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Sample records for full tungsten wall

  1. Compatibility of ITER scenarios with full tungsten wall in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, O.; Sips, A. C. C.; Dux, R.; Eich, T.; Fuchs, J. C.; Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Maggi, C. F.; Neu, R.; Pütterich, T.; Schweinzer, J.; Stober, J.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2009-11-01

    The transition of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) from a graphite device to a full tungsten device is demonstrated with a reduction by an order of magnitude in both the carbon deposition and deuterium retention. The tungsten source is dominated by sputtering from intrinsic light impurities, and the tungsten influxes from the outboard limiters are the main source for the plasma. In H-mode discharges, central heating (neutral beams, ECRH) is used to increase turbulent outward transport avoiding tungsten accumulation. ICRH can only be used after boronization as its application otherwise results in large W influxes due to light impurities accelerated by electrical fields at the ICRH antennas. ELMs are important in reducing the inward transport of tungsten in the H-mode edge barrier and are controlled by gas puffing. Even without boronization, stationary, ITER baseline H-modes (confinement enhancement factor from ITER 98(y, 2) scaling H98 ~ 1, normalized beta βN ~ 2), with W concentrations below 3 × 10-5 were routinely achieved up to 1.2 MA plasma current. The compatibility of high performance improved H-modes with unboronized W wall was demonstrated, achieving H98 = 1.1 and βN up to 2.6 at modest triangularities δ cooled by N2 seeding. N2 seeding does not only protect the divertor tiles but also considerably improves the performance of improved H-mode discharges. The energy confinement increased to H98-factors of 1.25 (βN ~ 2.7) and thereby exceeded the best values in a carbon-dominated AUG machine under similar conditions. Recent investigations show that this improvement is due to higher temperatures rather than to peaking of the electron density profile. Further ITER discharge scenario tests include the demonstration of ECRF assisted low voltage plasma start-up and current rise to q95 = 3 at toroidal electric fields below 0.3 V m-1, to achieve a ITER compatible range of plasma internal inductance of 0.71-0.97. The results reported here strongly support tungsten as a first

  2. Development of divertor tungsten coatings for the JET ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, G. F.; Coad, P.; Greuner, H.; Hill, M.; Hirai, T.; Likonen, J.; Maier, H.; Mayer, M.; Neu, R.; Philipps, V.; Pitts, R.; Riccardo, V.; JET EFDA Contributors

    2009-06-01

    The main objectives of the JET ITER-like Wall Project are to provide a beryllium main wall and tungsten divertor with at least a 4 year lifetime to allow full evaluation of the materials and related plasma scenarios for ITER. Tungsten coatings will be used over most of the divertor area and this paper describes the latest developments in the coating technology and an analysis of the implications for the coating lifetime and machine operation. Both steady state and transient heat loads are assessed.

  3. Electrocatalytic Activity of Tungsten Trioxide Micro-spheres, Tungsten Carbide Microspheres and Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube-tungsten Carbide Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hongzhi; YAN Taining

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide micropheres were prepared by spray pyrolysis, and tungsten carbidemicrospheres were produced by spray pyrolysis-low temperature reduction and carbonization technology.Multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide composites were prepared by the continuous reductionand carbonization process using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and WO_3 precursor by mo-lecular level mixing and calcination. The morphology and structure of the samples were characterized byscanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, the crystal phase was identified by X-ray diffraction. The electrocatalytic activity of the sample was analyzed by means of me-thanol oxidation. Tungsten carbide microspheres were catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction.Nevertheless tungsten trioxide microspheres and multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide compos-ites were not catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction. These results indicate that tungsten carbide micropheres are promising catalyst for methanol oxidation.

  4. Progress of ITER full tungsten divertor technology qualification in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezato, K., E-mail: ezato.koichiro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1, Mukoyma, Naka-shi, Ibaraki (Japan); Suzuki, S.; Seki, Y.; Mohri, K.; Yokoyama, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1, Mukoyma, Naka-shi, Ibaraki (Japan); Escourbiac, F.; Hirai, T. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Kuznetcov, V. [NIIEFA, 3 doroga na Metallostroy, Metallostroy, St. Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • JAEA has demonstrated tungsten monoblock technology for ITER divertor that needs to withstand the repetitive heat load as high as 20 MW/m{sup 2}. This includes as follows; • Bonding technologies between W and Cu interlayer, and between Cu interlayer and CuCrZr tube. • Non-destructive examination techniques, especially, ultrasonic testing method, and. • Load carrying capability of W monoblock attachment to support structure of ITER divertor. - Abstract: Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is in progress for technology qualification toward full-tungsten (W) ITER divertor outer vertical target (OVT), especially, tungsten monoblock technology that needs to withstand the repetitive heat load as high as 20 MW/m{sup 2}. To demonstrate the armor heat sink bonding technology and heat removal capability, 6 small-scale W monoblock mock-ups manufactured by different bonding technologies using different W materials in addition to 4 full-scale prototype plasma-facing units (PFUs). After non-destructive test, the W components were tested under high heat flux (HHF) in ITER Divertor Test Facility (IDTF) at NIIEFA. Consequently, all of the W monoblocks endured the repetitive heat load at 20 MW/m{sup 2} for 1000 cycles (requirements 20 MW/m{sup 2} for 300 cycles) without any failure. In addition to the armor to heat sink joints, the load carrying capability test on the W monoblock with a leg attachment was carried out. In uniaxial tensile test, all of the W monoblock attachments with different bonding technologies such as brazing and HIPping withstand the tensile load exceeding 20 kN that is the value more than twice the design value. The failures occurred at the leg attachments or the W monoblocks, rather than the bonding interface of the W monoblocks to the leg attachment.

  5. Tungsten transport and sources control in JET ITER-like wall H-mode plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorczak, N., E-mail: nicolas.fedorczak@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Monier-Garbet, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Pütterich, T. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Jlich, Assoc EURATOM-FZJ, Jlich (Germany); Devynck, P.; Dumont, R.; Goniche, M.; Joffrin, E. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lerche, E. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Luna, E. de la [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maddison, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Maggi, C. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Matthews, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Nunes, I. [Istituto de plasmas e fusao nuclear, Lisboa (Portugal); Rimini, F. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Solano, E.R. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Tsalas, M. [Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, NCSR Demokritos 153 10, Attica (Greece); Vries, P. de [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    A set of discharges performed with the JET ITER-like wall is investigated with respect to control capabilities on tungsten sources and transport. In attached divertor regimes, increasing fueling by gas puff results in higher divertor recycling ion flux, lower divertor tungsten source, higher ELM frequency and lower core plasma radiation, dominated by tungsten ions. Both pedestal flushing by ELMs and divertor screening (including redeposition) are possibly responsible. For specific scenarios, kicks in plasma vertical position can be employed to increase the ELM frequency, which results in slightly lower core radiation. The application of ion cyclotron radio frequency heating at the very center of the plasma is efficient to increase the core electron temperature gradient and flatten electron density profile, resulting in a significantly lower central tungsten peaking. Beryllium evaporation in the main chamber did not reduce the local divertor tungsten source whereas core radiation was reduced by approximately 50%.

  6. Effects of impurity transport and melt layer motion to the tungsten wall erosion during anomaly events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibano, K., E-mail: kibano@eei.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tsutsui, T.; Lang, T.L.; Togo, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2015-08-15

    Developing designs of future fusion devices, safety and soundness of the rector at anomaly events must be ensured. A computational approach is being taken by developing a homegrown integrated reactor simulation code and analyzing a loss-of-cooling-gas-puff accident (LCGA). This code currently includes simple plasma, edge, and wall models. In this study, models for the tungsten transport and melt layer motion was added and used for the analysis. It was found that this accident results significant erosion of the wall while impurities from the wall would contribute the radiation cooling for the intense heat flux. However, these effects strongly depend on an uncertain parameter of the tungsten transport as well as the tungsten melt layer motion. Thus, parametric survey for these uncertain quantities were taken and discussed.

  7. Modelling the thermomechanical behaviour of the tungsten first wall in HiPER laser fusion scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoz, D.; Páramo, A. R.; Rivera, A.; Perlado, J. M.; González-Arrabal, R.

    2016-12-01

    The behaviour of a tungsten first wall is studied under the irradiation conditions predicted for the different operational scenarios of the European laser fusion project HiPER, which is based on direct drive targets and an evacuated dry wall chamber. The scenarios correspond to different stages in the development of a nuclear fusion reactor, from proof of principle (bunch mode facility) to economic feasibility (pre-commercial power plant). This work constitutes a quantitative study to evaluate first wall performance under realistic irradiation conditions in the different scenarios. We calculated the radiation fluxes assuming the geometrical configurations reported so far for HiPER. Then, we calculated the irradiation-induced evolution of first wall temperature and the thermomechanical response of the material. The results indicate that the first wall will plastically deform up to a few microns underneath the surface. Continuous operation in a power plant leads to fatigue failure with crack generation and growth. Finally, crack propagation and the minimum tungsten thickness required to fulfil the first wall protection role is studied. The response of tungsten as a first wall material as well as its main limitations will be discussed for the HiPER scenarios.

  8. Comparison on heat flux deposition between carbon and tungsten wall – Investigations on energy recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bufferand, H., E-mail: hugo.bufferand@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, 13108 St Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bucalossi, J.; Ciraolo, G.; Fedorczak, N. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 St Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Genesio, P. [PIIM, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, 13397 Marseille (France); Ghendrih, Ph.; Gunn, J. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 St Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Marandet, Y.; Martin, C.; Mellet, N. [PIIM, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, 13397 Marseille (France); Serre, E. [M2P2, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, 13451 Marseille (France); Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 St Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    The influence of the plasma facing components material on the scrape-off layer plasma is investigated. In particular, the energy recycling is found to be more pronounced for tungsten wall compared with carbon wall. Edge plasma simulations performed with the transport code SOLEDGE2D-EIRENE show that this enhanced energy recycling in the tungsten case leads to an increase of the scrape-off layer temperature. Moreover, the energy recycling depends on the ion angle of incidence with the wall. A PIC code has been used to model the ion acceleration in the magnetic pre-sheath and determine the later angle of incidence. These simulations show that ions mostly impact the wall with rather shallow incident angles leading to a further increase of the energy recycling.

  9. Tungsten(VI) Oxide Flake-Wall Film Electrodes for Photoelectrochemical Oxygen Evolution from Water

    OpenAIRE

    Amano, Fumiaki; Li, Ding; Ohtani, Bunsho

    2010-01-01

    A vertically arrayed flake film, "flake-wall film", of monoclinic tungsten(VI) oxide (WO3) was prepared on a transparent conductive glass. The WO3 flake-wall film exhibited superior performance for photoelectrochemical water oxidation under visible-light irradiation compared to that of a film consisting of horizontally laminated WO3 flakes. The small difference between photocurrent densities under front-side irradiation and back-side irradiation indicates the excellent electron transport prop...

  10. Full size testing of sheet pile walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuilen, J.W.G. van de; Linden, M.L.R. van der; Katsma, H.; Stolle, P.

    1996-01-01

    Azobé (Lophira alata) is widely used in timber sheet pile walls in the Netherlands. The boards in these walls are coupled and therefore load-sharing can be expected. A simulation model based on the finite element method DIANA (DIANA, 1992) was developed and load-sharing could be calculated. To check

  11. Applicability of tungsten/EUROFER blanket module for the DEMO first wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igitkhanov, Yu., E-mail: juri.igitkhanov@lhm.fzk.de [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IHM, Karlsruhe (Germany); Bazylev, B.; Landman, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IHM, Karlsruhe (Germany); Boccaccini, L. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, INR, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    In this paper we analyse a sandwich-type blanket configuration of W/EUROFER for DEMO first wall under steady-state normal operation and off-normal conditions, such as vertical displacements and runaway electrons. The heat deposition and consequent erosion of the tungsten armour is modelled under condition of helium cooling of the first wall blanket module and by taking into account the conversion of the magnetic energy stored in the runaway electron current into heat through the ohmic dissipation of the return current induced in the metallic armour structure. It is shown that under steady-state DEMO operation the first wall sandwich type module will tolerate heat loads up to ∼14 MW/m{sup 2}. It will also sustain the off-normal events, apart from the hot vertical displacement events, which will melt the tungsten armour surface.

  12. Applicability of tungsten/EUROFER blanket module for the DEMO first wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igitkhanov, Yu.; Bazylev, B.; Landman, I.; Boccaccini, L.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we analyse a sandwich-type blanket configuration of W/EUROFER for DEMO first wall under steady-state normal operation and off-normal conditions, such as vertical displacements and runaway electrons. The heat deposition and consequent erosion of the tungsten armour is modelled under condition of helium cooling of the first wall blanket module and by taking into account the conversion of the magnetic energy stored in the runaway electron current into heat through the ohmic dissipation of the return current induced in the metallic armour structure. It is shown that under steady-state DEMO operation the first wall sandwich type module will tolerate heat loads up to ˜14 MW/m2. It will also sustain the off-normal events, apart from the hot vertical displacement events, which will melt the tungsten armour surface.

  13. Video analysis of dust events in full-tungsten ASDEX Upgrade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brochard, F.; Shalpegin, A.; Bardin, S.; Lunt, T.; Rohde, V.; Briançon, J. L.; Pautasso, G.; Vorpahl, C.; Neu, R.; ASDEX Upgrade team,

    2017-01-01

    Fast video data recorded during seven consecutive operation campaigns (2008–2012) in full-tungsten ASDEX Upgrade have been analyzed with an algorithm developed to automatically detect and track dust particles. A total of 2425 discharges have been analyzed, corresponding to 12 204 s of plasma

  14. Tungsten disulphide coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, R. L. D.; Hsu, W. K.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    2002-06-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNs), coated with ordered WS 2 mono- or multi-layers, are generated by pyrolysing H 2S/N 2 over MWCNs thinly coated with WO 3. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals the presence of hexagonal WS 2 arrays in the tube surface, consistent with the WS 2 simulated structure.

  15. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures of tungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  16. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Doped Tungsten Oxide Thin Films for Hydrogen Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adisorn Tuantranont

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have fabricated hydrogen gas sensors based on undoped and 1 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT-doped tungsten oxide (WO3 thin films by means of the powder mixing and electron beam (E-beam evaporation technique. Hydrogen sensing properties of the thin films have been investigated at different operating temperatures and gas concentrations ranging from 100 ppm to 50,000 ppm. The results indicate that the MWCNT-doped WO3 thin film exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen. Thus, MWCNT doping based on E-beam co-evaporation was shown to be an effective means of preparing hydrogen gas sensors with enhanced sensing and reduced operating temperatures. Creation of nanochannels and formation of p-n heterojunctions were proposed as the sensing mechanism underlying the enhanced hydrogen sensitivity of this hybridized gas sensor. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on a MWCNT-doped WO3 hydrogen sensor prepared by the E-beam method.

  17. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Doped Tungsten Oxide Thin Films for Hydrogen Gas Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In this work we have fabricated hydrogen gas sensors based on undoped and 1 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-doped tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films by means of the powder mixing and electron beam (E-beam) evaporation technique. Hydrogen sensing properties of the thin films have been investigated at different operating temperatures and gas concentrations ranging from 100 ppm to 50,000 ppm. The results indicate that the MWCNT-doped WO3 thin film exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity ...

  18. Mechanical properties of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy after first-wall coating with tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Takuya, E-mail: nagasaka@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Watanabe, Hideo [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta; Iwata, Noriyuki; Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    A first-wall coating was fabricated with tungsten on a reference V-4Cr-4Ti alloy (NIFS-HEAT-2, NH2) substrate by a vacuum plasma spray (VPS) process and brazing (BR). The hardness, fracture stress, and elastic modulus of tungsten (W) coating applied by the vacuum plasma spray process (VPS-W) were lower than the tungsten used for brazing (BR-W). The low mass density and defects of VPS-W are thought to be responsible for the degradation of the strength. The NH2 substrate indicated hardening and embrittlement produced by the W coating and some post-coating heat treatment (PCHT). Hardening and embrittlement by a VPS coating can be recovered by removing hydrogen from the NH2 substrate in a vacuum by annealing at 673 K. Oxygen transfer from the W coating to the NH2 substrate was indicated above 1173 K but did not induce embrittlement of the substrate. Hardening by the BR process can be recovered by PCHT at 1273 K, but embrittlement was not improved. The mechanisms of the hardening and embrittlement are discussed based on a microstructural analysis.

  19. Video analysis of dust events in full-tungsten ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochard, F.; Shalpegin, A.; Bardin, S.; Lunt, T.; Rohde, V.; Briançon, J. L.; Pautasso, G.; Vorpahl, C.; Neu, R.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-03-01

    Fast video data recorded during seven consecutive operation campaigns (2008-2012) in full-tungsten ASDEX Upgrade have been analyzed with an algorithm developed to automatically detect and track dust particles. A total of 2425 discharges have been analyzed, corresponding to 12 204 s of plasma operation. The analysis aimed at precisely identifying and sorting the discharge conditions responsible of the dust generation or remobilization. Dust rates are found to be significantly lower than in tokamaks with carbon PFCs. Significant dust events occur mostly during off-normal plasma phases such as disruptions and particularly those preceded by vertical displacement events (VDEs). Dust rates are also increased but to a lower extent during type-I ELMy H-modes. The influences of disruption energy, heating scenario, vessel venting and vessel vibrations are also presented.

  20. 2D tritium distribution on tungsten tiles used in JET ITER-like wall project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Y., E-mail: hatano@ctg.u-toyama.ac.jp [University of Toyama, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Widdowson, A.; Bekris, N.; Ayres, C.; Baron-Wiechec, A. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Likonen, J.; Koivuranta, S. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Association EURATOM-Tekes, P.O. Box 1000, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Ikonen, J. [University of Helsinki, Association EURATOM-Tekes, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Yumizuru, K. [University of Toyama, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Post-mortem measurements of 2-dimensional tritium (T) distribution using an imaging plate (IP) technique were performed for tungsten (W) divertor tiles (W-coated CFC) used in JET-ITER like wall (ILW) project. The observed T distributions were clearly inhomogeneous, and there were band-like regions with high T concentrations that extended in the toroidal direction on tiles 1, 3, 4 and 6. The concentrations of T in the band-like regions were higher by an order of magnitude than the concentrations in other parts. The inhomogeneous T distributions were explained by non-uniform co-deposition with other elements such as beryllium. The concentrations of T on the outboard vertical tiles (tiles 7 and 8) were low and relatively uniform in comparison with other tiles.

  1. Numerical assessment of functionally graded tungsten/EUROFER coating system for first wall applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, D.D., E-mail: dandna.qu@partner.kit.edu; Basuki, W.W.; Aktaa, J.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Tungsten coatings with W/EUROFER functional graded (FG) interlayers on EUROFER substrates are investigated by means of finite element (FE) simulations as first wall (FW) application. • The FE simulations consider elasto-perfectly plastic and elasto-viscoplastic material models and the fabrication phase and operation phase. • The effects of FG-interlayers thicknesses on mitigating the residual stress and inelastic strain are studied. • Allowable number of cycles is calculated based on creep damage accumulation. - Abstract: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels, e.g. EUROFER, are to be used as structural material for the first wall (FW) of future fusion power plants. The interaction between the plasma and the FW, especially physical sputtering, will limit the FW lifetime under normal operation. Therefore, a tungsten coating should be selected to protect the FW due to its low sputtering yield, low activation, high melting point and high thermal conductivity. However, the mismatch of thermo-physical properties between W and EUROFER induces large residual thermal stresses and even failure of components. Functionally graded material (FGM) is considered as an appropriate solution to mitigate the high residual stresses. In this work, W coatings on EUROFER substrates with W/EUROFER FG-layer (the coating system) are investigated by means of finite element (FE) simulations considering elasto-perfectly plastic and elasto-viscoplastic material models. For determining optimal parameters of the coating system the vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) fabrication process and the operation phase of the fusion reactor are simulated. Based on the FE results creep assessment of the coating system is performed demonstrating the gain in lifetime to be expected when using a FG-layer and investigating its dependence on the thickness of the FG-layer.

  2. Powder metallurgical processing of self-passivating tungsten alloys for fusion first wall application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Ruiz, P.; Ordás, N.; Iturriza, I. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Walter, M.; Gaganidze, E. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Lindig, S.; Koch, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); García-Rosales, C., E-mail: cgrosales@ceit.es [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    Self-passivating tungsten based alloys are expected to provide a major safety advantage compared to pure tungsten, presently the main candidate material for first wall armour of future fusion reactors. In case of a loss of coolant accident with simultaneous air ingress, a protective oxide scale will be formed on the surface of W avoiding the formation of volatile and radioactive WO{sub 3}. Bulk WCr12Ti2.5 alloys were manufactured by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and their properties compared to bulk WCr10Si10 alloys from previous work. The MA parameters were adjusted to obtain the best balance between lowest possible amount of contaminants and effective alloying of the elemental powders. After HIP, a density >99% is achieved for the WCr12Ti2.5 alloy and a very fine and homogeneous microstructure with grains in the submicron range is obtained. Unlike the WCr10Si10 material, no intergranular ODS phase inhibiting grain growth was detected. The thermal and mechanical properties of the WCr10Si10 material are dominated by the silicide (W,Cr){sub 5}Si{sub 3}; it shows a sharp ductile-to brittle transition in the range 1273–1323 K. The thermal conductivity of the WCr12Ti2.5 alloy is close to 50 W/mK in the temperature range of operation; it exhibits significantly higher strength and lower DBTT – around 1170 K – than the WCr10Si10 material.

