullary rays (straight tubules and collecting ducts. Prostate: acini and fibro-muscular stroma. Lung: bronchi, bronchioles, alveolar ducts, alveoli and pleura. Urinary bladder: urothelium, lamina propria, muscularis propria, and serosa. Testis: seminiferous tubules with intra-tubular sperms. Conclusion: Light-CT TM is a powerful imaging tool to perform fast histology on fresh and fixed tissues, without introducing artifacts. Its compact size, ease of handling, fast image acquisition and safe incident light levels makes it well-suited for various intra-operative and intra-procedural triaging and

  3. Rapid evaluation of fresh ex vivo kidney tissue with full-field optical coherence tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT is a real-time imaging technique that rapidly generates images reminiscent of histology without any tissue processing, warranting its exploration for evaluation of ex vivo kidney tissue. Methods: Fresh tissue sections from tumor and adjacent nonneoplastic kidney (n = 25 nephrectomy specimens; clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC = 12, papillary RCC (PRCC = 4, chromophobe RCC (ChRCC = 4, papillary urothelial carcinoma (PUC = 1, angiomyolipoma (AML = 2 and cystic nephroma = 2 were imaged with a commercial FFOCT device. Sections were submitted for routine histopathological diagnosis. Results: Glomeruli, tubules, interstitium, and blood vessels were identified in nonneoplastic tissue. In tumor sections, the normal architecture was completely replaced by either sheets of cells/trabeculae or papillary structures. The former pattern was seen predominantly in CCRCC/ChRCC and the latter in PRCC/PUC (as confirmed on H&E. Although the cellular details were not very prominent at this resolution, we could identify unique cytoplasmic signatures in some kidney tumors. For example, the hyper-intense punctate signal in the cytoplasm of CRCC represents glycogen/lipid, large cells with abundant hyper-intense cytoplasm representing histiocytes in PRCC, and signal-void large polygonal cell representing adipocytes in AML. According to a blinded analysis was performed by an uropathologist, all nonneoplastic tissues were differentiated from neoplastic tissues. Further, all benign tumors were called benign and malignant were called malignant. A diagnostic accuracy of 80% was obtained in subtyping the tumors. Conclusion: The ability of FFOCT to reliably differentiate nonneoplastic from neoplastic tissue and identify some tumor types makes it a valuable tool for rapid evaluation of ex vivo kidney tissue e.g. for intraoperative margin assessment and kidney biopsy adequacy. Recently, higher resolution images were

  4. Comparison of tissue equalization, and premium view post-processing methods in full field digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Baoying, E-mail: chenby128@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xinsi Road 1, 710038 Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Wang Wei; Huang Jin; Zhao Ming; Cui Guangbin [Department of Radiology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xinsi Road 1, 710038 Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Xu Jing [Cell Engineering Research Centre and Department of Cell Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Changle West Road 169, 710032 Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Guo Wei; Du Pang; Li Pei [Department of Radiology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xinsi Road 1, 710038 Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yu Jun, E-mail: pclamper@163.co [Department of Preclinical Experiment Center, Fourth Military Medical University, Changle West Road 169, 710032 Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2010-10-15

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic abilities of 2 post-processing methods provided by GE Senographe DS system, tissue equalization (TE) and premium view (PV) in full field digital mammography (FFDM). Materials and methods: In accordance with the ethical standards of the World Medical Association, this study was approved by regional ethics committee and signed informed patient consents were obtained. We retrospectively reviewed digital mammograms from 101 women (mean age, 47 years; range, 23-81 years) in the modes of TE and PV, respectively. Three radiologists, fully blinded to the post-processing methods, all patient clinical information and histologic results, read images by using objective image interpretation criteria for diagnostic information end points such as lesion border delineation, definition of disease extent, visualization of internal and surrounding morphologic features of the lesions. Also, overall diagnostic impression in terms of lesion conspicuity, detectability and diagnostic confidence was assessed. Between-group comparisons were performed with Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Readers 1, 2, and 3 demonstrated significant overall better impression of PV in 29, 27, and 24 patients, compared with that for TE in 12, 13, and 11 patients, respectively (p < 0.05). Significant (p < 0.05) better impression of PV was also demonstrated for diagnostic information end points. Importantly, PV proved to be more sensitive than TE while detecting malignant lesions in dense breast rather than benign lesions and malignancy in non-dense breast (p < 0.01). Conclusion: PV compared with TE provides marked better diagnostic information in FFDM, particularly for patients with malignancy in dense breast.

  5. Full-field illumination approach with multiple speckle for optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Florian; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic endomicroscopy (OR-PAE) allows going beyond the limited penetration depth of conventional optical-resolution photoacoustic systems. Recently, it has been shown that OR-PAE may be performed through minimally invasive multimode fibers, by raster scanning a focus spot with optical wavefront shaping [1]. Here we introduce for the first time an approach to perform OR-PAE through a multimode fiber with a full-field illumination approach. By using multiple known speckle patterns, we show that it is possible to obtain optical-diffraction limited photoacoustic images, with the same resolution as that obtained by raster scanning a focus spot, i.e that of the speckle grain size. The fluctuations patterns of the photoacoustic amplitude at each pixel in the sample plane with the series of multiple speckle illumination were used to encode each pixel. This approach with known speckle illumination requires an initial calibration stage, that consists in learn a set of fluctuation patterns pixel per pixel, which will encode patterns each pixel of the scanned area. A point-like absorber was scanned across the filed-of-view during the calibration stage to acquire the reference patterns. Image reconstruction may be carried out by cross-correlating the series of photoacoustic amplitude measured with the sample to the reference patterns obtained during the calibration stage. In this work, the approach above was carried out both theoretically with Monte-carlo simulations and experimentally through a multi-mode fiber with samples made of absorbing spheres. [1] Papadopoulos et al., " Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy by use of a multimode fiber", Appl. Phys. Lett., 102(21), 2013

  6. Estimation of surface curvature from full-field shape data using principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sameer; Vinuchakravarthy, S.; Subramanian, S. J.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional digital image correlation (3D-DIC) is a popular image-based experimental technique for estimating surface shape, displacements and strains of deforming objects. In this technique, a calibrated stereo rig is used to obtain and stereo-match pairs of images of the object of interest from which the shapes of the imaged surface are then computed using the calibration parameters of the rig. Displacements are obtained by performing an additional temporal correlation of the shapes obtained at various stages of deformation and strains by smoothing and numerically differentiating the displacement data. Since strains are of primary importance in solid mechanics, significant efforts have been put into computation of strains from the measured displacement fields; however, much less attention has been paid to date to computation of curvature from the measured 3D surfaces. In this work, we address this gap by proposing a new method of computing curvature from full-field shape measurements using principal component analysis (PCA) along the lines of a similar work recently proposed to measure strains (Grama and Subramanian 2014 Exp. Mech. 54 913-33). PCA is a multivariate analysis tool that is widely used to reveal relationships between a large number of variables, reduce dimensionality and achieve significant denoising. This technique is applied here to identify dominant principal components in the shape fields measured by 3D-DIC and these principal components are then differentiated systematically to obtain the first and second fundamental forms used in the curvature calculation. The proposed method is first verified using synthetically generated noisy surfaces and then validated experimentally on some real world objects with known ground-truth curvatures.

  7. Quality control and primo-diagnosis of transurethral bladder resections with full-field OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, P.; Ducesne, I.; Anract, J.; Yang, C.; Sibony, M.; Beuvon, F.; Delongchamps, N. B.; Dalimier, E.

    2017-02-01

    Transurethral resections are commonly used for bladder cancer diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Cancer staging relies largely on the analysis of muscle in the resections; however, muscle presence is uncertain at the time of the resection. An extemporaneous quality control tool would be of great use to certify the presence of muscle in the resection, and potentially formulate a primo-diagnosis, in order to ensure optimum patient care. Full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) offers a fast and non-destructive method of obtaining images of biological tissues at ultrahigh resolution (1μm in all 3 directions), approaching traditional histological sections. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of FFOCT for the quality control and the primo-diagnosis of transurethral bladder resections. Over 70 transurethral bladder resections were imaged with FFOCT within minutes, shortly after excision, and before histological preparation. Side-by-side comparison with histology allowed to establish reading criteria for the presence of muscle and cancer in particular. Images of 24 specimens were read blindly by three non-pathologists readers: two resident urologists and a junior bio-medical engineer, who were asked to notify the presence of muscle and tumor. Results showed that after appropriate training, 96% accuracy could be obtained on both tumour and muscle detection. FFOCT is a fast and nondestructive imaging technique that provides analysis results concordant with histology. Its implementation as a quality control and primo-diagnosis tool for transurethral bladder resections in the urology suite is feasible and lets envision high value for the patient.

  8. Computer-aided detection system applied to full-field digital mammograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega Bolivar, Alfonso; Sanchez Gomez, Sonia; Merino, Paula; Alonso-Bartolome, Pilar; Ortega Garcia, Estrella (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Marques of Valdecilla Hospital, Santander (Spain)), e-mail: avegab@telefonica.net; Munoz Cacho, Pedro (Dept. of Statistics, Univ. Marques of Valdecilla Hospital, Santander (Spain)); Hoffmeister, Jeffrey W. (iCAD, Inc., Nashua, NH (United States))

    2010-12-15

    Background: Although mammography remains the mainstay for breast cancer screening, it is an imperfect examination with a sensitivity of 75-92% for breast cancer. Computer-aided detection (CAD) has been developed to improve mammographic detection of breast cancer. Purpose: To retrospectively estimate CAD sensitivity and false-positive rate with full-field digital mammograms (FFDMs). Material and Methods: CAD was used to evaluate 151 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (n=48) and invasive breast cancer (n=103) detected with FFDM. Retrospectively, CAD sensitivity was estimated based on breast density, mammographic presentation, histopathology type, and lesion size. CAD false-positive rate was estimated with screening FFDMs from 200 women. Results: CAD detected 93% (141/151) of cancer cases: 97% (28/29) in fatty breasts, 94% (81/86) in breasts containing scattered fibroglandular densities, 90% (28/31) in heterogeneously dense breasts, and 80% (4/5) in extremely dense breasts. CAD detected 98% (54/55) of cancers manifesting as calcifications, 89% (74/83) as masses, and 100% (13/13) as mixed masses and calcifications. CAD detected 92% (73/79) of invasive ductal carcinomas, 89% (8/9) of invasive lobular carcinomas, 93% (14/15) of other invasive carcinomas, and 96% (46/48) of DCIS. CAD sensitivity for cancers 1-10 mm was 87% (47/54); 11-20 mm, 99% (70/71); 21-30 mm, 86% (12/14); and larger than 30 mm, 100% (12/12). The CAD false-positive rate was 2.5 marks per case. Conclusion: CAD with FFDM showed a high sensitivity in identifying cancers manifesting as calcifications or masses. CAD sensitivity was maintained in small lesions (1-20 mm) and invasive lobular carcinomas, which have lower mammographic sensitivity

  9. Full-field predictions of ice dynamic recrystallisation under simple shear conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Griera, Albert; Bons, Paul D.; Lebensohn, Ricardo A.; Evans, Lynn A.; Jansen, Daniela; Weikusat, Ilka

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the flow of ice on the microstructural scale is essential for improving our knowledge of large-scale ice dynamics, and thus our ability to predict future changes of ice sheets. Polar ice behaves anisotropically during flow, which can lead to strain localisation. In order to study how dynamic recrystallisation affects to strain localisation in deep levels of polar ice sheets, we present a series of numerical simulations of ice polycrystals deformed under simple-shear conditions. The models explicitly simulate the evolution of microstructures using a full-field approach, based on the coupling of a viscoplastic deformation code (VPFFT) with dynamic recrystallisation codes. The simulations provide new insights into the distribution of stress, strain rate and lattice orientation fields with progressive strain, up to a shear strain of three. Our simulations show how the recrystallisation processes have a strong influence on the resulting microstructure (grain size and shape), while the development of lattice preferred orientations (LPO) appears to be less affected. Activation of non-basal slip systems is enhanced by recrystallisation and induces a strain hardening behaviour up to the onset of strain localisation and strain weakening behaviour. Simulations demonstrate that the strong intrinsic anisotropy of ice crystals is transferred to the polycrystalline scale and results in the development of strain localisation bands than can be masked by grain boundary migration. Therefore, the finite-strain history is non-directly reflected by the final microstructure. Masked strain localisation can be recognised in ice cores, such as the EDML, from the presence of stepped boundaries, microshear and grains with zig-zag geometries.

  10. Global sensitivity analysis in the identification of cohesive models using full-field kinematic data

    KAUST Repository

    Alfano, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Failure of adhesive bonded structures often occurs concurrent with the formation of a non-negligible fracture process zone in front of a macroscopic crack. For this reason, the analysis of damage and fracture is effectively carried out using the cohesive zone model (CZM). The crucial aspect of the CZM approach is the precise determination of the traction-separation relation. Yet it is usually determined empirically, by using calibration procedures combining experimental data, such as load-displacement or crack length data, with finite element simulation of fracture. Thanks to the recent progress in image processing, and the availability of low-cost CCD cameras, it is nowadays relatively easy to access surface displacements across the fracture process zone using for instance Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The rich information provided by correlation techniques prompted the development of versatile inverse parameter identification procedures combining finite element (FE) simulations and full field kinematic data. The focus of the present paper is to assess the effectiveness of these methods in the identification of cohesive zone models. In particular, the analysis is developed in the framework of the variance based global sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity of kinematic data to the sought cohesive properties is explored through the computation of the so-called Sobol sensitivity indexes. The results show that the global sensitivity analysis can help to ascertain the most influential cohesive parameters which need to be incorporated in the identification process. In addition, it is shown that suitable displacement sampling in time and space can lead to optimized measurements for identification purposes.

  11. Characterization of the effects of the FineView algorithm for full field digital mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanczyk, H.; McDonagh, E.; Marshall, N. W.; Castellano, I.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of an image processing algorithm (FineView) on both quantitative image quality parameters and the threshold contrast detail response of the GE Senographe DS full-field digital mammography system. The system was characterized using signal transfer property, pre-sampling modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the system. An algorithmic modulation transfer function (MTFa) was calculated from images acquired at a reduced detector air kerma (DAK) and with the FineView algorithm enabled. Two sets of beam conditions were used: Mo/Mo/28 kV and Rh/Rh/29 kV, both with 2 mm added Al filtration at the x-ray tube. Images were acquired with and without FineView at four DAK levels from 14 to 378 µGy. The threshold contrast detail response was assessed using the CDMAM contrast-detail test object which was imaged under standard clinical conditions with and without FineView at three DAK levels from 24 to 243 µGy. The images were scored by both human observers and by automated scoring software. Results indicated an improvement of up to 125% at 5 mm-1 in MTFa when FineView was activated, particularly at high DAK levels. A corresponding increase of up to 425% at 5 mm-1 was also seen in the NNPS, again with the same DAK dependence. FineView did not influence DQE, an indication that the signal to noise ratio transfer of the system remained unchanged. FineView did not affect the threshold contrast detectability of the system, a result that is consistent with the DQE results.

  12. Full Field X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging Using Micro Pore Optics for Planetary Surface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D. F.; Gailhanou, M.; Walter, P.; Schyns, E.; Marchis, F.; Thompson, K.; Bristow, T.

