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Sample records for full-f vlasov simulation

  1. Reduced Vlasov-Maxwell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helluy, Philippe; Navoret, Laurent; Pham, Nhung; Crestetto, Anaïs

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we review two different numerical methods for Vlasov-Maxwell simulations. The first method is based on a coupling between a Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) Maxwell solver and a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) Vlasov solver. The second method only uses a DG approach for the Vlasov and Maxwell equations. The Vlasov equation is first reduced to a space-only hyperbolic system thanks to the finite-element method. The two numerical methods are implemented using OpenCL in order to achieve high performance on recent Graphic Processing Units (GPU).

  2. Global full-f gyrokinetic simulations of plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandgirard, V [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Sarazin, Y [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Angelino, P [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bottino, A [Max Plank Institut fr Plasmaphysik, IPP-EURATOM AssociationGarching (Germany); Crouseilles, N [IRMA, Universite Louis Pasteur, 7, rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Darmet, G [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Dif-Pradalier, G [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Garbet, X [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ghendrih, Ph [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Jolliet, S [CRPP, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Latu, G [LaBRI, 341 Cours Liberation, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Sonnendruecker, E [IRMA, Universite Louis Pasteur, 7, rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Villard, L [CRPP, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-12-15

    Critical physical issues can be specifically tackled with the global full-f gyrokinetic code GYSELA. Three main results are presented. First, the self-consistent treatment of equilibrium and fluctuations highlights the competition between two compensation mechanisms for the curvature driven vertical charge separation, namely, parallel flow and polarization. The impact of the latter on the turbulent transport is discussed. In the non-linear regime, the benchmark with the Particle-In-Cell code ORB5 looks satisfactory. Second, the transport scaling with {rho}{sub *} is found to depend both on {rho}{sub *} itself and on the distance to the linear threshold. Finally, a statistical steady-state turbulent regime is achieved in a reduced version of GYSELA by prescribing a constant heat source.

  3. Global full-f gyrokinetic simulations of plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Angelino, P.; Bottino, A.; Crouseilles, N.; Darmet, G.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph; Jolliet, S.; Latu, G.; Sonnendrücker, E.; Villard, L.

    2007-12-01

    Critical physical issues can be specifically tackled with the global full-f gyrokinetic code GYSELA. Three main results are presented. First, the self-consistent treatment of equilibrium and fluctuations highlights the competition between two compensation mechanisms for the curvature driven vertical charge separation, namely, parallel flow and polarization. The impact of the latter on the turbulent transport is discussed. In the non-linear regime, the benchmark with the Particle-In-Cell code ORB5 looks satisfactory. Second, the transport scaling with ρ* is found to depend both on ρ* itself and on the distance to the linear threshold. Finally, a statistical steady-state turbulent regime is achieved in a reduced version of GYSELA by prescribing a constant heat source.

  4. Full-f gyrokinetic simulation of edge pedestal in Textor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiviniemi, Timo [Aalto Univ. (Finland)

    2016-11-01

    In ongoing simulations we have noticed that change phase angle between electric field and density oscillation may be important for changes in particle transport for different isotopes which could explain part of the so-called isotope-effect. Even the present database from the PRACE simulation (about 20 cases and some 4 TB of data) can still be further explored for this as the 3D data for both electric field and density exists. After finishing the PRACE project the code has been updated to include scrape-off-layer (SOL) which has opened several possibilities for future research.

  5. Vlasov simulation in multiple spatial dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, Harvey A

    2011-01-01

    A long-standing challenge encountered in modeling plasma dynamics is achieving practical Vlasov equation simulation in multiple spatial dimensions over large length and time scales. While direct multi-dimension Vlasov simulation methods using adaptive mesh methods [J. W. Banks et al., Physics of Plasmas 18, no. 5 (2011): 052102; B. I. Cohen et al., November 10, 2010, http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2010.DPP.NP9.142] have recently shown promising results, in this paper we present an alternative, the Vlasov Multi Dimensional (VMD) model, that is specifically designed to take advantage of solution properties in regimes when plasma waves are confined to a narrow cone, as may be the case for stimulated Raman scatter in large optic f# laser beams. Perpendicular grid spacing large compared to a Debye length is then possible without instability, enabling an order 10 decrease in required computational resources compared to standard particle in cell (PIC) methods in 2D, with another reduction of that order in 3D. Fur...

  6. Global full-f gyrokinetic simulations with GYSELA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Darmet, G.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, P.

    2007-07-01

    The gyrokinetic description of turbulence allows one to investigate the impact of wave particle resonances on the transport level, as well as a rigorous treatment of the dynamics of zonal flows, which are known to contribute to the turbulence saturation. Various numerical approaches can be envisaged to tackle the problem. The GYSELA code is based on a semi- Lagrangian scheme, which takes benefit from both the Eulerian and PIC approaches. The full ion distribution function is considered, allowing for the self-consistent treatment of equilibrium and fluctuations. Several implications of such an approach will be highlighted. First, in toroidal geometry, properly choosing the initial state reveals crucial in those simulations where the equilibrium and the fluctuations are resolved simultaneously. Especially, previous results report the self generation of large scale flows if the initial state departs from an equilibrium. Here, the dynamics of these flow is derived analytically, showing that an up-down asymmetric geodesic acoustic mode builds up first, linearly in time. It results from the vertical charge imbalance due to the magnetic field inhomogeneity. 5D simulations confirm these analytical results. Conversely, when initialising with an equilibrium distribution function, i.e. depending on the motion invariants only, the vertical charge separation is naturally compensated by parallel flows Second, when scale separation between equilibrium and fluctuations is no longer assumed, the mean profile relaxation competes with the non linear couplings, which govern direct or inverse energy cascades, to saturate the turbulence level. In the 5D version of GYSELA, modelling the electrostatic branch of the Ion Temperature Gradient turbulence, coupling to two thermal baths located at the radial boundaries provides the free energy to the system. While the linear regime allows one to recover the Cyclone base case, the non-linear turbulent regime exhibits the complexity of boundary

  7. Vlasov simulations of parallel potential drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Gunell

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An auroral flux tube is modelled from the magnetospheric equator to the ionosphere using Vlasov simulations. Starting from an initial state, the evolution of the plasma on the flux tube is followed in time. It is found that when applying a voltage between the ends of the flux tube, about two thirds of the potential drop is concentrated in a thin double layer at approximately one Earth radius altitude. The remaining part is situated in an extended region 1–2 Earth radii above the double layer. Waves on the ion timescale develop above the double layer, and they move toward higher altitude at approximately the ion acoustic speed. These waves are seen both in the electric field and as perturbations of the ion and electron distributions, indicative of an instability. Electrons of magnetospheric origin become trapped between the magnetic mirror and the double layer during its formation. At low altitude, waves on electron timescales appear and are seen to be non-uniformly distributed in space. The temporal evolution of the potential profile and the total voltage affect the double layer altitude, which decreases with an increasing field aligned potential drop. A current–voltage relationship is found by running several simulations with different voltages over the system, and it agrees with the Knight relation reasonably well.

  8. Recent advances in gyrokinetic full-f particle simulation of medium sized Tokamaks with ELMFIRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janhunen, S.J.; Kiviniemi, T.P.; Korpio, T.; Leerink, S.; Nora, M. [Helsinki University of Technology, Euratom-Tekes Association, Espoo (Finland); Heikkinen, J.A. [VTT, Euratom-Tekes Association, Espoo (Finland); Ogando, F. [Helsinki University of Technology, Euratom-Tekes Association, Espoo (Finland); Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Large-scale kinetic simulations of toroidal plasmas based on first principles are called for in studies of transition from low to high confinement mode and internal transport barrier formation in the core plasma. Such processes are best observed and diagnosed in detached plasma conditions in mid-sized tokamaks, so gyrokinetic simulations for these conditions are warranted. A first principles test-particle based kinetic model ELMFIRE[1] has been developed and used in interpretation[1,2] of FT-2 and DIII-D experiments. In this work we summarize progress in Cyclone (DIII-D core) and ASDEX Upgrade pedestal region simulations, and show that in simulations the choice of adiabatic electrons results in quenching of turbulence (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. GYSELA, a full-f global gyrokinetic Semi-Lagrangian code for ITG turbulence simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Crouseilles, N.; Latu, G.; Sonnendrücker, E.; Besse, N.; Bertrand, P.

    2006-11-01

    This work addresses non-linear global gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence with the GYSELA code. The particularity of GYSELA code is to use a fixed grid with a Semi-Lagrangian (SL) scheme and this for the entire distribution function. The 4D non-linear drift-kinetic version of the code already showns the interest of such a SL method which exhibits good properties of energy conservation in non-linear regime as well as an accurate description of fine spatial scales. The code has been upgrated to run 5D simulations of toroidal ITG turbulence. Linear benchmarks and non-linear first results prove that semi-lagrangian codes can be a credible alternative for gyrokinetic simulations.

  10. Nonlinear evolution of parallel propagating Alfven waves: Vlasov - MHD simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Nariyuki, Y; Kumashiro, T; Hada, T

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear evolution of circularly polarized Alfv\\'en waves are discussed by using the recently developed Vlasov-MHD code, which is a generalized Landau-fluid model. The numerical results indicate that as far as the nonlinearity in the system is not so large, the Vlasov-MHD model can validly solve time evolution of the Alfv\\'enic turbulence both in the linear and nonlinear stages. The present Vlasov-MHD model is proper to discuss the solar coronal heating and solar wind acceleration by Alfve\\'n waves propagating from the photosphere.

  11. A 5D gyrokinetic full- f global semi-Lagrangian code for flux-driven ion turbulence simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandgirard, V.; Abiteboul, J.; Bigot, J.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Crouseilles, N.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ehrlacher, Ch.; Esteve, D.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Latu, G.; Mehrenberger, M.; Norscini, C.; Passeron, Ch.; Rozar, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Sonnendrücker, E.; Strugarek, A.; Zarzoso, D.

    2016-10-01

    This paper addresses non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence in tokamak plasmas. The electrostatic GYSELA code is one of the few international 5D gyrokinetic codes able to perform global, full- f and flux-driven simulations. Its has also the numerical originality of being based on a semi-Lagrangian (SL) method. This reference paper for the GYSELA code presents a complete description of its multi-ion species version including: (i) numerical scheme, (ii) high level of parallelism up to 500k cores and (iii) conservation law properties.

  12. Vlasov Simulations of Ionospheric Heating Near Upper Hybrid Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmi, A. C.; Eliasson, B. E.; Shao, X.; Milikh, G. M.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2014-12-01

    It is well-known that high-frequency (HF) heating of the ionosphere can excite field- aligned density striations (FAS) in the ionospheric plasma. Furthermore, in the neighborhood of various resonances, the pump wave can undergo parametric instabilities to produce a variety of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves. We have used a Vlasov simulation with 1-spatial dimension, 2-velocity dimensions, and 2-components of fields, to study the effects of ionospheric heating when the pump frequency is in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance, employing parameters currently available at ionospheric heaters such as HAARP. We have found that by seeding theplasma with a FAS of width ~20% of the simulation domain, ~10% depletion, and by applying a spatially uniform HF dipole pump electric field, the pump wave gives rise to a broad spectrum of density fluctuations as well as to upper hybrid and lower hybrid oscillating electric fields. We also observe collisionless bulk-heating of the electrons that varies non-linearly with the amplitude of the pump field.

  13. Relativistic simulation of the Vlasov equation for plasma expansion into vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    H ABBASI; R Shokoohi; Moridi, M.

    2012-01-01

      In this study, relativistic Vlasov simulation of plasma for expansion of collisionless plasma for into vacuum is presented. The model is based on 1+1 dimensional phase space and electrostatic approximation. For this purpose, the electron dynamics is studied by the relativistic Vlasov equation. Regardless of the ions temperature, fluid equations are used for their dynamics. The initial electrons distribution function is the relativistic Maxwellian. The results show that due to the electrons ...

  14. Block-Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Algorithms for Vlasov Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hittinger, J A F

    2012-01-01

    Direct discretization of continuum kinetic equations, like the Vlasov equation, are under-utilized because the distribution function generally exists in a high-dimensional (>3D) space and computational cost increases geometrically with dimension. We propose to use high-order finite-volume techniques with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to reduce the computational cost. The primary complication comes from a solution state comprised of variables of different dimensions. We develop the algorithms required to extend standard single-dimension block structured AMR to the multi-dimension case. Specifically, algorithms for reduction and injection operations that transfer data between mesh hierarchies of different dimensions are explained in detail. In addition, modifications to the basic AMR algorithm that enable the use of high-order spatial and temporal discretizations are discussed. Preliminary results for a standard 1D+1V Vlasov-Poisson test problem are presented. Results indicate that there is po...

  15. Relativistic simulation of the Vlasov equation for plasma expansion into vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Abbasi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available   In this study, relativistic Vlasov simulation of plasma for expansion of collisionless plasma for into vacuum is presented. The model is based on 1+1 dimensional phase space and electrostatic approximation. For this purpose, the electron dynamics is studied by the relativistic Vlasov equation. Regardless of the ions temperature, fluid equations are used for their dynamics. The initial electrons distribution function is the relativistic Maxwellian. The results show that due to the electrons relativistic temperature, the process of the plasma expansion takes place faster, the resulting electric field is stronger and the ions are accelerated to higher velocities, in comparison to the non-relativistic case.

  16. Full-f Neoclassical Simulations toward a Predictive Model for H-mode Pedestal Ion Energy, Particle and Momentum Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, D. J. [PPPL; Boedo, J. A. [University of California San Diego; Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics; Chang, C. S. [PPPL; Canik, J. M. [ORNL; deGrassie, J. S. [General Atomics; Gerhardt, S. P. [PPPL; Grierson, B. A. [General Atomics; Groebner, R. J. [General Atomics; Maingi, Rajesh [PPPL; Smith, S. P. [General Atomics

    2014-09-01

    Energy and particle transport rates are decoupled in the H-mode edge since the ion thermal transport rate is primarily set by the neoclassical transport of the deuterium ions in the tail of the thermal energy distribution, while the net particle transport rate is set by anomalous transport of the colder bulk ions. Ion orbit loss drives the energy distributions away from Maxwellian, and describes the anisotropy, poloidal asymmetry and local minimum near the separatrix observed in the Ti profile. Non-Maxwellian distributions also drive large intrinsic edge flows, and the interaction of turbulence at the top of the pedestal with the intrinsic edge flow can generate an intrinsic core torque. The primary driver of the radial electric field (Er) in the pedestal and scrapeoff layer (SOL) are kinetic neoclassical effects, such as ion orbit loss of tail ions and parallel electron loss to the divertor. This paper describes the first multi-species kinetic neoclassical transport calculations for ELM-free H-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer on DIII-D using XGC0, a 5D full-f particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. Quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles is achieved by adding random-walk particle diffusion to the guiding-center drift motion. This interpretative technique quantifies the role of neoclassical, anomalous and neutral transport to the overall pedestal structure, and consequently illustrates the importance of including kinetic effects self-consistently in transport calculations around transport barriers.

  17. Vlasov simulations of electron hole dynamics in inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzichev, Ilya; Vasko, Ivan; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mozer, Forrest; Artemyev, Anton

    2017-04-01

    Electron holes (EHs) or phase space vortices are solitary electrostatic waves existing due to electrons trapped within EH electrostatic potential. Since the first direct observation [1], EHs have been widely observed in the Earth's magnetosphere: in reconnecting current sheets [2], injection fronts [3], auroral region [4], and many other space plasma systems. EHs have typical spatial scales up to tens of Debye lengths, electric field amplitudes up to hundreds of mV/m and propagate along magnetic field lines with velocities of about electron thermal velocity [5]. The role of EHs in energy dissipation and supporting of large-scale potential drops is under active investigation. The accurate interpretation of spacecraft observations requires understanding of EH evolution in inhomogeneous plasma. The critical role of plasma density gradients in EH evolution was demonstrated in [6] using PIC simulations. Interestingly, up to date no studies have addressed a role of magnetic field gradients in EH evolution. In this report, we use 1.5D gyrokinetic Vlasov code to demonstrate the critical role of magnetic field gradients in EH dynamics. We show that EHs propagating into stronger (weaker) magnetic field are decelerated (accelerated) with deceleration (acceleration) rate dependent on the magnetic field gradient. Remarkably, the reflection points of decelerating EHs are independent of the average magnetic field gradient in the system and depend only on the EH parameters. EHs are decelerated (accelerated) faster than would follow from the "quasi-particle" concept assuming that EH is decelerated (accelerated) entirely due to the mirror force acting on electrons trapped within EH. We demonstrate that EH propagation in inhomogeneous magnetic fields results in development of a net potential drop along an EH, which depends on the magnetic field gradient. The revealed features will be helpful for interpreting spacecraft observations and results of advanced particle simulations. In

  18. Comparison of free-streaming ELM formulae to a Vlasov simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulton, D., E-mail: david.moulton@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul Lez Durance (France); Fundamenski, W. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Manfredi, G. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux, CNRS and Université de Strasbourg, BP 43, F-67034 Strasbourg (France); Hirstoaga, S. [INRIA Nancy Grand-Est and Institut de Recherche en Mathématiques Avancées, 7 rue René Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg (France); Tskhakaya, D. [Association EURATOM-ÖAW, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-07-15

    The main drawbacks of the original free-streaming equations for edge localised mode transport in the scrape-off layer [W. Fundamenski, R.A. Pitts, Plasma Phys. Control Fusion 48 (2006) 109] are that the plasma potential is not accounted for and that only solutions for ion quantities are considered. In this work, the equations are modified and augmented in order to address these two issues. The new equations are benchmarked against (and justified by) a numerical simulation which solves the Vlasov equation in 1d1v. When the source function due to an edge localised mode is instantaneous, the modified free-streaming ‘impulse response’ equations agree closely with the Vlasov simulation results. When the source has a finite duration in time, the agreement worsens. However, in all cases the match is encouragingly good, thus justifying the applicability of the free-streaming approach.

  19. Collisional effects on the numerical recurrence in Vlasov-Poisson simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The initial state recurrence in numerical simulations of the Vlasov-Poisson system is a well-known phenomenon. Here we study the effect on recurrence of artificial collisions modeled through the Lenard-Bernstein operator [A. Lenard and I. B. Bernstein, Phys. Rev. 112, 1456-1459 (1958)]. By decomposing the linear Vlasov-Poisson system in the Fourier-Hermite space, the recurrence problem is investigated in the linear regime of the damping of a Langmuir wave and of the onset of the bump-on-tail instability. The analysis is then confirmed and extended to the nonlinear regime through a Eulerian collisional Vlasov-Poisson code. It is found that, despite being routinely used, an artificial collisionality is not a viable way of preventing recurrence in numerical simulations without compromising the kinetic nature of the solution. Moreover, it is shown how numerical effects associated to the generation of fine velocity scales, can modify the physical features of the system evolution even in nonlinear regime. This mean...

  20. Collisional effects on the numerical recurrence in Vlasov-Poisson simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università della Calabria, 87036 Rende (CS) (Italy); Camporeale, Enrico [Center for Mathematics and Computer Science (CWI), 1090 GB Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    The initial state recurrence in numerical simulations of the Vlasov-Poisson system is a well-known phenomenon. Here, we study the effect on recurrence of artificial collisions modeled through the Lenard-Bernstein operator [A. Lenard and I. B. Bernstein, Phys. Rev. 112, 1456–1459 (1958)]. By decomposing the linear Vlasov-Poisson system in the Fourier-Hermite space, the recurrence problem is investigated in the linear regime of the damping of a Langmuir wave and of the onset of the bump-on-tail instability. The analysis is then confirmed and extended to the nonlinear regime through an Eulerian collisional Vlasov-Poisson code. It is found that, despite being routinely used, an artificial collisionality is not a viable way of preventing recurrence in numerical simulations without compromising the kinetic nature of the solution. Moreover, it is shown how numerical effects associated to the generation of fine velocity scales can modify the physical features of the system evolution even in nonlinear regime. This means that filamentation-like phenomena, usually associated with low amplitude fluctuations contexts, can play a role even in nonlinear regime.

  1. Noiseless Vlasov-Poisson simulations with linearly transformed particles

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, M Campos; Friedman, A; Grote, D; Lund, S

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a deterministic discrete-particle simulation approach, the Linearly-Transformed Particle-In-Cell (LTPIC) method, that employs linear deformations of the particles to reduce the noise traditionally associated with particle schemes. Formally, transforming the particles is justified by local first order expansions of the characteristic flow in phase space. In practice the method amounts to using deformation matrices within the particle shape functions; these matrices are updated via local evaluations of the forward numerical flow. Because it is necessary to periodically remap the particles on a regular grid to avoid excessively deforming their shapes, the method can be seen as a development of Denavit's Forward Semi-Lagrangian (FSL) scheme [J. Denavit, J. Comp. Physics 9, 75 (1972)]. However, it has recently been established [M. Campos Pinto, "Smooth particle methods without smoothing", arXiv:1112.1859 (2012)] that the underlying Linearly-Transformed Particle scheme converges for abstract transport ...

  2. Vlasov Simulations of Electron-Ion Collision Effects on Damping of Electron Plasma Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, J W; Berger, R L; Tran, T M

    2016-01-01

    Collisional effects can play an essential role in the dynamics of plasma waves by setting a minimum damping rate and by interfering with wave-particle resonances. Kinetic simulations of the effects of electron-ion pitch angle scattering on Electron Plasma Waves (EPWs) are presented here. In particular, the effects of such collisions on the frequency and damping of small-amplitude EPWs for a range of collision rates and wave phase velocities are computed and compared with theory. Both the Vlasov simulations and linear kinetic theory find the direct contribution of electron-ion collisions to wave damping is about a factor of two smaller than is obtained from linearized fluid theory. To our knowledge, this simple result has not been published before. Simulations have been carried out using a grid-based (Vlasov) approach, based on a high-order conservative finite difference method for discretizing the Fokker-Planck equation describing the evolution of the electron distribution function. Details of the implementat...

  3. Vlasov simulations of electron-ion collision effects on damping of electron plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, J. W., E-mail: banksj3@rpi.edu [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Brunner, S.; Tran, T. M. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Swiss Plasma Center (SPC), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Berger, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Collisional effects can play an essential role in the dynamics of plasma waves by setting a minimum damping rate and by interfering with wave-particle resonances. Kinetic simulations of the effects of electron-ion pitch angle scattering on Electron Plasma Waves (EPWs) are presented here. In particular, the effects of such collisions on the frequency and damping of small-amplitude EPWs for a range of collision rates and wave phase velocities are computed and compared with theory. Both the Vlasov simulations and linear kinetic theory find the direct contribution of electron-ion collisions to wave damping significantly reduced from that obtained through linearized fluid theory. To our knowledge, this simple result has not been published before. Simulations have been carried out using a grid-based (Vlasov) approach, based on a high-order conservative finite difference method for discretizing the Fokker-Planck equation describing the evolution of the electron distribution function. Details of the implementation of the collision operator within this framework are presented. Such a grid-based approach, which is not subject to numerical noise, is of particular interest for the accurate measurements of the wave damping rates.

  4. Vlasov Simulations of Ladder Climbing and Autoresonant Acceleration of Langmuir Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kentaro; Barth, Ido; Kaminski, Erez; Dodin, Ilya; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2016-10-01

    The energy of plasma waves can be moved up and down the spectrum using chirped modulations of plasma parameters, which can be driven by external fields. Depending on the discreteness of the wave spectrum, this phenomenon is called ladder climbing (LC) or autroresonant acceleration (AR) of plasmons, and was first proposed by Barth et al. based on a linear fluid model. Here, we report a demonstration of LC/AR from first principles using fully nonlinear Vlasov simulations of collisionless bounded plasma. We show that, in agreement to the basic theory, plasmons survive substantial transformations of the spectrum and are destroyed only when their wave numbers become large enough to trigger Landau damping. The work was supported by the NNSA SSAA Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-NA0002948 and the DTRA Grant No. HDTRA1-11-1-0037.

  5. Vlasov simulations of multi-ion plasma turbulence in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Perrone, Denise; Servidio, Sergio; Dalena, Serena; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations are employed to investigate the role of kinetic effects in a two-dimensional turbulent multi-ion plasma, composed of protons, alpha particles and fluid electrons. In the typical conditions of the solar-wind environment, and in situations of decaying turbulence, the numerical results show that the velocity distribution functions of both ion species depart from the typical configuration of thermal equilibrium. These non-Maxwellian features are quantified through the statistical analysis of the temperature anisotropy, for both protons and alpha particles, in the reference frame given by the local magnetic field. Anisotropy is found to be higher in regions of high magnetic stress. Both ion species manifest a preferentially perpendicular heating, although the anisotropy is more pronounced for the alpha particles, according with solar wind observations. Anisotropy of the alpha particle, moreover, is correlated to the proton anisotropy, and also depends on the local differential flo...

  6. On the multistream approach of relativistic Weibel instability. III. Comparison with full-kinetic Vlasov simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghizzo, A. [Institut Jean Lamour UMR 7163, Université de Lorraine, BP 239 F-54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    2013-08-15

    The saturation of the Weibel instability in the relativistic regime is investigated within the Hamiltonian reduction technique based on the multistream approach developed in paper I in the linear case and in paper II for the nonlinear saturation. In this work, the study is compared with results obtained by full kinetic 1D2V Vlasov-Maxwell simulations based on a semi-Lagrangian technique. For a temperature anisotropy, qualitatively different regimes are realized depending on the excitation of the longitudinal (plasma) electric field, in contrast with the existing theories of the Weibel instability based on their purely transverse characters. The emphasis here is on gaining a better understanding of the nonlinear aspects of the Weibel instability. The multistream model offers an alternate way to make calculations or numerical experiments more tractable, when only a few moments of the velocity distribution of the plasma are considered.

  7. Vlasov simulations of kinetic Alfvén waves at proton kinetic scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vásconez, C. L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Observatorio Astronómico de Quito, Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Quito (Ecuador); Valentini, F.; Veltri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Camporeale, E. [Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Kinetic Alfvén waves represent an important subject in space plasma physics, since they are thought to play a crucial role in the development of the turbulent energy cascade in the solar wind plasma at short wavelengths (of the order of the proton gyro radius ρ{sub p} and/or inertial length d{sub p} and beyond). A full understanding of the physical mechanisms which govern the kinetic plasma dynamics at these scales can provide important clues on the problem of the turbulent dissipation and heating in collisionless systems. In this paper, hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations are employed to analyze in detail the features of the kinetic Alfvén waves at proton kinetic scales, in typical conditions of the solar wind environment (proton plasma beta β{sub p} = 1). In particular, linear and nonlinear regimes of propagation of these fluctuations have been investigated in a single-wave situation, focusing on the physical processes of collisionless Landau damping and wave-particle resonant interaction. Interestingly, since for wavelengths close to d{sub p} and β{sub p} ≃ 1 (for which ρ{sub p} ≃ d{sub p}) the kinetic Alfvén waves have small phase speed compared to the proton thermal velocity, wave-particle interaction processes produce significant deformations in the core of the particle velocity distribution, appearing as phase space vortices and resulting in flat-top velocity profiles. Moreover, as the Eulerian hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell algorithm allows for a clean almost noise-free description of the velocity space, three-dimensional plots of the proton velocity distribution help to emphasize how the plasma departs from the Maxwellian configuration of thermodynamic equilibrium due to nonlinear kinetic effects.

  8. Vlasov Simulation of Electrostatic Solitary Structures in Multi-Component Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Pickett, Jolene S.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic solitary structures have been observed in the Earth's magnetosheath by the Cluster spacecraft. Recent theoretical work has suggested that these solitary structures are modeled by electron acoustic solitary waves existing in a four-component plasma system consisting of core electrons, two counter-streaming electron beams, and one species of background ions. In this paper, the excitation of electron acoustic waves and the formation of solitary structures are studied by means of a one-dimensional electrostatic Vlasov simulation. The present result first shows that either electron acoustic solitary waves with negative potential or electron phase-space holes with positive potential are excited in four-component plasma systems. However, these electrostatic solitary structures have longer duration times and higher wave amplitudes than the solitary structures observed in the magnetosheath. The result indicates that a high-speed and small free energy source may be needed as a fifth component. An additional simulation of a five-component plasma consisting of a stable four-component plasma and a weak electron beam shows the generation of small and fast electron phase-space holes by the bump-on-tail instability. The physical properties of the small and fast electron phase-space holes are very similar to those obtained by the previous theoretical analysis. The amplitude and duration time of solitary structures in the simulation are also in agreement with the Cluster observation.

  9. Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations of fast-electron transport with hydrodynamic plasma response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingham, R J; Sherlock, M; Ridgers, C P; Evans, R G, E-mail: rj.kingham@imperial.ac.u [Plasma Physics Group, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    We report on kinetic simulations of the transport of laser-produced relativistic electron beams (REB) through solid-density plasma, including the hydrodynamic response of the plasma. We consider REBs with parameters relevant to fast-ignition of compressed inertial confinement fusion capsules. We show that over the 10-20ps timescales required for fast-ignition, thermal pressure (from Ohmic heating) can significantly modify the density which in turn strongly affects the propagation of injected fast-electrons; it allows them to re-collimate into a narrow, intense beam under conditions where they initially undergo beam-hollowing. Similar static-density calculations do not show re-collimation. The re-collimation effect is attributed to PdV cooling in the pressure-induced density-channel, which in turn suppresses defocusing magnetic fields generated by resistivity gradients. These simulations have been carried out using the new 2D-3V Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (VFP) code FIDO running in hybrid mode.

  10. Vlasov-Maxwell, self-consistent electromagnetic wave emission simulations of type III solar radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiklauri, David

    2010-01-01

    1.5D Vlasov-Maxwell simulations are employed to model electromagnetic emission generation in a fully self-consistent plasma kinetic model for the first time in the solar physics context. The simulations mimic the plasma emission mechanism and Larmor drift instability in a plasma thread that connects the Sun to Earth with the spatial scales compressed appropriately. The effects of spatial density gradients on the generation of electromagnetic radiation are investigated. It is shown that 1.5D inhomogeneous plasma with a uniform background magnetic field directed transverse to the density gradient is aperiodically unstable to Larmor-drift instability. The latter results in a novel effect of generation of electromagnetic emission at plasma frequency. When density gradient is removed (i.e. when plasma becomes stable to Larmor-drift instability) and a $low$ density, super-thermal, hot beam is injected along the domain, in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, plasma emission mechanism generates non-esc...

  11. A Kinetic Vlasov Model for Plasma Simulation Using Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Many-Core Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, Noah

    Advances are reported in the three pillars of computational science achieving a new capability for understanding dynamic plasma phenomena outside of local thermodynamic equilibrium. A continuum kinetic model for plasma based on the Vlasov-Maxwell system for multiple particle species is developed. Consideration is added for boundary conditions in a truncated velocity domain and supporting wall interactions. A scheme to scale the velocity domain for multiple particle species with different temperatures and particle mass while sharing one computational mesh is described. A method for assessing the degree to which the kinetic solution differs from a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is introduced and tested on a thoroughly studied test case. The discontinuous Galerkin numerical method is extended for efficient solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in five or more particle phase-space dimensions using tensor-product hypercube elements with arbitrary polynomial order. A scheme for velocity moment integration is integrated as required for coupling between the plasma species and electromagnetic waves. A new high performance simulation code WARPM is developed to efficiently implement the model and numerical method on emerging many-core supercomputing architectures. WARPM uses the OpenCL programming model for computational kernels and task parallelism to overlap computation with communication. WARPM single-node performance and parallel scaling efficiency are analyzed with bottlenecks identified guiding future directions for the implementation. The plasma modeling capability is validated against physical problems with analytic solutions and well established benchmark problems.

  12. Vlasov simulations of Kinetic Alfv\\'en Waves at proton kinetic scales

    CERN Document Server

    Vasconez, C L; Camporeale, E; Veltri, P

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic Alfv\\'en waves represent an important subject in space plasma physics, since they are thought to play a crucial role in the development of the turbulent energy cascade in the solar wind plasma at short wavelengths (of the order of the proton inertial length $d_p$ and beyond). A full understanding of the physical mechanisms which govern the kinetic plasma dynamics at these scales can provide important clues on the problem of the turbulent dissipation and heating in collisionless systems. In this paper, hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations are employed to analyze in detail the features of the kinetic Alfv\\'en waves at proton kinetic scales, in typical conditions of the solar wind environment. In particular, linear and nonlinear regimes of propagation of these fluctuations have been investigated in a single-wave situation, focusing on the physical processes of collisionless Landau damping and wave-particle resonant interaction. Interestingly, since for wavelengths close to $d_p$ and proton plasma beta $\\bet...

  13. Numerical simulation of Vlasov equation with parallel tools; Simulations numeriques de l'equation de Vlasov a l'aide d'outils paralleles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyroux, J

    2005-11-15

    This project aims to make even more powerful the resolution of Vlasov codes through the various parallelization tools (MPI, OpenMP...). A simplified test case served as a base for constructing the parallel codes for obtaining a data-processing skeleton which, thereafter, could be re-used for increasingly complex models (more than four variables of phase space). This will thus make it possible to treat more realistic situations linked, for example, to the injection of ultra short and ultra intense impulses in inertial fusion plasmas, or the study of the instability of trapped ions now taken as being responsible for the generation of turbulence in tokamak plasmas. (author)

  14. A New Class of Non-Linear, Finite-Volume Methods for Vlasov Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, J W; Hittinger, J A

    2009-11-24

    Methods for the numerical discretization of the Vlasov equation should efficiently use the phase space discretization and should introduce only enough numerical dissipation to promote stability and control oscillations. A new high-order, non-linear, finite-volume algorithm for the Vlasov equation that discretely conserves particle number and controls oscillations is presented. The method is fourth-order in space and time in well-resolved regions, but smoothly reduces to a third-order upwind scheme as features become poorly resolved. The new scheme is applied to several standard problems for the Vlasov-Poisson system, and the results are compared with those from other finite-volume approaches, including an artificial viscosity scheme and the Piecewise Parabolic Method. It is shown that the new scheme is able to control oscillations while preserving a higher degree of fidelity of the solution than the other approaches.

  15. Full-F gyrofluid model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    variables. The fluid moment hierarchy is closed by approximating the gyrokinetic distribution function as a finite order Hermite-Laguerre polynomial and by determining closure approximations for terms involving the gyrokinetic gyro-averaging operator. The model exactly conserves the gyrokinetic full......-F energy invariant evaluated using the Hermite-Laguerre decomposition. The model is suited for qualitative studies of the interplay between turbulence, flows, and dynamically evolving profiles in magnetically confined plasmas....

  16. Vlasov - Maxwell, Self-consistent Electromagnetic Wave Emission Simulations in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiklauri, David

    2010-12-01

    1.5D Vlasov - Maxwell simulations are employed to model electromagnetic emission generation in a fully self-consistent plasma kinetic model for the first time in the context of solar physics. The simulations mimic the plasma emission mechanism and Larmor-drift instability in a plasma thread that connects the Sun to Earth with the spatial scales compressed appropriately. The effects of spatial density gradients on the generation of electromagnetic radiation are investigated. It is shown that a 1.5D inhomogeneous plasma with a uniform background magnetic field directed transverse to the density gradient is aperiodically unstable to the Larmor-drift instability. The latter results in a novel effect of generation of electromagnetic emission at plasma frequency. The generated perturbations consist of two parts: i) non-escaping (trapped) Langmuir type oscillations, which are localised in the regions of density inhomogeneity, and are highly filamentary, with the period of appearance of the filaments close to electron plasma frequency in the dense regions; and ii) escaping electromagnetic radiation with phase speeds close to the speed of light. When the density gradient is removed ( i.e. when plasma becomes stable to the Larmor-drift instability) and a low density super-thermal, hot beam is injected along the domain, in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, the plasma emission mechanism generates non-escaping Langmuir type oscillations, which in turn generate escaping electromagnetic radiation. It is found that in the spatial location where the beam is injected, standing waves, oscillating at the plasma frequency, are excited. These can be used to interpret the horizontal strips (the narrow-band line emission) observed in some dynamical spectra. Predictions of quasilinear theory are: i) the electron free streaming and ii) the long relaxation time of the beam, in accord with the analytic expressions. These are corroborated via direct, fully-kinetic simulation

  17. Generation of initial Vlasov distributions for simulation of charged particle beams with high space-charge intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, S M; Kikuchi, T; Davidson, R C

    2007-04-12

    Self-consistent Vlasov simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel, both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

  18. Vlasov simulations of self generated strong magnetic fields in plasmas and laser-plasma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inglebert A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A new formulation based on Hamiltonian reduction technique using the invariance of generalized canonical momentum is introduced for the study of relativistic Weibel-type instability. An example of application is given for the current filamentation instability resulting from the propagation of two counter-streaming electron beams in the relativistic regime of the instability. This model presents a double advantage. From an analytical point of view, the method is exact and standard fluid dispersion relations for Weibel or filamentation instabilies can be recovered. From a numerical point of view, the method allows a drastic reduction of the computational time. A 1D multi-stream Vlasov-Maxwell code is developed using such dynamical invariants in the perpendicular momentum space. Numerical comparison with a full Vlasov-Maxwell system has also been carried out to show the efficiency of this reduction technique.

  19. Monte Carlo particle-in-cell methods for the simulation of the Vlasov-Maxwell gyrokinetic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottino, A.; Sonnendrücker, E.

    2015-10-01

    > The particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm is the most popular method for the discretisation of the general 6D Vlasov-Maxwell problem and it is widely used also for the simulation of the 5D gyrokinetic equations. The method consists of coupling a particle-based algorithm for the Vlasov equation with a grid-based method for the computation of the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. In this review we derive a Monte Carlo PIC finite-element model starting from a gyrokinetic discrete Lagrangian. The variations of the Lagrangian are used to obtain the time-continuous equations of motion for the particles and the finite-element approximation of the field equations. The Noether theorem for the semi-discretised system implies a certain number of conservation properties for the final set of equations. Moreover, the PIC method can be interpreted as a probabilistic Monte Carlo like method, consisting of calculating integrals of the continuous distribution function using a finite set of discrete markers. The nonlinear interactions along with numerical errors introduce random effects after some time. Therefore, the same tools for error analysis and error reduction used in Monte Carlo numerical methods can be applied to PIC simulations.

  20. Vlasov-Poisson simulations of electrostatic parametric instability for localized Langmuir wave packets in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Henri, Pierre; Briand, Carine; Mangeney, André; 10.1029/2009JA014969

    2013-01-01

    Recent observation of large amplitude Langmuir waveforms during a Type III event in the solar wind have been interpreted as the signature of the electrostatic decay of beam-driven Langmuir waves. This mechanism is thought to be a first step to explain the generation of solar Type III radio emission. The threshold for this parametric instability in typical solar wind condition is investigated here by means of 1D-1V Vlasov-Poisson simulations. We show that the amplitude of the observed Langmuir beat-like waveforms is of the order of the effective threshold computed from the full kinetic simulations. The expected level of associated ion acoustic density fluctuations have also been computed for comparison with observations.

  1. Multirate Particle-in-Cell Time Integration Techniques of Vlasov-Maxwell Equations for Collisionless Kinetic Plasma Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Guangye [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chacon, Luis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knoll, Dana Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barnes, Daniel C [Coronado Consulting

    2015-07-31

    A multi-rate PIC formulation was developed that employs large timesteps for slow field evolution, and small (adaptive) timesteps for particle orbit integrations. Implementation is based on a JFNK solver with nonlinear elimination and moment preconditioning. The approach is free of numerical instabilities (ωpeΔt >>1, and Δx >> λD), and requires many fewer dofs (vs. explicit PIC) for comparable accuracy in challenging problems. Significant gains (vs. conventional explicit PIC) may be possible for large scale simulations. The paper is organized as follows: Vlasov-Maxwell Particle-in-cell (PIC) methods for plasmas; Explicit, semi-implicit, and implicit time integrations; Implicit PIC formulation (Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) with nonlinear elimination allows different treatments of disparate scales, discrete conservation properties (energy, charge, canonical momentum, etc.)); Some numerical examples; and Summary.

  2. Vlasov simulations of electron heating by Langmuir turbulence near the critical altitude in the radiation-modified ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. G.; Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V.

    1997-12-01

    One-dimensional Vlasov equations are solved numerically for conditions appropriate to the ionospheric F-region during the initial stages of HF-radiation modification experiments at two altitudes: one at the critical altitude, the other approximately 1.5 km lower. Numerical simulations of wave growth and saturation with self-consistent evolution of particle distributions are run past the point at which a statistically steady state is reached. At the critical altitude the wave turbulence is dominated by coherent collapsing wave packets or `cavitons' and at the lower altitude by a combination of coherent (strong) and incoherent (weak) turbulence. Our results are consistent with the predictions of Hanssen et al. [Journal of Geophysical Research, 97, 12,073 (1992)]. Semi-open boundary conditions, in which a small fraction of the hot electrons generated by interactions with the strong localized caviton fields are replaced by electrons from the cool background distribution, are employed to model a heated region of finite length that is large compared to the simulation domain. The resultant steady-state electron distributions are characterized by power-law tails of hot electrons superposed on an approximately Maxwellian bulk distribution. The Langmuir-wave dissipation spectra are found to be in good agreement with predictions based on linear Landau damping on the nonthermal electron tails.

  3. Langmuir wave filamentation in the kinetic regime. I. Filamentation instability of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes in multidimensional Vlasov simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silantyev, Denis A.; Lushnikov, Pavel M.; Rose, Harvey A.

    2017-04-01

    A nonlinear Langmuir wave in the kinetic regime k λ D ≳ 0.2 may have a filamentation instability, where k is the wavenumber and λD is the Debye length. The nonlinear stage of that instability develops into the filamentation of Langmuir waves which in turn leads to the saturation of the stimulated Raman scattering in laser-plasma interaction experiments. Here, we study the linear stage of the filamentation instability of the particular family (H. A. Rose and D. A. Russell, Phys. Plasmas 8, 4784 (2001)) of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) modes (I. B. Bernstein et al., Phys. Rev. 108, 546 (1957)) that is a bifurcation of the linear Langmuir wave. Performing direct 2 + 2D Vlasov-Poisson simulations of collisionless plasma, we find the growth rates of oblique modes of the electric field as a function of BGK's amplitude, wavenumber, and the angle of the oblique mode's wavevector relative to the BGK's wavevector. Simulation results are compared to theoretical predictions.

  4. Hybrid (Vlasov-Fluid) simulation of ion-acoustic soliton chain formation and validity of Korteweg de-Vries model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminmansoor, F.; Abbasi, H.

    2015-08-01

    The present paper is devoted to simulation of nonlinear disintegration of a localized perturbation into ion-acoustic solitons train in a plasma with hot electrons and cold ions. A Gaussian initial perturbation is used to model the localized perturbation. For this purpose, first, we reduce fluid system of equations to a Korteweg de-Vries equation by the following well-known assumptions. (i) On the ion-acoustic evolution time-scale, the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) is assumed to be stationary. (ii) The calculation is restricted to small amplitude cases. Next, in order to generalize the model to finite amplitudes cases, the evolution of EVDF is included. To this end, a hybrid code is designed to simulate the case, in which electrons dynamics is governed by Vlasov equation, while cold ions dynamics is, like before, studied by the fluid equations. A comparison between the two models shows that although the fluid model is capable of demonstrating the general features of the process, to have a better insight into the relevant physics resulting from the evolution of EVDF, the use of kinetic treatment is of great importance.

  5. Kinetic Simulations - Oshun (Vlasov-Fokker-Planck) and PIC (Osiris) - Physics and Open Source Software In The UCLA PICKSE Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tableman, Adam; Tzoufras, Michail; Fonseca, Ricardo; Mori, W. B.

    2016-10-01

    We present physics results and general updates for two plasma kinetic simulation codes developed under the UCLA PICKSE initiative. We also discuss the issues around making these codes open source such that they can be used (and contributed too) by a large audience. The first code discussed is Oshun - a Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (VFP) code. Recent simulations with the VFP code OSHUN will be presented for all of the aforementioned problems. The algorithmic improvements that have facilitated these studies will be also be discussed. The second code discussed is the PIC code Osiris. Osiris is a widely respected code used in hundreds of papers. Osiris was first developed for laser-plasma interactions but has grown into a robust framework covering most areas of plasma research. One defining feature of Osiris is that it is highly optimized for a variety of hardware configurations and scales linearly over 1 million + CPU nodes. We will discuss the recently released version 4.0 written in modern, fully-object oriented FORTRAN. Funding provided by Grants NSF ACI 1339893 and DOE DE NA 0001833.

  6. Comparison between 1D and 1 1/2D Eulerian Vlasov codes for the numerical simulation of stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghizzo, A.; Bertrand, P.; Lebas, J.; Shoucri, M.; Johnston, T.; Fijalkow, E.; Feix, M. R.

    1992-10-01

    The present 1 1/2D relativistic Euler-Vlasov code has been used to check the validity of a hydrodynamic description used in a 1D version of the Vlasov code. By these means, detailed numerical results can be compared; good agreement furnishes full support for the 1D electromagnetic Vlasov code, which runs faster than the 1 1/2D code. The results obtained assume a nonrelativistic v(y) velocity.

  7. Vlasov on GPU (VOG Project)

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrenberger, M; Marradi, L; Crouseilles, N; Sonnendrucker, E; Afeyan, B

    2013-01-01

    This work concerns the numerical simulation of the Vlasov-Poisson set of equations using semi- Lagrangian methods on Graphical Processing Units (GPU). To accomplish this goal, modifications to traditional methods had to be implemented. First and foremost, a reformulation of semi-Lagrangian methods is performed, which enables us to rewrite the governing equations as a circulant matrix operating on the vector of unknowns. This product calculation can be performed efficiently using FFT routines. Second, to overcome the limitation of single precision inherent in GPU, a {\\delta}f type method is adopted which only needs refinement in specialized areas of phase space but not throughout. Thus, a GPU Vlasov-Poisson solver can indeed perform high precision simulations (since it uses very high order reconstruction methods and a large number of grid points in phase space). We show results for rather academic test cases on Landau damping and also for physically relevant phenomena such as the bump on tail instability and t...

  8. High Order Vlasov Solvers for the Simulation of KEEN Wavea Including the L-B and F-P Collision Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnendrucker, Eric; Crouseilles, Nicolas; Afeyan, Bedros

    2012-10-01

    Since the discovery of KEEN waves in 2002, it has been an open question whether the detailed phase space structures found in those well resolved simulations of Afeyan et al., would survive (essentially) intact, if instead of cubic splines, higher order interpolation schemes were used, up to spectral accuracy. In this work, the Vlasov-Poisson system is solved using Fourier-Fourier descriptions in phase space, and Fourier spline. The splines can be any order approaching spectral accuracy quickly. These simulations show what the role of numerical dissipation is for the stable simulation of driven KEEN waves, how delicate structures found in low order simulations survive and persist even when the microscope with which they are being scrutinized is much more powerful. The Fourier capability also allows truncated descriptions for the theoretical advancement of reduced models of fully formed KEEN waves, as described previously by Afeyan et al. The partitioned phase space structures they found is further tested by the use of a Lenard-Bernstein collision model on the way to including the full Fokker Planck collision operator in cylindrical (in velocity space) geometry, advanced by Greengard et al.