  3. Target particle and heat loads in low-triangularity L-mode plasmas in JET with carbon and beryllium/tungsten walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Belo, P.; Corrigan, G.; Harting, D.; Wiesen, S.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Brix, M.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Eich, T.; Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Lowry, C.; Maggi, C. F.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A. G.; Sergienko, G.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Sirinelli, A.; Stamp, M. F.; van Rooij, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Divertor radiation profiles, and power and particle fluxes to the target have been measured in attached \\{JET\\} L-mode plasmas with carbon and beryllium/tungsten wall materials. In the beryllium/tungsten configuration, factors of 2–3 higher power loads and peak temperatures at the low field side tar

  4. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-doped tungsten oxide thin films for hydrogen gas sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongchoosuk, Chatchawal; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Phokharatkul, Ditsayut; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2010-01-01

    In this work we have fabricated hydrogen gas sensors based on undoped and 1 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-doped tungsten oxide (WO(3)) thin films by means of the powder mixing and electron beam (E-beam) evaporation technique. Hydrogen sensing properties of the thin films have been investigated at different operating temperatures and gas concentrations ranging from 100 ppm to 50,000 ppm. The results indicate that the MWCNT-doped WO(3) thin film exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen. Thus, MWCNT doping based on E-beam co-evaporation was shown to be an effective means of preparing hydrogen gas sensors with enhanced sensing and reduced operating temperatures. Creation of nanochannels and formation of p-n heterojunctions were proposed as the sensing mechanism underlying the enhanced hydrogen sensitivity of this hybridized gas sensor. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on a MWCNT-doped WO(3) hydrogen sensor prepared by the E-beam method.

  5. Plasma Wall Interaction Phenomena on Tungsten Armour Materials for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uytdenhouwen, I. [SCK.CEN - The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Massaut, V. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Van Oost, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-07-01

    One of the most attractive future complements to present energy sources is nuclear fusion. A large progress was made throughout the last decade from both the physical as the technological area leading to the construction of the ITER machine. One of the key issues that recently received a large interest at international level is focused on the Plasma Wall Interaction (PWI). One of the promising Plasma Facing Materials (PFM) are Tungsten (W) and Tungsten alloys. However, despite the worldwide use and industrial availability of W, the database of physical and mechanical properties is very limited. Especially after fusion relevant neutron irradiation and PWI phenomena, most of the properties are still unknown. The plasma fuel consists out of deuterium (D) and tritium (T). Tritium is radio-active and therefore an issue from the safety point of view. During steady-state plasma operation of future fusion power plants, the PFM need to extract a power density of {approx}10-20 MW/m{sup 2}. On top of this heat, transient events will deposit an additional non-negligible amount of energy (Disruptions, Vertical Displacement Events, Edge Localized Modes) during short durations. These severe heat loads cause cracking and even melting of the surface resulting in a reduced lifetime and the creation of dust. A contribution to the understanding of cracking phenomena under the severe thermal loads is described as well as the properties degradation under neutron irradiation. Several W grades were irradiated in the BR2 reactor (SCK.CEN) and the thermal loads were simulated with the electron-beam facility JUDITH (FZJ). Since knowledge should be gained about the Tritium retention in the PFM for safety and licensing reasons, a unique test facility at SCK.CEN is being set-up. The plasmatron VISION-I will simulate steady state plasmas for Tritium retention studies. The formation of surface cracks and dust, the initial porosity, neutron induced traps, re-deposited material - change the Tritium

  6. Generation and analysis of plasmas with centrally reduced helicity in full-tungsten ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    The most promising concepts for harnessing nuclear fusion are toroidal devices like tokamaks, where a plasma is confined by helically twisted magnetic field lines. To provide the twisting of the field lines, a tokamak relies on a toroidal current in the plasma, which is largely generated by a transformer. As such, conventional tokamaks are limited to pulsed operation. Moreover, this current makes tokamak plasmas prone to numerous confinement degrading magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities that can emerge at locations where the field line helicity q takes on rational values like 1/1, 3/2 or 2/1, i.e. sawteeth or neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). This thesis presents studies of plasmas with centrally elevated q-profiles created by external electron-cyclotron and neutral beam current drive (ECCD/NBCD) under steady-state conditions in the full-tungsten tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. Without the usually monotonic q-profile, instabilities of low helicity disappear, thereby improving the plasma stability. Furthermore, elevating q increases the amount of so-called (toroidal) bootstrap current, which the plasma drives by itself in the presence of pressure gradients, thereby reducing the reliance on the transformer. In the best case, an advanced tokamak (AT) could thus run in steady state. Additionally, an elevated and thus flat/slightly reversed q-profile is thought to improve confinement by impeding turbulent transport. Reconstruction of the tailored q-profile is accomplished with the new integrated data equilibrium (IDE) code and information from a key diagnostic that is based on the Motional Stark Effect (MSE). During the course of this work it was discovered that the MSE diagnostic suffers from interference from polarised background light. A prototype mitigation system was successfully tested. Also, non-linearities in the diagnostic's optical relay system were found and a calibration scheme devised to take them into account. Both the conventional approach of AT

  7. Migration of tungsten dust in tokamaks: role of dust–wall collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratynskaia, S.; Vignitchouk, L.; Tolias, P.; I. Bykov,; H. Bergsåker,; Litnovsky, A.; N. den Harder,; Lazzaro, E.

    2013-01-01

    The modelling of a controlled tungsten dust injection experiment in TEXTOR by the dust dynamics code MIGRAINe is reported. The code, in addition to the standard dust–plasma interaction processes, also encompasses major mechanical aspects of dust–surface collisions. The use of analytical expressions

  8. Non-boronized compared with boronized operation of ASDEX Upgrade with full-tungsten plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, A.; Dux, R.; Mayer, M.; Neu, R.; Pütterich, T.; Bobkov, V.; Fuchs, J. C.; Eich, T.; Giannone, L.; Gruber, O.; Herrmann, A.; Horton, L. D.; Maggi, C. F.; Meister, H.; Müller, H. W.; Rohde, V.; Sips, A.; Stäbler, A.; Stober, J.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2009-04-01

    After completion of the tungsten coating of all plasma facing components, ASDEX Upgrade has been operated without boronization for 1 1/2 experimental campaigns. This has allowed the study of fuel retention under conditions of relatively low D co-deposition with low-Z impurities as well as the operational space of a full-tungsten device for the unfavourable condition of a relatively high intrinsic impurity level. Restrictions in operation were caused by the central accumulation of tungsten in combination with density peaking, resulting in H-L backtransitions induced by too low separatrix power flux. Most important control parameters have been found to be the central heating power, as delivered predominantly by ECRH, and the ELM frequency, most easily controlled by gas puffing. Generally, ELMs exhibit a positive impact, with the effect of impurity flushing out of the pedestal region overbalancing the ELM-induced W source. The restrictions of plasma operation in the unboronized W machine occurred predominantly under low or medium power conditions. Under medium-high power conditions, stable operation with virtually no difference between boronized and unboronized discharges was achieved. Due to the reduced intrinsic radiation with boronization and the limited power handling capability of VPS coated divertor tiles (≈10 MW m-2), boronized operation at high heating powers was possible only with radiative cooling. To enable this, a previously developed feedback system using (thermo-)electric current measurements as approximate sensor for the divertor power flux was introduced into the standard AUG operation. To avoid the problems with reduced ELM frequency due to core plasma radiation, nitrogen was selected as radiating species since its radiative characteristic peaks at lower electron temperatures in comparison with Ne and Ar, favouring SOL and divertor radiative losses. Nitrogen seeding resulted not only in the desired divertor power load reduction but also in improved

  9. Target particle and heat loads in low-triangularity L-mode plasmas in JET with carbon and beryllium/tungsten walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, M., E-mail: mathias.groth@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Espoo (Finland); Brezinsek, S. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Belo, P. [Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Association EURATOM-IST, Lisbon (Portugal); Corrigan, G. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Harting, D.; Wiesen, S. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Beurskens, M.N.A.; Brix, M. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Clever, M.; Coenen, J.W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Eich, T. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Garching (Germany); Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Huber, A. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Jachmich, S. [Association “EURATOM Belgium State”, Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Brussels (Belgium); Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Lowry, C. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Maggi, C.F. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Garching (Germany); Marsen, S. [Max-Planck-Institut for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald (Germany); and others

    2013-07-15

    Divertor radiation profiles, and power and particle fluxes to the target have been measured in attached JET L-mode plasmas with carbon and beryllium/tungsten wall materials. In the beryllium/tungsten configuration, factors of 2–3 higher power loads and peak temperatures at the low field side target were observed in high-recycling scrape-off layer conditions, whilst in close-to-sheath-limited conditions almost identical plasmas were obtained. The 30% reduction in total radiation with the beryllium/tungsten wall is consistent with a reduction of carbon as the dominant impurity radiator; however similar ion current to the plates, emission from recycling neutrals and neutral pressures in the pumping plenum were measured. Simulations with the EDGDE2/EIRENE code of these plasmas indicate a reduction of the total divertor radiation when carbon is omitted, but significantly higher power loads in high-recycling and detached conditions are predicted than measured.

  10. Reconstruction of massive full-thickness abdominal wall defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Paulsen, Ida Felbo; Bentzen, Vibeke Egerup

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to use a nonabsorbable mesh for abdominal wall reconstruction after total wound rupture and successfully split-skin graft directly on the mesh. Sufficient granulation tissue formation prior to skin grafting was obtained with long-term use of negative pressure...

  11. Simulation of tungsten sputtering with EDGE2D–EIRENE in low triangularity L-mode JET ITER like wall configuration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harting, D.; Groth, M.; Beurskens, M.; Boerner, P.; Brix, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Corrigan, G.; Lehnen, M.; Marsen, S.; van Rooij, G. J.; Reiter, D.; Wiesen, S.

    2013-01-01

    The 2D edge plasma transport code EDGE2D-EIRENE has been upgraded to account for the actual material and geometric properties of the newly installed İTER\\} like wall (ILW) at JET. This includes the simulation of beryllium and tungsten impurities as well as a revised treatment of sputtering by main p

  12. Efficient degradation of methylene blue dye over tungsten trioxide/multi-walled carbon nanotube system as a novel photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinari, Mohammad; Momeni, Mohamad Mohsen; Ahangarpour, Marzieh [Isfahan University of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Combination of acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube/tungsten trioxide (MWCNT/WO{sub 3}) with different MWCNT's weight percentages as visible light-induced photocatalysts for photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) dye was synthesized. These photocatalysts were characterized by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Their photocatalytic activities were tested by using MB as a model compound. The results show that the MWCNT/WO{sub 3} hybrid nanostructures exhibit higher photocatalytic activity than pure WO{sub 3} or MWCNTs due to their higher absorption enhancement in visible light region and effective separation of electrons and holes. The stability of the hybrid was characterized through cyclic photocatalytic test. (orig.)

  13. Efficient degradation of methylene blue dye over tungsten trioxide/multi-walled carbon nanotube system as a novel photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinari, Mohammad; Momeni, Mohamad Mohsen; Ahangarpour, Marzieh

    2016-10-01

    Combination of acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube/tungsten trioxide (MWCNT/WO3) with different MWCNT's weight percentages as visible light-induced photocatalysts for photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) dye was synthesized. These photocatalysts were characterized by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Their photocatalytic activities were tested by using MB as a model compound. The results show that the MWCNT/WO3 hybrid nanostructures exhibit higher photocatalytic activity than pure WO3 or MWCNTs due to their higher absorption enhancement in visible light region and effective separation of electrons and holes. The stability of the hybrid was characterized through cyclic photocatalytic test.

  14. Full scale tests of moisture buffer capacity of wall materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2005-01-01

    Moisture buffer capacity of hygroscopic materials can be used to moderate peaks in the relative humidity (RH) of indoor air as well as moisture content variations in building materials and furnishing. This can help to ensure healthier indoor environments by preventing many processes......, the buffer performance is investigated first for the untreated material, then after adding rendering on the surfaces, and finally with latex paint. Similarly for the walls of plasterboard construction, the buffer effects are investigated first for the insulation (cellulose or mineral wool), then after adding...... reduced even with the supposedly highly vapour permeable rendering finish, not to mention the case when the latex paint was used. In the same way, the experiments for the plaster board construction demonstrated how cellulose insulation, as a very hygroscopic material, is a good buffer compared...

  15. Simulation of tungsten sputtering with EDGE2D–EIRENE in low triangularity L-mode JET ITER like wall configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harting, D., E-mail: d.harting@fz-juelich.de [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – IEK-4, Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, TEC, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Groth, M. [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Otakaari 4, 02015 Espoo (Finland); Beurskens, M. [Culham Science Centre, Association EURATOM-CCFE Fusion, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Boerner, P. [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – IEK-4, Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, TEC, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Brix, M. [Culham Science Centre, Association EURATOM-CCFE Fusion, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Coenen, J.W. [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – IEK-4, Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, TEC, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Corrigan, G. [Culham Science Centre, Association EURATOM-CCFE Fusion, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lehnen, M. [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – IEK-4, Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, TEC, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Marsen, S. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, Association EURATOM, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Rooij, G. van [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen PO Box 1207, 3420BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); and others

    2013-07-15

    The 2D edge plasma transport code EDGE2D-EIRENE has been upgraded to account for the actual material and geometric properties of the newly installed ITER like wall (ILW) at JET. This includes the simulation of beryllium and tungsten impurities as well as a revised treatment of sputtering by main plasma and impurity atoms and ions (including self sputtering). In this work, two L-mode density regimes, a sheath limited and a high recycling regime, are presented with a power scan from 2 to 6 MW. Tungsten is self consistently simulated with the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma by the EDGE2D–EIRENE code. A detailed analysis of the tungsten sputtering is presented, resolving the individual contributions of the different atomic and ion species in the simulations.

  16. EBSD analysis of tungsten-filament carburization during the hot-wire CVD of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, Clive J; Arendse, Christopher J; Camagu, Sigqibo T; Swart, Hendrik

    2014-02-01

    Filament condition during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition conditions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes is a major concern for a stable deposition process. We report on the novel application of electron backscatter diffraction to characterize the carburization of tungsten filaments. During the synthesis, the W-filaments transform to W2C and WC. W-carbide growth followed a parabolic behavior corresponding to the diffusion of C as the rate-determining step. The grain size of W, W2C, and WC increases with longer exposure time and increasing filament temperature. The grain size of the recrystallizing W-core and W2C phase grows from the perimeter inwardly and this phenomenon is enhanced at filament temperatures in excess of 1,400°C. Cracks appear at filament temperatures >1,600°C, accompanied by a reduction in the filament operational lifetime. The increase of the W2C and recrystallized W-core grain size from the perimeter inwardly is ascribed to a thermal gradient within the filament, which in turn influences the hardness measurements and crack formation.

  17. Reconstruction of full thickness abdominal wall defect following tumor resection: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reconstruction of a full thickness abdominal wall defect is a demanding procedure for general and also for plastic surgeons, requiring vigorous planning and reconstruction of three layers. Case Outline. We present a case of a 70-year-old patient with a huge abdominal wall tumor with 40 years evolution. Surgery was performed under general anesthesia. Full thickness abdominal defect appeared after the tumor resection. Reconstruction followed in the same act. The defect was reconstructed using a combination of techniques, including omental flap, fascia lata graft, local skin flaps and skin grafts. After surgery no major complications were noted, only a partial skin flap loss, which was repaired using partial thickness skin grafts. The final result was described by the patient as very good, without hernia formation. Conclusion. Omenthoplasty, abdominal wall reconstruction in combination with free fascia lata graft and skin grafts can be one of good options for the reconstruction of full thickness abdominal wall defects.

  18. Tungsten toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Mark L; Sheppard, Paul R; Witten, Brandon L

    2012-04-05

    There is emerging evidence that tungsten has toxic health effects. We summarize the recent tungsten toxicity research in this short review. Tungsten is widely used in many commercial and military applications because it has the second highest melting temperature of any element. Consequently, it is important to elucidate the potential health effects of tungsten.

  19. EBSD analysis of tungsten-filament carburization during the hot-wire CVD of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available -scale synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes ~MWCNTs! using HWCVD ~Dillon et al., 2003!. Despite the efforts to reduce filament aging, the fila- ment alloying process is still being investigated. Previous studies have focused primarily on linking microscopy, X... pyrometer. At Received August 23, 2013; accepted November 26, 2013 *Corresponding author. E-mail: coliphant@nmisa.org Microsc. Microanal. Page 1 of 10 doi:10.1017/S1431927613014001 MicroscopyAND Microanalysis © MICROSCOPY SOCIETY OF AMERICA 2013 each...

  20. Endoluminal compression clip : full-thickness resection of the mesenteric bowel wall in a porcine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopelman, Yael; Siersema, Peter D.; Nir, Yael; Szold, Amir; Bapaye, Amol; Segol, Ori; Willenz, Ehud P.; Lelcuk, Shlomo; Geller, Alexander; Kopelman, Doron

    2009-01-01

    Background: Performing a full-thickness intestinal wall resection Of a sessile polyp located on the mesenteric side with a compression clip may lead to compression of mesenteric vessels. The application of such a clip may therefore cause a compromised blood supply in the particular bowel segment, le

  1. Full-scale performance testing and evaluation of unitized curtain walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ilter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Unitized curtain wall systems have been widely seen on high-rise buildings’ facades by bringing benefits with regard to ease of construction, lightness, etc. However, some design and application problems related to structural and infiltration performance of a facade system might arise during its life cycle, which is difficult for the building to compensate. This paper presents a comparative analysis of the structural and infiltration performance of the two identically detailed and produced unitized curtain wall system mock-ups. In order to understand long-term environmental effects on the curtain wall system, a fatigue process was applied on one system in addition to the standard test procedures, while the standard test procedure was applied on the other reference specimen. The tests on the two identical specimens were conducted in accordance with TS EN 13830 and AAMA 501.4 Standards. As a result of air infiltration and wind load resistance tests, air infiltration and frontal deflection values on the facade surface were obtained. Hence, experimental performance of the systems was compared and the effect of the fatigue procedure on the facade performance was evaluated.  