    2016-01-01

    Many planetary surface processes leave evidence as small features in the sub-millimetre scale. Current planetary X-ray fluorescence spectrometers lack the spatial resolution to analyse such small features as they only provide global analyses of areas greater than 100 mm(exp 2). A micro-XRF spectrometer will be deployed on the NASA Mars 2020 rover to analyse spots as small as 120m. When using its line-scanning capacity combined to perpendicular scanning by the rover arm, elemental maps can be generated. We present a new instrument that provides full-field XRF imaging, alleviating the need for precise positioning and scanning mechanisms. The Mapping X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer - "Map-X" - will allow elemental imaging with approximately 100µm spatial resolution and simultaneously provide elemental chemistry at the scale where many relict physical, chemical and biological features can be imaged in ancient rocks. The arm-mounted Map-X instrument is placed directly on the surface of an object and held in a fixed position during measurements. A 25x25 mm(exp 2) surface area is uniformly illuminated with X-rays or alpha-particles and gamma-rays. A novel Micro Pore Optic focusses a fraction of the emitted X-ray fluorescence onto a CCD operated at a few frames per second. On board processing allows measuring the energy and coordinates of each X-ray photon collected. Large sets of frames are reduced into 2d histograms used to compute higher level data products such as elemental maps and XRF spectra from selected regions of interest. XRF spectra are processed on the ground to further determine quantitative elemental compositions. The instrument development will be presented with an emphasis on the characterization and modelling of the X-ray focussing Micro Pore Optic. An outlook on possible alternative XRF imaging applications will be discussed.

  13. Postoperative changes in the full-field electroretinogram following sevoflurane anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Iohom, G

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that disturbances of the visual pathway persist following general anaesthesia, even after normal clinical discharge criteria have been met. METHODS: We performed full-field flash electroretinography in the right eye of 10 unpremedicated ASA I patients who underwent N2O\\/sevoflurane anaesthesia. Electroretinograms were recorded preoperatively, immediately after discharge from the recovery room and 2 h after discontinuation of sevoflurane. The time at which postanaesthesia discharge score first exceeded 9 was also noted. Data were analysed using paired, one-tailed Student\\'s t-test. RESULTS: Latency of the b-wave on the photopic electroretinogram was greater at each postoperative time point (30.5 +\\/- 0.9 and 30 +\\/- 1.3 ms), compared to preoperative values (29.2 +\\/- 0.8 ms, P < 0.001 and P = 0.04, respectively). The A-B amplitude of the b-wave was less postoperatively (220.3 +\\/- 52.7 and 210.3 +\\/- 42.7 pV) compared to values before operation (248.1 +\\/- 57.6 microV, P = 0.03 and P = 0.01, respectively). Oscillatory potential latencies were greater at each postoperative time point (21.4 +\\/- 0.5 and 20.8 +\\/- 0.6 ms) compared to before operation (20.4 +\\/- 0.4 ms, P < 0.001 and P = 0.03, respectively). Oscillatory potential amplitudes were less at the first postoperative time point (17.5 +\\/- 6.1 microV), compared to preoperative values (22 +\\/- 6.4 microV, P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative electroretinogram abnormalities are consistently present in patients who have undergone N2O\\/sevoflurane anaesthesia. These abnormalities persist beyond the time at which standard clinical discharge criteria have been met.

  14. Full-field optical coherence tomography for the analysis of fresh unstained human lobectomy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT is a real-time imaging technique that generates high-resolution three-dimensional tomographic images from unprocessed and unstained tissues. Lack of tissue processing and associated artifacts, along with the ability to generate large-field images quickly, warrants its exploration as an alternative diagnostic tool. Materials and Methods: One section each from the tumor and from adjacent non-neoplastic tissue was collected from 13 human lobectomy specimens. They were imaged fresh with FFOCT and then submitted for routine histopathology. Two blinded pathologists independently rendered diagnoses based on FFOCT images. Results: Normal lung architecture (alveoli, bronchi, pleura and blood vessels was readily identified with FFOCT. Using FFOCT images alone, the study pathologists were able to correctly identify all tumor specimens and in many cases, the histological subtype of tumor (e.g., adenocarcinomas with various patterns. However, benign diagnosis was provided with high confidence in roughly half the tumor-free specimens (others were diagnosed as equivocal or false positive. Further analysis of these images revealed two major confounding features: (a Extensive lung collapse and (b presence of smoker′s macrophages. On a closer inspection, however, the smoker′s macrophages could often be identified as distinct from tumor cells based on their relative location in the alveoli, size and presence of anthracosis. We posit that greater pathologist experience, complemented with morphometric analysis and color-coding of image components, may help minimize the contribution of these confounders in the future. Conclusion: Our study provides evidence for the potential utility of FFOCT in identifying and differentiating lung tumors from non-neoplastic lung tissue. We foresee its potential as an adjunct to intra-surgical frozen section analysis for margin assessment, especially in limited lung

  15. Impact of full field digital mammography on the classification and mammographic characteristics of interval breast cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, Mark, E-mail: marktknox@gmail.com; O’Brien, Angela, E-mail: angelaobrien@doctors.org.uk; Szabó, Endre, E-mail: endrebacsi@freemail.hu; Smith, Clare S., E-mail: csmith@mater.ie; Fenlon, Helen M., E-mail: helen.fenlon@cancerscreening.ie; McNicholas, Michelle M., E-mail: michelle.mcnicholas@cancerscreening.ie; Flanagan, Fidelma L., E-mail: fidelma.flanagan@cancerscreening.ie

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Digital mammography has changed the presentation of interval breast cancer. • Less interval breast cancers are associated with microcalcifications following FFDM. • Interval breast cancer audit remains a key feature of any breast screening program. - Abstract: Objective: Full field digital mammography (FFDM) is increasingly replacing screen film mammography (SFM) in breast screening programs. Interval breast cancers are an issue in all screening programs and the purpose of our study is to assess the impact of FFDM on the classification of interval breast cancers at independent blind review and to compare the mammographic features of interval cancers at FFDM and SFM. Materials and methods: This study included 138 cases of interval breast cancer, 76 following an FFDM screening examination and 62 following screening with SFM. The prior screening mammogram was assessed by each of five consultant breast radiologists who were blinded to the site of subsequent cancer. Subsequent review of the diagnostic mammogram was performed and cases were classified as missed, minimal signs, occult or true interval. Mammographic features of the interval cancer at diagnosis and any abnormality identified on the prior screening mammogram were recorded. Results: The percentages of cancers classified as missed at FFDM and SFM did not differ significantly, 10.5% (8 of 76) at FFDM and 8.1% (5 of 62) at SFM (p = .77). There were significantly less interval cancers presenting as microcalcifications (alone or in association with another abnormality) following screening with FFDM, 16% (12 of 76) than following a SFM examination, 32% (20 of 62) (p = .02). Conclusion: Interval breast cancers continue to pose a problem at FFDM. The switch to FFDM has changed the mammographic presentation of interval breast cancer, with less interval cancers presenting in association with microcalcifications.

  16. Full field reservoir modeling of shale assets using advanced data-driven analytics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soodabeh Esmaili; Shahab D. Mohaghegh

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from shale has attracted much attention in the recent years. When applied to this prolific and hydrocarbon rich resource plays, our understanding of the complexities of the flow mechanism (sorption process and flow behavior in complex fracture systems-induced or natural) leaves much to be desired. In this paper, we present and discuss a novel approach to modeling, history matching of hydrocarbon production from a Marcellus shale asset in southwestern Pennsylvania using advanced data mining, pattern recognition and machine learning technologies. In this new approach instead of imposing our understanding of the flow mechanism, the impact of multi-stage hydraulic fractures, and the production process on the reservoir model, we allow the production history, well log, completion and hydraulic fracturing data to guide our model and determine its behavior. The uniqueness of this tech-nology is that it incorporates the so-called “hard data” directly into the reservoir model, so that the model can be used to optimize the hydraulic fracture process. The “hard data” refers to field measure-ments during the hydraulic fracturing process such as fluid and proppant type and amount, injection pressure and rate as well as proppant concentration. This novel approach contrasts with the current industry focus on the use of “soft data” (non-measured, interpretive data such as frac length, width, height and conductivity) in the reservoir models. The study focuses on a Marcellus shale asset that in-cludes 135 wells with multiple pads, different landing targets, well length and reservoir properties. The full field history matching process was successfully completed using this data driven approach thus capturing the production behavior with acceptable accuracy for individual wells and for the entire asset.

  17. Normal Values of Standard Full Field Electroretinography in an Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Mehdi Parvaresh

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To determine normal values of standard full-field electroretinography (ERG and to evaluate their variations with age in an Iranian population. METHODS: Through convenient sampling, 170 normal subjects 1-80 years of age were selected from residents of Tehran. ERG amplitudes and implicit time values were measured according to recommendations by the International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision. Evaluations consisted of light-adapted ERG including single-white flash and 30-Hz flicker response; and dark-adapted ERG including rod, maximal dark-adapted and cone responses. RESULTS: No significant difference in ERG values was observed between men and women, or between right and left eyes. ERG amplitudes were lower (P=0.04 and implicit time values were greater (P=0.03 in subjects 70-80 years of age as compared to younger individuals. CONCLUSIONS: ERG parameters are significantly diminished with age. Our results may serve as a reference against which standard ERG responses can be compared.

  18. Detector evaluation of a prototype amorphous selenium-based full field digital mammography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesneck, Jonathan L.; Saunders, Robert S.; Samei, Ehsan; Xia, Jessie Q.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2005-04-01

    This study evaluated the physical performance of a selenium-based direct full-field digital mammography prototype detector (Siemens Mammomat NovationDR), including the pixel value vs. exposure linearity, the modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The current detector is the same model which received an approvable letter from FDA for release to the US market. The results of the current prototype are compared to those of an earlier prototype. Two IEC standard beam qualities (RQA-M2: Mo/Mo, 28 kVp, 2 mm Al; RQA-M4: Mo/Mo, 35 kVp, 2 mm Al) and two additional beam qualities (MW2: W/Rh, 28 kVp, 2 mm Al; MW4: W/Rh, 35 kVp, 2 mm Al) were investigated. To calculate the modulation transfer function (MTF), a 0.1 mm Pt-Ir edge was imaged at each beam quality. Detector pixel values responded linearly against exposure values (R2 0.999). As before, above 6 cycles/mm Mo/Mo MTF was slightly higher along the chest-nipple axis compared to the left-right axis. MTF was comparable to the previously reported prototype, with slightly reduced resolution. The DQE peaks ranged from 0.71 for 3.31 μC/kg (12.83 mR) to 0.4 for 0.48 μC/kg (1.86 mR) at 1.75 cycles/mm for Mo/Mo at 28 kVp. The DQE range for W/Rh at 28 kVP was 0.81 at 2.03 μC/kg (7.87 mR) to 0.50 at 0.50 μC/kg (1.94 mR) at 1 cycle/mm. NNPS tended to increase with greater exposures, while all exposures had a significant low-frequency component. Bloom and detector edge artifacts observed previously were no longer present in this prototype. The new detector shows marked noise improvement, with slightly reduced resolution. There remain artifacts due to imperfect gain calibration, but at a reduced magnitude compared to a prototype detector.

  19. Regularized discriminate analysis for breast mass detection on full field digital mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun; Sahiner, Berkman; Zhang, Yiheng; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Zhou, Chuan; Ge, Jun; Wu, Yi-Ta

    2006-03-01

    In computer-aided detection (CAD) applications, an important step is to design a classifier for the differentiation of the abnormal from the normal structures. We have previously developed a stepwise linear discriminant analysis (LDA) method with simplex optimization for this purpose. In this study, our goal was to investigate the performance of a regularized discriminant analysis (RDA) classifier in combination with a feature selection method for classification of the masses and normal tissues detected on full field digital mammograms (FFDM). The feature selection scheme combined a forward stepwise feature selection process and a backward stepwise feature elimination process to obtain the best feature subset. An RDA classifier and an LDA classifier in combination with this new feature selection method were compared to an LDA classifier with stepwise feature selection. A data set of 130 patients containing 260 mammograms with 130 biopsy-proven masses was used. All cases had two mammographic views. The true locations of the masses were identified by experienced radiologists. To evaluate the performance of the classifiers, we randomly divided the data set into two independent sets of approximately equal size for training and testing. The training and testing were performed using the 2-fold cross validation method. The detection performance of the CAD system was assessed by free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analysis. The average test FROC curve was obtained by averaging the FP rates at the same sensitivity along the two corresponding test FROC curves from the 2-fold cross validation. At the case-based sensitivities of 90%, 80% and 70% on the test set, our RDA classifier with the new feature selection scheme achieved an FP rate of 1.8, 1.1, and 0.6 FPs/image, respectively, compared to 2.1, 1.4, and 0.8 FPs/image with stepwise LDA with simplex optimization. Our results indicate that RDA in combination with the sequential forward inclusion

  20. Panel Session

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege

    2004-01-01

    In this panel session, four researchers will discuss the role of a theoretical foundation, in particular AT, in the design of information technology based artefacts. The general discussion will take of from a specific examination of the ActAD approach.......In this panel session, four researchers will discuss the role of a theoretical foundation, in particular AT, in the design of information technology based artefacts. The general discussion will take of from a specific examination of the ActAD approach....

  1. Dynamic full field optical coherence tomography: subcellular metabolic contrast revealed in tissues by temporal analysis of interferometric signals

    CERN Document Server

    Apelian, Clement; Thouvenin, Olivier; Boccara, A Claude

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new endogenous approach to reveal subcellular metabolic contrast in fresh ex vivo tissues taking advantage of the time dependence of the full field optical coherence tomography interferometric signals. This method reveals signals linked with local activity of the endogenous scattering elements which can reveal cells where other imaging techniques fail or need exogenous contrast agents. We benefit from the micrometric transverse resolution of full field OCT to image intracellular features. We used this time dependence to identify different dynamics at the millisecond scale on a wide range of organs in normal or pathological conditions.

  2. A low density, high stiffness flat loudspeaker with improved sound frequency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel flat loudspeaker with improved sound frequency response. Flat loudspeakers provide advantages of compact dimensions and high durability. Known flat loudspeaker technology is based on high modal density. However, the resonances in the panel are complex and difficult to

  3. Structural Response Prediction: Full-field, Dynamic Pressure and Displacement Measurements of a Panel Excited by Shock Boundary-layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) S. Michael Spottswood, Timothy J. Beberniss, and Thomas G. Eason (AFRL...International Symposium on Particle Image Velocimetry – PIV09, Melbourne , Victoria, Australia, August 25-28, 2009. 24 P.J. Schmid, “Dynamic mode

  4. Flat for Free Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Manman

    2010-01-01

    @@ Just as Thomas Fried man's famous book,The World Is Flat,if not completely flat,it is anyway tending to be shaped flat.January 1,2010 saw the formation of the China-ASEAN Free Trade Agreement(CAFTA),which was another historical event flattening majority of Asia continent for international trade.

  5. Quantitative full-field strain measurements by SAOED (SrAl2O4:Eu2+,Dy3+) mechanoluminescent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani Azad, Ali; Rahimi, Mohammad Reza; Yun, Gun Jin

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a new calibration method for mechano-luminescence (ML) thin film sensors was proposed to enable quantitative full-field strain measurements in pixel-level resolution for the first time along with two standard reference test methods. The proposed method has a distinct advantage of its facet-free full-field strain sensing capability with pixel-level resolution. For the ML sensor, standard reference test methods were proposed for developing calibrated relationships between ML light intensity and effective strains: (1) uniaxial tensile reference test and (2) non-uniform strain reference test. From the reference tests, two different calibration models were developed in a recurrence equation form and validated measuring general strain distributions on different experimental specimens. Verified finite element (FE) simulation results were compared with ML effective strains to confirm its accuracy. The comparisons of the ML effective strains with FE simulation results showed that the calibration models can acceptably measure full-field strains. Limitations, sources of errors, suggestions for improving accuracy and practical considerations were also discussed. A conclusion of this research is that the proposed method enables ML sensing films to measure quantitative full-field strain distributions.