  9. A high-resolution global Vlasov simulation of a small dielectric body with a weak intrinsic magnetic field on the K computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Fukazawa, Keiichiro

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between the solar wind and solar system bodies, such as planets, satellites, and asteroids, is one of the fundamental global-scale phenomena in space plasma physics. In the present study, the electromagnetic environment around a small dielectric body with a weak intrinsic magnetic field is studied by means of a first-principle kinetic plasma simulation, which is a challenging task in space plasma physics as well as high-performance computing. Due to several computational limitations, five-dimensional full electromagnetic Vlasov simulations with two configuration space and three velocity space coordinates are performed with two different spatial resolutions. The Debye-scale charge separation is not solved correctly in the simulation run with a low spatial resolution, while all the physical processes in collisionless plasma are included in the simulation run with a high spatial resolution. The direction comparison of electromagnetic fields between the two runs shows that there is small difference in the structure of magnetic field lines. On the other hand, small-scale fine structures of electrostatic fields are enhanced by the electric charge separation and the charge accumulation on the surface of the body in the high-resolution run, while these structures are absent in the low-resolution runs. These results are consistent with the conventional understanding of plasma physics that the structure and dynamics of global magnetic fields, which are generally described by the magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) equations, are not affected by electron-scale microphysics.

  10. Multi-dimensional Vlasov simulations and modeling of trapped-electron-driven filamentation of electron plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, R. L., E-mail: berger5@llnl.gov; Cohen, B. I. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Brunner, S., E-mail: stephan.brunner@epfl.ch [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CRPP-PPB, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Banks, J. W. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, AE 301, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Winjum, B. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Kinetic simulations of two-dimensional finite-amplitude electron plasma waves are performed in a one-wavelength long system. A systematic study of the most unstable linear sideband mode, in particular its growth rate γ and wavenumber k{sub y}, is carried out by scanning the amplitude and wavenumber of the initial wave. Simulation results are compared with numerical and analytical solutions to a two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger model [H. A. Rose and L. Yin, Phys. Plasmas 15, 042311 (2008)] and to the reduced model by Kruer et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 23, 838 (1969)] generalized to two dimensions.

  11. A cloudy Vlasov solution

    CERN Document Server

    Alard, C

    2004-01-01

    We propose to integrate the Vlasov-Poisson equations giving the evolution of a dynamical system in phase-space using a continuous set of local basis functions. In practice, the method decomposes the density in phase-space into small smooth units having compact support. We call these small units ``clouds'' and choose them to be Gaussians of elliptical support. Fortunately, the evolution of these clouds in the local potential has an analytical solution, that can be used to evolve the whole system during a significant fraction of dynamical time. In the process, the clouds, initially round, change shape and get elongated. At some point, the system needs to be remapped on round clouds once again. This remapping can be performed optimally using a small number of Lucy iterations. The remapped solution can be evolved again with the cloud method, and the process can be iterated a large number of times without showing significant diffusion. Our numerical experiments show that it is possible to follow the 2 dimensional ...

  12. Wave dispersion in the hybrid-Vlasov model: Verification of Vlasiator

    OpenAIRE

    Kempf, Yann; Pokhotelov, Dimitry; von Alfthan, Sebastian; Vaivads, Andris; Palmroth, Minna; Koskinen, Hannu E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Vlasiator is a new hybrid-Vlasov plasma simulation code aimed at simulating the entire magnetosphere of the Earth. The code treats ions (protons) kinetically through Vlasov's equation in the six-dimensional phase space while electrons are a massless charge-neutralizing fluid [M. Palmroth et al., Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 99, 41 (2013); A. Sandroos et al., Parallel Computing 39, 306 (2013)]. For first global simulations of the magnetosphere, it is critical to verify ...

  13. Finite difference modeling of sinking stage curved beam based on revised Vlasov equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张磊; 朱真才; 沈刚; 曹国华

    2015-01-01

    For the static analysis of the sinking stage curved beam, a finite difference model was presented based on the proposed revised Vlasov equations. First, revised Vlasov equations for thin-walled curved beams with closed sections were deduced considering the shear strain on the mid-surface of the cross-section. Then, the finite difference formulation of revised Vlasov equations was implemented with the parabolic interpolation based on Taylor series. At last, the finite difference model was built by substituting geometry and boundary conditions of the sinking stage curved beam into the finite difference formulation. The validity of present work is confirmed by the published literature and ANSYS simulation results. It can be concluded that revised Vlasov equations are more accurate than the original one in the analysis of thin-walled beams with closed sections, and that present finite difference model is applicable in the evaluation of the sinking stage curved beam.

  14. Tokamak-like Vlasov equilibria

    CERN Document Server

    Tasso, H

    2014-01-01

    Vlasov equilibria of axisymmetric plasmas with vacuum toroidal magnetic field can be reduced, up to a selection of ions and electrons distributions functions, to a Grad-Shafranov-like equation. Quasineutrality narrow the choice of the distributions functions. In contrast to two-dimensional translationally symmetric equilibria whose electron distribution function consists of a displaced Maxwellian, the toroidal equilibria need deformed Maxwellians. In order to be able to carry through the calculations, this deformation is produced by means of either a Heaviside step function or an exponential function. The resulting Grad-Shafranov-like equations are established explicitly.

  15. Vlasov versus N-body: the H\\'enon sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Colombi, S; Peirani, S; Plum, G; Suto, Y

    2015-01-01

    We perform a detailed comparison of the phase-space density traced by the particle distribution in Gadget simulations to the result obtained with a spherical Vlasov solver using the splitting algorithm. The systems considered are apodized H\\'enon spheres with two values of the virial ratio, R ~ 0.1 and 0.5. After checking that spherical symmetry is well preserved by the N-body simulations, visual and quantitative comparisons are performed. In particular we introduce new statistics, correlators and entropic estimators, based on the likelihood of whether N-body simulations actually trace randomly the Vlasov phase-space density. When taking into account the limits of both the N-body and the Vlasov codes, namely collective effects due to the particle shot noise in the first case and diffusion and possible nonlinear instabilities due to finite resolution of the phase-space grid in the second case, we find a spectacular agreement between both methods, even in regions of phase-space where nontrivial physical instabi...

  16. Vlasov models for kinetic Weibel-type instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghizzo, A.; Sarrat, M.; Del Sarto, D.

    2017-02-01

    The Weibel instability, driven by a temperature anisotropy, is investigated within different kinetic descriptions based on the semi-Lagrangian full kinetic and relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell model, on the multi-stream approach, which is based on a Hamiltonian reduction technique, and finally, with the full pressure tensor fluid-type description. Dispersion relations of the Weibel instability are derived using the three different models. A qualitatively different regime is observed in Vlasov numerical experiments depending on the excitation of a longitudinal plasma electric field driven initially by the combined action of the stream symmetry breaking and weak relativistic effects, in contrast with the existing theories of the Weibel instability based on their purely transverse characters. The multi-stream model offers an alternate way to simulate easily the coupling with the longitudinal electric field and particularly the nonlinear regime of saturation, making numerical experiments more tractable, when only a few moments of the distribution are considered. Thus a numerical comparison between the reduced Hamiltonian model (the multi-stream model) and full kinetic (relativistic) Vlasov simulations has been investigated in that regime. Although nonlinear simulations of the fluid model, including the dynamics of the pressure tensor, have not been carried out here, the model is strongly relevant even in the three-dimensional case.

  17. Vlasov Analysis of Microbunching Gain for Magnetized Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Cheng Ying [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    For a high-brightness electron beam with low energy and high bunch charge traversing a recirculation beamline, coherent synchrotron radiation and space charge effect may result in the microbunching instability (MBI). Both tracking simulation and Vlasov analysis for an early design of Circulator Cooler Ring for the Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider reveal significant MBI. It is envisioned these could be substantially suppressed by using a magnetized beam. In this work, we extend the existing Vlasov analysis, originally developed for a non-magnetized beam, to the description of transport of a magnetized beam including relevant collective effects. The new formulation will be further employed to confirm prediction of microbunching suppression for a magnetized beam transport in a recirculating machine design.

  18. Coupled Vlasov and two-fluid codes on GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Rieke, M; Grauer, R

    2014-01-01

    We present a way to combine Vlasov and two-fluid codes for the simulation of a collisionless plasma in large domains while keeping full information of the velocity distribution in localized areas of interest. This is made possible by solving the full Vlasov equation in one region while the remaining area is treated by a 5-moment two-fluid code. In such a treatment, the main challenge of coupling kinetic and fluid descriptions is the interchange of physically correct boundary conditions between the different plasma models. In contrast to other treatments, we do not rely on any specific form of the distribution function, e.g. a Maxwellian type. Instead, we combine an extrapolation of the distribution function and a correction of the moments based on the fluid data. Thus, throughout the simulation both codes provide the necessary boundary conditions for each other. A speed-up factor of around 20 is achieved by using GPUs for the computationally expensive solution of the Vlasov equation and an overall factor of a...

  19. Stability analysis of cylindrical Vlasov equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A general method of stability analysis is described which may be applied to a large class of such problems, namely those which are described dynamically by the Vlasov equation, and geometrically by cylindrical symmetry. The method is presented for the simple case of the Vlasov-Poisson (electrostatic) equations, and the results are applied to a calculation of the lower-hybrid-drift instability in a plasma with a rigid rotor distribution function. The method is extended to the full Vlasov-Maxwell (electromagnetic) equations. These results are applied to a calculation of the instability of the extraordinary electromagnetic mode in a relativistic E-layer interacting with a background plasma.

  20. Vlasov moments, integrable systems and singular solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, John [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Holm, Darryl D. [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Computer and Computational Science Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: d.holm@ic.ac.uk; Tronci, Cesare [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); TERA Foundation for Oncological Hadrontherapy, 11 V. Puccini, Novara 28100 (Italy)

    2008-02-11

    The Vlasov equation governs the evolution of the single-particle probability distribution function (PDF) for a system of particles interacting without dissipation. Its singular solutions correspond to the individual particle motions. The operation of taking the moments of the Vlasov equation is a Poisson map. The resulting Lie-Poisson Hamiltonian dynamics of the Vlasov moments is found to be integrable is several cases. For example, the dynamics for coasting beams in particle accelerators is associated by a hodograph transformation to the known integrable Benney shallow-water equation. After setting the context, the Letter focuses on geodesic Vlasov moment equations. Continuum closures of these equations at two different orders are found to be integrable systems whose singular solutions characterize the geodesic motion of the individual particles.

  1. Vlasov-Poisson in 1D: waterbags

    CERN Document Server

    Colombi, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    We revisit in one dimension the waterbag method to solve numerically Vlasov-Poisson equations. In this approach, the phase-space distribution function $f(x,v)$ is initially sampled by an ensemble of patches, the waterbags, where $f$ is assumed to be constant. As a consequence of Liouville theorem it is only needed to follow the evolution of the border of these waterbags, which can be done by employing an orientated, self-adaptive polygon tracing isocontours of $f$. This method, which is entropy conserving in essence, is very accurate and can trace very well non linear instabilities as illustrated by specific examples. As an application of the method, we generate an ensemble of single waterbag simulations with decreasing thickness, to perform a convergence study to the cold case. Our measurements show that the system relaxes to a steady state where the gravitational potential profile is a power-law of slowly varying index $\\beta$, with $\\beta$ close to $3/2$ as found in the literature. However, detailed analys...

  2. Integer lattice dynamics for Vlasov-Poisson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocz, Philip; Succi, Sauro

    2017-03-01

    We revisit the integer lattice (IL) method to numerically solve the Vlasov-Poisson equations, and show that a slight variant of the method is a very easy, viable, and efficient numerical approach to study the dynamics of self-gravitating, collisionless systems. The distribution function lives in a discretized lattice phase-space, and each time-step in the simulation corresponds to a simple permutation of the lattice sites. Hence, the method is Lagrangian, conservative, and fully time-reversible. IL complements other existing methods, such as N-body/particle mesh (computationally efficient, but affected by Monte Carlo sampling noise and two-body relaxation) and finite volume (FV) direct integration schemes (expensive, accurate but diffusive). We also present improvements to the FV scheme, using a moving-mesh approach inspired by IL, to reduce numerical diffusion and the time-step criterion. Being a direct integration scheme like FV, IL is memory limited (memory requirement for a full 3D problem scales as N6, where N is the resolution per linear phase-space dimension). However, we describe a new technique for achieving N4 scaling. The method offers promise for investigating the full 6D phase-space of collisionless systems of stars and dark matter.

  3. Integer Lattice Dynamics for Vlasov-Poisson

    CERN Document Server

    Mocz, Philip

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the integer lattice (IL) method to numerically solve the Vlasov-Poisson equations, and show that a slight variant of the method is a very easy, viable, and efficient numerical approach to study the dynamics of self-gravitating, collisionless systems. The distribution function lives in a discretized lattice phase-space, and each time-step in the simulation corresponds to a simple permutation of the lattice sites. Hence, the method is Lagrangian, conservative, and fully time-reversible. IL complements other existing methods, such as N-body/particle mesh (computationally efficient, but affected by Monte-Carlo sampling noise and two-body relaxation) and finite volume (FV) direct integration schemes (expensive, accurate but diffusive). We also present improvements to the FV scheme, using a moving mesh approach inspired by IL, to reduce numerical diffusion and the time-step criterion. Being a direct integration scheme like FV, IL is memory limited (memory requirement for a full 3D problem scales as N^6, ...

  4. Trapping scaling for bifurcations in the Vlasov systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, J; Métivier, D; Yamaguchi, Y Y

    2016-04-01

    We study nonoscillating bifurcations of nonhomogeneous steady states of the Vlasov equation, a situation occurring in galactic models, or for Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes in plasma physics. Through an unstable manifold expansion, we show that in one spatial dimension the dynamics is very sensitive to the initial perturbation: the instability may saturate at small amplitude-generalizing the "trapping scaling" of plasma physics-or may grow to produce a large-scale modification of the system. Furthermore, resonances are strongly suppressed, leading to different phenomena with respect to the homogeneous case. These analytical findings are illustrated and extended by direct numerical simulations with a cosine interaction potential.

  5. Trapping scaling for bifurcations in the Vlasov systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, J.; Métivier, D.; Yamaguchi, Y. Y.

    2016-04-01

    We study nonoscillating bifurcations of nonhomogeneous steady states of the Vlasov equation, a situation occurring in galactic models, or for Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes in plasma physics. Through an unstable manifold expansion, we show that in one spatial dimension the dynamics is very sensitive to the initial perturbation: the instability may saturate at small amplitude—generalizing the "trapping scaling" of plasma physics—or may grow to produce a large-scale modification of the system. Furthermore, resonances are strongly suppressed, leading to different phenomena with respect to the homogeneous case. These analytical findings are illustrated and extended by direct numerical simulations with a cosine interaction potential.

  6. Hamiltonian particle-in-cell methods for Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    CERN Document Server

    He, Yang; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop Hamiltonian particle-in-cell methods for Vlasov-Maxwell equations by applying conforming finite element methods in space and splitting methods in time. For the spatial discretisation, the criteria for choosing finite element spaces are presented such that the semi-discrete system possesses a discrete non-canonical Poisson structure. We apply a Hamiltonian splitting method to the semi-discrete system in time, then the resulting algorithm is Poisson preserving and explicit. The conservative properties of the algorithm guarantee the efficient and accurate numerical simulation of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations over long-time.

  7. Solving the Vlasov equation in complex geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnendrücker E.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an isoparametric analysis to solve the Vlasov equation with a semi-Lagrangian scheme. A Vlasov-Poisson problem modeling a heavy ion beam in an axisymmetric configuration is considered. Numerical experiments are conducted on computational meshes targeting different geometries. The impact of the computational grid on the accuracy and the computational cost are shown. The use of analytical mapping or Bézier patches does not induce a too large computational overhead and is quite accurate. This approach successfully couples an isoparametric analysis with a semi-Lagrangian scheme, and we expect to apply it to a gyrokinetic Vlasov solver. Nous présentons ici une analyse isoparamétrique pour résoudre l’équation de Vlasov à l’aide d’un schéma Semi-Lagrangien. Le cas test d’un faisceau axisymétrique d’ions lourds est étudié dans le cadre du système Vlasov-Poisson. Des tests numériques sont effectués sur différents maillages a fin d’étudier diverses géométries. L’impact du choix de maillage sur la précision numérique et le coût de calcul est quantifié. L’utilisation de mapping analytique ou de patches de Bézier ne semble pas trop coûteux et permet une précision numérique suffisante. Le couplage de l’analyse isoparamétrique au schéma Semi-Lagrangien est donc réeussi, nous espérons pouvoir appliquer cette méthode à des solveurs de l’équation de Vlasov gyrocinétique.

  8. Kinetic Boltzmann, Vlasov and Related Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Sinitsyn, Alexander; Vedenyapin, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Boltzmann and Vlasov equations played a great role in the past and still play an important role in modern natural sciences, technique and even philosophy of science. Classical Boltzmann equation derived in 1872 became a cornerstone for the molecular-kinetic theory, the second law of thermodynamics (increasing entropy) and derivation of the basic hydrodynamic equations. After modifications, the fields and numbers of its applications have increased to include diluted gas, radiation, neutral particles transportation, atmosphere optics and nuclear reactor modelling. Vlasov equation was obtained in

  9. PROTON KINETIC EFFECTS IN VLASOV AND SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servidio, S.; Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Osman, K. T.; Chapman, S. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Califano, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Matthaeus, W. H., E-mail: sergio.servidio@fis.unical.it [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Kinetic plasma processes are investigated in the framework of solar wind turbulence, employing hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) simulations. Statistical analysis of spacecraft observation data relates proton temperature anisotropy T /T {sub ∥} and parallel plasma beta β{sub ∥}, where subscripts refer to the ambient magnetic field direction. Here, this relationship is recovered using an ensemble of HVM simulations. By varying plasma parameters, such as plasma beta and fluctuation level, the simulations explore distinct regions of the parameter space given by T /T {sub ∥} and β{sub ∥}, similar to solar wind sub-datasets. Moreover, both simulation and solar wind data suggest that temperature anisotropy is not only associated with magnetic intermittent events, but also with gradient-type structures in the flow and in the density. This connection between non-Maxwellian kinetic effects and various types of intermittency may be a key point for understanding the complex nature of plasma turbulence.

  10. Proton Kinetic Effects in Vlasov and Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Servidio, S; Valentini, F; Perrone, D; Califano, F; Chapman, S; Matthaeus, W H; Veltri, P

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic plasma processes have been investigated in the framework of solar wind turbulence, employing Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) simulations. The dependency of proton temperature anisotropy T_{\\perp}/T_{\\parallel} on the parallel plasma beta \\beta_{\\parallel}, commonly observed in spacecraft data, has been recovered using an ensemble of HVM simulations. By varying plasma parameters, such as plasma beta and fluctuation level, the simulations explore distinct regions of the parameter space given by T_{\\perp}/T_{\\parallel} and \\beta_{\\parallel}, similar to solar wind sub-datasets. Moreover, both simulation and solar wind data suggest that temperature anisotropy is not only associated with magnetic intermittent events, but also with gradient-type structures in the flow and in the density. This connection between non-Maxwellian kinetic effects and various types of intermittency may be a key point for understanding the complex nature of plasma turbulence.

  11. Hydrodynamic limits of the Vlasov equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprino, S. (Universita' de L' Aquila Coppito (Italy)); Esposito, R.; Marra, R. (Universita' di Roma tor Vergata, Roma (Italy)); Pulvirenti, M. (Universita' di Roma la Sapienza, Roma (Italy))

    1993-01-01

    In the present work, the authors study the Vlasov equation for repulsive forces in the hydrodynamic regime. For initial distributions at zero temperature the limit equations turn out to be the compressible and incompressible Euler equations under suitable space-time scalings. 17 refs.

  12. Irreversible energy flow in forced Vlasov dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Plunk, Gabriel G.

    2014-10-01

    © EDP Sciences, Società Italiana di Fisica, Springer-Verlag. The recent paper of Plunk [G.G. Plunk, Phys. Plasmas 20, 032304 (2013)] considered the forced linear Vlasov equation as a model for the quasi-steady state of a single stable plasma wavenumber interacting with a bath of turbulent fluctuations. This approach gives some insight into possible energy flows without solving for nonlinear dynamics. The central result of the present work is that the forced linear Vlasov equation exhibits asymptotically zero (irreversible) dissipation to all orders under a detuning of the forcing frequency and the characteristic frequency associated with particle streaming. We first prove this by direct calculation, tracking energy flow in terms of certain exact conservation laws of the linear (collisionless) Vlasov equation. Then we analyze the steady-state solutions in detail using a weakly collisional Hermite-moment formulation, and compare with numerical solution. This leads to a detailed description of the Hermite energy spectrum, and a proof of no dissipation at all orders, complementing the collisionless Vlasov result.

  13. Vlasov analysis of microbunching instability for magnetized beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-Y. Tsai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For a high-brightness electron beam with high bunch charge traversing a recirculation beam line, coherent synchrotron radiation and space charge effects may result in microbunching instability (MBI. Both tracking simulation and Vlasov analysis for an early design of a circulator cooler ring (CCR for the Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC reveal significant MBI [Ya. Derbenev and Y. Zhang, Proceedings of the Workshop on Beam Cooling and Related Topics, COOL’09, Lanzhou, China, 2009 (2009, FRM2MCCO01]. It is envisioned that the MBI could be substantially suppressed by using a magnetized beam. In this paper we have generalized the existing Vlasov analysis, originally developed for a nonmagnetized beam (or transversely uncoupled beam, to the description of transport of a magnetized beam including relevant collective effects. The new formulation is then employed to confirm prediction of microbunching suppression for a magnetized beam transport in the recirculation arc of a recent JLEIC energy recovery linac (ERL based cooler design for electron cooling. It is found that the smearing effect in the longitudinal beam phase space originates from the large transverse beam size as a nature of the magnetized beams and becomes effective through the x-z correlation when the correlated distance is larger than the microbunched scale. As a comparison, MBI analysis of the early design of JLEIC CCR is also presented in this paper.

  14. Parallelized Vlasov-Fokker-Planck solver for desktop personal computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeldt, Patrik; Brosi, Miriam; Schwarz, Markus; Steinmann, Johannes L.; Müller, Anke-Susanne

    2017-03-01

    The numerical solution of the Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equation is a well established method to simulate the dynamics, including the self-interaction with its own wake field, of an electron bunch in a storage ring. In this paper we present Inovesa, a modularly extensible program that uses opencl to massively parallelize the computation. It allows a standard desktop PC to work with appropriate accuracy and yield reliable results within minutes. We provide numerical stability-studies over a wide parameter range and compare our numerical findings to known results. Simulation results for the case of coherent synchrotron radiation will be compared to measurements that probe the effects of the microbunching instability occurring in the short bunch operation at ANKA. It will be shown that the impedance model based on the shielding effect of two parallel plates can not only describe the instability threshold, but also the presence of multiple regimes that show differences in the emission of coherent synchrotron radiation.

  15. The whistler mode in a Vlasov plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, R. L.; Gary, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    In this study, properties of small-amplitude parallel and oblique whistler-mode waves are investigated for a wide range of plasma parameters by numerically solving the full electromagnetic Vlasov-dispersion equation. To investigate the cold-plasma and electrostatic approximations for the whistler mode, the results are compared with results obtained using these descriptions. For large wavelengths, the cold-plasma description is often accurate, while for short wavelengths and sufficiently oblique propagation, the electrostatic description is often accurate. The study demonstrates that in a Vlasov plasma the whistler mode near resonance has a group velocity more nearly parallel to the magnetic field than that predicted by cold-plasma theory.

  16. Wave dispersion in the hybrid-Vlasov model: verification of Vlasiator

    CERN Document Server

    Kempf, Yann; von Alfthan, Sebastian; Vaivads, Andris; Palmroth, Minna; Koskinen, Hannu E J

    2013-01-01

    Vlasiator is a new hybrid-Vlasov plasma simulation code aimed at simulating the entire magnetosphere of the Earth. The code treats ions (protons) kinetically through Vlasov's equation in the six-dimensional phase space while electrons are a massless charge-neutralizing fluid [M. Palmroth et al., Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 99, 41 (2013); A. Sandroos et al., Parallel Computing 39, 306 (2013)]. For first global simulations of the magnetosphere, it is critical to verify and validate the model by established methods. Here, as part of the verification of Vlasiator, we characterize the low-\\beta\\ plasma wave modes described by this model and compare with the solution computed by the Waves in Homogeneous, Anisotropic Multicomponent Plasmas (WHAMP) code [K. R\\"onnmark, Kiruna Geophysical Institute Reports 179 (1982)], using dispersion curves and surfaces produced with both programs. The match between the two fundamentally different approaches is excellent in the low-frequency, long wavelength...

  17. Vlasov equation for long-range interactions on a lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Bachelard, Romain; De Ninno, Giovanni; Ruffo, Stefano; Staniscia, F

    2011-01-01

    We show that, in the continuum limit, the dynamics of Hamiltonian systems defined on a lattice with long-range couplings is well described by the Vlasov equation. This equation can be linearized around the homogeneous state and a dispersion relation, that depends explicitly on the Fourier modes of the lattice, can be derived. This allows to compute the stability thresholds of the homogeneous state, which turn out to depend on the mode number. When this state is unstable, the growth rates are also function of the mode number. Explicit calculations are performed for the $\\alpha$-HMF model with $0 \\leq \\alpha <1$, for which the zero mean-field mode is always found to dominate the exponential growth. The theoretical predictions are successfully compared with numerical simulations performed on a finite lattice.

  18. Vlasov equation for long-range interactions on a lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, R; Dauxois, T; De Ninno, G; Ruffo, S; Staniscia, F

    2011-06-01

    We show that, in the continuum limit, the dynamics of Hamiltonian systems defined on a lattice with long-range couplings is well described by the Vlasov equation. This equation can be linearized around the homogeneous state, and a dispersion relation, which depends explicitly on the Fourier modes of the lattice, can be derived. This allows one to compute the stability thresholds of the homogeneous state, which turns out to depend on the mode number. When this state is unstable, the growth rates are also functions of the mode number. Explicit calculations are performed for the α-Hamiltonian mean field model with 0≤α<1, for which the mean-field mode is always found to dominate the exponential growth. The theoretical predictions are successfully compared with numerical simulations performed on a finite lattice.

  19. Canonical derivation of the Vlasov-Coulomb noncanonical Poisson structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, A.N.; Dewar, R.L.

    1983-09-01

    Starting from a Lagrangian formulation of the Vlasov-Coulomb system, canonical methods are used to define a Poisson structure for this system. Successive changes of representation then lead systematically to the noncanonical Lie-Poisson structure for functionals of the Vlasov distribution.

  20. Transient Growth in a Magnetized Vlasov Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratushnaya, Valeria; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Collisionless plasmas, such as those encountered in tokamaks, exhibit a rich variety of instabilities. The physical origin, triggering mechanisms and fundamental understanding of many tokamak instabilities, however, is still an open problem. Aiming to gain a better insight into this question, we investigate the stability properties of a collisionless Vlasov plasma for the case of: (a) stationary homogeneous magnetic field, and (b) weakly non-stationary and non-homogeneous magnetic field. We narrow the scope of our investigation to the case of a Maxwellian plasma and examine its evolution with an electrostatic approximation. We show that the linearized Vlasov operator is non-normal, which leads to an algebraic growth of perturbations in a magnetized plasma followed by exponential decay, i.e., classical Landau damping behaviour. This is a so-called transient growth phenomenon, developed in the framework of non-modal stability theory in the context of hydrodynamics. In a homogeneous magnetic field the typical time scales of the transient growth are of the order of several plasma periods. The first-order distribution function and the corresponding electric field are calculated and the dependence on the initial conditions is studied. Supported by baseline research funds at KAUST.

  1. An asymptotic preserving scheme for the relativistic Vlasov--Maxwell equations in the classical limit

    CERN Document Server

    Crouseilles, Nicolas; Faou, Erwan

    2016-01-01

    We consider the relativistic Vlasov--Maxwell (RVM) equations in the limit when the light velocity $c$ goes to infinity. In this regime, the RVM system converges towards the Vlasov--Poisson system and the aim of this paper is to construct asymptotic preserving numerical schemes that are robust with respect to this limit. Our approach relies on a time splitting approach for the RVM system employing an implicit time integrator for Maxwell's equations in order to damp the higher and higher frequencies present in the numerical solution. It turns out that the choice of this implicit method is crucial as even $L$-stable methods can lead to numerical instabilities for large values of $c$. A number of numerical simulations are conducted in order to investigate the performances of our numerical scheme both in the relativistic as well as in the classical limit regime. In addition, we derive the dispersion relation of the Weibel instability for the continuous and the discretized problem.

  2. An asymptotic preserving scheme for the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations in the classical limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouseilles, Nicolas; Einkemmer, Lukas; Faou, Erwan

    2016-12-01

    We consider the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell (RVM) equations in the limit when the light velocity c goes to infinity. In this regime, the RVM system converges towards the Vlasov-Poisson system and the aim of this paper is to construct asymptotic preserving numerical schemes that are robust with respect to this limit. Our approach relies on a time splitting approach for the RVM system employing an implicit time integrator for Maxwell's equations in order to damp the higher and higher frequencies present in the numerical solution. A number of numerical simulations are conducted in order to investigate the performances of our numerical scheme both in the relativistic as well as in the classical limit regime. In addition, we derive the dispersion relation of the Weibel instability for the continuous and the discretized problem.

  3. One-dimensional Vlasov-Maxwell equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, John M.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that the Vlasov equilibrium of a plasma of charged particles in an electromagnetic field is closely related to a fluid equilibrium, where only a few moments of the velocity distribution of the plasma are considered. In this fluid equilibrium the electric field should be calculated from Ohm's law, rather than the Poisson equation. In practice, only one-dimensional equilibria are treated, because the symmetry makes this case tractable. The emphasis here is on gaining a better understanding of the subject, but an alternate way of doing the calculations is suggested. It is shown that particle distributions can be found that are consistent with any reasonable electromagnetic field profile.

  4. Entropy production in coarse grained Vlasov equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morawetz, K. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), LPC-ISMRA, 14 - Caen (France); Walke, R. [Rostock Univ., Fachbereich Physick (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    The Vlasov equation is analyzed for coarse grained distributions. This coarse graining resembles a finite width of test-particles as used in numerical implementations. It is shown that this coarse grained distribution obeys a kinetic equation similar to the Vlasov equation, but with additional terms. These terms give rise to entropy production indicating dissipative features. The reason is a nonlinear mode coupling due to the finite width of the test-particles. The interchange of coarse graining and dynamical evolution is discussed with the help of an exactly solvable model and practical consequences are worked out. By calculating analytically the stationary solution we can show that a sum of modified Boltzmann-like distributions is approached dependent on the initial distribution. This behavior is independent of degeneracy and only controlled by the width of test-particles. The condition for approaching a stationary solution is derived in that the coarse graining energy given by momentum coarse graining should be smaller than a quarter of the kinetic energy. Observable consequences of this coarse graining are: (i) In the thermodynamics the coarse graining leads to spatial correlations in observables. (ii) Too large radii of nucleus in self-consistent treatments are observed and an explicit correction term appears in the Thomas Fermi equation. (iii) The momentum coarse graining translates into a structure term in the response function and resembles to a certain extent vertex correction correlations or internal structure effects. (iv) The coarse graining which is numerically unavoidable leads to a modified centroid energy and higher damping width of collective modes. The numerical codes should be revised in that a refolding is proposed. (author)

  5. Defining an equilibrium state in global full-f gyrokinetic models

    OpenAIRE

    Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Grandgirard, V; Sarazin, Y.; ,; ,; (:unav); Ghendrih, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    International audience; This paper tackles the delicate choice of the initial distribution function in full-f gyrokinetic codes such as GYSELA 5D, aiming at predicting the turbulent transport level in low collisional tokamak plasmas. It is found, both analytically and numerically, that a Maxwellian distribution function with constant profiles on magnetic flux surfaces leads to the fast generation of a large scale electric field. Such a field opposes the up–down charge separation governed by t...

  6. Beyond single stream with the Schroedinger method - Closing the Vlasov hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlemann, Cora; Kopp, Michael; Haugg, Thomas [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Theresienstr. 37, D-80333 Munich (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    We investigate large scale structure formation of dark matter in the phase-space description based on the Vlasov equation whose nonlinearity is induced by gravitational interaction according to the Poisson equation. Determining the time-evolution of density and peculiar velocity demands solving the full Vlasov hierarchy for the moments of the phase-space distribution function. In the presence of long-range interaction no consistent truncation of the hierarchy is known apart from the pressureless fluid (dust) model which is incapable of describing virialization due to the occurrence of shell-crossing singularities and the inability to generate higher cumulants like vorticity and velocity dispersion. Our goal is to find a phase-space distribution function that is able to describe regions of multi-streaming and therefore can serve as theoretical N-body double. We use the coarse-grained Wigner probability distribution obtained from a wavefunction fulfilling the Schroedinger equation and show that its evolution equation bears strong resemblance to the Vlasov equation but cures the shell-crossing singularities. This feature was already employed in cosmological simulations of large-scale structure formation by Widrow and Kaiser '93. We are able to show that the coarse-grained Wigner ansatz automatically closes the corresponding hierarchy while incorporating nonzero higher cumulants which are determined self-consistently from density and velocity.

  7. Convergence analysis of Strang splitting for Vlasov-type equations

    CERN Document Server

    Einkemmer, Lukas

    2012-01-01

    A rigorous convergence analysis of the Strang splitting algorithm for Vlasov-type equations in the setting of abstract evolution equations is provided. It is shown that under suitable assumptions the convergence is of second order in the time step h. As an example, it is verified that the Vlasov-Poisson equation in 1+1 dimensions fits into the framework of this analysis. Also, numerical experiments for the latter case are presented.

  8. The Hamiltonian Structure of the Maxwell-Vlasov Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    principle of Percival [1979). 4. By using an appropriate Darboux theorem, (see Marsden [1981], lecture 1), one can show that Of admits canonically...get the Vlasov-Poisson equation. It would also be of interest to realize both the Vlasov-Maxwell and MHD equations as limiting cases of a grand...de Vries equation, Springer Lecture Notes, #755, 1-15 and Inv. Math. 50, 219-248. J. Arms (1979]. Linearization stability of gravitational and gauge

  9. A Parallelized Vlasov-Fokker-Planck-Solver for Desktop PCs

    CERN Document Server

    Schönfeldt,; Brosi,; Miriam,; Schwarz,; Markus,; Steinmann,; L., Johannes; Müller,; Anke-Susanne,

    2016-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equation is a well established method to simulate the dynamics, including the self-interaction with its own wake field, of an electron bunch in a storage ring. In this paper we present Inovesa, a modularly extensible program that uses OpenCL to massively parallelize the computation. It allows a standard desktop PC to work with appropriate accuracy and yield reliable results within minutes. We provide numerical stability-studies over a wide parameter range and compare our numerical findings to known results. Simulation results for the case of coherent synchrotron radiation will be compared to measurements that probe the effects of the micro-bunching instability occurring in the short bunch operation at ANKA. It will be shown that the impedance model based on the shielding effect of two parallel plates can not only describe the instability threshold, but also the presence of multiple regimes that show differences in the emission of coherent synchrotron radiatio...

  10. Parallelized Vlasov-Fokker-Planck solver for desktop personal computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Schönfeldt

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The numerical solution of the Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equation is a well established method to simulate the dynamics, including the self-interaction with its own wake field, of an electron bunch in a storage ring. In this paper we present Inovesa, a modularly extensible program that uses opencl to massively parallelize the computation. It allows a standard desktop PC to work with appropriate accuracy and yield reliable results within minutes. We provide numerical stability-studies over a wide parameter range and compare our numerical findings to known results. Simulation results for the case of coherent synchrotron radiation will be compared to measurements that probe the effects of the microbunching instability occurring in the short bunch operation at ANKA. It will be shown that the impedance model based on the shielding effect of two parallel plates can not only describe the instability threshold, but also the presence of multiple regimes that show differences in the emission of coherent synchrotron radiation.

  11. ADI type preconditioners for the steady state inhomogeneous Vlasov equation

    CERN Document Server

    Gasteiger, Markus; Ostermann, Alexander; Tskhakaya, David

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current work is to find numerical solutions of the steady state inhomogeneous Vlasov equation. This problem has a wide range of applications in the kinetic simulation of non-thermal plasmas. However, the direct application of either time stepping schemes or iterative methods (such as Krylov based methods like GMRES or relexation schemes) is computationally expensive. In the former case the slowest timescale in the system forces us to perform a long time integration while in the latter case a large number of iterations is required. In this paper we propose a preconditioner based on an ADI type splitting method. This preconditioner is then combined with both GMRES and Richardson iteration. The resulting numerical schemes scale almost ideally (i.e. the computational effort is proportional to the number of grid points). Numerical simulations conducted show that this can result in a speedup of close to two orders of magnitude (even for intermediate grid sizes) with respect to the not preconditio...

  12. Equations of motion of test particles for solving the spin-dependent Boltzmann-Vlasov equation

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Yin; Li, Bao-An; Shen, Wen-Qing

    2016-01-01

    A consistent derivation of the equations of motion (EOMs) of test particles for solving the spin-dependent Boltzmann-Vlasov equation is presented. Though the obtained EOMs are general, they are particularly useful in simulating nucleon spinor transport in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. It is shown that the nucleon transverse flow in heavy-ion collisions especially those involving polarized projectile and/or target nuclei depends strongly on the spin-orbit coupling. Future comparisons of model simulations with experimental data will help constrain the poorly known in-medium nucleon spin-orbit coupling relevant for understanding properties of rare isotopes and their astrophysical impacts.

  13. Asymptotic-preserving Particle-In-Cell methods for the Vlasov-Maxwell system near quasi-neutrality

    CERN Document Server

    Degond, Pierre; Doyen, David

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we design Asymptotic-Preserving Particle-In-Cell methods for the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the quasi-neutral limit, this limit being characterized by a Debye length negligible compared to the space scale of the problem. These methods are consistent discretizations of the Vlasov-Maxwell system which, in the quasi-neutral limit, remain stable and are consistent with a quasi-neutral model (in this quasi-neutral model, the electric field is computed by means of a generalized Ohm law). The derivation of Asymptotic-Preserving methods is not straightforward since the quasi-neutral model is a singular limit of the Vlasov-Maxwell model. The key step is a reformulation of the Vlasov-Maxwell system which unifies the two models in a single set of equations with a smooth transition from one to another. As demonstrated in various and demanding numerical simulations, the Asymptotic-Preserving methods are able to treat efficiently both quasi-neutral plasmas and non-neutral plasmas, making them particularly we...

  14. Asymptotic-Preserving Particle-In-Cell methods for the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the quasi-neutral limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degond, P.; Deluzet, F.; Doyen, D.

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we design Asymptotic-Preserving Particle-In-Cell methods for the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the quasi-neutral limit, this limit being characterized by a Debye length negligible compared to the space scale of the problem. These methods are consistent discretizations of the Vlasov-Maxwell system which, in the quasi-neutral limit, remain stable and are consistent with a quasi-neutral model (in this quasi-neutral model, the electric field is computed by means of a generalized Ohm law). The derivation of Asymptotic-Preserving methods is not straightforward since the quasi-neutral model is a singular limit of the Vlasov-Maxwell model. The key step is a reformulation of the Vlasov-Maxwell system which unifies the two models in a single set of equations with a smooth transition from one to another. As demonstrated in various and demanding numerical simulations, the Asymptotic-Preserving methods are able to treat efficiently both quasi-neutral plasmas and non-neutral plasmas, making them particularly well suited for complex problems involving dense plasmas with localized non-neutral regions.

  15. Vlasov-Fokker-Planck modeling of magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Alexander [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the magnetic fields that can develop in high-power-laser interactions with solid-density plasma is important because such fields significantly modify both the magnitude and direction of electron heat fluxes. The dynamics of such fields evidently have consequences for inertial fusion energy applications, as the coupling of the laser beams with the walls or pellet and the development of temperature inhomogeneities are critical to the uniformity of the implosion and potentially the success of, for example, the National Ignition Facility. To study these effects, we used the code Impacta, a two-dimensional, fully implicit, Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code with self-consistent magnetic fields and a hydrodynamic ion model, designed for nanosecond time-scale laser-plasma interactions. Heat-flux effects in Ohm’s law under non-local conditions was investigated; physics that is not well captured by standard numerical models but is nevertheless important in fusion-related scenarios. Under such conditions there are numerous interesting physical effects, such as collisional magnetic instabilities, amplification of magnetic fields, re-emergence of non-locality through magnetic convection, and reconnection of magnetic field lines and redistribution of thermal energy. In this project highlights included the first full scale kinetic simulations of a magnetized hohlraum [Joglekar 2016] and the discovery of a new magnetic reconnection mechanism [Joglekar 2014] as well as a completed PhD thesis and the production of a new code for Inertial Fusion research.

  16. Defining an equilibrium state in global full-f gyrokinetic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dif-Pradalier, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph. [CEA Cadarache, CEA/DSM/DRFC, EURATOM Assoc, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance, (France)

    2008-07-01

    This paper tackles the delicate choice of the initial distribution function in full-f gyrokinetic codes such as GYSELA 5D, aiming at predicting the turbulent transport level in low collisional tokamak plasmas. It is found, both analytically and numerically, that a Maxwellian distribution function with constant profiles on magnetic flux surfaces leads to the fast generation of a large scale electric field. Such a field opposes the up-down charge separation governed by the inhomogeneity of the equilibrium magnetic field. If large enough, the shearing rate induced by the resulting poloidal E * B velocity could efficiently reduce the plasma micro-instabilities which account for the development of the turbulence. Starting in the ab initio code GYSELA 5D from an equilibrium distribution function depending on motion invariants only is shown to cure such a problem. In this case, charge separation is counter-balanced by parallel flow, and the standard fluid force balance is recovered. (authors)

  17. Defining an equilibrium state in global full-f gyrokinetic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dif-Pradalier, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.

    2008-02-01

    This paper tackles the delicate choice of the initial distribution function in full-f gyrokinetic codes such as G YSELA 5D, aiming at predicting the turbulent transport level in low collisional tokamak plasmas. It is found, both analytically and numerically, that a Maxwellian distribution function with constant profiles on magnetic flux surfaces leads to the fast generation of a large scale electric field. Such a field opposes the up-down charge separation governed by the inhomogeneity of the equilibrium magnetic field. If large enough, the shearing rate induced by the resulting poloidal E×B velocity could efficiently reduce the plasma micro-instabilities which account for the development of the turbulence. Starting in the ab initio code G YSELA 5 D from an equilibrium distribution function depending on motion invariants only is shown to cure such a problem. In this case, charge separation is counter-balanced by parallel flow, and the standard fluid force balance is recovered.

  18. The Einstein-Vlasov System/Kinetic Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Andréasson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to provide a guide to theorems on global properties of solutions to the Einstein-Vlasov system. This system couples Einstein’s equations to a kinetic matter model. Kinetic theory has been an important field of research during several decades in which the main focus has been on non-relativistic and special relativistic physics, i.e., to model the dynamics of neutral gases, plasmas, and Newtonian self-gravitating systems. In 1990, Rendall and Rein initiated a mathematical study of the Einstein-Vlasov system. Since then many theorems on global properties of solutions to this system have been established. This paper gives introductions to kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes and then the Einstein–Vlasov system is introduced. We believe that a good understanding of kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes is fundamental to a good comprehension of kinetic theory in general relativity.

  19. Magnetic reconnection and kinetic effects in Vlasov turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servidio, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    The process of magnetic reconnection is ubiquitous in nature, being typical of large scale magnetic configurations. Recently [1], reconnection has been observed to emerge locally and intermittently in plasmas, being a crucial element of turbulence itself. Systematic analysis of MHD simulations reveals the presence of a large number of X-type neutral points, where magnetic reconnection occurs. More recently, the same phenomenon has been inspected within plasma models [2]. The link between magnetic reconnection and kinetic effects in the turbulent solar-wind has been investigated by means of multi-dimensional simulations of the hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) code [3], using 5D (2D in space and 3D in velocity space) and full 6D simulations of plasma turbulence. Kinetic effects manifest through the deformation of the proton distribution function, with patterns of non-Maxwellian features being concentrated near regions of strong magnetic gradients. Recent analyses [4] of solar-wind data from spacecraft aimed to quantify kinetic effects through the temperature anisotropy T⊥/T|| on the proton velocity distribution function. Values of the anisotropy range broadly, with most values between 10-1 and 101. Moreover, the distribution of temperature anisotropy depends systematically on the ambient proton parallel beta β|| (the ratio of parallel kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure), manifesting a characteristic rhomboidal shape. In order to make contact with solar-wind observations, temperature anisotropy has been evaluated from an ensemble of HVM simulations [5], obtained by varying the global plasma beta and fluctuation level, in such a way to cover distinct regions of the parameter space defined by T⊥/T|| and β||. The HVM simulations presented here demonstrate that, when the distribution function is free to explore the entire velocity subspace, new features appear as complex interactions between the particles and the turbulent background. Comparison of numerical results

  20. A multi-dimensional, energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic Vlasov-Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Guangye

    2015-01-01

    For decades, the Vlasov-Darwin model has been recognized to be attractive for particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic plasma simulations in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes, to avoid radiative noise issues and gain computational efficiency. However, the Darwin model results in an elliptic set of field equations that renders conventional explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. Here, we explore a fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov-Darwin model in multiple dimensions, which overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. The finite-difference scheme for Darwin field equations and particle equations of motion is space-time-centered, employing particle sub-cycling and orbit-averaging. The algorithm conserves total energy, local charge, canonical-momentum in the ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge exactly. An asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large time steps and cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy consid...

  1. From the Hartree dynamics to the Vlasov equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikter, Niels Patriz; Porta, Marcello; Saffirio, Chiara;

    2016-01-01

    We consider the evolution of quasi-free states describing N fermions in the mean field limit, as governed by the nonlinear Hartree equation. In the limit of large N, we study the convergence towards the classical Vlasov equation. For a class of regular interaction potentials, we establish precise...... bounds on the 0rate of convergence....

  2. On global solutions for the Vlasov-Poisson system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. Zhidkov

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article we show that the Vlasov-Poisson system has a unique weak solution in the space $L_1cap L_infty$. For this purpose, we use the method of characteristics, unlike the approach in [12].

  3. The Einstein-Vlasov System/Kinetic Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréasson Håkan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to provide a guide to theorems on global properties of solutions to the Einstein-Vlasov system. This system couples Einstein’s equations to a kinetic matter model. Kinetic theory has been an important field of research during several decades in which the main focus has been on nonrelativistic and special relativistic physics, i.e. to model the dynamics of neutral gases, plasmas, and Newtonian self-gravitating systems. In 1990, Rendall and Rein initiated a mathematical study of the Einstein-Vlasov system. Since then many theorems on global properties of solutions to this system have been established. The Vlasov equation describes matter phenomenologically, and it should be stressed that most of the theorems presented in this article are not presently known for other such matter models (i.e. fluid models. This paper gives introductions to kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes and then the Einstein-Vlasov system is introduced. We believe that a good understanding of kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes is fundamental to good comprehension of kinetic theory in general relativity.

  4. Computing ITG turbulence with a full-f semi-Lagrangian code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph. [CEA Cadarache, CEA/DSM/DRFC, Assoc Euratom CEA, Cadarache (France); Crouseilles, N.; Latu, G.; Sonnendruecker, E. [Univ Strasbourg 1, IRMA, F-67084 Strasbourg (France); Besse, N.; Bertrand, P. [Univ Nancy 1, LPMIA, BP 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre Les Nancy (France)

    2008-07-01

    This paper addresses non-linear global gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence with the GYSELA code. The particularity of GYSELA code is to use a semi-Lagrangian (SL) scheme for the full distribution function. The 4D non-linear drift-kinetic version of the code already shows the interest in such a SL method which exhibits good properties of energy conservation. The code has been upgraded to run 5D toroidal simulations. Linear benchmarks and non-linear results are presented. (authors)

  5. Computing ITG turbulence with a full- f semi-Lagrangian code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Crouseilles, N.; Latu, G.; Sonnendrücker, E.; Besse, N.; Bertrand, P.