  2. Simulation of radiative divertor plasmas by Ar seeding with the full W-wall in JT-60SA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, H.; Shimizu, K.; Nakano, T.; Asakura, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Hoshino, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Radiative divertor plasmas for JT-60SA with a full tungsten (W) wall, which is one of options in future, have been simulated with a SOL/divertor integrated code, SONIC. A conventional modified-coronal radiation (MCR) model with a finite confinement time is used for both Ar and W for the purpose of wide-range parameter surveys for the divertor plasma to obtain the required conditions (q{sub t} ≤ 10 MW/m{sup 2}, n{sup Sep}{sub e-mid} = 3∝8 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, P{sub rad} < ∝30 MW), saving the calculation time. At low W density ratio (n{sub W}/n{sub i} = 1 x 10{sup -5}), due to low radiative power from W ions, Ar density ratio (n{sub Ar}/n{sub i} ≥ 1.0 x 10{sup -3}) and a strong gas puff (Γ{sub p} ≥ 3.0 x 10{sup 22} s{sup -1}) are inevitable to suppress the divertor heat flux down to 10 MW/m{sup 2}. Increasing n{sub W}/n{sub i} to 1 x 10{sup -3} in the divertor region, the divertor heat load becomes low and the operative regions are expanded. While, the W production shall be suppressed since the W radiation is increased with replacement of Ar radiation and the particle recycling decreased. A Monte-Carlo module (IMPMC) implemented in SONIC for Ar seeding reveals that the spatial distribution of Ar ions is predominantly determined by shell structures of the Ar ions. The consistency between IMPMC and MCR calculations is demonstrated for the averaged n{sub Ar}/n{sub i} ratio, the electron density and temperature profiles on the divertor target and typical parameter such as the divertor heat load. It shows that the detailed analysis with IMPMC model can be speedily obtained, using a steady state solution obtained by MCR model as an initial state. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Scaling of the frequencies of the type one edge localized modes and their effect on the tungsten source in JET ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devynck, P.; Fedorczak, N.; Meyer, O.; Contributors, JET

    2016-12-01

    A database of 250 pulses taken randomly during the experimental campaigns of JET with the ITER-like wall (ILW) is used to study the frequency dependences of the type I edge localized modes (ELM). A scaling of the ELM frequency is presented as a function of the pedestal density drop dN ped and a very simple model to interpret this scaling is discussed. In this model, the frequency of the ELMs is governed by the time needed by the neutral flux to refill the density of the pedestal. The filling rate is the result of a small imbalance between the neutral flux filling the pedestal and the outward flux that expels the particles to the SOL. The ELM frequency can be governed by such a mechanism if the recovery time of the temperature of the pedestal in JET occurs before or at the same time as the one of the density. This is observed to be the case. An effect of the fuelling is measured when the number of injected particles is less than 1  ×  1022 particles s-1. In that case an increase of the inter-ELM time is observed which is related to the slower recovery of the density pedestal. Additionally, a scaling is found for the source of tungsten during the ELMs. The number of tungsten atoms eroded by the ELMs per second is proportional to dN ped multiplied by the ELM frequency. This is possible only if the tungsten sputtering yield is independent of the energy of the impinging particle hitting the divertor. This result is in agreement with Guillemault et al (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 085006) and is compatible with the D+  ions hitting the divertor having energies above 2 keV. Finally, by plotting the Wcontent/Wsource ratio during ELM crash, a global decreasing behaviour with the ELM frequency is found. However at frequencies below 40 Hz a scatter towards upper values is found. This scatter is found to correlate with the gas injection level. In a narrow ELM frequency band around 20 Hz, it is found that both the ratio Wcontent/Wsource and Wsource

  4. Tungsten transport in the plasma edge at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzer, Michael Arthur

    2015-04-30

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) will play a crucial role in future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants, since they will be subject to high energy and particle loads, but at the same time have to ensure long lifetimes and a low tritium retention. These requirements will most probably necessitate the use of high-Z materials such as tungsten for the wall materials, since their erosion properties are very benign and, unlike carbon, capture only little tritium. The drawback with high-Z materials is, that they emit strong line radiation in the core plasma, which acts as a powerful energy loss mechanism. Thus, the concentration of these high-Z materials has to be controlled and kept at low levels in order to achieve a burning plasma. Understanding the transport processes in the plasma edge is essential for applying the proper impurity control mechanisms. This control can be exerted either by enhancing the outflux, e.g. by Edge Localized Modes (ELM), since they are known to expel impurities from the main plasma, or by reducing the influx, e.g. minimizing the tungsten erosion or increasing the shielding effect of the Scrape Off Layer (SOL). ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been successfully operating with a full tungsten wall for several years now and offers the possibility to investigate these edge transport processes for tungsten. This study focused on the disentanglement of the frequency of type-I ELMs and the main chamber gas injection rate, two parameters which are usually linked in H-mode discharges. Such a separation allowed for the first time the direct assessment of the impact of each parameter on the tungsten concentration. The control of the ELM frequency was performed by adjusting the shape of the plasma, i.e. the upper triangularity. The radial tungsten transport was investigated by implementing a modulated tungsten source. To create this modulated source, the linear dependence of the tungsten erosion rate at the Ion Cyclotron Resonance

  5. Concrete Flow in Diaphragm Wall Panels: A Full-Scale In-Situ Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dalen, J.H.; Bosch, J.W.; Broere, W.

    2015-01-01

    Flow processes, taking place during the concreting of diaphragm wall panels (D-wall panels), are of great importance for the quality of the wall. During this phase, the bentonite, present in the excavated trench, should be completely replaced by concrete in a controlled way. In literature several ca

  6. Film cooling on a convex wall: Heat transfer and hydrodynamic measurements for full and partial coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhama, K.; Moffat, R. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.

    1985-08-01

    Turbine-blade cooling is an important issue for high-efficiency turbine engines, and discrete-hole injection is widely used as a cooling method. In the present study, detailed measurements were made of the heat transfer and hydrodynamics of a film-cooled flow on a convex wall, both for full and partial coverage. Two important parameters were altered: the blowing ratio, m, and the number of rows of injection holes. Three values of m were tested: m = 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6. In the blown region, m = 0.4 results in the lowest Stanton numbers of the three blowing ratios tested. This indicates that the value of m = 0.4 is near optimum on the convex wall from the point of view of cooling effect by injection. In the recovery region, Stanton numbers gradually approach the no injection values. Although the heat-transfer behavior during recovery from injection looks relatively complicated, the behavior of Stanton number can be explained in terms of two mechanisms: recovery from the thermal effect of injection and recovery from the turbulence augmentation. This interpretation of the data is supported by the hydrodynamic and temperture-profile measurements. For partial blowing cases, the data follow the full-coverage values inside the blown region. In the unblown region, both in the curved and in the flat plate, the effect of the number of blown rows is clearly seen. Hydrodynamic boundary-layer profiles were measured with the aid of a triple hot-water probe. Three mean-velocity components and six turbulence quantities were simultaneously measured, and inside the blown region strong three-dimensionality was observed.

  7. Silica-templated synthesis of ordered mesoporous tungsten carbide/graphitic carbon composites with nanocrystalline walls and high surface areas via a temperature-programmed carburization route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhangxiong; Yang, Yunxia; Gu, Dong; Li, Qiang; Feng, Dan; Chen, Zhenxia; Tu, Bo; Webley, Paul A; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2009-12-01

    Ordered mesostructured tungsten carbide and graphitic carbon composites (WC/C) with nanocrystalline walls are fabricated for the first time by a temperature-programmed carburization approach with phosphotungstic acid (PTA) as a precursor and mesoporous silica materials as hard templates. The mesostructure, crystal phase, and amount of deposited graphitic carbon can be conveniently tuned by controlling the silica template (SBA-15 or KIT-6), carburizing temperature (700-1000 degrees C), the PTA-loading amount, and the carburizing atmosphere (CH(4) or a CH(4)/H(2) mixture). A high level of deposited carbon is favorable for connecting and stabilizing the WC nanocrystallites to achieve high mesostructural regularity, as well as promoting the carburization reaction. Meanwhile, large pore sizes and high mesoporosity of the silica templates can promote WC-phase formation. These novel, ordered, mesoporous WC/C nanocomposites with high surface areas (74-169 m(2) g(-1)), large pore volumes (0.14-0.17 cm(3) g(-1)), narrow pore-size distributions (centered at about 3 nm), and very good oxidation resistance (up to 750 degrees C) have potential applications in fuel-cell catalysts and nanodevices.

  8. Full scale measurements and CFD investigations of a wall radiant cooling system integrated in thin concrete walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikeska, Tomás; Fan, Jianhua; Svendsen, Svend

    2017-01-01

    Densely occupied spaces such as classrooms can very often have problems with overheating. It can be difficult to cool such spaces by means of a ventilation system without creating draughts and causing discomfort for occupants. The use of a wall radiant cooling system is a suitable option for spaces...... with a high occupant density. Radiant systems can remove most sensible heat loads resulting in a relatively small requirement for supply air for ventilation....

  9. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Mengdi; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H2), which reacted with WF6 at the substrate to deposit W. The

  10. Global Tungsten Demand and Supply Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořáček, Jaroslav; Sousedíková, Radmila; Vrátný, Tomáš; Jureková, Zdenka

    2017-03-01

    An estimate of the world tungsten demand and supply until 2018 has been made. The figures were obtained by extrapolating from past trends of tungsten production from1905, and its demand from 1964. In addition, estimate suggestions of major production and investment companies were taken into account with regard to implementations of new projects for mining of tungsten or possible termination of its standing extraction. It can be assumed that tungsten supply will match demand by 2018. This suggestion is conditioned by successful implementation of new tungsten extraction projects, and full application of tungsten recycling methods.

  11. pion Kaon Scattering in full QCD with domain wall valence quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silas Beane; Paulo Bedaque; Thomas Luu; Konstantinos Orginos; Elisabetta Pallante; Assumpta Parreno; Martin Savage

    2006-07-24

    We calculate the {pi}{sup +}K{sup +} scattering length at pion masses of m{sub {pi}} {approx} 290, 350, 490 and 600 MeV in fully-dynamical lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks and rooted staggered sea quarks. The lattice data, analyzed at next-to-leading order in chiral perturbation theory, allows an extraction of the full piK scattering amplitude at threshold. Extrapolating to the physical point gives m{sub {pi}} {alpha}{sub 3/2} = -0.0574 {+-} 0.0016{sub -0.0058}{sup +0.0024} and m{sub {pi}} {alpha}{sub 1/2} = 0.1725 {+-} 0.0017{sub -0.0156}{sup +0.0023} for the I = 3/2 and I = 1/2 scattering lengths, respectively, where the first error is statistical and the second error is an estimate of the systematic error due to truncation of the chiral expansion.

  12. Evaluation of the Strength Variation of Normal and Lightweight Self-Compacting Concrete in Full Scale Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinali, M.; Ranjbar, M. M.; Rezvani, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    The strength of cast concrete along the height and length of large structural members might vary due to inadequate compaction, segregation, bleeding, head pressure, and material type. The distribution of strength within a series of full scale reinforced concrete walls was examined using non...... strength variation and the relationship to the strength of standard cube samples. Investigation of the strength variation along the height of the wall showed that SCC mixes had better strength uniformity and that the NC mix had the greatest strength variation. There were no significant strength differences...... between mixtures along the length of the walls. Furthermore, different admixture replacements did not have a meaningful effect on the strength distribution....

  13. L-H power threshold studies with tungsten/carbon divertor on the EAST tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, L.; Xu, G. S.; Gao, W.

    2016-01-01

    The power threshold for low (L) to high (H) confinement mode transition achieved by radio-frequency heating and molybdenum first wall with lithium coating has been experimentally investigated on the EAST tokamak for two sets of divertor geometries and materials: tungsten/carbon divertor and full...... configuration, with the ion grad-B drift direction away from the primary X-point, a lower normalized power threshold is observed in EAST with the tungsten/carbon divertor, compared to the carbon divertor after intensive lithium wall coating. A newly installed cryopump increasing the pumping efficiency also...

  14. Mathematical modelling of full scale combustion in front wall fired boiler of EDP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, J.L.T.; Coelho, L.M.R.; Carvalho, M.G. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal)

    1998-12-31

    Numerical modelling of pulverised coal combustion is applied to simulate front wall fired utility boilers to analyse the influence of air staging (using rows of burners out of service BOOS) or combined fuel and air staging (reburning). The NO{sub x} post processor of an existing numerical model is modified to consider these conditions and calculations are applied to two utility boilers. For the case of using BOOS the model indicates NO{sub x} reductions from 5 to 12% while for reburning the NO{sub x} emissions resulting from coal are reduced by 28%. The analysis of the results address besides the NO{sub x} emissions the amount of carbon in ash and the heat flux distribution in the boiler walls and superheater panels. 22 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. πK scattering in full QCD with domain-wall valence quarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beane, Silas R.; Bedaque, Paulo F.; Luu, Thomas C.; Orginos, Kostas; Pallante, Elisabetta; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the π+K+ scattering length in fully-dynamical lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on MILC lattices with rooted staggered sea-quarks at a lattice spacing of b = 0.125 fm, lattice spatial size of L = 2.5 fm and at pion masses of mπ ~ 290, 350, 490 and 600 MeV. The lattice data, an

  16. Simulating thermo-mechanical interaction between a xenon gas-filled chamber and tungsten first-wall armor for the LIFE reactor design using the BUCKY 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heltemes, T A; Prochaska, A E; Moses, G A, E-mail: taheltemes@wisc.ed [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The BUCKY 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code has been used to simulate the dynamic thermo-mechanical interaction between a xenon gas-filled chamber and tungsten first-wall armor with an indirect-drive laser fusion target for the LIFE reactor design. Two classes of simulations were performed: (1) short-time (0-2 ms) simulations to fully capture the hydrodynamic effects of the introduction of the LIFE indirect-drive target x-ray and ion threat spectra and (2) long-time (2-70 ms) simulations starting with quiescent chamber conditions characteristic of those at 2 ms to estimate xenon plasma cooling between target implosions at 13 Hz. The short-time simulation results reported are: (1) the plasma hydrodynamics of the xenon in the chamber, (2) dynamic overpressure on the tungsten armor, and (3) time-dependent temperatures in the tungsten armor. The ramifications of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) vs. non-LTE opacity models are also addressed.

  17. fK /f{pi} in Full QCD with Domain Wall Valence Quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silas Beane; Paulo Bedaque; Konstantinos Orginos; Martin Savage

    2007-05-01

    We compute the ratio of pseudoscalar decay constants f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} using domain-wall valence quarks and rooted improved Kogut-Susskind sea quarks. By employing continuum chiral perturbation theory, we extract the Gasser-Leutwyler low-energy constant L{sub 5}, and extrapolate f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} to the physical point. We find: f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} = 1.218 {+-} 0.002{sub -0.024}{sup +0.011} where the first error is statistical and the second error is an estimate of the systematic due to chiral extrapolation and fitting procedures. This value agrees within the uncertainties with the determination by the MILC collaboration, calculated using Kogut-Susskind valence quarks, indicating that systematic errors arising from the choice of lattice valence quark are small.

  18. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mengdi, E-mail: M.Yang@utwente.nl; Aarnink, Antonius A. I.; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J.; Wolters, Rob A. M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 °C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), which reacted with WF{sub 6} at the substrate to deposit W. The growth behavior was monitored in real time by an in situ spectroscopic ellipsometer. In this work, the authors compare samples with tungsten grown by either HWALD or chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in terms of growth kinetics and properties. For CVD, the samples were made in a mixture of WF{sub 6} and molecular or atomic hydrogen. Resistivity of the WF{sub 6}-H{sub 2} CVD layers was 20 μΩ·cm, whereas for the WF{sub 6}-at-H-CVD layers, it was 28 μΩ·cm. Interestingly, the resistivity was as high as 100 μΩ·cm for the HWALD films, although the tungsten films were 99% pure according to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction reveals that the HWALD W was crystallized as β-W, whereas both CVD films were in the α-W phase.

  19. Arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes with full surface coverage for high-performance electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-jen; Tulevski, George S; Zhu, Yu; Lu, Darsen D; Haensch, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have exceptional electronic properties and have been proposed as a replacement for silicon in applications such as low-cost thin-film transistors and high-performance logic devices. However, practical devices will require dense, aligned arrays of electronically pure nanotubes to optimize performance, maximize device packing density and provide sufficient drive current (or power output) for each transistor. Here, we show that aligned arrays of semiconducting carbon nanotubes can be assembled using the Langmuir-Schaefer method. The arrays have a semiconducting nanotube purity of 99% and can fully cover a surface with a nanotube density of more than 500 tubes/µm. The nanotube pitch is self-limited by the diameter of the nanotube plus the van der Waals separation, and the intrinsic mobility of the nanotubes is preserved after array assembly. Transistors fabricated using this approach exhibit significant device performance characteristics with a drive current density of more than 120 µA µm(-1), transconductance greater than 40 µS µm(-1) and on/off ratios of ∼1 × 10(3).

  20. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  1. Thermal stability of warm-rolled tungsten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfonso Lopez, Angel

    Pure tungsten is considered as armor material for the most critical parts of fusion reactors (thedivertor and the blanket first wall), mainly due to its high melting point (3422 °C). This is becauseboth the divertor and the first wall have to withstand high temperatures during service which...... and recrystallization occur in tungsten, and quantifying the kinetics and microstructuralaspects of these restoration processes. Two warm-rolled tungsten plates are annealed attemperatures between 1100 °C and 1350 °C, under vacuum conditions or argon atmosphere. Theeffects of annealing on the microstructure...... on these activation energies) to lower annealingtemperatures allows predicting the lifespan of these tungsten plates under fusion reactor conditions.A much longer lifetime at normal operating temperatures was found for the plate W67 (e.g. at least1 million years at 800 °C) as compared to the plate W90 (e.g 71 years...

  2. Fracture behavior of shallow cracks in full-thickness clad beams from an RPV wall section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, J. A.; Bass, B. R.; McAfee, W. J.

    A testing program is described that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in weld material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPV's). The beam specimens are fabricated from an RPV shell segment that includes weld, plate and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include material gradients and material inhomogeneities in welded regions. The shallow-crack clad beam specimens showed a significant loss of constraint similar to that of other shallow-crack single-edge notch bend (SENB) specimens. The stress-based Dodds-Anderson scaling model appears to be effective in adjusting the test data to account for in-plane loss of constraint for uniaxially tested beams, but cannot predict the observed effects of out-of-plane biaxial loading on shallow-crack fracture toughness. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation (based on plastic zone width) performed acceptably when applied to the uniaxial and biaxial shallow-crack fracture toughness data.

  3. Overview of experimental preparation for the ITER-Like Wall at JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brezinsek, S.; Fundamenski, W.; Eich, T.; Coad, J. P.; Giroud, C.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Joffrin, E.; Krieger, K.; McCormick, K.; Lehnen, M.; Loarer, T.; de la Luna, E.; Maddison, G.; Matthews, G. F.; Mertens, P.; Nunes, I.; Philipps, V.; Riccardo, V.; Rubel, M.; Stamp, M. F.; Tsalas, M.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments in JET with carbon-based plasma-facing components have been carried out in preparation of the ITER-Like Wall with beryllium main chamber and full tungsten divertor. The preparatory work was twofold: (i) development of techniques, which ensure safe operation with the new wall and (ii) pro

  4. Structure and function of the first full-length murein peptide ligase (Mpl cell wall recycling protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debanu Das

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell walls contain peptidoglycan, an essential polymer made by enzymes in the Mur pathway. These proteins are specific to bacteria, which make them targets for drug discovery. MurC, MurD, MurE and MurF catalyze the synthesis of the peptidoglycan precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine by the sequential addition of amino acids onto UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (UDP-MurNAc. MurC-F enzymes have been extensively studied by biochemistry and X-ray crystallography. In gram-negative bacteria, ∼30-60% of the bacterial cell wall is recycled during each generation. Part of this recycling process involves the murein peptide ligase (Mpl, which attaches the breakdown product, the tripeptide L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelate, to UDP-MurNAc. We present the crystal structure at 1.65 Å resolution of a full-length Mpl from the permafrost bacterium Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4 (PaMpl. Although the Mpl structure has similarities to Mur enzymes, it has unique sequence and structure features that are likely related to its role in cell wall recycling, a function that differentiates it from the MurC-F enzymes. We have analyzed the sequence-structure relationships that are unique to Mpl proteins and compared them to MurC-F ligases. We have also characterized the biochemical properties of this enzyme (optimal temperature, pH and magnesium binding profiles and kinetic parameters. Although the structure does not contain any bound substrates, we have identified ∼30 residues that are likely to be important for recognition of the tripeptide and UDP-MurNAc substrates, as well as features that are unique to Psychrobacter Mpl proteins. These results provide the basis for future mutational studies for more extensive function characterization of the Mpl sequence-structure relationships.

  5. Some features of sintering of tungsten powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreiev Igor Viktorovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of activating the sintering process for tungsten powders using a closed reaction space and hydrogen, steam-saturated water was observed. This sintering process is allowed to activate super coarse-grained (1000μm tungsten powder sat relatively low temperatures (1000-1200°C.

  6. Performance of a Modified Shear Box Apparatus for Full Scale Laboratory Study of Segmental Retaining Wall Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Zahidul Islam Bhuiyan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper outlines the performance of a modified large scale shear box apparatus, which is mainly used to execute full scale laboratory study of segmental retaining walls. A typical apparatus has already been adopted by the current ASTM and NCMA test protocols and by literature studying of those test protocols, it is found that protocols recommend a fixed vertical actuator with roller or airbag configuration as a proposed vertical loading assembly. Previous research study demonstrated that vertical loading arrangement greatly influences the interface shear capacity of block systems and fixed vertical actuator with flexible airbag shows better loading arrangement for the blocks which have dilatant behavior. However, airbag arrangement is strenuous and time-consuming loading assembly compared to fixed vertical actuator which increases normal load with shear displacement due to bending of vertical actuator locked with the top block during shear loading. For the drawbacks of fixed vertical loading arrangement, the apparatus used in this study was fully redesigned and modified in terms of normal loading arrangement specially. A moveable vertical loading assembly is used in the modified apparatus which allows the piston movement with the top blocks during shear testing. The results outlined in this paper report that normal load remains constant over the period of shear testing for a wide range of surcharge loading. It could easily be concluded that the modified apparatus might be a better alternative to the existing apparatus used in the test protocols.

  7. ITER tungsten divertor design development and qualification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, T., E-mail: takeshi.hirai@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F.; Carpentier-Chouchana, S.; Fedosov, A.; Ferrand, L.; Jokinen, T.; Komarov, V.; Kukushkin, A.; Merola, M.; Mitteau, R.; Pitts, R.A.; Shu, W.; Sugihara, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Riccardi, B. [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Suzuki, S. [JAEA, Fusion Research and Development Directorate JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaragi 311-0193 (Japan); Villari, R. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Detailed design development plan for the ITER tungsten divertor. • Latest status of the ITER tungsten divertor design. • Brief overview of qualification program for the ITER tungsten divertor and status of R and D activity. -- Abstract: In November 2011, the ITER Council has endorsed the recommendation that a period of up to 2 years be set to develop a full-tungsten divertor design and accelerate technology qualification in view of a possible decision to start operation with a divertor having a full-tungsten plasma-facing surface. To ensure a solid foundation for such a decision, a full tungsten divertor design, together with a demonstration of the necessary high performance tungsten monoblock technology should be completed within the required timescale. The status of both the design and technology R and D activity is summarized in this paper.