  6. Sandwich Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ramachandran

    1963-05-01

    Full Text Available This introductory article give an insight into the different methods employed in the construction of Sandwich panels, their limitations and future design application for defence use as a structural element with one of the highest strength-weight ratios yet devised.

  7. Panel Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proceedings of the ASIS Mid-Year Meeting, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Lists the speakers and summarizes the issues addressed for 12 panel sessions on topics related to networking, including libraries and national networks, federal national resources and energy programs, multimedia issues, telecommuting, remote image serving, accessing the Internet, library automation, scientific information, applications of Z39.50,…

  8. Full field modeling of dynamic recrystallization in a global level set framework, application to 304L stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulais-Sinou Romain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new full field numerical approach for the simulation of dynamic and post-dynamic recrystallization will be detailed. A level Set framework is employed to link a crystal plasticity finite element method with the modeling of recrystallization. Plasticity is calculated through the activation of slip systems and provides predictions for both SSDs and GNDs densities. These predictions control the activation and kinetics of recrystallization. All the developments are applied on 304L stainless steel.

  9. Screen-film versus full-field digital mammography: Radiation dose and image quality in a large teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stantić Tomislav J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to measure the radiation dose and image quality in conventional screen-film mammography and full-field digital mammography in women referred to mammography examination. Participants underwent bilateral, two-view screen-film mammography or full-field digital mammography. The visibility of anatomical regions and overall clinical image quality was rated by experienced radiologists. Total of 387 women and 1548 mammograms were enrolled in the study. Image quality was assessed in terms of image quality score, whereas patient dose assessment was performed in terms of mean glandular dose. Average mean glandular dose for cranio-caudal projection was 1.5 mGy and 2.1 mGy in full-field digital mammography and screen-film mammography, respectively. For medio-lateral oblique projection, corresponding values were 2.3 and 2.1 mGy. Overall image quality criteria scoring was 0.82 and 0.99 for screen-film and digital systems, respectively. The scores were in the range from 0.11 to 1.0 for different anatomical structures. Overall, full-field digital mammography was superior both in terms of image quality and dose over the screen-film mammography. The results have indicated that phantom dose values can assist in setting the optimisation activities in mammography and for comparison between mammography units. To obtain accurate diagnostic information with an acceptable radiation dose to breast, it is necessary to periodically perform patient dose and image quality surveys in all mammography units.

  10. Full-field ultrasonic inspection for a composite sandwich plate skin-core debonding detection using laser-based ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, See Yenn; Victor, Jared J.; Todd, Michael D.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a full-field ultrasonic guided wave method is proposed to inspect a composite sandwich specimen made for an aircraft engine nacelle. The back skin/core interface of the specimen is built with two fabricated disbond defects (diameters of 12.7 mm and 25.4 mm) by removing areas of the adhesive used to bond the back skin to the core. A laser ultrasonic interrogation system (LUIS) incorporated with a disbond detection algorithm is developed. The system consists of a 1-kHz laser ultrasonic scanning system and a single fixed ultrasonic sensor to interrogate ultrasonic guided waves in the sandwich specimen. The interest area of 400 mm × 400 mm is scanned at a 0.5 mm scan interval. The corresponding full-field ultrasonic data is obtained and generated in the three-dimensional (3-D) space-time domain. Then, the 3-D full-field ultrasonic data is Fourier transformed and the ultrasonic frequency spectra are analyzed to determine the dominant frequency that is sensitive to the disbond defects. Continuous wavelet transform (CWT) based on fast Fourier transform (FFT) is implemented as a single-frequency bandpass filter to filter the full-field ultrasonic data in the 3-D space-time domain at the selected dominant frequency. The LUIS has shown the ability to detect the disbond with diameters of 11 mm and 23 mm which match to the pre-determined disbond sizes well. For future research, a robust signal processing algorithm and a model-based matched filter will be investigated to make the detection process autonomous and improve detectability

  11. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors: Automated measurement development for full field digital mammography

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, E. E.; Sellers, T.A.; Lu, B.; Heine, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors are used for standardized mammographic reporting and are assessed visually. This reporting is clinically relevant because breast composition can impact mammographic sensitivity and is a breast cancer risk factor. New techniques are presented and evaluated for generating automated BI-RADS breast composition descriptors using both raw and calibrated full field digital mammography (FFDM) image data.

  12. Realization of the purely spatial Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in full-field images of spontaneous parametric down conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Moreau, Paul-Antoine; Devaux, Fabrice; Lantz, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We present a demonstration of EPR entanglement by detecting purely spatial quantum correlations in the near and far-field of highly spatially multimode spontaneous parametric down conversion generated in a type 2 BBO crystal. Full field imaging is performed in the photon counting regime with an electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera. We obtain a violation of Heisenberg inequalities with inferred quantities taking into account all the biphoton pairs in both the near and far field.

  13. Relatively Flat Envelopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁南庆

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate relatively flat envelopes. A necessary and sufficient condition is given for a relatively-finitely presented module to have a (mono-morphic or epic) relatively flat envelope. Then those rings are characterized whose every relatively-finitely presented module has a relatively flat envelope which coincides with its in-jective envelope. Some known results are obtained as corollaries.

  14. Creating flat design websites

    CERN Document Server

    Pratas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This book contains practical, step-by-step tutorials along with plenty of explanation about designing your flat website. Each section is introduced sequentially, building up your web design skills and completing your website.Creating Flat Design Websites is ideal for you if you are starting on your web development journey, but this book will also benefit seasoned developers wanting to start developing in flat.

  15. Strongly Gorenstein Flat Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Xia ZHANG; Li Min WANG

    2011-01-01

    This article is concerned with the strongly Gorenstein flat dimensions of modules and rings.We show this dimension has nice properties when the ring is coherent,and extend the well-known Hilbert's syzygy theorem to the strongly Gorenstein flat dimensions of rings.Also,we investigate the strongly Gorenstein flat dimensions of direct products of rings and (almost)excellent extensions of rings.

  16. Micro X-ray Fluorescence Imaging in a Tabletop Full Field-X-ray Fluorescence Instrument and in a Full Field-Particle Induced X-ray Emission End Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Francesco Paolo; Caliri, Claudia; Cosentino, Luigi; Gammino, Santo; Mascali, David; Pappalardo, Lighea; Rizzo, Francesca; Scharf, Oliver; Santos, Hellen Cristine

    2016-10-08

    A full field-X-ray camera (FF-XRC) was developed for performing the simultaneous mapping of chemical elements with a high lateral resolution. The device is based on a conventional CCD detector coupled to a straight shaped polycapillary. Samples are illuminated at once with a broad primary beam that can consist of X-rays or charged particles in two different analytical setups. The characteristic photons induced in the samples are guided by the polycapillary to the detector allowing the elemental imaging without the need for scanning. A single photon counting detection operated in a multiframe acquisition mode and a processing algorithm developed for event hitting reconstruction have enabled one to use the CCD as a high energy resolution X-ray detector. A novel software with a graphical user interface (GUI) programmed in Matlab allows full control of the device and the real-time imaging with a region-of-interest (ROI) method. At the end of the measurement, the software produces spectra for each of the pixels in the detector allowing the application of a least-squares fitting with external analytical tools. The FF-XRC is very compact and can be installed in different experimental setups. This work shows the potentialities of the instrument in both a full field-micro X-ray fluorescence (FF-MXRF) tabletop device and in a full field-micro particle induced X-ray emission (FF-MPIXE) end-station operated with an external proton beam. Some examples of applications are given as well.

  17. Underwater Explosion Damage of Ship Hull Panels

    OpenAIRE

    K. Rarnajeyathilagam; Vendhan, C.P.

    2003-01-01

    Underwater explosion is a major threat to ships and submarines in a war environment. The prediction of the mode and the extent of the failure is an essential step in designing for shock loading. The localised failure in a hull panel is severe compared to the global response of the ship. In this study, an attempt has been made to predict the response and failure modes of three types of hull panels (flat, concave, and convex). The shock loading on the hull panel has been estimated based on the ...

  18. Full-field modal analysis during base motion excitation using high-speed 3D digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Viedma, Ángel J.; López-Alba, Elías; Felipe-Sesé, Luis; Díaz, Francisco A.

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, many efforts have been made to exploit full-field measurement optical techniques for modal identification. Three-dimensional digital image correlation using high-speed cameras has been extensively employed for this purpose. Modal identification algorithms are applied to process the frequency response functions (FRF), which relate the displacement response of the structure to the excitation force. However, one of the most common tests for modal analysis involves the base motion excitation of a structural element instead of force excitation. In this case, the relationship between response and excitation is typically based on displacements, which are known as transmissibility functions. In this study, a methodology for experimental modal analysis using high-speed 3D digital image correlation and base motion excitation tests is proposed. In particular, a cantilever beam was excited from its base with a random signal, using a clamped edge join. Full-field transmissibility functions were obtained through the beam and converted into FRF for proper identification, considering a single degree-of-freedom theoretical conversion. Subsequently, modal identification was performed using a circle-fit approach. The proposed methodology facilitates the management of the typically large amounts of data points involved in the DIC measurement during modal identification. Moreover, it was possible to determine the natural frequencies, damping ratios and full-field mode shapes without requiring any additional tests. Finally, the results were experimentally validated by comparing them with those obtained by employing traditional accelerometers, analytical models and finite element method analyses. The comparison was performed by using the quantitative indicator modal assurance criterion. The results showed a high level of correspondence, consolidating the proposed experimental methodology.

  19. Measurement of the mechanical properties of nickel film based on the full-field deformation:An improved blister method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zihan Wang; Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Chunsheng Lu

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the mechanical properties of thin films, an improved blister method is proposed, which combines a digital speckle correlation method with the blister test. Based on this method, an experimental setup is developed to measure Young's modulus, residual stress, and interfacial adhesion energy of an electroplated nickel film. The results show that the improved blister method has the advantage of a high accuracy full-field measurement with the simple operation and low requirement on environments, which can be used to characterize the mechanical properties of films with various scales from laboratorial to industrial applications.

  20. Full-field tracking and measuring of particle motion in capillary vessels by using time-varying laser speckle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luying; Wang, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    We propose a random perturbation model to describe the variation of laser speckle patterns caused by moving particles in capillary vessels. When passing through probing volume, moving particles encode random perturbations into observed laser speckle patterns. We extract the perturbation envelopes of time-varying laser speckles for tracking the motion of single particle. And, the full-field transverse velocities of flowing particles are obtained by using cross-correlation between the perturbation envelopes. The proposed method is experimentally verified by the use of polymer-microsphere suspension in a glass capillary.

  1. Counting and differentiating aquatic biotic nanoparticles by full-field interferometry: from laboratory tests to Tara Oceans sample analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Boccara, Martine; Bryan, Catherine Venien; Bailly-Bechet, Marc; Bowler, Chris; Boccara, Albert Claude

    2016-01-01

    There is a huge abundance of viruses and membrane vesicles in seawater. We describe a new full-field, incoherently illuminated, shot-noise limited, common-path interferometric detection method that we couple with the analysis of Brownian motion to detect, quantify, and differentiate biotic nanoparticles. We validated the method with calibrated nanoparticles and homogeneous DNA or RNA.viruses. The smallest virus size that we characterized with a suitable signal-to-noise ratio was around 30 nm in diameter. Analysis of Brownian motions revealed anisotropic trajectories for myoviruses.We further applied the method for vesicles detection and for analysis of coastal and oligotrophic samples from Tara Oceans circumnavigation.

  2. Redox and speciation mapping of rock thin sections using high spatial resolution full-field imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, V.; Susini, J.; Salomé, M.; Beraldin, O.; Heymes, T.; Lewin, E.

    2009-04-01

    Because of their complex genesis, natural rocks are the most often heterogeneous systems, with various scale-level heterogeneities for both chemistry and structure. In the last decade, the dramatic improvements of hyperspectral imaging techniques provided new tools for accurate material characterisation. Most of these micro- and nano- analytical techniques rely on scanning instruments, which offer high spatial resolution but suffer from long acquisition times imposing practical limits on the field of view. Conversely, full-field imaging techniques rely on a fast parallel acquisition but have limited resolution. Although soft X-ray full-field microscopes based on Fresnel zone plates are commonly used for high resolution imaging, its combination with spectroscopy is challenging and 2D chemical mapping still difficult. For harder X-rays, lensless X-ray microscope based on simple propagation geometry is easier and can be readily used for 2D spectro-microscopy. A full-field experimental setup was optimized at the ESRF-ID21 beamline to image iron redox and speciation distributions in rocks thin sections. The setup comprises a Si111 or Si220 (E = 0.4 eV) monochromator, a special sample stage and a sensitive camera associated with a brand new GGG:Eu light conversion scintillator and high magnification visible light optics. The pixel size ranges from 1.6 to 0.16 m according to the optic used. This instrument was used to analyse phyllosilicates and oxides of metamorphic sediments coming from the Aspromonte nappes-pile in Calabria. Iron chemical state distributions were derived - from images of 1000 Ã- 2000 Ã- 30 m3 rock thin sections - by subtraction of absorption images above and below the Fe K-edge. Using an automatic stitching reconstruction, a wide field image (4Ã-3 mm2 with a 1 m2 resolution for a total of about 12 millions pixels) of Fetotal elemental distribution was produced. Moreover, -XANES analyses (more than 1 million individual -XANES spectra) were performed

  3. Achromatic and high-resolution full-field X-ray microscopy based on total-reflection mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Emi, Yoji; Kino, Hidetoshi; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2015-04-20

    We developed an achromatic and high-resolution full-field X-ray microscope based on advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics that comprises two pairs of elliptical mirrors and hyperbolic mirrors utilizing the total reflection of X-rays. Performance tests to investigate the spatial resolution and chromatic aberration were performed at SPring-8. The microscope clearly resolved the pattern with ~100-nm feature size. Imaging the pattern by changing the X-ray energy revealed achromatism in the wide energy range of 8-11 keV.

  4. [Dissociation of visual evoked responses to hemi-field or full-field flash-checkerboard stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson-Dollfus, D; Layet, A; Hannequin, D; Menard, J F; Parain, D; Nehili, F

    1984-06-01

    Unexpected visual evoked responses (VERs) were recorded in 5 subjects with tumoral, ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions of the retrochiasmatic visual pathways. The flash pattern stimulation was always binocular and involved full-field and half-field stimuli. In these 5 cases, the total field VER was asymmetrical with anomalies on the affected occipital region. However half-field VERs P100 contralateral to the stimulus were noted both on the normal and on the affected occipital region. One can ask if this is not an electrophysiological equivalent of the clinical relative hemianopsia.