    2008-02-01

    This paper addresses non-linear global gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence with the G YSELA code. The particularity of G YSELA code is to use a semi-Lagrangian (SL) scheme for the full distribution function. The 4D non-linear drift-kinetic version of the code already shows the interest in such a SL method which exhibits good properties of energy conservation. The code has been upgrated to run 5D toroidal simulations. Linear benchmarks and non-linear results are presented.

  6. Hamiltonian formalism of two-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Maxim V

    2014-12-08

    In this paper, the two-dimensional Benney system describing long wave propagation of a finite depth fluid motion and the multi-dimensional Russo-Smereka kinetic equation describing a bubbly flow are considered. The Hamiltonian approach established by J. Gibbons for the one-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation is extended to a multi-dimensional case. A local Hamiltonian structure associated with the hydrodynamic lattice of moments derived by D. J. Benney is constructed. A relationship between this hydrodynamic lattice of moments and the two-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation is found. In the two-dimensional case, a Hamiltonian hydrodynamic lattice for the Russo-Smereka kinetic model is constructed. Simple hydrodynamic reductions are presented.

  7. Linear Vlasov analysis for stability of a bunched beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnock, Robert; Stupakov, Gennady; Venturini, Marco; Ellison, James A.

    2004-06-30

    We study the linearized Vlasov equation for a bunched beam subject to an arbitrary wake function. Following Oide and Yokoya, the equation is reduced to an integral equation expressed in angle-action coordinates of the distorted potential well. Numerical solution of the equation as a formal eigenvalue problem leads to difficulties, because of singular eigenmodes from the incoherent spectrum. We rephrase the equation so that it becomes non-singular in the sense of operator theory, and has only regular solutions for coherent modes. We report on a code that finds thresholds of instability by detecting zeros of the determinant of the system as they enter the upper-half frequency plane, upon increase of current. Results are compared with a time-domain integration of the nonlinear Vlasov equation with a realistic wake function for the SLC damping rings. There is close agreement between the two calculations.

  8. Linear Vlasov Analysis for Stability of a Bunched Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnock, R

    2004-08-12

    The authors study the linearized Vlasov equation for a bunched beam subject to an arbitrary wake function. Following Oide and Yokoya, the equation is reduced to an integral equation expressed in angle-action coordinates of the distorted potential well. Numerical solution of the equation as a formal eigenvalue problem leads to difficulties, because of singular eigenmodes from the incoherent spectrum. The authors rephrase the equation so that it becomes non-singular in the sense of operatory theory, and has only regular solutions for coherent modes. They report on a code that finds thresholds of instability by detecting zeros of the determinant of the system as they enter the upper-half frequency plane, upon increase of current. Results are compared with a time-domain integration of the nonlinear Vlasov equation with a realistic wake function for the SLC damping rings. There is close agreement between the two calculations.

  9. Variational formulations of guiding-center Vlasov-Maxwell theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizard, Alain J.; Tronci, Cesare

    2016-06-01

    The variational formulations of guiding-center Vlasov-Maxwell theory based on Lagrange, Euler, and Euler-Poincaré variational principles are presented. Each variational principle yields a different approach to deriving guiding-center polarization and magnetization effects into the guiding-center Maxwell equations. The conservation laws of energy, momentum, and angular momentum are also derived by Noether method, where the guiding-center stress tensor is now shown to be explicitly symmetric.

  10. Yang-Mills-Vlasov system in the temporal gauge. Systeme de Yang-Mills-Vlasov en jauge temporelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquet-Bruhat, Y.; Noutchegueme, N. (Paris-6 Univ., 75 (FR))

    1991-01-01

    We prove a local in time existence theorem of a solution of the Cauchy problem for the Yang-Mills-Vlasov integrodifferential system. Such equations govern the evolution of plasmas, for instance of quarks and gluons (quagmas), where non abelian gauge fields and Yang-Mills charges replace the usual electromagnetic field and electric charge. We work with the temporal gauge and use functional spaces with appropriate weight on the momenta, but no fall off is required in the space direction.

  11. A Full Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell Study of Turbulent Dynamics and Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    TenBarge, J. M.; Juno, J.; Hakim, A.

    2016-12-01

    The development of a detailed understanding of turbulence in magnetized plasmas has been a long standing goal of the broader scientific community, both as a fundamental physics process and because of its applicability to a wide variety of phenomena. Turbulence in a magnetized plasma is the primary mechanism responsible for transforming energy at large injection scales into small-scale motions, which are ultimately dissipated as heat in systems such as the solar corona and wind. At large scales, the turbulence is well described by fluid models of the plasma; however, understanding the processes responsible for heating a weakly collisional plasma such as the solar wind requires a kinetic description. We present the first fully kinetic Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell study of turbulence using the Gkeyll simulation code. We focus on the pristine distribution function dynamics that are possible with the Eulerian approach. We also present the signatures and form of dissipation as diagnosed via field-particle correlation functions.

  12. The Hamiltonian structure and Euler-Poincare formulation of the Vlasov-Maxwell and gyrokinetic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J.; Tang, W. M. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Qin, H. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Chandre, C. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS - Aix-Marseille Universite, Campus de Luminy, Marseille 13009 (France)

    2013-02-15

    We present a new variational principle for the gyrokinetic system, similar to the Maxwell-Vlasov action presented in H. Cendra et al., [J. Math. Phys. 39, 3138 (1998)]. The variational principle is in the Eulerian frame and based on constrained variations of the phase space fluid velocity and particle distribution function. Using a Legendre transform, we explicitly derive the field theoretic Hamiltonian structure of the system. This is carried out with a modified Dirac theory of constraints, which is used to construct meaningful brackets from those obtained directly from Euler-Poincare theory. Possible applications of these formulations include continuum geometric integration techniques, large-eddy simulation models, and Casimir type stability methods.

  13. Hamiltonian particle-in-cell methods for Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yang; Sun, Yajuan; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the Vlasov-Maxwell equations based on the Morrison-Marsden-Weinstein bracket. We develop Hamiltonian particle-in-cell methods for this system by employing finite element methods in space and splitting methods in time. In order to derive the semi-discrete system that possesses a discrete non-canonical Poisson structure, we present a criterion for choosing the appropriate finite element spaces. It is confirmed that some conforming elements, e.g., Nédélec's mixed elements, satisfy this requirement. When the Hamiltonian splitting method is used to discretize this semi-discrete system in time, the resulting algorithm is explicit and preserves the discrete Poisson structure. The structure-preserving nature of the algorithm ensures accuracy and fidelity of the numerical simulations over long time.

  14. Adaptive multiresolution semi-Lagrangian discontinuous Galerkin methods for the Vlasov equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, N.; Deriaz, E.; Madaule, É.

    2017-03-01

    We develop adaptive numerical schemes for the Vlasov equation by combining discontinuous Galerkin discretisation, multiresolution analysis and semi-Lagrangian time integration. We implement a tree based structure in order to achieve adaptivity. Both multi-wavelets and discontinuous Galerkin rely on a local polynomial basis. The schemes are tested and validated using Vlasov-Poisson equations for plasma physics and astrophysics.

  15. Vlasov-type and Liouville-type equations, their microscopic, energetic and hydrodynamical consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedenyapin, V. V.; Negmatov, M. A.; Fimin, N. N.

    2017-06-01

    We give a derivation of the Vlasov-Maxwell and Vlasov-Poisson-Poisson equations from the Lagrangians of classical electrodynamics. The equations of electromagnetic hydrodynamics (EMHD) and electrostatics with gravitation are derived from them by means of a `hydrodynamical' substitution. We obtain and compare the Lagrange identities for various types of Vlasov equations and EMHD equations. We discuss the advantages of writing the EMHD equations in Godunov's double divergence form. We analyze stationary solutions of the Vlasov-Poisson-Poisson equation, which give rise to non-linear elliptic equations with various properties and various kinds of behaviour of the trajectories of particles as the mass passes through a critical value. We show that the classical equations can be derived from the Liouville equation by the Hamilton-Jacobi method and give an analogue of this procedure for the Vlasov equation as well as in the non-Hamiltonian case.

  16. A Vlasov equation with Dirac potential used in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardos, Claude [Universite Paris-Diderot, Laboratoire J.-L. Lions, BP187, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Nouri, Anne [Laboratoire d' Analyse, Topologie et Probabilites (UMR 6632), Aix-Marseille Universite, 39 Rue Joliot-Curie, 13453 Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

    2012-11-15

    Well-posedness of the Cauchy problem is analyzed for a singular Vlasov equation governing the evolution of the ionic distribution function of a quasineutral fusion plasma. The Penrose criterium is adapted to the linearized problem around a time and space homogeneous distribution function showing (due to the singularity) more drastic differences between stable and unstable situations. This pathology appears on the full nonlinear problem, well-posed locally in time with analytic initial data, but generally ill-posed in the Hadamard sense. Eventually with a very different class of solutions, mono-kinetic, which constrains the structure of the density distribution, the problem becomes locally in time well-posed.

  17. Numerical solution to the Vlasov equation: The 2D code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijalkow, Eric

    1999-02-01

    The present code solves the two-dimensional Vlasov equation for a periodic in space system, in presence of an external magnetic field B O. The self coherent electric field given by Poisson equation is computed by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). The output of the code consist of a list of diagnostics, such as total mass conservation, total momentum and energies, and of projections of the distribution function in different subspaces as the x- v x space, the x- y space and so on.

  18. A multi-dimensional, energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic Vlasov-Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; Chacón, L.

    2015-12-01

    For decades, the Vlasov-Darwin model has been recognized to be attractive for particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic plasma simulations in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes, to avoid radiative noise issues and gain computational efficiency. However, the Darwin model results in an elliptic set of field equations that renders conventional explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. Here, we explore a fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov-Darwin model in multiple dimensions, which overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. The finite-difference scheme for Darwin field equations and particle equations of motion is space-time-centered, employing particle sub-cycling and orbit-averaging. The algorithm conserves total energy, local charge, canonical-momentum in the ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge exactly. An asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy considerations, not stability, and can be orders of magnitude larger than required in a standard explicit electromagnetic PIC simulation. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with various numerical experiments in 2D-3V.

  19. On axisymmetric and stationary solutions of the self-gravitating Vlasov system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Ellery; Andréasson, Håkan; Logg, Anders

    2016-08-01

    Axisymmetric and stationary solutions are constructed to the Einstein-Vlasov and Vlasov-Poisson systems. These solutions are constructed numerically, using finite element methods and a fixed-point iteration in which the total mass is fixed at each step. A variety of axisymmetric stationary solutions are exhibited, including solutions with toroidal, disk-like, spindle-like, and composite spatial density configurations, as are solutions with non-vanishing net angular momentum. In the case of toroidal solutions, we show for the first time, solutions of the Einstein-Vlasov system which contain ergoregions.

  20. On Axisymmetric and Stationary Solutions of the Self-Gravitating Vlasov System

    CERN Document Server

    Ames, Ellery; Logg, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Axisymmetric and stationary solutions are constructed to the Einstein--Vlasov and Vlasov--Poisson systems. These solutions are constructed numerically, using finite element methods and a fixed-point iteration in which the total mass is fixed at each step. A variety of axisymmetric stationary solutions are exhibited, including solutions with toroidal, disk-like, spindle-like, and composite spatial density configurations, as are solutions with non-vanishing net angular momentum. In the case of toroidal solutions, we show for the first time, solutions of the Einstein--Vlasov system which contain ergoregions.

  1. Vlasov tokamak equilibria with shearad toroidal flow and anisotropic pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Kuiroukidis, Ap; Tasso, H

    2015-01-01

    By choosing appropriate deformed Maxwellian ion and electron distribution functions depending on the two particle constants of motion, i.e. the energy and toroidal angular momentum, we reduce the Vlasov axisymmetric equilibrium problem for quasineutral plasmas to a transcendental Grad-Shafranov-like equation. This equation is then solved numerically under the Dirichlet boundary condition for an analytically prescribed boundary possessing a lower X-point to construct tokamak equilibria with toroidal sheared ion flow and anisotropic pressure. Depending on the deformation of the distribution functions these steady states can have toroidal current densities either peaked on the magnetic axis or hollow. These two kinds of equilibria may be regarded as a bifurcation in connection with symmetry properties of the distribution functions on the magnetic axis.

  2. On the contribution of exchange interactions to the Vlasov equation

    CERN Document Server

    Zamanian, J; Marklund, M

    2014-01-01

    Exchange effects play an important role in determining the equilibrium properties of dense matter systems, as well as for magnetic phenomena. There exists an extensive literature concerning, e.g., the effects of exchange interactions on the equation of state of dense matter. Here, a generalization of the Vlasov equation to include exchange effects is presented allowing for electromagnetic mean fields, thus incorporating some of the dynamic effects due to the exchange interactions. Treating the exchange term perturbatively, the correction to classical Langmuir waves in plasmas is found, and the results are compared with previous work. It is noted that the relative importance of exchange effects scales similarly with density and temperature as particle dispersive effects, but that the overall magnitude is sensitive to the details of the specific problem. The implications of our results are discussed.

  3. High-order Hamiltonian splitting for Vlasov-Poisson equations

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, Fernando; Faou, Erwan; Mehrenberger, Michel

    2015-01-01

    We consider the Vlasov-Poisson equation in a Hamiltonian framework and derive new time splitting methods based on the decomposition of the Hamiltonian functional between the kinetic and electric energy. Assuming smoothness of the solutions, we study the order conditions of such methods. It appears that these conditions are of Runge-Kutta-Nystr{\\"o}m type. In the one dimensional case, the order conditions can be further simplified, and efficient methods of order 6 with a reduced number of stages can be constructed. In the general case, high-order methods can also be constructed using explicit computations of commutators. Numerical results are performed and show the benefit of using high-order splitting schemes in that context. Complete and self-contained proofs of convergence results and rigorous error estimates are also given.

  4. Gyrokinetic approach in particle simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.W.

    1981-10-01

    A new scheme for particle simulation based on the gyrophase-averaged Vlasov equation has been developed. It is suitable for studying low-frequency microinstabilities and the associated anomalous transport in magnetically confined plasmas. The scheme retains the gyroradius effects but not the gyromotion; it is, therefore, far more efficient and versatile than the conventional ones. Furthermore, the reduced Vlasov equation is also amenable to analytical studies.

  5. Local Existence and Continuation Criterion for Solutions of the Spherically Symmetric Einstein-Vlasov-Maxwell System

    CERN Document Server

    Noundjeu, P

    2003-01-01

    Using the iterative Scheme we prove the local existence and uniqueness of solutions of the spherically symmetric Einstein-Vlasov-Maxwell system with small initial data. We prove a continuation criterion to global in-time solutions.

  6. On Invariant Measures for the Vlasov Equation with a Regular Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Zhidkov, P E

    2003-01-01

    We consider a Vlasov equation with a smooth bounded potential of interaction between particles in a class of measure-valued solutions and construct a measure which is invariant for this problem in a sense.

  7. Comparison of Semi-Lagrangian Algorithms for Solving Vlasov-type Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stephan

    2005-10-01

    In view of pursuing CRPP's effort in carrying out gyrokinetic simulations using an Eulerian-type approach [M. Brunetti et. al, Comp. Phys. Comm. 163, 1 (2004)], different alternative algorithms have been considered. The issue is to identify the most appropriate time-stepping scheme, both from a point of view of numerical accuracy and numerical efficiency. Our efforts have concentrated on two semi-Lagrangian approaches: The widely used cubic B-spline interpolation scheme, based on the original work of Cheng and Knorr [C. Z. Cheng and G. Knorr, J. Comp. Phys. 22, 330 (1976)], as well as the Cubic Interpolation Propagation (CIP) scheme, based on cubic Hermite interpolation, which has only more recently been applied for solving Vlasov-type equations [T. Nakamura and T. Yabe, Comp. Phys. Comm. 120, 122 (1999)]. The systematic comparison of these algorithms with respect to their basic spectral (diffusion/dispersion) properties, as well as their ability to avoid the overshoot (Gibbs) problem, is first presented. Results from solving a guiding-center model of the two-dimensional Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are then compared. This test problem enables to address some of the key technical issues also met with the more complex gyrokinetic-type equations.

  8. On Higher-order Corrections to Gyrokinetic Vlasov-Poisson Equations in the Long Wavelength Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.W. Lee and R.A. Kolesnikov

    2009-02-17

    In this paper, we present a simple iterative procedure for obtaining the higher order E x B and dE/dt (polarization) drifts associated with the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Poisson equations in the long wavelength limit of k⊥ρi ~ o(ε) and k⊥L ~ o(1), where ρi is the ion gyroradius, L is the scale length of the background inhomogeneity and ε is a smallness parameter. It can be shown that these new higher order k⊥ρi terms, which are also related to the higher order perturbations of the electrostatic potential Φ, should have negligible effects on turbulent and neoclassical transport in tokamaks, regardless of the form of the background distribution and the amplitude of the perturbation. To address further the issue of a non-Maxwellian plasma, higher order finite Larmor radius terms in the gyrokinetic Poisson's equation have been studied and shown to be unimportant as well. On the other hand, the terms of o(k2⊥ρi2) ~ o(ε) and k⊥L ~ o(1) can indeed have impact on microturbulence, especially in the linear stage, such as those arising from the difference between the guiding center and the gyrocenter densities due to the presence of the background gradients. These results will be compared with a recent study questioning the validity of the commonly used gyrokinetic equations for long time simulations.

  9. ColDICE: A parallel Vlasov-Poisson solver using moving adaptive simplicial tessellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousbie, Thierry; Colombi, Stéphane

    2016-09-01

    Resolving numerically Vlasov-Poisson equations for initially cold systems can be reduced to following the evolution of a three-dimensional sheet evolving in six-dimensional phase-space. We describe a public parallel numerical algorithm consisting in representing the phase-space sheet with a conforming, self-adaptive simplicial tessellation of which the vertices follow the Lagrangian equations of motion. The algorithm is implemented both in six- and four-dimensional phase-space. Refinement of the tessellation mesh is performed using the bisection method and a local representation of the phase-space sheet at second order relying on additional tracers created when needed at runtime. In order to preserve in the best way the Hamiltonian nature of the system, refinement is anisotropic and constrained by measurements of local Poincaré invariants. Resolution of Poisson equation is performed using the fast Fourier method on a regular rectangular grid, similarly to particle in cells codes. To compute the density projected onto this grid, the intersection of the tessellation and the grid is calculated using the method of Franklin and Kankanhalli [65-67] generalised to linear order. As preliminary tests of the code, we study in four dimensional phase-space the evolution of an initially small patch in a chaotic potential and the cosmological collapse of a fluctuation composed of two sinusoidal waves. We also perform a "warm" dark matter simulation in six-dimensional phase-space that we use to check the parallel scaling of the code.

  10. Equations of motion of test particles for solving the spin-dependent Boltzmann–Vlasov equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Xia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A consistent derivation of the equations of motion (EOMs of test particles for solving the spin-dependent Boltzmann–Vlasov equation is presented. The resulting EOMs in phase space are similar to the canonical equations in Hamiltonian dynamics, and the EOM of spin is the same as that in the Heisenburg picture of quantum mechanics. Considering further the quantum nature of spin and choosing the direction of total angular momentum in heavy-ion reactions as a reference of measuring nucleon spin, the EOMs of spin-up and spin-down nucleons are given separately. The key elements affecting the spin dynamics in heavy-ion collisions are identified. The resulting EOMs provide a solid foundation for using the test-particle approach in studying spin dynamics in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. Future comparisons of model simulations with experimental data will help to constrain the poorly known in-medium nucleon spin–orbit coupling relevant for understanding properties of rare isotopes and their astrophysical impacts.

  11. Numerical solution of the Maxwell-Vlasov equations in the periodic regime. Application to the study of isotope separation by ion cyclotron resonance; Resolution numerique des equations de Maxwell-Vlasov en regime periodique. Application a l'etude de la separation isotopique par resonance cyclotron ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omnes, P

    1999-01-25

    This work is dedicated to the study of the behaviour of a magnetic confined plasma that is excited by a purely sinusoidal electric current delivered by an antenna. The response of the electrons to the electromagnetic field is considered as linear,whereas the ions of the plasma are represented by a non-relativistic Vlasov equation. In order to avoid transients, the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations are solved in a periodic mode and in a bounded domain. An equivalent electric conductivity tensor has been defined, this tensor is a linear operator that links the electric current generated by the movement of the particles to the electromagnetic field. Theoretical considerations can assure the existence and uniqueness of a periodical solution to Vlasov equations and of a solution to Maxwell equations in harmonic mode. The system of equations is periodical and has been solved by using an iterative method. The application of this method to the simulation of a isotopic separation device based on ionic cyclotron resonance has shown that the convergence is reached in a few iterations and that the solution is valid. Furthermore a method based on a finite-volume formulation of Maxwell equations in the time domain is presented. 2 new variables are defined in order to better take into account the Gauss' law and the conservation of the magnetic flux, the new system is still hyperbolic. The parallelization of the process has been successfully realized. (A.C.)

  12. Transient growth of a Vlasov plasma in a weakly inhomogeneous magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Ratushnaya, Valeria

    2016-12-17

    We investigate the stability properties of a collisionless Vlasov plasma in a weakly inhomogeneous magnetic field using non-modal stability analysis. This is an important topic in a physics of tokamak plasma rich in various types of instabilities. We consider a thin tokamak plasma in a Maxwellian equilibrium, subjected to a small arbitrary perturbation. Within the framework of kinetic theory, we demonstrate the emergence of short time scale algebraic instabilities evolving in a stable magnetized plasma. We show that the linearized governing operator (Vlasov operator) is non-normal leading to the transient growth of the perturbations on the time scale of several plasma periods that is subsequently followed by Landau damping. We calculate the first-order distribution function and the electric field and study the dependence of the transient growth characteristics on the magnetic field strength and perturbation parameters of the system. We compare our results with uniformly magnetized plasma and field-free Vlasov plasma.

  13. Transient growth of a Vlasov plasma in a weakly inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratushnaya, Valeria; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the stability properties of a collisionless Vlasov plasma in a weakly inhomogeneous magnetic field using non-modal stability analysis. This is an important topic in a physics of tokamak plasma rich in various types of instabilities. We consider a thin tokamak plasma in a Maxwellian equilibrium, subjected to a small arbitrary perturbation. Within the framework of kinetic theory, we demonstrate the emergence of short time scale algebraic instabilities evolving in a stable magnetized plasma. We show that the linearized governing operator (Vlasov operator) is non-normal leading to the transient growth of the perturbations on the time scale of several plasma periods that is subsequently followed by Landau damping. We calculate the first-order distribution function and the electric field and study the dependence of the transient growth characteristics on the magnetic field strength and perturbation parameters of the system. We compare our results with uniformly magnetized plasma and field-free Vlasov plasma.

  14. Relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell modelling using finite volumes and adaptive mesh refinement

    CERN Document Server

    Wettervik, Benjamin Svedung; Siminos, Evangelos; Fülöp, Tünde

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of collisionless plasmas can be modelled by the Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations. An Eulerian approach is needed to accurately describe processes that are governed by high energy tails in the distribution function, but is of limited efficiency for high dimensional problems. The use of an adaptive mesh can reduce the scaling of the computational cost with the dimension of the problem. Here, we present a relativistic Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell solver with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement in one spatial and one momentum dimension. The discretization of the Vlasov equation is based on a high-order finite volume method. A flux corrected transport algorithm is applied to limit spurious oscillations and ensure the physical character of the distribution function. We demonstrate a speed-up by a factor of five, because of the use of an adaptive mesh, in a typical scenario involving laser-plasma interaction in the self-induced transparency regime.

  15. On global classical solutions of the three dimensional relativistic Vlasov-Darwin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuting; Zhang, Xianwen

    2016-08-01

    We study the Cauchy problem of the relativistic Vlasov-Darwin system with generalized variables proposed by Sospedra-Alfonso et al. ["Global classical solutions of the relativistic Vlasov-Darwin system with small Cauchy data: the generalized variables approach," Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 205, 827-869 (2012)]. We prove global existence of a non-negative classical solution to the Cauchy problem in three space variables under small perturbation of the initial datum, and as a consequence, we obtain that nearly spherically symmetric solutions with required regularity exist globally in time.

  16. Hamiltonian reductions of the one-dimensional Vlasov equation using phase-space moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandre, C.; Perin, M.

    2016-03-01

    We consider Hamiltonian closures of the Vlasov equation using the phase-space moments of the distribution function. We provide some conditions on the closures imposed by the Jacobi identity. We completely solve some families of examples. As a result, we show that imposing that the resulting reduced system preserves the Hamiltonian character of the parent model shapes its phase space by creating a set of Casimir invariants as a direct consequence of the Jacobi identity. We exhibit three main families of Hamiltonian models with two, three, and four degrees of freedom aiming at modeling the complexity of the bunch of particles in the Vlasov dynamics.

  17. Linear stability of stationary solutions of the Vlasov-Poisson system in three dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batt, J.; Rein, G. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Mathematisches Inst.); Morrison, P.J. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Rigorous results on the stability of stationary solutions of the Vlasov-Poisson system are obtained in both the plasma physics and stellar dynamics contexts. It is proven that stationary solutions in the plasma physics (stellar dynamics) case are linearly stable if they are decreasing (increasing) functions of the local, i.e. particle, energy. The main tool in the analysis is the free energy of the system, a conserved quantity. In addition, an appropriate global existence result is proven for the linearized Vlasov-Poisson system and the existence of stationary solutions that satisfy the above stability condition is established.

  18. Lagrangian formulation of the one-dimensional Vlasov equation. [in plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewak, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    A new formulation of the one-dimensional Vlasov equation is derived which is analogous to the Kalman-transformed cold-plasma equations. The equations are shown to yield nonsecular, nonlinear approximations to a source or boundary-value problem. It is suggested that the formulation may have other applications in nonlinear plasma theory.

  19. Convergence of the Vlasov-Poisson-Fokker- Planck system to the incompressible Euler equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We establish the convergence of the Vlasov-Poisson-Fokker-Planck system to the incompressible Euler equations in this paper. The convergence is rigorously proved on the time interval where the smooth solution to the incompressible Euler equations exists. The proof relies on the compactness argument and the so-called relative-entropy method.

  20. The Cauchy Problem for the 3-D Vlasov-Poisson System with Point Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioro, Carlo; Miot, Evelyne; Pulvirenti, Mario

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we establish global existence and uniqueness of the solution to the three-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson system in the presence of point charges with repulsive interaction. The present analysis extends an analogous two-dimensional result (Caprino and Marchioro in Kinet. Relat. Models 3(2):241-254, 2010).

  1. The Cauchy problem for the 3-D Vlasov-Poisson system with point charges

    CERN Document Server

    Marchioro, Carlo; Pulvirenti, Mario

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we establish global existence and uniqueness of the solution to the three-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson system in presence of point charges in case of repulsive interaction. The present analysis extends an analogeous two-dimensional result by Caprino and Marchioro [On the plasma-charge model, to appear in Kinetic and Related Models (2010)].

  2. Ill-Posedness of the Hydrostatic Euler and Singular Vlasov Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han-Kwan, Daniel; Nguyen, Toan T.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we develop an abstract framework to establish ill-posedness, in the sense of Hadamard, for some nonlocal PDEs displaying unbounded unstable spectra. We apply this to prove the ill-posedness for the hydrostatic Euler equations as well as for the kinetic incompressible Euler equations and the Vlasov-Dirac-Benney system.

  3. On Local Smooth Solutions for the Vlasov Equation with the Potential of Interactions {\\pm} r^{-2}

    CERN Document Server

    Zhidkov, P E

    2003-01-01

    For the initial value problem for the Vlasov equation with the potential of interactions {\\pm} r^{-2} we prove the existence and uniqueness of a local solution with values in the Schwartz space S of infinitely differentiable functions rapidly decaying at infinity.

  4. On the energy conservation by weak solutions of the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell system

    OpenAIRE

    Sospedra-Alfonso, Reinel

    2010-01-01

    We show that weak solutions of the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell system preserve the total energy provided that the electromagnetic field is locally of bounded variation and, for any $\\lambda$> 0, the one-particle distribution function has a square integrable $\\lambda$-moment in the momentum variable.

  5. Cosmology and gravitational waves in the Nordstrom-Vlasov system, a laboratory for Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Corda, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We discuss a cosmological solution of the system which was originally introduced by Calogero and is today popularly known as "Nordstrom-Vlasov system". Although the model is un-physical, its cosmological solution results interesting for the same reasons for which the Nordstrom-Vlasov system was originally introduced in the framework of galactic dynamics. In fact, it represents a theoretical laboratory where one can rigorously study some problems, like the importance of the gravitational waves in the dynamics, which at the present time are not well understood within the physical model of the Einstein-Vlasov system. As the cosmology of the Nordstrom-Vlasov system is founded on a scalar field, a better understanding of the system is important also in the framework of the Dark Energy problem. In fact, various attempts to achieve Dark Energy by using scalar fields are present in the literature. In the solution an analytical expression for the time dependence of the cosmological evolution of the Nordstrom's scalar ...

  6. Resolution of the Vlasov-Maxwell system by PIC discontinuous Galerkin method on GPU with OpenCL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crestetto Anaïs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an implementation of a Vlasov-Maxwell solver for multicore processors. The Vlasov equation describes the evolution of charged particles in an electromagnetic field, solution of the Maxwell equations. The Vlasov equation is solved by a Particle-In-Cell method (PIC, while the Maxwell system is computed by a Discontinuous Galerkin method. We use the OpenCL framework, which allows our code to run on multicore processors or recent Graphic Processing Units (GPU. We present several numerical applications to two-dimensional test cases.

  7. Vlasov fluid stability of a 2-D plasma with a linear magnetic field null

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Vlasov fluid stability of a 2-dimensional plasma near an O type magnetic null is investigated. Specifically, an elongated Z-pinch is considered, and applied to Field Reversed Configurations at Los Alamos National Laboratory by making a cylindrical approximation of the compact torus. The orbits near an elliptical O type null are found to be very complicated; the orbits are large and some are stochastic. The kinetic corrections to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are investigated by evaluating the expectation values of the growth rates of a Vlasov fluid dispersion functional by using set of trial functions based on ideal MHD. The dispersion functional involves fluid parts and orbit dependent parts. The latter involves phase integral of two time correlations. The phase integral is replaced by the time integral both for the regular and for the stochastic orbits. Two trial functions are used; one has a large displacement near the null and the other away from the null.

  8. Linear Vlasov solver for microbunching gain estimation with inclusion of CSR, LSC and linac geometric impedances

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Cheng-Ying; Li, Rui; Tennant, Chris

    2015-01-01

    As is known, microbunching instability (MBI) has been one of the most challenging issues in designs of magnetic chicanes for short-wavelength free-electron lasers or linear colliders, as well as those of transport lines for recirculating or energy recovery linac machines. To more accurately quantify MBI in a single-pass system and for more complete analyses, we further extend and continue to increase the capabilities of our previously developed linear Vlasov solver [1] to incorporate more relevant impedance models into the code, including transient and steady-state free-space and/or shielding coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) impedances, the longitudinal space charge (LSC) impedances, and the linac geometric impedances with extension of the existing formulation to include beam acceleration [2]. Then, we directly solve the linearized Vlasov equation numerically for microbunching gain amplification factor. In this study we apply this code to a beamline lattice of transport arc [3] following an upstream linac...

  9. Non-modal stability analysis and transient growth in a magnetized Vlasov plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ratushnaya, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Collisionless plasmas, such as those encountered in tokamaks, exhibit a rich variety of instabilities. The physical origin, triggering mechanisms and fundamental understanding of many plasma instabilities, however, are still open problems. We investigate the stability properties of a collisionless Vlasov plasma in a stationary homogeneous magnetic field. We narrow the scope of our investigation to the case of Maxwellian plasma. For the first time using a fully kinetic approach we show the emergence of the local instability, a transient growth, followed by classical Landau damping in a stable magnetized plasma. We show that the linearized Vlasov operator is non-normal leading to the algebraic growth of the perturbations using non-modal stability theory. The typical time scales of the obtained instabilities are of the order of several plasma periods. The first-order distribution function and the corresponding electric field are calculated and the dependence on the magnetic field and perturbation parameters is s...

  10. Progress on a Vlasov Treatment of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation from Arbitrary Planar Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Bassi, Gabriele; Warnock, Robert L

    2005-01-01

    We study the influence of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on particle bunches traveling on arbitrary planar orbits between parallel conducting plates (shielding). The time evolution of the phase space distribution is determined by solving the Vlasov-Maxwell equations in the time domain. This provides lower numerical noise than the macroparticle method, and allows the study of emittance degradation and microbunching in bunch compressors. We calculate the fields excited by the bunch in the lab frame using a formula simpler than that based on retarded potentials.* We have developed an algorithm for solving the Vlasov equation in the beam frame using arc length as the independent variable and our method of local characteristics (discretized Perron-Frobenius operator).We integrate in the interaction picture in the hope that we can adopt a fixed grid. The distribution function will be represented by B-splines, in a scheme preserving positivity and normalization of the distribution. The transformation between l...

  11. Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-D plasma with a linear magnetic field null

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-dimensional plasma near an O type magnetic null is investigated. Specifically, an elongated Z-pinch is considered, and applied to Field Reversed Configurations at Los Alamos National Laboratory by making a cylindrical approximation of the compact torus. The orbits near an elliptical O type null are found to be very complicated; the orbits are large and some are stochastic. The kinetic corrections to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are investigated by evaluating the expectation values of the growth rates of a Vlasov Fluid dispersion functional by using a set of trial functions based on ideal MHD. The dispersion functional involves fluid parts and orbit dependent parts. The latter involves phase integral of two time correlations. The phase integral is replaced by the time integral both for the regular and for the stochastic orbits. Two trial functions are used; one has a large displacement near the null and the other away from the null.

  12. Veiled singularities for the spherically symmetric massless Einstein-Vlasov system

    CERN Document Server

    Rendall, Alan D

    2016-01-01

    This paper continues the investigation of the formation of naked singularities in the collapse of collisionless matter initiated in [RV]. There the existence of certain classes of non-smooth solutions of the Einstein-Vlasov system was proved. Those solutions are self-similar and hence not asymptotically flat. To obtain solutions which are more physically relevant it makes sense to attempt to cut off these solutions in a suitable way so as to make them asymptotically flat. This task, which turns out to be technically challenging, will be carried out in this paper. [RV] A. D. Rendall and J. J. L. Vel\\'{a}zquez, A class of dust-like self-similar solutions of the massless Einstein-Vlasov system. Annales Henri Poincare 12, 919-964, (2011).

  13. Nonlinear wave evolution in VLASOV plasma: a lie-transform analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, J.R.

    1979-08-01

    Nonlinear wave evolution in Vlasov plasma is analyzed using the Lie transform, a powerful mathematical tool which is applicable to Hamiltonian systems. The first part of this thesis is an exposition of the Lie transform. Dewar's general Lie transform theory is explained and is used to construct Deprit's Lie transform perturbation technique. The basic theory is illustrated by simple examples.

  14. On classical solutions of the relativistic Vlasov-Klein-Gordon system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kunzinger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a collisionless ensemble of classical particles coupled with a Klein-Gordon field. For the resulting nonlinear system of partial differential equations, the relativistic Vlasov-Klein-Gordon system, we prove local-in-time existence of classical solutions and a continuation criterion which says that a solution can blow up only if the particle momenta become large. We also show that classical solutions are global in time in the one-dimensional case.

  15. The Goursat Problem for the Einstein-Vlasov System: (I) The Initial Data Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Calvin, Tadmon

    2011-01-01

    We show how to assign, on two intersecting null hypersurfaces, initial data for the Einstein-Vlasov system in harmonic coordinates. As all the components of the metric appear in each component of the stress-energy tensor, the hierarchical method of Rendall can not apply strictly speaking. To overcome this difficulty, an additional assumption have been imposed to the metric on the initial hypersurfaces. Consequently, the distribution function is constrained to satisfy some integral equations on the initial hypersurfaces.

  16. Variational principles for the guiding-center Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    CERN Document Server

    Brizard, A J

    2016-01-01

    The Lagrange, Euler, and Euler-Poincar\\'{e} variational principles for the guiding-center Vlasov-Maxwell equations are presented. Each variational principle presents a different approach to deriving guiding-center polarization and magnetization effects into the guiding-center Maxwell equations. The conservation laws of energy, momentum, and angular momentum are also derived by Noether method, where the guiding-center stress tensor is now shown to be explicitly symmetric.

  17. Discrete Time McKean–Vlasov Control Problem: A Dynamic Programming Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Huyên, E-mail: pham@math.univ-paris-diderot.fr; Wei, Xiaoli, E-mail: tyswxl@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Probabilités et Modèles Aléatoires, CNRS, UMR 7599, Université Paris Diderot (France)

    2016-12-15

    We consider the stochastic optimal control problem of nonlinear mean-field systems in discrete time. We reformulate the problem into a deterministic control problem with marginal distribution as controlled state variable, and prove that dynamic programming principle holds in its general form. We apply our method for solving explicitly the mean-variance portfolio selection and the multivariate linear-quadratic McKean–Vlasov control problem.

  18. One-species Vlasov-Poisson-Landau system for soft potentials in ℝ3

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cong; Lei, Yuanjie

    2016-12-01

    We consider the global classical solution near a global Maxwellian to the one-species Vlasov-Poisson-Landau system in the whole space Rx 3 . It is shown that our global solvability result is obtained under the weaker smallness condition on the initial perturbation than that of Duan et al., [preprint arXiv:1112.3261 (2011)] and Lei et al., [Kinet. Relat. Models 7(3), 551-590 (2014)].

  19. Geometric Integration Of The Vlasov-Maxwell System With A Variational Particle-in-cell Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Squire, H. Qin and W.M. Tang

    2012-03-27

    A fully variational, unstructured, electromagnetic particle-in-cell integrator is developed for integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. Using the formalism of Discrete Exterior Calculus [1], the field solver, interpolation scheme and particle advance algorithm are derived through minimization of a single discrete field theory action. As a consequence of ensuring that the action is invariant under discrete electromagnetic gauge transformations, the integrator exactly conserves Gauss's law.

  20. Geometric integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell system with a variational particle-in-cell scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J.; Tang, W. M. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Qin, H. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2012-08-15

    A fully variational, unstructured, electromagnetic particle-in-cell integrator is developed for integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. Using the formalism of discrete exterior calculus [Desbrun et al., e-print arXiv:math/0508341 (2005)], the field solver, interpolation scheme, and particle advance algorithm are derived through minimization of a single discrete field theory action. As a consequence of ensuring that the action is invariant under discrete electromagnetic gauge transformations, the integrator exactly conserves Gauss's law.

  1. Geometric integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell system with a variational particle-in-cell scheme

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A fully variational, unstructured, electromagnetic particle-in-cell integrator is developed for integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. Using the formalism of Discrete Exterior Calculus, the field solver, interpolation scheme and particle advance algorithm are derived through minimization of a single discrete field theory action. As a consequence of ensuring that the action is invariant under discrete electromagnetic gauge transformations, the integrator exactly conserves Gauss's law.

  2. Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for Vlasov-Maxwell systems

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Liu, Jian; He, Yang; Zhang, Ruili; Sun, Yajuan

    2015-01-01

    Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for classical particle-field systems governed by the Vlasov-Maxwell equations are developed. The algorithm conserves a discrete non-canonical symplectic structure derived from the Lagrangian of the particle-field system, which is naturally discrete in particles. The electromagnetic field is spatially-discretized using the method of discrete exterior calculus with high-order interpolating differential forms for a cubic grid. The resulting time-domain Lagrangian assumes a non-canonical symplectic structure. It is also gauge invariant and conserves charge. The system is then solved using a splitting method discovered by He et al., which produces five exactly-soluable sub-systems, and high-order structure- preserving algorithms follow by combinations. The explicit, high-order, and conservative nature of the algorithms is especially suitable for long-term simulations of particle-field systems with extremely large number of degrees of freedom ...

  3. Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for Vlasov-Maxwell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Jianyuan [School of Nuclear Science and Technology and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China; Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China; Qin, Hong [School of Nuclear Science and Technology and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China; Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA; Liu, Jian [School of Nuclear Science and Technology and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China; Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China; He, Yang [School of Nuclear Science and Technology and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China; Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China; Zhang, Ruili [School of Nuclear Science and Technology and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China; Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China; Sun, Yajuan [LSEC, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2719, Beijing 100190, China

    2015-11-01

    Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for classical particle-field systems governed by the Vlasov-Maxwell equations are developed. The algorithms conserve a discrete non-canonical symplectic structure derived from the Lagrangian of the particle-field system, which is naturally discrete in particles. The electromagnetic field is spatially discretized using the method of discrete exterior calculus with high-order interpolating differential forms for a cubic grid. The resulting time-domain Lagrangian assumes a non-canonical symplectic structure. It is also gauge invariant and conserves charge. The system is then solved using a structure-preserving splitting method discovered by He et al. [preprint arXiv: 1505.06076 (2015)], which produces five exactly soluble sub-systems, and high-order structure-preserving algorithms follow by combinations. The explicit, high-order, and conservative nature of the algorithms is especially suitable for long-term simulations of particle-field systems with extremely large number of degrees of freedom on massively parallel supercomputers. The algorithms have been tested and verified by the two physics problems, i.e., the nonlinear Landau damping and the electron Bernstein wave. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  4. Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for Vlasov-Maxwell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Liu, Jian; He, Yang; Zhang, Ruili [School of Nuclear Science and Technology and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Qin, Hong, E-mail: hongqin@ustc.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Sun, Yajuan [LSEC, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2719, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for classical particle-field systems governed by the Vlasov-Maxwell equations are developed. The algorithms conserve a discrete non-canonical symplectic structure derived from the Lagrangian of the particle-field system, which is naturally discrete in particles. The electromagnetic field is spatially discretized using the method of discrete exterior calculus with high-order interpolating differential forms for a cubic grid. The resulting time-domain Lagrangian assumes a non-canonical symplectic structure. It is also gauge invariant and conserves charge. The system is then solved using a structure-preserving splitting method discovered by He et al. [preprint http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1505.06076 (2015)], which produces five exactly soluble sub-systems, and high-order structure-preserving algorithms follow by combinations. The explicit, high-order, and conservative nature of the algorithms is especially suitable for long-term simulations of particle-field systems with extremely large number of degrees of freedom on massively parallel supercomputers. The algorithms have been tested and verified by the two physics problems, i.e., the nonlinear Landau damping and the electron Bernstein wave.

  5. AP-Cloud: Adaptive Particle-in-Cloud method for optimal solutions to Vlasov-Poisson equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingyu; Samulyak, Roman; Jiao, Xiangmin; Yu, Kwangmin

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new adaptive Particle-in-Cloud (AP-Cloud) method for obtaining optimal numerical solutions to the Vlasov-Poisson equation. Unlike the traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) method, which is commonly used for solving this problem, the AP-Cloud adaptively selects computational nodes or particles to deliver higher accuracy and efficiency when the particle distribution is highly non-uniform. Unlike other adaptive techniques for PIC, our method balances the errors in PDE discretization and Monte Carlo integration, and discretizes the differential operators using a generalized finite difference (GFD) method based on a weighted least square formulation. As a result, AP-Cloud is independent of the geometric shapes of computational domains and is free of artificial parameters. Efficient and robust implementation is achieved through an octree data structure with 2:1 balance. We analyze the accuracy and convergence order of AP-Cloud theoretically, and verify the method using an electrostatic problem of a particle beam with halo. Simulation results show that the AP-Cloud method is substantially more accurate and faster than the traditional PIC, and it is free of artificial forces that are typical for some adaptive PIC techniques.

  6. Development of a fully implicit particle-in-cell scheme for gyrokinetic electromagnetic turbulence simulation in XGC1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Seung-Hoe; Hager, R.; Chang, C. S.; Chacon, L.; Chen, G.; EPSI Team

    2016-10-01

    The cancelation problem has been a long-standing issue for long wavelengths modes in electromagnetic gyrokinetic PIC simulations in toroidal geometry. As an attempt of resolving this issue, we implemented a fully implicit time integration scheme in the full-f, gyrokinetic PIC code XGC1. The new scheme - based on the implicit Vlasov-Darwin PIC algorithm by G. Chen and L. Chacon - can potentially resolve cancelation problem. The time advance for the field and the particle equations is space-time-centered, with particle sub-cycling. The resulting system of equations is solved by a Picard iteration solver with fixed-point accelerator. The algorithm is implemented in the parallel velocity formalism instead of the canonical parallel momentum formalism. XGC1 specializes in simulating the tokamak edge plasma with magnetic separatrix geometry. A fully implicit scheme could be a way to accurate and efficient gyrokinetic simulations. We will test if this numerical scheme overcomes the cancelation problem, and reproduces the dispersion relation of Alfven waves and tearing modes in cylindrical geometry. Funded by US DOE FES and ASCR, and computing resources provided by OLCF through ALCC.

  7. 3D solutions of the Poisson-Vlasov equations for a charged plasma and particle-core model in a line of FODO cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetti, G.; Rambaldi, S.; Bazzani, A.; Comunian, M.; Pisent, A.

    2003-09-01

    We consider a charged plasma of positive ions in a periodic focusing channel of quadrupolar magnets in the presence of RF cavities. The ions are bunched into charged triaxial ellipsoids and their description requires the solution of a fully 3D Poisson-Vlasov equation. We also analyze the trajectories of test particles in the exterior of the ion bunches in order to estimate their diffusion rate. This rate is relevant for a high intensity linac (TRASCO project). A numerical PIC scheme to integrate the Poisson-Vlasov equations in a periodic focusing system in 2 and 3 space dimensions is presented. The scheme consists of a single particle symplectic integrator and a Poisson solver based on FFT plus tri-diagonal matrix inversion. In the 2D version arbitrary boundary conditions can be chosen. Since no analytical self-consistent 3D solution is known, we chose an initial Neuffer-KV distribution in phase space, whose electric field is close to the one generated by a uniformly filled ellipsoid. For a matched (periodic) beam the orbits of test particles moving in the field of an ellipsoidal bunch, whose semi-axis satisfy the envelope equations, is similar to the orbits generated by the self-consistent charge distribition obtained from the PIC simulation, even though it relaxes to a Fermi-Dirac-like distribution. After a transient the RMS radii and emittances have small amplitude oscillations. The PIC simulations for a mismatched (quasiperiodic) beam are no longer comparable with the ellipsoidal bunch model even though the qualitative behavior is the same, namely a stronger diffusion due to the increase of resonances.

  8. 3D solutions of the Poisson-Vlasov equations for a charged plasma and particle-core model in a line of FODO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchetti, G.; Rambaldi, S.; Bazzani, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126, Bologna (Italy); Comunian, M.; Pisent, A. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)

    2003-09-01

    We consider a charged plasma of positive ions in a periodic focusing channel of quadrupolar magnets in the presence of RF cavities. The ions are bunched into charged triaxial ellipsoids and their description requires the solution of a fully 3D Poisson-Vlasov equation. We also analyze the trajectories of test particles in the exterior of the ion bunches in order to estimate their diffusion rate. This rate is relevant for a high intensity linac (TRASCO project). A numerical PIC scheme to integrate the Poisson-Vlasov equations in a periodic focusing system in 2 and 3 space dimensions is presented. The scheme consists of a single particle symplectic integrator and a Poisson solver based on FFT plus tri-diagonal matrix inversion. In the 2D version arbitrary boundary conditions can be chosen. Since no analytical self-consistent 3D solution is known, we chose an initial Neuffer-KV distribution in phase space, whose electric field is close to the one generated by a uniformly filled ellipsoid. For a matched (periodic) beam the orbits of test particles moving in the field of an ellipsoidal bunch, whose semi-axis satisfy the envelope equations, is similar to the orbits generated by the self-consistent charge distribution obtained from the PIC simulation, even though it relaxes to a Fermi-Dirac-like distribution. After a transient the RMS radii and emittances have small amplitude oscillations. The PIC simulations for a mismatched (quasiperiodic) beam are no longer comparable with the ellipsoidal bunch model even though the qualitative behavior is the same, namely a stronger diffusion due to the increase of resonances. (orig.)