  8. Secondary electron emission from plasma-generated nanostructured tungsten fuzz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, M.; Raitses, Y.; Wirz, R.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, several researchers [e.g., Yang et al., Sci. Rep. 5, 10959 (2015)] have shown that tungsten fuzz can grow on a hot tungsten surface under bombardment by energetic helium ions in different plasma discharges and applications, including magnetic fusion devices with plasma facing tungsten components. This work reports the direct measurements of the total effective secondary electron emission (SEE) from tungsten fuzz. Using dedicated material surface diagnostics and in-situ characterization, we find two important results: (1) SEE values for tungsten fuzz are 40%-63% lower than for smooth tungsten and (2) the SEE values for tungsten fuzz are independent of the angle of the incident electron. The reduction in SEE from tungsten fuzz is most pronounced at high incident angles, which has important implications for many plasma devices since in a negative-going sheath the potential structure leads to relatively high incident angles for the electrons at the plasma confining walls. Overall, low SEE will create a relatively higher sheath potential difference that reduces plasma electron energy loss to the confining wall. Thus, the presence or self-generation in a plasma of a low SEE surface such as tungsten fuzz can be desirable for improved performance of many plasma devices.

  9. Induction plasma spheroidization of tungsten and molybdenum powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The melting, evaporation and oxidation behaviors as well as the solidification phenomena of tungsten and molybdenum in induction plasma were studied. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology and the cross section of plasma-processed powders. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the oxides formed on the particle surface of these two metals. The influence of spray chamber pressure on the spheroidization and oxidation phenomena was discussed. The results show that fewer Mo particles than W particles are spheroidized at the same powder feed rate under the same plasma spray condition although molybdenum has a lower melting point. A small fraction of tungsten is evaporized and condensed either on the surface of tungsten particles nearby or on the wall of spray chamber. Tungsten oxides were found in tungsten powder processed under soft vacuum condition. Extremely large grains form inside some spheroidized particles of tungsten powder.

  10. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S.; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A. K.; Ghosh, J.; Choudhary, K. K.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS.

  11. Behaviour of a new composite mesh for the repair of full-thickness abdominal wall defects in a rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Pascual

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Composite biomaterials designed for the repair of abdominal wall defects are composed of a mesh component and a laminar barrier in contact with the visceral peritoneum. This study assesses the behaviour of a new composite mesh by comparing it with two latest-generation composites currently used in clinical practice. METHODS: Defects (7x5cm created in the anterior abdominal wall of New Zealand White rabbits were repaired using a polypropylene mesh and the composites: Physiomesh(TM; Ventralight(TM and a new composite mesh with a three-dimensional macroporous polyester structure and an oxidized collagen/chitosan barrier. Animals were sacrificed on days 14 and 90 postimplant. Specimens were processed to determine host tissue incorporation, gene/protein expression of neo-collagens (RT-PCR/immunofluorescence, macrophage response (RAM-11-immunolabelling and biomechanical resistance. On postoperative days 7/14, each animal was examined laparoscopically to quantify adhesions between the visceral peritoneum and implant. RESULTS: The new composite mesh showed the lowest incidence of seroma in the short term. At each time point, the mesh surface covered with adhesions was greater in controls than composites. By day 14, the implants were fully infiltrated by a loose connective tissue that became denser over time. At 90 days, the peritoneal mesh surface was lined with a stable mesothelium. The new composite mesh induced more rapid tissue maturation than Physiomesh(TM, giving rise to a neoformed tissue containing more type I collagen. In Ventralight(TM the macrophage reaction was intense and significantly greater than the other composites at both follow-up times. Tensile strengths were similar for each biomaterial. CONCLUSIONS: All composites showed optimal peritoneal behaviour, inducing good peritoneal regeneration and scarce postoperative adhesion formation. A greater foreign body reaction was observed for Ventralight(TM. All composites induced

  12. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of tungsten slugs.

  13. High Purity Tungsten Spherical Particle Preparation From WC-Co Spent Hard Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chulwoong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was recycled to obtain high purity spherical tungsten powder by a combined hydrometallurgy and physical metallurgy pathway. Selective leaching of tungsten element from hard metal scrap occurs at solid / liquid interface and therefore enlargement of effective surface area is advantageous. Linear oxidation behavior of Tungsten carbide-cobalt and the oxidized scrap is friable to be pulverized by milling process. In this regard, isothermally oxidized Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was mechanically broken into particles and then tungsten trioxide particle was recovered by hydrometallurgical method. Recovered tungsten trioxide was reduced to tungsten particle in a hydrogen environment. After that, tungsten particle was melted and solidified to make a spherical one by RF (Ratio Frequency thermal plasma process. Well spherical tungsten micro-particle was successfully obtained from spent scrap. In addition to the morphological change, thermal plasma process showed an advantage for the purification of feedstock particle.

  14. Plasma operation with an all metal first-wall: Comparison of an ITER-like wall with a carbon wall in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, G. F.; Jet Efda Contributors; ASDEX-Upgrade Team

    2013-07-01

    Installation of the ITER-like Wall (ILW) in JET, has allowed a direct comparison of operation with all carbon plasma facing components (PFCs) to an all metal beryllium/tungsten first-wall under otherwise nearly identical conditions. The JET results are compared with experience from ASDEX-Upgrade where there was a gradual change to a full tungsten first-wall over an extended period. The scope of this review ranges from experience with machine conditioning, impurities and breakdown to material migration, fuel retention, disruptions, impact on operational space, energy confinement and compatibility with impurity seeding. Significant changes are reported, not only in the physics directly related to plasma-surface interactions but also to the main plasma which is strongly affected in unexpected ways, impacting many aspects of tokamak operation.

  15. Microstructure and properties of liquid-phase sintered tungsten heavy alloys by using ultra-fine tungsten powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于洋; 王尔德

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure and properties of liquid-phase sintered 93W-4.9Ni-2.1Fe tungsten heavy alloys using ultra-fine tungsten powders (medium particle size of 700 nm) and original tungsten powders (medium particle size of 3 μm) were investigated respectively. Commercial tungsten powders (original tungsten powders) were mechanically milled in a high-energy attritor mill for 35 h. Ultra-fine tungsten powders and commercial Ni, Fe powders were consolidated into green compacts by using CIP method and liquid-phase sintering at 1 465 ℃ for 30 min in the dissociated ammonia atmosphere. Liquid-phase sintered tungsten heavy alloys using ultra-fine tungsten powders exhibit full densification (above 99% in relative density) and higher strength and elongation compared with conventional liquidphase sintered alloys using original tungsten powders due to lower sintering temperature at 1 465 ℃ and short sintering time. The mechanical properties of sintered tungsten heavy alloy are found to be mainly dependent on the particles size of raw tungsten powders and liquid-phase sintering temperature.

  16. Extraction Factor Of Tungsten Sources From Tungsten Scraps By Zinc Decomposition Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pee J.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition promoting factors and extraction process of tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders in the zinc decomposition process of tungsten scraps which are composed mostly of tungsten carbide and cobalt were evaluated. Zinc volatility was suppressed by the enclosed graphite crucible and zinc volatilization pressure was produced in the reaction graphite crucible inside an electric furnace for ZDP (Zinc Decomposition Process. Decomposition reaction was done for 2hours at 650°, which 100% decomposed the tungsten scraps that were over 30 mm thick. Decomposed scraps were pulverized under 75μm and were composed of tungsten carbide and cobalt identified by the XRD (X-ray Diffraction. To produce the WC(Tungsten Carbide powder directly from decomposed scraps, pulverized powders were reacted with hydrochloric acid to remove the cobalt binder. Also to produce the tungstic acid, pulverized powders were reacted with aqua regia to remove the cobalt binder and oxidize the tungsten carbide. Tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders were identified by XRD and chemical composition analysis.

  17. Laparoscopic morgagni hernia repair using single-site umbilical and full-thickness abdominal wall repair: Technical report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L van Niekerk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Single incision laparoscopic surgery is used in many centres for routine cases such as appendisectomy, splenectomy and cholecystectomy. Morgagni hernias are uncommon and account for 1-2% of all congenital diaphragmatic hernia. We report our first laparoscopic repair of two Morgagni hernias, using a single umbilical incision and full-thickness abdominal wall repair with standard straight laparoscopic instruments. Operative time was short and compared favourably with the laparoscopic repair.

  18. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  19. A full-scale experimental set-up for assessing the energy performance of radiant wall and active chilled beam for cooling buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2015-01-01

    in decreasing the cooling need of the radiant wall compared to the active chilled beam. It has also been observed that the type and repartition of heat load have an influence on the cooling demand. Regarding the comfort level, both terminals met the general requirements, except at high solar heat gains......Full-scale experiments under both steady-state and dynamic conditions have been performed to compare the energy performance of a radiant wall and an active chilled beam. From these experiments, it has been observed that the radiant wall is a more secure and efficient way of removing heat from...... the test room than the active chilled beam. The energy saving, which can be estimated to around 10%, is due to increased ventilation losses. The asymmetry between air and radiant temperature, the air temperature gradient and the possible short-circuit between inlet and outlet play an equally important role...

  20. Textbook tests with tungsten

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2010-01-01

    CERN's linear collider detector group joins forces with CALICE in building the world's first tungsten hadronic calorimeter.   Hadronic calorimeter prototype made of tungsten for the linear collider detector being equipped with CALICE scintillators. In a hall for test beam experiments at CERN, next to the CLOUD climate experiment and an irradiation facility, sits a detector prototype that is in many ways a first. It's the first ever hadronic sandwich calorimeter (HCal) prototype made of tungsten. It's the first prototype for a detector for the Compact Linear Collider Study CLIC, developed by the linear collider detector R&D group (LCD group) at CERN. And it's the first piece of hardware that results directly from the cooperation between CLIC and ILC detector study groups. Now its makers are keen to see first particle showers in their detector. The tungsten calorimeter has just moved from a workshop at CERN, where it was assembled from finely polished tungsten squares and triangles, into the ...

  1. Laparoscopic Morgagni hernia repair using single-site umbilical and full-thickness abdominal wall repair: technical report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    Single incision laparoscopic surgery is used in many centres for routine cases such as appendectomy, splenectomy and cholecystectomy. Morgagni hernias are uncommon and account for 1-2% of all congenital diaphragmatic hernia. We report our first laparoscopic repair of two Morgagni hernias, using a single umbilical incision and full-thickness abdominal wall repair with standard straight laparoscopic instruments. Operative time was short and compared favourably with the laparoscopic repair.

  2. Reconstruction of Full-Field Wall Pressure Fluctuations on a Flat Plate in the Wake of a Step Cylinder: Applications of Linear Stochastic Estimation (LSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Di; Chen, Yujia; Wang, Shaofei; Liu, Yingzheng; Wang, Weizhe

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that it is possible to reconstruct the full flow field based on time-resolved measurements at discrete locations using linear stochastic estimation (LSE). The objective of this study is to develop and apply this technique to wall pressure fluctuation measurements in low speed flows. Time-resolved wall pressure fluctuations on a flat plate in the wake of a step cylinder at low speed (V PSP). The microphone arrays are arranged properly to capture the dominant features in the flow field at 10 kHz. The PSP is excited using a continuous UV-LED, and the luminescent signal is recorded by a high-speed camera at 2 kHz. The microphone data at discrete locations are used to reconstruct the full-field wall pressure fluctuations based on LSE. The PSP results serve as basis for improvement of the LSE scheme and also for validation of the reconstructed pressure field. Other data processing techniques including proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) are also used for analyzing the unsteady flow features. This LSE technique has great potential in real-time flow diagnostics and control.

  3. Advanced smart tungsten alloys for a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Tan, X.; Schmitz, J.; Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.

    2017-06-01

    The severe particle, radiation and neutron environment in a future fusion power plant requires the development of advanced plasma-facing materials. At the same time, the highest level of safety needs to be ensured. The so-called loss-of-coolant accident combined with air ingress in the vacuum vessel represents a severe safety challenge. In the absence of a coolant the temperature of the tungsten first wall may reach 1200 °C. At such a temperature, the neutron-activated radioactive tungsten forms volatile oxide which can be mobilized into atmosphere. Smart tungsten alloys are being developed to address this safety issue. Smart alloys should combine an acceptable plasma performance with the suppressed oxidation during an accident. New thin film tungsten-chromium-yttrium smart alloys feature an impressive 105 fold suppression of oxidation compared to that of pure tungsten at temperatures of up to 1000 °C. Oxidation behavior at temperatures up to 1200 °C, and reactivity of alloys in humid atmosphere along with a manufacturing of reactor-relevant bulk samples, impose an additional challenge in smart alloy development. First exposures of smart alloys in steady-state deuterium plasma were made. Smart tungsten-chroimium-titanium alloys demonstrated a sputtering resistance which is similar to that of pure tungsten. Expected preferential sputtering of alloying elements by plasma ions was confirmed experimentally. The subsequent isothermal oxidation of exposed samples did not reveal any influence of plasma exposure on the passivation of alloys.

  4. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WROUGHT TUNGSTEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanical properties of wrought tungsten vol. II. Creep rupture test data from 1500 to 5000 F, and tensile test data from room temperature to 5000 F at various strain rates for tungsten sheet material.

  5. Multi-scale full-field measurements and near-wall modeling of turbulent subcooled boiling flow using innovative experimental techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Yassin A., E-mail: y-hassan@tamu.edu

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • Near wall full-field velocity components under subcooled boiling were measured. • Simultaneous shadowgraphy, infrared thermometry wall temperature and particle-tracking velocimetry techniques were combined. • Near wall velocity modifications under subcooling boiling were observed. - Abstract: Multi-phase flows are one of the challenges on which the CFD simulation community has been working extensively with a relatively low success. The phenomena associated behind the momentum and heat transfer mechanisms associated to multi-phase flows are highly complex requiring resolving simultaneously for multiple scales on time and space. Part of the reasons behind the low predictive capability of CFD when studying multi-phase flows, is the scarcity of CFD-grade experimental data for validation. The complexity of the phenomena and its sensitivity to small sources of perturbations makes its measurements a difficult task. Non-intrusive and innovative measuring techniques are required to accurately measure multi-phase flow parameters while at the same time satisfying the high resolution required to validate CFD simulations. In this context, this work explores the feasible implementation of innovative measuring techniques that can provide whole-field and multi-scale measurements of two-phase flow turbulence, heat transfer, and boiling parameters. To this end, three visualization techniques are simultaneously implemented to study subcooled boiling flow through a vertical rectangular channel with a single heated wall. These techniques are listed next and are used as follow: (1) High-speed infrared thermometry (IR-T) is used to study the impact of the boiling level on the heat transfer coefficients at the heated wall, (2) Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) is used to analyze the influence that boiling parameters have on the liquid phase turbulence statistics, (3) High-speed shadowgraphy with LED illumination is used to obtain the gas phase dynamics. To account

  6. Extraction Factor Of Tungsten Sources From Tungsten Scraps By Zinc Decomposition Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J.-H. Pee; G.H. Kim; H.Y. Lee; Y.J. Kim

    2015-01-01

    Decomposition promoting factors and extraction process of tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders in the zinc decomposition process of tungsten scraps which are composed mostly of tungsten carbide...

  7. Tungsten diffusion in olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Van Orman, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    Diffusion of tungsten has been characterized in synthetic forsterite and natural olivine (Fo90) under dry conditions. The source of diffusant was a mixture of magnesium tungstate and olivine powders. Experiments were prepared by sealing the source material and polished olivine under vacuum in silica glass ampoules with solid buffers to buffer at NNO or IW. Prepared capsules were annealed in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 45 min to several weeks, at temperatures from 1050 to 1450 °C. Tungsten distributions in the olivine were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation is obtained for W diffusion in forsterite: D=1.0×10-8exp(-365±28 kJ mol/RT) m s Diffusivities for the synthetic forsterite and natural Fe-bearing olivine are similar, and tungsten diffusion in olivine shows little dependence on crystallographic orientation or oxygen fugacity. The slow diffusivities measured for W in olivine indicate that Hf-W ages in olivine-metal systems will close to diffusive exchange at higher temperatures than other chronometers commonly used in cosmochronology, and that tungsten isotopic signatures will be less likely to be reset by subsequent thermal events.

  8. Gas tungsten arc welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  9. OPAL Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  10. High Heat Load Properties of Ultra Fine Grain Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Du, J.; Ge, C. [Lab. of Special Ceramic and P/M, University of Science and Technology, 100083 Beijing (China); Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G. [FZJ-Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association Euratom-FZJ, Institut fur Plasmaphysik, Postfach 1913, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Song, S.X. [Research Center on Fusion Materials (RCFM), University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), 100083 Beijing (China)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is increasingly considered as a promising candidate armour materials facing the plasma in tokamaks for medium to high heat flux components (EAST, ASDEX, ITER). Fabrication tungsten with ultra fine grain size is considered as an effective way to ameliorate some disadvantages of tungsten, such as its brittleness at room temperature. But the research data on the performance of ultra fine grain tungsten is still very limit. In this work, high heat load properties of pure ultra-fine grain tungsten have been studied. The ultra fine grain tungsten samples with average grain size of 0.2 {mu}m, 1 {mu}m and 3 {mu}m were fabricated by resistance sintering under ultra high pressure. The annealing experiments for the investigation of the material resistance against grain growth have been done by annealing samples in a vacuum furnace at different temperature holding for 2 hours respectively. It is found that recrystallization and grain growth occur at heating temperature of 1250 deg. c. The finer the initial grain sizes of tungsten, the smaller its grain growth grain. The effects of transient high thermal loads (off normal events like disruptions) on tungsten surface morphology have been performed in electron beam test facility JUDITH. The thermal loads tests have been carried out with 4 ms pulses at different power density of 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, 0.55 and 0.88 GW/m{sup 2} respectively. Horizontal cracks formed for all tungsten samples at 0.44 GW/m{sup 2}. Particle erosions occurred for tungsten with 3 {mu}m size at 0.33 GW/m{sup 2} and for tungsten with 0.2 and 1 {mu}m size at 0.55 GW/m{sup 2}. The weight loss of tungsten with 0.2, 1 and 3 {mu}m size are 2,0.1,0.6 mg respectively at 0.88 GW/m{sup 2}. The effects of a large number of very short transient repetitive thermal loads (ELM-like) on tungsten surface morphology also have been performed by using a fundamental wave of a YAG laser. It is found that tungsten with 0.2 {mu}m size has

  11. Homogenous Silver-Tungsten Composite Production for Electrical Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid M. Azhar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Silver-tungsten composite materials have been widely used as medium duty electrical contacts since they offer the advantages of both refractory tungsten (welding and erosion resistance and silver (efficient electro-thermal conductivities. Since there is no alloying between the two elements (Ag and W, the properties of the composite depends on their composition. So for any particular application, a balance must be struck between the desirable properties of the two metals. Both welding and erosion resistance properties of silver-tungsten contacts depend on particle size, morphology and distribution of both elements within the composite, with finer W particles in Ag matrix give better performance. The main objective of this study is to produce an intimately mixed silver-tungsten powder with homogeneous distribution of both phases (silver and tungsten in the composite. Thus, to produce homogenous elemental silver-tungsten powder, the reduction behavior of each tungstate is studied at various reduction temperatures using TGA technique. Based on the results obtained from TGA, the reduction of silver tungstate carried out in two stage reduction process for producing elemental silver-tungsten powder with controlled particle size of tungsten. Also, small quantities of Fe and Co as sinter aids are introduced into tungstates by co-precipitation technique. However, the precipitated Fe and Co doped silver tungstates are reduced to yield Iron and cobalt doped silver-tungsten powders. The effect of Fe and Co on the morphology and particle size of the tungsten is studied using SEM. The reduced products will be used for subsequent sintering experiments to produce high density sintered compact for contact fabrication.

  12. Dense Pure Tungsten Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianzheng Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing using tungsten, a brittle material, is difficult because of its high melting point, thermal conductivity, and oxidation tendency. In this study, pure tungsten parts with densities of up to 18.53 g/cm3 (i.e., 96.0% of the theoretical density were fabricated by selective laser melting. In order to minimize balling effects, the raw polyhedral tungsten powders underwent a spheroidization process before laser consolidation. Compared with polyhedral powders, the spherical powders showed increased laser absorptivity and packing density, which helped in the formation of a continuous molten track and promoted densification.