  5. Defect visualization of aircraft UHF antenna radome using full-field pulse-echo ultrasonic propagation imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, H. J.; Hong, S. C.; Lee, J. R.; Kim, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    Most of aircraft antennas usually have various types of radome made of composite materials for protecting antenna structures. However, these antenna radome structures, which are installed on the outside of airplane, are easy to be damaged by external forces such as drag, foreign object, bird strike and others. In this study, full-field pulse-echo ultrasonic propagation imaging (PE UPI) system is proposed as the non-destructive inspection technique to visualize manufacturing defects in composite antenna radome. Based on the results of the sample case study, it is shown that the ultrasonic wave propagation imaging (UWPI) that is generated by the proposed full-field PE UPI system is able to highlight the intact internal condition of antenna structure and its defect area. Additional damage visualization techniques like ultrasonic energy mapping (UEM), variable time window amplitude map (VTWAM) and also ultrasonic spectral imaging (USI) algorithms are applied to improve the reliability of the damage visualization. It can be concluded that the proposed PE UPI system is an effective non-destructive inspection technique for the composite radome structures.

  6. Behaviour model identification based on inverse modeling and using Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM): application on rubber and steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velay, V.; Robert, L.; Schmidt, F.; Hmida, S.; Vallet, T.

    2007-04-01

    Biaxial properties of materials (polymer or steel) used in many industrial processes are often difficult to measure. However, these properties are useful for the numerical simulations of plastic-processing operations like blow moulding or thermoforming for polymers and superplastic forming or single point incremental forming for steels. Today, Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM) are promising tools for experimental analysis of materials. Indeed, they are able to provide a very large amount of data (displacement or strain) spatially distributed. In this paper, a mixed numerical and experimental investigation is proposed in order to identify multi-axial constitutive behaviour models. The procedure is applied on two different materials commonly used in forming processes: polymer (rubber in this first approach) and steel. Experimental tests are performed on various rubber and steel structural specimens (notched and open-hole plate samples) in order to generate heterogeneous displacement field. Two different behaviour models are considered. On the one hand, a Money-Rivlin hyperelastic law is investigated to describe the high levels of strain induced in tensile test performed on a rubber open-hole specimen. On the other hand, Ramberg-Osgood law allows to reproduce elasto-plastic behaviour of steel on a specimen that induces heterogeneous strain fields. Each parameter identification is based on a same Finite Element Model Updated (FEMU) procedure which consists in comparing results provided by the numerical simulation (ABAQUS™) with full field measurements obtained by the DISC (Digital Image Stereo-Correlation) technique (Vic-3D®).

  7. Measurement of high temperature full-field strain up to 2000 °C using digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Chenghai; Jin, Hua; Meng, Songhe; Zhang, Yumin; Xie, Weihua

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the deformation and strain at elevated temperature is a critical factor for the stability of aerodynamic shape, and an important consideration for the thermal protection system design. However, accurate measurement of deformation and strain at high temperatures is a challenge. Here, we present a measurement study for full-field strain mapping up to 2000 °C using digital image correlation (DIC) method, which mainly depends on the quality of speckle patterns on the specimen surface. In our study, the strain values are analyzed by DIC method while specimens are heated using a large electric current. Improvements in filtering and speckling allow the measured temperatures using this method to reach 2000 °C. We confirmed the validity of this method by comparison of measured Young’s modulus values with reference data for Inconel 718 Ni-based superalloy and graphite at different temperatures. Additionally, the full-field strain and Young’s modulus were demonstrated for a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon (C/C) composite uniaxial tensile specimen at 2000 °C.

  8. Image stack alignment in full-field X-ray absorption spectroscopy using SIFT_PyOCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleo, Pierre; Pouyet, Emeline; Kieffer, Jérôme

    2014-03-01

    Full-field X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments allow the acquisition of millions of spectra within minutes. However, the construction of the hyperspectral image requires an image alignment procedure with sub-pixel precision. While the image correlation algorithm has originally been used for image re-alignment using translations, the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm (which is by design robust versus rotation, illumination change, translation and scaling) presents an additional advantage: the alignment can be limited to a region of interest of any arbitrary shape. In this context, a Python module, named SIFT_PyOCL, has been developed. It implements a parallel version of the SIFT algorithm in OpenCL, providing high-speed image registration and alignment both on processors and graphics cards. The performance of the algorithm allows online processing of large datasets.

  9. 3D Imaging of Nickel Oxidation States using Full Field X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Nanotomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, George; Harris, William; Izzo, John; Grew, Kyle N. (Connecticut); (USARL)

    2012-01-20

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) cycling of the nickel electrocatalyst phase in the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode can lead to performance degradation and cell failure. A greater understanding of nickel redox mechanisms at the microstructural level is vital to future SOFC development. Transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) provides several key techniques for exploring oxidation states within SOFC electrode microstructure. Specifically, x-ray nanotomography and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy have been applied to study samples of varying nickel (Ni) and nickel oxide (NiO) compositions. The imaged samples are treated as mock SOFC anodes containing distinct regions of the materials in question. XANES spectra presented for the individual materials provide a basis for the further processing and analysis of mixed samples. Images of composite samples obtained are segmented, and the distinct nickel and nickel oxide phases are uniquely identified using full field XANES spectroscopy. Applications to SOFC analysis are discussed.

  10. High-dynamic-range microscope imaging based on exposure bracketing in full-field optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Montgomery, Paul C; Serio, Bruno; Twardowski, Patrice; Uhring, Wilfried

    2016-04-01

    By applying the proposed high-dynamic-range (HDR) technique based on exposure bracketing, we demonstrate a meaningful reduction in the spatial noise in image frames acquired with a CCD camera so as to improve the fringe contrast in full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). This new signal processing method thus allows improved probing within transparent or semitransparent samples. The proposed method is demonstrated on 3 μm thick transparent polymer films of Mylar, which, due to their transparency, produce low contrast fringe patterns in white-light interference microscopy. High-resolution tomographic analysis is performed using the technique. After performing appropriate signal processing, resulting XZ sections are observed. Submicrometer-sized defects can be lost in the noise that is present in the CCD images. With the proposed method, we show that by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio of the images, submicrometer-sized defect structures can thus be detected.

  11. Full-field, high-spatial-resolution detection of local structural damage from low-resolution random strain field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongchao; Sun, Peng; Nagarajaiah, Satish; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Weisman, R. Bruce

    2017-07-01

    Structural damage is typically a local phenomenon that initiates and propagates within a limited area. As such high spatial resolution measurement and monitoring is often needed for accurate damage detection. This requires either significantly increased costs from denser sensor deployment in the case of global simultaneous/parallel measurements, or increased measurement time and labor in the case of global sequential measurements. This study explores the feasibility of an alternative approach to this problem: a computational solution in which a limited set of randomly positioned, low-resolution global strain measurements are used to reconstruct the full-field, high-spatial-resolution, two-dimensional (2D) strain field and rapidly detect local damage. The proposed approach exploits the implicit low-rank and sparse data structure of the 2D strain field: it is highly correlated without many edges and hence has a low-rank structure, unless damage-manifesting itself as sparse local irregularity-is present and alters such a low-rank structure slightly. Therefore, reconstruction of the full-field, high-spatial-resolution strain field from a limited set of randomly positioned low-resolution global measurements is modeled as a low-rank matrix completion framework and damage detection as a sparse decomposition formulation, enabled by emerging convex optimization techniques. Numerical simulations on a plate structure are conducted for validation. The results are discussed and a practical iterative global/local procedure is recommended. This new computational approach should enable the efficient detection of local damage using limited sets of strain measurements.

  12. Panel discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No Author Given

    1975-01-01

    Panel discussion: summation and future projections. Introductory remarks by panelists followed by questions and comments from the floor. Panelists: Dr. Joseph Barnea (former director of Resources and Transport for the United Nations; energy consultant to the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR)); the Honorable Clyde F. Bel, Jr. (member of the Louisiana House of Representatives representing District 90 and New Orleans); Dr. David Lombard (acting chief of the Advanced Systems Branch of the Division of Geothermal Energy Research and Technology, Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)); Fred C. Repper (vice-president of Central Power and Light Company in Corpus Christi, Texas); Dr. Hans Suter (environmental consultant in Corpus Christi, Texas; environmental columnist for the Corpus Christi Caller Times). Session chairman: Herbert Woodson.

  13. Flat-port connectors

    KAUST Repository

    Alrashed, Mohammed

    2017-05-26

    Disclosed are various embodiments for connectors used with electronic devices, such as input and/or output ports to connect peripheral equipment or accessories. More specifically, various flat-port are provided that can be used in place of standard connectors including, but not limited to, audio jacks and Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports. The flat-port connectors are an alternate connection design to replace the traditional receptacle port (female-port), making the device more sealed creation more dust and water resistant. It is unique in the way of using the outer surfaces of the device for the electrical connection between the ports. Flat-port design can allow the manufacture of extremely thin devices by eliminating the side ports slots that take a lot of space and contribute to the increase thickness of the device. The flat-port receptacle improves the overall appearance of the device and makes it more resistant to dust and water.

  14. Tests of Flat Panels with Four Types of Stiffeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-01-01

    within one-half of 1 percent by a standard tensile test. in this test two Huggenberger tensometers with 1-inch gage lengths were used to measure the...into three equal parts by a lever arrsngement, the loads being 25-pound bags of shot. This lever system wss designed to fit all four stiffener spacings...the platens about an axis normal to the plane of the specimen was very small. In the second and third groups of tests, tensometers were also attached

  15. CMOS Flat-Panel CBCT for Dental Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Han Bean; Cho, Min Kook; Kim, Jee Young; Lee, Hyun Ji; Cho, Bong Hye [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Sung Kyn [E-WOO Technology, Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Computed tomography (CT) has become one of the most frequently used imaging modalities for the preoperative evaluation of the jaw for dental implants. Sometimes dental Implant surgery needs histologic information of the regeneration of bone structure However conventional dental CT cannot serve these information because of its resolution limit. Hence we suggest dental CT which has micro scale resolution with high magnification factor. In these regards, We investigated micro dental CT with optimal magnification factor about our hardware system and evaluated along the 2D and 3D performance experimentally.

  16. Human Visual Performance and Flat Panel Display Image Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    In0.42Ga0.58 amber 617 SiC yellow 590 GaN blue 440 GaN green 515 GaAs:Si with green 550 YF3YbEr GaAs:Si with blue 470 YF3:Yb:Tn InSe yellow 590 3.0...nm, from a neon gas. Other gases , and their discharge colors, which have been used in gas dis- charge displays incude argon (blue), cadmium (red

  17. Combined-load buckling behavior of metal-matrix composite sandwich panels under different thermal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1991-01-01

    Combined compressive and shear buckling analysis was conducted on flat rectangular sandwich panels with the consideration of transverse shear effects of the core. The sandwich panel is fabricated with titanium honeycomb core and laminated metal matrix composite face sheets. The results show that the square panel has the highest combined load buckling strength, and that the buckling strength decreases sharply with the increases of both temperature and panel aspect ratio. The effect of layup (fiber orientation) on the buckling strength of the panels was studied in detail. The metal matrix composite sandwich panel was much more efficient than the sandwich panel with nonreinforced face sheets and had the same specific weight.

  18. Novel method for high accuracy figure measurement of optical flat

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Kewei; Li, Dahai; Yang, Lijie; Guo, Guangrao; Li, Mengyang; Wang, Xuemin; Zhang, Tao; Xiong, Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Phase Measuring Deflectometry (PMD) is a non-contact, high dynamic-range and full-field metrology which becomes a serious competitor to interferometry. However, the accuracy of deflectometry metrology is strongly influenced by the level of the calibrations, including test geometry, imaging pin-hole camera and digital display. In this paper, we propose a novel method that can measure optical flat surface figure to a high accuracy. We first calibrate the camera using a checker pattern shown on a LCD display at six different orientations, and the last orientation is aligned at the same position as the test optical flat. By using this method, lens distortions and the mapping relationship between the CCD pixels and the subaperture coordinates on the test optical flat can be determined at the same time. To further reduce the influence of the calibration errors on measurements, a reference optical flat with a high quality surface is measured, and then the system errors in our PMD setup can be eliminated by subtracting the figure of the reference flat from the figure of the test flat. Although any expensive coordinates measuring machine, such as laser tracker and coordinates measuring machine are not applied in our measurement, our experimental results of optical flat figure from low to high order aberrations still show a good agreement with that from the Fizeau interferometer.

  19. Blind identification of full-field vibration modes from video measurements with phase-based video motion magnification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongchao; Dorn, Charles; Mancini, Tyler; Talken, Zachary; Kenyon, Garrett; Farrar, Charles; Mascareñas, David

    2017-02-01

    user supervision and calibration. First a multi-scale image processing method is applied on the frames of the video of a vibrating structure to extract the local pixel phases that encode local structural vibration, establishing a full-field spatiotemporal motion matrix. Then a high-spatial dimensional, yet low-modal-dimensional, over-complete model is used to represent the extracted full-field motion matrix using modal superposition, which is physically connected and manipulated by a family of unsupervised learning models and techniques, respectively. Thus, the proposed method is able to blindly extract modal frequencies, damping ratios, and full-field (as many points as the pixel number of the video frame) mode shapes from line of sight video measurements of the structure. The method is validated by laboratory experiments on a bench-scale building structure and a cantilever beam. Its ability for output (video measurements)-only identification and visualization of the weakly-excited mode is demonstrated and several issues with its implementation are discussed.

  20. Flat roof integration. CPT solar (AET IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chianese, D.; Pola, I.; Bernasconi, A.; Bura, E.; Cereghetti, N.; Realini, A.; Pasinelli, P.; Rioggi, S.

    2007-11-15

    This illustrated final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at a 15.4 kWp solar power installation in Trevano, Switzerland, that features flexible amorphous silicon triple-junction modules, mounted nearly horizontally and directly laminated to flexible polyolefin membranes that form the covering of a flat roof. The main objective of this study was to verify in which order of magnitude the better thermal behaviour of amorphous silicon cells can compensate for losses due to the quasi-horizontal roof integration (lower irradiation and higher reflection), and thus be competitive in the flat roof construction and refurbishment markets. The modules used and their characteristics are described. Performance, temperature levels and energy-production are reviewed for the panels of the installation. The performance of the inverter used is also reviewed. Data on temperatures and production are presented in graphical form and optical losses are examined.

  1. Full-field wing deformation measurement scheme for in-flight cantilever monoplane based on 3D digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei-Gang; Liang, Jin; Guo, Xiang; Guo, Cheng; Hu, Hao; Tang, Zheng-Zong

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a new non-contact scheme, based on 3D digital image correlation technology, is presented to measure the full-field wing deformation of in-flight cantilever monoplanes. Because of the special structure of the cantilever wing, two conjugated camera groups, which are rigidly connected and calibrated to an ensemble respectively, are installed onto the vertical fin of the aircraft and record the whole measurement. First, a type of pre-stretched target and speckle pattern are designed to adapt the oblique camera view for accurate detection and correlation. Then, because the measurement cameras are swinging with the aircraft vertical trail all the time, a camera position self-correction method (using control targets sprayed on the back of the aircraft), is designed to orientate all the cameras’ exterior parameters to a unified coordinate system in real time. Besides, for the excessively inclined camera axis and the vertical camera arrangement, a weak correlation between the high position image and low position image occurs. In this paper, a new dual-temporal efficient matching method, combining the principle of seed point spreading, is proposed to achieve the matching of weak correlated images. A novel system is developed and a simulation test in the laboratory was carried out to verify the proposed scheme.