  9. Semiclassical Vlasov and fluid models for an electron gas with spin effects

    CERN Document Server

    Hurst, Jerome; Manfredi, Giovanni; Hervieux, Paul-Antoine

    2014-01-01

    We derive a four-component Vlasov equation for a system composed of spin-1/2 fermions (typically electrons). The orbital part of the motion is classical, whereas the spin degrees of freedom are treated in a completely quantum-mechanical way. The corresponding hydrodynamic equations are derived by taking velocity moments of the phase-space distribution function. This hydrodynamic model is closed using a maximum entropy principle in the case of three or four constraints on the fluid moments, both for Maxwell-Boltzmann and Fermi-Dirac statistics.

  10. Quasineutral limit of the Vlasov-Poisson system with massless electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Han-Kwan, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the quasineutral limit (in other words the limit when the Debye length tends to zero) of Vlasov-Poisson like equations describing the behaviour of ions in a plasma. We consider massless electrons, with a charge density following a Maxwell-Boltzmann law. For cold ions, using the relative entropy method, we derive the classical Isothermal Euler or the (inviscid) Shallow Water systems from fluid mechanics. In a second time, we study the combined quasineutral and strong magnetic field regime for such plasmas.

  11. Explicit Solutions of the One-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson System with Infinite Mass and Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Pankavich, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    A collisionless plasma is modeled by the Vlasov-Poisson system in one-dimension. A fixed background of positive charge, dependent only upon velocity, is assumed and the situation in which the mobile negative ions balance the positive charge as x tends to positive or negative infinity. Thus, the total positive charge and the total negative charge are infinite. In this paper, the charge density of the system is shown to be compactly supported. More importantly, both the electric field and the number density are determined explicitly for large values of x.

  12. Goursat problem for the Yang-Mills-Vlasov system in temporal gauge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Dossa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the characteristic Cauchy problem for the Yang-Mills-Vlasov (YMV system in temporal gauge, where the initial data are specified on two intersecting smooth characteristic hypersurfaces of Minkowski spacetime $(mathbb{R}^{4},eta $. Under a $mathcal{C}^{infty }$ hypothesis on the data, we solve the initial constraint problem and the evolution problem. Local in time existence and uniqueness results are established thanks to a suitable combination of the method of characteristics, Leray's Theory of hyperbolic systems and techniques developed by Choquet-Bruhat for ordinary spatial Cauchy problems related to (YMV systems.

  13. Binary jumps in continuum. II. Non-equilibrium process and a Vlasov-type scaling limit

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelshtein, Dmitri; Kutoviy, Oleksandr; Lytvynov, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Let $\\Gamma$ denote the space of all locally finite subsets (configurations) in $\\mathbb R^d$. A stochastic dynamics of binary jumps in continuum is a Markov process on $\\Gamma$ in which pairs of particles simultaneously hop over $\\mathbb R^d$. We discuss a non-equilibrium dynamics of binary jumps. We prove the existence of an evolution of correlation functions on a finite time interval. We also show that a Vlasov-type mesoscopic scaling for such a dynamics leads to a generalized Boltzmann non-linear equation for the particle density.

  14. Geometry of Vlasov kinetic moments: A bosonic Fock space for the symmetric Schouten bracket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, John [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Holm, Darryl D. [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Computer and Computational Science Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tronci, Cesare [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); TERA Foundation for Oncological Hadrontherapy, 11 V. Puccini, Novara 28100 (Italy)], E-mail: cesare.tronci@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-06-02

    The dynamics of Vlasov kinetic moments is shown to be Lie-Poisson on the dual Lie algebra of symmetric contravariant tensor fields. The corresponding Lie bracket is identified with the symmetric Schouten bracket and the moment Lie algebra is related with a bundle of bosonic Fock spaces, where creation and annihilation operators are used to construct the cold plasma closure. Kinetic moments are also shown to define a momentum map, which is infinitesimally equivariant. This momentum map is the dual of a Lie algebra homomorphism, defined through the Schouten bracket. Finally the moment Lie-Poisson bracket is extended to anisotropic interactions.

  15. Local null-controllability of the 2-D Vlasov-Navier-Stokes system

    OpenAIRE

    Moyano, Iván

    2016-01-01

    We prove a null controllability result for the Vlasov-Navier-Stokes system, which describes the interaction of a large cloud of particles immersed in a fluid. We show that one can modify both the distribution of particles and the velocity field of the fluid from any initial state to the zero steady state, by means of an internal control. Indeed, we can modify the non-linear dynamics of the system in order to absorb the particles and let the fluid at rest. The proof is achieved thanks to the r...

  16. Self-similar analysis of Vlasov-Einstein equations in spherical symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier, A.; Burgan, J.R.; Feix, M.; Fijalkow, E.

    1980-03-15

    The Vlasov-Einstein system of equations is studied from the point of view of group transformations. Continuous groups are shown to generalize the usual infinitesimal treatment of the metric tensor to the case of a distribution function. Reduced equations are obtained, leading to a time-dependent analytical solution, which yields as a limiting case the Schwarzchild metric. The problem of a purely radial motion of null particles is discussed and leads to an expression for the redshift in a nonstatic, inhomogeneous spacetime.

  17. Geometric integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell system with a variational particle-in-cell scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Jonathan; Qin, Hong; Tang, William

    2012-10-01

    A fully variational, unstructured, electromagnetic particle-in-cell integrator is developed for integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. Using the formalism of Discrete Exterior Calculus [1], the field solver, interpolation scheme and particle advance algorithm are derived through minimization of a single discrete field theory action. As a consequence of ensuring that the action is invariant under discrete electromagnetic gauge transformations, the integrator exactly conserves Gauss's law. This work was supported by USDOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.[4pt] [1] M. Desbrun, A. N. Hirani, M. Leok, and J. E. Marsden, (2005), arXiv:math/0508341

  18. Future global non-linear stability of surface symmetric solutions of the Einstein-Vlasov system with a cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Nungesser, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    We show future global non-linear stability of surface symmetric solutions of the Einstein-Vlasov system with a positive cosmological constant. Estimates of higher derivatives of the metric and the matter terms are obtained using an inductive argument. In a recent research monograph Ringstr\\"{o}m shows future non-linear stability of (not necessarily symmetric) solutions of the Einstein-Vlasov system with a non-linear scalar field if certain local estimates on the geometry and the matter terms are fulfilled. We show that these assumptions are satisfied at late times for the case under consideration here which together with Cauchy stability leads to our main conclusion.

  19. Nonlinear wave structures as exact solutions of Vlasov-Maxwell equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, B.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Janaki, M. S.; Sharma, A. S.

    2001-12-01

    Many recent observations by POLAR and Geotail spacecraft of the low-latitudes magnetopause boundary layer (LLBL) and the polar cap boundary layer (PCBL) have detected nonlinear wave structures [Tsurutani et al, Geophys. Res. Lett., 25, 4117, 1998]. These nonlinear waves have electromagnetic signatures that are identified with Alfven and Whistler modes. Also solitary waves with mono- and bi-polar features were observed. In general such electromagnetic structures are described by the full Vlasov-Maxwell equations for waves propagating at an angle to the ambient magnetic field, but it has been a diffficult task obtaining the solutions because of the inherent nonlinearity. We have obtained an exact nonlinear solution of the full Vlasov-Maxwell equations in the presence of an electromagnetic wave propagating at an arbitrary direction with an ambient magnetic field. This is accomplished by finding the constants of motion of the charged particles in the electromagnetic field of the wave and then constructing a realistic distribution function as a function of these constants of motion. The corresponding trapping conditions for such waves are obtained, yielding the self-consistent description for the particles in the presence of the nonlinear waves. The interpretation of the observed nonlinear structures in terms of these general solutions will be presented.

  20. Vlasov modelling of parallel transport in a tokamak scrape-off layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manfredi, G [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux, CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, BP 43, F-67034 Strasbourg (France); Hirstoaga, S [INRIA Nancy Grand-Est and Institut de Recherche en Mathematiques Avancees, 7 rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg (France); Devaux, S, E-mail: Giovanni.Manfredi@ipcms.u-strasbg.f, E-mail: hirstoaga@math.unistra.f, E-mail: Stephane.Devaux@ccfe.ac.u [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    A one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson model is used to describe the parallel transport in a tokamak scrape-off layer. Thanks to a recently developed 'asymptotic-preserving' numerical scheme, it is possible to lift numerical constraints on the time step and grid spacing, which are no longer limited by, respectively, the electron plasma period and Debye length. The Vlasov approach provides a good velocity-space resolution even in regions of low density. The model is applied to the study of parallel transport during edge-localized modes, with particular emphasis on the particles and energy fluxes on the divertor plates. The numerical results are compared with analytical estimates based on a free-streaming model, with good general agreement. An interesting feature is the observation of an early electron energy flux, due to suprathermal electrons escaping the ions' attraction. In contrast, the long-time evolution is essentially quasi-neutral and dominated by the ion dynamics.

  1. Non-modal stability analysis and transient growth in a magnetized Vlasov plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Ratushnaya, V.

    2014-12-01

    Collisionless plasmas, such as those encountered in tokamaks, exhibit a rich variety of instabilities. The physical origin, triggering mechanisms and fundamental understanding of many plasma instabilities, however, are still open problems. We investigate the stability properties of a 3-dimensional collisionless Vlasov plasma in a stationary homogeneous magnetic field. We narrow the scope of our investigation to the case of Maxwellian plasma and examine its evolution with an electrostatic approximation. For the first time using a fully kinetic approach we show the emergence of the local instability, a transient growth, followed by classical Landau damping in a stable magnetized plasma. We show that the linearized Vlasov operator is non-normal leading to the algebraic growth of the perturbations using non-modal stability theory. The typical time scales of the obtained instabilities are of the order of several plasma periods. The first-order distribution function and the corresponding electric field are calculated and the dependence on the magnetic field and perturbation parameters is studied. Our results offer a new scenario of the emergence and development of plasma instabilities on the kinetic scale.

  2. On local smooth solutions for the Vlasov equation with the potential of interactions ±r−2

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Zhidkov

    2004-01-01

    For the initial value problem for the Vlasov equation with the potential of interactions ±r−2, we prove the existence and uniqueness of a local solution with values in the Schwartz space S of infinitely differentiable functions rapidly decaying at infinity.

  3. Existence of Global Weak Solutions to a Hybrid Vlasov-MHD Model for Magnetized Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Bin; Tronci, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    We prove the global-in-time existence of large-data finite-energy weak solutions to an incompressible hybrid Vlasov-magnetohydrodynamic model in three space dimensions. The model couples three essential ingredients of magnetized plasmas: a transport equation for the probability density function, which models energetic rarefied particles of one species; the incompressible Navier--Stokes system for the bulk fluid; and a parabolic evolution equation, involving magnetic diffusivity, for the magnetic field. The physical derivation of our model is given. It is also shown that the weak solution, whose existence is established, has nonincreasing total energy, and that it satisfies a number of physically relevant properties, including conservation of the total momentum, conservation of the total mass, and nonnegativity of the probability density function for the energetic particles. The proof is based on a one-level approximation scheme, which is carefully devised to avoid increase of the total energy for the sequence...

  4. Description of the evolution of inhomogeneities on a dark matter halo with the Vlasov equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Fernández, Paola; Jiménez-Vázquez, Erik; Alcubierre, Miguel; Montoya, Edison; Núñez, Darío

    2017-09-01

    We use a direct numerical integration of the Vlasov equation in spherical symmetry with a background gravitational potential to determine the evolution of a collection of particles in different models of a galactic halo in order to test its stability against perturbations. Such collection is assumed to represent a dark matter inhomogeneity which is represented by a distribution function defined in phase-space. Non-trivial stationary states are obtained and determined by the virialization of the system. We describe some features of these stationary states by means of the properties of the final distribution function and final density profile. We compare our results using the different halo models and find that the NFW halo model is the most stable of them, in the sense that an inhomogeneity in this halo model requires a shorter time to virialize.

  5. From one-dimensional fields to Vlasov equilibria: Theory and application of Hermite polynomials

    CERN Document Server

    Allanson, O; Troscheit, S; Wilson, F

    2016-01-01

    We consider the theory and application of a solution method for the inverse problem in collisionless equilibria, namely that of calculating a Vlasov-Maxwell equilibrium for a given macroscopic (fluid) equilibrium. Using Jeans' Theorem, the equilibrium distribution functions are expressed as functions of the constants of motion, in the form of a Maxwellian multiplied by an unknown function of the canonical momenta. In this case it is possible to reduce the inverse problem to inverting Weierstrass transforms, which we achieve by using expansions over Hermite polynomials. A sufficient condition on the pressure tensor is found which guarantees the convergence and the boundedness of the candidate solution, when satisfied. This condition is obtained by elementary means, and it is clear how to put it into practice. We also argue that for a given pressure tensor for which our method applies, there always exists a positive distribution function solution for a sufficiently magnetised plasma. Illustrative examples of th...

  6. A Reduction of the Vlasov--Maxwell System Using Phase-Space Blobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadwick, B. A.; Lee, Frank M.; Faeh, Luke

    2011-10-01

    We develop a new computational approach to solving the Vlasov-Maxwell equation by representing the distribution function by a supper-position of finite-extent phase- space ``blobs.'' Each blob evolves as a warm beamletdriven by the collective plasma fields. The underlying approximation treats each blob as a different plasma species and, as such, makes a counting error which we expect to be reflected in the system entropy. This approach results in a non-canonical Hamiltonian model, inheriting various properties of the original system. The primary advance of this technique over traditional Lagrangian particle methods is the near elimination of macro-particle ``noise.'' Since we are evolving elements of phase-space, the distribution function can be readily reconstructed at any instant. We discuss the performance and convergence of this model using a variety of standard examples. Supported by the U.S. DoE under Contract DE-FG02-08ER55000

  7. Exact nonlinear analytic Vlasov-Maxwell tangential equilibria with arbitrary density and temperature profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Mottez, F

    2003-01-01

    The tangential layers are characterized by a bulk plasma velocity and a magnetic field that are perpendicular to the gradient direction. They have been extensively described in the frame of the Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) theory. But the MHD theory does not look inside the transition region if the transition has a size of a few ion gyroradii. A series of kinetic tangential equilibria, valid for a collisionless plasma is presented. These equilibria are exact analytical solutions of the Maxwell-Vlasov equations. The particle distribution functions are sums of an infinite number of elementary functions parametrized by a vector potential. Examples of equilibria relevant to space plasmas are shown. A model for the deep and sharp density depletions observed in the auroral zone of the Earth is proposed. Tangential equilibria are also relevant for the study of planetary environments and of remote astrophysical plasmas.

  8. On the spatially homogeneous and isotropic Einstein-Vlasov-Fokker-Planck system with cosmological scalar field

    CERN Document Server

    Calogero, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The Einstein-Vlasov-Fokker-Planck system describes the kinetic diffusion dynamics of self-gravitating particles within the Einstein theory of general relativity. We study the Cauchy problem for spatially homogeneous and isotropic solutions and prove the existence of both global solutions and solutions that blow-up in finite time depending on the size of certain functions of the initial data. We also derive information on the large-time behavior of global solutions and toward the singularity for solutions which blow-up in fine time. Our results entail the existence of a phase of decelerated expansion followed by a phase of accelerated expansion, in accordance with the physical expectations in cosmology.

  9. Canonicalizable gyrocenter and structure-preserving geometric algorithms for the Vlasov-Maxwell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Littlejohn's introduction of the non-canonical symplectic structure for the gyrocenter dynamics revolutionized plasma kinetic theory. The discovery of the non-canonical symplectic algorithm for gyrocenters initiated the search for symplectic algorithms for the gyrokinetic system. This effort is enforced by the recent discovery of canonical and non-canonical symplectic algorithms for the Vlasov-Maxwell (VM) system. However, symplectic algorithms for the gyrokinetic system remain elusive despite intense effort. In retrospect, the success of the symplectic algorithms for the VM system can be attributed to its global canonicalizability. Darboux's theorem ensures that any symplectic structure is locally canonicalizable, but not necessarily globally. Indeed, Littlejohn's gyrocenter is not globally canonicalizable. In this talk, I will show to construct a different gyrocenter that is globally canonicalizable. It should be a good starting point for developing symplectic algorithms for the gyrokinetic system. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-09CH11466).

  10. An adaptive, high-order phase-space remapping for the two-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson equations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Bei; Colella, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The numerical solution of high dimensional Vlasov equation is usually performed by particle-in-cell (PIC) methods. However, due to the well-known numerical noise, it is challenging to use PIC methods to get a precise description of the distribution function in phase space. To control the numerical error, we introduce an adaptive phase-space remapping which regularizes the particle distribution by periodically reconstructing the distribution function on a hierarchy of phase-space grids with high-order interpolations. The positivity of the distribution function can be preserved by using a local redistribution technique. The method has been successfully applied to a set of classical plasma problems in one dimension. In this paper, we present the algorithm for the two dimensional Vlasov-Poisson equations. An efficient Poisson solver with infinite domain boundary conditions is used. The parallel scalability of the algorithm on massively parallel computers will be discussed.

  11. The Einstein-Vlasov system with cosmological constant in a surface-symmetric cosmological model local existence and continuation criteria

    CERN Document Server

    Tchapnda, S B; Tchapnda, Sophonie Blaise; Noutchegueme, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    The Einstein-Vlasov system describes a self-gravitating, collisionless gas within the framework of general relativity. We investigate the initial value problem in a cosmological setting with surface symmetry and a non-zero cosmological constant and prove local existence and continuation criteria in both time directions. The continuation criterion says that as long as the maximum velocity remains bounded and the lapse function remains bounded then the solution can be continued. This applies to either time direction.

  12. The Vlasov-Navier-Stokes system in a 2D pipe: existence and stability of regular equilibria

    OpenAIRE

    Glass, Olivier; Han-Kwan, Daniel; Moussa, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Vlasov-Navier-Stokes system in a 2D pipe with partially absorbing boundary conditions. We show the existence of stationary states for this system near small Poiseuille flows for the fluid phase, for which the kinetic phase is not trivial. We prove the asymptotic stability of these states with respect to appropriately compactly supported perturbations. The analysis relies on geometric control conditions which help to avoid any concentration phenomenon for the kineti...

  13. Vlasov equation eigenvalues and eigenvectors for Fourier-Hermite dispersion matrices of order greater than 1,000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, F. C.

    1972-01-01

    The connection between the Van Kampen and Landau representations of the Vlasov equations has been extended to Fourier-Hermite expansions containing more than 1000 terms by taking advantage of the properties of tridiagonal matrices. These numerical results are regarded as conclusive indications of the nonuniformly convergent behavior of the approximation curve in the limit of an infinite number of terms and represent an extension of work begun by Grant (1967) and by Grant and Feix (1967).

  14. Global existence of solutions to the incompressible Navier-Stokes-Vlasov equations in a time-dependent domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudin, Laurent; Grandmont, Céline; Moussa, Ayman

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we prove the existence of global weak solutions for the incompressible Navier-Stokes-Vlasov system in a three-dimensional time-dependent domain with absorption boundary conditions for the kinetic part. This model arises from the study of respiratory aerosol in the human airways. The proof is based on a regularization and approximation strategy designed for our time-dependent framework.

  15. A class of dust-like self-similar solutions of the massless Einstein-Vlasov system

    CERN Document Server

    Rendall, Alan D

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the existence of a class of self-similar solutions of the Einstein-Vlasov system is proved. The initial data for these solutions are not smooth, with their particle density being supported in a submanifold of codimension one. They can be thought of as intermediate between smooth solutions of the Einstein-Vlasov system and dust. The motivation for studying them is to obtain insights into possible violation of weak cosmic censorship by solutions of the Einstein-Vlasov system. By assuming a suitable form of the unknowns it is shown that the existence question can be reduced to that of the existence of a certain type of solution of a four-dimensional system of ordinary differential equations depending on two parameters. This solution starts at a particular point $P_0$ and converges to a stationary solution $P_1$ as the independent variable tends to infinity. The existence proof is based on a shooting argument and involves relating the dynamics of solutions of the four-dimensional system to that of s...

  16. A simple class of singular, two species Vlasov equilibria sustaining nonmonotonic potential distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocera, L.; Palumbo, L. J. [CNR-IPCF, Theoretical Plasma Physics, Via Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    We present new elementary, exact weak singular solutions of the steady state, two species, electrostatic, one dimensional Vlasov-Poisson equations. The distribution of the hot, finite mass, mobile ions is assumed to be log singular at the position of the electric potential's minimum. We show that the electron energy distributions on opposite sides of this minimum are not equal. This leads to a jump discontinuity of the electron distribution across its separatrix. A simple relation exists between the difference of these two electron distributions and that of the ions. The velocity Fourier transform of the electron singular distribution is smooth and appears as a simple Neumann series. Elementary, finite amplitude profiles of the electric potential result from Poisson equation, which are smoothly, but nonmonotonically and asymmetrically distributed in space. Two such profiles are given explicitly as appropriate for a nonmonotonic double layer and for a plasma bounded by a surface. The distributions of both electrons and ions supporting such potential meet smooth and kinetically stable boundary conditions at one plasma boundary. For sufficiently small potential to electron temperature ratios, the nonthermal, discontinuous electron distribution resulting at the other plasma boundary is also stable against Landau damped perturbations of the electron distribution.

  17. The exact solution of one-dimensional nonrelativistic Vlasov equation: Antitropic electron beams and Landau damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Nikolay S.; Zelekson, Lev A.

    2017-03-01

    The exact stationary solution of one-dimensional non-relativistic Vlasov equation is obtained in the article. It is shown that in the energy exchange with the self-consistent longitudinal electric field, both wave trapped charged particles and the passing ones take part. It is proved that the trapped electron distribution is fundamentally different from distribution functions described by other authors, which used the Bernstein, Greene, and Kruskal method. So, the correct distribution function is characterized by its sudden change at the equality of wave and electrons' velocity but not on the edges of the potential well. This jump occurs for any arbitrary small value of wave potential. It was also found that the energy density of fast electrons trapped by the wave is less than the energy density of slow trapped electrons. This leads to the fact that the energy of the self-consistent electric field may both increase and decrease due to the nonlinear Landau damping. The conditions under which a similar effect can be observed are defined. Also for the first time, it is shown that the self-generated strong electric field always produces antitropic electron beams.

  18. Multilevel and Multi-index Monte Carlo methods for the McKean–Vlasov equation

    KAUST Repository

    Haji-Ali, Abdul-Lateef

    2017-09-12

    We address the approximation of functionals depending on a system of particles, described by stochastic differential equations (SDEs), in the mean-field limit when the number of particles approaches infinity. This problem is equivalent to estimating the weak solution of the limiting McKean–Vlasov SDE. To that end, our approach uses systems with finite numbers of particles and a time-stepping scheme. In this case, there are two discretization parameters: the number of time steps and the number of particles. Based on these two parameters, we consider different variants of the Monte Carlo and Multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) methods and show that, in the best case, the optimal work complexity of MLMC, to estimate the functional in one typical setting with an error tolerance of $$\\\\mathrm {TOL}$$TOL, is when using the partitioning estimator and the Milstein time-stepping scheme. We also consider a method that uses the recent Multi-index Monte Carlo method and show an improved work complexity in the same typical setting of . Our numerical experiments are carried out on the so-called Kuramoto model, a system of coupled oscillators.

  19. ColDICE: a parallel Vlasov-Poisson solver using moving adaptive simplicial tessellation

    CERN Document Server

    Sousbie, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Resolving numerically Vlasov-Poisson equations for initially cold systems can be reduced to following the evolution of a three-dimensional sheet evolving in six-dimensional phase-space. We describe a public parallel numerical algorithm consisting in representing the phase-space sheet with a conforming, self-adaptive simplicial tessellation of which the vertices follow the Lagrangian equations of motion. The algorithm is implemented both in six- and four-dimensional phase-space. Refinement of the tessellation mesh is performed using the bisection method and a local representation of the phase-space sheet at second order relying on additional tracers created when needed at runtime. In order to preserve in the best way the Hamiltonian nature of the system, refinement is anisotropic and constrained by measurements of local Poincar\\'e invariants. Resolution of Poisson equation is performed using the fast Fourier method on a regular rectangular grid, similarly to particle in cells codes. To compute the density proj...

  20. Deterministic methods for the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations and the Van Allen belts dynamics; Methodes deterministes de resolution des equations de Vlasov-Maxwell relativistes en vue du calcul de la dynamique des ceintures de Van Allen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bourdiec, S

    2007-03-15

    Artificial satellites operate in an hostile radiation environment, the Van Allen radiation belts, which partly condition their reliability and their lifespan. In order to protect them, it is necessary to characterize the dynamics of the energetic electrons trapped in these radiation belts. This dynamics is essentially determined by the interactions between the energetic electrons and the existing electromagnetic waves. This work consisted in designing a numerical scheme to solve the equations modelling these interactions: the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations. Our choice was directed towards methods of direct integration. We propose three new spectral methods for the momentum discretization: a Galerkin method and two collocation methods. All of them are based on scaled Hermite functions. The scaling factor is chosen in order to obtain the proper velocity resolution. We present in this thesis the discretization of the one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson system and the numerical results obtained. Then we study the possible extensions of the methods to the complete relativistic problem. In order to reduce the computing time, parallelization and optimization of the algorithms were carried out. Finally, we present 1Dx-3Dv (mono-dimensional for x and three-dimensional for velocity) computations of Weibel and whistler instabilities with one or two electrons species. (author)

  1. Self-consistent Vlasov-Maxwell description of the longitudinal dynamics of intense charged particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a self-consistent kinetic model for the longitudinal dynamics of a long, coasting beam propagating in straight (linear geometry in the z direction in the smooth-focusing approximation. Starting with the three-dimensional Vlasov-Maxwell equations, and integrating over the phase-space (x_{⊥},p_{⊥} transverse to beam propagation, a closed system of equations is obtained for the nonlinear evolution of the longitudinal distribution function F_{b}(z,p_{z},t and average axial electric field ⟨E_{z}^{s}⟩(z,t. The primary assumptions in the present analysis are that the dependence on axial momentum p_{z} of the distribution function f_{b}(x,p,t is factorable, and that the transverse beam dynamics remains relatively quiescent (absence of transverse instability or beam mismatch. The analysis is carried out correct to order k_{z}^{2}r_{w}^{2} assuming slow axial spatial variations with k_{z}^{2}r_{w}^{2}≪1, where k_{z}∼∂/∂z is the inverse length scale of axial variation in the line density λ_{b}(z,t=∫dp_{z}F_{b}(z,p_{z},t, and r_{w} is the radius of the conducting wall (assumed perfectly conducting. A closed expression for the average longitudinal electric field ⟨E_{z}^{s}⟩(z,t in terms of geometric factors, the line density λ_{b}, and its derivatives ∂λ_{b}/∂z,… is obtained for the class of bell-shaped density profiles n_{b}(r,z,t=(λ_{b}/πr_{b}^{2}f(r/r_{b}, where the shape function f(r/r_{b} has the form specified by f(r/r_{b}=(n+1(1-r^{2}/r_{b}^{2}^{n} for 0≤r

  2. NEW INSIGHT INTO SHORT-WAVELENGTH SOLAR WIND FLUCTUATIONS FROM VLASOV THEORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahraoui, F.; Belmont, G. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique-UPMC, Observatoire de Saint-Maur, 4 avenue de Neptune, 94107 Saint-Maur-des-Fosses (France); Goldstein, M. L., E-mail: fouad.sahraoui@lpp.polytechnique.fr [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-04-01

    The nature of solar wind (SW) turbulence below the proton gyroscale is a topic that is being investigated extensively nowadays, both theoretically and observationally. Although recent observations gave evidence of the dominance of kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) at sub-ion scales with {omega} < {omega}{sub ci}, other studies suggest that the KAW mode cannot carry the turbulence cascade down to electron scales and that the whistler mode (i.e., {omega} > {omega}{sub ci}) is more relevant. Here, we study key properties of the short-wavelength plasma modes under limited, but realistic, SW conditions, typically {beta}{sub i} {approx}> {beta}{sub e} {approx} 1 and for high oblique angles of propagation 80 Degree-Sign {<=} {Theta}{sub kB} < 90 Degree-Sign as observed from the Cluster spacecraft data. The linear properties of the plasma modes under these conditions are poorly known, which contrasts with the well-documented cold plasma limit and/or moderate oblique angles of propagation ({Theta}{sub kB} < 80 Degree-Sign ). Based on linear solutions of the Vlasov kinetic theory, we discuss the relevance of each plasma mode (fast, Bernstein, KAW, whistler) in carrying the energy cascade down to electron scales. We show, in particular, that the shear Alfven mode (known in the magnetohydrodynamic limit) extends at scales k{rho}{sub i} {approx}> 1 to frequencies either larger or smaller than {omega}{sub ci}, depending on the anisotropy k{sub ||}/k . This extension into small scales is more readily called whistler ({omega} > {omega}{sub ci}) or KAW ({omega} < {omega}{sub ci}), although the mode is essentially the same. This contrasts with the well-accepted idea that the whistler branch always develops as a continuation at high frequencies of the fast magnetosonic mode. We show, furthermore, that the whistler branch is more damped than the KAW one, which makes the latter the more relevant candidate to carry the energy cascade down to electron scales. We discuss how these new findings

  3. Study of the heavy ions (Au+Au at 150 AMeV) collisions with the FOPI detector. Comparison with the Landau-Vlasov model; Etude des collisions d`ions lourds AU+AU a 150 A.MeV avec le detecteur FOPI. Comparaison avec le modele de Landau-Vlasov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussange, S.

    1995-09-15

    In this thesis, heavy ions (Au+Au) collisions experiments are made at 150 AMeV.In the first part, a general study of the nuclear matter equation is presented. Then the used Landau-Vlasov theoretical model is describe. The third part presents the FOPI experience and the details of how to obtain this theoretical predictions (filter, cuts, corrections, possible centrality selections).At the end, experimental results and comparisons with the Landau-Vlasov model are presented. (TEC). 105 refs., 96 figs., 14 tabs.

  4. Hamiltonian fluid closures of the Vlasov-Amp{\\`e}re equations: from water-bags to N moment models

    CERN Document Server

    Perin, M; Morrison, P J; Tassi, E

    2015-01-01

    Moment closures of the Vlasov-Amp{\\`e}re system, whereby higher moments are represented as functions of lower moments with the constraint that the resulting fluid system remains Hamiltonian, are investigated by using water-bag theory. The link between the water-bag formalism and fluid models that involve density, fluid velocity, pressure and higher moments is established by introducing suitable thermodynamic variables. The cases of one, two and three water-bags are treated and their Hamiltonian structures are provided. In each case, we give the associated fluid closures and we discuss their Casimir invariants. We show how the method can be extended to an arbitrary number of fields, i.e., an arbitrary number of water-bags and associated moments. The thermodynamic interpretation of the resulting models is discussed. Finally, a general procedure to derive Hamiltonian N-field fluid models is proposed.

  5. Proof of the cosmic no-hair conjecture in the T^3-Gowdy symmetric Einstein-Vlasov setting

    CERN Document Server

    Andréasson, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    The currently preferred models of the universe undergo accelerated expansion induced by dark energy. One model for dark energy is a positive cosmological constant. It is consequently of interest to study Einstein's equations with a positive cosmological constant coupled to matter satisfying the ordinary energy conditions; the dominant energy condition etc. Due to the difficulty of analysing the behaviour of solutions to Einstein's equations in general, it is common to either study situations with symmetry, or to prove stability results. In the present paper, we do both. In fact, we analyse, in detail, the future asymptotic behaviour of T^3-Gowdy symmetric solutions to the Einstein-Vlasov equations with a positive cosmological constant. In particular, we prove the cosmic no-hair conjecture in this setting. However, we also prove that the solutions are future stable (in the class of all solutions). Some of the results hold in a more general setting. In fact, we obtain conclusions concerning the causal structure...

  6. Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ngada, N M

    2015-01-01

    The complexity and cost of building and running high-power electrical systems make the use of simulations unavoidable. The simulations available today provide great understanding about how systems really operate. This paper helps the reader to gain an insight into simulation in the field of power converters for particle accelerators. Starting with the definition and basic principles of simulation, two simulation types, as well as their leading tools, are presented: analog and numerical simulations. Some practical applications of each simulation type are also considered. The final conclusion then summarizes the main important items to keep in mind before opting for a simulation tool or before performing a simulation.

  7. The Einstein-Vlasov system in spherical symmetry: reduction of the equations of motion and classification of single-shell static solutions, in the limit of massless particles

    CERN Document Server

    Gundlach, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We express the Einstein-Vlasov system in spherical symmetry in terms of a dimensionless momentum variable $z$ (radial over angular momentum). This regularises the limit of massless particles, and in that limit allows us to obtain a reduced system in independent variables $(t,r,z)$ only. Similarly, in this limit the Vlasov density function $f$ for static solutions depends on a single variable $Q$ (energy over angular momentum). This reduction allows us to show that any given static metric which has vanishing Ricci scalar, is vacuum at the centre and for $r>3M$ and obeys certain energy conditions uniquely determines a consistent $f=\\bar k(Q)$ (in closed form). Vice versa, any $\\bar k(Q)$ within a certain class uniquely determines a static metric (as the solution of a system of two first-order quasilinear ODEs). Hence the space of static spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein-Vlasov is locally a space of functions of one variable. For a simple 2-parameter family of functions $\\bar k(Q)$, we construct the co...

  8. 3D Maxwell-Vlasov boundary value problem solution in stellarator geometry in ion cyclotron frequency range. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovin, V.; Watari, T.; Fukuyama, A.

    1996-12-01

    We develop the theory for the wave excitation, propagation and absorption in 3-dimensional (3D) stellarator equilibrium high beta plasma in ion cyclotron frequency range (ICRF). This theory forms a basis for a 3D code creation, urgently needed for the ICRF heating scenarios development for the constructed LHD and projected W7-X stellarators and for the stellarators being at operation (like CHS, W7-AS, etc.). The theory solves the 3D Maxwell-Vlasov antenna-plasma-conducting shell boundary value problem in the non - orthogonal flux coordinates ({psi}, {theta}, {phi}), {psi} being magnetic flux function, {theta} and {phi} being the poloidal and toroidal angles, respectively. All basic physics, like wave refraction, reflection and diffraction are firstly self consistently included, along with the fundamental ion and ion minority cyclotron resonances, two ion hybrid resonance, electron Landau and TTMP absorption. Antenna reactive impedance and loading resistance are also calculated and urgently needed for an antenna -generator matching. This is accomplished in a real confining magnetic field being varying in a plasma major radius direction, in toroidal and poloidal directions, through making use of the hot dense plasma dielectric kinetic tensor. The theory is developed in a manner that includes tokamaks and magnetic mirrors as the particular cases through general metric tensor (provided by an equilibrium solver) treatment of the wave equations. We describe the structure of newly developed stellarator ICRF 3D full wave code STELION, based on theory described in this report. (J.P.N.)

  9. Global well-posedness and large time behavior of classical solutions to the Vlasov-Fokker-Planck and magnetohydrodynamics equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng

    2017-02-01

    We are concerned with the global well-posedness of the fluid-particle system which describes the evolutions of disperse two-phase flows. The system consists of the Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equation for the dispersed phase (particles) coupled to the compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations modelling a dense phase (fluid) through the friction forcing. Global well-posedness of the Cauchy problem is established in perturbation framework, and rates of convergence of solutions toward equilibrium, which are algebraic in the whole space and exponential on torus, are also obtained under some additional conditions on initial data. The existence of global solution and decay rate of the solution are proved based on the classical energy estimates and Fourier multiplier technique, which are considerably complicated and some new ideas and techniques are thus required. Moreover, it is shown that neither shock waves nor vacuum and concentration in the solution are developed in a finite time although there is a complex interaction between particle and fluid.

  10. AN ASYMPTOTIC PRESERVING SCHEME FOR THE VLASOV-POISSON-FOKKER-PLANCK SYSTEM IN THE HIGH FIELD REGIME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Jin; Li Wang

    2011-01-01

    The Vlasov-Poisson-Fokker-Planck system under the high field scaling describes the Brownian motion of a large system of particles in a surrounding bath where both collision and field effects (electrical or gravitational) are dominant. Numerically solving this system becomes challenging due to the stiff collision term and stiff nonlinear transport term with respect to the high field.We present a class of Asymptotic-Preserving scheme which is efficient in the high field regime,namely,large time steps and coarse meshes can be used,yet the high field limit is still captured.The idea is to combine the two stiff terms and treat them implicitly.Thanks to the linearity of the collision term,using the discretization described in [Jin S,Yan B.J.Comp.Phys.,2011,230:6420-6437]we only need to invert a symmetric matrix.This method can be easily extended to higher dimensions.The method is shown to be positive,stable,mass and asymptotic preserving.Numerical experiments validate its efficiency in both kinetic and high field regimes including mixing regimes.

  11. Vlasov-Poisson in 1D for initially cold systems: post-collapse Lagrangian perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Colombi, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    We study analytically the collapse of an initially smooth, cold, self-gravitating collisionless system in one dimension. The system is described as a central "S" shape in phase-space surrounded by a nearly stationary halo acting locally like a harmonic background on the S. To resolve the dynamics of the S under its self-gravity and under the influence of the halo, we introduce a novel approach using post-collapse Lagrangian perturbation theory. This approach allows us to follow the evolution of the system between successive crossing times and to describe in an iterative way the interplay between the central S and the halo. Our theoretical predictions are checked against measurements in entropy conserving numerical simulations based on the waterbag method. While our post-collapse Lagrangian approach does not allow us to compute rigorously the long term behavior of the system, i.e. after many crossing times, it explains the close to power-law behavior of the projected density observed in numerical simulations. ...

  12. Einstein-Vlasov system in spherical symmetry: Reduction of the equations of motion and classification of single-shell static solutions in the limit of massless particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Carsten

    2016-12-01

    We express the Einstein-Vlasov system in spherical symmetry in terms of a dimensionless momentum variable z (radial over angular momentum). This regularizes the limit of massless particles, and in that limit allows us to obtain a reduced system in independent variables (t ,r ,z ) only. Similarly, in this limit the Vlasov density function f for static solutions depends on a single variable Q (energy over angular momentum). This reduction allows us to show that any given static metric that has vanishing Ricci scalar, is vacuum at the center and for r >3 M and obeys certain energy conditions uniquely determines a consistent f =k ¯(Q ) (in closed form). Vice versa, any k ¯(Q ) within a certain class uniquely determines a static metric (as the solution of a system of two first-order quasilinear ordinary differential equations). Hence the space of static spherically symmetric solutions of the Einstein-Vlasov system is locally a space of functions of one variable. For a simple two-parameter family of functions k ¯(Q ), we construct the corresponding static spherically symmetric solutions, finding that their compactness is in the interval 0.7 ≲maxr(2 M /r )≤8 /9 . This class of static solutions includes one that agrees with the approximately universal type-I critical solution recently found by Akbarian and Choptuik (AC) in numerical time evolutions. We speculate on what singles it out as the critical solution found by fine-tuning generic data to the collapse threshold, given that AC also found that all static solutions are one-parameter unstable and sit on the threshold of collapse.

  13. Flows of non-smooth vector fields and degenerate elliptic equations with applications to the Vlasov-Poisson and semigeostrophic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The first part of the book is devoted to the transport equation for a given vector field, exploiting the lagrangian structure of solutions. It also treats the regularity of solutions of some degenerate elliptic equations, which appear in the eulerian counterpart of some transport models with congestion. The second part of the book deals with the lagrangian structure of solutions of the Vlasov-Poisson system, which describes the evolution of a system of particles under the self-induced gravitational/electrostatic field, and the existence of solutions of the semigeostrophic system, used in meteorology to describe the motion of large-scale oceanic/atmospheric flows.

  14. Uniformly accurate Particle-in-Cell method for the long time solution of the two-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson equation with uniform strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouseilles, Nicolas; Lemou, Mohammed; Méhats, Florian; Zhao, Xiaofei

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we focus on the numerical resolution of the four dimensional phase space Vlasov-Poisson system subject to a uniform strong external magnetic field. To do so, we consider a Particle-in-Cell based method, for which the characteristics are reformulated by means of the two-scale formalism, which is well-adapted to handle highly-oscillatory equations. Then, a numerical scheme is derived for the two-scale equations. The so-obtained scheme enjoys a uniform accuracy property, meaning that its accuracy does not depend on the small parameter. Several numerical results illustrate the capabilities of the method.

  15. Vlasov modelling of laser-driven collisionless shock acceleration of protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svedung Wettervik, B.; DuBois, T. C.; Fülöp, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-05-15

    Ion acceleration due to the interaction between a short high-intensity laser pulse and a moderately overdense plasma target is studied using Eulerian Vlasov–Maxwell simulations. The effects of variations in the plasma density profile and laser pulse parameters are investigated, and the interplay of collisionless shock and target normal sheath acceleration is analyzed. It is shown that the use of a layered-target with a combination of light and heavy ions, on the front and rear side, respectively, yields a strong quasi-static sheath-field on the rear side of the heavy-ion part of the target. This sheath-field increases the energy of the shock-accelerated ions while preserving their mono-energeticity.

  16. Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gould, Derek A; Chalmers, Nicholas; Johnson, Sheena J

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable p...... performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used.......Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable...

  17. Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sheldon

    2006-01-01

    Ross's Simulation, Fourth Edition introduces aspiring and practicing actuaries, engineers, computer scientists and others to the practical aspects of constructing computerized simulation studies to analyze and interpret real phenomena. Readers learn to apply results of these analyses to problems in a wide variety of fields to obtain effective, accurate solutions and make predictions about future outcomes. This text explains how a computer can be used to generate random numbers, and how to use these random numbers to generate the behavior of a stochastic model over time. It presents the statist

  18. Simulation of 2D Kinetic Effects in Plasmas using the Grid Based Continuum Code LOKI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jeffrey; Berger, Richard; Chapman, Tom; Brunner, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Kinetic simulation of multi-dimensional plasma waves through direct discretization of the Vlasov equation is a useful tool to study many physical interactions and is particularly attractive for situations where minimal fluctuation levels are desired, for instance, when measuring growth rates of plasma wave instabilities. However, direct discretization of phase space can be computationally expensive, and as a result there are few examples of published results using Vlasov codes in more than a single configuration space dimension. In an effort to fill this gap we have developed the Eulerian-based kinetic code LOKI that evolves the Vlasov-Poisson system in 2+2-dimensional phase space. The code is designed to reduce the cost of phase-space computation by using fully 4th order accurate conservative finite differencing, while retaining excellent parallel scalability that efficiently uses large scale computing resources. In this poster I will discuss the algorithms used in the code as well as some aspects of their parallel implementation using MPI. I will also overview simulation results of basic plasma wave instabilities relevant to laser plasma interaction, which have been obtained using the code.

  19. Hybrid (kinetic-fluid) simulation scheme based on method of characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Javaheri, N; Abbasi, H

    2015-01-01

    Certain features of the method of characteristics are of considerable interest in relation with Vlasov simulation [H. Abbasi {\\it et al}, Phys. Rev. E \\textbf{84}, 036702 (2011)]. A Vlasov simulation scheme of this kind can be recurrence free providing initial phase points in velocity space are set randomly. Naturally, less filtering of fine-structures (arising from grid spacing) is possible as there is now a smaller scale than the grid spacing that is average distance between two phase points. Its interpolation scheme is very simple in form and carried out with less operations. In our previous report, the simplest model (immobile ions) was considered to merely demonstrate the important features. Now, a hybrid model is introduced that solves the coupled Vlasov-Fluid-Poisson system self-consistently. A possible application of the code is the study of ion-acoustic (IA) soliton attributes. To this end, a collisionless plasma with hot electrons and cold positive ions is considered. For electrons, the collisionles...

  20. iVPIC: A low-­dispersion, energy-­conserving relativistic PIC solver for LPI simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon, Luis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-07

    We have developed a novel low-­dispersion, exactly energy-­conserving PIC algorithm for the relativistic Vlasov-­Maxwell system. The approach features an exact energy conservation theorem while preserving the favorable performance and numerical dispersion properties of explicit PIC. The new algorithm has the potential to enable much longer laser-­plasma-­interaction (LPI) simulations than are currently possible.

  1. Stabilit\\'e orbitale pour le syst\\`eme de Vlasov-Poisson gravitationnel, d'apr\\`es Lemou-M\\'ehats-Rapha\\"el, Guo, Lin, Rein et al. [Orbital stability for the gravitational Vlasov-Poisson system, after Lemou-M\\'ehats-Rapha\\"el, Guo, Lin, Rein et al.

    CERN Document Server

    Mouhot, Clément

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent mathematical progresses made on the study of the orbital stability properties for the gravitational Vlasov-Poisson system. We present in details the paper of Lemou, M\\'ehats and Rapha\\"el (Inventiones 2011) and we review also the previous works by Dolbeault, Guo, Hadzic, Lin, Rein, S\\'anchez, Soler, Wan, Wolansky. We also include a discussion of the history of this topic and the pioneering works by physicists like Antonov, Lynden-Bell and Aly. This is the text of a Bourbaki seminar given in november 2011 (in french).

  2. Weak turbulence theory and simulation of the gyro-water-bag model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Nicolas; Bertrand, Pierre; Morel, Pierre; Gravier, Etienne

    2008-05-01

    The thermal confinement time of a magnetized fusion plasma is essentially determined by turbulent heat conduction across the equilibrium magnetic field. To achieve the study of turbulent thermal diffusivities, Vlasov gyrokinetic description of the magnetically confined plasmas is now commonly adopted, and offers the advantage over fluid models (MHD, gyrofluid) to take into account nonlinear resonant wave-particle interactions which may impact significantly the predicted turbulent transport. Nevertheless kinetic codes require a huge amount of computer resources and this constitutes the main drawback of this approach. A unifying approach is to consider the water-bag representation of the statistical distribution function because it allows us to keep the underlying kinetic features of the problem, while reducing the Vlasov kinetic model into a set of hydrodynamic equations, resulting in a numerical cost comparable to that needed for solving multifluid models. The present paper addresses the gyro-water-bag model derived as a water-bag-like weak solution of the Vlasov gyrokinetic models. We propose a quasilinear analysis of this model to retrieve transport coefficients allowing us to estimate turbulent thermal diffusivities without computing the full fluctuations. We next derive another self-consistent quasilinear model, suitable for numerical simulation, that we approximate by means of discontinuous Galerkin methods.

  3. The Vlasov formalism for extended relativistic mean field models: the crust-core transition and the stellar matter equation of state

    CERN Document Server

    Pais, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The Vlasov formalism is extended to relativistic mean-field hadron models with non-linear terms up to fourth order and applied to the calculation of the crust-core transition density. The effect of the nonlinear $\\omega\\rho$ and $\\sigma\\rho$ coupling terms on the crust-core transition density and pressure, and on the macroscopic properties of some families of hadronic stars is investigated. For that purpose, six families of relativistic mean field models are considered. Within each family, the members differ in the symmetry energy behavior. For all the models, the dynamical spinodals are calculated, and the crust-core transition density and pressure, and the neutron star mass-radius relations are obtained. The effect on the star radius of the inclusion of a pasta calculation in the inner crust is discussed. The set of six models that best satisfy terrestrial and observational constraints predicts a radius of 13.6$\\pm$0.3 km and a crust thickness of $1.36\\pm 0.06$km for a 1.4 $M_\\odot$ star.