  13. Low-Temperature Strengths and Ductility of Various Tungsten Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Hiraoka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We used three kinds of tungsten sheets in this study. First, we examined microstructure such as grain size distribution using an optical microscope. Secondly, we carried out three-point bend tests at temperatures between about 290 and 500 K. Then, we examined fracture surface of a failed specimen using a scanning electron microscope. Lastly, by analyzing all these results, we evaluated apparent intergranular and transgranular fracture strengths and discussed strengths and ductility of tungsten. Additionally, we compared mechanical properties of tungsten with those of molybdenum.

  14. Mineral resource of the month: tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on tungsten. It says that tungsten is a metal found in chemical compounds such as in the scheelite and ore minerals wolframite. It states that tungsten has the highest melting point and it forms a compound as hard as diamond when combined with carbon. It states that tungsten can be used as a substitute for lead in fishing weights, ammunition, and hunting shot. Moreover, China started to export tungsten materials and products instead of tungsten raw materials.

  15. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-07-17

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO{sub 2}, as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a

  16. Development of Tungsten Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    W-3.0% Ni-1.6% Fe and a zirconium foil (2 mils ) laminate. In addition, a GTE tungsten alloy (tungsten blended with 8% nickel and 2% iron) was...vescide.Wolframbleche sollten des- direction. i.e. the longitudinal direction. qu’elles sont lonaitudinales ou transver- ’AIM 1btakeristalliso tion noch 1 Stunde

  17. Preparation of tungsten oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulian, Christopher J.; Dye, Robert C.; Son, Steven F.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Perry, W. Lee

    2009-09-22

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O) was prepared from a precursor solution of ammonium paratungstate in concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid. The precursor solution was rapidly added to water, resulting in the crash precipitation of a yellow white powder identified as WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O nanosized platelets by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Annealing of the powder at 200.degree. C. provided cubic phase WO.sub.3 nanopowder, and at 400.degree. C. provided WO.sub.3 nanopowder as a mixture of monoclinic and orthorhombic phases.

  18. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  19. Studing Tungsten-containing Electroerosion Powders and Alloys Synthesized from Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Ageev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of the X-ray spectral microanalysis of the powder obtained using electroerosion dispersion of tungsten-containing wastes in distilled water, and the alloy powder synthesized from this powder are presented in the article. It is shown that the basic elements both in the powder obtained using electroerosion dispersion of tungsten-containing wastes in distilled water and in the synthesized alloy are tungsten, molybdenum, iron, oxygen and carbon.

  20. Infection structure-specific reductive iron assimilation is required for cell wall integrity and full virulence of the maize pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarouki, Emad; Deising, Holger B

    2013-06-01

    Ferroxidases are essential components of the high-affinity reductive iron assimilation pathway in fungi. Two ferroxidase genes, FET3-1 and FET3-2, have been identified in the genome of the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. Complementation of growth defects of the ferroxidase-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain Δfet3fet4 showed that both Fet3-1 and Fet3-2 of C. graminicola represent functional ferroxidases. Expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein fusions in yeast and C. graminicola indicated that both ferroxidase proteins localize to the plasma membrane. Transcript abundance of FET3-1 increased dramatically under iron-limiting conditions but those of FET3-2 were hardly detectable. Δfet3-1 and Δfet3-2 single as well as Δfet3-1/2 double-deletion strains were generated. Under iron-sufficient or deficient conditions, vegetative growth rates of these strains did not significantly differ from that of the wild type but Δfet3-1 and Δfet3-1/2 strains showed increased sensitivity to reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, under iron-limiting conditions, appressoria of Δfet3-1 and Δfet3-1/2 strains showed significantly reduced transcript abundance of a class V chitin synthase and exhibited severe cell wall defects. Infection assays on intact and wounded maize leaves, quantitative data of infection structure differentiation, and infection stage-specific expression of FET3-1 showed that reductive iron assimilation is required for appressorial penetration, biotrophic development, and full virulence.

  1. Dual catalytic purpose of the tungsten filament during the synthesis of single-helix carbon microcoils by hot-wire CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available post-deposition annealing. Tungsten, originating from the heated tungsten filament, is identified as the catalyst material responsible for the growth of the microcoils. High-resolution transmission spectroscopy, combined with Raman spectroscopy, confirm...

  2. 49 CFR 173.338 - Tungsten hexafluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tungsten hexafluoride. 173.338 Section 173.338... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.338 Tungsten hexafluoride. (a) Tungsten... expansion test, must be condemned if removed from tungsten hexafluoride service. [ 74 FR 16143, Apr. 9,...

  3. Effect of neutron irradiation on the microstructure of tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Klimenkov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Two grades of pure tungsten, single and polycrystalline, were irradiated for 282 days in the HFR reactor, Petten, at 900 °C to an average damage level of 1.6dpa. Each grade of tungsten was investigated using the transmission electron microscope (TEM to assess the effect of neutron irradiation on tungsten microstructure. Investigations revealed the formation of faceted cavities, whose diameter varies from 4 to 14nm in both materials. The cavities are homogeneously distributed only inside single crystalline tungsten. The local distribution of cavities in polycrystalline tungsten is strongly influenced by grain boundaries. The number densities of cavities were measured to be 4×1021 m−3 for polycrystalline and 2.5×1021 m−3 for single crystalline tungsten. This corresponds to volumetric densities of 0.45% and 0.33% respectively. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM revealed that faces of cavities are oriented in (110 plane. Analytical investigations showed precipitation of rhenium and osmium produced by a transmutation reaction around cavities and at grain boundaries.

  4. Fully Relativistic Electron Impact Excitation Cross-Section and Polarization for Tungsten Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electron impact excitation of highly charged tungsten ions in the framework of a fully relativistic distorted wave approach is considered in this paper. Calculations of electron impact excitation cross-sections for the M- and L-shell transitions in the tungsten ions Wn+ (n = 44–66 and polarization of the decay of photons from the excited tungsten ions are briefly reviewed and discussed. New calculations in the wide range of incident electron energies are presented for M-shell transitions in the K-like through Ne-like tungsten ions.

  5. Deposition and Coating Properties on CVD Tungsten

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Ji-hong; LI Zheng-xiang; LIU Gao-jian; ZHOU Hui-Huang; CHUN liang

    2004-01-01

    Surface characterization and microstructure studies are performed on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten coating. There is about 2 μm thickness diffusion layer of tungsten in the molybdenum substrate. The thermal shock test shows tungsten coating has good adhesion with molybdenum substrate, but the elements of oxygen and carbon in the tungsten coating have the bad affection to the adhesion. The result of high-temperature diffusion experiment is the diffusion rate from molybdenum substrate to tungsten coating is faster.

  6. Comparative Investigation of Tungsten Fibre Nets Reinforced Tungsten Composite Fabricated by Three Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibre nets reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W containing four net layers were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS, hot pressing (HP and cold rolling after HP (HPCR, with the weight fraction of fibres being 17.4%, 10.5% and 10.5%, respectively. The relative density of the HPCRed samples is the highest (99.8% while that of the HPed composites is the lowest (95.1%. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattering diffraction were exploited to characterize the microstructure, while tensile and hardness tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the samples. It was found that partial recrystallization of fibres occurred after the sintering at 1800 °C. The SPSed and HPed Wf/W composites begin to exhibit plastic deformation at 600 °C with tensile strength (TS of 536 and 425 MPa and total elongation at break (TE of 11.6% and 23.0%, respectively, while the HPCRed Wf/W composites exhibit plastic deformation at around 400 °C. The TS and TE of the HPCRed Wf/W composites at 400 °C are 784 MPa and 8.4%, respectively. The enhanced mechanical performance of the Wf/W composites over the pure tungsten can be attributed to the necking, cracking, and debonding of the tungsten fibres.

  7. Behavior of tungsten fiber-reinforced tungsten based on single fiber push-out study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jasper

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten (W, a tungsten fiber-reinforced tungsten-composite material (Wf/W is under development. The composite addresses the brittleness of W by extrinsic toughening through the introduction of energy dissipation mechanisms. These mechanisms allow the reduction of stress peaks and thus improve the materials resistance against crack growth. They do not rely on the intrinsinc material properties such as ductility. By utilizing powder metallurgy (PM one could benefit from available industrialized approaches for composite production and alloying routes. In this contribution the PM method of hot isostatic pressing (HIP is used to produce Wf/W samples containing W fibers coated with an Er2O3 interface. Analysis of the matrix material demonstrates a dense tungsten bulk, a deformed fiber and a deformed, but still intact interface layer. Metallographic analysis reveals indentations of powder particles in the interface, forming a complex 3D structure. Special emphasis is placed on push-out tests of single fiber HIP samples, where a load is applied via a small indenter on the fiber, to test the debonding and frictional properties of the Er2O3 interface region enabling the energy dissipation mechanisms. Together with the obtained experimental results, an axisymmetric finite element model is discussed and compared to existing work. In the HIP Wf/W composites the matrix adhesion is rather large and can dominate the push-out behavior. This is in contrast to the previously tested CVD produced samples.

  8. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM TUNGSTEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnam, K.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the rccovery of uranium which has adhered to tungsten parts in electromagnetic isotope separation apparatus. Such a tungsten article is dissolved electrolytically in 20% NaOH by using the tungsten article as the anode. The resulting solution, containing soluble sodium lungstate and an insoluble slime, is then filtered. The slime residue is ignited successively with sodium nitrate and sodium pyrosulfate and leashed, and the resulting filtrates are combined with the original filtrate. Uranium is then recovered from the combined flltrates by diuranate precipitation.

  9. 氧化钨纳米线-单壁碳纳米管复合型气敏元件的室温NO_2敏感性能与机理%Room temperature NO2-sensing properties and mechanism of the sensors based on tungsten oxide nanowires/single-wall carbon nanotubes composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦玉香; 王飞; 沈万江; 胡明

    2012-01-01

    One-dimensional tungsten oxide nanowires are synthesized by the solvothermal method. The sensors based on tungsten oxide nanowires/single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) composites are fabricated by introducing SWNT, and their NO2 sensing properties are evaluated at room temperature. X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscope characterizations indicate that the as-synthesized nanowires are monoclinic WlsO49, and SWNTs are embedded within the nanowire matrix in the prepared tungsten oxide nanowires/SWNT composites. The tungsten oxide nanowires/SWNT composites-based sensors show high sensitivity, good selectivity and super fast response to NO2 gas at room temperature. The NO2 sensing properties of the sensors increase with the decrease of SWNT content. The sensing mechanism of the composites-based sensor is discussed and it is thought that the introduction of SWNT induces the formation of a large number of p-n hetero junctions and cross-linked diffusion channels in the structure of the composites, which are responsible for the good NO2 sensing properties at room temperature.%利用溶剂热法合成了一维的氧化钨纳米线,通过掺入适量单壁碳纳米管(SWNT)制备了基于氧化钨纳米线-SWNT复合结构的室温气敏元件并评价了其对NO_2气体的室温敏感性能.利用X射线与扫描电子显微镜表征了材料的微结构,结果表明,合成的氧化钨纳米线具有单斜的W_(18)O_(49)结构,复合材料中SWNT被包埋在氧化钨纳米线中间.气敏性能测试结果表明,氧化钨纳米线-SWNT复合结构气敏元件在室温下对NO_2气体表现出了高的灵敏度和超快的响应特性;较低的SWNT掺入量对获得好的气敏性能有利.分析了基于复合结构材料气敏元件的可能的气敏机理,认为元件良好的室温敏感性能与SWNT掺入在复合结构材料中引入大量的贯穿气孔和p-n异质结有关.

  10. Tungsten resources of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Max Gregg

    1974-01-01

    Brazilian tungsten production, 85 percent of which is exported, comes almost entirely from scheelite-bearing tactites in northeast Brazil, and has reached an annual rate of about 2,000 metric tons (2,200 short tons) of scheelite concentrate with 70 percent WO3. Scheelite ore reserves, located principally in the State of Rio Grande do Norte, are estimated to be as high as 8,300,000 tons (9,100,000 short tons) containing 0.7 percent WO3. Minor deposits (or those about which only minimal information is available) of wolframite, with which some cassiterite is associated, are located in Sao Paulo, Santa Catarina, and Rio Grande do Sul. Both the scheelite and the wolframite deposits are considered . to be late Precambrian A (620 to 900 m.y.) or early Cambrian in age.

  11. Tungsten Toxicity in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S.; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten (W) is a rare heavy metal, widely used in a range of industrial, military and household applications due to its unique physical properties. These activities inevitably have accounted for local W accumulation at high concentrations, raising concerns about its effects for living organisms. In plants, W has primarily been used as an inhibitor of the molybdoenzymes, since it antagonizes molybdenum (Mo) for the Mo-cofactor (MoCo) of these enzymes. However, recent advances indicate that, beyond Mo-enzyme inhibition, W has toxic attributes similar with those of other heavy metals. These include hindering of seedling growth, reduction of root and shoot biomass, ultrastructural malformations of cell components, aberration of cell cycle, disruption of the cytoskeleton and deregulation of gene expression related with programmed cell death (PCD). In this article, the recent available information on W toxicity in plants and plant cells is reviewed, and the knowledge gaps and the most pertinent research directions are outlined. PMID:27137642

  12. Tungsten chemical vapor deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kiichi; Takeda, Nobuo.

    1993-07-13

    A tungsten chemical vapor deposition method is described, comprising: a first step of selectively growing a first thin tungsten film of a predetermined thickness in a desired region on the surface of a silicon substrate by reduction of a WF[sub 6] gas introduced into an atmosphere of a predetermined temperature containing said silicon substrate; and a second step of selectively growing a second tungsten film of a predetermined thickness on said first thin tungsten film by reduction of said WF[sub 6] with a silane gas further introduced into said atmosphere, wherein the surface state of said substrate is monitored by a pyrometer and the switching from said first step to said second step is performed when the emissivity of infrared light from the substrate surfaces reaches a predetermined value.

  13. Electrical and optical properties of mixed phase tungsten trioxide films grown by laser pyrolysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser pyrolysis was chosen to synthesize tungsten trioxide starting with tungsten ethoxide precursor. The film was found to have a thickness that varied from 205 nm to 1 µm. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the presence of a...

  14. Ion cyclotron resonance heating for tungsten control in various JET H-mode scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniche, M.; Dumont, R. J.; Bobkov, V.; Buratti, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Challis, C.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Drewelow, P.; Fedorczak, N.; Garcia, J.; Giroud, C.; Graham, M.; Graves, J. P.; Hobirk, J.; Jacquet, P.; Lerche, E.; Mantica, P.; Monakhov, I.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Nave, M. F. F.; Noble, C.; Nunes, I.; Pütterich, T.; Rimini, F.; Sertoli, M.; Valisa, M.; Van Eester, D.; Contributors, JET

    2017-05-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in the hydrogen minority scheme provides central ion heating and acts favorably on the core tungsten transport. Full wave modeling shows that, at medium power level (4 MW), after collisional redistribution, the ratio of power transferred to the ions and the electrons vary little with the minority (hydrogen) concentration n H/n e but the high-Z impurity screening provided by the fast ions temperature increases with the concentration. The power radiated by tungsten in the core of the JET discharges has been analyzed on a large database covering the 2013-2014 campaign. In the baseline scenario with moderate plasma current (I p = 2.5 MA) ICRH modifies efficiently tungsten transport to avoid its accumulation in the plasma centre and, when the ICRH power is increased, the tungsten radiation peaking evolves as predicted by the neo-classical theory. At higher current (3-4 MA), tungsten accumulation can be only avoided with 5 MW of ICRH power with high gas injection rate. For discharges in the hybrid scenario, the strong initial peaking of the density leads to strong tungsten accumulation. When this initial density peaking is slightly reduced, with an ICRH power in excess of 4 MW,very low tungsten concentration in the core (˜10-5) is maintained for 3 s. MHD activity plays a key role in tungsten transport and modulation of the tungsten radiation during a sawtooth cycle is correlated to the fishbone activity triggered by the fast ion pressure gradient.

  15. Preparation of tungsten disulfide motor oil and its tribological characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Through using mineral oil and synthetic oil to deploy the semisynthesis base oil, modifying the surfaces of ultrafine tungsten disulfide grains by surface chemical embellishment and adsorption embellishment to make them suspended steadily in the base oil as solid lubricating additive, and adding some function additives, the tungsten disulfide motor oil was prepared. The tribological characteristics of this kind motor oil and the well-known motor oils in our country and overseas were studied. The results show that the oil film strength of this kind of motor oil is respectively 1.06 and 1.38 times of that of shell helix ultra motor oil and great wall motor oil, and its sintering load is 1.75 and 2.33 times of that of them, and when tested under 392 N, 1 450 r/min and 30 min, the friction coefficients of friction pairs lubricated by the tungsten disulfide motor oil decrease with the increase of time, meanwhile, the diameter of worn spot is small, and the surface of worn spot is smooth, and no obvious furrows appear. The experiments indicate that the tungsten disulfide motor oil has the better antiwear, antifriction and extreme pressure properties than the well-known motor oils.

  16. China’s Tungsten Resources Supply and Demand Situation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>China’s production of tungsten products mainly includes tungsten ore concentrates and a series of intermediate tungsten products such as ferro-tungsten, tungstic acid, sodium tungstate, calcium tungstate, tungsten trioxide, tungsten blue oxide, ammonium paratungstate, ammonium metatungstate, tungsten powder etc. During the period between 1949-1997, China produced 1.85 million tons of tungsten ore concentrates, in which 873,000 tons were exported with US$3.1 billion in value.

  17. Problems of interaction of a supersonic gas mixture with a wall solved by the projection method applied to the full Boltzmann equation

    CERN Document Server

    Raines, Alla

    2015-01-01

    Numerical solution of non-steady problems of supersonic inflow of a binary mixture of a rarefied gas on a normally posed wall with mirror and diffuse reflection laws is obtained on the basis of the kinetic Boltzmann equation for the model of hard sphere molecules. For calculation of collision integrals we apply the projection method, developed by Tcheremissine for a one-component gas and generalized by the author for a binary gas mixture in the case of cylindrical symmetry. We demonstrate a good qualitative agreement of our results with other authors for one-component gases.

  18. Further development of the tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gietl, Hanns; Hoeschen, Till; Riesch, Johann [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aumann, Martin; Coenen, Jan [Forschungszentrum Juelich, IEK4, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Huber, Philipp [Lehrstuhl fuer Textilmaschinenbau und Institut fuer Textiltechnik (ITA), 52062 Aachen (Germany); Neu, Rudolf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    For the use in a fusion device tungsten has a unique property combination. The brittleness below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature and the embrittlement during operation e.g. by overheating, neutron irradiation are the main drawbacks for the use of pure tungsten. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites utilize extrinsic mechanisms to improve the toughness. After proofing that this idea works in principle the next step is the conceptual proof for the applicability in fusion reactors. This will be done by producing mock-ups and testing them in cyclic high heat load tests. For this step all constituents of the composite, which are fibre, matrix and interface, and all process steps need to be investigated. Tungsten fibres are investigated by means of tension tests to find the optimum diameter and pretreatment. New interface concepts are investigated to meet the requirements in a fusion reactor, e.g. high thermal conductivity, low activation. In addition weaving processes are evaluated for their use in the fibre preform production. This development is accompanied by an extensive investigation of the materials properties e.g. single fibre tension tests.

  19. Chemically deposited tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten – The way to a mock-up for divertor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Riesch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of advanced materials is essential for sophisticated energy systems like a future fusion reactor. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W utilize extrinsic toughening mechanisms and therefore overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten at low temperature and its sensitivity to operational embrittlement. This material has been successfully produced and tested during the last years and the focus is now put on the technological realisation for the use in plasma facing components of fusion devices. In this contribution, we present a way to utilize Wf/W composites for divertor applications by a fabrication route based on the chemical vapour deposition (CVD of tungsten. Mock-ups based on the ITER typical design can be realized by the implementation of Wf/W tiles. A concept based on a layered deposition approach allows the production of such tiles in the required geometry. One fibre layer after the other is positioned and ingrown into the W-matrix until the final sample size is reached. Charpy impact tests on these samples showed an increased fracture energy mainly due to the ductile deformation of the tungsten fibres. The use of Wf/W could broaden the operation temperature window of tungsten significantly and mitigate problems of deep cracking occurring typically in cyclic high heat flux loading. Textile techniques are utilized to optimise the tungsten wire positioning and process speed of preform production. A new device dedicated to the chemical deposition of W enhances significantly, the available machine time for processing and optimisation. Modelling shows that good deposition results are achievable by the use of a convectional flow and a directed temperature profile in an infiltration process.

  20. The effect of crystal orientation on the behavior of a polycrystalline tungsten surface under focused Ga{sup +} ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran Guang, E-mail: gran@xmu.edu.cn [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wu Shenghua [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Liu Xiang; Wu Jihong [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Li, Ning [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zu Xiaotao [Department of Applied Physics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Wang Lumin, E-mail: lmwang@umich.edu [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We in situ investigated the microstructure evolution during FIB bombardment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The irradiation behaviors depended significantly on the crystal orientation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tungsten grain with (0 0 1) crystal orientation showed good irradiation resistance. - Abstract: The effect of crystal orientation on the behavior of a tungsten surface under a 30 keV focused Ga{sup +} ion beam with different bombardment angles has been investigated by in situ scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Results indicate that the grains of tungsten with various orientations behave quite differently. Grains with a (0 0 1) direction parallel to the ion beam always maintain a much smoother surface morphology with less mass removal after ion bombardment, indicating a lower sputtering yield. The orientation dependence of surface sputtering of tungsten can be used to guide the fabrication of tungsten-based first wall component in a nuclear fusion reactor.