  2. Full-field bulge test for planar anisotropic tissues: part I--experimental methods applied to human skin tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Theresa K; Atlan, Lorre S; Voo, Liming M; Nguyen, Thao D

    2013-04-01

    The nonlinear anisotropic properties of human skin tissue were investigated using bulge testing. Full-field displacement data were obtained during testing of human skin tissues procured from the lower back of post-mortem human subjects using 3-D digital image correlation. To measure anisotropy, the dominant fiber direction of the tissue was determined from the deformed geometry of the specimen. Local strains and stress resultants were calculated along both the dominant fiber direction and the perpendicular direction. Variation in anisotropy and stiffness was observed between specimens. The use of stress resultants rather than the membrane stress approximation accounted for bending effects, which are significant for a thick nonlinear tissue. Of the six specimens tested, it was observed that specimens from older donors exhibited a stiffer and more isotropic response than those from younger donors. It was seen that the mechanical response of the tissue was negligibly impacted by preconditioning or the ambient humidity. The methods presented in this work for skin tissue are sufficiently general to be applied to other planar tissues, such as pericardium, gastrointestinal tissue, and fetal membranes. The stress resultant-stretch relations will be used in a companion paper to obtain material parameters for a nonlinear anisotropic hyperelastic model. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Super-resolved image acquisition with full-field localization-based microscopy: theoretical analysis and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Taehwang; Lee, Wonju; Kim, Donghyun

    2016-02-01

    We analyze and evaluate super-resolved image acquisition with full-field localization microscopy in which an individual signal sampled by localization may or may not be switched. For the analysis, Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem based on ideal delta function was extended to sampling with unit pulse comb and surface-enhanced localized near-field that was numerically calculated with finite difference time domain. Sampling with unit pulse was investigated in Fourier domain where magnitude of baseband becomes larger than that of adjacent subband, i.e. aliasing effect is reduced owing to pulse width. Standard Lena image was employed as imaging target and a diffraction-limited optical system is assumed. A peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) was introduced to evaluate the efficiency of image reconstruction quantitatively. When the target was sampled without switching by unit pulse as the sampling width and period are varied, PSNR increased eventually to 18.1 dB, which is the PSNR of a conventional diffraction-limited image. PSNR was found to increase with a longer pulse width due to reduced aliasing effect. When switching of individual sampling pulses was applied, blurry artifact outside the excited field is removed for each pulse and PSNR soars to 25.6 dB with a shortened pulse period, i.e. effective resolution of 72 nm is obtained, which can further be decreased.

  4. Defect Localization Capabilities of a Global Detection Scheme: Spatial Pattern Recognition Using Full-field Vibration Test Data in Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Prabhu, M.; Arnold, S. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recently, a conceptually simple approach, based on the notion of defect energy in material space has been developed and extensively studied (from the theoretical and computational standpoints). The present study focuses on its evaluation from the viewpoint of damage localization capabilities in case of two-dimensional plates; i.e., spatial pattern recognition on surfaces. To this end, two different experimental modal test results are utilized; i.e., (1) conventional modal testing using (white noise) excitation and accelerometer-type sensors and (2) pattern recognition using Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI), a full field method capable of analyzing the mechanical vibration of complex structures. Unlike the conventional modal testing technique (using contacting accelerometers), these emerging ESPI technologies operate in a non-contacting mode, can be used even under hazardous conditions with minimal or no presence of noise and can simultaneously provide measurements for both translations and rotations. Results obtained have clearly demonstrated the robustness and versatility of the global NDE scheme developed. The vectorial character of the indices used, which enabled the extraction of distinct patterns for localizing damages proved very useful. In the context of the targeted pattern recognition paradigm, two algorithms were developed for the interrogation of test measurements; i.e., intensity contour maps for the damaged index, and the associated defect energy vector field plots.

  5. A full-field strategy to take texture-induced anisotropy into account during FE simulations of metal forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houtte, Paul; Gawad, Jerzy; Eyckens, Philip; van Bael, Bert; Samaey, Giovanni; Roose, Dirk

    2011-11-01

    During metal forming, the mechanical properties in all locations of the part evolve, usually in a heterogeneous way. In principle, this should be taken into account when performing finite element (FE) simulations of the forming process, by modeling the evolution of the mechanical properties in every integration point of the FE mesh and coupling the result back to the FEshell. This is the meaning of the term `full-field modeling.' The issue is developed further with focus on the evolution of texture and plastic anisotropy. It is explained that in principle, such fullfield modeling would require a gigantic computational effort which (at least at present) would be out of reach of most research organizations. A methodology is then presented to overcome this difficulty by using efficient models for texture updating and for texture-based plastic anisotropy, and by optimizing the overall calculation scheme without sacrificing the accuracy of the texture prediction. Some of the first results (obtained for cup drawing of anisotropic deep drawing steel) are shown, including comparison to experimental results. Possible future applications of the method are proposed.

  6. Full-field dynamic strain prediction on a wind turbine using displacements of optical targets measured by stereophotogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqersad, Javad; Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Health monitoring of rotating structures (e.g. wind turbines and helicopter blades) has historically been a challenge due to sensing and data transmission problems. Unfortunately mechanical failure in many structures initiates at components on or inside the structure where there is no sensor located to predict the failure. In this paper, a wind turbine was mounted with a semi-built-in configuration and was excited using a mechanical shaker. A series of optical targets was distributed along the blades and the fixture and the displacement of those targets during excitation was measured using a pair of high speed cameras. Measured displacements with three dimensional point tracking were transformed to all finite element degrees of freedom using a modal expansion algorithm. The expanded displacements were applied to the finite element model to predict the full-field dynamic strain on the surface of the structure as well as within the interior points. To validate the methodology of dynamic strain prediction, the predicted strain was compared to measured strain by using six mounted strain-gages. To verify if a simpler model of the turbine can be used for the expansion, the expansion process was performed both by using the modes of the entire turbine and modes of a single cantilever blade. The results indicate that the expansion approach can accurately predict the strain throughout the turbine blades from displacements measured by using stereophotogrammetry.

  7. Combined use of fine needle aspiration cytology and full field digital mammography in preoperative assessment of breast masses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanan Zhang; Junsheng Li; Zhenling Ji; Wenhao Tang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of these two methods and focus on the analysis and management of the false-negative cases.Methods: Results of full field digital mammography (FFDM) and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC)were obtained and analyzed from a consecutive of 102 women with palpable breast masses, results were correlated with the histopathological findings.Results: Of the 102 cases, malignancy was confirmed in 43 cases (42.16%) by final pathological examination, the sensitivity and specificity of cancer detection with FNA cytology was 90.7% (39/43) and 89.8% (53/59), respectively, the whole accuracy was 90.2% (92/102), with a positive predictive value of 86.7% (39/45) and a negative predictive value of 93.0% (53/57).FFDM gave a sensitivity of 88.4% (38/43), specificity of 83.1% (49/59), and whole accuracy 85.3% (87/102), the positive predictive value and negative predictive value was 79.2% (38/48) and 90.7% (49/54), respectively.All the FNAC-negative cancer cases were suggestive of malignancy by FFDM findings, however, the benign cases which presentas equivocal finding by FNA cytology, could not be ruled out the presence of malignancy.Conclusion: FNAC and FFDM both are accurate, effective and economical diagnostic modalities, combined use of these two methods can reduced the misdiagnosis rate of breast masses.

  8. Time-Lapse Observation of Electrolysis of Copper Sulfate with a Full-Field X-ray Fluorescence Imaging Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohigashi, Takuji; Aota, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Norio; Takano, Hidekazu; Yokosuka, Hiroki; Aoki, Sadao

    2008-06-01

    The time-lapse observation of the electrodeposition of copper in copper sulfate solution was performed by imaging X-ray fluorescence from the copper deposition. The X-ray fluorescence was directly imaged with a full-field Wolter mirror microscope, which was constructed at the Photon Factory. Controlling the electric current in the solution from 0 to 71.7 µA, the deposition of copper on a Pt cathode was directly observed by imaging its X-ray fluorescence. One exposure time for obtaining an X-ray fluorescence image was 80 s. Then, it was 17 min later from the beginning of the electrolysis when the X-ray fluorescence image of the electrodeposition is observed for the first time. At this exposure time, the detection limit of the mass of copper was estimated to be 0.60 pg/image, which was calculated using test samples of 1.00×10-3-1.00 mol/l copper sulfate solutions.

  9. Full field residual stress determination using hole-drilling and electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI with phase unwrapping method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyu B.I.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The hole-drilling strain gauge technique has become a standard method in measuring residual stresses [1]. Moiré interferometry combining hole-drilling method opens additional opportunity for full-field residual stress measurement using optical interferometry [2]. The optical moiré method has a non-contact feature comparing with strain gauge method. Yet Moiré interferometry suffers a drawback in its complicated grating preparation on one hand and it is difficult to be applied to work piece with complicated geometry on the other hand. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI provides information about the displacement field of a surface and it can be conveniently used on asreceived surfaces without special surface preparation and can be applied to work piece with complicated geometry that may be unsuitable for applying strain gauge or gratings. Studies on combining ESPI with hole-drilling show that is feasible to obtain reasonable residual stress values [3, 4]. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the detail of hole-drilling technique combining ESPI with phase unwrapping method to reveal the full field stress distribution and to measure the associated stress field on a thin specimen exerted by a uni-axial load. This study also demonstrates the noise reduction achieved by Gaussian low pass filter and a successful phase unwrapping resulted from five-step phase shifting and cellular automata method. Figure 1 shows the experimental setup of the ESPI system and the hole-drilling system. The light from a laser source is split into two beams. One split beam emerges from a PZT-stage to provide stepwise phase shifting and it further interferes with the other split image beam on the specimen surface to produce speckle patterns onto the CCD camera. By recording the speckle images of stepwise phase shifting before and after hole-drilling, the fringe patterns at each step can be obtained. Through a uniaxial loading fixture loads with

  10. Rapid and high-resolution imaging of human liver specimens by full-field optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yue; Gao, Wanrong; Zhou, Yuan; Guo, Yingcheng; Guo, Feng; He, Yong

    2015-11-01

    We report rapid and high-resolution tomographic en face imaging of human liver specimens by full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). First, the arrangement of the FF-OCT system was described and the performance of the system was measured. The measured axial and lateral resolutions of the system are 0.8 and 0.9 μm, respectively. The system has a sensitivity of ˜60 dB and can achieve an imaging rate of 7 fps and a penetration depth of ˜80 μm. The histological structures of normal liver can be seen clearly in the en face tomographic images, including central veins, cords of hepatocytes separated by sinusoidal spaces, and portal area (portal vein, the hepatic arteriole, and the bile duct). A wide variety of histological subtypes of hepatocellular carcinoma was observed in en face tomographic images, revealing notable cancerous features, including the nuclear atypia (enlarged convoluted nuclei), the polygonal tumor cells with obvious resemblance to hepatocytes with enlarged nuclei. In addition, thicker fibrous bands, which make the cytoplasmic plump vesicular nuclei indistinct, were also seen in the images. Finally, comparison between the portal vein in a normal specimen versus that seen in the rare type of cholangiocarcinoma was made. The results show that the cholangiocarcinoma presents with a blurred pattern of portal vein in the lateral direction and an aggregated distribution in the axial direction; the surrounding sinusoidal spaces and nuclei of cholangiocarcinoma are absent. The findings in this work may be used as additional signs of liver cancer or cholangiocarcinoma, demonstrating capacity of FF-OCT device for early cancer diagnosis and many other tumor-related studies in biopsy.

  11. Performance of computer-aided detection applied to full-field digital mammography in detection of breast cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadaf, Arifa, E-mail: arifa.sadaf@gmail.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X5 (Canada); Crystal, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.crystal@utoronto.ca [Department of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X5 (Canada); Scaranelo, Anabel, E-mail: anabel.scaranelo@uhn.on.ca [Department of Medical Imaging, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Rm 3-922, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Helbich, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.helbich@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University Vienna - General Hospital Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, Floor 7F, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate performance of computer-aided detection (CAD) with full-field digital mammography (FFDM) in detection of breast cancers. Materials and Methods: CAD was retrospectively applied to standard mammographic views of 127 cases with biopsy proven breast cancers detected with FFDM (Senographe 2000, GE Medical Systems). CAD sensitivity was assessed in total group of 127 cases and for subgroups based on breast density, mammographic lesion type, mammographic lesion size, histopathology and mode of presentation. Results: Overall CAD sensitivity was 91% (115 of 127 cases). There were no statistical differences (p > 0.1) in CAD detection of cancers in dense breasts 90% (53/59) versus non-dense breasts 91% (62/68). There was statistical difference (p < 0.05) in CAD detection of cancers that appeared mammographically as microcalcifications only versus other mammographic manifestations. CAD detected 100% (44/44) of cancers manifesting as microcalcifications, 89% (47/53) as no-calcified masses or asymmetries, 88% (14/16) as masses with associated calcifications, and 71% (10/14) as architectural distortions. CAD sensitivity for cancers 1-10 mm was 84% (38/45); 11-20 mm 93% (55/59); and >20 mm 97% (22/23). Conclusion: CAD applied to FFDM showed 100% sensitivity in identifying cancers manifesting as microcalcifications only and high sensitivity 86% (71/83) for other mammographic appearances of cancer. Sensitivity is influenced by lesion size. CAD in FFDM is an adjunct helping radiologist in early detection of breast cancers.

  12. Mapping 3D breast lesions from full-field digital mammograms using subject-specific finite element models

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, E.; Oliver, A.; Diaz, O.; Diez, Y.; Gubern-Mérida, A.; Martí, R.; Martí, J.

    2017-03-01

    Patient-specific finite element (FE) models of the breast have received increasing attention due to the potential capability of fusing images from different modalities. During the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to X-ray mammography registration procedure, the FE model is compressed mimicking the mammographic acquisition. Subsequently, suspicious lesions in the MRI volume can be projected into the 2D mammographic space. However, most registration algorithms do not provide the reverse information, avoiding to obtain the 3D geometrical information from the lesions localized in the mammograms. In this work we introduce a fast method to localize the 3D position of the lesion within the MRI, using both cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) mammographic projections, indexing the tetrahedral elements of the biomechanical model by means of an uniform grid. For each marked lesion in the Full-Field Digital Mammogram (FFDM), the X-ray path from source to the marker is calculated. Barycentric coordinates are computed in the tetrahedrons traversed by the ray. The list of elements and coordinates allows to localize two curves within the MRI and the closest point between both curves is taken as the 3D position of the lesion. The registration errors obtained in the mammographic space are 9.89 +/- 3.72 mm in CC- and 8.04 +/- 4.68 mm in MLO-projection and the error in the 3D MRI space is equal to 10.29 +/- 3.99 mm. Regarding the uniform grid, it is computed spending between 0.1 and 0.7 seconds. The average time spent to compute the 3D location of a lesion is about 8 ms.