  4. Accuracy analysis of a 2D Poisson-Vlasov PIC solver and estimates of the collisional effects in space charge dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bazzani, A; Franchi, A; Rambaldi, S; Turchetti, G

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the accuracy of a 2D Poisson-Vlasov PIC integrator, taking the KV as a reference solution for a FODO cell. The particle evolution is symplectic and the Poisson solver is based on FFT. The numerical error, evaluated by comparing the moments of the distribution and the electric field with the exact solution, shows a linear growth. This effect can be modeled by a white noise in the envelope equations for the KV beam. In order to investigate the collisional effects we have integrated the Hamilton's equations for N charged macro-particles with a hard-core r/sub H/ reducing the computational complexity to N/sup 3/2/. In the constant focusing case we observed that a KV beam, matched or mismatched relaxes to the Maxwell-Boltzmann self consistent distribution on a time interval, which depends on r/sub H/ and has a finite limit, for r/sub H/ to 0. A fully 3D PIC code for short bunches was developed for the ADS linac design at LNL (Italy). A 3D particle-core model, based on Langevin's equations with the drift...

  5. A 4th-Order Particle-in-Cell Method with Phase-Space Remapping for the Vlasov-Poisson Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Andrew; Van Straalen, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Numerical solutions to the Vlasov-Poisson system of equations have important applications to both plasma physics and cosmology. In this paper, we present a new Particle-in-Cell (PIC) method for solving this system that is 4th-order accurate in both space and time. Our method is a high-order extension of one presented previously [B. Wang, G. Miller, and P. Colella, SIAM J. Sci. Comput., 33 (2011), pp. 3509--3537]. It treats all of the stages of the standard PIC update - charge deposition, force interpolation, the field solve, and the particle push - with 4th-order accuracy, and includes a 6th-order accurate phase-space remapping step for controlling particle noise. We demonstrate the convergence of our method on a series of one- and two- dimensional electrostatic plasma test problems, comparing its accuracy to that of a 2nd-order method. As expected, the 4th-order method can achieve comparable accuracy to the 2nd-order method with many fewer resolution elements.

  6. Comparison of different Maxwell solvers coupled to a PIC resolution method of Maxwell-Vlasov equations; Evaluation de differents solveurs Maxwell pour la resolution de Maxwell-Vlasov par une methode PIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fochesato, Ch. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Dept. de Conception et Simulation des Armes, Service Simulation des Amorces, Lab. Logiciels de Simulation, 91 (France); Bouche, D. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Dept. de Physique Theorique et Appliquee, Lab. de Recherche Conventionne, Centre de Mathematiques et Leurs Applications, 91 (France)

    2007-07-01

    The numerical solution of Maxwell equations is a challenging task. Moreover, the range of applications is very wide: microwave devices, diffraction, to cite a few. As a result, a number of methods have been proposed since the sixties. However, among all these methods, none has proved to be free of drawbacks. The finite difference scheme proposed by Yee in 1966, is well suited for Maxwell equations. However, it only works on cubical mesh. As a result, the boundaries of complex objects are not properly handled by the scheme. When classical nodal finite elements are used, spurious modes appear, which spoil the results of simulations. Edge elements overcome this problem, at the price of rather complex implementation, and computationally intensive simulations. Finite volume methods, either generalizing Yee scheme to a wider class of meshes, or applying to Maxwell equations methods initially used in the field of hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, are also used. Lastly, 'Discontinuous Galerkin' methods, generalizing to arbitrary order of accuracy finite volume methods, have recently been applied to Maxwell equations. In this report, we more specifically focus on the coupling of a Maxwell solver to a PIC (Particle-in-cell) method. We analyze advantages and drawbacks of the most widely used methods: accuracy, robustness, sensitivity to numerical artefacts, efficiency, user judgment. (authors)

  7. Numerical simulation of whistler-triggered VLF emissions observed in Antartica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunn, D. [Southhampton Univ., Southhampton (United Kingdom); Smith, A.J. [British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    The authors have extracted from VLF databases from British Antarctica Survey data taken at Halley and Faraday stations, examples of whistler-triggered emissions (WTE). The WTE are relatively narrow band emissions triggered by natural background whistlers undergoing nonlinear wave particle interactions generally in the equatorial regions. They occur with either rising or falling frequency relative to the triggering waves. Using a Vlasov type code the authors are able to simulate the types of emissions which are observed. 24 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Generation of Initial Kinetic Distributions for Simulation of Long-Pulse Charged Particle Beams with High Space-Charge intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Steven M.; Kikuchi, Takashi; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2007-04-03

    Self-consistent Vlasov-Poisson simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel--both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of kinetic distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of unbunched or weakly bunched beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial kinetic distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

  9. Multidimensional, fully implicit, exactly conserving electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Luis

    2015-09-01

    We discuss a new, conservative, fully implicit 2D-3V particle-in-cell algorithm for non-radiative, electromagnetic kinetic plasma simulations, based on the Vlasov-Darwin model. Unlike earlier linearly implicit PIC schemes and standard explicit PIC schemes, fully implicit PIC algorithms are unconditionally stable and allow exact discrete energy and charge conservation. This has been demonstrated in 1D electrostatic and electromagnetic contexts. In this study, we build on these recent algorithms to develop an implicit, orbit-averaged, time-space-centered finite difference scheme for the Darwin field and particle orbit equations for multiple species in multiple dimensions. The Vlasov-Darwin model is very attractive for PIC simulations because it avoids radiative noise issues in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes. The algorithm conserves global energy, local charge, and particle canonical-momentum exactly, even with grid packing. The nonlinear iteration is effectively accelerated with a fluid preconditioner, which allows efficient use of large timesteps, O(√{mi/me}c/veT) larger than the explicit CFL. In this presentation, we will introduce the main algorithmic components of the approach, and demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with various numerical experiments in 1D and 2D. Support from the LANL LDRD program and the DOE-SC ASCR office.

  10. Kinetic features revealed by top-hat electrostatic analysers: numerical simulations and instrument response results

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Rossana; Marcucci, Maria Federica; Brienza, Daniele; Bruno, Roberto; Consolini, Giuseppe; Perrone, Denise; Valentini, Franceso; Servidio, Sergio; Stabile, Sara; Pezzi, Oreste; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Lavraud, Benoit; De Keyser, Johan; Retinò, Alessandro; Fazakerley, Andrew; Wicks, Robert; Vaivads, Andris; Salatti, Mario; Veltri, Pierliugi

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission devoted to study energization, acceleration and heating of turbulent space plasmas, and designed to perform field and particle measurements at kinetic scales in different near-Earth regions and in the solar wind. Solar Orbiter (SolO), together with Solar Probe Plus, will provide the first comprehensive remote and in situ measurements which are critical to establish the fundamental physical links between the Sun's dynamic atmosphere and the turbulent solar wind. The fundamental process of turbulent dissipation is mediated by physical mechanism that occur at a variety of temporal and spatial scales, and most efficiently at the kinetics scales. Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations of solar-wind turbulence show that kinetic effects manifest as particle beams, production of temperature anisotropies and ring-like modulations, preferential heating of heavy ions. We use a numerical code able to reproduce the response of a typical electrostatic analyzer of top-hat type starting from velocity distribution functions (VDFs) generated by Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) numerical simulations. Here, we show how optimized particle measurements by top-hat analysers can capture the kinetic features injected by turbulence in the VDFs.

  11. A new framework for magnetohydrodynamic simulations with anisotropic pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Hirabayashi, Kota; Amano, Takanobu

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new theoretical and numerical framework of the magnetohydrodynamic simulation incorporated with an anisotropic pressure tensor, which can play an important role in a collisionless plasma. A classical approach to handle the anisotropy is based on the double adiabatic approximation assuming that a pressure tensor is well described only by the components parallel and perpendicular to the local magnetic field. This gyrotropic assumption, however, fails around a magnetically neutral region, where the cyclotron period may get comparable to or even longer than a dynamical time in a system, and causes a singularity in the mathematical expression. In this paper, we demonstrate that this singularity can be completely removed away by the combination of direct use of the 2nd-moment of the Vlasov equation and an ingenious gyrotropization model. Numerical tests also verify that the present model properly reduces to the standard MHD or the double adiabatic formulation in an asymptotic manner under an appropria...

  12. Three-dimensional multispecies nonlinear perturbative particle simulations of collective processes in intense particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Collective processes in intense charged particle beams described self-consistently by the Vlasov-Maxwell equations are studied using a 3D multispecies nonlinear perturbative particle simulation method. The newly developed beam equilibrium, stability, and transport (BEST code is used to simulate the nonlinear stability properties of intense beam propagation, surface eigenmodes in a high-intensity beam, and the electron-proton (e-p two-stream instability observed in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR experiment. Detailed simulations in a parameter regime characteristic of the PSR experiment show that the dipole-mode two-stream instability is stabilized by a modest spread (about 0.1% in axial momentum of the beam particles.

  13. Kinetic simulations and reduced modeling of longitudinal sideband instabilities in non-linear electron plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, S. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, (Switzerland); Berger, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cohen, B. I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hausammann, L. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, (Switzerland); Valeo, E. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Kinetic Vlasov simulations of one-dimensional finite amplitude Electron Plasma Waves are performed in a multi-wavelength long system. A systematic study of the most unstable linear sideband mode, in particular its growth rate γ and quasi- wavenumber δk, is carried out by scanning the amplitude and wavenumber of the initial wave. Simulation results are successfully compared against numerical and analytical solutions to the reduced model by Kruer et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 23, 838 (1969)] for the Trapped Particle Instability (TPI). A model recently suggested by Dodin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 215006 (2013)], which in addition to the TPI accounts for the so-called Negative Mass Instability because of a more detailed representation of the trapped particle dynamics, is also studied and compared with simulations.

  14. Kinetic description of electron-proton instability in high-intensity proton linacs and storage rings based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald C. Davidson

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The present analysis makes use of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations to develop a fully kinetic description of the electrostatic, electron-ion two-stream instability driven by the directed axial motion of a high-intensity ion beam propagating in the z direction with average axial momentum γ_{b}m_{b}β_{b}c through a stationary population of background electrons. The ion beam has characteristic radius r_{b} and is treated as continuous in the z direction, and the applied transverse focusing force on the beam ions is modeled by F_{foc}^{b}=-γ_{b}m_{b}ω_{βb}^{0^{2}}x_{⊥} in the smooth-focusing approximation. Here, ω_{βb}^{0}=const is the effective betatron frequency associated with the applied focusing field, x_{⊥} is the transverse displacement from the beam axis, (γ_{b}-1m_{b}c^{2} is the ion kinetic energy, and V_{b}=β_{b}c is the average axial velocity, where γ_{b}=(1-β_{b}^{2}^{-1/2}. Furthermore, the ion motion in the beam frame is assumed to be nonrelativistic, and the electron motion in the laboratory frame is assumed to be nonrelativistic. The ion charge and number density are denoted by +Z_{b}e and n_{b}, and the electron charge and number density by -e and n_{e}. For Z_{b}n_{b}>n_{e}, the electrons are electrostatically confined in the transverse direction by the space-charge potential φ produced by the excess ion charge. The equilibrium and stability analysis retains the effects of finite radial geometry transverse to the beam propagation direction, including the presence of a perfectly conducting cylindrical wall located at radius r=r_{w}. In addition, the analysis assumes perturbations with long axial wavelength, k_{z}^{2}r_{b}^{2}≪1, and sufficiently high frequency that |ω/k_{z}|≫v_{Tez} and |ω/k_{z}-V_{b}|≫v_{Tbz}, where v_{Tez} and v_{Tbz} are the characteristic axial thermal speeds of the background electrons and beam ions. In this regime, Landau damping (in axial velocity space v_{z} by resonant ions and

  15. Guiding-center models for edge plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, Jens

    2010-09-15

    The work presented in this thesis falls into two categories: development of reduced dynamical models applicable to edge turbulence in magnetically confined fusion plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments in the scrape-off layer region investigating the influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the radial plasma transport. The coexistence of low-frequency fluctuations, having length scales comparable to the ion gyroradius, steep pressure gradients and strong E x B flows in the edge region of fusion plasmas violates the standard gyrokinetic ordering. In this thesis two models are presented that overcome some of the difficulties associated with the development of reduced dynamical models applicable to the edge. Second order guiding-center coordinates are derived using the phasespace Lie transform method. Using a variational principle the corresponding Vlasov-Maxwell equations expressed in guiding-center coordinates are derived including a local energy theorem. The second order terms describe lowest order finite Larmor radius effects. This set of equations might be relevant for edge plasmas due to the capability of capturing strong E x B flows and lowest order finite Larmor radius effects self-consistently. Next, an extension of the existing gyrokinetic formalism with strong flows is presented. In this work the background electric fields is dynamical, whereas earlier contributions did only incorporate a stationary electric field. In an ordering relevant for edge plasma turbulence, fully electromagnetic second order gyrokinetic coordinates and the corresponding gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations are derived, including a local energy theorem. By taking the polarization and magnetization densities in the drift kinetic limit, we present the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations in a more tractable form, which could be relevant for direct numerical simulations of edge plasma turbulence. Finally, an investigation of the influence of finite Larmor

  16. Numerical and laboratory simulations of auroral acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunell, H.; De Keyser, J. [1Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Mann, I. [EISCAT Scientific Association, P.O. Box 812, SE-981 28 Kiruna, Sweden and Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden)

    2013-10-15

    The existence of parallel electric fields is an essential ingredient of auroral physics, leading to the acceleration of particles that give rise to the auroral displays. An auroral flux tube is modelled using electrostatic Vlasov simulations, and the results are compared to simulations of a proposed laboratory device that is meant for studies of the plasma physical processes that occur on auroral field lines. The hot magnetospheric plasma is represented by a gas discharge plasma source in the laboratory device, and the cold plasma mimicking the ionospheric plasma is generated by a Q-machine source. In both systems, double layers form with plasma density gradients concentrated on their high potential sides. The systems differ regarding the properties of ion acoustic waves that are heavily damped in the magnetosphere, where the ion population is hot, but weakly damped in the laboratory, where the discharge ions are cold. Ion waves are excited by the ion beam that is created by acceleration in the double layer in both systems. The efficiency of this beam-plasma interaction depends on the acceleration voltage. For voltages where the interaction is less efficient, the laboratory experiment is more space-like.

  17. SpectralPlasmaSolver: a Spectral Code for Multiscale Simulations of Collisionless, Magnetized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vencels, Juris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Manzini, Gianmarco; Markidis, Stefano; Peng, Ivy Bo; Roytershteyn, Vadim

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and implementation of a spectral code, called SpectralPlasmaSolver (SPS), for the solution of the multi-dimensional Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The method is based on a Hermite-Fourier decomposition of the particle distribution function. The code is written in Fortran and uses the PETSc library for solving the non-linear equations and preconditioning and the FFTW library for the convolutions. SPS is parallelized for shared- memory machines using OpenMP. As a verification example, we discuss simulations of the two-dimensional Orszag-Tang vortex problem and successfully compare them against a fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell simulation. An assessment of the performance of the code is presented, showing a significant improvement in the code running-time achieved by preconditioning, while strong scaling tests show a factor of 10 speed-up using 16 threads.

  18. Guiding-center models for edge plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens

    The work presented in this thesis falls into two categories: development of reduced dynamical models applicable to edge turbulence in magnetically confined fusion plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments in the scrape-off layer region investigating the influence of finite...... models are presented that overcome some of the difficulties associated with the development of reduced dynamical models applicable to the edge. Second order guiding-center coordinates are derived using the phasespace Lie transform method. Using a variational principle the corresponding Vlasov......-Maxwell equations in a more tractable form, which could be relevant for direct numerical simulations of edge plasma turbulence. Finally, an investigation of the influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the radial transport of isolated plasma filaments (blobs) in the scrape-off region of fusion plasmas...

  19. Numerical Simulation of the Time Evolution of Small-Scale Irregularities in the F-Layer Ionospheric Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Mingalev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of magnetic field-aligned small-scale irregularities in the electron concentration, existing in the F-layer ionospheric plasma, is investigated with the help of a mathematical model. The plasma is assumed to be a rarefied compound consisting of electrons and positive ions and being in a strong, external magnetic field. In the applied model, kinetic processes in the plasma are simulated by using the Vlasov-Poisson system of equations. The system of equations is numerically solved applying a macroparticle method. The time evolution of a plasma irregularity, having initial cross-section dimension commensurable with a Debye length, is simulated during the period sufficient for the irregularity to decay completely. The results of simulation indicate that the small-scale irregularity, created initially in the F-region ionosphere, decays accomplishing periodic damped vibrations, with the process being collisionless.

  20. On the influence of initial state on gyrokinetic simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Grandgirard, P; Sarazin, P; Garbet, P; Ghendrih, Philippe; Angelino, P

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The influence of the initial state on the turbulence and transport is addressed in collisionless, global, and full-f gyrokinetic simulations solving both the equilibrium and the fluctuations. For two strongly differing initial states, it is found that the steady turbulent regime exhibits nearly identical statistical properties. This result is in marked contrast with the claim of different final states. In fact, a long transient with very different properties finally ev...

  1. Numerical methods for the simulation of particle generated electromagnetic fields in acclerator physics; Numerische Methoden zur Simulation teilchengenerierter elektromagnetischer Felder in der Beschleunigerphysik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, T.

    2006-07-18

    In this work modifications of the classical Particle-In-Cell method for the solution of the Maxwell-Vlasov equations are investigated with respect to their application in particle accelerator physics. The aim of the work is to find modifications of the method which minimize and under certain conditions even eliminate the numerical dispersion effect along the beam axis in the numerical solution of Maxwell's equations. This is achieved by the development of dedicated time-integration methods for the Finite Integration Technique and two Finite Volume Methods. The methods are theoretically investigated regarding the conservation of a discrete energy and the existence of a discrete continuity equation. Finally, some of the methods are applied to the simulation of a high frequency rf-gun. (orig.)

  2. ULF foreshock under radial IMF: THEMIS observations and global kinetic simulation Vlasiator results compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmroth, Minna; Rami, Vainio; Archer, Martin; Hietala, Heli; Afanasiev, Alexandr; Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    For decades, a certain type of ultra low frequency waves with a period of about 30 seconds have been observed in the Earth's quasi-parallel foreshock. These waves, with a wavelength of about an Earth radius, are compressive and propagate with an average angle of 20 degrees with respect of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The latter property has caused trouble to scientists as the growth rate for the instability causing the waves is maximized along the magnetic field. So far, these waves have been characterized by single or multi-spacecraft methods and 2-dimensional hybrid-PIC simulations, which have not fully reproduced the wave properties. Vlasiator is a newly developed, global hybrid-Vlasov simulation, which solves the six-dimensional phase space utilising the Vlasov equation for protons, while electrons are a charge-neutralising fluid. The outcome of the simulation is a global reproduction of ion-scale physics in a holistic manner where the generation of physical features can be followed in time and their consequences can be quantitatively characterised. Vlasiator produces the ion distribution functions and the related kinetic physics in unprecedented detail, in the global scale magnetospheric scale with a resolution of a couple of hundred kilometres in the ordinary space and 20 km/s in the velocity space. We run Vlasiator under a radial IMF in five dimensions consisting of the three-dimensional velocity space embedded in the ecliptic plane. We observe the generation of the 30-second ULF waves, and characterize their evolution and physical properties in time. We compare the results both to THEMIS observations and to the quasi-linear theory. We find that Vlasiator reproduces the foreshock ULF waves in all reported observational aspects, i.e., they are of the observed size in wavelength and period, they are compressive and propagate obliquely to the IMF. In particular, we discuss the issues related to the long-standing question of oblique propagation.

  3. A methodology for the rigorous verification of plasma simulation codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Fabio

    2016-10-01

    The methodology used to assess the reliability of numerical simulation codes constitutes the Verification and Validation (V&V) procedure. V&V is composed by two separate tasks: the verification, which is a mathematical issue targeted to assess that the physical model is correctly solved, and the validation, which determines the consistency of the code results, and therefore of the physical model, with experimental data. In the present talk we focus our attention on the verification, which in turn is composed by the code verification, targeted to assess that a physical model is correctly implemented in a simulation code, and the solution verification, that quantifies the numerical error affecting a simulation. Bridging the gap between plasma physics and other scientific domains, we introduced for the first time in our domain a rigorous methodology for the code verification, based on the method of manufactured solutions, as well as a solution verification based on the Richardson extrapolation. This methodology was applied to GBS, a three-dimensional fluid code based on a finite difference scheme, used to investigate the plasma turbulence in basic plasma physics experiments and in the tokamak scrape-off layer. Overcoming the difficulty of dealing with a numerical method intrinsically affected by statistical noise, we have now generalized the rigorous verification methodology to simulation codes based on the particle-in-cell algorithm, which are employed to solve Vlasov equation in the investigation of a number of plasma physics phenomena.

  4. Simulations of ionospheric turbulence produced by HF heating near the upper hybrid layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmi, A.; Eliasson, B.; Shao, X.; Milikh, G. M.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2016-06-01

    Heating of the ionosphere by high-frequency (HF), ordinary (O) mode electromagnetic waves can excite magnetic field-aligned density striations, associated with upper and lower hybrid turbulence and electron heating. We have used Vlasov simulations in one spatial and two velocity dimensions to study the induced turbulence in the presence of striations when the O-mode pump is mode converted to large-amplitude upper hybrid oscillations trapped in a striation. Parametric processes give rise to upper and lower hybrid turbulence, as well as to large amplitude, short wavelength electron Bernstein waves. The latter excite stochastic electron heating when their amplitudes exceed a threshold for stochasticity, leading to a rapid increase of the electron temperature by several thousands of kelvin. The results have relevance for high-latitude heating experiments.

  5. Numerical Simulation for One Dimensional Steady Quasineutral Hybrid Model of Stationary Plasma Thruster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Daren; Wu Zhiwen; Wu Xiaoling

    2005-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the physical mechanism of the Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT), an integral equation describing the ion density of the steady SPT and the ion velocity distribution function at an arbitrary axial position of the steady SPT channel are derived. The integral equation is equivalent to the Vlasov equation, but the former is simpler than the latter. A one dimensional steady quasineutral hybrid model is established. In this model, ions are described by the above integral equation, and neutrals and electrons are described by hydrodynamic equations. The transferred equivalency to the differential equation and the integral equation, together with other equations, are solved by an ordinary differential equation (ODE) solver in the Matlab.The numerical simulation results show that under various circumstances, the ion average velocity would be different and needs to be deduced separately.

  6. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection with a Non-Uniform Guide Field

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Fiona; Hesse, Michael; Harrison, Michael G; Stark, Craig R

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented of a first study of collisionless magnetic reconnection starting from a recently found exact nonlinear force-free Vlasov-Maxwell equilibrium. The initial state has a Harris sheet magnetic field profile in one direction and a non-uniform guide field in a second direction, resulting in a spatially constant magnetic field strength as well as a constant initial plasma density and plasma pressure. It is found that the reconnection process initially resembles guide field reconnection, but that a gradual transition to anti-parallel reconnection happens as the system evolves. The time evolution of a number of plasma parameters is investigated, and the results are compared with simulations starting from a Harris sheet equilibrium and a Harris sheet plus constant guide field equilibrium.

  7. Continuum Edge Gyrokinetic Theory and Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X Q; Xiong, Z; Dorr, M R; Hittinger, J A; Bodi, K; Candy, J; Cohen, B I; Cohen, R H; Colella, P; Kerbel, G D; Krasheninnikov, S; Nevins, W M; Qin, H; Rognlien, T D; Snyder, P B; Umansky, M V

    2007-01-09

    The following results are presented from the development and application of TEMPEST, a fully nonlinear (full-f) five dimensional (3d2v) gyrokinetic continuum edge-plasma code. (1) As a test of the interaction of collisions and parallel streaming, TEMPEST is compared with published analytic and numerical results for endloss of particles confined by combined electrostatic and magnetic wells. Good agreement is found over a wide range of collisionality, confining potential, and mirror ratio; and the required velocity space resolution is modest. (2) In a large-aspect-ratio circular geometry, excellent agreement is found for a neoclassical equilibrium with parallel ion flow in the banana regime with zero temperature gradient and radial electric field. (3) The four-dimensional (2d2v) version of the code produces the first self-consistent simulation results of collisionless damping of geodesic acoustic modes and zonal flow (Rosenbluth-Hinton residual) with Boltzmann electrons using a full-f code. The electric field is also found to agree with the standard neoclassical expression for steep density and ion temperature gradients in the banana regime. In divertor geometry, it is found that the endloss of particles and energy induces parallel flow stronger than the core neoclassical predictions in the SOL. (5) Our 5D gyrokinetic formulation yields a set of nonlinear electrostatic gyrokinetic equations that are for both neoclassical and turbulence simulations.

  8. An energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic 1D-3V Vlasov-Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Guangye

    2013-01-01

    A recent proof-of-principle study proposes a nonlinear electrostatic implicit particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in one dimension (Chen, Chacon, Barnes, J. Comput. Phys. 230 (2011) 7018). The algorithm employs a kinetically enslaved Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method, and conserves energy and charge to numerical round-off. In this study, we generalize the method to electromagnetic simulations in 1D using the Darwin approximation of Maxwell's equations, which avoids radiative aliasing noise issues by ordering out the light wave. An implicit, orbit-averaged time-space-centered finite difference scheme is applied to both the 1D Darwin field equations (in potential form) and the 1D-3V particle orbit equations to produce a discrete system that remains exactly charge- and energy-conserving. Furthermore, enabled by the implicit Darwin equations, exact conservation of the canonical momentum per particle in any ignorable direction is enforced via a suitable scattering rule for the magnetic field. Several 1D numer...

  9. Mathematical modeling and numerical study of a spray in a rarefied gas. Application to the simulation of dust particle transport in ITER in case of vacuum loss accident; Modelisation mathematique et etude numerique d'un aerosol dans un gaz rarefie. Application a la simulation du transport de particules de poussiere en cas d'accident de perte de vide dans ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, F.

    2009-11-15

    The thesis deals with kinetic models describing a rarefied spray. These models rely on coupling two Partial Differential Equations which describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the distribution of molecules and dust particles. The model presented in the first part is described by two Boltzmann-type equations where collisions between molecules and particles are modeled by two collision operators. We suggest two models of this collision operators. In the first one, collisions between dust particles and molecules are supposed to be elastic. In the second one, we assume those collisions are inelastic and given by a diffuse reflexion mechanism on the surface of dust specks. This leads to establish non classical collision operators. We prove that in the case of elastic collisions, the spatially homogeneous system has weak solutions which preserve mass and energy, and which satisfy an entropy inequality. We then describe the numerical simulation of the inelastic model, which is based on a Direct Simulation Method. This brings to light that the numerical simulation of the system becomes too expensive because the typical size of a dust particle is too large. We therefore introduce in the second part of this work a model constituted of a coupling (by a drag force term) between a Boltzmann equation and a Vlasov equation. To this end, we perform a scaling of the Boltzmann/Boltzmann system and an asymptotic expansion of one of the dimensionless collision operators with respect to the ratio of mass between a molecule of gas and a particle. A rigorous proof of the passage to the limit is given in the spatially homogeneous setting, for the elastic model of collision operators. It includes a new variant of Povzner's inequality in which the vanishing mass ratio is taken into account. Moreover, we numerically compare the Boltzmann/Boltzmann and Vlasov/Boltzmann systems with the inelastic collision operators. The simulation of the Vlasov equation is performed with a Particle

  10. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  11. Canonical symplectic particle-in-cell method for long-term large-scale simulations of the Vlasov–Maxwell equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; Xiao, Jianyuan; Zhang, Ruili; He, Yang; Wang, Yulei; Sun, Yajuan; Burby, Joshua W.; Ellison, Leland; Zhou, Yao

    2015-12-14

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is the most important numerical tool in plasma physics. However, its long-term accuracy has not been established. To overcome this difficulty, we developed a canonical symplectic PIC method for the Vlasov-Maxwell system by discretising its canonical Poisson bracket. A fast local algorithm to solve the symplectic implicit time advance is discovered without root searching or global matrix inversion, enabling applications of the proposed method to very large-scale plasma simulations with many, e.g. 10(9), degrees of freedom. The long-term accuracy and fidelity of the algorithm enables us to numerically confirm Mouhot and Villani's theory and conjecture on nonlinear Landau damping over several orders of magnitude using the PIC method, and to calculate the nonlinear evolution of the reflectivity during the mode conversion process from extraordinary waves to Bernstein waves.

  12. A multi-species collisional operator for full-F gyrokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estève, D.; Garbet, X.; Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Latu, G.; Norscini, C.

    2015-12-01

    A linearized multi-species collision operator has been developed for an efficient implementation in gyrokinetic codes. This operator satisfies the main expected properties: particle, momentum, and energy conservation, and existence of an H-theorem. A gyrokinetic version is then calculated, which involves derivatives with respect to the gyrocenter position, parallel velocity, and magnetic momentum. An isotropic version in the velocity space can be constructed for the specific problem of trace impurities colliding with a main species. A simpler version that involves derivatives with parallel velocity only has been developed. This reduced version has been implemented in the GYSELA gyrokinetic code, and is shown to comply with particle, momentum, and energy conservation laws. Moreover, the interspecies relaxation rates for momentum and energy agree very well with the theoretical values.

  13. A multi-species collisional operator for full-F gyrokinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estève, D.; Garbet, X.; Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Latu, G.; Norscini, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance cedex (France)

    2015-12-15

    A linearized multi-species collision operator has been developed for an efficient implementation in gyrokinetic codes. This operator satisfies the main expected properties: particle, momentum, and energy conservation, and existence of an H-theorem. A gyrokinetic version is then calculated, which involves derivatives with respect to the gyrocenter position, parallel velocity, and magnetic momentum. An isotropic version in the velocity space can be constructed for the specific problem of trace impurities colliding with a main species. A simpler version that involves derivatives with parallel velocity only has been developed. This reduced version has been implemented in the GYSELA gyrokinetic code, and is shown to comply with particle, momentum, and energy conservation laws. Moreover, the interspecies relaxation rates for momentum and energy agree very well with the theoretical values.

  14. Global particle in cell simulation of radio frequency waves in tokamak ∖fs20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuley, Animesh; Lin, Z.; Bao, J.; Lau, C.; Sun, G. Y.

    2016-10-01

    We are looking into a new nonlinear kinetic simulation model to study the radio frequency heating and current drive of fusion plasmas using toroidal code GTC. In this model ions are considered as fully kinetic (FK) particles using Vlasov equation and the electrons are treated as drift kinetic (DK) particles using drift kinetic equation. We have benchmarked this numerical model to verify the linear physics of normal modes, conversion of slow and fast waves and its propagation in the core region of the tokamak using the Boozer coordinates. In the nonlinear simulation of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) in a tokamak, parametric decay instability (PDI) is observed where a large amplitude pump wave decays into an IBW sideband and an ion cyclotron quasi-mode (ICQM). The ICQM induces an ion perpendicular heating, with a heating rate proportional to the pump wave intensity. Finally, in the electromagnetic LH simulation, nonlinear wave trapping of electrons is verified and plasma current is nonlinearly driven. Presently we are working on the development of new PIC simulation model using cylindrical coordinates to address the RF wave propagation from the edge of the tokamak to the core region and the parametric instabilities associated with this RF waves. We have verified the cyclotron integrator using Boris push method.

  15. Variational principle for the parallel-symplectic representation of electromagnetic gyrokinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizard, Alain J.

    2017-08-01

    The nonlinear (full-f) electromagnetic gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations are derived in the parallel-symplectic representation from an Eulerian gyrokinetic variational principle. The gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations are shown to possess an exact energy conservation law, which is derived by the Noether method from the gyrokinetic variational principle. Here, the gyrocenter Poisson bracket and the gyrocenter Jacobian contain contributions from the perturbed magnetic field. In the full-f formulation of the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell theory presented here, the gyrocenter parallel-Ampère equation contains a second-order contribution to the gyrocenter current density that is derived from the second-order gyrocenter ponderomotive Hamiltonian.

  16. Kinetic simulations of ladder climbing by electron plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kentaro; Barth, Ido; Kaminski, Erez; Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-05-01

    The energy of plasma waves can be moved up and down the spectrum using chirped modulations of plasma parameters, which can be driven by external fields. Depending on whether the wave spectrum is discrete (bounded plasma) or continuous (boundless plasma), this phenomenon is called ladder climbing (LC) or autoresonant acceleration of plasmons. It was first proposed by Barth et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 075001 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.075001] based on a linear fluid model. In this paper, LC of electron plasma waves is investigated using fully nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations of collisionless bounded plasma. It is shown that, in agreement with the basic theory, plasmons survive substantial transformations of the spectrum and are destroyed only when their wave numbers become large enough to trigger Landau damping. Since nonlinear effects decrease the damping rate, LC is even more efficient when practiced on structures like quasiperiodic Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) waves rather than on Langmuir waves per se.

  17. Test of some numerical limiters for the conservative PSM scheme for 4D Drift-Kinetic simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Guterl, Jerome; Crouseilles, Nicolas; Grandgirard, Virginie; Latu, Guillaume; Mehrenberger, Michel; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work is simulation of magnetised plasmas in the ITER project framework. In this context, Vlasov-Poisson like models are used to simulate core turbulence in the tokamak in a toroidal geometry. This leads to heavy simulation because a 6D dimensional problem has to be solved, 3D in space and 3D in velocity. The model is reduced to a 5D gyrokinetic model, taking advantage of the particular motion of particles due to the presence of a strong magnetic field. However, accurate schemes, parallel algorithms need to be designed to bear these simulations. This paper describes a Hermite formulation of the conservative PSM scheme which is very generic and allows to implement different semi-Lagrangian schemes. We also test and propose numerical limiters which should improve the robustness of the simulations by diminishing spurious oscillations. We only consider here the 4D drift-kinetic model which is the backbone of the 5D gyrokinetic models and relevant to build a robust and accurate numerical method.

  18. Nonlinear delta f Simulations of Collective Effects in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Hong Qi

    2003-01-01

    A nonlinear delta(f) particle simulation method based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations has been recently developed to study collective processes in high-intensity beams, where space-charge and magnetic self-field effects play a critical role in determining the nonlinear beam dynamics. Implemented in the Beam Equilibrium, Stability and Transport (BEST) code [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson, and W.W. Lee, Physical Review -- Special Topics on Accelerator and Beams 3 (2000) 084401; 3 (2000) 109901.], the nonlinear delta(f) method provides a low-noise and self-consistent tool for simulating collective interactions and nonlinear dynamics of high-intensity beams in modern and next-generation accelerators and storage rings, such as the Spallation Neutron Source and heavy ion fusion drivers. A wide range of linear eigenmodes of high-intensity charged-particle beams can be systematically studied using the BEST code. Simulation results for the electron-proton two-stream instability in the Proton Storage Ring experiment [R. Macek, ...

  19. Multi-scale modelling and numerical simulation of electronic kinetic transport; Modelisation et simulation numerique multi-echelle du transport cinetique electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duclous, R

    2009-11-15

    This research thesis which is at the interface between numerical analysis, plasma physics and applied mathematics, deals with the kinetic modelling and numerical simulations of the electron energy transport and deposition in laser-produced plasmas, having in view the processes of fuel assembly to temperature and density conditions necessary to ignite fusion reactions. After a brief review of the processes at play in the collisional kinetic theory of plasmas, with a focus on basic models and methods to implement, couple and validate them, the author focuses on the collective aspect related to the free-streaming electron transport equation in the non-relativistic limit as well as in the relativistic regime. He discusses the numerical development and analysis of the scheme for the Vlasov-Maxwell system, and the selection of a validation procedure and numerical tests. Then, he investigates more specific aspects of the collective transport: the multi-specie transport, submitted to phase-space discontinuities. Dealing with the multi-scale physics of electron transport with collision source terms, he validates the accuracy of a fast Monte Carlo multi-grid solver for the Fokker-Planck-Landau electron-electron collision operator. He reports realistic simulations for the kinetic electron transport in the frame of the shock ignition scheme, the development and validation of a reduced electron transport angular model. He finally explores the relative importance of the processes involving electron-electron collisions at high energy by means a multi-scale reduced model with relativistic Boltzmann terms.

  20. Nonlinear perturbative particle simulation studies of the electron-proton two-stream instability in high intensity proton beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-stream instabilities in intense charged particle beams, described self-consistently by the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations, are studied using a 3D multispecies perturbative particle simulation method. The recently developed Beam Equilibrium, Stability and Transport code is used to simulate the linear and nonlinear properties of the electron-proton (e-p two-stream instability observed in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR experiment for a long, coasting beam. Simulations in a parameter regime characteristic of the PSR experiment show that the e-p instability has a dipole-mode structure, and that the growth rate is an increasing function of beam intensity, but a decreasing function of the longitudinal momentum spread. It is also shown that the instability threshold decreases with increasing fractional charge neutralization and increases with increasing axial momentum spread of the beam particles. In the nonlinear phase, the simulations show that the proton density perturbation first saturates at a relatively low level and subsequently grows to a higher level. Finally, the nonlinear space-charge-induced transverse tune spread, which introduces a major growth-rate reduction effect on the e-p instability, is studied for self-consistent equilibrium populations of protons and electrons.

  1. Noiseless Vlasov–Poisson simulations with linearly transformed particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Pinto, Martin, E-mail: campos@ann.jussieu.fr [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); CNRS, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); UPMC Univ. Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); Sonnendrücker, Eric, E-mail: sonnen@math.unistra.fr [IRMA, UMR 7501, Université de Strasbourg and CNRS, 7 rue René Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Project-team CALVI, INRIA Nancy Grand Est, 7 rue René Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Friedman, Alex, E-mail: af@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grote, David P., E-mail: grote1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lund, Steve M., E-mail: smlund@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    We introduce a deterministic discrete-particle simulation approach, the Linearly-Transformed Particle-In-Cell (LTPIC) method, that employs linear deformations of the particles to reduce the noise traditionally associated with particle schemes. Formally, transforming the particles is justified by local first order expansions of the characteristic flow in phase space. In practice the method amounts of using deformation matrices within the particle shape functions; these matrices are updated via local evaluations of the forward numerical flow. Because it is necessary to periodically remap the particles on a regular grid to avoid excessively deforming their shapes, the method can be seen as a development of Denavit's Forward Semi-Lagrangian (FSL) scheme (Denavit, 1972 [8]). However, it has recently been established (Campos Pinto, 2012 [20]) that the underlying Linearly-Transformed Particle scheme converges for abstract transport problems, with no need to remap the particles; deforming the particles can thus be seen as a way to significantly lower the remapping frequency needed in the FSL schemes, and hence the associated numerical diffusion. To couple the method with electrostatic field solvers, two specific charge deposition schemes are examined, and their performance compared with that of the standard deposition method. Finally, numerical 1d1v simulations involving benchmark test cases and halo formation in an initially mismatched thermal sheet beam demonstrate some advantages of our LTPIC scheme over the classical PIC and FSL methods. Benchmarked test cases also indicate that, for numerical choices involving similar computational effort, the LTPIC method is capable of accuracy comparable to or exceeding that of state-of-the-art, high-resolution Vlasov schemes.

  2. Kinetic Simulations of the Self-Focusing and Dissipation of Finite-Width Electron Plasma Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winjum, B. J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Berger, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chapman, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Banks, J. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brunner, S. [Federal Inst. of Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-09-01

    Two-dimensional simulations, both Vlasov and particle-in-cell, are presented that show the evolution of the field and electron distribution of finite-width, nonlinear electron plasma waves. The intrinsically intertwined effects of self-focusing and dissipation of field energy caused by electron trapping are studied in simulated systems that are hundreds of wavelengths long in the transverse direction but only one wavelength long and periodic in the propagation direction. From various initial wave states, both the width at focus Δm relative to the initial width Δ0 and the maximum field amplitude at focus are shown to be a function of the growth rate of the transverse modulational instability γTPMI divided by the loss rate of field energy νE to electrons escaping the trapping region. With dissipation included, an amplitude threshold for self-focusing γTPMIE~1 is found that supports the analysis of Rose [Phys. Plasmas 12, 012318 (2005)].

  3. Gyrokinetic and kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of guide-field reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio Alejandro; Büchner, Jörg; Kilian, Patrick; Told, Daniel; Jenko, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations of (strong) guide-field reconnection can be computationally very demanding, due to the intrinsic stability and accuracy conditions required by this numerical method. One convenient approach to circumvent this issue is using gyrokinetic theory, an approximation of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations for strongly magnetized plasmas that eliminates the fast gyromotion, and thus reduces the computational cost. Although previous works have started to compare the features of reconnection between both approaches, a complete understanding of the differences is far from being complete. This knowledge is essential to discern the limitations of the gyrokinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection when applied to scenarios with moderate guide fields, such as the Solar corona, in contrast to most of the fusion/laboratory plasmas. We extend a previous work by our group, focused in the differences in the macroscopic flows, by analyzing the heating processes and non-thermal features developed by reconnection between both plasma approximations. We relate these processes by identifying some high-frequency cross-streaming instabilities appearing only in the fully kinetic approach. We characterize the effects of these phenonema such as anisotropic electron heating, beam formation and turbulence under different parameter regimes. And finally, we identify the conditions under which these instabilities tends to become negligible in the fully kinetic model, and thus a comparison with gyrokinetic theory becomes more reliable.

  4. Simulating Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Robert C.; Allen, Brockenbrough

    1975-01-01

    Described are simulations that can be used to illustrate evolution by natural selection. Suggestions for simulating phenomena such as adaptive radiation, color match to background and vision of predators are offered. (BR)

  5. Simulating Vito

    CERN Document Server

    Fragapane, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the techniques used to simulate the proposed upgrade to the ASPIC line at ISOLDE, VITO. It discusses the process used in the program SIMION by explaining how to start with an Autodesk Inventor drawing and import this into SIMION to get a working simulation. It then goes on to discuss the pieces of VITO which have been simulated in the program and how they were simulated. Finally, it explains a little about the simulations of the full beamline which have been done and discusses what still needs to be done.

  6. Can the downward current region of the aurora be simulated in the laboratory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunell, H.; Andersson, L.; De Keyser, J.; Mann, I.

    2016-05-01

    A laboratory plasma device is proposed to simulate the downward current region of the aurora. In this device, a discharge in neon is used as a plasma source to represent the hot plasma of the magnetosphere, and a sodium Q-machine source represents the ionospheric plasma. An electrostatic Vlasov model is used to simulate both the downward current region itself and the proposed laboratory analogue. All important phenomena that appear in the simulation of space are found in the laboratory simulation too: a double layer carries most of the potential difference; double layers are in constant motion in the direction of decreasing magnetic field; electron phase space holes appear on the high potential side of double layers and these holes carry a part of the potential difference during double layer disruptions. The ability to simulate auroral physics in the laboratory is better for the downward than the upward current region, because of the lower levels of ion acoustic-like waves in the laboratory model of the former region. Better laboratory-space agreement is found when the discharge and Q-machine ions are of similar masses. If the masses differ significantly, as they do when using helium together with sodium ions, waves on the ion time scale dominate the plasma on the low potential side of the double layer, and there is a tendency toward multiple double layers appearing simultaneously at different locations. The experiment is suitable for the study of heating processes that occur in the downward current region and to address the behaviour of the current-voltage relationship for low voltages.

  7. Simulation games

    OpenAIRE

    Giddings, S.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter outlines the conventions and pleasures of simulation games as a category, and explores the complicated and contested term simulation. This concept goes to the heart of what computer games and video games are, and the ways in which they articulate ideas, processes, and phenomena between their virtual worlds and the actual world. It has been argued that simulations generate and communicate knowledge and events quite differently from the long-­dominant cultural mode of narrative. Th...

  8. Continuum kinetic and multi-fluid simulations of classical sheaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagas, P.; Hakim, A.; Juno, J.; Srinivasan, B.

    2017-02-01

    The kinetic study of plasma sheaths is critical, among other things, to understand the deposition of heat on walls, the effect of sputtering, and contamination of the plasma with detrimental impurities. The plasma sheath also provides a boundary condition and can often have a significant global impact on the bulk plasma. In this paper, kinetic studies of classical sheaths are performed with the continuum kinetic code, Gkeyll, which directly solves the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The code uses a novel version of the finite-element discontinuous Galerkin scheme that conserves energy in the continuous-time limit. The fields are computed using Maxwell equations. Ionization and scattering collisions are included; however, surface effects are neglected. The aim of this work is to introduce the continuum kinetic method and compare its results with those obtained from an already established finite-volume multi-fluid model also implemented in Gkeyll. Novel boundary conditions on the fluids allow the sheath to form without specifying wall fluxes, so the fluids and fields adjust self-consistently at the wall. The work presented here demonstrates that the kinetic and fluid results are in agreement for the momentum flux, showing that in certain regimes, a multi-fluid model can be a useful approximation for simulating the plasma boundary. There are differences in the electrostatic potential between the fluid and kinetic results. Further, the direct solutions of the distribution function presented here highlight the non-Maxwellian distribution of electrons in the sheath, emphasizing the need for a kinetic model. The densities, velocities, and the potential show a good agreement between the kinetic and fluid results. However, kinetic physics is highlighted through higher moments such as parallel and perpendicular temperatures which provide significant differences from the fluid results in which the temperature is assumed to be isotropic. Besides decompression cooling, the heat flux

  9. Excel simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Verschuuren, Gerard M

    2013-01-01

    Covering a variety of Excel simulations, from gambling to genetics, this introduction is for people interested in modeling future events, without the cost of an expensive textbook. The simulations covered offer a fun alternative to the usual Excel topics and include situations such as roulette, password cracking, sex determination, population growth, and traffic patterns, among many others.

  10. Numerical simulation of charging of an absorbing sphere in collisionless plasmas: asymptotics and trapped particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselyov, Alexander; Dolgonosov, Maxim; Krasovsky, Victor

    It is very important to determine the form of trapped particle distribution function in the problem of plasma disturbance by a spherical absorbing body. There are two ways of solving this problem: stability analysis of the physical system or examination of initial value problem. In this work the second method has been chosen. The physical system under consideration can be described by Poisson-Vlasov equations. In the initial moment of time the absorbing sphere appears in collisionless plasma. Distribution functions for electrons and ions are assumed to be monoenergetic at the start. The aim of the study is to observe plasma dynamics at long times and to determine the steady state of the plasma. Numerical simulation is based on PIC ("particles-in-cell") method. Spherical symmetry of the problem is widely employed to simplify model and reduce calculation count. It allows to treat charged particle dynamics as a motion with one degree of freedom, while the problem as a whole remains three-dimensional. This gives an opportunity to use moderate computational resources. A massively parallel code using GPGPU and OpenCL technologies has been developed, as well as auxiliary utilities for testing, result processing and representation. As a result, spatial and temporal plasma characteristics near absorbing sphere have been obtained. Formation of trapped ion bunch in the vicinity of the sphere has been observed on the phase plane while approaching equilibrium state.

  11. Proposal of a brand-new gyrokinetic algorithm for global MHD simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naitou, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Hashimoto, Hiroki; Andachi, Takehisa; Lee, Wei-Li; Tokuda, Shinji; Yagi, Masatoshi

    2009-11-01

    A new algorithm for the gyrokinetic PIC code is proposed. The basic equations are energy conserving and composed of (1) the gyrokinetic Vlasov (GKV) equation, (2) the Vortex equation, and (3) the generalized Ohm's law along the magnetic field. Equation (2) is used to advance electrostatic potential in time. Equation (3) is used to advance longitudinal component of vector potential in time as well as estimating longitudinal induced electric field to accelerate charged particles. The particle information is used to estimate pressure terms in equation (3). The idea was obtained in the process of reviewing the split-weight-scheme formalism. This algorithm was incorporated in the Gpic-MHD code. Preliminary results for the m=1/n=1 internal kink mode simulation in the cylindrical geometry indicate good energy conservation, quite low noise due to particle discreteness, and applicability to larger spatial scale and higher beta regimes. The advantage of new Gpic-MHD is that the lower order moments of the GKV equation are estimated by the moment equation while the particle information is used to evaluate the second order moment.