  1. Low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingchen Cao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available High photoresponse can be achieved in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the response times are inconveniently limited by defects. Here, we report low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide prepared by exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD method. The exfoliated device exhibits n-type behaviour; while the CVD device exhibits intrinsic behaviour. In off state, the CVD device has four times larger ratio of photoresponse for laser on/off and photoresponse decay–rise times are 0.1 s (limited by our setup, while the exfoliated device has few seconds. These findings are discussed in terms of charge trapping and localization.

  2. CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Mavromanolakis

    2007-12-01

    A highly granular electromagnetic calorimeter prototype based on tungsten absorber and sampling units equipped with silicon pads as sensitive devices for signal collection is under construction. The full prototype will have in total 30 layers and be read out by about 10000 Si cells of 1 × 1 cm2. A first module consisting of 14 layers and depth of 7.2 0 at normal incidence, having in total 3024 channels of 1 cm2, was tested recently with - beam. We describe the prototype and discuss some preliminary testbeam results on its performance with respect to position resolution, response inhomogeneity and transverse containment.

  3. Ambient Pressure Synthesis of Nanostructured Tungsten Oxide Crystalline Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. X. Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of the ambient pressure synthesis of tungsten oxide nanowires and nanoparticles on AlN substrates using the hot filament CVD techniques. The morphologic surface, crystallographic structures, chemical compositions, and bond structures of the obtained samples have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and Raman scattering, respectively. Different morphologies were observed for different substrate temperatures, but otherwise identical growth conditions. The experimental measurements reveal the evolutions of the crystalline states and bond structures following the substrate temperatures. Besides, different substrate materials also affected the tungsten oxide nanostructures. Bundles of wire-type tungsten oxide nanowires with a length of up to 5 mm were obtained on Al2O3 substrate. Furthermore, the sensitive properties of the super long nanowires to the gas and different temperature were investigated. The dependence of the sensitivity of tungsten oxide nanowires to the methane as a function of the time was obtained. The sensitive properties of the tungsten oxide nanowires have almost linear relationship with the temperature.

  4. Tungsten coatings electro-deposited on CFC substrates from oxide molten salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ningbo; Zhang, Yingchun; Lang, Shaoting; Jiang, Fan; Wang, Lili

    2014-12-01

    Tungsten is considered as plasma facing material in fusion devices because of its high melting point, its good thermal conductivity, its low erosion rate and its benign neutron activation properties. On the other hand, carbon based materials like C/C fiber composites (CFC) have been used for plasma facing materials (PFMs) due to their high thermal shock resistance, light weight and high strength. Tungsten coatings on CFC substrates are used in the JET divertor in the frame of the JET ITER-like wall project, and have been prepared by plasma spray (PS) and other techniques. In this study, tungsten coatings were electro-deposited on CFC from Na2WO4-WO3 molten salt under various deposition parameters at 900 °C in air. In order to obtain tungsten coatings with excellent performance, the effects of pulse duration ratio and pulse current density on microstructures and crystal structures of tungsten coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Rigaku Industrial Co., Ltd., D/MAX-RB) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM, JSM 6480LV). It is found that the pulsed duration ratio and pulse current density had a significant influence on tungsten nucleation and electro-crystallization phenomena. SEM observation revealed that intact, uniform and dense tungsten coatings formed on the CFC substrates. Both the average grain size and thickness of the coating increased with the pulsed current density. The XRD results showed that the coatings consisted of a single phase of tungsten with the body centered cubic (BCC) structure. The oxygen content of electro-deposited tungsten coatings was lower than 0.05%, and the micro-hardness was about 400 HV.

  5. Synthesis of Tungsten Diselenide Nanoparticles by Chemical Vapor Condensation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg V. Tolochko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline tungsten diselenide (WSe2 nanoparticles have been synthesized by a gas phase reaction using tungsten hexacarbonyl and elemental selenium as precursors. The WSe2 nanoparticle morphology varies from the spherical shape to flake-like layered structures. Mean size in smaller dimension are less than 5 nm and the number of layers decreased linearly with decreasing of reaction time and concentration of carbonyl in the gas phase. The mean value of interlayer distance in <0001> direction is comparable with the microscopic values. The selenium-to-tungsten atomic ratios of 2.07, 2.19 and 2.19 were determined respectively, approach to the stoichiometric ratio of 2:1. Main impurities are oxygen and carbon and strongly interrelated with carbonyl concentration in the gas phase.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7356

  6. The tungsten metallome of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M.; Pinkse, M.; Bol, E.; Krijgen, G.; Wolterbeek, H.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    The tungsten metallome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been investigated using electroanalytical metal analysis and native–native 2D-PAGE with the radioactive tungsten isotope W-187 (t1/2 = 23.9 h). P. furiosus cells have an intracellular tungsten concentration of 29 mM, of

  7. The tungsten metallome of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Bol, E.; Krijger, G.C.; Wolterbeek, H.T.; Verhaert, P.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    The tungsten metallome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been investigated using electroanalytical metal analysis and native-native 2D-PAGE with the radioactive tungsten isotope W-187 (t(1/2) = 23.9 h). P. furiosus cells have an intracellular tungsten concentration of 29 mu M

  8. Tungsten:Balance between Demand and Supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>In 2011,the tungsten market remained basically consistent with macro economic trends. In the first half of 2011, under the backdrop of upward economic situation,tungsten export and domestic consumption grew significantly and tungsten enterprises achieved remarkable economic benefits. However, as European debt crisis deepened in the second half of 2011, the global economic growth slowed down and

  9. Tungsten:Value Regression Is Inevitable Trend

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>China boasts rich reserve of tungsten resources,which accounts for about 65% of proved global tungsten mineral resource reserve,ranking top in the world.Judging from global production in the past five years,China’s tungsten production also far outstrips those of other countries,about

  10. Tungsten: A Preliminary Environmental Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Bioaccumulation of Tungsten in Plants Natural Sources • Trees & shrubs in Rocky Mountain region, USA • Siberian pine, willows, mosses & lichen in tungsten...Transitional metal ion binding • Peptidase activity • DNA & protein binding BUILDING STRONG® Geochemistry: • Aging of tungsten in soil results in

  11. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  12. A molecular dynamics study of melting and dissociation of tungsten nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to study the melting and dissociation of free tungsten nanoparticles. For the various interatomic potentials applied, the melting points of the tungsten nanoparticles increased with increasing nanoparticle diameter. Combining these results with the melting point of bulk tungsten in the experiment, the melting point of nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 4 to 12 nm could be determined. As the temperature increases, free nanoparticles are subject to dissociation phenomena. The dissociation rate was observed to follow Arrhenius behavior, and the Meyer–Neldel rule was obeyed. These results are useful in understanding the behavior of tungsten dust generated in nuclear fusion devices as well as for the preparation, formation, and application of tungsten powders.

  13. Mathematical Modelling of the Process of Tungsten Fluorides Reduction by Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendakov Roman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of tungsten fluorides reduction by hydrogen is a component part of Fluoride technology of tungsten conversion. Nowadays the researchers are definitely interested in studying this process. It is connected with common use of metal tungsten products in different sectors of the economy, which is the result of unique qualities of this metal. With the help of physical and mathematical modelling of the process of tungsten hexafluoride reduction by hydrogen, it becomes possible to create an import substitution technology of metal tungsten conversion. Fluoride technology of tungsten conversion allows putting different coverings and make tungsten products of different shapes, which is impossible to get traditionally. The process of tungsten fluorides reduction by hydrogen can be referred to CVD processes (Chemical Vapor Deposition. Common use of CVD technologies for getting metal products and coverings is limited by definite problems, connected with access difficulties to initial components of research and the lack of information about their basic thermal characteristics. Therefore, mathematical description of the initial components mass-moving process, which provides with optimal value of their concentration in gas flow and in precipitation zone, is a question of current importance.

  14. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.

    1999-11-23

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  15. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN TUNGSTEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSENS, [No Value; ELKERIEM, MSA; PLEITER, F

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen-vacancy interaction in tungsten was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. Hydrogen trapping at an In-111-vacancy cluster manifests itself as a change of the local electric field gradient, which gives rise to an observable

  16. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  17. Thermal response of nanostructured tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kajita, Shin; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, Thomas; van Eden, Stein; de Kruif, Thijs; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2014-01-01

    The thermal response of nanostructured tungsten, which was fabricated in the linear divertor simulator NAGDIS-II, was investigated using pulsed plasma in the MAGNUM-PSI device and by using high powered laser pulses. The temperature evolution in response to the pulses was measured with an infrared fa

  18. Mineral of the month: tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2006-01-01

    Tungsten has the highest melting point of all metals, one of the highest densities and, when combined with carbon, is almost as hard as diamond. These and other properties make it useful in a wide variety of important commercial, industrial and military applications.

  19. Tungsten biochemistry of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevers, L.E.

    2008-01-01

    Tungsten is the heaviest element that exhibits biological activity (atomic number 74), when it is present in an enzyme. It is taken up by cells in the form of tungstate, and it is subsequently processed into an organic cofactor referred to as tungstopterin, which is found as active center in several

  20. Measurements of temperature of the tungsten hexa-ethoxide pyrolysis flame using IR camera

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mudau, AE

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In laser pyrolysis, temperature measurement and control plays a vital role during the development of nanoparticles. Authors present the results of temperature measurements using infrared camera on a tungsten hexa-ethoxide pyrolysis flame used...

  1. Laser cleaning of tungsten ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Aniruddha, E-mail: nontee65@rediffmail.com [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, Maharashtra, 401504 (India); Sonar, V.R.; Das, D.K.; Bhatt, R.B.; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, Mohd.; Kumar, Arun [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, Maharashtra, 401504 (India); Nilaya, J.P.; Biswas, D.J. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, 400085 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Removal of a thin oxide layer from a tungsten ribbon was achieved using the fundamental, second and third harmonic radiation from a Q- switched Nd-YAG laser. It was found that beyond the threshold, oxide removal was achieved at all wavelengths for a wide range of fluence values. The removal mechanism of the oxide layer was found to be critically dependent on both wavelength and fluence of the incident radiation and has been identified as ejection or sublimation. The un-cleaned and cleaned surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Laser cleaned tungsten ribbons were used in a thermal ionization mass spectrometer (TIMS) to determine isotopic composition of Neodymium atoms.

  2. Synthesis of nanosized tungsten powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Nanosized tungsten powder was synthesized by means of different methods and under different conditions with nanosized WO3 powder. The powder and the intermediate products were characterized using XRD, SEM, TEM, BET (Brunauer Emmett Teller Procedure) and SAXS (X-ray diffracto-spectrometer/Kratky small angle scattering goniometer). The results show that nanosized WO3 can be completely reduced to WO2 at 600℃ after 40 min, and WO2 can be reduced to W at 700℃ after 90 min, moreover, the mean size of W particles is less than 40 nm. Furthermore, the process of WO3→WO2→W excelled that of WO3→W in getting stable nanosized tungsten powder with less grain size.

  3. Does speciation matter for tungsten ecotoxicology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strigul, Nikolay

    2010-09-01

    Tungsten is a widely used transition metal that has not been thoroughly investigated with regards to its ecotoxicological effects. Tungsten anions polymerize in environmental systems as well as under physiological conditions in living organisms. These polymerization/condensation reactions result in the development of several types of stable polyoxoanions. Certain chemical properties (in particular redox and acidic properties) differentiate these polyanions from monotungstates. However, our current state of knowledge on tungsten toxicology, biological and environmental effects is based entirely on experiments where monotungstates were used and assumed by the authors to be the form of tungsten that was present and that produced the observed effect. Recent discoveries indicate that tungsten speciation may be important to ecotoxicology. New results obtained by different research groups demonstrate that polytungstates develop and persist in environmental systems, and that polyoxotungstates are much more toxic than monotungstates. This paper reviews the available toxicological information from the standpoint of tungsten speciation and identifies knowledge gaps and pertinent future research directions.

  4. Mechanics of tungsten blistering II: Analytical treatment and fracture mechanical assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Muyuan; You, Jeong-Ha, E-mail: you@ipp.mpg.de

    2015-10-15

    Since a decade the blistering of pure tungsten under hydrogen implantation has been one of the major research topics in relation to the plasma–wall interaction of tungsten-armored first wall. Overall blistering may reduce the erosion lifetime of the wall. Mature blisters grown by high internal pressure are likely to burst leading to exfoliation of the surface. Therefore, the control and suppression of blistering is an important concern for sustainable operation of the tungsten-armored plasma-facing components. In this context, a quantitative assessment of the mechanical conditions for blister bulging and growth is an important concern. In this article a theoretical framework is presented to describe the bulging deformation of tungsten blisters and to estimate the mechanical driving force of blister growth. The validity of the analytical formulations based on the theory of elastic plates is evaluated with the help of finite element analysis. Plastic strains and J-integral values at the blister boundary edge are assessed by means of numerical simulation. Extensive parametric studies were performed for a range of blister geometry (cap aspect ratio), gas pressure, yield stress and hardening rate. The characteristic features of the blistering mechanics are discussed and the cracking energy is quantitatively estimated for the various combinations of parameters.

  5. Mechanics of tungsten blistering II: Analytical treatment and fracture mechanical assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Muyuan; You, Jeong-Ha

    2015-10-01

    Since a decade the blistering of pure tungsten under hydrogen implantation has been one of the major research topics in relation to the plasma-wall interaction of tungsten-armored first wall. Overall blistering may reduce the erosion lifetime of the wall. Mature blisters grown by high internal pressure are likely to burst leading to exfoliation of the surface. Therefore, the control and suppression of blistering is an important concern for sustainable operation of the tungsten-armored plasma-facing components. In this context, a quantitative assessment of the mechanical conditions for blister bulging and growth is an important concern. In this article a theoretical framework is presented to describe the bulging deformation of tungsten blisters and to estimate the mechanical driving force of blister growth. The validity of the analytical formulations based on the theory of elastic plates is evaluated with the help of finite element analysis. Plastic strains and J-integral values at the blister boundary edge are assessed by means of numerical simulation. Extensive parametric studies were performed for a range of blister geometry (cap aspect ratio), gas pressure, yield stress and hardening rate. The characteristic features of the blistering mechanics are discussed and the cracking energy is quantitatively estimated for the various combinations of parameters.

  6. Recent Progress in Processing of Tungsten Heavy Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Şahin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten heavy alloys (WHAs belong to a group of two-phase composites, based on W-Ni-Cu and W-Ni-Fe alloys. Due to their combinations of high density, strength, and ductility, WHAs are used as radiation shields, vibration dampers, kinetic energy penetrators and heavy-duty electrical contacts. This paper presents recent progresses in processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties of WHAs. Various processing techniques for the fabrication of WHAs such as conventional powder metallurgy (PM, advent of powder injection molding (PIM, high-energy ball milling (MA, microwave sintering (MW, and spark-plasma sintering (SPS are reviewed for alloys. This review reveals that key factors affecting the performance of WHAs are the microstructural factors such as tungsten and matrix composition, chemistry, shape, size and distributions of tungsten particles in matrix, and interface-bonding strength between the tungsten particle and matrix in addition to processing factors. SPS approach has a better performance than those of others, followed by extrusion process. Moreover, deformation behaviors of WHA penetrator and depleted uranium (DU Ti alloy impacting at normal incidence both rigid and thick mild steel target are studied and modelled as elastic thermoviscoplastic. Height of the mushroomed region is smaller for α=0.3 and it forms sooner in each penetrator as compared to that for α=0.2.

  7. Thermal Neutron Capture onto the Stable Tungsten Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal neutron-capture measurements of the stable tungsten isotopes have been carried out using the guided thermal-neutron beam at the Budapest Reactor. Prompt singles spectra were collected and analyzed using the HYPERMET γ-ray analysis software package for the compound tungsten systems 183W, 184W, and 187W, prepared from isotopically-enriched samples of 182W, 183W, and 186W, respectively. These new data provide both confirmation and new insights into the decay schemes and structure of the tungsten isotopes reported in the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File based upon previous elemental analysis. The experimental data have also been compared to Monte Carlo simulations of γ-ray emission following the thermal neutron-capture process using the statistical-decay code DICEBOX. Together, the experimental cross sections and modeledfeeding contribution from the quasi continuum, have been used to determine the total radiative thermal neutron-capture cross sections for the tungsten isotopes and provide improved decay-scheme information for the structural- and neutron-data libraries.

  8. Sintering Characteristics of Iron and Cobalt Doped Silver-tungsten Metal-matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Es-saheb

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Silver-Tungsten composites are known as electrical contact materials used in circuit breakers and industrial relays. The performance of the contact during their service life depends upon high strength and anti-weld properties of these materials. Despite their promising industrial applications, the literature dealing with their production route is still limited. Therefore, a comprehensive study exploring the structure related properties with great emphasis on the sintering process of these materials is carried out. Therefore, in this study, the successful production of a homogeneous composite powder with controlled tungsten particle size using co-precipitation and two stage reduction techniques is followed by the compaction and sintering processes. Thus, high density compacts are produced from Fe and Co doped silver-tungsten powder using powder metallurgy technique. Various environments and sintering conditions, including N2 atmosphere and temperatures up to 1000°C, to obtain successful compacts from both doped and un-doped powders, are investigated. The morphologies and the microstructures of the sintered compacts obtained under the different sintering conditions are characterized and assessed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. Results display excellent agreement with the published studies and no evidence was found for the activated sintering of silver-tungsten by Fe additions. Also, the homogeneity of silver-tungsten in compacts is completely lost in the Fe-doped powders. However, Co additions help to facilitate the sintering between silver and tungsten whilst retaining a high homogeneity between the silver and tungsten in the sintered product.

  9. Microstructures and Wear Performance of PTAW Deposited Ni-Based Coatings with Spherical Tungsten Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewei Deng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ni-based coatings with different content of spherical tungsten carbide were deposited by plasma transfer arc welding (PTAW method on 304 austenitic stainless steel sheets in this study. The microstructure and wear property of spherical tungsten carbide particle reinforced composite coatings were investigated by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA and sliding wear test. It is shown that the fraction of spherical tungsten carbides has an important influence on microstructure of Ni-based overlay. The Ni40 overlay consists of γ-Ni dendrites with interdendritic Ni-based eutectics, borides and carbides improving the wear resistance. In the case of composite coatings with different content of tungsten carbide, many new phases are observed, such as Ni2W4C and NiW. In addition, there are a large number of irregular structures in composite coatings, such as acicular structure and irregular stripe organization. The results of sliding wear test indicate that the mass loss of coatings is influenced by the content of tungsten carbide. The mass loss decreases with the increase of tungsten carbide fraction. At high load, the abrasive resistance of composite coating with 60 wt. % tungsten carbide is improved about 50-fold compared to that of Ni40 overlay.

  10. Fine grain tungsten produced with nanoscale powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Lin; Fang Zhao; Liying Zhang; Chengyi Wu; Zhimeng Guo

    2005-01-01

    Nanoscale tungsten powder was prepared by reducing nanoscale tungsten trioxide in hydrogen to WO2.90 and further to W powder. After compacted with a rubber die, the nanoscale tungsten powder was sintered in a high-temperature dilatometer to investigate its shrinkage process. The results show that the compact of the nanoscale tungsten powder starts to shrink at 1050℃ and ends at 1500℃. The shrinkage rate reaches the maximum value at 1210℃. The relative density of sintered samples is 96.4%, and its grain size is about 5.8 μm.

  11. 40 CFR 421.100 - Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... primary tungsten subcategory. 421.100 Section 421.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Tungsten Subcategory § 421.100 Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten... tungsten at primary tungsten facilities....

  12. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-07-19

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm{sup -2} at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced

  13. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-07-19

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm{sup -2} at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced

  14. High-energy, high-rate consolidation of tungsten and tungsten-based composite powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunathan, S.K.; Persad, C.; Bourell, D.L.; Marcus, H.L. (Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1991-01-20

    Tungsten and tungsten-based heavy alloys are well known for their superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. However, unalloyed tungsten is difficult to consolidate owing to its very high melting temperature (3683 K). The additions of small amounts of low-melting elements such as iron, nickel, cobalt and copper, facilitate the powder processing of dense heavy alloys at moderate temperatures. Energetic high-current pulses have been used recently for powder consolidation. In this paper, the use of a homopolar generator as a power source to consolidate selected tungsten and tungsten-based alloys is examined. Various materials were consolidated including unalloyed tungsten, W-Nb, W-Ni, and tungsten heavy alloy with boron carbide. The effect of process parameters such as pressure and specific energy input on the consolidation of different alloy systems is described in terms of microstructure and property relationships. (orig.).