  13. Evaluation of automatic exposure control performance in full-field digital mammography systems using contrast-detail analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez Castellanos, Ivan M.; Kaczmarek, Richard; Brunner, Claudia C.; de Las Heras, Hugo; Liu, Haimo; Chakrabarti, Kish

    2012-03-01

    Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) is increasingly replacing screen-film systems for screening and diagnosis of breast abnormalities. All FFDM systems are equipped with an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) which automatically selects technique factors to optimize dose and image quality. It is therefore crucial that AEC performance is properly adjusted and optimized to different breast thicknesses. In this work, we studied the AEC performance of three widely used FFDM systems using the CDMAM and QUART mam/digi phantoms. We used the CDMAM phantom to generate Contrast-Detail (C-D) curves for each AEC mode available in the FFDM systems under study for phantoms with equivalent X-Ray attenuation properties as 3.2 cm, 6 cm and 7.5 cm thick breasts. Generated C-D curves were compared with ideal C-D curves constructed using a metric referred to as the k-factor which is the product of the thickness and the diameter of the smallest correctly identified disks in the CDMAM phantom. Previous observer studies have indicated that k-factor values of 60 to 80 μm2 are particularly useful in demonstrating the threshold for object detectability for detectors used in digital mammography systems. The QUART mam/digi phantom was used to calculate contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values at different phantom thicknesses. The results of the C-D analysis and CNR measurements were used to determine limiting CNR values intended to provide a threshold for proper image quality assessment. The results of the Contrast-Detail analysis show that for two of the three evaluated FFDM systems, at higher phantom thicknesses, low contrast signal detectability gets worse. This agrees with the results obtained with the QUART mam/digi phantom, where CNR decreases below determined limiting CNR values.

  14. Microcalcification detection in full-field digital mammograms with PFCM clustering and weighted SVM-based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Mei, Ming; Liu, Jun; Hu, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Clustered microcalcifications (MCs) in mammograms are an important early sign of breast cancer in women. Their accurate detection is important in computer-aided detection (CADe). In this paper, we integrated the possibilistic fuzzy c-means (PFCM) clustering algorithm and weighted support vector machine (WSVM) for the detection of MC clusters in full-field digital mammograms (FFDM). For each image, suspicious MC regions are extracted with region growing and active contour segmentation. Then geometry and texture features are extracted for each suspicious MC, a mutual information-based supervised criterion is used to select important features, and PFCM is applied to cluster the samples into two clusters. Weights of the samples are calculated based on possibilities and typicality values from the PFCM, and the ground truth labels. A weighted nonlinear SVM is trained. During the test process, when an unknown image is presented, suspicious regions are located with the segmentation step, selected features are extracted, and the suspicious MC regions are classified as containing MC or not by the trained weighted nonlinear SVM. Finally, the MC regions are analyzed with spatial information to locate MC clusters. The proposed method is evaluated using a database of 410 clinical mammograms and compared with a standard unweighted support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The detection performance is evaluated using response receiver operating (ROC) curves and free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curves. The proposed method obtained an area under the ROC curve of 0.8676, while the standard SVM obtained an area of 0.8268 for MC detection. For MC cluster detection, the proposed method obtained a high sensitivity of 92 % with a false-positive rate of 2.3 clusters/image, and it is also better than standard SVM with 4.7 false-positive clusters/image at the same sensitivity.

  15. Supersonic Flutter of Laminated Curved Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganapathi

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic flutter analysis of laminated composite curved panels is investigated using doubly-curved, quadrilateral, shear flexible, shell element based on field-consistency approach. The formulation includes transverse shear deformation, in-plane and rotary inertias. The aerodynamic force is evaluated using two-dimensional static aerodynamic approximation for high supersonic flow. Initially, the model developed here is verified for the flutter analysis of flat plates. Numerical results are presented for isotropic, orthotropic and laminated anisotropic curved panels. A detailed parametric study is carried out to observe the effects of aspect and thickness ratios, number of layers, lamination scheme, and boundary conditions on flutter boundary.

  16. Individual energy savings for individual flats in blocks of flats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anker; Rose, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that similar flats in a block do not have the same energy demand. Part of the explanation for this is the location of the flat in the building, e.g. on the top floor, at the house end or in the middle of the building. It is possible to take this into account when the heating bill...... is distributed on the individual flats. Today, most blocks of flats have individual heat meters to save energy and to ensure a fair distribution of the cost. If all flats have the same indoor temperature, the distribution is correct. In practice, the inhabitants of the different flats maintain different indoor...

  17. Comparison of image quality using a X-ray stereotactical whole-body system and a direct flat-panel X-ray device in examinations of the pelvis and knee; Bildqualitativer Vergleich eines roentgenstereotaktischen Ganzkoerperaufnahmesystems mit der direkten Flachdetektor-Radiografie anhand von Untersuchungen des Beckens und des Knies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, K.B.; Weber, C.; Schwabe, H. [Klinikum der Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; and others

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The novel biplanar X-ray unit 'EOS', EOS Imaging, allows to acquire simultaneously 2 perpendicular planes of full-length spine and limbs and to measure spatially correct angles based on the acquired image data sets. This is to be seen alongside with a low spatial resolution, high investment costs and high operating expenses. The use of the biplanar X-ray unit in morphology based skeletal radiography might improve the cost-benefit-relation. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare image quality of the EOS-unit and the flat panel (FP)-technology as reference in a clinical setting. Materials and Methods: All 114 patients of the Orthopedic Hospital Dept., who had a biplanar full-length lower limb radiograph and a FP-examination of the pelvis and/or the knee with maximum time interval of 3 months without changes in the clinical and radiological findings were included in the study. All X-ray examinations had been carried out due to clinical indications. Secondary captures comparable to the FP-images were extracted from the electronic EOS-image data sets. 4 radiologists independently from each other compared the visualization of normal anatomical structures of the pseudonymous EOS- and FP-images in a randomized order. Results: In the overview of all readers and all skeletal regions image quality of the FP-images was considered being superior in a mean of 83 {+-} 13 % standard deviation of the pair comparisons (minimum 48 %, maximum 100 %). Image quality of the EOS-images was assessed as being superior in 2 {+-} 3 % of the cases (0 %, 10 %). Image quality of 0.8 {+-} 3 % of the FP-images (0 %, 17 %) and 30 {+-} 34 % (0 %, 100 %) of the EOS-images was estimated as diagnostically inadequate. 30 {+-} 33 % of the pair comparisons (0 %, 100 %) showed a diagnostically inadequate image quality of the EOS-images and a diagnostically good image quality of the FP-images. Conclusion: Image quality of biplanar full-length lower limb X-ray examinations is not

  18. Application of flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in interventional therapy for carotid cavernous fistutas:initial clinical experience%平板DSA新技术在介入治疗颈内动脉海绵窦瘘中应用初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石强; 梁传声; 臧培卓; 徐克

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the clinical value offlat-panel digital subtraction angiography (DSA)in interventional therapy for carotid-cavemous fistula (CCF). Methods Three-dimensional (3D)DSA Was performed in 12 patients with CCF before the interventional therapy.The fistular orifice was located and measured with multiplanar reconstruction technique,and the Landscap roadmap of the fistula was obtained.Fistula embolization was performed according to the location of the fistular orifice and the surrounding bony marker indicated by 3D and Landscap roadmap. Results The fistular orifices were clearly displayed in the 12 patients with an average orifice diameter of 3.7 mm.The intemal carotid artery(ICA)and the bony marker of the cavernous sinus were shown simultaneously.Ten patients received endovascular embolization wiith detachable balloon, and 1 patient was treated wiith coil and 1 with stent placement.The ICA remained patent in 11 cases and carotid artery occlusion was performed in 1 case. Conclusion The 3D flat-panel DSA provides rich infolrmati,Ion on the fistular orifice,,and the bony markers can be identified by landscape roadmap technique..The combination of these two techniques guarantees effective and safe treatment of CCE.%目的 探讨平板DSA新技术在介入治疗颈内动脉海绵窦瘘(CCF)中的应用价值.方法 12例CCF患者术前行3DDSA检查,应用多平面重建技术定位瘘口并对瘘口进行测量.治疗中利用可调控实时透视路途技术(Landscap技术)制作路径图,以3D图像所示瘘口及周围骨性标志作为对照进行封堵治疗.结果 12例CCF均可清晰定位瘘口,瘘口直径平均3.7 mm.利用Landscap技术使颈内动脉路径及海绵窦骨性标志同时可见.球囊栓塞10例,弹簧圈栓塞1例,支架封堵瘘口1例.颈内动脉通畅11例,1例行颈内动脉闭塞.结论 平板DSA 3D技术提供了瘘口的丰富信息,Landscap技术为治疗增加了骨性标志,其联合应用为治疗CCF提供了安全保障.

  19. Complete data preparation flow for Massively Parallel E-Beam lithography on 28nm node full-field design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Aurélien; Browning, Clyde; Brandt, Pieter; Chartoire, Jacky; Bérard-Bergery, Sébastien; Hazart, Jérôme; Chagoya, Alexandre; Postnikov, Sergei; Saib, Mohamed; Lattard, Ludovic; Schavione, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Massively parallel mask-less electron beam lithography (MP-EBL) offers a large intrinsic flexibility at a low cost of ownership in comparison to conventional optical lithography tools. This attractive direct-write technique needs a dedicated data preparation flow to correct both electronic and resist processes. Moreover, Data Prep has to be completed in a short enough time to preserve the flexibility advantage of MP-EBL. While the MP-EBL tools have currently entered an advanced stage of development, this paper will focus on the data preparation side of the work for specifically the MAPPER Lithography FLX-1200 tool [1]-[4], using the ASELTA Nanographics Inscale software. The complete flow as well as the methodology used to achieve a full-field layout data preparation, within an acceptable cycle time, will be presented. Layout used for Data Prep evaluation was one of a 28 nm technology node Metal1 chip with a field size of 26x33mm2, compatible with typical stepper/scanner field sizes and wafer stepping plans. Proximity Effect Correction (PEC) was applied to the entire field, which was then exported as a single file to MAPPER Lithography's machine format, containing fractured shapes and dose assignments. The Soft Edge beam to beam stitching method was employed in the specific overlap regions defined by the machine format as well. In addition to PEC, verification of the correction was included as part of the overall data preparation cycle time. This verification step was executed on the machine file format to ensure pattern fidelity and accuracy as late in the flow as possible. Verification over the full chip, involving billions of evaluation points, is performed both at nominal conditions and at Process Window corners in order to ensure proper exposure and process latitude. The complete MP-EBL data preparation flow was demonstrated for a 28 nm node Metal1 layout in 37 hours. The final verification step shows that the Edge Placement Error (EPE) is kept below 2.25 nm

  20. Detective quantum efficiency measured as a function of energy for two full-field digital mammography systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, N W [Clinical Physics CAU, Barts and The London NHS Trust, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, London, EC1A 6BE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Nick.Marshall@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk

    2009-05-07

    This paper presents detective quantum efficiency (DQE) data measured for a range of x-ray beam qualities for two full-field digital mammography (FFDM) systems: a caesium iodide (CsI) detector-based unit and a system designed around an amorphous selenium (a-Se) x-ray detector. Four beam qualities were studied for each system, covering mean energies from 17.8 keV to 23.4 keV for the CsI system and 17.8 keV to 24.7 keV for the a-Se unit. These were set using 2, 4, 6 and 7 cm polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) and typical tube voltage and target/filter combinations selected by the automatic exposure control (AEC) program used clinically on these systems. Normalized noise power spectra (NNPS) were calculated from flood images acquired at these beam qualities for a target detector air kerma of 100 {mu}Gy. Modulation transfer function (MTF) data were acquired at 28 kV and Mo/Mo target/filter setting. The DQE was then calculated from the MTF and NNPS results. For comparison, the quantum detective efficiency (QDE) and energy absorption efficiency (EAE) were calculated from tabulated narrow beam spectral data. With regard to detector response, some energy dependence was noted for pixel value plotted against air kerma at the detector. This amounted to a change in the gradient of the detector response of approximately 15% and 30% per keV for the CsI- and a-Se-based systems, respectively. For the DQE results, a reduction in DQE(0) of 22% was found for the CsI-based unit as beam quality changed from 25 kV Mo/Mo and 2 cm PMMA to 32 kV Rh/Rh and 7 cm PMMA. For the a-Se system, a change in beam quality from 25 kV Mo/Mo and 2 cm PMMA to 34 kV Mo/Rh and 7 cm PMMA led to a reduction in DQE(0) of 8%. Comparing measured data with simple calculations, a reduction in x-ray quantum detection efficiency of 27% was expected for the CsI-based system, while a reduction of 11% was predicted for the a-Se system.

  1. Detective quantum efficiency measured as a function of energy for two full-field digital mammography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, N W

    2009-05-07

    This paper presents detective quantum efficiency (DQE) data measured for a range of x-ray beam qualities for two full-field digital mammography (FFDM) systems: a caesium iodide (CsI) detector-based unit and a system designed around an amorphous selenium (a-Se) x-ray detector. Four beam qualities were studied for each system, covering mean energies from 17.8 keV to 23.4 keV for the CsI system and 17.8 keV to 24.7 keV for the a-Se unit. These were set using 2, 4, 6 and 7 cm polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) and typical tube voltage and target/filter combinations selected by the automatic exposure control (AEC) program used clinically on these systems. Normalized noise power spectra (NNPS) were calculated from flood images acquired at these beam qualities for a target detector air kerma of 100 microGy. Modulation transfer function (MTF) data were acquired at 28 kV and Mo/Mo target/filter setting. The DQE was then calculated from the MTF and NNPS results. For comparison, the quantum detective efficiency (QDE) and energy absorption efficiency (EAE) were calculated from tabulated narrow beam spectral data. With regard to detector response, some energy dependence was noted for pixel value plotted against air kerma at the detector. This amounted to a change in the gradient of the detector response of approximately 15% and 30% per keV for the CsI- and a-Se-based systems, respectively. For the DQE results, a reduction in DQE(0) of 22% was found for the CsI-based unit as beam quality changed from 25 kV Mo/Mo and 2 cm PMMA to 32 kV Rh/Rh and 7 cm PMMA. For the a-Se system, a change in beam quality from 25 kV Mo/Mo and 2 cm PMMA to 34 kV Mo/Rh and 7 cm PMMA led to a reduction in DQE(0) of 8%. Comparing measured data with simple calculations, a reduction in x-ray quantum detection efficiency of 27% was expected for the CsI-based system, while a reduction of 11% was predicted for the a-Se system.