  12. Kinetic Simulation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Quasi-periodic Upflows in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, Wenzhi; Zhang, Lei; Vocks, Christian; Marsch, Eckart; Tu, Chuanyi; Peter, Hardi; Wang, Linghua

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-periodic disturbances of emission-line parameters are frequently observed in the corona. These disturbances propagate upward along the magnetic field with speeds $\\sim100~\\rm{km~s}^{-1}$. This phenomenon has been interpreted as evidence of the propagation of slow magnetosonic waves or argued to be signature of the intermittent outflows superposed on the background plasmas. Here we aim to present a new "wave + flow" model to interpret these observations. In our scenario, the oscillatory motion is a slow mode wave, and the flow is associated with a beam created by the wave-particle interaction owing to Landau resonance. With the help of a Vlasov model, we simulate the propagation of the slow mode wave and the generation of the beam flow. We find that weak periodic beam flows can be generated owing to Landau resonance in the solar corona, and the phase with strongest blueward asymmetry is ahead of that with strongest blueshift by about 1/4 period. We also find that the slow wave damps to the level of 1/e a...

  13. Simulation tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jenni, F

    2006-01-01

    In the last two decades, simulation tools made a significant contribution to the great progress in development of power electronics. Time to market was shortened and development costs were reduced drastically. Falling costs, as well as improved speed and precision, opened new fields of application. Today, continuous and switched circuits can be mixed. A comfortable number of powerful simulation tools is available. The users have to choose the best suitable for their application. Here a simple rule applies: The best available simulation tool is the tool the user is already used to (provided, it can solve the task). Abilities, speed, user friendliness and other features are continuously being improved—even though they are already powerful and comfortable. This paper aims at giving the reader an insight into the simulation of power electronics. Starting with a short description of the fundamentals of a simulation tool as well as properties of tools, several tools are presented. Starting with simplified models ...

  14. Motion Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  15. Solar Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Oriel Corporation's simulators have a high pressure xenon lamp whose reflected light is processed by an optical system to produce a uniform solar beam. Because of many different types of applications, the simulators must be adjustable to replicate many different areas of the solar radiation spectrum. Simulators are laboratory tools for such purposes as testing and calibrating solar cells, or other solar energy systems, testing dyes, paints and pigments, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic preparations, plant and animal studies, food and agriculture studies and oceanographic research.

  16. Simulation Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Pat

    1976-01-01

    Describes five simulation exercises: a problem for a student teacher, an industrial relations game, a series of student problems; an international relations crisis, and a sociological exercise on public and private opinions. (LS)

  17. Global and Kinetic MHD Simulation by the Gpic-MHD Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi NAITOU; Yusuke YAMADA; Kenji KAJIWARA; Wei-li LEE; Shinji TOKUDA; Masatoshi YAGI

    2011-01-01

    In order to implement large-scale and high-beta tokamak simulation, a new algorithm of the electromagnetic gyrokinetic PIC (particle-in-cell) code was proposed and installed on the Gpic-MHD code [Gyrokinetic PIC code for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation]. In the new algorithm, the vorticity equation and the generalized Ohm's law along the magnetic field are derived from the basic equations of the gyrokinetic Vlasov, Poisson, and Ampere system and are used to describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the field quantities of the electrostatic potential φ and the longitudinal component of the vector potential Az. The basic algorithm is equivalent to solving the reduced-MHD-type equations with kinetic corrections, in which MHD physics related to Alfven modes are well described. The estimation of perturbed electron pressure from particle dynamics is dominant, while the effects of other moments are negligible. Another advantage of the algorithm is that the longitudinal induced electric field, ETz = -δAz/δt, is explicitly estimated by the generalized Ohm's law and used in the equations of motion. Furthermore, the particle velocities along the magnetic field are used (vz-formulation) instead of generalized momentums (pz-formulation), hence there is no problem of 'cancellation', which would otherwise appear when Az is estimated from the Ampere's law in the pz-formulation. The successful simulation of the collisionless internal kink mode by the new Gpic-MHD with realistic values of the large-scale and high-beta tokamaks revealed the usefulness of the new algorithm.

  18. Simulating Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  19. Simulating Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  20. Study of trapping effect on ion-acoustic solitary waves based on a fully kinetic simulation approach

    CERN Document Server

    Jenab, S M

    2016-01-01

    A fully kinetic simulation approach, treating each plasma component based on the Vlasov equation, is adopted to study the disintegration of an initial density perturbation (IDP) into a number of ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in the presence of the trapping effect of electrons. The non-linear fluid theory developed by Schamel has identified three separate regimes of ion-acoustic solitary waves based on the trapping parameter. Here, the disintegration process and the resulting self-consistent IASWs are studied in a wide range of trapping parameters covering all the three regimes continuously. The dependency of features such as the time of disintegration, the number, speed and size of IASWs on the trapping parameter are focused upon. It is shown that an increase in this parameter slows down the propagation of IASWs while decreases their sizes in the phase space. These features of IASWs tend to saturate for large value of trapping parameters. The disintegration time shows a more complicated behavior than wh...

  1. RCS Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    store config.) to be considered, Moving parts to be considered · Hybridisation of methods · Fast algorithms, new Aproaches · Geometry representations...Page 2 Military Aircraft Overview • Introduction • Methods ,Tools for mm-wave applications • Examples • Further requirements / developments Page 3...Flexible handling of Geometry · Parametrisation of Geometry Page 4 Military Aircraft Methods for RCS simulations •Fundamental subdivision between full

  2. DSN Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir; Vatan, Farrokh; Barrett, Anthony; James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Williams, Colin

    2009-01-01

    The DSN Simulator (wherein DSN signifies NASA's Deep Space Network) is an updated version of the software described in DSN Array Simulator (NPO-44506), Software Tech Briefs (Special supplement to NASA Tech Briefs), Vol. 32, No. 9 (September 2008), page 26. To recapitulate: This software is used for computational modeling of proposed DSN facilities comprising arrays of antennas and transmitting and receiving equipment for microwave communication with spacecraft on interplanetary missions. Such modeling is performed to estimate facility performance, evaluate requirements that govern facility design, and evaluate proposed improvements in hardware and/or software. The software includes a Monte Carlo simulation component that enables rapid generation of key mission-set metrics (e.g., numbers of links, data rates, and data volumes), and statistical distributions thereof as functions of time. The prior version of the software could model only one DSN facility at a time and included hard-coded, unconfigurable metrics. The present updated version is capable of modeling the entire DSN and provides for configurable metrics, making it possible to perform loading analyses for alternative future DSN architectures and mission-set scenarios. The present version also features an improved user interface and interfaces for exchange of data with other DSN software and with a DSN mission model database.

  3. Flight Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    G.B.Churchill 12 SIMULATION DES COMMANDES DE VOL ELECTRIQES AU CENTRE D’ESSAIS EN VOL FRANAIS (CEV) POUR LES AVIONS DE TRANSPORT CIVIL par R.Vadrot 13 Reference...rapid advancements in the state-of-the-art will have a positive impact on both civil and military aerospace planners. In summary, this conference clearly...pilotes at des inginieurs du Bureau d’Etudes Systime d’Aroes : l disposent anfin d’un mayan puissant de dialogue entre concapteurs at utilisateurs. La

  4. Neuromechanical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald H Edwards

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the interaction between the body and the brain for the control of behavior has been recognized in recent years with the advent of neuromechanics, a field in which the coupling between neural and biomechanical processes is an explicit focus. A major tool used in neuromechanics is simulation, which connects computational models of neural circuits to models of an animal’s body situated in a virtual physical world. This connection closes the feedback loop that links the brain, the body, and the world through sensory stimuli, muscle contractions and body movement. Neuromechanical simulations enable investigators to explore the dynamical relationships between the brain, the body, and the world in ways that are difficult or impossible through experiment alone. Studies in a variety of animals have permitted the analysis of extremely complex and dynamic neuromechanical systems, they have demonstrated that the nervous system functions synergistically with the mechanical properties of the body, they have examined hypotheses that are difficult to test experimentally, and they have explored the role of sensory feedback in controlling complex mechanical systems with many degrees of freedom. Each of these studies confronts a common set of questions: (i how to abstract key features of the body, the world and the CNS in a useful model, (ii how to ground model parameters in experimental reality, (iii how to optimize the model and identify points of sensitivity and insensitivity, and (iv how to share neuromechanical models for examination, testing, and extension by others.

  5. Flux-driven gyrokinetic simulations of ion turbulent transport at low magnetic shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarazin, Y; Strugarek, A; Dif-Pradalier, G; Abiteboul, J; Allfrey, S; Garbet, X; Ghendrih, Ph; Grandgirard, V; Latu, G, E-mail: yanick.sarazin@cea.fr

    2010-11-01

    Ion Temperature Gradient driven turbulence is investigated with the global full-f gyrokinetic code GYSELA for different magnetic equilibria. Reversed shear and monotonous q profile cases do not exhibit dramatic changes nor in the dynamics nor in the level of turbulence, leading to similar mean profiles. Especially, no transport barrier is observed in the vicinity of s = 0 in the general case, although the radial extent of the gap without resonant modes is larger than the typical turbulence correlation length. Conversely, a transport barrier is found to develop in the gap region if non resonant modes are artificially suppressed from the simulation. Such simulations tend to reconcile previously published contradictory results, while extending the analysis to more realistic flux-driven gyrokinetic regimes.

  6. On the influence of initial state on gyrokinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dif-Pradalier, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Angelino, P.

    2008-04-01

    The influence of the initial state on the turbulence and transport is addressed in collisionless, global, and full-f gyrokinetic simulations solving both the equilibrium and the fluctuations. For two strongly differing initial states, it is found that the steady turbulent regime exhibits nearly identical statistical properties. This result is in marked contrast with the claim of different final states. In fact, a long transient with very different properties finally evolves towards the same turbulent regime for long simulation times. When the initial state is a local Maxwellian, i.e., constant on flux surfaces, a large-scale sheared electric potential develops on short time scales to compensate for the vertical curvature and grad-B drifts. We predict analytically (i) the temporal dynamics at short times of this electric potential, (ii) its poloidal structure, and (iii) its saturation time. All agree well with numerical simulations using the GYSELA code. The impact on the transport is twofold, as compared to the canonical initial state, where f only depends on the motion invariants: (i) the turbulence is delayed due to a weaker effective growth rate, (ii) the same transport level is obtained at long times and the turbulence exhibits nearly identical statistical characteristics. In agreement, the electric potential of these two cases has the same magnitude despite very different transients.

  7. Plasma simulation with the Differential Algebraic Cubic Interpolated Propagation scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, Takayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    A computer code based on the Differential Algebraic Cubic Interpolated Propagation scheme has been developed for the numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation for a one-dimensional plasma with immobile ions. The scheme advects the distribution function and its first derivatives in the phase space for one time step by using a numerical integration method for ordinary differential equations, and reconstructs the profile in phase space by using a cubic polynomial within a grid cell. The method gives stable and accurate results, and is efficient. It is successfully applied to a number of equations; the Vlasov equation, the Boltzmann equation with the Fokker-Planck or the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) collision term and the relativistic Vlasov equation. The method can be generalized in a straightforward way to treat cases such as problems with nonperiodic boundary conditions and higher dimensional problems. (author)

  8. Self-consistent electrostatic simulations of reforming double layers in the downward current region of the aurora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunell, H.; Keyser, J. de [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium); Andersson, L. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics; Mann, I. [EISCAT Scientific Association, Kiruna (Sweden); Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics

    2015-07-01

    The plasma on a magnetic field line in the downward current region of the aurora is simulated using a Vlasov model. It is found that an electric field parallel to the magnetic fields is supported by a double layer moving toward higher altitude. The double layer accelerates electrons upward, and these electrons give rise to plasma waves and electron phase-space holes through beam-plasma interaction. The double layer is disrupted when reaching altitudes of 1- 2 Earth radii where the Langmuir condition no longer can be satisfied due to the diminishing density of electrons coming up from the ionosphere. During the disruption the potential drop is in part carried by the electron holes. The disruption creates favourable conditions for double layer formation near the ionosphere and double layers form anew in that region. The process repeats itself with a period of approximately 1 min. This period is determined by how far the double layer can reach before being disrupted: a higher disruption altitude corresponds to a longer repetition period. The disruption altitude is, in turn, found to increase with ionospheric density and to decrease with total voltage. The current displays oscillations around a mean value. The period of the oscillations is the same as the recurrence period of the double layer formations. The oscillation amplitude increases with increasing voltage, whereas the mean value of the current is independent of voltage in the 100 to 800V range covered by our simulations. Instead, the mean value of the current is determined by the electron density at the ionospheric boundary.

  9. Nonlinear Alfvén Waves in a Vlasov Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bell, T.F.

    1965-01-01

    Stationary solutions to the nonlinear Vlasov—Boltzmann equations are considered which represent one-dimensional electromagnetic waves in a hot magnetoplasma. These solutions appear in arbitrary reference frames as circularly polarized, sinusoidal waves of unlimited amplitude, i.e., as nonlinear...... Alfvén waves. Solutions are found implicitly by deriving a set of integral dispersion relations which link the wave characteristics with the particle distribution functions. A physical discussion is given of the way in which the Alfvén waves can trap particles, and it is shown that the presence...

  10. Phase space structures in gyrokinetic simulations of fusion plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghendrih, Philippe; Norscini, Claudia; Cartier-Michaud, Thomas; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Abiteboul, Jérémie; Dong, Yue; Garbet, Xavier; Gürcan, Ozgür; Hennequin, Pascale; Grandgirard, Virginie; Latu, Guillaume; Morel, Pierre; Sarazin, Yanick; Storelli, Alexandre; Vermare, Laure

    2014-10-01

    ion Larmor frequency for the characteristic amplitude of the magnetic field B0, qi and mi being, respectively, the ion charge and mass. The electric drift velocity is also found to exhibit a poloidal pattern, with maximum amplitude of the fluctuations either in the top or in the bottom regions of the machine depending on the sign of the zonal flow shear. This effect is found to be correlated to the stopping capability of the corrugation structures. The neoclassical properties stemming from the trapped particle drifts lead to large distortion of the distribution function. As expected, these prevail at the outer part of the simulation region despite the large collisionality. The distribution function fluctuations appear to be aligned along the v∥ = const. lines at constant poloidal angle. A specific symmetry is observed regarding the interplay of turbulence with the trapped-passing region. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Theory and Applications of the Vlasov Equation", edited by Francesco Pegoraro, Francesco Califano, Giovanni Manfredi and Philip J. Morrison.

  11. Manned Flight Simulator (MFS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Aircraft Simulation Division, home to the Manned Flight Simulator (MFS), provides real-time, high fidelity, hardware-in-the-loop flight simulation capabilities...

  12. Advanced Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Simulation Center consists of 10 individual facilities which provide missile and submunition hardware-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. The following...

  13. COCOA: Simulating Observations of Star Cluster Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askar, Abbas; Giersz, Mirek; Pych, Wojciech; Dalessandro, Emanuele

    2017-03-01

    COCOA (Cluster simulatiOn Comparison with ObservAtions) creates idealized mock photometric observations using results from numerical simulations of star cluster evolution. COCOA is able to present the output of realistic numerical simulations of star clusters carried out using Monte Carlo or N-body codes in a way that is useful for direct comparison with photometric observations. The code can simulate optical observations from simulation snapshots in which positions and magnitudes of objects are known. The parameters for simulating the observations can be adjusted to mimic telescopes of various sizes. COCOA also has a photometry pipeline that can use standalone versions of DAOPHOT (ascl:1104.011) and ALLSTAR to produce photometric catalogs for all observed stars.

  14. The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adorisio, Cristina; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmed, Hossain; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov , Andrei; Aktas, Adil; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antos, Jaroslav; Antunovic, Bijana; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Theodoros; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Arutinov, David; Asai, Makoto; Asai, Shoji; Silva, José; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asner, David; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Mark; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Baranov, Sergey; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Bartsch, Detlef; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Bazalova, Magdalena; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Becerici, Neslihan; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Graham; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Ayda; Beddall, Andrew; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benincasa, Gianpaolo; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blocker, Craig; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bocci, Andrea; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bondarenko, Valery; Bondioli, Mario; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Bourdarios, Claire; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodet, Eyal; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, Françcois; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Byatt, Tom; Caballero, Jose; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Caramarcu, Costin; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carrillo Montoya, German D.; Carron Montero, Sebastian; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Tcherniatine, Valeri; Chesneanu, Daniela; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chevallier, Florent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Citterio, Mauro; Clark, Allan G.; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H.; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Consonni, Michele; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cranshaw, Jack; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dallison, Steve; Daly, Colin; Dam, Mogens; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Dawson, Ian; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De Mora, Lee; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dean, Simon; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Deng, Wensheng; Denisov, Sergey; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djilkibaev, Rashid; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen , Michael; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Dushkin, Andrei; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Egorov, Kirill; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ermoline, Iouri; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Facius, Katrine; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Fayard, Louis; Fayette, Florent; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernandes, Bruno; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; Freestone, Julian; French, Sky; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, K K; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gautard, Valerie; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; Georgatos, Fotios; George, Simon; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Girtler, Peter; Giugni, Danilo; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goggi, Virginio; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçcalo, Ricardo; Gonella, Laura; Gong, Chenwei; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Green, Barry; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griesmayer, Erich; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Groh, Manfred; Groll, Marius; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Härtel, Roland; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansl-Kozanecka, Traudl; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hashemi, Kevan; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Hemperek, Tomasz; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Hori, Takuya; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howe, Travis; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Isobe, Tadaaki; Issakov, Vladimir; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Itoh, Yuki; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jared, Richard; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joffe, David; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kalinowski, Artur; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karagoz, Muge; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kastoryano, Michael; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kayumov, Fred; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoriauli, Gia; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kind, Oliver; Kind, Peter; King, Barry; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Klute, Markus; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Koblitz, Birger; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kolos, Serguei; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konovalov, Serguei; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostka, Peter; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Serguei; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotov, Konstantin; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Henri; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kwee, Regina; La Rotonda, Laura; Labbe, Julien; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Rémi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lane, Jenna; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Lazzaro, Alfio; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; Le Vine, Micheal; Lebedev, Alexander; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lellouch, Jeremie; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Leyton, Michael; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shumin; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lilley, Joseph; Lim, Heuijin; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Tiankuan; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Lovas, Lubomir; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Luehring, Frederick; Luisa, Luca; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahmood, A.; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makouski, Mikhail; Makovec, Nikola; Malecki, Piotr; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mambelli, Marco; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March , Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Alex; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martini, Agnese; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massol, Nicolas; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maxfield, Stephen; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W. Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Mills, Bill; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Misawa, Shigeki; Miscetti, Stefano; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Mladenov, Dimitar; Moa, Torbjoern; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Moore, Roger; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morais, Antonio; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Garcia, Raul; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nakatsuka, Hiroki; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nderitu, Simon Kirichu; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicoletti, Giovanni; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Notz, Dieter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nožička, Miroslav; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver, John; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Ortega, Eduardo; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Ottersbach, John; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Oyarzun, Alejandro; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozone, Kenji; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Park, Su-Jung; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parker, Sherwood; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor , Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Patwa, Abid; Pauly, Thilo; Peak, Lawrence; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Persembe, Seda; Perus, Antoine; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poffenberger, Paul; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Ponsot, Patrick; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Popule, Jiri; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Porter, Robert; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potekhin, Maxim; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Potter, Keith; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puigdengoles, Carles; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qi, Ming; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Weiming; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renkel, Peter; Rescia, Sergio; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richards, Ronald; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Roa Romero, Diego Alejandro; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodriguez, Diego; Rodriguez Garcia, Yohany; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Maltrana, Diego; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryan, Patrick; Rybkin, Grigori; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandhu, Pawan; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sanny, Bernd; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Savard, Pierre; Savine, Alexandre; Savinov, Vladimir; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R.~Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitz, Martin; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schreiner, Alexander; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schroers, Marcel; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloper, John erik; Sluka, Tomas; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yuri; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Soluk, Richard; Sondericker, John; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spencer, Edwin; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St. Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stancu, Stefan Nicolae; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stastny, Jan; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Su, Dong; Soh, Dart-yin; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Takuya; Suzuki, Yu; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szymocha, Tadeusz; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taga, Adrian; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Ryan P.; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Tennenbaum-Katan, Yaniv-David; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Stan; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thomson, Evelyn; Thun, Rudolf; Tic, Tomas; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomasek, Lukas; Tomasek, Michal; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuggle, Joseph; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Tuts, Michael; Twomey, Matthew Shaun; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasilyeva, Lidia; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Viehhauser, Georg; Villa, Mauro; Villani, Giulio; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Viret, Sébastien; Virzi, Joseph; Vitale , Antonio; Vitells, Ofer; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vudragovic, Dusan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Peter; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Jin; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Wastie, Roy; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Marc; Weber, Manuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Werthenbach, Ulrich; Wessels, Martin; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wright, Dennis; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xu, Da; Xu, Neng; Yamada, Miho; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yao, Weiming; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zambrano, Valentina; Zanello, Lucia; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Qizhi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu

    2010-01-01

    The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

  15. The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. 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V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-12-01

    The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

  16. Neoclassical Simulation of Tokamak Plasmas using Continuum Gyrokinetc Code TEMPEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X Q

    2007-11-09

    We present gyrokinetic neoclassical simulations of tokamak plasmas with self-consistent electric field for the first time using a fully nonlinear (full-f) continuum code TEMPEST in a circular geometry. A set of gyrokinetic equations are discretized on a five dimensional computational grid in phase space. The present implementation is a Method of Lines approach where the phase-space derivatives are discretized with finite differences and implicit backwards differencing formulas are used to advance the system in time. The fully nonlinear Boltzmann model is used for electrons. The neoclassical electric field is obtained by solving gyrokinetic Poisson equation with self-consistent poloidal variation. With our 4D ({psi}, {theta}, {epsilon}, {mu}) version of the TEMPEST code we compute radial particle and heat flux, the Geodesic-Acoustic Mode (GAM), and the development of neoclassical electric field, which we compare with neoclassical theory with a Lorentz collision model. The present work provides a numerical scheme and a new capability for self-consistently studying important aspects of neoclassical transport and rotations in toroidal magnetic fusion devices.

  17. Gyrokinetic simulations predict anomalous poloidal rotation in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Grandgirard, Virginie; Sarazin, Yanick; Garbet, Xavier; Ghendrih, Phillippe; Angelino, Paolo

    2008-11-01

    First-principle based collisionless gyrokinetic theory consensually provides today's deepest insight on turbulence-related problems in plasma physics. Conversely, neoclassical theory describes the effects of binary Coulomb collisions in a toroidal and inhomogeneous magnetic geometry and its consequences on particle trapping. The interplay between turbulence and collisions is a subject of great current focus for first-principle modeling since recent evidences have started to emphasise its relevance for the onset and the control of enhanced confinement regimes in the next-generation devices like Iter. A finite differences Fokker-Planck ion-ion collision operator is implemented in the full-f and global GYSELA code and has been thoroughly benchmarked in neoclassical regimes. Two types of simulations are compared, either purely neoclassical or turbulent including neoclassical effects. In each case, three different values of collisionality in the banana regime are investigated. Preliminary results show an enhancement of about 30% of the poloidal rotation of the main ions (Z=1) in the turbulent regime as compared to its neoclassical value. In all cases the radial force balance equation is satisfied within a few percent. Most of this increase comes from the radial electric field.

  18. Simulations of Magnetic Reconnection - Kinetic Mechanisms Underlying the Fluid Description of Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunai, icolas; Belmont, Gerard; Smets, Roch

    2012-01-01

    Because of its ability to transfer the energy stored in magnetic field together with the breaking of the flux freezing constraint, magnetic reconnection is considered as one of the most important phenomena in plasma physics. When it happens in a collision less environment such as the terrestrial magnetosphere, it should a priori be modelled with in the framework of kinetic physics. The evidence of kinetic features has incidentally for a long time, been shown by researchers with the help of both numerical simulations and satellite observations. However, most of our understanding of the process comes from the more intuitive fluid interpretation with simple closure hypothesis which do not include kinetic effects. To what extent are these two separate descriptions of the same phenomenon related? What is the role of kinetic effects in the averaged/fluid dynamics of reconnection? This thesis addresses these questions for the proton population in the particular case of anti parallel merging with the help of 2D Hybrid simulations. We show that one can not assume, as is usually done, that the acceleration of the proton flow is only due to the Laplace force. Our results show, for symmetric and asymmetric connection, the importance of the pressure force, opposed to the electric one on the separatrices, in the decoupling region. In the symmetric case, we emphasize the kinetic origin of this force by analyzing the proton distribution functions and explain their structure by studying the underlying particle dynamics. Protons, as individual particles, are shown to bounce in the electric potential well created by the Hall effect. The spatial divergence of this well results in a mixing in phase space responsible for the observed structure of the pressure tensor. A detailed energy budget analysis confirms the role of the pressure force for the acceleration; but, contrary to what is sometimes assumed, it also reveals that the major part of the incoming Poynting flux is transferred to

  19. Process simulation using WITNESS

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Aomar, Raid; Ulgen, Onur M

    2015-01-01

    Teaches basic and advanced modeling and simulation techniques to both undergraduate and postgraduate students and serves as a practical guide and manual for professionals learning how to build simulation models using WITNESS, a free-standing software package. This book discusses the theory behind simulation and demonstrates how to build simulation models with WITNESS. The book begins with an explanation of the concepts of simulation modeling and a "guided tour" of the WITNESS modeling environment. Next, the authors cover the basics of building simulation models using WITNESS and mode

  20. Combine Harvester Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, Ole; Sørlie, James Arnold

    1999-01-01

    A simulator for training pilots in the operation of a modern high-tech combine harvester is presented. The new simulator application is based on DMI´s well-known DMS maritime simulator architecture. Two major challenges have been encountered in the development of the simulator: 1) interfacing...... the simulator software and the harvester hardware, and 2) the visual image generation system. Aims of the project have been to promote technology transfer from DMI´s maritime simulator to new application areas, to develop a state-of-the-art pilot training environment, and to utilise the state......-of-the-art in objec-oriented graphics programming technologies....

  1. Ride Motion Simulator (RMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The RMS is a simulator designed for crew station and man-in-the-loop experimentation. The simulator immerses users in a synthetic battlefield to experience realistic...

  2. USU Patient Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — he National Capital Area (NCA) Medical Simulation Center is a state-of-the-art training facility located near the main USU campus. It uses simulated patients (i.e.,...

  3. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  4. LOADING SIMULATION PROGRAM C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — LSPC is the Loading Simulation Program in C++, a watershed modeling system that includes streamlined Hydrologic Simulation Program Fortran (HSPF) algorithms for...

  5. The Business Flight Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, P.; Simpson, D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe a simulation program based on a workshop approach designed for postsecondary business students. Features and benefits of the workshop technique are discussed. The authors cover practical aspects of designing and implementing simulation workshops. (CH)

  6. Kriging metamodeling for simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beers, W.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Many scientific disciplines use mathematical models to describe complicated real systems. Often, analytical methods are inadequate, so simulation is applied. This thesis focuses on computer intensive simulation experiments in Operations Research/Management Science. For such experiments it is necessa

  7. PHYSICAL SIMULATION & TEST

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Crew Station/Turret Motion Based Simulator (CS/TMBS) Test station simulates operational scenarios The CS/TMBS is a high-capacity six-degrees-of-freedom test device....

  8. Airflow Simulation Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The paper describes the development in airflow simulations in rooms . The research is, as other areas of flow research, influenced by the decreasing cost of computation which seems to indicate an increased use of airflow simulation in the coming years....

  9. Transfer-Function Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaya, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer function simulator constructed from analog or both analog and digital components substitute for device that has faults that confound analysis of feedback control loop. Simulator is substitute for laser and spectrophone.

  10. Eye Disease Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... USAJobs Home > Eye Health Information > Eye Disease Simulations Eye Disease Simulations Age-Related Macular Degeneration Cataract Diabetic ... information page Back to top Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic Eye Disease information page Back to top Glaucoma Glaucoma ...

  11. Teaching with simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, N.P.G.

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on whole-class science teaching with computer simulations. Computer simulations display dynamic, visual representations of natural phenomena and can make a great contribution to the science classroom. Simulations can be used in multiple ways. Teachers who have an

  12. Simulation and psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Krage, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Psychology is relevant for improving the use of simulation in anesthesiology, as it allows us to describe, explain and optimize the interactions of learners and instructors as well as the design of simulation scenarios and debriefings. Much psychological expertise is not used for simulation...

  13. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even, Wesley Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dolence, Joshua C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  14. Simulators in driver training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    In 2010, about 150 driving simulators were being used for the basic driver training in the Netherlands. According to theories about how people learn, simulator training has both advantages and disadvantages. In order to be able to learn something from a simulator, its technical quality must be

  15. Simulators in driver training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    In 2010, about 150 driving simulators were being used for the basic driver training in the Netherlands. According to theories about how people learn, simulator training has both advantages and disadvantages. In order to be able to learn something from a simulator, its technical quality must be adequ

  16. Today's Business Simulation Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    New technologies are transforming the business simulation industry. The technologies come from research in computational fields of science, and they endow simulations with new capabilities and qualities. These capabilities and qualities include computerized behavioral simulations, online feedback and coaching, advanced interfaces, learning on…

  17. Simulation in Sport Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayer, Joris; Rascher, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Simulations have long been used in business schools to give students experience making real-world decisions in a relatively low risk environment. The OAKLAND A'S BASEBALL BUSINESS SIMULATOR takes a traditional business simulation and applies it to the sport industry, in which sales of tangible products are replaced by sales of experiences provided…

  18. Simulation Interoperability (Interoperabilite de la simulation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    solutions arising from the capability to test together different simulators / simulation areas. The innovative value of SimLabs is representing one...common infrastructure for its storage, knowledge reuse can be realised on a larger scale, i.e., the same knowledge can be used in several...the state and behavior of a real-world object or the perception of a real-world object, feature, condition, or chosen standard in a measurable or

  19. Simulation modeling and arena

    CERN Document Server

    Rossetti, Manuel D

    2015-01-01

    Emphasizes a hands-on approach to learning statistical analysis and model building through the use of comprehensive examples, problems sets, and software applications With a unique blend of theory and applications, Simulation Modeling and Arena®, Second Edition integrates coverage of statistical analysis and model building to emphasize the importance of both topics in simulation. Featuring introductory coverage on how simulation works and why it matters, the Second Edition expands coverage on static simulation and the applications of spreadsheets to perform simulation. The new edition als

  20. NS simulator for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    Altman, Eitan

    2012-01-01

    NS-2 is an open-source discrete event network simulator which is widely used by both the research community as well as by the people involved in the standardization protocols of IETF. The goal of this book is twofold: on one hand to learn how to use the NS-2 simulator, and on the other hand, to become acquainted with and to understand the operation of some of the simulated objects using NS-2 simulations. The book is intended to help students, engineers or researchers who need not have much background in programming or who want to learn through simple examples how to analyse some simulated obje

  1. Partnership for Edge Physics Simulation (EPSI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroder, Peter [California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2015-02-11

    We propose to develop advanced simulation codes, based upon an extreme parallelism, first principles kinetic approach, to address the challenges associated with the edge region of magnetically confined plasmas. This work is relevant to both existing magnetic fusion facilities and essential for next-generation burning plasma experiments, such as ITER where success is critically dependent upon H-mode operation achieving an edge pedestal of sufficient height for good core plasma performance without producing deleterious large scale edge localized instabilities. The plasma edge presents a well-known set of multi-physics, multi-scale problems involving complex 3D magnetic geometry. Perhaps the greatest computational challenge is the lack of scale separation – temporal scales for drift waves, Alfven waves, ELM dynamics for example have strong overlap. Similar overlap occurs on the spatial scales for the ion poloidal gyro-radius, drift wave and pedestal width. The traditional approach of separating fusion problems into weakly interacting spatial or temporal domains clearly breaks down in the edge. A full kinetic model (full-f model) must be solved to understand and predict the edge physics including non-equilibrium thermodynamic issues arising from the magnetic topology (the open field lines producing a spatially sensitive velocity hole), plasma wall interactions, neutral and atomic physics. The plan here is to model these phenomena within a comprehensive first principles set of equations without the need for the insurmountable multiple-codes coupling issues by building on the XGC1 code developed under the SciDAC Proto-FSP Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES). This proposal includes the critical participants in the XGC1 development. We propose enhancing the capability of XGC1 by including all the important turbulence physics contained in kinetic ion and electron electromagnetic dynamics, by extending the PIC technology to incorporate several positive features found

  2. Eternity Variables to Simulate Specifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, WH; Boiten, EA; Moller, B

    2002-01-01

    Simulation of specifications is introduced as a unification and generalization of refinement mappings, history variables, forward simulations, prophecy variables, and backward simulations. Eternity variables are introduced as a more powerful alternative for prophecy variables and backward simulation

  3. Adiabatic Quantum Simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Biamonte, J D; Whitfield, J D; Fitzsimons, J; Aspuru-Guzik, A

    2010-01-01

    In his famous 1981 talk, Feynman proposed that unlike classical computers, which would presumably experience an exponential slowdown when simulating quantum phenomena, a universal quantum simulator would not. An ideal quantum simulator would be error resistant, easily controllable, and built using existing technology. Moving away from gate-model and projective measurement based implementations of quantum computing may offer a less resource-intensive, and consequently a more feasible solution. Here we consider an adiabatic quantum simulator which simulates the ground state properties of sparse Hamiltonians consisting of one- and two-body interaction terms, using sparse Hamiltonians with at most three-body interactions. Properties of such Hamiltonians can be well approximated with Hamiltonians containing only two-local terms. The register holding the simulated ground state is brought adiabatically into interaction with a probe qubit, followed by a single diabatic gate operation on the probe which then undergoes...

  4. Simulation integration with confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelich, Tom; Stalcup, Bruce W.

    1999-07-01

    Current financial, schedule and risk constraints mandate reuse of software components when building large-scale simulations. While integration of simulation components into larger systems is a well-understood process, it is extremely difficult to do while ensuring that the results are correct. Illgen Simulation Technologies Incorporated and Litton PRC have joined forces to provide tools to integrate simulations with confidence. Illgen Simulation Technologies has developed an extensible and scaleable, n-tier, client- server, distributed software framework for integrating legacy simulations, models, tools, utilities, and databases. By utilizing the Internet, Java, and the Common Object Request Brokering Architecture as the core implementation technologies, the framework provides built-in scalability and extensibility.

  5. Discrete-Event Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateek Sharma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Simulation can be regarded as the emulation of the behavior of a real-world system over an interval of time. The process of simulation relies upon the generation of the history of a system and then analyzing that history to predict the outcome and improve the working of real systems. Simulations can be of various kinds but the topic of interest here is one of the most important kind of simulation which is Discrete-Event Simulation which models the system as a discrete sequence of events in time. So this paper aims at introducing about Discrete-Event Simulation and analyzing how it is beneficial to the real world systems.

  6. Developing Software Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Hall

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Programs in education and business often require learners to develop and demonstrate competence in specified areas and then be able to effectively apply this knowledge. One method to aid in developing a skill set in these areas is through the use of software simulations. These simulations can be used for learner demonstrations of competencies in a specified course as well as a review of the basic skills at the beginning of subsequent courses. The first section of this paper discusses ToolBook, the software used to develop our software simulations. The second section discusses the process of developing software simulations. The third part discusses how we have used software simulations to assess student knowledge of research design by providing simulations that allow the student to practice using SPSS and Excel.

  7. Parallel Atomistic Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEFFELFINGER,GRANT S.

    2000-01-18

    Algorithms developed to enable the use of atomistic molecular simulation methods with parallel computers are reviewed. Methods appropriate for bonded as well as non-bonded (and charged) interactions are included. While strategies for obtaining parallel molecular simulations have been developed for the full variety of atomistic simulation methods, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo have received the most attention. Three main types of parallel molecular dynamics simulations have been developed, the replicated data decomposition, the spatial decomposition, and the force decomposition. For Monte Carlo simulations, parallel algorithms have been developed which can be divided into two categories, those which require a modified Markov chain and those which do not. Parallel algorithms developed for other simulation methods such as Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo, grand canonical molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo methods for protein structure determination are also reviewed and issues such as how to measure parallel efficiency, especially in the case of parallel Monte Carlo algorithms with modified Markov chains are discussed.

  8. Instrumented Architectural Simulation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delagi, B. A.; Saraiya, N.; Nishimura, S.; Byrd, G.

    1987-01-01

    Simulation of systems at an architectural level can offer an effective way to study critical design choices if (1) the performance of the simulator is adequate to examine designs executing significant code bodies, not just toy problems or small application fragements, (2) the details of the simulation include the critical details of the design, (3) the view of the design presented by the simulator instrumentation leads to useful insights on the problems with the design, and (4) there is enough flexibility in the simulation system so that the asking of unplanned questions is not suppressed by the weight of the mechanics involved in making changes either in the design or its measurement. A simulation system with these goals is described together with the approach to its implementation. Its application to the study of a particular class of multiprocessor hardware system architectures is illustrated.

  9. In-Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Anders Thais; Slot, Susanne; Paltved, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In situ simulation offers on-site training to healthcare professionals. It refers to a training strategy where simulation technology is integrated into the clinical encounter. Training in the simulation laboratory does not easily tap into situational resources, e.g. individual, team......, and organisational characteristic. Therefore, it might fail to fully mimic real clinical team processes. Though research on in situ simulation in healthcare is in its infancy, literature is abundant on patient safety and team training1. Patient safety reporting systems that identify risks to patients can improve...... offered in situ simulation faculty with a model for integrating reported critical incidents and adverse events with contextual needs analysis and short-term observations. Furthermore the research group is working on detailing the barriers of in situ simulation such as resources for team training despite...

  10. Developing Software Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Hall

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Programs in education and business often require learners to develop and demonstrate competence in specified areas and then be able to effectively apply this knowledge. One method to aid in developing a skill set in these areas is through the use of software simulations. These simulations can be used for learner demonstrations of competencies in a specified course as well as a review of the basic skills at the beginning of subsequent courses. The first section of this paper discusses ToolBook, the software used to develop our software simulations. The second section discusses the process of developing software simulations. The third part discusses how we have used software simulations to assess student knowledge of research design by providing simulations that allow the student to practice using SPSS and Excel.

  11. Rotorcraft simulation at Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to rotorcraft simulation experience at NASA's Ames research facility, which has involved complex mathematical modeling, high computational capability requirements, and strong influences from pilot motion and visual cues. A development history and performance assessment is presented for the rotorcraft simulation hardware, together with projections of near term development improvements of capabilities. Greater demand is anticipated for the simulation of all-digital helicopter flight control systems.

  12. SIMULATION OF LOGISTICS PROCESSES

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. Taranenko; Fedorenko, I.

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the theoretical basis of the simulation. The study shows the simulation of logistic processes in industrial countries is an integral part of many economic projects aimed at the creation or improvement of logistics systems. The paper was used model Beer Game for management of logistics processes in the enterprise. The simulation model implements in AnyLogic package. AnyLogic product allows us to consider the logistics processes as an integrated system, which allows reach...

  13. Kriging Metamodeling for Simulation.

    OpenAIRE

    van Beers, W.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Many scientific disciplines use mathematical models to describe complicated real systems. Often, analytical methods are inadequate, so simulation is applied. This thesis focuses on computer intensive simulation experiments in Operations Research/Management Science. For such experiments it is necessary to apply interpolation. In this thesis, Kriging interpolation for random simulation is proposed and a novel type of Kriging - called Detrended Kriging - is developed. Kriging turns out to give b...

  14. Packet Tracer network simulator

    CERN Document Server

    Jesin, A

    2014-01-01

    A practical, fast-paced guide that gives you all the information you need to successfully create networks and simulate them using Packet Tracer.Packet Tracer Network Simulator is aimed at students, instructors, and network administrators who wish to use this simulator to learn how to perform networking instead of investing in expensive, specialized hardware. This book assumes that you have a good amount of Cisco networking knowledge, and it will focus more on Packet Tracer rather than networking.

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yazhen

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary scientific studies often rely on the understanding of complex quantum systems via computer simulation. This paper initiates the statistical study of quantum simulation and proposes a Monte Carlo method for estimating analytically intractable quantities. We derive the bias and variance for the proposed Monte Carlo quantum simulation estimator and establish the asymptotic theory for the estimator. The theory is used to design a computational scheme for minimizing the mean square er...

  16. Simulations in nanobiotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Eom, Kilho

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Simulations in NanobiotechnologyKilho EomSimulations in Biological SciencesModeling the Interface between Biological and Synthetic Components in Hybrid NanosystemsRogan Carr, Jeffrey Comer, and Aleksei AksimentievCoarse-Grained Modeling of Large Protein Complexes for Understanding Their Conformational DynamicsKilho Eom, Gwonchan Yoon, Jae In Kim, and Sungsoo NaContinuum Modeling and Simulation of Membrane ProteinsXi ChenExploring the Energy Landscape of Biopolymers U

  17. NPS AUV Integrated Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    147 3. GRAPHIC OBJECT MODEI’QUSING OBJECTFILE FORMAT (cIF)...................... ........... 149. APPENDIX -C. NPS, AUV SONAR CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM...Monterey Bay .. 15 Figure 2.8 Graphics simulation for NPS AUV sonar visualization .......... 15’ Figure 3.1 Integrated simulator network physical...3.11 Integrated simulation display of AUV minefield searh ........ 39 Figure4.1 NPS AUV sonar beam profiles in the NPS pool .......... 43 Figure 42 NPS

  18. Multiscale Simulations Using Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore

    We are developing particle methods as a general framework for large scale simulations of discrete and continuous systems in science and engineering. The specific application and research areas include: discrete element simulations of granular flow, smoothed particle hydrodynamics and particle...... vortex methods for problems in continuum fluid dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics for flow at the meso scale, and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of nanofluidic systems. We employ multiscale techniques to breach the atomistic and continuum scales to study fundamental problems in fluid...

  19. Mesh network simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Pei Ping; YURY N. PETRENKO

    2015-01-01

    A Mesh network simulation framework which provides a powerful and concise modeling chain for a network structure will be introduce in this report. Mesh networks has a special topologic structure. The paper investigates a message transfer in wireless mesh network simulation and how does it works in cellular network simulation. Finally the experimental result gave us the information that mesh networks have different principle in transmission way with cellular networks in transmission, and multi...

  20. Regional transportation simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, K.; Rickert, M.; Frye, R.; Stretz, P.; Simon, P.; Jacob, R.; Barrett, C.L.

    1998-07-01

    For transportation planning applications, it is useful to not only model each individual traveler, but also the decision-making process leading to their travel demand. Simulation-based modeling of this process means iterations between the actual transportation micro-simulation and the modules simulating the process making the plans. This means that for understanding a single day of travel, it may be necessary to simulate that day hundreds of times for the iteration process, leading to a considerable strain on computational resources.

  1. The ATLAS Simulation Software

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Z

    2008-01-01

    We present the status of the ATLAS Simulation Pro ject. Recent detector description improvements have focussed on commissioning layouts, implementation of inert material, and comparisons to the as-built detector. Core Simulation is reviewed with a focus on parameter optimizations, physics list choices, visualization, large-scale production, and validation. A fast simulation is also briefly described, and its performance is evaluated with respect to the full Simulation. Digitization, the last step of the Monte Carlo chain, is described, including developments in pile up and data overlay.

  2. Constructing emotion through simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Mendenhall, Christine D

    2017-07-21

    Evidence increasingly suggests that simulations implement patterns of prior experience to construct one's current experience, whether that experience is oriented in the past, in the here and now, or in the future. Simulation is the mechanism by which the brain capitalizes on prior learning to efficiently navigate the situation at hand. This review examines the latest developments in theory and empirical research that address simulation during emotional phenomena. Integration of evidence across multiple literatures suggests that simulation accounts provide a unifying framework across many different emotional phenomena and highlights the importance of investigating dynamics, complexity, and variation in emotional experiences moving forward. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Simulation of quantum computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H; Michielsen, K; Hams, AH; Miyashita, S; Saito, K; Landau, DP; Lewis, SP; Schuttler, HB

    2001-01-01

    We describe a simulation approach to study the functioning of Quantum Computer hardware. The latter is modeled by a collection of interacting spin-1/2 objects. The time evolution of this spin system maps one-to-one to a quantum program carried out by the Quantum Computer. Our simulation software con

  4. Multicore Education through Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, O.

    2011-01-01

    A project-oriented course for advanced undergraduate and graduate students is described for simulating multiple processor cores. Simics, a free simulator for academia, was utilized to enable students to explore computer architecture, operating systems, and hardware/software cosimulation. Motivation for including this course in the curriculum is…

  5. Simulation 󈨔 Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-21

    Simulation directe par reseau electrique 4:30 - 4:45 p.m. CLOSING SESSION TECHNICAL APPLICATIONS Lecture Hall B Wednesday, June 25, 1980 vi ... . .I...Sensibilitd du moteur pas--pas au moyen d’un module a deux paramntres 11:10 - 11:30 aom. R. LeDoeuff / C. Iung (France) Digital Simulation of a Three Phase

  6. Simulating Laboratory Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, J. E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of computer assisted instruction in a medical microbiology course. Presents examples of how computer assisted instruction can present case histories in which the laboratory procedures are simulated. Discusses an authoring system used to prepare computer simulations and provides one example of a case history dealing with fractured…

  7. Interactive Reactor Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Herbert E., Jr.; Himmelblau, David M.

    In the field of chemical engineering, interactive process models can simulate the dynamic behavior and analysis of chemical processes. DYFLO was the process simulation program selected as a foundation for development of interactive programs for computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in chemical engineering. Interactive Computing and time sharing…

  8. Simulations using meshfree methods

    CERN Document Server

    P, Kirana Kumara

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, attempt is made to solve a few problems using the Polynomial Point Collocation Method (PPCM), the Radial Point Collocation Method (RPCM), Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), and the Finite Point Method (FPM). A few observations on the accuracy of these methods are recorded. All the simulations in this paper are three dimensional linear elastostatic simulations, without accounting for body forces.

  9. Simulating offshore sandwaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, A.A.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Damme, van R.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Sand waves form a prominent regular pattern in the offshore seabeds of sandy shallow seas and pose a threat to a range of offshore activities. A two-dimensional vertical (2DV) flow and morphological simulation model describing the behaviour of these sand waves has been developed. The simulation mode

  10. Approach to simulation effectiveness

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goncalves, DPD

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available ? The context and purpose of simulation are important in answering the question. If the simulation is viewed as a system, it follows that it has stakeholders and requirements originating from the creating system. An important result is that measures...

  11. Multicore Education through Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, O.

    2011-01-01

    A project-oriented course for advanced undergraduate and graduate students is described for simulating multiple processor cores. Simics, a free simulator for academia, was utilized to enable students to explore computer architecture, operating systems, and hardware/software cosimulation. Motivation for including this course in the curriculum is…

  12. Political Simulations Using Excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Simulations have received considerable attention as a tool to promote problem-solving skills, intense involvement, and high-order thinking among students. Whether semester-long exercises or a single-class session, simulations are often used in areas of conflict studies, diplomatic studies, trade disputes, electoral processes, and policy and legal…

  13. Rehearsal Enabling Simulation Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    developed by Renaissance Sciences Corporation (RSC) in collaboration with Elmendorf Civil Engineering, Joint Pacific Area Range Complex (JPARC) management...from the Air Force Combat Climatology Center (AFCCC) into Expert Common Immersive Theatre Environment (XCITE) threat simulations. AFCCC created an...L-3 Communications Link Simulation and Training, and Renaissance Science Corporation. The team provided as needed consultation to numerous

  14. TANGO Array.. 2. Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.

    2004-01-01

    The angular and energy resolutions of the TANGO Array were obtained using extensive Monte Carlo simulations performed with a double purpose: (1) to determine the appropriate parameters for the array fitting to the desired range of sensitivity (the knee energy region), and (2) to construct a reliable shower database required for reference in the analysis of experimental data. The AIRES code, with the SIBYLL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (assuming protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 10 14 to 10 18 eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detectors (water Cherenkov detectors), including the electronics, pickup noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cables. The trigger stage was considered in the simulations in order to estimate the trigger efficiency of the array and to verify the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper delineates the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and describes the simulated data. The results of these simulations suggest that we can expect an error in the energy of the primary cosmic-ray of ˜60% of the estimated value and that the error in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as ˜4°. The present simulations also indicate that unambiguous assignments of the primary energy cannot be obtained because of the uncertainty in the nature of the primary cosmic ray.