  15. Tungsten/Platinum Hybrid Nanowire Growth via Field Emission Using Nanorobotic Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports tungsten-platinum hybrid nanowire growth via field emission, based on nanorobotic manipulation within a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM. A multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT was used as the emitter, and a tungsten probe was used as the anode at the counterposition, by way of nanomanipulation. By independently employing trimethylcyclopentadienyl platinum (CpPtMe3 and tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO6 as precursors, the platinum nanowire grew on the tip of the MWCNT emitter. Tungsten nanowires then grew on the tip of the platinum nanowire. The hybrid nanowire length wascontrolled by nanomanipulation. Their purity was evaluated using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Thus, it is possible to fabricate various metallic hybrid nanowires by changing the precursor materials. Hybrid nanowires have various applications in nanoelectronics, nanosensor devices, and nanomechanical systems.

  16. APPLICATION OF AN EXPERIMENTAL METHODOLOGY IN THE OPTIMIZATION OF A TUNGSTEN CONCENTRATION PROCESS BY MICROEMULSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C.S. RAMOS

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - In this work, we applied an experimental planning methodology in order to correlate the necessary amounts with the description of the a tungsten extraction process by microemulsions. The result is a mathematical modelling carried out using the Sheffe Net method, where the mixtures concentration values are represented inside an equilateral triangle. The tungsten concentration process occurs in two stages: extraction and reextraction. The extraction stage was determined by monitoring: phase relative volume (Vr, extraction percentage (%E and tungsten concentration in the microemulsion phase (Ctm e. The reextraction phase was determined by monitoring: reextraction percentage (%Re and tungsten concentration in the aqueous phase (Ctaq. Finally, we obtained equations that relate the extraction / reextraction properties to the composition of specific points inside the extraction region, obeying the error limits specified for the acceptance of each parameter. The results were evaluated through the construction of isoresponse diagrams and correlation graphics between experimental values and those obtained through use of equations.

  17. Structures and transitions in tungsten grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhu, Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marian, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    The objective of this study is to develop a computational methodology to predict structure, energies of tungsten grain boundaries as a function of misorientation and inclination. The energies and the mobilities are the necessary input for thermomechanical model of recrystallization of tungsten for magnetic fusion applications being developed by the Marian Group at UCLA.

  18. Tribological properties of sputtered tungsten and tungsten nitride thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wong; K.M.; ShenY.G.; Wong; P.L.

    2001-01-01

    The surface roughness, hardness and tribological properties of tungsten (W) and tung-sten nitride (WNx) thin films prepared by dc magnetron sputtering and reactive magnetron sputter-ing in Ar-N2 gas mixtures have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoindenta-tion measurements and ball-on-disc wear testing. A pronounced surface roughness was observedonly for films under compressive strains. The surface was flat under tension but rough under com-pression. Similar hardness with value about 20 GPa were observed in the W and WNx (x=0.3)films. This is thought to be due to the fact the grains are restricted to a very small size in the coat-ings. The higher coefficients of friction (0.4 for W and 0.9 for WN0.3) suggest that WN0.3 is not theoptimum phase. Finally, discussions are made with tribological test results.

  19. Structural and electrical properties in tungsten/tungsten oxide multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacucci, Arnaud [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP47870, F-21078 DIJON Cedex (France); Potin, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.potin@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP47870, F-21078 DIJON Cedex (France); Imhoff, Luc [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP47870, F-21078 DIJON Cedex (France); Martin, Nicolas [Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR 6174 CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, ENSMM, UTBM, 32 Avenue de l' observatoire, F-25044, BESANCON Cedex (France)

    2014-02-28

    Tungsten and tungsten oxide periodic nanometric multilayers have been deposited by DC reactive sputtering using the reactive gas pulsing process. Different pulsing periods have been used for each deposition to produce metal-oxide periodic alternations ranging from 3.3 to 71.5 nm. The morphology, crystallinity and chemical composition of these films have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques. The produced multilayers exhibited an amorphous structure and the composition stability of WO{sub 3} sub-layers has been pointed out. Moreover, electrical properties have also been studied by the van der Pauw technique. It revealed a clear stability of resistivity versus temperature for almost all samples and an influence of the multilayered structure on the resistivity behavior. - Highlights: • W/WO{sub 3} multilayers with nanometric periods are produced by gas pulsing. • Multilayers are mainly amorphous and the oxide sub-layers composed of WO{sub 3}. • Crystallized inclusions of β-W and β-W{sub 3}O phases in metallic sub-layers • Metallic-like behavior with low temperature coefficient of resistance.

  20. Seed growth of tungsten diselenide nanotubes from tungsten oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seok Joon; Park, Jin Cheol; Park, Min Ho; Park, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Ki Kang; Lee, Young Hee

    2015-05-13

    We report growth of tungsten diselenide (WSe2) nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with a two-zone furnace. WO3 nanowires were first grown by annealing tungsten thin films under argon ambient. WSe2 nanotubes were then grown at the tips of WO3 nanowires through selenization via two steps: (i) formation of tubular WSe2 structures on the outside of WO3 nanowires, resulting in core (WO3)-shell (WSe2) and (ii) growth of WSe2 nanotubes at the tips of WO3 nanowires. The observed seed growth is markedly different from existing substitutional growth of WSe2 nanotubes, where oxygen atoms are replaced by selenium atoms in WO3 nanowires to form WSe2 nanotubes. Another advantage of our growth is that WSe2 film was grown by simply supplying hydrogen gas, where the native oxides were reduced to thin film instead of forming oxide nanowires. Our findings will contribute to engineer other transition metal dichacogenide growth such as MoS2, WS2, and MoSe2.

  1. Experimental research on the penetration of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullet into steel target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen X.W.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the penetration experiments of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullets into 45# steel targets are conducted by employing H25 artillery. In which, an experimental technique of sub-caliber penetration is constructed. The quasi static and dynamic behaviours of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are also experimental investigated. The self-sharpening phenomenon of composite material is observed. Integrated with metallographic analysis, the failure modes of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are identified systemically and compared with the quasi-static and dynamic material tests. It includes four failure modes, i.e., shear fracture of tungsten fiber, brittle fracture of tungsten fiber and shear fracture of metallic glass matrix as well as melting of tungsten fiber and metallic glass matrix. Comparatively, three failure mechanisms of tungsten fiber in the bullet nose are also identified, i.e., shear fracture, splitting fracture and bending or/and buckling. Finally, the mechanism of self-sharpening behaviour of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material is discussed.

  2. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Han, Y.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Höschen, T.; Jasper, B.; Zhao, P.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself.

  3. Thermal stability of a highly-deformed warm-rolled tungsten plate in the temperature range 1100 °C to 1250 °C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfonso Lopez, Angel; Juul Jensen, Dorte; Luo, G.-N.

    2015-01-01

    Pure tungsten is considered as armor material for the most critical parts of fusion reactors (i.e. the divertor and the first wall), among other reasons due to its high melting point (3422 °C) and recrystallization temperature. The thermal stability of a pure tungsten plate warm-rolled to a high...... suggest that large plastic deformations (e.g. applied during shaping) are only suitable to produce tungsten components to be used at relatively low temperatures (up to 900 °C for a 2 years lifespan). Higher operation temperatures will lead to fast degradation of the microstructure during operation....

  4. The DAMPE silicon tungsten tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, Valentina; Asfandiyarov, R; Azzarello, P; Bernardini, P; Bertucci, B; Bolognini, A; Cadoux, F; Caprai, M; Domenjoz, M; Dong, Y; Duranti, M; Fan, R; Franco, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gong, K; Guo, D; Husi, C; Ionica, M; Lacalamita, N; Loparco, F; Marsella, G; Mazziotta, M N; Mongelli, M; Nardinocchi, A; Nicola, L; Pelleriti, G; Peng, W; Pohl, M; Postolache, V; Qiao, R; Surdo, A; Tykhonov, A; Vitillo, S; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wu, D; Wu, X; Zhang, F; De Mitri, I; La Marra, D

    2017-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite has been successfully launched on the 17th December 2015. It is a powerful space detector designed for the identification of possible Dark Matter signatures thanks to its capability to detect electrons and photons with an unprecedented energy resolution in an energy range going from few GeV up to 10 TeV. Moreover, the DAMPE satellite will contribute to a better understanding of the propagation mechanisms of high energy cosmic rays measuring the nuclei flux up to 100 TeV. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon-tungsten tracker-converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is made of twelve layers of single-sided AC-coupled silicon micro-strip detectors for a total silicon area of about 7 $m^2$ . To promote the conversion of incident photons into electron-positron pairs, tungsten foils are inserted into the supporting structure. In this document, a detailed description of the STK constructi...

  5. Fracture behaviour of polycrystalline tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaganidze, Ermile; Rupp, Daniel; Aktaa, Jarir

    2014-03-01

    Fracture behaviour of round blank polycrystalline tungsten was studied by means of three point bending Fracture-Mechanical (FM) tests at temperatures between RT and 1000 °C and under high vacuum. To study the influence of the anisotropic microstructure on the fracture toughness (FT) and ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) the specimens were extracted in three different, i.e. longitudinal, radial and circumferential orientations. The FM tests yielded distinctive fracture behaviour for each specimen orientation. The crack propagation was predominantly intergranular for longitudinal orientation up to 600 °C, whereas transgranular cleavage was observed at low test temperatures for radial and circumferentially oriented specimens. At intermediate test temperatures the change of the fracture mode took place for radial and circumferential orientations. Above 800 °C all three specimen types showed large ductile deformation without noticeable crack advancement. For longitudinal specimens the influence of the loading rate on the FT and DBT was studied in the loading rate range between 0.06 and 18 MPa m1/2/s. Though an increase of the FT was observed for the lowest loading rate, no resolvable dependence of the DBT on the loading rate was found partly due to loss of FT validity. A Master Curve approach is proposed to describe FT vs. test temperature data on polycrystalline tungsten. Fracture safe design space was identified by analysis compiled FT data.

  6. Nanostructured Tungsten Oxide Composite for High-Performance Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyuan Feng Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of composite tungsten oxide nanowires-based gas sensors. The morphologic surface, crystallographic structures, and chemical compositions of the obtained nanowires have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Raman scattering, respectively. The experimental measurements reveal that each wire consists of crystalline nanoparticles with an average diameter of less than 250 nm. By using the synthesized nanowires, highly sensitive prototypic gas sensors have been designed and fabricated. The dependence of the sensitivity of tungsten oxide nanowires to the methane and hydrogen gases as a function of time has been obtained. Various sensing parameters such as sensitivity, response time, stability, and repeatability were investigated in order to reveal the sensing ability.

  7. Pitfalls of tungsten multileaf collimator in proton beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, Vadim; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States) and Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center (Formerly Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute), Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Particle beam therapy is associated with significant startup and operational cost. Multileaf collimator (MLC) provides an attractive option to improve the efficiency and reduce the treatment cost. A direct transfer of the MLC technology from external beam radiation therapy is intuitively straightforward to proton therapy. However, activation, neutron production, and the associated secondary cancer risk in proton beam should be an important consideration which is evaluated. Methods: Monte Carlo simulation with FLUKA particle transport code was applied in this study for a number of treatment models. The authors have performed a detailed study of the neutron generation, ambient dose equivalent [H*(10)], and activation of a typical tungsten MLC and compared with those obtained from a brass aperture used in a typical proton therapy system. Brass aperture and tungsten MLC were modeled by absorber blocks in this study, representing worst-case scenario of a fully closed collimator. Results: With a tungsten MLC, the secondary neutron dose to the patient is at least 1.5 times higher than that from a brass aperture. The H*(10) from a tungsten MLC at 10 cm downstream is about 22.3 mSv/Gy delivered to water phantom by noncollimated 200 MeV beam of 20 cm diameter compared to 14 mSv/Gy for the brass aperture. For a 30-fraction treatment course, the activity per unit volume in brass aperture reaches 5.3 x 10{sup 4} Bq cm{sup -3} at the end of the last treatment. The activity in brass decreases by a factor of 380 after 24 h, additional 6.2 times after 40 days of cooling, and is reduced to background level after 1 yr. Initial activity in tungsten after 30 days of treating 30 patients per day is about 3.4 times higher than in brass that decreases only by a factor of 2 after 40 days and accumulates to 1.2 x 10{sup 6} Bq cm{sup -3} after a full year of operation. The daily utilization of the MLC leads to buildup of activity with time. The overall activity continues to increase

  8. Deuterium blistering in tungsten and tungsten vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arshad, Kameel; Yuan, Yue; Cheng, Long; Wang, Jun [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhou, Zhang-Jian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), Beijing 100083 (China); De Temmerman, Gregory [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lu, Guang-Hong, E-mail: lgh@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-06-15

    In order to evaluate D blistering behavior in W based plasma facing materials, rolled W and different grades of W-V targets were exposed to high flux of 1.2 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}, low energy (38 eV) D plasma at two different surface temperatures. The blistering behavior was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy, accompanied by electron back-scattering diffraction. Highest numbers of blisters were observed on the surface of rolled tungsten. The addition of V precursor to W suppressed D blister formation. In the case of W-V alloys, comparatively submicron V-containing materials have shown high tendency but small size blisters formation than micron V-containing samples. A high density of blisters was observed near the (111) plane on the surface of both V-containing alloys. Nano-sized blisters were also observed on V enriched surface.

  9. Experimental study on seismic behavior of full-scale composite walls with cold-formed thin-walled steel tubular truss%足尺冷弯薄壁管桁架组合墙体抗震性能试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静峰; 余波; 朱旭峰; 董传明

    2013-01-01

    为揭示地震作用下开洞类型和开洞率对冷弯薄壁管桁架组合墙体的抗震性能影响,进行六榀足尺冷弯薄壁管桁架组合墙体的水平低周反复荷载试验,了解其抗震性能和破坏模式,深入研究墙体的水平荷载-水平位移滞回曲线和骨架曲线、强度和刚度退化规律、耗能能力等.结合现有规范,对新型墙体的延性进行评价.试验表明,冷弯薄壁管桁架结构组合墙体具有良好的滞回性能、延性和耗能能力,其中延性系数μ=3.78 ~6.54,极限状态能量耗散系数E =0.55 ~0.68;开洞类型、开洞率和蒙皮效应对此类墙体的抗震性能影响较大,在设计中应合理考虑这些因素.双面OSB板对冷弯薄壁骨架结构起到较好的蒙皮效应;墙体开洞会削弱墙体的承载力和刚度,当开洞面积较小时增加四肢柱数量和加强洞口两侧构造可明显提高其受力性能和抗震性能.%To investigate the influence of opening type and opening rate on seismic behavior of composite walls with cold-formed thin-walled steel tube truss, an experimental program on six full-scale specimens under horizontal cyclic loading was conducted. The seismic behavior and failure modes of the composite walls were investigated. The load-displacement hysteresis curves and envelope curves, degeneration regulation of strength and stiffness, and energy dissipation were also analyzed. The test results show that the proposed composite wall has good hysteretic behavior, ductility and energy dissipation, for which ductility coefficient μ = 3 . 78 ~ 6. 54 and energy dissipation coefficient E -0. 55 ~ 0. 68. It is found that the opening type, the opening rate and the skin diagram action may affect the seismic behavior of the composite walls, and hence these parameters should be considered effectively in the structural design. The double-side OSB plates have good skin diaphragm effects on the cold-formed thin-walled steel framework. The strength

  10. Analysis of cobalt, tantalum, titanium, vanadium and chromium in tungsten carbide by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Archer, M

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used to measure the concentrations of cobalt, tantalum, titanium, vanadium and chromium in solutions of tungsten carbide. The main advantage of the method described here lies...

  11. Dielectronic recombination of tungsten ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bowen; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dong, Chenzhong; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio calculations of dielectronic recombination rate coefficients of Ne-, Pd- and Ag-like tungsten have been performed. Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities and autoionization rates were calculated using the Flexible Atomic Code. The contributions from different channels to the total rate coefficients are discussed. The present calculated rate coefficients are compared with other calculations where available. Excellent agreement has been found for Ne-like W while a large discrepancy was found for Pd-like W, which implies that more ab initio calculations and experimental measurements are badly needed. Further calculations demonstrated that the influence of configuration interaction is small while nonresonant radiative stabilizing (NRS) contribution to doubly excited non-autoionizing states are vital. The data obtained are expected to be useful for modeling plasmas for fusion applications, especially for the ITER community, which makes experimental verification even more essential.

  12. The electron affinity of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, A.O.; Andersson, P.; Klason, P.; Hanstorp, D. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Diehl, C. [Institut fur Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitat, Mainz (Germany); Present Address: Max-Planck-Institut fur Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Forstner, O. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Wien (Austria)

    2010-11-15

    The electron affinity of tungsten has been measured using laser photodetachment threshold spectroscopy in a collinear geometry. The electron affinity was determined to 6583.6(6) cm{sup -1} by observing the onset of the process when W{sup -} ions in the 5d{sup 5}6s{sup 2} {sup 6}S{sub 5/2} ground state are photo-detached producing neutral W atoms in the 5d{sup 4}6s{sup 2} {sup 5}D{sub 0} ground state. The measured value is in agreement with previous measurements and improves the accuracy by almost two orders of magnitude. Further, a photodetachment signal below the ground state photodetachment threshold was found, which indicates the existence of a bound excited state in W{sup -}. (authors)

  13. Viscosity of liquid undercooled tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Paul-François; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi

    2005-05-01

    Knowledge of the viscosity and its temperature dependence is essential to improve metallurgical processes as well as to validate theoretical and empirical models of liquid metals. However, data for metals with melting points above 2504K could not be determined yet due to contamination and containment problems. Here we report the viscosity of tungsten, the highest melting point metal (3695K), measured by a levitation technique. Over the 3350-3700-K temperature range, which includes the undercooled region by 345K, the viscosity data could be fitted as η(T )=0.108exp[1.28×105/(RT)](mPas). At the melting point, the datum agrees with the proposed theoretical and empirical models of liquid metals but presents atypical temperature dependence, suggesting a basic change in the mechanism of momentum transfer.

  14. Direct Electrochemical Preparation of Cobalt, Tungsten, and Tungsten Carbide from Cemented Carbide Scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangjun; Xi, Xiaoli; Nie, Zuoren; Zhang, Liwen; Ma, Liwen

    2017-02-01

    A novel process of preparing cobalt, tungsten, and tungsten carbide powders from cemented carbide scrap by molten salt electrolysis has been investigated in this paper. In this experiment, WC-6Co and NaCl-KCl salt were used as sacrificial anode and electrolyte, respectively. The dissolution potential of cobalt and WC was determined by linear sweep voltammetry to be 0 and 0.6 V ( vs Ag/AgCl), respectively. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior of cobalt and tungsten ions was investigated by a variety of electrochemical techniques. Results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square-wave voltammetry show that the cobalt and tungsten ions existed as Co2+ and W2+ on melts, respectively. The effect of applied voltage, electrolysis current, and electrolysis times on the composition of the product was studied. Results showed that pure cobalt powder can be obtained when the electrolysis potential is lower than 0.6 V or during low current and short times. Double-cathode and two-stage electrolysis was utilized for the preparation of cobalt, tungsten carbide, and tungsten powders. Additionally, X-ray diffraction results confirm that the product collected at cathodes 1 and 2 is pure Co and WC, respectively. Pure tungsten powder was obtained after electrolysis of the second part. Scanning electron microscope results show that the diameters of tungsten, tungsten carbide, and cobalt powder are smaller than 100, 200, and 200 nm, respectively.

  15. Visible light photoinactivation of bacteria by tungsten oxide nanostructures formed on a tungsten foil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasempour, Fariba [Plasma Physics Research Centre, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 147789-3855, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azimirad, Rouhollah [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amini, Abbas [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Kingswood, NSW 2751 (Australia); Akhavan, Omid, E-mail: oakhavan@sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • Synthesis of tungsten oxide nano/micro-structures on W foils using KOH as a catalyst. • Strong antibacterial activity of tungsten oxide nanorods under visible light irradiation. • Decrease in photoinactivation of bacteria on tungsten oxide nano/micro-rods doped by potassium. - Abstract: Antibacterial activity of tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods were studied against Escherichia coli bacteria under visible light irradiation and in dark. A two-step annealing process at temperatures up to 390 °C and 400–800 °C was applied to synthesize the tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods on tungsten foils using KOH as a catalyst. Annealing the foils at 400 °C in the presence of catalyst resulted in formation of tungsten oxide nanorods (with diameters of 50–90 nm and crystalline phase of WO{sub 3}) on surface of tungsten foils. By increasing the annealing temperature up to 800 °C, tungsten oxide microrods with K{sub 2}W{sub 6}O{sub 19} crystalline phase were formed on the foils. The WO{sub 3} nanorods showed a strong antibacterial property under visible light irradiation, corresponding to >92% bacterial inactivation within 24 h irradiation at room temperature, while the K{sub 2}W{sub 6}O{sub 19} microrods formed at 800 °C could inactivate only ∼45% of the bacteria at the same conditions.