  2. Relationship between Full-Field Digital Mammographic Features and Clinicopathologic Characteristics in 176 Cases with Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe Sun; Hongwei Liang; Huimian Xu

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Different mammographic features are probably predictive of different prognosis. However, ambiguity still exists in understanding the relationship between them. In resent years, digital mammography has been available for clinical use which has led to a revolution in the resolving of images and an increase in early-stage breast cancer detection.Based on the above knowledge, this study was performed to evaluate the relationship between full-field digital mammographic features and clinicopathologic characteristics in breast cancer.METHODS Digital mammograms of 176 patients with pathologically proven breast cancer were reviewed. Also, clinical and pathologic records (histological types and axillary lymph nodes status) were retrospectively examined.RESULTS Most of the patients with a solitary microcalcification were young women under the age of 50(84.4%), but the majority of the patients with microcalcifications complicated by a mass were elderly women. Microcalcifications detected by mammography occurred frequently in ductal carcinoma in situ (28.1%) and in early invasive carcinoma (15.6%). Breast cancers with expression of microcalcifications combined with a spiculate mass had a high metastatic rate of axillary lymph nodes (69.4%). A high metastatic rate of axillary lymph nodes was also found in the patients with solitary worm-like microcalcifications (57.1%), solitary spiculate mass (53.7%) and solitary non-worm-like microcalcifications (44.4%). Simple worm-like microcalcifications accompanied with metastasis of 4 to 9 axillary lymph nodes occurred in 42.9% of the(6/14) cases. The patients with microcalcifications combined by a spiculate mass and with metastasis of 4 to 9 axillary lymph nodes accounted for 27.8% (10/36) of the cases,and those with metastases of 10 and over accounted for 16.7% (6/36).CONCLUSION Solitary microcalcifications occur frequently in young women and are usually associated with early breast cancer. There is a close relationship

  3. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors: Automated measurement development for full field digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, E. E.; Sellers, T. A.; Lu, B. [Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Division of Population Sciences, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Heine, J. J. [Department of Cancer Imaging and Metabolism, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors are used for standardized mammographic reporting and are assessed visually. This reporting is clinically relevant because breast composition can impact mammographic sensitivity and is a breast cancer risk factor. New techniques are presented and evaluated for generating automated BI-RADS breast composition descriptors using both raw and calibrated full field digital mammography (FFDM) image data.Methods: A matched case-control dataset with FFDM images was used to develop three automated measures for the BI-RADS breast composition descriptors. Histograms of each calibrated mammogram in the percent glandular (pg) representation were processed to create the new BR{sub pg} measure. Two previously validated measures of breast density derived from calibrated and raw mammograms were converted to the new BR{sub vc} and BR{sub vr} measures, respectively. These three measures were compared with the radiologist-reported BI-RADS compositions assessments from the patient records. The authors used two optimization strategies with differential evolution to create these measures: method-1 used breast cancer status; and method-2 matched the reported BI-RADS descriptors. Weighted kappa (κ) analysis was used to assess the agreement between the new measures and the reported measures. Each measure's association with breast cancer was evaluated with odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for body mass index, breast area, and menopausal status. ORs were estimated as per unit increase with 95% confidence intervals.Results: The three BI-RADS measures generated by method-1 had κ between 0.25–0.34. These measures were significantly associated with breast cancer status in the adjusted models: (a) OR = 1.87 (1.34, 2.59) for BR{sub pg}; (b) OR = 1.93 (1.36, 2.74) for BR{sub vc}; and (c) OR = 1.37 (1.05, 1.80) for BR{sub vr}. The measures generated by method-2 had κ between 0.42–0.45. Two of these

  4. Flat covers of modules

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jinzhong

    1996-01-01

    Since the injective envelope and projective cover were defined by Eckmann and Bas in the 1960s, they have had great influence on the development of homological algebra, ring theory and module theory. In the 1980s, Enochs introduced the flat cover and conjectured that every module has such a cover over any ring. This book provides the uniform methods and systematic treatment to study general envelopes and covers with the emphasis on the existence of flat cover. It shows that Enochs' conjecture is true for a large variety of interesting rings, and then presents the applications of the results. Readers with reasonable knowledge in rings and modules will not have difficulty in reading this book. It is suitable as a reference book and textbook for researchers and graduate students who have an interest in this field.

  5. Flat Earth图片

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    欢迎来到这期的光盘介绍。本月的附刊光盘中,除了每月的精彩教程外,您可在光盘中找到15张由Flat Earth友情提供的库存图片。当然还有Twixtor和最新的Acrobat Reader 7。

  6. Damage Function Rating Procedure for Flat Slab Basement Shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    with solid heads at the columns . These types of slabs are 33 I r~ Omm- D6U0St - m . -I ig. "-.TyiaaFalSasontucin 34 -4 called ribbed, or " waffle ", slabs ...and for design purposes are considered flat slabs with the solid heads at the columns performing the same function as the drop panels. Waffle flat...she:.ers, an upgrading method must be developed and verified by test for these critical stress areas adjacent to the column supports. Waffle Slabs

  7. APPLIED ORIGAMI. Origami of thick panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Peng, Rui; You, Zhong

    2015-07-24

    Origami patterns, including the rigid origami patterns in which flat inflexible sheets are joined by creases, are primarily created for zero-thickness sheets. In order to apply them to fold structures such as roofs, solar panels, and space mirrors, for which thickness cannot be disregarded, various methods have been suggested. However, they generally involve adding materials to or offsetting panels away from the idealized sheet without altering the kinematic model used to simulate folding. We develop a comprehensive kinematic synthesis for rigid origami of thick panels that differs from the existing kinematic model but is capable of reproducing motions identical to that of zero-thickness origami. The approach, proven to be effective for typical origami, can be readily applied to fold real engineering structures.

  8. Underwater Explosion Damage of Ship Hull Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rarnajeyathilagam

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Underwater explosion is a major threat to ships and submarines in a war environment. The prediction of the mode and the extent of the failure is an essential step in designing for shock loading. The localised failure in a hull panel is severe compared to the global response of the ship. In this study, an attempt has been made to predict the response and failure modes of three types of hull panels (flat, concave, and convex. The shock loading on the hull panel has been estimated based on the Taylor's plate theory. The numerical analysis has been carried out using the CSAIGENSA (DYNA3D code that employs nonlinear finite element model.

  9. Flat conductor cable commercialization project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, P.; Wadsworth, E.

    1977-01-01

    An undercarpet flat conductor cable and a baseboard flat conductor cable system were studied for commercialization. The undercarpet system is designed for use in office and commercial buildings. It employs a flat power cable, protected by a grounded metal shield, that terminates in receptacles mounted on the floor. It is designed to interface with a flat conductor cable telephone system. The baseboard system consists of a flat power cable mounted in a plastic raceway; both the raceway and the receptacles are mounted on the surface of the baseboard. It is designed primarily for use in residential buildings, particularly for renovation and concrete and masonry construction.

  10. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003535.htm Antinuclear antibody panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The antinuclear antibody panel is a blood test that looks at ...

  11. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  12. Piecewise flat gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Meent, Maarten, E-mail: M.vandeMeent@uu.nl [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, PO Box 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-04-07

    We examine the continuum limit of the piecewise flat locally finite gravity model introduced by 't Hooft. In the linear weak field limit, we find the energy-momentum tensor and metric perturbation of an arbitrary configuration of defects. The energy-momentum turns out to be restricted to satisfy certain conditions. The metric perturbation is mostly fixed by the energy-momentum except for its lightlike modes which reproduce linear gravitational waves, despite no such waves being present at the microscopic level.

  13. Flat feet in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe flatfoot, as one of very frequent deformities in everyday medical practice. A special condition of the deformity associated with a calcaneal valgus position and complicated by a knee valgus position (as a consequence of non-treatment is described. Also, the precise anatomy of the longitudinal foot arches (medial and lateral, definition and classification of the deformity, clinical findings and therapeutic protocols are proposed. The authors especially emphasise that the need for having extensive knowledge on the differences between a flexible and rigid flatfoot, having in mind that the treatment of flexible flat foot is usually not necessary, while the treatment of rigid flatfoot is usually unavoidable.

  14. Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel Print A A A What's in ... Is The hepatic function panel, also known as liver function tests, is a group of seven tests ...

  15. TRMM Solar Array Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This final report presents conclusions/recommendations concerning the TRMM Solar Array; deliverable list and schedule summary; waivers and deviations; as-shipped performance data, including flight panel verification matrix, panel output detail, shadow test summary, humidity test summary, reverse bias test panel; and finally, quality assurance summary.

  16. Full-field quantitative phase imaging by white-light interferometry with active phase stabilization and its application to biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinhong; Yamauchi, Toyohiko; Iwai, Hidenao; Yamashita, Yutaka; Zhang, Haijun; Hiruma, Teruo

    2006-06-01

    We report a Koehler-illumination-based full-field, actively stabilized, low-coherence phase-shifting interferometer, which is built on a white-light Michelson interferometer. By using a phase-stepping technique we can obtain full-field phase images of the sample. An actively stabilized phase-lock circuit is employed in the system to reduce phase noise. An application to human epithelial cells (HeLa cells) is achieved in our experiment. The advancement of this technique rests in its ability to take images of unstained biological samples quantitatively and on a nanometer scale.

  17. Full Field Birefringence Measurement of Grown-In Stresses in Thin Silicon Sheet: Final Technical Report, 2 January 2002 - 15 January 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danyluk, S.; Ostapenka, S.

    2008-11-01

    This paper summarizes polariscopy work that led to prototype non-contact, near-infrared light-transmission system for inspecting thin, flat, large-area Si wafers. Acoustic work led to commercially viable system to inspect wafers for microcracks.

  18. Buckling of open-section bead-stiffened composite panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laananen, D. H.; Renze, S. P.

    Stiffened panels are structures that can be designed to efficiently support inplane compression, bending, and shear loads. Although the stiffeners are usually discrete elements which are fastened or bonded to a flat or continuously curved plate, manufacturing methods such as thermoforming allow integral formation of the stiffeners in a panel. Such a configuration offers potential advantages in terms of a reduced number of parts and manufacturing operations. For thermoplastic composite panels stiffened by integrally formed open-section beads, the effects of bead spacing and bend cross-section geometry on the initiation of buckling under uniaxial compression and uniform shear loading were investigated. Finite elements results for a range of stiffened panel sizes and bead geometries are presented and compared with approximate closed-form solutions based on an effective flat plate size. Experimental verification of analytical predictions for one of the shear panels and one of the compression panels is described. Compensation of the forming tool to reduce the degree of initial curvature of the panels was found to be necessary.

  19. THE THERMOELECTRIC SOLAR PANELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ahiska

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, load characteristics of thermoelectric and photovoltaic solar panels are investigated and compared with each other with experiments. Thermoelectric solar panels converts the heat generated by sun directly to electricity; while, photovoltaic solar pales converts photonic energy from sun to electricity. In both types, maximum power can be obtained when the load resistance is equal to internal resistance. According to experimental results, power generated from unit surface with thermoelectric panel is 30 times greater than the power generated by photovoltaic panel. From a panel surface of 1 m2, thermoelectric solar panel has generated 4 kW electric power, while from the same surface, photovoltaic panel has generated 132 W only.

  20. IS THE WORLD FLAT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Încalţărău

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization became more and more prominent during the last decades. There is no way to argue that globalization led to more interconnected economies, facilitating the communication and the collaboration around the world. But where is this going? Doesglobalization mean uniformity or diversity? As the world begins to resemble more, the people are trying to distinguish between them more, which can exacerbate nationalistic feeling. Friedman argues that globalization made the world smaller and flatter, allowing all countries to take chance of the available opportunities equally. But is this really true? Although politic and cultural factors can stand in front of a really flat world, what is the key for Chinese and Indian success and which are theirs perspectives?

  1. Flat Helical Nanosieves

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, Shengtao; Hussain, Sajid; Huang, Kun; Ling, Xiaohui; Siew, Shawn Yohanes; Liu, Hong; Teng, Jinghua; Danner, Aaron; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Compact and miniaturized devices with flexible functionalities are always highly demanded in optical integrated systems. Plasmonic nanosieve has been successfully harnessed as an ultrathin flat platform for complex manipulation of light, including holography, vortex generation and non-linear processes. Compared with most of reported single-functional devices, multi-functional nanosieves might find more complex and novel applications across nano-photonics, optics and nanotechnology. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a promising roadmap for nanosieve-based helical devices, which achieves full manipulations of optical vortices, including its generation, hybridization, spatial multiplexing, focusing and non-diffraction propagation etc., by controlling the geometric phase of spin light via over 121 thousands of spatially-rotated nano-sieves. Thanks to such spin-conversion nanosieve helical elements, it is no longer necessary to employ the conventional two-beam interferometric measurement to characterize optical ...

  2. More Ricci-flat branes

    CERN Document Server

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, J M

    1999-01-01

    Certain supergravity solutions (including domain walls and the magnetic fivebrane) have recently been generalised by Brecher and Perry by relaxing the condition that the brane worldvolume be flat. In this way they obtain examples in which the brane worldvolume is a static spacetime admitting parallel spinors. In this note we simply point out that the restriction to static spacetimes is unnecessary, and in this way exhibit solutions where the brane worldvolume is an indecomposable Ricci-flat lorentzian manifold admitting parallel spinors. We discuss more Ricci-flat fivebranes and domain walls, as well as new Ricci-flat D3-branes.

  3. Design, Optimization, and Evaluation of A1-2139 Compression Panel with Integral T-Stiffeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulani, Sameer B.; Havens, David; Norris, Ashley; Bird, R. Keith; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Olliffe, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A T-stiffened panel was designed and optimized for minimum mass subjected to constraints on buckling load, yielding, and crippling or local stiffener failure using a new analysis and design tool named EBF3PanelOpt. The panel was designed for a compression loading configuration, a realistic load case for a typical aircraft skin-stiffened panel. The panel was integrally machined from 2139 aluminum alloy plate and was tested in compression. The panel was loaded beyond buckling and strains and out-of-plane displacements were extracted from 36 strain gages and one linear variable displacement transducer. A digital photogrammetric system was used to obtain full field displacements and strains on the smooth (unstiffened) side of the panel. The experimental data were compared with the strains and out-of-plane deflections from a high-fidelity nonlinear finite element analysis.

  4. Paneling architectural freeform surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Eigensatz, Michael

    2010-07-26

    The emergence of large-scale freeform shapes in architecture poses big challenges to the fabrication of such structures. A key problem is the approximation of the design surface by a union of patches, socalled panels, that can be manufactured with a selected technology at reasonable cost, while meeting the design intent and achieving the desired aesthetic quality of panel layout and surface smoothness. The production of curved panels is mostly based on molds. Since the cost of mold fabrication often dominates the panel cost, there is strong incentive to use the same mold for multiple panels. We cast the major practical requirements for architectural surface paneling, including mold reuse, into a global optimization framework that interleaves discrete and continuous optimization steps to minimize production cost while meeting user-specified quality constraints. The search space for optimization is mainly generated through controlled deviation from the design surface and tolerances on positional and normal continuity between neighboring panels. A novel 6-dimensional metric space allows us to quickly compute approximate inter-panel distances, which dramatically improves the performance of the optimization and enables the handling of complex arrangements with thousands of panels. The practical relevance of our system is demonstrated by paneling solutions for real, cutting-edge architectural freeform design projects. © 2010 ACM.

  5. Paneling architectural freeform surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Eigensatz, Michael

    2010-07-25

    The emergence of large-scale freeform shapes in architecture poses big challenges to the fabrication of such structures. A key problem is the approximation of the design surface by a union of patches, so-called panels, that can be manufactured with a selected technology at reasonable cost, while meeting the design intent and achieving the desired aesthetic quality of panel layout and surface smoothness. The production of curved panels is mostly based on molds. Since the cost of mold fabrication often dominates the panel cost, there is strong incentive to use the same mold for multiple panels. We cast the major practical requirements for architectural surface paneling, including mold reuse, into a global optimization framework that interleaves discrete and continuous optimization steps to minimize production cost while meeting user-specified quality constraints. The search space for optimization is mainly generated through controlled deviation from the design surface and tolerances on positional and normal continuity between neighboring panels. A novel 6-dimensional metric space allows us to quickly compute approximate inter-panel distances, which dramatically improves the performance of the optimization and enables the handling of complex arrangements with thousands of panels. The practical relevance of our system is demonstrated by paneling solutions for real, cutting-edge architectural freeform design projects.

  6. High temperature flat plate solar collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hozumi, S.; Aso, S.; Ebisu, K.; Uchino, H.