  15. TANGO Array. 2. Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauleo, P. E-mail: pablo.bauleo@colostate.edu; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A

    2004-01-11

    The angular and energy resolutions of the TANGO Array were obtained using extensive Monte Carlo simulations performed with a double purpose: (1) to determine the appropriate parameters for the array fitting to the desired range of sensitivity (the knee energy region), and (2) to construct a reliable shower database required for reference in the analysis of experimental data. The AIRES code, with the SIBYLL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (assuming protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 18} eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detectors (water Cherenkov detectors), including the electronics, pickup noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cables. The trigger stage was considered in the simulations in order to estimate the trigger efficiency of the array and to verify the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper delineates the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and describes the simulated data. The results of these simulations suggest that we can expect an error in the energy of the primary cosmic-ray of {approx}60% of the estimated value and that the error in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as {approx}4 deg. . The present simulations also indicate that unambiguous assignments of the primary energy cannot be obtained because of the uncertainty in the nature of the primary cosmic ray.

  16. Interactive Foresight Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Sanne; Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Jacobsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Combined Simulation Approach (CSA) is a way to evaluate risks and address potential unforeseen problems in a more interactive way than what is often observed in practice in companies or sectors. The approach is based on a combination of scenario analysis and discrete-event computer simulation...

  17. Electric-car simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, C. P.; Slusser, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    PARAMET, interactive simulation program for parametric studies of electric vehicles, guides user through simulation by menu and series of prompts for input parameters. Program considers aerodynamic drag, rolling resistance, linear and rotational acceleration, and road gradient as forces acting on vehicle.

  18. Risk Management and Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovmand, David

    2014-01-01

    Review of: Risk Management and Simulation / Aparna Gupta. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2013, xxix + 491 pp., $99.95(H), ISBN: 978-1-4398-3594-4.......Review of: Risk Management and Simulation / Aparna Gupta. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2013, xxix + 491 pp., $99.95(H), ISBN: 978-1-4398-3594-4....

  19. Trick Simulation Environment 07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Alexander S.; Penn, John M.

    2012-01-01

    The Trick Simulation Environment is a generic simulation toolkit used for constructing and running simulations. This release includes a Monte Carlo analysis simulation framework and a data analysis package. It produces all auto documentation in XML. Also, the software is capable of inserting a malfunction at any point during the simulation. Trick 07 adds variable server output options and error messaging and is capable of using and manipulating wide characters for international support. Wide character strings are available as a fundamental type for variables processed by Trick. A Trick Monte Carlo simulation uses a statistically generated, or predetermined, set of inputs to iteratively drive the simulation. Also, there is a framework in place for optimization and solution finding where developers may iteratively modify the inputs per run based on some analysis of the outputs. The data analysis package is capable of reading data from external simulation packages such as MATLAB and Octave, as well as the common comma-separated values (CSV) format used by Excel, without the use of external converters. The file formats for MATLAB and Octave were obtained from their documentation sets, and Trick maintains generic file readers for each format. XML tags store the fields in the Trick header comments. For header files, XML tags for structures and enumerations, and the members within are stored in the auto documentation. For source code files, XML tags for each function and the calling arguments are stored in the auto documentation. When a simulation is built, a top level XML file, which includes all of the header and source code XML auto documentation files, is created in the simulation directory. Trick 07 provides an XML to TeX converter. The converter reads in header and source code XML documentation files and converts the data to TeX labels and tables suitable for inclusion in TeX documents. A malfunction insertion capability allows users to override the value of any

  20. Rainfall simulation in education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Piet; Baartman, Jantiene; Gooren, Harm; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall simulation has become an important method for the assessment of soil erosion and soil hydrological processes. For students, rainfall simulation offers an year-round, attractive and active way of experiencing water erosion, while not being dependent on (outdoors) weather conditions. Moreover, using rainfall simulation devices, they can play around with different conditions, including rainfall duration, intensity, soil type, soil cover, soil and water conservation measures, etc. and evaluate their effect on erosion and sediment transport. Rainfall simulators differ in design and scale. At Wageningen University, both BSc and MSc student of the curriculum 'International Land and Water Management' work with different types of rainfall simulation devices in three courses: - A mini rainfall simulator (0.0625m2) is used in the BSc level course 'Introduction to Land Degradation and Remediation'. Groups of students take the mini rainfall simulator with them to a nearby field location and test it for different soil types, varying from clay to more sandy, slope angles and vegetation or litter cover. The groups decide among themselves which factors they want to test and they compare their results and discuss advantage and disadvantage of the mini-rainfall simulator. - A medium sized rainfall simulator (0.238 m2) is used in the MSc level course 'Sustainable Land and Water Management', which is a field practical in Eastern Spain. In this course, a group of students has to develop their own research project and design their field measurement campaign using the transportable rainfall simulator. - Wageningen University has its own large rainfall simulation laboratory, in which a 15 m2 rainfall simulation facility is available for research. In the BSc level course 'Land and Water Engineering' Student groups will build slopes in the rainfall simulator in specially prepared containers. Aim is to experience the behaviour of different soil types or slope angles when (heavy) rain

  1. SIMULATION IN MEDICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. Palés Argullós

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In last twenty years, we are seeing increasingly widespread use of simulations in the training of doctors and other professionals of health sciences at the different stages of their educational continuum (undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing medical education. So much so that the concept of simulations-based medical education has emerged and it is now recognized as a vital tool to ensure the learning of medical students and doctors, and to improve patient safety. This article will describe the reasons for the introduction and development of this new methodology, its advantages and the different models and currently available resources. We will describe also the characteristics of so-called simulation centres or clinical skills laboratories that have been developed worldwide, where the simulation-based medical education take place. Moreover, we will refer briefly to the situation in our country and finally to the principles of a good development of the simulation-based medical education.

  2. Handbook of simulation optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    The Handbook of Simulation Optimization presents an overview of the state of the art of simulation optimization, providing a survey of the most well-established approaches for optimizing stochastic simulation models and a sampling of recent research advances in theory and methodology. Leading contributors cover such topics as discrete optimization via simulation, ranking and selection, efficient simulation budget allocation, random search methods, response surface methodology, stochastic gradient estimation, stochastic approximation, sample average approximation, stochastic constraints, variance reduction techniques, model-based stochastic search methods and Markov decision processes. This single volume should serve as a reference for those already in the field and as a means for those new to the field for understanding and applying the main approaches. The intended audience includes researchers, practitioners and graduate students in the business/engineering fields of operations research, management science,...

  3. Simulators and endourological training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna, M Pilar; Hatzinger, Martin; Rassweiler, Jens

    2002-05-01

    Acquisition of skills laboratory training seems to be of importance in the training of surgeons, and is intended to cover the gap between theoretical learning and real practice. Economic and ethical reasons limit the use of animals during the learning process, while trends in medical change have severely restricted the available time to teach and to learn. With the incorporation of laparoscopy and the blossoming of minimally invasive techniques, mainly endoscopy, simulators have gained wide acceptance as an important tool in the surgeon's learning process. Two types of simulators are currently available: inanimates or mannequins and virtual reality simulators. A review of the recent literature shows that there is generally a significant improvement in dexterity after using simulators, whichever type is used. It is still unknown whether training simulation influences the patient's outcome positively.

  4. A bobsleigh simulator software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempfler, Georg S., E-mail: georg.rempfler@alumni.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, CLA G23.3, IMES—Center of Mechanics (Switzerland); Glocker, Christoph, E-mail: glocker@imes.mavt.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, CLA J23.1, IMES—Center of Mechanics (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    This paper presents a model of the artificial ice track in Whistler, Canada that is based on its construction data, and a model of a two-men bobsleigh consisting of nine rigid bodies, having 13 degrees of freedom and incorporating 17 hard frictional contacts. These models are implemented within a simulator that is capable of performing accurate real time simulations of piloted runs on commonly available PC hardware. The simulation is verified against the results of the official two-men race that took place during the Olympic Winter Games in 2010. The simulator has been used by several professional Swiss pilots during their preparation for the 2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. The simulator is exploited to analyse and judge the range of possible driving lines regarding speed and runtime improvements. It could also serve to consult track designers about safety issues and sleigh constructors about the expected dynamics on a track.

  5. Simulation in resuscitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gavin D

    2007-05-01

    The quality of education, CPR guidelines and the chain of survival all contribute to patient outcome following cardiac arrest. Increasing concerns about patient safety have focused attention on the methods used to train and prepare doctors for clinical practice. Reductions in clinical exposure at both undergraduate and postgraduate level have been implicated in junior doctors inability to recognise and manage critically ill patients. Simulation is used as a central training tool in contemporary advanced life support teaching. Simulation provides a learning opportunity for controlled clinical practice without putting patients or others at risk. This review examines the history and rationale for simulation training in resuscitation and provides some background to the learning theories that underpin it. The role of task trainers, high and low fidelity patient simulators and computer assisted simulation as teaching tools are discussed.

  6. Educational science meets simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquale, Susan J

    2015-03-01

    With the increased use of simulation to teach the knowledge and skills demanded of clinical practice, toward the achievement of optimal patient care outcomes, it becomes increasingly important that clinician educators have fundamental knowledge about educational science and its applications to teaching and learning. As the foremost goal of teaching is to facilitate learning, it is essential that the simulation experience be oriented to the learning process. In order for this to occur, is it necessary for the clinician educator to understand the fundamentals of educational science and theories of education such that they can apply them to teaching and learning in an environment focused on medical simulation. Underscoring the rationale for the fundamentals of educational science to be applied to the simulation environment, and to work in tandem with simulation, is the importance that accurate and appropriate information is retained and applied toward establishing competence in essential practice-based skills and procedures.

  7. Hardware Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-04-12

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32 bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain validated solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedra that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester. We show that the hardware accelerated solution is faster than the current technique used by scientists.

  8. Neoclassical equilibrium in gyrokinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nguyen, C.; Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Ghendrih, Ph.

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents a set of model collision operators, which reproduce the neoclassical equilibrium and comply with the constraints of a full-f global gyrokinetic code. The assessment of these operators is based on an entropy variational principle, which allows one to perform a fast calculation of the neoclassical diffusivity and poloidal velocity. It is shown that the force balance equation is recovered at lowest order in the expansion parameter, the normalized gyroradius, hence allowing one to calculate correctly the radial electric field. Also, the conventional neoclassical transport and the poloidal velocity are reproduced in the plateau and banana regimes. The advantages and drawbacks of the various model operators are discussed in view of the requirements for neoclassical and turbulent transport.

  9. Adiabatic quantum simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Biamonte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In his famous 1981 talk, Feynman proposed that unlike classical computers, which would presumably experience an exponential slowdown when simulating quantum phenomena, a universal quantum simulator would not. An ideal quantum simulator would be controllable, and built using existing technology. In some cases, moving away from gate-model-based implementations of quantum computing may offer a more feasible solution for particular experimental implementations. Here we consider an adiabatic quantum simulator which simulates the ground state properties of sparse Hamiltonians consisting of one- and two-local interaction terms, using sparse Hamiltonians with at most three-local interactions. Properties of such Hamiltonians can be well approximated with Hamiltonians containing only two-local terms. The register holding the simulated ground state is brought adiabatically into interaction with a probe qubit, followed by a single diabatic gate operation on the probe which then undergoes free evolution until measured. This allows one to recover e.g. the ground state energy of the Hamiltonian being simulated. Given a ground state, this scheme can be used to verify the QMA-complete problem LOCAL HAMILTONIAN, and is therefore likely more powerful than classical computing.

  10. Simulation in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micieli, Giuseppe; Cavallini, Anna; Santalucia, Paola; Gensini, Gianfranco

    2015-10-01

    Simulation is a frontier for disseminating knowledge in almost all the fields of medicine and it is attracting growing interest because it offers a means of developing new teaching and training models, as well as of verifying what has been learned in a critical setting that simulates clinical practice. The role of simulation in neurology, until now limited by the obvious physical limitations of the dummies used to train students and learners, is now increasing since, today, it allows anamnestic data to be related to the instrumental evidence necessary for diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making, i.e., to the findings of neurophysiological investigations (EEG, carotid and vertebral echography and transcranial Doppler, for example) and neuroradiological investigations (CT, MRI imaging), as well as vital parameter monitoring (ECG, saturimetry, blood pressure, respiratory frequency, etc.). Simulation, by providing learners with opportunities to discuss, with experts, different profiles of biological parameters (both during the simulation itself and in the subsequent debriefing session), is becoming an increasingly important tool for training those involved in evaluation of critical neurological patients (stroke, Guillan Barrè syndrome, myasthenia, status epilepticus, headache, vertigo, confusional status, etc.) and complex cases. In this SIMMED (Italian Society for Simulation in Medicine) position paper, the applications (present and, possibly, future) of simulation in neurology are reported.

  11. Team training/simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Erin A S; Fisher, Janet; Arafeh, Julia; Druzin, Maurice

    2010-03-01

    Obstetrical emergencies require the rapid formation of a team with clear communication, strong leadership, and appropriate decision-making to ensure a positive patient outcome. Obstetric teams can improve their emergency response capability and efficiency through team and simulation training. Postpartum hemorrhage is an ideal model for team and simulation training, as postpartum hemorrhage requires a multidisciplinary team with the capability to produce a protocol-driven, rapid response. This article provides an overview of team and simulation training and focuses on applications within obstetrics, particularly preparation for postpartum hemorrhage.

  12. Multiscale Simulations Using Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore

    We are developing particle methods as a general framework for large scale simulations of discrete and continuous systems in science and engineering. The specific application and research areas include: discrete element simulations of granular flow, smoothed particle hydrodynamics and particle vor...... dynamics. Recent work on the thermophoretic motion of water nanodroplets confined inside carbon nanotubes, and multiscale techniques for polar liquids will be discussed in detail at the symposium....... vortex methods for problems in continuum fluid dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics for flow at the meso scale, and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of nanofluidic systems. We employ multiscale techniques to breach the atomistic and continuum scales to study fundamental problems in fluid...

  13. MD SIMULATION FOR NANOCRYSTALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马新玲; 杨卫

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) provided an ab initio simulation for nano-scale mechanical behavior of materials, provided that the inter-atomic potential is accurately prescribed. MD is particularly suitable in simulating the formation, the deformation, and the evolution of nanocrystals under a fast strain rate. To tackle large scale system and nano-seconds time duration, parallel algorithm is desired. The present paper reviews the recent advances in MD simulation for nanocrystals with attention focused on the applications toward nanomechanics. The examined issues are: formation of nanocrystalline metals, nanoindentation on nanocrystals, fast deformation of nanocrystals, orderdisorder transition, and nano-particle impact.

  14. The ATLAS Detector Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, P.J. [University of Edinburgh, School of Physics and Astronomy, James Clerk Maxwell Building, The Kings Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    We present the simulation software for the ATLAS experiment [G. Aad et al., The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, JINST 3 (2008), S08003] at the Large Hadron Collider [L. Evans and P. Bryant, LHC Machine, JINST 3 (2008), S08001]. The overall infrastructure and some selected features are discussed. In particular, the detector description, the interface to Geant4, event generator support, magnetic field integration improvements, pile-up and digitisation of overlapping events and fast simulation. Also described are performance studies, large scale production and the validation of the simulated output against recent data.

  15. Simulation dynamique du voilier

    CERN Document Server

    Roncin, Kostia

    2010-01-01

    A sailing simulator has been developed from a new point of view. It will rather be for the sailor to use it than for the architect. One boat which characteristics were already known has been chosen. The whole coupled mechanic equations system has been solved. Heave and pitch equations, usually neglected, have been introduced to evaluate each trim of the crew and provide an optimal ride analysis tool. In this paper, efforts models and their determination's method are briefly presented. A tack simulation is shown as a brief overview on the simulator possibilities.

  16. Bioinspired swimming simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Michel; Iollo, Angelo

    2016-10-01

    We present a method to simulate the flow past bioinspired swimmers starting from pictures of an actual fish. The overall approach requires i) a skeleton graph generation to get a level-set function from pictures; ii) optimal transportation to obtain the velocity on the body surface; iii) flow simulations realized with a Cartesian method based on penalization. This technique can be used to automate modeling swimming motion from data collected by biologists. We illustrate this paradigm by simulating the swimming of a mackerel fish.

  17. Network simulation experiments manual

    CERN Document Server

    Aboelela, Emad

    2011-01-01

    Network Simulation Experiments Manual, Third Edition, contains simulation-based experiments to help students and professionals learn about key concepts in computer networking. The simulation approach provides a virtual environment for a wide range of desirable features, such as modeling a network based on specified criteria and analyzing its performance under different scenarios. The experiments include the basics of using OPNET IT Guru Academic Edition; operation of the Ethernet network; partitioning of a physical network into separate logical networks using virtual local area networks (V

  18. Dynamical Simulation of Probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that classical probabilities, and in particular, probabilistic Turing machine, can be simulated by combining chaos and non-Lipschitz dynamics, without utilization of any man-made devices(such as random number generators). Self-orgainizing properties of systems coupling simulated and calculated probabilities and their link to quantum computations are discussed. Special attention was focused upon coupled stochastic processes, defined in terms of conditional probabilities, for which joint probability does not exist. Simulations of quantum probabilities are also discussed.

  19. Simulation of a microgrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulǎu, Lucian Ioan

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the simulation of a microgrid system with storage technologies. The microgrid comprises 6 distributed generators (DGs), 3 loads and a 150 kW storage unit. The installed capacity of the generators is 1100 kW, while the total load demand is 900 kW. The simulation is performed by using a SCADA software, considering the power generation costs, the loads demand and the system's power losses. The generators access the system in order of their power generation cost. The simulation is performed for the entire day.

  20. Delay modeling in logic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acken, J. M.; Goldstein, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    As digital integrated circuit size and complexity increases, the need for accurate and efficient computer simulation increases. Logic simulators such as SALOGS (SAndia LOGic Simulator), which utilize transition states in addition to the normal stable states, provide more accurate analysis than is possible with traditional logic simulators. Furthermore, the computational complexity of this analysis is far lower than that of circuit simulation such as SPICE. An eight-value logic simulation environment allows the use of accurate delay models that incorporate both element response and transition times. Thus, timing simulation with an accuracy approaching that of circuit simulation can be accomplished with an efficiency comparable to that of logic simulation. 4 figures.

  1. Supply Chain Simulation : A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of simulation in supply chain management.It reviews four types of simulation, namely spreadsheet simulation, system dynamics, discreteevent simulation, and business games.Which simulation type should be applied, depends on the type of managerial question to be answered b

  2. CATCC/AATCC Simulator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 15G30 CATCC/AATCC simulator provides high fidelity training for Navy Air Traffic Control (ATC) trainees in a realistic shipboard air traffic control environment....

  3. A Simulation of Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Michael W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A simulation of the decreased visual acuity of individuals with amblyopia is used in one optometry program to help students understand how amblyopia patients see. Students act as patient, then as doctor, proceeding through clinical diagnosis. (MSE)

  4. Electromechanical Drivetrain Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallego-Calderon, Juan; Branner, Kim; Natarajan, Anand

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this paper is another step from the DTU Wind Energy efforts to advance understanding of the electromechanical drive-train loads and its interaction with the rest of the components in the wind turbine. The main objective of the PhD is to investigate the modelling and simulation...... flexibilities, the generator dynamics and the grid, along with the structural loads in the wind turbine. In this paper, two simulation approaches are presented and conclusions are made according to their advantages and disadvantages. The drive-train is described by means of a torsional model composed...... of a wind turbine’s drivetrain using an integrated simulation approach where different simulation tools are interconnected. Matlab and HAWC2 are used for this purpose. A contribution is expected to be in the study of the interaction between the mechanical loads in the gearbox due to gear mesh and bearing...

  5. Immersive Simulation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Develops and tests novel user interfaces for 3D virtual simulators and first-person shooter games that make user interaction more like natural interaction...

  6. Simulating spacecraft systems

    CERN Document Server

    Eickhoff, Jens

    2009-01-01

    This book on the application of functional system simulation in spacecraft development covers the entire process from spacecraft design to final verification. It offers the latest research in all relevant topics and includes numerous examples.

  7. MONARC Simulation Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Dobre, Ciprian

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the latest generation of the MONARC (MOdels of Networked Analysis at Regional Centers) simulation framework, as a design and modelling tool for large scale distributed systems applied to HEP experiments. A process-oriented approach for discrete event simulation is well-suited for describing concurrent running programs, as well as the stochastic arrival patterns that characterize how such systems are used. The simulation engine is based on Threaded Objects (or Active Objects), which offer great flexibility in simulating the complex behavior of distributed data processing programs. The engine provides an appropriate scheduling mechanism for the Active objects with support for interrupts. This approach offers a natural way of describing complex running programs that are data dependent and which concurrently compete for shared resources as well as large numbers of concurrent data transfers on shared resources. The framework provides a complete set of basic components (processing nodes, data s...

  8. GLAST LAT Full Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, Luca [INFN Pisa (Italy); Bastieri, Denis [Universita di Padova and INFN Padova (Italy); Boinee, Praveen [Universita di Udine (Italy); INFN Trieste (Italy); Brigida, Monica [Universita di Bari and INFN Bari (Italy); Cabras, Giuseppe [Universita di Udine (Italy); INFN Trieste (Italy); Cecchi, Claudia [Universita di Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); De Angelis, Alessandro [Universita di Udine (Italy); INFN Trieste (Italy); Favretto, Dario [Universita di Udine (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Fiorucci, Massimo [Universita di Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Frailis, Marco [Universita di Udine (Italy); INFN Trieste (Italy); Gargano, Fabio [Universita di Bari and INFN Bari (Italy); Giannitrapani, Riccardo [Universita di Udine (Italy); INFN Trieste (Italy); Giglietto, Nicola [Universita di Bari and INFN Bari (Italy); Kuss, Michael [INFN Pisa (Italy); Latronico, Luca [INFN Pisa (Italy); Lionetto, Andrea [Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' and INFN Roma-2 (Italy); Longo, Francesco [INFN Trieste (Italy); Universita di Trieste (Italy); Loparco, Francesco [Universita di Bari and INFN Bari (Italy); Lubrano, Pasquale [Universita di Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Marcucci, Francesca [Universita di Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Mazziotta, Mario Nicola [Universita di Bari and INFN Bari (Italy); Milotti, Edoardo [Universita di Udine (Italy); INFN Trieste (Italy); Morselli, Aldo [Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' and INFN Roma-2 (Italy); Omodei, Nicola [INFN Pisa (Italy) and Universita di Siena (Italy)]. E-mail: nicola.omodei@pi.infn.it; Pepe, Monica [Universita di Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Rando, Riccardo [Universita di Padova and INFN Padova (Italy); Razzano, Massimiliano [INFN Pisa (Italy); Spandre, Gloria [INFN Pisa (Italy); Tosti, Gino [Universita di Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy)

    2006-01-15

    This paper presents the simulation of the GLAST high energy gamma-ray telescope. The simulation package, written in C++, is based on the Geant4 toolkit, and it is integrated into a general framework used to process events. A detailed simulation of the electronic signals inside Silicon detectors has been provided and it is used for the particle tracking, which is handled by a dedicated software. A unique repository for the geometrical description of the detector has been realized using the XML language and a C++ library to access this information has been designed and implemented. As first application of the GLAST LAT software, one day of simulated data has been produced. This paper outlines the contribution developed by the Italian GLAST software group.

  9. Simulating Cosmic Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, D H; Hernquist, L E; Weinberg, David H.; Katz, Neal; Hernquist, Lars

    1997-01-01

    We describe cosmological simulation techniques and their application to studies of cosmic structure formation, with particular attention to recent hydrodynamic simulations of structure in the high redshift universe. Collisionless N-body simulations with Gaussian initial conditions produce a pattern of sheets, filaments, tunnels, and voids that resembles the observed large scale galaxy distribution. Simulations that incorporate gas dynamics and dissipation form dense clumps of cold gas with sizes and masses similar to the luminous parts of galaxies. Models based on inflation and cold dark matter predict a healthy population of high redshift galaxies, including systems with star formation rates of 20 M_{\\sun}/year at z=6. At z~3, most of the baryons in these models reside in the low density intergalactic medium, which produces fluctuating Lyman-alpha absorption in the spectra of background quasars. The physical description of this ``Lyman-alpha forest'' is particularly simple if the absorption spectrum is viewe...

  10. Water Quality Analysis Simulation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Water Quality analysis simulation Program, an enhancement of the original WASP. This model helps users interpret and predict water quality responses to natural...

  11. Water Quality Analysis Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Water Quality analysis simulation Program, an enhancement of the original WASP. This model helps users interpret and predict water quality responses to natural phenomena and man-made pollution for variious pollution management decisions.

  12. Fidelity in clinical simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne; Nøhr, Christian; Rasmussen, Stine Loft

    2013-01-01

    Clinical simulation may be used to identify user needs for context sensitive functionalities in e-Health. The objective with this paper is to describe how user requirements and use cases in a large EHR-platform procurement may be validated by clinical simulation using a very low-fidelity prototype...... without any existing test data. Instead of using test scenarios and use cases, the healthcare professionals who are participating in the clinical simulation are generating both scenario and patient data themselves. We found that this approach allows for an imaginative discussion, not restricted by known...... functionalities and limitations, of the ideal EHR-platform. Subsequently, we discuss benefits and challenges of using an extremely low fidelity environment and discuss the degree of fidelity necessary for conducting clinical simulation....

  13. ANS Based Submarine Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    computer based simulation proraon supplied by Dr. John Ware at Computer Sceinces Corporation (CSC). Thee am two reasons to use simulated data instead...ANS (Artificial Neural System) capable of modeling submarine perfomncie based on full scale data generated using a computer based simulabon program...The Optimized Entropy algorilth enables the solutions to diffcu problems on a desktop computer within an acceptable time frame. Ob6ectve for w

  14. Passenger Information System Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Botha, Louis

    2015-01-01

    This thesis goes through the development process of a Passenger Information System simulator for a customer to test their route information databases on before distributing these to the rolling stock. The paper starts by describing the basic components and devices of a Mitron passenger information system and the purpose of the passenger information system simulator ordered by the customer. The paper continues by describing the initial design that was offered to the customer. The 11 ma...

  15. Simulated floating zone method

    OpenAIRE

    Ozawa, Ryo; Kato, Yasuyuki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides the simulated floating zone (SFZ) method that is an efficient simulation technique to obtain thermal equilibrium states, especially useful when domain formation prevents the system from reaching a spatially-uniform stable state. In the SFZ method, the system is heated up locally, and the heated region is steadily shifted, similar to the floating zone method for growing a single crystal with less lattice defect and impurity in experiments. We demonstrate that the SFZ method...

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Tarmyshov, Konstantin B.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular simulations can provide a detailed picture of a desired chemical, physical, or biological process. It has been developed over last 50 years and is being used now to solve a large variety of problems in many different fields. In particular, quantum calculations are very helpful to study small systems at a high resolution where electronic structure of compounds is accounted for. Molecular dynamics simulations, in turn, are employed to study development of a certain molecular ensemble ...

  17. Xyce parallel electronic simulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Santarelli, Keith R.

    2010-05-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide.

  18. Atomistic simulations of fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Embedded atom interaction potentials are used to simulate the atomistic aspects of the fracture process. Simulations are presented for the behavior of cracks in pure metals and intermetallics, near the Griffith condition. The materials considered include Fe, Cu, Ni as well as Fe, Ni, Co, and Ti aluminides. The work focuses on the comparative study of fracture behavior in the different materials. The role of the atomic relaxation at the crack tip and of lattice trapping phenomena is analyzed.

  19. Solenoid-Simulation Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Electrical properties of solenoids imitated for tests of control circuits. Simulation circuit imitates voltage and current responses of two engine-controlling solenoids. Used in tests of programs of digital engine-control circuits, also provides electronic interface with circuits imitating electrical properties of pressure sensors and linear variable-differential transformers. Produces voltages, currents, delays, and discrete turnon and turnoff signals representing operation of solenoid in engine-control relay. Many such circuits used simulating overall engine circuitry.

  20. Bridge Crossing Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-07

    Requirement BCS Computer-controlled hydraulic actuation system to impart simulated crossing loads on an entire bridge structure undergoing fatigue test ...structure. Bridge test site with prepared embankments corresponding to the span and bank condition requirements of the bridge under test Conduct real...Center (AEC). (5) Sample size and number of crossings required. The number of required simulated crossings to conduct fatigue testing per the

  1. Theory Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlachter, Jack [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-23

    Los Alamos has a long history in theory, modeling and simulation. We focus on multidisciplinary teams that tackle complex problems. Theory, modeling and simulation are tools to solve problems just like an NMR spectrometer, a gas chromatograph or an electron microscope. Problems should be used to define the theoretical tools needed and not the other way around. Best results occur when theory and experiments are working together in a team.

  2. Modelling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casetti, E.; Vogt, W.G.; Mickle, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    This conference includes papers on the uses of supercomputers, multiprocessors, artificial intelligence and expert systems in various energy applications. Topics considered include knowledge-based expert systems for power engineering, a solar air conditioning laboratory computer system, multivariable control systems, the impact of power system disturbances on computer systems, simulating shared-memory parallel computers, real-time image processing with multiprocessors, and network modeling and simulation of greenhouse solar systems.

  3. Simulation - modeling - experiment; Simulation - modelisation - experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    After two workshops held in 2001 on the same topics, and in order to make a status of the advances in the domain of simulation and measurements, the main goals proposed for this workshop are: the presentation of the state-of-the-art of tools, methods and experiments in the domains of interest of the Gedepeon research group, the exchange of information about the possibilities of use of computer codes and facilities, about the understanding of physical and chemical phenomena, and about development and experiment needs. This document gathers 18 presentations (slides) among the 19 given at this workshop and dealing with: the deterministic and stochastic codes in reactor physics (Rimpault G.); MURE: an evolution code coupled with MCNP (Meplan O.); neutronic calculation of future reactors at EdF (Lecarpentier D.); advance status of the MCNP/TRIO-U neutronic/thermal-hydraulics coupling (Nuttin A.); the FLICA4/TRIPOLI4 thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling (Aniel S.); methods of disturbances and sensitivity analysis of nuclear data in reactor physics, application to VENUS-2 experimental reactor (Bidaud A.); modeling for the reliability improvement of an ADS accelerator (Biarotte J.L.); residual gas compensation of the space charge of intense beams (Ben Ismail A.); experimental determination and numerical modeling of phase equilibrium diagrams of interest in nuclear applications (Gachon J.C.); modeling of irradiation effects (Barbu A.); elastic limit and irradiation damage in Fe-Cr alloys: simulation and experiment (Pontikis V.); experimental measurements of spallation residues, comparison with Monte-Carlo simulation codes (Fallot M.); the spallation target-reactor coupling (Rimpault G.); tools and data (Grouiller J.P.); models in high energy transport codes: status and perspective (Leray S.); other ways of investigation for spallation (Audoin L.); neutrons and light particles production at intermediate energies (20-200 MeV) with iron, lead and uranium targets (Le Colley F

  4. TANGO ARRAY II: Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.

    The angular and energy resolution of the TANGO Array has been obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. The AIRES code, with the SYBILL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 1014 eV to 1018 eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detector stations (water ˇCerenkov detectors), including the electronics, pick up noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cabling. The trigger stage is taken into account in order to produce estimates of the trigger efficiency of the array and to check the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper describes the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and presents the simulated data. These simulations indicate that the accuracy of the cosmic ray primary energy determination is expected to be ˜ 60 % and the precision in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as ˜ 4 degrees.

  5. Perfect simulation of Hawkes processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl

    This article concerns a perfect simulation algorithm for unmarked and marked Hawkes processes. The usual stratihtforward simulation algorithm suffers from edge effects, whereas our perfect simulation algorithm does not. By viewing Hawkes processes as Poisson cluster processes and using...

  6. Eternity Variables to Simulate Specifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, WH; Boiten, EA; Moller, B

    2002-01-01

    Simulation of specifications is introduced as a unification and generalization of refinement mappings, history variables, forward simulations, prophecy variables, and backward simulations. Eternity variables are introduced as a more powerful alternative for prophecy variables and backward

  7. Progress of CEFR Simulator Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xue-xin; CHEN; Shu-ming

    2012-01-01

    <正>Fast reactor simulator test is a key step to ensure the simulator quality, simulator test is a key part of the whole development of simulator in the process of project. Harbin Engineering University is responsible to fast reactor simulator project, and fast reactor engineering department collaborates with Harbin Engineering University to develop the project, and jointly test the simulator, fast reactor will be mainly to take part in the test using a user identity

  8. Security Information System Digital Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study built a simulation model for the study of food security information system relay protection. MATLAB-based simulation technology can support the analysis and design of food security information systems. As an example, the food security information system fault simulation, zero-sequence current protection simulation and transformer differential protection simulation are presented in this study. The case studies show that the simulation of food security information system relay protection is effective and feasible.

  9. Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Korn, Granino A

    2010-01-01

    Showing you how to use personal computers for modeling and simulation, Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation, Second Edition provides a practical tutorial on interactive dynamic-system modeling and simulation. It discusses how to effectively simulate dynamical systems, such as aerospace vehicles, power plants, chemical processes, control systems, and physiological systems. Written by a pioneer in simulation, the book introduces dynamic-system models and explains how software for solving differential equations works. After demonstrating real simulation programs with simple examples, the author

  10. Converting DYNAMO simulations to Powersim Studio simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2014-02-01

    DYNAMO is a computer program for building and running 'continuous' simulation models. It was developed by the Industrial Dynamics Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for simulating dynamic feedback models of business, economic, and social systems. The history of the system dynamics method since 1957 includes many classic models built in DYANMO. It was not until the late 1980s that software was built to take advantage of the rise of personal computers and graphical user interfaces that DYNAMO was supplanted. There is much learning and insight to be gained from examining the DYANMO models and their accompanying research papers. We believe that it is a worthwhile exercise to convert DYNAMO models to more recent software packages. We have made an attempt to make it easier to turn these models into a more current system dynamics software language, Powersim © Studio produced by Powersim AS2 of Bergen, Norway. This guide shows how to convert DYNAMO syntax into Studio syntax.

  11. Benchmark of a new multi-ion-species collision operator for $\\delta f$ Monte Carlo neoclassical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Satake, Shinsuke; Pianpanit, Theerasarn; Sugama, Hideo; Nunami, Masanori; Matsuoka, Seikichi; Ishiguro, Seiji; Kanno, Ryutaro

    2016-01-01

    A numerical method to implement a linearized Coulomb collision operator for multi-ion-species neoclassical transport simulation using two-weight $\\delta f$ Monte Carlo method is developed. The conservation properties and the adjointness of the operator in the collisions between two particle species with different temperatures are verified. The linearized operator in a $\\delta f$ Monte Carlo code is benchmarked with other two kinetic simulation codes, i. e., a $\\delta f$ continuum gyrokinetic code with the same linearized collision operator and a full-f PIC code with Nanbu collision operator. The benchmark simulations of the equilibration process of plasma flow and temperature fluctuation among several particle species show very good agreement between $\\delta f$ Monte Carlo code and the other two codes. An error in the H-theorem in the two-weight $\\delta f$ Monte Carlo method is found, which is caused by the weight spreading phenomenon inherent in the two-weight $\\delta f$ method. It is demonstrated that the w...

  12. Computer Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronskikh, V. S. [Fermilab

    2014-05-09

    Verification and validation of computer codes and models used in simulation are two aspects of the scientific practice of high importance and have recently been discussed by philosophers of science. While verification is predominantly associated with the correctness of the way a model is represented by a computer code or algorithm, validation more often refers to model’s relation to the real world and its intended use. It has been argued that because complex simulations are generally not transparent to a practitioner, the Duhem problem can arise for verification and validation due to their entanglement; such an entanglement makes it impossible to distinguish whether a coding error or model’s general inadequacy to its target should be blamed in the case of the model failure. I argue that in order to disentangle verification and validation, a clear distinction between computer modeling (construction of mathematical computer models of elementary processes) and simulation (construction of models of composite objects and processes by means of numerical experimenting with them) needs to be made. Holding on to that distinction, I propose to relate verification (based on theoretical strategies such as inferences) to modeling and validation, which shares the common epistemology with experimentation, to simulation. To explain reasons of their intermittent entanglement I propose a weberian ideal-typical model of modeling and simulation as roles in practice. I suggest an approach to alleviate the Duhem problem for verification and validation generally applicable in practice and based on differences in epistemic strategies and scopes

  13. Multilevel turbulence simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tziperman, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors propose a novel method for the simulation of turbulent flows, that is motivated by and based on the Multigrid (MG) formalism. The method, called Multilevel Turbulence Simulations (MTS), is potentially more efficient and more accurate than LES. In many physical problems one is interested in the effects of the small scales on the larger ones, or in a typical realization of the flow, and not in the detailed time history of each small scale feature. MTS takes advantage of the fact that the detailed simulation of small scales is not needed at all times, in order to make the calculation significantly more efficient, while accurately accounting for the effects of the small scales on the larger scale of interest. In MTS, models of several resolutions are used to represent the turbulent flow. The model equations in each coarse level incorporate a closure term roughly corresponding to the tau correction in the MG formalism that accounts for the effects of the unresolvable scales on that grid. The finer resolution grids are used only a small portion of the simulation time in order to evaluate the closure terms for the coarser grids, while the coarse resolution grids are then used to accurately and efficiently calculate the evolution of the larger scales. The methods efficiency relative to direct simulations is of the order of the ratio of required integration time to the smallest eddies turnover time, potentially resulting in orders of magnitude improvement for a large class of turbulence problems.

  14. DSN Array Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikidjian, Raffi; Mackey, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    The DSN Array Simulator (wherein 'DSN' signifies NASA's Deep Space Network) is an updated version of software previously denoted the DSN Receive Array Technology Assessment Simulation. This software (see figure) is used for computational modeling of a proposed DSN facility comprising user-defined arrays of antennas and transmitting and receiving equipment for microwave communication with spacecraft on interplanetary missions. The simulation includes variations in spacecraft tracked and communication demand changes for up to several decades of future operation. Such modeling is performed to estimate facility performance, evaluate requirements that govern facility design, and evaluate proposed improvements in hardware and/or software. The updated version of this software affords enhanced capability for characterizing facility performance against user-defined mission sets. The software includes a Monte Carlo simulation component that enables rapid generation of key mission-set metrics (e.g., numbers of links, data rates, and date volumes), and statistical distributions thereof as functions of time. The updated version also offers expanded capability for mixed-asset network modeling--for example, for running scenarios that involve user-definable mixtures of antennas having different diameters (in contradistinction to a fixed number of antennas having the same fixed diameter). The improved version also affords greater simulation fidelity, sufficient for validation by comparison with actual DSN operations and analytically predictable performance metrics.

  15. Simulations of Granular Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H. J.; Müller, M.

    For the last ten years there has been an enormous progress in the simulation of granular media like sand or powders. These simulations consist in simulating trajectories of each particle individually. Essentially one has to solve the Newton's equations including the effects of Coulomb friction and the physics occuring at a collision. But the details of the trajectories are not important for the collective behaviour. Therefore simplifications are introduced on the smallest scales. I will introduce various methods like molecular dynamics that are used to simulate large amounts of particles (over 109). Some of these medhods are based on the exploitation of parallelisation and metacomputing. Other approaches are more stochastic (DSMC Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) which simplify the calculation of collisions, positions and collision times. Very successful has been also the use of cellular automata which have been able to predict details such as the logarithmic tale of sand heaps. I will also discuss numerical techniques used for the surrounding fluid. This can be water in the case of sedimentation or air when one studies the formation of dunes in the desert. The calculation of velocity and pressure field of the fluid are done using multigrid techniques on parallel computers. We will compare the performance of the various techniques and show some benchmarks on the dependence on the size of the system, the density of particles and the number of processors used.

  16. OMV mission simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cok, Keith E.

    1989-01-01

    The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) will be remotely piloted during rendezvous, docking, or proximity operations with target spacecraft from a ground control console (GCC). The real-time mission simulator and graphics being used to design a console pilot-machine interface are discussed. A real-time orbital dynamics simulator drives the visual displays. The dynamics simulator includes a J2 oblate earth gravity model and a generalized 1962 rotating atmospheric and drag model. The simulator also provides a variable-length communication delay to represent use of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) and NASA Communications (NASCOM). Input parameter files determine the graphics display. This feature allows rapid prototyping since displays can be easily modified from pilot recommendations. A series of pilot reviews are being held to determine an effective pilot-machine interface. Pilots fly missions with nominal to 3-sigma dispersions in translational or rotational axes. Console dimensions, switch type and layout, hand controllers, and graphic interfaces are evaluated by the pilots and the GCC simulator is modified for subsequent runs. Initial results indicate a pilot preference for analog versus digital displays and for two 3-degree-of-freedom hand controllers.

  17. Innovative simulation systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jędrasiak, Karol

    2016-01-01

    This monograph provides comprehensive guidelines on the current and future trends of innovative simulation systems. In particular, their important components, such as augmented reality and unmanned vehicles are presented. The book consists of three parts. Each part presents good practices, new methods, concepts of systems and new algorithms. Presented challenges and solutions are the results of research and conducted by the contributing authors. The book describes and evaluates the current state of knowledge in the field of innovative simulation systems. Throughout the chapters there are presented current issues and concepts of systems, technology, equipment, tools, research challenges and current, past and future applications of simulation systems. The book is addressed to a wide audience: academic staff, representatives of research institutions, employees of companies and government agencies as well as students and graduates of technical universities in the country and abroad. The book can be a valuable sou...

  18. Simulated airplane headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bui, Sebastian Bao Dinh; Petersen, Torben; Poulsen, Jeppe Nørgaard;

    2017-01-01

    meeting the diagnostic and safety criteria based on an approved study protocol. Simulation of AH was achieved by entering a pressure chamber with similar characteristics of an airplane flight. Selected potential biomarkers including salivary prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), cortisol, facial thermo-images, blood...... participants in the AH-group experienced a headache attack similar to AH experience during flight. The non-AH-group did not experience any headaches. Our data showed that the values for PGE2, cortisol and SPO were significantly different in the AH-group in comparison with the non-AH-group during the flight...... simulation in the pressure chamber. CONCLUSION: The pressure chamber proved useful not only to provoke AH-like attack but also to study potential biomarkers for AH in this study. PGE2, and cortisol levels together with SPO presented dysregulation during the simulated AH-attack in affected individuals...

  19. Immune system simulation online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Lund, Ole; Castiglione, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The recognition of antigenic peptides is a major event of an immune response. In current mesoscopic-scale simulators of the immune system, this crucial step has been modeled in a very approximated way. RESULTS: We have equipped an agent-based model of the immune system with immuno......-informatics methods to allow the simulation of the cardinal events of the antigenic recognition, going from single peptides to whole proteomes. The recognition process accounts for B cell-epitopes prediction through Parker-scale affinity estimation, class I and II HLA peptide prediction and binding through position...... simulation. AVAILABILITY: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/C-ImmSim-10.1/ CONTACT: f.castiglione@iac.cnr.it...

  20. SIMULATION OF LOGISTICS PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Taranenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the theoretical basis of the simulation. The study shows the simulation of logistic processes in industrial countries is an integral part of many economic projects aimed at the creation or improvement of logistics systems. The paper was used model Beer Game for management of logistics processes in the enterprise. The simulation model implements in AnyLogic package. AnyLogic product allows us to consider the logistics processes as an integrated system, which allows reaching better solutions. Logistics process management involves pooling the sales market, production and distribution to ensure the temporal level of customer service at the lowest cost overall. This made it possible to conduct experiments and to determine the optimal size of the warehouse at the lowest cost.

  1. Interface Simulation Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Černý

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical (boolean notion of refinement for behavioral interfaces of system components is the alternating refinement preorder. In this paper, we define a distance for interfaces, called interface simulation distance. It makes the alternating refinement preorder quantitative by, intuitively, tolerating errors (while counting them in the alternating simulation game. We show that the interface simulation distance satisfies the triangle inequality, that the distance between two interfaces does not increase under parallel composition with a third interface, and that the distance between two interfaces can be bounded from above and below by distances between abstractions of the two interfaces. We illustrate the framework, and the properties of the distances under composition of interfaces, with two case studies.

  2. Constructive Engineering of Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Daniel R.; Barsness, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Joint experimentation that investigates sensor optimization, re-tasking and management has far reaching implications for Department of Defense, Interagency and multinational partners. An adaption of traditional human in the loop (HITL) Modeling and Simulation (M&S) was one approach used to generate the findings necessary to derive and support these implications. Here an entity-based simulation was re-engineered to run on USJFCOM's High Performance Computer (HPC). The HPC was used to support the vast number of constructive runs necessary to produce statistically significant data in a timely manner. Then from the resulting sensitivity analysis, event designers blended the necessary visualization and decision making components into a synthetic environment for the HITL simulations trials. These trials focused on areas where human decision making had the greatest impact on the sensor investigations. Thus, this paper discusses how re-engineering existing M&S for constructive applications can positively influence the design of an associated HITL experiment.

  3. Image Simulation with Shapelets

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, R J; Bacon, D J; Conselice, C J; Massey, Richard J.; Refregier, Alexandre R.; Bacon, Christopher J. Conselice & David J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method to manufacture simulated deep sky images, with realistic galaxy morphologies and telescope characteristics. For this purpose, we first use the shapelets formalism (Refregier 2003) to parametrize the shapes of all galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field. We consider the distribution of real galaxy morphologies in shapelet parameter space, then resample this distribution to generate new galaxies. The simulated objects include realistic spiral arms, bars, discs, arbitrary radial profiles and even dust lanes or knots. We apply standard morphology diagnostics to demonstrate that our artificial images closely mimic real data in terms of galaxy size, concentration and asymmetry statistics, etc. Observational effects, including Point-Spread Function, noise, pixellisation, and astrometric distortions are also modelled. Sample images are made available on the world wide web. These simulations are useful to develop and test precision image analysis techniques, including photometry, astrometry, and shape me...

  4. Simulation of Mission Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlstrom, Nicholas Mercury

    2016-01-01

    This position with the Simulation and Graphics Branch (ER7) at Johnson Space Center (JSC) provided an introduction to vehicle hardware, mission planning, and simulation design. ER7 supports engineering analysis and flight crew training by providing high-fidelity, real-time graphical simulations in the Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) lab. The primary project assigned by NASA mentor and SES lab manager, Meghan Daley, was to develop a graphical simulation of the rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) phases of flight. The simulation is to include a generic crew/cargo transportation vehicle and a target object in low-Earth orbit (LEO). Various capsule, winged, and lifting body vehicles as well as historical RPOD methods were evaluated during the project analysis phase. JSC core mission to support the International Space Station (ISS), Commercial Crew Program (CCP), and Human Space Flight (HSF) influenced the project specifications. The simulation is characterized as a 30 meter +V Bar and/or -R Bar approach to the target object's docking station. The ISS was selected as the target object and the international Low Impact Docking System (iLIDS) was selected as the docking mechanism. The location of the target object's docking station corresponds with the RPOD methods identified. The simulation design focuses on Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) system architecture models with station keeping and telemetry data processing capabilities. The optical and inertial sensors, reaction control system thrusters, and the docking mechanism selected were based on CCP vehicle manufacturer's current and proposed technologies. A significant amount of independent study and tutorial completion was required for this project. Multiple primary source materials were accessed using the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS) and reference textbooks were borrowed from the JSC Main Library and International Space Station Library. The Trick Simulation Environment and User

  5. The Brian simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan F M Goodman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Brian is a simulator for spiking neural networks (http://www.briansimulator.org. The focus is on making the writing of simulation code as quick and easy as possible for the user, and on flexibility: new and non-standard models are no more difficult to define than standard ones. This allows scientists to spend more time on the details of their models, and less on their implementation. Neuron models are defined by writing differential equations in standard mathematical notation, facilitating scientific communication. Brian is written in the Python programming language, and uses vector-based computation to allow for efficient simulations. It is particularly useful for neuroscientific modelling at the systems level, and for teaching computational neuroscience.

  6. Simulations of vortex generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, P.

    1995-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via direct numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the stream direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise vorticity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations complement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators at NASA Ames and Stanford University (Saddoughi, 1994, and Jacobson and Reynolds, 1993). Jacobson and Reynolds (1993) used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and he observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. Our task is to simulate the flows generated by these devices and to conduct a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin (1994). The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands of particles allow for high resolution simulations. The results of the present simulations would help us assess some of the effects of three-dimensionality in experiments and investigate the role

  7. Crowd simulation and visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Hugo; Rudomin, Isaac; Ayguadé Parra, Eduard; Hernandez, Benjamin; Espinosa-Oviedo, Javier A.; Vargas-Solar, Genoveva

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to simulate and visualize crowds. Our goal is to represent the most realistic possible scenarios in a city. Due to the high demand of resources a GPU Cluster is used. We use real data from which we identify the behavior of the masses applying statistical and artificial intelligence techniques. In order to take advantge of the processing power of the GPU cluster we use the following programming models during the characters simulation: MPI, OmpSs and CUDA. We d...

  8. Compassion for simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    This topic for debate explores how simulation based education has become an area where Higher Education providers look to deliver on an agenda of recruiting, educating and assessing for compassion. This paper offers that rather than SBE being a forum for developing and promoting compassion it may actually be achieving the opposite both for those we educate and those they in turn care for. It does this through introducing two ideas, near enemies and Jung's shadow and uses these ideas to explore our understanding and expression of compassion through simulation.

  9. Emotional Intelligence and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Sophia K; Phitayakorn, Roy

    2015-08-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is an established concept in the business literature with evidence that it is an important factor in determining career achievement. There is increasing interest in the role that EI has in medical training, but it is still a nascent field. This article reviews the EI literature most relevant to surgical training and proposes that simulation offers many benefits to the development of EI. Although there are many unanswered questions, it is expected that future research will demonstrate the effectiveness of using simulation to develop EI within surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Terascale Optimal PDE Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Keyes

    2009-07-28

    The Terascale Optimal PDE Solvers (TOPS) Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (ISIC) was created to develop and implement algorithms and support scientific investigations performed by DOE-sponsored researchers. These simulations often involve the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on terascale computers. The TOPS Center researched, developed and deployed an integrated toolkit of open-source, optimal complexity solvers for the nonlinear partial differential equations that arise in many DOE application areas, including fusion, accelerator design, global climate change and reactive chemistry. The algorithms created as part of this project were also designed to reduce current computational bottlenecks by orders of magnitude on terascale computers, enabling scientific simulation on a scale heretofore impossible.

  11. Discrete large eddy simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.TAO; K.R.RAJAGOPAL

    2001-01-01

    Despite the intense effort expended towards obtaining a model for describing the turbulent flows of fluid,there is no model at hand that can do an adequate job.This leads us to look for a non-traditional approach to turbulence modeling.In this work we conjoin the notion of large eddy simulation with those of fuzzy sets and neural networks to describe a class of turbulent flow.in previous works we had discussed several issues concerning large eddy simulation such as filtering and averaging,Here,we discuss the use of fuzzy sets to improve the filtering procedure.

  12. Strategic Balanced Scorecard Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen; Nielsen, Erland Hejn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to show how a System Dynamics Modelling approach can be integrated into the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) for a case company with special focus on the handling of causality in a dynamic perspective. The case company’s BSC model includes five perspectives and a number...... of financial and non-financial measures. The overall idea of BSC is to make the strategy operational, as proposed by Kaplan and Norton (1992; 1996; 2007) and to use the strategy for simulation. Our results indicate that a company may gain great learning insight from such simulation studies. The whole article...

  13. Simulation versus Optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Arler, Finn; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2017-01-01

    investment optimisation or optimal solutions approach. On the other hand the analytical simulation or alternatives assessment approach. Awareness of the dissimilar theoretical assumption behind the models clarifies differences between the models, explains dissimilarities in results, and provides...... a theoretical and methodological foundation for understanding and interpreting results from the two archetypes. Keywords: energy system analysis; investment optimisation models; simulations models; modelling theory;renewable energy......In recent years, several tools and models have been developed and used for the design and analysis of future national energy systems. Many of these models focus on the integration of various renewable energy resources and the transformation of existing fossil-based energy systems into future...

  14. Water Energy Simulation Toolset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-05-17

    The Water-Energy Simulation Toolset (WEST) is an interactive simulation model that helps visualize impacts of different stakeholders on water quantity and quality of a watershed. The case study is applied for the Snake River Basin with the fictional name Cutthroat River Basin. There are four groups of stakeholders of interest: hydropower, agriculture, flood control, and environmental protection. Currently, the quality component depicts nitrogen-nitrate contaminant. Users can easily interact with the model by changing certain inputs (climate change, fertilizer inputs, etc.) to observe the change over the entire system. Users can also change certain parameters to test their management policy.

  15. Immune system simulation online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Lund, Ole; Castiglione, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The recognition of antigenic peptides is a major event of an immune response. In current mesoscopic-scale simulators of the immune system, this crucial step has been modeled in a very approximated way. RESULTS: We have equipped an agent-based model of the immune system with immuno......-informatics methods to allow the simulation of the cardinal events of the antigenic recognition, going from single peptides to whole proteomes. The recognition process accounts for B cell-epitopes prediction through Parker-scale affinity estimation, class I and II HLA peptide prediction and binding through position...

  16. Simulation modeling of carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwein, L B; Cohen, S M

    1992-03-01

    A discrete-time simulation model of carcinogenesis is described mathematically using recursive relationships between time-varying model variables. The dynamics of cellular behavior is represented within a biological framework that encompasses two irreversible and heritable genetic changes. Empirical data and biological supposition dealing with both control and experimental animal groups are used together to establish values for model input variables. The estimation of these variables is integral to the simulation process as described in step-by-step detail. Hepatocarcinogenesis in male F344 rats provides the basis for seven modeling scenarios which illustrate the complexity of relationships among cell proliferation, genotoxicity, and tumor risk.

  17. Simulating neural systems with Xyce.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Mei, Ting; Warrender, Christina E.; Aimone, James Bradley; Teeter, Corinne; Duda, Alex M.

    2012-12-01

    Sandias parallel circuit simulator, Xyce, can address large scale neuron simulations in a new way extending the range within which one can perform high-fidelity, multi-compartment neuron simulations. This report documents the implementation of neuron devices in Xyce, their use in simulation and analysis of neuron systems.

  18. Simulation in International Relations Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Brigid A.; Blake, Elizabeth L.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the educational implications of simulations in international relations. Highlights include the development of international relations simulations; the role of technology; the International Communication and Negotiation Simulations (ICONS) project at the University of Maryland; evolving information technology; and simulating real-world…

  19. The JWS online simulation database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Martin; Eicher, Johann J; van Niekerk, David D; Waltemath, Dagmar; Snoep, Jacky L

    2017-05-15

    JWS Online is a web-based platform for construction, simulation and exchange of models in standard formats. We have extended the platform with a database for curated simulation experiments that can be accessed directly via a URL, allowing one-click reproduction of published results. Users can modify the simulation experiments and export them in standard formats. The Simulation database thus lowers the bar on exploring computational models, helps users create valid simulation descriptions and improves the reproducibility of published simulation experiments. The Simulation Database is available on line at https://jjj.bio.vu.nl/models/experiments/ . jls@sun.ac.za .

  20. The history of medical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Kathleen R

    2008-06-01

    The historical roots of simulation might be described with the broadest definition of medical simulation: "an imitation of some real thing, state of affairs, or process" for the practice of skills, problem solving, and judgment. From the first "blue box" flight simulator to the military's impetus in the transfer of modeling and simulation technology to medicine, worldwide acceptance of simulation training is growing. Large collaborative simulation centers support the expectation of increases in multidisciplinary, interprofessional, and multimodal simulation training. Virtual worlds, both immersive and Web-based, are at the frontier of innovation in medical education.

  1. Nuclear lattice simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epelbaum E.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We review recent progress on nuclear lattice simulations using chiral effective field theory. We discuss lattice results for dilute neutron matter at next-to-leading order, three-body forces at next-to-next-toleading order, isospin-breaking and Coulomb effects, and the binding energy of light nuclei.

  2. Fault-Mechanism Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    An inexpensive, simple mechanical model of a fault can be produced to simulate the effects leading to an earthquake. This model has been used successfully with students from elementary to college levels and can be demonstrated to classes as large as thirty students. (DF)

  3. Enabling immersive simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, Josh (University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA); Mateas, Michael (University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA); Hart, Derek H.; Whetzel, Jonathan; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Glickman, Matthew R.; Abbott, Robert G.

    2009-02-01

    The object of the 'Enabling Immersive Simulation for Complex Systems Analysis and Training' LDRD has been to research, design, and engineer a capability to develop simulations which (1) provide a rich, immersive interface for participation by real humans (exploiting existing high-performance game-engine technology wherever possible), and (2) can leverage Sandia's substantial investment in high-fidelity physical and cognitive models implemented in the Umbra simulation framework. We report here on these efforts. First, we describe the integration of Sandia's Umbra modular simulation framework with the open-source Delta3D game engine. Next, we report on Umbra's integration with Sandia's Cognitive Foundry, specifically to provide for learning behaviors for 'virtual teammates' directly from observed human behavior. Finally, we describe the integration of Delta3D with the ABL behavior engine, and report on research into establishing the theoretical framework that will be required to make use of tools like ABL to scale up to increasingly rich and realistic virtual characters.

  4. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-10-05

    This code is a highly modular framework for developing smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations running on parallel platforms. The compartmentalization of the code allows for rapid development of new SPH applications and modifications of existing algorithms. The compartmentalization also allows changes in one part of the code used by many applications to instantly be made available to all applications.

  5. simulations of roughage intake

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nsahlai

    South African Journal of Animal Science 2007, 37 (4) ... The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of Illius and Gordon's simulation .... Materials and Methods .... the crude protein (CP) content of the diet was introduced as a covariate to ...

  6. Simulating Energy Transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chappin, E.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever wanted to know whether a CO2 tax outperforms the EU emissions trading scheme? Or how long it really takes markets to change and to let consumers choose differently? In this book, Emile Chappin explores simulation models to provide us with answers before policy interventions are impleme

  7. Evaluation Training: Simulation Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carl B.; Farr, Roger

    The preparation of this simulation material package is guided by the concept of an evaluator as a decision-maker, based on the definition of evaluation as a continuous assessment concerned with answering decision-making questions. The continuous concept of evaluation is based on the model created by Egon Guba and Daniel Stufflebeam, named by its…

  8. Active Target Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan; Draznik, Peter; Frank, Nathan

    2012-10-01

    We have simulated an existing experimental design to determine the resolution improvement upon energy measurements of neutron unbound nuclei. A number of experiments of this type have been performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), located at Michigan State University. An excited nucleus is typically produced with a radioactive beam interacting with a passive Beryllium target. Many different nuclei are produced in experiment, each of which immediately decays into a charged particle and neutron. The charged particles are detected and the neutrons interact in scintillation detectors such as the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and Large Multi-Institutional Scintillation Array (LISA). In our simulation, we have constructed an active target that provides additional information such that the point of nuclear interaction within the target may be determined. This information improves the resolution in decay energy measurements of neutron unbound isotopes. This presentation will cover some aspects of the simulation process, as well as showing some of the results that demonstrate the simulated improvement over a passive target.

  9. Multimodal perception and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkhoven, P.J.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses mechanisms of multimodal perception in the context of multimodal simulators and virtual worlds. We review some notable findings from psychophysical experiments with a focus on what we call touch-inclusive multimodal perception—that is, the sensory integration of the tactile sy

  10. The LHCb Grid Simulation

    CERN Multimedia

    Baranov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb Grid access if based on the LHCbDirac system. It provides access to data and computational resources to researchers with different geographical locations. The Grid has a hierarchical topology with multiple sites distributed over the world. The sites differ from each other by their number of CPUs, amount of disk storage and connection bandwidth. These parameters are essential for the Grid work. Moreover, job scheduling and data distribution strategy have a great impact on the grid performance. However, it is hard to choose an appropriate algorithm and strategies as they need a lot of time to be tested on the real grid. In this study, we describe the LHCb Grid simulator. The simulator reproduces the LHCb Grid structure with its sites and their number of CPUs, amount of disk storage and bandwidth connection. We demonstrate how well the simulator reproduces the grid work, show its advantages and limitations. We show how well the simulator reproduces job scheduling and network anomalies, consider methods ...

  11. Simulation Insights Using "R"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, Boyan

    2013-01-01

    This article attempts to introduce the reader to computational thinking and solving problems involving randomness. The main technique being employed is the Monte Carlo method, using the freely available software "R for Statistical Computing." The author illustrates the computer simulation approach by focusing on several problems of…

  12. Spin network quantum simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzuoli, Annalisa; Rasetti, Mario

    2002-12-30

    We propose a general setting for a universal representation of the quantum structure on which quantum information stands, whose dynamical evolution (information manipulation) is based on angular momentum recoupling theory. Such scheme complies with the notion of 'quantum simulator' in the sense of Feynman, and is shown to be related with the topological quantum field theoretical approach to quantum computation.

  13. Simulating solar MHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schüssler

    Full Text Available Two aspects of solar MHD are discussed in relation to the work of the MHD simulation group at KIS. Photospheric magneto-convection, the nonlinear interaction of magnetic field and convection in a strongly stratified, radiating fluid, is a key process of general astrophysical relevance. Comprehensive numerical simulations including radiative transfer have significantly improved our understanding of the processes and have become an important tool for the interpretation of observational data. Examples of field intensification in the solar photosphere ('convective collapse' are shown. The second line of research is concerned with the dynamics of flux tubes in the convection zone, which has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the solar dynamo. Simulations indicate that the field strength in the region where the flux is stored before erupting to form sunspot groups is of the order of 105 G, an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates based on equipartition with the kinetic energy of convective flows.

    Key words. Solar physics · astrophysics and astronomy (photosphere and chromosphere; stellar interiors and dynamo theory; numerical simulation studies.

  14. Simulating Energy Transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chappin, E.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever wanted to know whether a CO2 tax outperforms the EU emissions trading scheme? Or how long it really takes markets to change and to let consumers choose differently? In this book, Emile Chappin explores simulation models to provide us with answers before policy interventions are

  15. Data Systems Dynamic Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouff, Christopher; Clark, Melana; Davenport, Bill; Message, Philip

    1993-01-01

    The Data System Dynamic Simulator (DSDS) is a discrete event simulation tool. It was developed for NASA for the specific purpose of evaluating candidate architectures for data systems of the Space Station era. DSDS provides three methods for meeting this requirement. First, the user has access to a library of standard pre-programmed elements. These elements represent tailorable components of NASA data systems and can be connected in any logical manner. Secondly, DSDS supports the development of additional elements. This allows the more sophisticated DSDS user the option of extending the standard element set. Thirdly, DSDS supports the use of data streams simulation. Data streams is the name given to a technique that ignores packet boundaries, but is sensitive to rate changes. Because rate changes are rare compared to packet arrivals in a typical NASA data system, data stream simulations require a fraction of the CPU run time. Additionally, the data stream technique is considerably more accurate than another commonly-used optimization technique.

  16. Simulating the Physical World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendsen, Herman J. C.

    2004-06-01

    The simulation of physical systems requires a simplified, hierarchical approach which models each level from the atomistic to the macroscopic scale. From quantum mechanics to fluid dynamics, this book systematically treats the broad scope of computer modeling and simulations, describing the fundamental theory behind each level of approximation. Berendsen evaluates each stage in relation to its applications giving the reader insight into the possibilities and limitations of the models. Practical guidance for applications and sample programs in Python are provided. With a strong emphasis on molecular models in chemistry and biochemistry, this book will be suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses on molecular modeling and simulation within physics, biophysics, physical chemistry and materials science. It will also be a useful reference to all those working in the field. Additional resources for this title including solutions for instructors and programs are available online at www.cambridge.org/9780521835275. The first book to cover the wide range of modeling and simulations, from atomistic to the macroscopic scale, in a systematic fashion Providing a wealth of background material, it does not assume advanced knowledge and is eminently suitable for course use Contains practical examples and sample programs in Python

  17. The ALFA Trigger Simulator

    CERN Document Server

    Dziedzic B

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents basic information about ALFA detectors used in the ATLAS experiment, and the structure of currently developed device used to test a new ALFA trigger interface. It discusses the block diagram of the device, principle of its operation, implementation details and future plans for developing the Simulator.

  18. Comprehensive simulations of superhumps

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Amanda J; Murray, James R; Truss, Michael R; Foulkes, Stephen B

    2007-01-01

    (Abridged) We use 3D SPH calculations with higher resolution, as well as with more realistic viscosity and sound-speed prescriptions than previous work to examine the eccentric instability which underlies the superhump phenomenon in semi-detached binaries. We illustrate the importance of the two-armed spiral mode in the generation of superhumps. Differential motions in the fluid disc cause converging flows which lead to strong spiral shocks once each superhump cycle. The dissipation associated with these shocks powers the superhump. We compare 2D and 3D results, and conclude that 3D simulations are necessary to faithfully simulate the disc dynamics. We ran our simulations for unprecedented durations, so that an eccentric equilibrium is established except at high mass ratios where the growth rate of the instability is very low. Our improved simulations give a closer match to the observed relationship between superhump period excess and binary mass ratio than previous numerical work. The observed black hole X-r...

  19. The Wageningen Rainfall Simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lassu, Tamas; Seeger, K.M.; Peters, P.D.; Keesstra, S.D.

    2015-01-01

    The set-up and characterisation of an indoor nozzle-type rainfall simulator (RS) at Wageningen University, the Netherlands, are presented. It is equipped with four Lechler nozzles (two nr. 460·788 and two nr. 461·008). The tilting irrigation plot is 6 m long and 2·5 m wide. An electrical pump

  20. De TNO OK simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litsenburg, C. van

    2015-01-01

    Onlangs werd de OK-simulator van TNO officieel in gebruik genomen. Prof. Dr. Ivo Broeders, hoogleraar Robotica en minimaal invasie technieken aan de Universiteit Twente en chirurg in het Meander Medisch Centrum was één van de inleiders tijdens de presentatie

  1. Transactive Energy Simulation Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-24

    TESP combines existing domain simulators in the electric power grid, with new transactive agents, growth models and evaluation scripts. The existing domain simulators include GridLAB-D for the distribution grid and single-family residential buildings, MATPOWER for transmission and bulk generation, and EnergyPlus for large buildings. More are planned for subsequent versions of TESP. The new elements are: • TEAgents - simulate market participants and transactive systems for market clearing. Some of this functionality was extracted from GridLAB-D and implemented in Python for customization by PNNL and others. • Growth Model - a means for simulating system changes over a multiyear period, including both normal load growth and specific investment decisions. Customizable in Python code. • Evaluation Script - a means of evaluating different transactive systems through customizable post-processing in Python code. TESP provides a method for other researchers and vendors to design transactive systems, and test them in a virtual environment. It allows customization of the key components by modifying Python code.

  2. Fault-Mechanism Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    An inexpensive, simple mechanical model of a fault can be produced to simulate the effects leading to an earthquake. This model has been used successfully with students from elementary to college levels and can be demonstrated to classes as large as thirty students. (DF)

  3. Ion trap simulation tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

    2009-02-01

    Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

  4. De TNO OK simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litsenburg, C. van

    2015-01-01

    Onlangs werd de OK-simulator van TNO officieel in gebruik genomen. Prof. Dr. Ivo Broeders, hoogleraar Robotica en minimaal invasie technieken aan de Universiteit Twente en chirurg in het Meander Medisch Centrum was één van de inleiders tijdens de presentatie

  5. Simulation of Silicon Photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Eckert, P; Schultz-Coulon, H C

    2012-01-01

    on the basic SiPM characteristics which have to be determined by measurements. The simulation was validated for a S10362-11-100C Hamamatsu MPPC in the whole dynamic range and was used to study the contribution of different noise sources to the response and photon-counting resolution.

  6. FASTBUS simulation tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, T.D. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Haney, M.J. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States))

    1991-10-01

    A generalized model of a FASTBUS master is presented. The model is used with simulation tools to aid in the specification, design, and production of FASTBUS slave modules. The model provides a mechanism to interact with the electrical schematics and software models to predict performance. The model is written in the IEEE std 1076-1987 hardware description language VHDL. A model of the ATC logic is also presented. VHDL was chosen to provide portability to various platforms and simulation tools. The models, in conjunction with most commercially available simulators, will perform all of the transactions specified in IEEE std 960-1989. The models may be used to study the behavior of electrical schematics and other software models and detect violations of the FASTBUS protocol. For example, a hardware design of a slave module could be studied, protocol violations detected and corrected before committing money to prototype development. The master model accepts a stream of high level commands from an ASCII file to initiate FASTBUS transactions. The high level command language is based on the FASTBUS standard routines listed in IEEE std 1177-1989. Using this standard-based command language to direct the model of the master, hardware engineers can simulate FASTBUS transactions in the language used by physicists and programmers to operate FASTBUS systems. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiman, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with the aerospace industry, other government agencies, and academia, is leading the effort to develop an advanced multidisciplinary analysis environment for aerospace propulsion systems called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. The initial development of NPSS focused on the analysis and design of airbreathing aircraft engines, but the resulting NPSS framework may be applied to any system, for example: aerospace, rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and even human system modeling. NPSS provides increased flexibility for the user, which reduces the total development time and cost. It is currently being extended to support the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Fundamental Aeronautics Program and the Advanced Virtual Engine Test Cell (AVETeC). NPSS focuses on the integration of multiple disciplines such as aerodynamics, structure, and heat transfer with numerical zooming on component codes. Zooming is the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail. NPSS development includes capabilities to facilitate collaborative engineering. The NPSS will provide improved tools to develop custom components and to use capability for zooming to higher fidelity codes, coupling to multidiscipline codes, transmitting secure data, and distributing simulations across different platforms. These powerful capabilities extend NPSS from a zero-dimensional simulation tool to a multi-fidelity, multidiscipline system-level simulation tool for the full development life cycle.

  8. Simulating polymer liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bladon, P.; Frenkel, D.

    1996-01-01

    A model suitable for simulating lyotropic polymer liquid crystals (PLCs) is described. By varying the persistence length between infinity and 25, the effect of increasing flexibility on the nematic - smectic transition of a PLC with a length-to-width ratio L/D = 6 is investigated. It is found that

  9. Simulation and CRM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Doris; Dieckmann, Peter; Lippert, Anne

    2011-01-01

    of challenges and deficiencies, and to monitor behavioural change. Several methods, including patient safety data, interviews, observational studies and simulations, can be used to specify learning objectives. The training should be established for the real team(s). Furthermore, leaders need to implement...

  10. Introduction. Biomolecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Adrian J

    2008-12-01

    'Everything that living things do can be understood in terms of the jigglings and wigglings of atoms' as Richard Feynman provocatively stated nearly 50 years ago. But how can we 'see' this wiggling and jiggling and understand how it drives biology? Increasingly, computer simulations of biological macromolecules are helping to meet this challenge.

  11. Mars Surface Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørnberg, Per; Merrison, Jonathan P.; Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur P.

    2010-05-01

    Laboratory simulations of the Martian surface are of importance to broaden scientific understanding of the physical processes, but also in order to develop the technology necessary for exploration of the planet. The Mars Simulation Laboratory at Aarhus University [1] has been involved in such simulations for around ten years and has developed several experimental facilities for carrying out science or instrument testing under conditions similar to those at the Martian surface, specifically low pressure, low temperature and importantly recreating the wind flow environment and dust suspension (reproducing the Martian dusty aerosol) using Mars analogue material [2]. The science involved in this simulation work has covered a broad spectrum including, erosion induced mineralogy/chemistry, particulate electrification, magnetic properties of Martian dust, biological survival, UV induced chemistry/mineralogy (using a solar simulator), adhesion/cohesion processes and the wind driven transport of dust and sand [3,4]. With regard to technology the wind tunnel facilities have been used in the development of the latest wind and dust sensing instrumentation [5,6]. With support from the European Space Agency (ESA) and Danish national funding an advanced Mars simulation facility has recently been constructed (2009). This wind tunnel facility has a cross section of 2 x 1 m and a length of 8 m, a temperature range down to below -120C, wind speeds in excess of 20m/s, and automated dust control. With a range of (specialised) sensing instrumentation it provides the opportunity to perform a new generation of scientific experiments and allow testing and technology development in the most realistic and rigorous environment. As well as being available for the space agencies, this facility will be open to all potential scientific collaborators. Also European planetary scientists may benefit from support through the EU Europlanet FP7 networking programme. For more information on access

  12. Simulations of Solar Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Formation of a coronal jet from twisted field lines that have reconnected with the ambient field. The colors show the radial velocity of the plasma. [Adapted from Szente et al. 2017]How do jets emitted from the Suns surface contribute to its corona and to the solar wind? In a recent study, a team of scientists performed complex three-dimensional simulations of coronal jets to answer these questions.Small ExplosionsCoronal jets are relatively small eruptions from the Suns surface, with heights of roughly 100 to 10,000 km, speeds of 10 to 1,000 km/s, and lifetimes of a few minutes to around ten hours. These jets are constantly present theyre emitted even from the quiet Sun, when activity is otherwise low and weve observed them with a fleet of Sun-watching space telescopes spanning the visible, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and X-ray wavelength bands.A comparison of simulated observations based on the authors model (left panels) to actual EUV and X-ray observations of jets (right panels). [Szente et al. 2017]Due to their ubiquity, we speculate that these jets might contribute to heating the global solar corona (which is significantly hotter than the surface below it, a curiosity known as the coronal heating problem). We can also wonder what role these jets might play in driving the overall solar wind.Launching a JetLed by Judit Szente (University of Michigan), a team of scientists has explored the impact of coronal jets on the global corona and solar wind with a series of numerical simulations. Szente and collaborators used three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that provide realistic treatment of the solar atmosphere, the solar wind acceleration, and the complexities of heat transfer throughout the corona.In the authors simulations, a jet is initiated as a magnetic dipole rotates at the solar surface, winding up field lines. Magnetic reconnection between the twisted lines and the background field then launches the jet from the dense and hot solar

  13. Continuum Kinetic and Multi-Fluid Simulations of Classical Sheaths

    CERN Document Server

    Cagas, Petr; Juno, James; Srinivasan, Bhuvana

    2016-01-01

    The kinetic study of plasma sheaths is critical, among other things, to understand the deposition of heat on walls, the effect of sputtering, and contamination of the plasma with detrimental impurities. The plasma sheath also provides a boundary condition and can often have a significant global impact on the bulk plasma. In this paper, kinetic studies of classical sheaths are performed with the continuum code, Gkeyll, that directly solves the Vlasov-Poisson/Maxwell equations. The code uses a novel version of the finite-element discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme that conserves energy in the continuous-time limit. The electrostatic field is computed using the Poisson equation. Ionization and scattering collisions are included, however, surface effects are neglected. The aim of this work is to introduce the continuum-kinetic method and compare its results to those obtained from an already established finite-volume multi-fluid model also implemented in Gkeyll. Novel boundary conditions on the fluids allow the she...

  14. 3D Simulations of Space Charge Effects in Particle Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelmann, A

    2002-10-01

    For the first time, it is possible to calculate the complicated three-dimensional proton accelerator structures at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Under consideration are external and self effects, arising from guiding and space-charge forces. This thesis has as its theme the design, implementation and validation of a tracking program for charged particles in accelerator structures. This work form part of the discipline of Computational Science and Engineering (CSE), more specifically in computational accelerator modelling. The physical model is based on the collisionless Vlasov-Maxwell theory, justified by the low density ({approx} 10{sup 9} protons/cm{sup 3}) of the beam and of the residual gas. The probability of large angle scattering between the protons and the residual gas is then sufficiently low, as can be estimated by considering the mean free path and the total distance a particle travels in the accelerator structure. (author)

  15. 3D Simulations of Space Charge Effects in Particle Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelmann, A

    2002-10-01

    For the first time, it is possible to calculate the complicated three-dimensional proton accelerator structures at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Under consideration are external and self effects, arising from guiding and space-charge forces. This thesis has as its theme the design, implementation and validation of a tracking program for charged particles in accelerator structures. This work form part of the discipline of Computational Science and Engineering (CSE), more specifically in computational accelerator modelling. The physical model is based on the collisionless Vlasov-Maxwell theory, justified by the low density ({approx} 10{sup 9} protons/cm{sup 3}) of the beam and of the residual gas. The probability of large angle scattering between the protons and the residual gas is then sufficiently low, as can be estimated by considering the mean free path and the total distance a particle travels in the accelerator structure. (author)

  16. Reevaluating simulation in nursing education: beyond the human patient simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavenato, Martin

    2009-07-01

    The human patient simulator or high-fidelity mannequin has become synonymous with the word simulation in nursing education. Founded on a historical context and on an evaluation of the current application of simulation in nursing education, this article challenges that assumption as limited and restrictive. A definition of simulation and a broader conceptualization of its application in nursing education are presented. The need for an ideological basis for simulation in nursing education is highlighted. The call is made for theory to answer the question of why simulation is used in nursing to anchor its proper and effective application in nursing education.

  17. Simulant Development for LAWPS Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schonewill, Philip P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burns, Carolyn A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-05-23

    This report describes simulant development work that was conducted to support the technology maturation of the LAWPS facility. Desired simulant physical properties (density, viscosity, solids concentration, solid particle size), sodium concentrations, and general anion identifications were provided by WRPS. The simulant recipes, particularly a “nominal” 5.6M Na simulant, are intended to be tested at several scales, ranging from bench-scale (500 mL) to full-scale. Each simulant formulation was selected to be chemically representative of the waste streams anticipated to be fed to the LAWPS system, and used the current version of the LAWPS waste specification as a formulation basis. After simulant development iterations, four simulants of varying sodium concentration (5.6M, 6.0M, 4.0M, and 8.0M) were prepared and characterized. The formulation basis, development testing, and final simulant recipes and characterization data for these four simulants are presented in this report.

  18. Fully Nonlinear Edge Gyrokinetic Simulations of Kinetic Geodesic-Acoustic Modes and Boundary Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X Q; Belli, E; Bodi, K; Candy, J; Chang, C S; Cohen, B I; Cohen, R H; Colella, P; Dimits, A M; Dorr, M R; Gao, Z; Hittinger, J A; Ko, S; Krasheninnikov, S; McKee, G R; Nevins, W M; Rognlien, T D; Snyder, P B; Suh, J; Umansky, M V

    2008-09-18

    We present edge gyrokinetic neoclassical simulations of tokamak plasmas using the fully nonlinear (full-f) continuum code TEMPEST. A nonlinear Boltzmann model is used for the electrons. The electric field is obtained by solving the 2D gyrokinetic Poisson Equation. We demonstrate the following: (1) High harmonic resonances (n > 2) significantly enhance geodesic-acoustic mode (GAM) damping at high-q (tokamak safety factor), and are necessary to explain both the damping observed in our TEMPEST q-scans and experimental measurements of the scaling of the GAM amplitude with edge q{sub 95} in the absence of obvious evidence that there is a strong q dependence of the turbulent drive and damping of the GAM. (2) The kinetic GAM exists in the edge for steep density and temperature gradients in the form of outgoing waves, its radial scale is set by the ion temperature profile, and ion temperature inhomogeneity is necessary for GAM radial propagation. (3) The development of the neoclassical electric field evolves through different phases of relaxation, including GAMs, their radial propagation, and their long-time collisional decay. (4) Natural consequences of orbits in the pedestal and scrape-off layer region in divertor geometry are substantial non-Maxwellian ion distributions and flow characteristics qualitatively like those observed in experiments.

  19. Advanced Discontinuous Galerkin Algorithms and First Open-Field Line Turbulence Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammett, G. W.; Hakim, A.; Shi, E. L.

    2016-10-01

    New versions of Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) algorithms have interesting features that may help with challenging problems of higher-dimensional kinetic problems. We are developing the gyrokinetic code Gkeyll based on DG. DG also has features that may help with the next generation of Exascale computers. Higher-order methods do more FLOPS to extract more information per byte, thus reducing memory and communications costs (which are a bottleneck at exascale). DG uses efficient Gaussian quadrature like finite elements, but keeps the calculation local for the kinetic solver, also reducing communication. Sparse grid methods might further reduce the cost significantly in higher dimensions. The inner product norm can be chosen to preserve energy conservation with non-polynomial basis functions (such as Maxwellian-weighted bases), which can be viewed as a Petrov-Galerkin method. This allows a full- F code to benefit from similar Gaussian quadrature as used in popular δf gyrokinetic codes. Consistent basis functions avoid high-frequency numerical modes from electromagnetic terms. We will show our first results of 3 x + 2 v simulations of open-field line/SOL turbulence in a simple helical geometry (like Helimak/TORPEX), with parameters from LAPD, TORPEX, and NSTX. Supported by the Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics, the SciDAC Center for the Study of Plasma Microturbulence, and DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Scalability of Hydrodynamic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Shikui

    2009-01-01

    Many hydrodynamic processes can be studied in a way that is scalable over a vastly relevant physical parameter space. We systematically examine this scalability, which has so far only briefly discussed in astrophysical literature. We show how the scalability is limited by various constraints imposed by physical processes and initial conditions. Using supernova remnants in different environments and evolutionary phases as application examples, we demonstrate the use of the scaling as a powerful tool to explore the interdependence among relevant parameters, based on a minimum set of simulations. In particular, we devise a scaling scheme that can be used to adaptively generate numerous seed remnants and plant them into 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the supernova-dominated interstellar medium.

  1. Validation of simulation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Muniza; Pedersen, Stig Andur

    2012-01-01

    In philosophy of science, the interest for computational models and simulations has increased heavily during the past decades. Different positions regarding the validity of models have emerged but the views have not succeeded in capturing the diversity of validation methods. The wide variety...... of models has been somewhat narrow-minded reducing the notion of validation to establishment of truth. This article puts forward the diversity in applications of simulation models that demands a corresponding diversity in the notion of validation....... of models with regards to their purpose, character, field of application and time dimension inherently calls for a similar diversity in validation approaches. A classification of models in terms of the mentioned elements is presented and used to shed light on possible types of validation leading...

  2. The programmable ECG simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caner, Candan; Engin, Mehmet; Engin, Erkan Zeki

    2008-08-01

    This paper reports the design and development of Digital Signal Controller (DSPIC)-based ECG simulator intended to use in testing, calibration and maintenance of electrocardiographic equipment, and to support biomedical engineering students' education. It generates all 12 healthy ECG derivation signals having a profile that varies with heart rate, amplitude, and different noise contamination in a manner which reflects true in vivo conditions. The heart rate can be set at the range of 30 to 120 beats/minute in four steps. The noise and power line interference effects can be set at the range of 0 to 20 dB in three steps. Since standard commercially available electronic components were used to construct the prototype simulator, the proposed design was also relatively inexpensive to produce.

  3. Polydispersity and EXAFS simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammelli, S; Degueldre, C; Bertsch, J [Laboratory for Nuclear Material, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D; Frahm, R, E-mail: sebastiano.cammelli@psi.c [Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gauss-Str. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    EXAFS is an important experimental technique for determining the local atomic structure of nanoclusters embedded in a bulk material. In practical cases, nanocluster samples do not contain homogeneous clusters of just one size, and the average cluster size is strongly influenced by the specific distribution of cluster sizes. Combinations of different cluster sizes might provide very similar results; this issue is called polydispersity. The goal of this study is to understand if there are any principal limitations for EXAFS studies related to polydispersity. Here a new approach based on EXAFS simulations followed by linear combination (LC) on EXAFS spectra is presented. The simulations were performed on pure Cu and binary Cu-Fe clusters. The main result of this study concerns the proof that polydispersity does not affect XAFS studies on nano-clusters within a size of up to 140 atoms.

  4. Simulations of Titan's paleoclimate

    CERN Document Server

    Lora, Juan M; Russell, Joellen L; Hayes, Alexander G

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effects of varying Saturn's orbit on the atmospheric circulation and surface methane distribution of Titan. Using a new general circulation model of Titan's atmosphere, we simulate its climate under four characteristic configurations of orbital parameters that correspond to snapshots over the past 42 kyr, capturing the amplitude range of long-period cyclic variations in eccentricity and longitude of perihelion. The model, which covers pressures from the surface to 0.5 mbar, reproduces the present-day temperature profile and tropospheric superrotation. In all four simulations, the atmosphere efficiently transports methane poleward, drying out the low- and mid-latitudes, indicating that these regions have been desert-like for at least tens of thousands of years. Though circulation patterns are not significantly different, the amount of surface methane that builds up over either pole strongly depends on the insolation distribution; in the present-day, methane builds up preferentially in the no...

  5. Electromagnetic Gyrokinetic Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, W

    2003-11-19

    A new electromagnetic kinetic electron {delta} particle simulation model has been demonstrated to work well at large values of plasma {beta} times the ion-to-electron mass ratio. The simulation is three-dimensional using toroidal flux-tube geometry and includes electron-ion collisions. The model shows accurate shear Alfven wave damping and microtearing physics. Zonal flows with kinetic electrons are found to be turbulent with the spectrum peaking at zero and having a width in the frequency range of the driving turbulence. This is in contrast with adiabatic electron cases where the zonal flows are near stationary, even though the linear behavior of the zonal flow is not significantly affected by kinetic electrons. zonal fields are found to be very weak, consistent with theoretical predictions for {beta} below the kinetic ballooning limit. Detailed spectral analysis of the turbulence data is presented in the various limits.

  6. Irreversible Simulated Tempering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yuji; Hukushima, Koji

    2016-10-01

    An extended ensemble Monte Carlo algorithm is proposed by introducing a violation of the detailed balance condition to the update scheme of the inverse temperature in simulated tempering. Our method, irreversible simulated tempering, is constructed on the basis of the framework of the skew detailed balance condition. By applying this method to the ferromagnetic Ising model in two dimensions on a square lattice as a benchmark, the dynamical behavior of the inverse temperature and an autocorrelation function of the magnetization are studied numerically. It is found that the relaxation dynamics of the inverse temperature qualitatively change from diffusive to ballistic on violating the detailed balance condition. Consequently, the autocorrelation time of the magnetization is several times smaller than that for the conventional algorithm satisfying the detailed balance condition.

  7. Serious Simulations (for fun)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    in the 20th century. They have become an important part of marketing, teaching, political activism, communication and information to the public. It is the language of the future, the language for and about the reality we are living in. The game simulations are still compelling and entertaining......’Serious Simulations (for fun)’ deals with a dramatic change in the area of computer games. Computer games have throughout the past decades given us the opportunity to experience, tell stories and play in virtual, computer generated worlds. Today, however, the narratives of the computer games......, their laws of physics and their rule structure not only belong to the game world. Incessantly and innovatively, they reach far beyond the game universe and into reality. The computer game today is the place where we not only escape reality, but also relate to reality – similar to the role of the movie...

  8. Radiation in Particle Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R; Graziani, F; Glosli, J; Surh, M

    2010-11-19

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of megabars to thousands of gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known. The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (planewaves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion. The third method is a hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo (MD/MC) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions. The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc. This approach is inspired by the virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Using a combination of these methods we believe it is possible to do atomic-scale particle

  9. Towards Quantum Simulating QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Wiese, Uwe-Jens

    2014-01-01

    Quantum link models provide an alternative non-perturbative formulation of Abelian and non-Abelian lattice gauge theories. They are ideally suited for quantum simulation, for example, using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. This holds the promise to address currently unsolvable problems, such as the real-time and high-density dynamics of strongly interacting matter, first in toy-model gauge theories, and ultimately in QCD.

  10. Maps and (no) Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Etienne

    As the title suggests, I examine the role of maps in accelerator theory, conveniently leaving simulation out of the picture for lack of time and space. This is really a primer on the map-based "Courant Snyder" theory as independently proposed by Dragt's group (author included) and Turchetti's group at Bologna. Quite obviously it is viewed here from the author's own perspective and prejudices.

  11. Towards quantum simulating QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, Uwe-Jens

    2014-11-15

    Quantum link models provide an alternative non-perturbative formulation of Abelian and non-Abelian lattice gauge theories. They are ideally suited for quantum simulation, for example, using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. This holds the promise to address currently unsolvable problems, such as the real-time and high-density dynamics of strongly interacting matter, first in toy-model gauge theories, and ultimately in QCD.

  12. RENEB accident simulation exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Brzozowska, Beata; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Baert, Annelot; Beaton-Green, Lindsay; Barrios, Leonardo; Barquinero, Joan Francesc; Bassinet, Celine; Beinke, Christina; Benedek, Anett; Beukes, Philip; Bortolin, Emanuela; Buraczewska, Iwona; Burbidge, Christopher; De Amicis, Andrea; De Angelis, Cinzia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The RENEB accident exercise was carried out in order to train the RENEB participants in coordinating and managing potentially large data sets that would be generated in case of a major radiological event. Materials and methods: Each participant was offered the possibility to activate the network by sending an alerting email about a simulated radiation emergency. The same participant had to collect, compile and report capacity, triage categorization and exposure scenario results ob...

  13. Simulations of Levy flights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantaleo, E; Pascazio, S [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Facchi, P [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy)], E-mail: ester.pantaleo@ba.infn.it

    2009-07-15

    Levy flights, also known as {alpha}-stable Levy processes or heavy-tailed statistics, are becoming a commonly used tool in optics. Nonetheless, the different parametrizations and the absence of any analytic expression for the distribution functions (apart from some exceptions) makes it difficult to efficiently simulate such processes. We review and compare three algorithms for the generation of sequences of symmetric stable Levy random variables.

  14. Interactive CFD simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Duque Lombana, Juan Fernando

    2007-01-01

    This project is about the development of an implementable Interactive Computer Fluid Dynamics methodology -- The range of this work begins with an overview of the current status of computational fluid dynamics simulation software and methodologies, continues with an introduction to what interactive and interactivity mean, develops an all original interactive CFD methodology to follow for the solution of fluid scenarios and finally, the description of the implementation of an interactive solve...

  15. Simulation of Bremsstrahlung production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patau, J.P.; Malbert, M.; Terrissol, M. (Centre de Physique Atomique, Toulouse (France))

    1981-10-01

    Electron slowing down and related phenomena are often greatly affected by bremsstrahlung production. Each creation of photon is individually simulated on the basis of a cross-section pack advised by Koch and Motz with corrections in the high energy frequency limit region. An accurate and fast sampling method is described. Its applicability covers a range between 50 keV and 80 MeV for target atoms whose atomic number is from 5 up to 90.

  16. Simulation Data as Data Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulla, G; Arrighi, W; Critchlow, T

    2003-11-18

    Computational or scientific simulations are increasingly being applied to solve a variety of scientific problems. Domains such as astrophysics, engineering, chemistry, biology, and environmental studies are benefiting from this important capability. Simulations, however, produce enormous amounts of data that need to be analyzed and understood. In this overview paper, we describe scientific simulation data, its characteristics, and the way scientists generate and use the data. We then compare and contrast simulation data to data streams. Finally, we describe our approach to analyzing simulation data, present the AQSim (Ad-hoc Queries for Simulation data) system, and discuss some of the challenges that result from handling this kind of data.

  17. Astronaut John Young in Command Module Simulator during Apollo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, command module pilot, inside the Command Module Simulator in bldg 5 during an Apollo Simulation. Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander and Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot are out of the view.

  18. Simulation of multihaem cytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Cláudio M; Baptista, António M

    2012-03-09

    This article presents an overview of the simulation studies of the behaviour of multihaem cytochromes using theoretical/computational methodologies, with an emphasis on cytochrome c(3). It starts with the first studies using rigid molecules and continuum electrostatic models, where protonation and redox events were treated as independent. The gradual addition of physical details is then described, from the inclusion of proton isomerism, to the proper treatment of the thermodynamics of electron-proton coupling, to the explicit inclusion of the solvent and protein structural reorganization into the models, culminating with the method for molecular dynamics simulations at constant pH and reduction potential, where the solvation, conformational, protonation and redox features are all simulated in a fully integrated and coupled way. We end with a discussion of the strategies used to study the interaction between multihaem cytochromes, taking into account the further coupling effect introduced by the molecular association. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. SIMULATE-4 developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, Sten-Oerjan [Studsvik Scandpower AB: Hantverkargatan 2A, SE-722 12 Vaesteraas (Sweden); Bahadir, Tamer [Studsvik Scandpower, Inc: 1087 Beacon St. Suite 301, Newton, MA 02459 (United States); Grandi, Gerardo M. [Studsvik Scandpower, Inc: 504 Shoup Avenue, Suite 201, Idaho Falls, ID, 83402 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This paper details the new thermal-hydraulics and shutdown margin calculation modules of Studsvik Scandpower's next generation nodal code, SIMULATE-4. SIMULATE-4's BWR thermal-hydraulics (TH) models an entire vessel loop: core, chimney (for natural circulation reactors), upper plenum, standpipes, steam separators, down comer, re-circulation pumps, and lower plenum. The PWR thermal-hydraulics models the region from lower to upper tie plate. The core portion of the TH models of PWR and BWRs are treated essentially identically, with each assembly having an active channel and a number of parallel water channels. In each axial node of a channel, the total mixture mass, steam mass, mixture enthalpy, and mixture momentum balance equations are solved. The 3-D fuel temperatures are evaluated in the TH module by solving the radial heat conduction equation for the average pin of each node. The BWR assembly may be divided into four radial sub-channels. Assembly or nodal cross flow is allowed for PWRs. A new three-dimensional shutdown margin (SDM) method based on 'mini-core' concept has been developed in SIMULATE-4. 'Mini-core' geometry is used as a fast screening tool where full 3D calculations are performed for those rods identified with SDM smaller than the user's input criteria. Various numerical test results are presented to illustrate improvements with each module. (authors)

  20. Simulation of semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    Oriato, D

    2001-01-01

    cathode, made using an AIGaAs heterostructure step. Simulations show the importance of the insertion of a thin highly-doped layer between the transit region and the electron launcher in order to improve device operation. Chapter 5 is an introduction to Ill-nitrides, in particular GaN and its alloy ln-GaN. We outline the discrepancy in the elastic and piezoelectric parameters found in the literature. Strain, dislocations and piezoelectricity are presented as the main features of a InGaN/GaN system. In chapter 6 an extensive simulation of the dependence of the optical band gap of a single InGaN quantum well on the piezoelectric and spontaneous polarization is reported. Quantum Confined Stark Effect and screening mechanisms are found to play a major role. The simulation of a novel InGaN/GaN double quantum well LED is presented. A wide well is used to capture electrons that tunnels in a narrow well where they recombine with holes. Resonant asymmetric tunneling of electron and holes is used to increase the efficie...