    1981-04-01

    Improvements in the efficiency of collectors are of great importance for extending the utilization of solar energy for heating and cooling in homes. A highly efficient collector makes the system size small and decreases the system cost effectively. From the view of the amount of energy collected, the efficient collector has a multiple effect, not only because of the high increase in instantaneous efficiency, but also because of the large usable intensity range of the insolation. On the basis of a functional analysis for a flat collector, the materials and parameters were selected and optimized, and a new high temperature flat collector was designed. The collector has 2 panes. The first pane is low iron glass and the second pane is a thin film of fluorinated ethylene-propylene copolymer. The overall solar transmittance for the two panes is 0.89. The collecting panel and its water paths were formed by means of welding and hydraulic expansion. The selective absorbing surface consists of colored stainless steel whose absorption characteristic is 0.89 and emission characteristic is 0.16. The thermal insulator preventing backward heatloss consists of double layers of urethane foam and glass wool. Furthermore, the sustained method for the second pane is contrived so as to prevent water condensation on the panes and excessive elevation of the absorber temperature during no load heating.

  7. Compressive and shear buckling analysis of metal matrix composite sandwich panels under different thermal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1993-01-01

    Combined inplane compressive and shear buckling analysis was conducted on flat rectangular sandwich panels using the Raleigh-Ritz minimum energy method with a consideration of transverse shear effect of the sandwich core. The sandwich panels were fabricated with titanium honeycomb core and laminated metal matrix composite face sheets. The results show that slightly slender (along unidirectional compressive loading axis) rectangular sandwich panels have the most desirable stiffness-to-weight ratios for aerospace structural applications; the degradation of buckling strength of sandwich panels with rising temperature is faster in shear than in compression; and the fiber orientation of the face sheets for optimum combined-load buckling strength of sandwich panels is a strong function of both loading condition and panel aspect ratio. Under the same specific weight and panel aspect ratio, a sandwich panel with metal matrix composite face sheets has much higher buckling strength than one having monolithic face sheets.

  8. Titanium honeycomb panel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, W. L.; Thompson, Randolph C.

    The paper describes the procedures of thermal mechanical tests carried out at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility on two tianium honeycomb wing panels bonded using liquid interface diffusion (LID) technique, and presents the results of these tests. The 58.4 cm square panels consisted of two 0.152-cm-thick Ti 6-2-4-2 face sheets LID-bonded to a 1.9-cm-thick honeycomb core, with bearing plates fastened to the perimeter of the upper and the lower panel surfaces. The panels were instrumented with sensors for measuring surface temperature, strain, and deflections to 315 C and 482 C. Thermal stress levels representative of those encountered during aerodynamic heating were produced by heating the upper panel surface and restraining all four edges. After more than 100 thermal cycles from room temperature to 315 C and 50 cycles from room temperature to 482 C, no significant structural degradation was detected in the panels.

  9. REINFORCED COMPOSITE PANEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A composite panel having front and back faces, the panel comprising facing reinforcement, backing reinforcement and matrix material binding to the facing and backing reinforcements, the facing and backing reinforcements each independently comprising one or more reinforcing sheets, the facing...... by matrix material, the facing and backing reinforcements being interconnected to resist out-of-plane relative movement. The reinforced composite panel is useful as a barrier element for shielding structures, equipment and personnel from blast and/or ballistic impact damage....

  10. REINFORCED COMPOSITE PANEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A composite panel having front and back faces, the panel comprising facing reinforcement, backing reinforcement and matrix material binding to the facing and backing reinforcements, the facing and backing reinforcements each independently comprising one or more reinforcing sheets, the facing rein...... by matrix material, the facing and backing reinforcements being interconnected to resist out-of-plane relative movement. The reinforced composite panel is useful as a barrier element for shielding structures, equipment and personnel from blast and/or ballistic impact damage....

  11. Anti-Stokes effect CCD camera and SLD based optical coherence tomography for full-field imaging in the 1550nm region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kredzinski, Lukasz; Connelly, Michael J.

    2012-06-01

    Full-field Optical coherence tomography is an en-face interferometric imaging technology capable of carrying out high resolution cross-sectional imaging of the internal microstructure of an examined specimen in a non-invasive manner. The presented system is based on competitively priced optical components available at the main optical communications band located in the 1550 nm region. It consists of a superluminescent diode and an anti-stokes imaging device. The single mode fibre coupled SLD was connected to a multi-mode fibre inserted into a mode scrambler to obtain spatially incoherent illumination, suitable for OCT wide-field modality in terms of crosstalk suppression and image enhancement. This relatively inexpensive system with moderate resolution of approximately 24um x 12um (axial x lateral) was constructed to perform a 3D cross sectional imaging of a human tooth. To our knowledge this is the first 1550 nm full-field OCT system reported.

  12. Evaluation of patient dose saving in grid-less x-ray mammography acquisition compared with full field digital mammography (FFDMG) acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdi, Ahmed Jibril; Mussmann, Bo Redder

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the patient radiation dose saving of grid-less X-ray mammography acquisitions compared with conventional full-field digital X-ray mammography (FFDMG). Methods and materials: The Siemens Inspiration MAMMOMAT PRIME system with Software Based Scatter Correction (SBSC) was used...... to investigate the dose saving in grid-less acquisition compared with conventional full-field digital mammography (FFDMG) acquisitions. A Piranha 657 was used to measure the entrance exposure. The entrance exposure was directly measured on different PMMA thicknesses of 20-70mm in steps of 10mm. The PMMA block...... thicknesses were then converted to an equivalent compressed breast tissue thicknesses. The average glandular dose (AGD) is calculated. Results: Dose reduction in both the directly measured entrance exposure and the calculated AGD is between 13% and 32% in the grid-less mammography acquisition. The contrast...

  13. Measurement of Full Field Strains in Filament Wound Composite Tubes Under Axial Compressive Loading by the Digital Image Correlation (DIC) Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    McNeill , S. R. Determination of Displacements Using an Improved Digital Image Correlation Method. Computer Vision August 1983. 13 12. Bruck, H. A... McNeill , S. R.; Russell, S. S.; Sutton, M. A. Use of Digital Image Correlation for Determination of Displacements and Strains. Non-Destructive...Evaluation for Aerospace Requirements, 1989. 13. Sutton, M. A.; McNeill , S. R.; Helm, J. D.; Schreier, H. Full-field Non-Contacting Measurement of

  14. [First experiments for the detection of simulated mammographic lesions: digital full field mammography with a new detector with a double plate of pure selenium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Wendtland, R; Hermann, K-P; Wenkel, E; Adamietz, B; Lell, M; Anders, K; Uder, M

    2011-02-01

    The article describes an experimental phantom study of a system for digital full field mammography with a new digital detector with a double plate of pure selenium. The experiments were carried out with the new full field digital mammography system Amulet from FujiFilm. This system has a new detector (18×24 cm(2)) on the basis of highly purified amorphous selenium (a-Se) with a pixel size of 50 µm. The x-rays are converted into electric signals in the first plate which are read into the second plate with the help of an optical switch and demonstrated in the form of an image. In this way a better pixel size/volume and signal-to-noise ratio should be achieved. The object of the investigation was the Wisconsin Mammographic Random Phantom, Model 152 A (Technical Performance Mo/Mo, 28 kV, 100 mAs). Five investigators with different experiences in mammography each received three images on a monitor with different random positions of the simulated lesions in the phantom for assessment. The detection rates were compared under the same conditions with the results of two other full field digital mammography systems. The median detection rate for all images and investigators for the new doubled plated a-Se detector with optical switch was 98.7%. For both other systems with a-Si or and a-Se detectors the detection rate was 89.8% or 97.3%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the detection rate of the simulated breast lesions for all three systems considering the interobserver and intraobserver variation. The first phantom study for the detection of simulated breast lesions with the new full field digital mammography system Amulet demonstrates equivalent results with the other systems used in the clinical routine. The trend towards superiority of the new system has to be confirmed in further clinical studies.

  15. Irritated Method for Flat warts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiBingxu

    2004-01-01

    Summary Background The relation between spontaneous regression of Flat warts and T cells depended immunity was confirmed. Cells immunity against HPV was induced by presenting of HPV related antigens, and thrived by cytokine and some chemistry agent. So how to make HPV which incubated in keratinocyte to present PHV antigens and keratinocyte to secret cytokine or chemistry agents should be a pursuance for dermatologist who are looking for a efficient method to deal with flat warts. Present research had exhibited inflammable agents can induce dermatitis when apply to the skin surface, so it might bring flat warts to spontaneous regression. Objective To observe the effectiveness of irritant drugs on flat warts, and at same time to understand more on the mechanism of the regression. Methods Compared with Control we treat 88 case of flat warts with retinoid gel or 3% hydrogen peroxide solution plus 5 % salicylic acid cream (HPSC). Results Both retinoid gel and HPSC reveal significant effect on flat warts. Conclusion Retinoid gel or SPHC was effective on the treatment of flat warts. The possible explanation for this is the drugs when put on the skin will induce dermatitis and dissolve or denude keratin.

  16. Flats: Preliminary WFC Data and Plans for Flight Flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlin, R. C.; Hartig, G.; Tsvetanov, Z.

    2000-10-01

    The ACS WFC pixel-to-pixel P-flats with the build-3 detector repeat over a three month time span to a precision of better than 0.1% rms. The shape of the low frequency Lflat field varies with wavelength, where the ratio of the F435W/F814W L-flats differs from unity by - 10% in two patches near opposite corners of the field of view. At ~0.5%, the high frequency pixel-to-pixel structure in the WFC P-flats is about half that of the HRC build-2 and does not increase as much toward shorter wavelengths as the HRC build-2 with the Lesser coating. The amplitude of the fringes for continuum illumination is less than 1%, even in the narrow band ramp filters, while the fringing in monochromatic light is - 10% at 9300 Å. The goals of the laboratory WFC and HRC flat field program are to obtain the set of external flats that fully populates the pipeline database and to archive a baseline of high S/N internal flats for tracking post-launch changes.

  17. Is classical flat Kasner spacetime flat in quantum gravity?

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Parampreet

    2016-01-01

    Quantum nature of classical flat Kasner spacetime is studied using effective spacetime description in loop quantum cosmology. We find that even though the spacetime curvature vanishes at the classical level, non-trivial quantum gravitational effects can arise. For the standard loop quantization of Bianchi-I spacetime, which uniquely yields universal bounds on expansion and shear scalars and results in a generic resolution of strong singularities, we find that a flat Kasner metric is not a physical solution of the effective spacetime description, except in a limit. The lack of a flat Kasner metric at the quantum level results from a novel feature of the loop quantum Bianchi-I spacetime: quantum geometry induces non-vanishing spacetime curvature components, making it not Ricci flat even when no matter is present. The non-curvature singularity of the classical flat Kasner spacetime is avoided, and the effective spacetime transits from a flat Kasner spacetime in asymptotic future, to a Minkowski spacetime in asym...

  18. Make Your Own Solar Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, David

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students make a simulated solar panel to learn about the principles behind energy production using solar panels. Provides information about how solar panels function to produce energy. (MCO)

  19. Make Your Own Solar Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, David

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students make a simulated solar panel to learn about the principles behind energy production using solar panels. Provides information about how solar panels function to produce energy. (MCO)

  20. Ronchi test for flat mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, N. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Engelfried, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: jurgen@ifisica.uaslp.mx; Morelos, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2005-11-11

    One of the RICHes in the velocity spectrometers of the proposed CKM experiment requires a flat mirror, situated in the high intensity kaon beam. To reduce the interaction background for the experiment, this mirror has to be as thin as possible. First glass prototypes were produced in Mexico. To test the surface quality of these prototypes, we extended the Ronchi method so flat mirrors can also be tested. We present the methods and report on results of our measurements.

  1. [Comparison of dignity determination of mammographic microcalcification with two systems for digital full-field mammography with different detector resolution: a retrospective clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Wendtland, R; Hermann, K-P; Adamietz, B; Meier-Meitinger, M; Wenkel, E; Lell, M; Anders, K; Uder, M

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective clinical study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the novel 50 µm FFDM (full-field digital mammography) system (DR) with an established 70 µm system (DR) in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant clusters of microcalcification (n=50) (BI-RADS™ classification 4/5) and to assess the possible incremental value of the 50 µm pixel-pitch on specificity. From March 2009 to September 2009, 50 patients underwent full-field digital mammography (FFDM) (detector resolution 70 µm) (Novation, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). As there were suspicious signs of microcalcification classified with BI-RADS™ 4/5 after diagnosis and preoperative wire localization, control images were made with the new FFDM system (detector: resolution 50 µm) (Amulet, Fujifilm, Tokyo, Japan) with the same exposure parameters. The diagnosis was determined after the operation by five radiologists with different experience in digital mammography from randomly distributed mediolateral views (monitor reading) whose results were correlated with the final histology of all lesions. Histopathology revealed 19 benign and 31 malignant lesions in 50 patients after open biopsy. The results of the five readers showed a higher sensitivity of the new FFDM system (80.0%) in the ability to recognize malignant microcalcification in comparison to the established system (74.8%). The specificity (75.8 versus 71.6%) was slightly higher for the new system but these results were not statistically significant (p<0.001). Considering the diagnostic accuracy, the new system (detector: resolution 50 µm) was also slightly superior to the well-known system (detector: resolution 70 µm) (80.1% versus 76.4%). Our study has shown that the new full-field digital mammography system using the novel detector compared with the already established FFDM system with respect to the assessment of microcalcification is at least equivalent.

  2. Observation of coupled vortex gyrations by 70-ps-time and 20-nm-space- resolved full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyunsung; Yu, Young-Sang; Lee, Ki-Suk; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Bocklage, Lars; Vogel, Andreas; Bolte, Markus; Meier, Guido; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2010-09-01

    We employed time-and space-resolved full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy to observe vortex-core gyrations in a pair of dipolar-coupled vortex-state Permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) disks. The 70 ps temporal and 20 nm spatial resolution of the microscope enabled us to simultaneously measure vortex gyrations in both disks and to resolve the phases and amplitudes of both vortex-core positions. We observed their correlation for a specific vortex-state configuration. This work provides a robust and direct method of studying vortex gyrations in dipolar-coupled vortex oscillators.

  3. Brain refractive index measured in vivo with high-NA defocus-corrected full-field OCT and consequences for two-photon microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binding, Jonas; Ben Arous, Juliette; Léger, Jean-François; Gigan, Sylvain; Boccara, Claude; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-03-14

    Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) is an important tool for in vivo tissue imaging with sub-cellular resolution, but the penetration depth of current systems is potentially limited by sample-induced optical aberrations. To quantify these, we measured the refractive index n' in the somatosensory cortex of 7 rats in vivo using defocus optimization in full-field optical coherence tomography (ff-OCT). We found n' to be independent of imaging depth or rat age. From these measurements, we calculated that two-photon imaging beyond 200 µm into the cortex is limited by spherical aberration, indicating that adaptive optics will improve imaging depth.

  4. POPOVER Review Panel report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davito, A.; Baker, C.J.; King, C.J.; Costerus, B.; Nelson, T.; Prokosch, D.; Pastrnak, J.; Grace, P.

    1996-04-10

    The POPOVER series of high explosive (HE) certification tests was conducted at the Big Explosives Experimental Facility (BEEF) in Area 4 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The two primary objectives of POPOVER were to certify that: (1) BEEF meets DOE requirements for explosives facilities and is safe for personnel-occupied operations during testing of large charges of conventional HE. (2) Facility structures and equipment will function as intended when subjected to the effects of these charges. After careful analysis of test results, the POPOVER Review Panel concludes that the POPOVER series met both objectives. Further details on the Review Panel`s conclusions are included in Section 7--Findings and Recommendations.

  5. Properties of flat-pressed wood plastic composites containing fire retardants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Jan. T. Benthien; Heiko Thoemen; Robert H. White

    <