  16. Direct Electrochemical Preparation of Cobalt, Tungsten, and Tungsten Carbide from Cemented Carbide Scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangjun; Xi, Xiaoli; Nie, Zuoren; Zhang, Liwen; Ma, Liwen

    2016-10-01

    A novel process of preparing cobalt, tungsten, and tungsten carbide powders from cemented carbide scrap by molten salt electrolysis has been investigated in this paper. In this experiment, WC-6Co and NaCl-KCl salt were used as sacrificial anode and electrolyte, respectively. The dissolution potential of cobalt and WC was determined by linear sweep voltammetry to be 0 and 0.6 V (vs Ag/AgCl), respectively. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior of cobalt and tungsten ions was investigated by a variety of electrochemical techniques. Results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square-wave voltammetry show that the cobalt and tungsten ions existed as Co2+ and W2+ on melts, respectively. The effect of applied voltage, electrolysis current, and electrolysis times on the composition of the product was studied. Results showed that pure cobalt powder can be obtained when the electrolysis potential is lower than 0.6 V or during low current and short times. Double-cathode and two-stage electrolysis was utilized for the preparation of cobalt, tungsten carbide, and tungsten powders. Additionally, X-ray diffraction results confirm that the product collected at cathodes 1 and 2 is pure Co and WC, respectively. Pure tungsten powder was obtained after electrolysis of the second part. Scanning electron microscope results show that the diameters of tungsten, tungsten carbide, and cobalt powder are smaller than 100, 200, and 200 nm, respectively.

  17. Effect of process parameters on induction plasma reactive deposition of tungsten carbide from tungsten metal powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tungsten carbide deposit was made directly from tungsten metal powder through the reaction with methane in radio frequency induction plasma. Effect of major process parameters on the induction plasma reactive deposition of tungsten carbide was studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, water displacement method, and microhardness test. The results show that methane flow rate, powder feed rate, particle size, reaction chamber pressure and deposition distance have significant influences on the phase composition, density, and microhardness of the deposit. Extra carbon is necessary to ensure the complete conversion of tungsten metal into the carbide.

  18. Advanced Electrochemical Machining (ECM) for tungsten surface micro-structuring in blanket applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holstein, Nils, E-mail: nils.holstein@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Baden-Württemberg (Germany); Krauss, Wolfgang; Konys, Jürgen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Baden-Württemberg (Germany); Heuer, Simon; Weber, Thomas [Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy- and Climate Research – Plasma Physics (IEK-4), D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Electrochemical Machining is an appropriate tool for tungsten shaping. • Progress in shaping achieved by combination of ECM with advanced micro-lithography. • Application in First Wall for connection of plasma facing material to breeder blanket. • Successful development of adhesion promotors by ECM for plasma spraying interlayers. • Microstructure electrochemical manufacturing of tungsten in sizes of 100 μm achieved. - Abstract: Plasma facing components for fusion applications must have to exhibit long-term stability under extreme physical conditions, and therefore any material imperfections caused by mechanical and/or thermal stresses in the shaping processes cannot be tolerated due to a high risk of possible technical failures under fusion conditions. To avoid such defects, the method of Electrochemical Machining (ECM) enables a complete defect-free processing of removal of tungsten material during the desired shaping, also for high penetration depths. Furthermore, supported by lithographic mask pretreatment, three-dimensional distinct geometric structures can be positive-imaged via the directional galvanic dissolution applying M-ECM process into the tungsten bulk material. New required applications for tungsten components, e.g. as adhesion promotors in W-surfaces to enable sure grip and bonding of thick plasma-spraying layers for blanket components, will define the way of further miniaturization of well-established millimeter dimensioned M-ECM shaping processes to dimensions of 100 μm and furthermore down to 50 μm. Besides current M-ECM limits the article describes inevitable needs of further developments for mask resists, mask materials and the resulting ECM parameters, to reach the needed accuracy in tungsten microstructure. The achieved progress and observed correlations of processing parameters will be manifested by produced demonstrators made by the new “μM”-ECM process.

  19. Extraction Factor Of Pure Ammonium Paratungstate From Tungsten Scraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pee J.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Typical oxidation process of tungsten scraps was modified by the rotary kiln with oxygen burner to increase the oxidation rate of tungsten scraps. Also to accelerate the solubility of solid oxidized products, the hydrothermal reflux method was adapted. By heating tungsten scraps in rotary kiln with oxygen burner at around 900° for 2hrs, the scraps was oxidized completely. Then oxidized products (WO3 and CoWO4 was fully dissolved in the solution of NaOH by hydrothermal reflux method at 150° for 2hrs. The dissolution rate of oxidized products was increased with increasing the reaction temperature and concentration of NaOH. And then CaWO4 and H2WO4 could be generated from the aqueous sodium tungstate solution. Ammonium paratungstate (APT also could be produced from tungstic acid using by aqueous ammonium solution. The morphologies (cubic and plate types of APT was controlled by the stirring process of purified solution of ammonium paratungstate.

  20. Synthesis, structure and properties of nickel-iron-tungsten alloy electrodeposits - Part II: Effect of microstructure on hardness, electrical and magnetic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirović Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured nickel-iron-tungsten alloys were produced by electrodeposition from an ammoniacal citrate bath. The tungsten content of the alloy ranged from 0.8 wt.% to 11 wt.%, and the crystal grain size of the FCC phase of the solid solution of iron and tungsten in nickel was between 14 nm and 3.3 nm. The amorphous phase content of the alloy increases with decreasing crystal grain size. As the amorphous phase content increases, the magnetization, electrical conductivity and hardness of the alloy decrease. Annealing the alloy to crystallization temperature results in structural relaxation during which the alloy undergoes short-range ordering in conjunction with decreases in the density of chaotically distributed dislocations and internal microstrain level, which increases the exchange integral value, the electronic density of states at the Fermi level, the mean free path of electrons, the ordering and the mean size of cluster in the sliding plane and results in more uniform orientation of dipole moments of certain nanoparticles. These changes: a increase the mobility of magnetic domain walls, facilitate the orientation of domains in the external magnetic field and cause an increase in magnetization; b cause a decrease in electrical resistance, and c impede the sliding of grain boundaries and increase the hardness of the alloy. Annealing the alloys at temperatures above 400ºC results in amorphous phase crystallization and larger crystal grains of the FCC phase, along with a decrease in the density of chaotically distributed dislocations and a decrease in internal microstrain level. The formation of larger crystal grains reduces the hardness of the alloy, decreases its specific electrical resistance and impedes both the orientation of certain magnetic domains and the shift of walls of already oriented domains, thus inducing a decrease in magnetization. The heat released during the milling of Ni87.3Fe11.3W1.4 alloy with FCC-phase crystal grains 8

  1. Characterization of a Cobalt-Tungsten Interconnect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Caspersen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A ferritic steel interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell must be coated in order to prevent chromium evaporation from the steel substrate. The Technical University of Denmark and Topsoe Fuel Cell have developed an interconnect coating based on a cobalt-tungsten alloy. The purpose of the coating...... is to act both as a diffusion barrier for chromium and provide better protection against high temperature oxidation than a pure cobalt coating. This work presents a characterization of a cobalt-tungsten alloy coating electrodeposited on the ferritic steel Crofer 22 H which subsequently was oxidized in air...... of oxidation time. The coating had completely oxidized during the 300 h oxidation time. GDOES measurements showed that the tungsten was located in an inner zone in the coating/substrate interface. The outer layer of the coating did not contain any tungsten after oxidation but consisted mainly of cobalt...

  2. SINTERED REFRACTORY TUNGSTEN ALLOYS. Gesinterte hochschmelzende wolframlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, R.; Sedlatschek, K.; Braun, H.

    1971-12-15

    Dependence of the melting point of the refractory metals on their positions in the periodic system - alloys of tungsten with other refractory metals - sintering of the alloys - processing of the alloys - technological properties.

  3. Photocatalysis and photoelectrochemical properties of tungsten trioxide nanostructured films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chin Wei

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO₃) possesses a small band gap energy of 2.4-2.8 eV and is responsive to both ultraviolet and visible light irradiation including strong absorption of the solar spectrum and stable physicochemical properties. Thus, controlled growth of one-dimensional (1D) WO₃ nanotubular structures with desired length, diameter, and wall thickness has gained significant interest. In the present study, 1D WO₃ nanotubes were successfully synthesized via electrochemical anodization of tungsten (W) foil in an electrolyte composed of 1 M of sodium sulphate (Na₂SO₄) and ammonium fluoride (NH₄F). The influence of NH₄F content on the formation mechanism of anodic WO₃ nanotubular structure was investigated in detail. An optimization of fluoride ions played a critical role in controlling the chemical dissolution reaction in the interface of W/WO₃. Based on the results obtained, a minimum of 0.7 wt% of NH₄F content was required for completing transformation from W foil to WO₃ nanotubular structure with an average diameter of 85 nm and length of 250 nm within 15 min of anodization time. In this case, high aspect ratio of WO₃ nanotubular structure is preferred because larger active surface area will be provided for better photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical (PEC) reactions.

  4. Reconstrucción de defectos torácicos de espesor total: Presentación de 8 casos de especial complejidad Reconstruction of full thickness defects on the chest wall: Presentation of 8 complex cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Lasso

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Las lesiones de gran tamaño en el tórax, requieren casi siempre para su reparación plastias complejas, que en algunos casos han de combinar el uso de tejidos autólogos y/o materiales sintéticos. Por tanto, la reconstrucción de la pared torácica supone un desafío desde el punto de vista reconstructivo en el que es fundamental el papel de los cirujanos plásticos. Los grandes defectos torácicos suelen ser secundarios a exéresis tumoral (tumores parietales de origen primario o secundario, infecciones, radionecrosis, traumatismos y malformaciones congénitas. Si bien los principios de la reconstrucción del tórax exigen una escisión amplia de la lesión, desbridamiento de los tejidos desvitalizados o irradiados y control de la infección local, dichas actuaciones no podrían abordarse con seguridad si no dispusiéramos de un amplio arsenal de técnicas reconstructivas, capaces de aportar tejidos sanos y bien vascularizados o voluminosos y amplios en superficie, junto con soportes rígidos mediante materiales aloplásticos. Gracias a estos avances, en la mayoría de los casos conseguimos el objetivo con sólo una intervención, cuando hace unos años necesitábamos varios procedimientos quirúrgicos. Presentamos una muestra variada de la experiencia de nuestro Servicio en el tratamiento de grandes defectos del tórax, en el que resumimos las distintas posibilidades que podemos encontrar en la práctica clínica diaria, y las soluciones que mejor se adaptan a las mismas.Reconstruction of full thickness defects on the chest wall is controversial and require the use of complex techniques that combine autologous tissue and/or alloplastic materials. Thus it is a challenge for plastic surgeons since it needs a suitable and functional reconstruction. The aethiology for these defects include tumoral surgery (primary wall tumors, or recurrences or metastasis, infections, radiation injury, trauma and congenital defects. Otherwise, first surgical

  5. Cationic Tungsten(VI Penta-Methyl Complex: Synthesis, Characterization and its Application in Olefin Metathesis Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dey Raju

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten-hexa-methyl readily reacts with B(C6F53 in dichloromethane and generates the corresponding well-defined cationic tungsten-penta-methyl complex which was identified precisely by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-13C NMR correlation spectroscopy. Unlike WMe6, this cationic complex has low energy barrier to form tungsten carbene intermediate, which was further supported by the fact that WMe6 alone has no activity in olefin metathesis reaction whereas the cationic complex shows catalytic activity for self-metathesis of 1-octene.

  6. Electronic Transitions of Tungsten Monosulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L. F.; Chan, Man-Chor; Zou, Wenli; Cheung, Allan S. C.

    2017-06-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of the tungsten monosulfide (WS) molecule in the near infrared region between 725 nm and 885 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The WS molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated tungsten atoms with 1% CS_{2} seeded in argon. Fifteen vibrational bands with resolved rotational structure have been recorded and analyzed, which were organized into seven electronic transition systems. The ground state has been identified to be the X^{3}Σ^{-}(0^{+}) state, and the determined vibrational frequency, ΔG_{1/2} and bond length, r_{0}, are respectively 556.7 cm^{-1} and 2.0676 Å. In addition, vibrational bands belong to another transition system involving lower state with Ω = 1 component have also been analyzed. Least-squares fit of the measured line positions yielded molecular constants for the electronic states involved. The low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of WS have been calculated using state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) and followed by MRCISD+Q (internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus Davidson's cluster correction). The active space consists of 10 electrons in 9 orbitals corresponding to the W 5d6s and S 3p shells. The lower molecular orbitals from W 5s5p and S 3s are inactive but are also correlated, and relativistic effective core potential (RECPs) are adopted to replace the core orbitals with 60 (W) and 10 (S) core electrons, respectively. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is calculated via the state-interaction (SI) approach with RECP spin-orbit operators using SA-CASSCF wavefunctions, where the diagonal elements in the SOC matrix are replaced by the corresponding MRCISD+Q energies calculated above. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of the ground and many low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of the WS molecule are obtained. The calculated

  7. The DAMPE silicon–tungsten tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzarello, P., E-mail: philipp.azzarello@unige.ch [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Ambrosi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Asfandiyarov, R. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Bernardini, P. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Bertucci, B.; Bolognini, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Cadoux, F. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Caprai, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); De Mitri, I. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Domenjoz, M. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Dong, Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Duranti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Fan, R. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); and others

    2016-09-21

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a spaceborne astroparticle physics experiment, launched on 17 December 2015. DAMPE will identify possible dark matter signatures by detecting electrons and photons in the 5 GeV–10 TeV energy range. It will also measure the flux of nuclei up to 100 TeV, for the study of the high energy cosmic ray origin and propagation mechanisms. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon–tungsten tracker–converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is composed of six tracking planes of 2 orthogonal layers of single-sided micro-strip detectors, for a total detector surface of ca. 7 m{sup 2}. The STK has been extensively tested for space qualification. Also, numerous beam tests at CERN have been done to study particle detection at silicon module level, and at full detector level. After description of the DAMPE payload and its scientific mission, we will describe the STK characteristics and assembly. We will then focus on some results of single ladder performance tests done with particle beams at CERN.

  8. Cluster dynamics modeling of accumulation and diffusion of helium in neutron irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.G.; Zhou, W.H.; Huang, L.F. [Key Laboratory for Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zeng, Z., E-mail: zzeng@theory.issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Ju, X. [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-12-15

    A cluster dynamics model based on rate theory has been developed to study the accumulation and diffusion processes of helium in tungsten under synergistic effects of helium implantation and neutron irradiation. By including self-interstitial atoms, vacancies and helium atoms as well as their clusters and further using more reliable parameters, the evolution of different types of defects with time and depth is investigated. The calculated results are comparable with experiments. The cases of helium plasma corresponding to the first wall and to the divertor are taken into account. The accumulation and diffusion behaviors of helium in tungsten are illustrated by the time and depth dependence of helium concentration in tungsten with or without the neutron irradiation, the contribution of different types of helium clusters/complexes to helium concentration and the depth profiles of different mobile defects and helium-vacancy complexes. It is concluded that the competition of trapping and diffusion effects dominates the behavior of helium atoms in tungsten for these two typical cases. Understanding these mechanisms is important for estimating damages to the plasma-facing materials.

  9. Recrystallization kinetics of warm-rolled tungsten in the temperature range 1150-1350 °C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfonso Lopez, Angel; Juul Jensen, Dorte; Luo, G.-N.

    2014-01-01

    Pure tungsten is a potential candidate material for the plasma-facing first wall and the divertor of fusion reactors. Both parts have to withstand high temperatures during service. This will alter the microstructure of the material by recovery, recrystallization and grain growth and will cause...... degradation in material properties as a loss in mechanical strength and embrittlement. The thermal stability of a pure tungsten plate warm-rolled to 67% thickness reduction was investigated by long-term isothermal annealing in the temperature range between 1150 °C and 1350 °C up to 2200 h. Changes...... indicate a sufficient thermal stability of the tungsten plate during operation below 1075 °C....

  10. Residual carbon content in the initial ITER-Like Wall experiments at JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brezinsek, S.; Jachmich, S.; Stamp, M. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Coenen, J. W.; Krieger, K.; Giroud, C.; Groth, M.; Philipps, V.; S. Grünhagen,; Smith, R.; van Rooij, G. J.; Ivanova, D.; Matthews, G. F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The residual carbon content and carbon edge flux in JET have been assessed by three independent diagnostic techniques after start of plasma operation with the ITER-Like Wall (ILW) with beryllium first wall and tungsten divertor: (i) in-situ measurements with optical spectroscopy on low

  11. Scandia doped tungsten matrix for impregnated cathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinshu; WANG Yanchun; LIU Wei; LI Hongyi; ZHOU Meiling

    2008-01-01

    As a matrix for Sc-type impregnated cathode,scandia doped tungsten with a uniform ldistribution of SC2O3 was obtained by powder metallurgy combined with the liquid-solid doping method.The microstructure and composition of the powder and the anti-ion bombardment behavior of scandium in the matrix were studied by means of SEM,EDS,XRD,and in-situ AES methods.Tungsten powder covered with scandium oxide,an ideal scandium oxide-doped tungsten powder for the preparation of Sc-type impregnated cathode,was obtained using the liquid-solid doping method.Compared with the matrix prepared with the mechanically mixed powder of tungsten and scandium oxide,SC2O3-W matrix prepared with this kind of powder had smaller grain size and uniform distribution of scandium.Sc on the surface of Sc2O3 doped tungsten mauix had good high temperature stability and good anti-ion bombardment capability.

  12. Ultrasonic drawing of tungsten wire for incandescent lamps production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordyuk, B N; Mordyuk, V S; Buryak, V V

    2004-04-01

    An influence of ultrasonic treatment (drawing) on structure, high temperature durability, evaporation and creep behaviours of tungsten single crystal and wires were investigated. A relation of tungsten wires properties with dislocation distribution was determined.

  13. Electroanalytical determination of tungsten and molybdenum in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedoorn, P L; van't Slot, P; van Leeuwen, H P; Hagen, W R

    2001-10-01

    Recent crystal structure determinations accelerated the progress in the biochemistry of tungsten-containing enzymes. In order to characterize these enzymes, a sensitive determination of this metal in protein-containing samples is necessary. An electroanalytical tungsten determination has successfully been adapted to determine the tungsten and molybdenum content in enzymes. The tungsten and molybdenum content can be measured simultaneously from 1 to 10 microg of purified protein with little or no sample handling. More crude protein samples require precipitation of interfering surface active material with 10% perchloric acid. This method affords the isolation of novel molybdenum- and tungsten-containing proteins via molybdenum and tungsten monitoring of column fractions, without using radioactive isotopes. A screening of soluble proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus for tungsten, using anion-exchange column chromatography to separate the proteins, has been performed. The three known tungsten-containing enzymes from P. furiosus were recovered with this screening.

  14. Evaluation of stable tungsten isotopes in the resolved resonance region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schillebeeckx P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade benchmark experiments and simulations, together with newly obtained neutron cross section data, have pointed out deficiencies in evaluated data files of W isotopes. The role of W as a fundamental structural material in different nuclear applications fully justifies a new evaluation of 182, 183, 184, 186W neutron resonance parameters. In this regard transmission and capture cross section measurements on natural and enriched tungsten samples were performed at the GELINA facility of the EC-JRC-IRMM. A resonance parameter file used as input in the resonance shape analysis was prepared based on the available literature and adjusted in first instance to transmission data.

  15. Photo-Oxidation of Water Using Nanocrystalline Tungsten Oxide under Visible Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. J. Hamilton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The photoelectrolysis of water to yield hydrogen and oxygen using visible light has enormous potential for solar energy harvesting if suitable photoelectrode materials can be developed. Few of the materials with a band gap suitable for visible light activation have the necessary band-edge potentials or photochemical stability to be suitable candidates. Tungsten oxide (bg 2.8 eV is a good candidate with absorption up to ≈440 nm and known photochemical stability. Thin films of tungsten oxide were prepared using an electrolytic route from peroxo-tungsten precursors. The tungsten oxide thin films were characterised by FESEM, Auger electron spectroscopy, and photoelectrochemical methods. The magnitude of the photocurrent response of the films under solar simulated irradiation showed a dependence on precursor used in the film preparation, with a comparatively lower response for samples containing impurities. The photocurrent response spectrum of the tungsten oxide films was more favourable than that recorded for titanium dioxide (TiO2 thin films. The WO3 photocurrent response was of equivalent magnitude but shifted into the visible region of the spectrum, as compared to that of the TiO2.

  16. Genotoxic Changes to Rodent Cells Exposed in Vitro to Tungsten, Nickel, Cobalt and Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Bardack

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten-based materials have been proposed as replacements for depleted uranium in armor-penetrating munitions and for lead in small-arms ammunition. A recent report demonstrated that a military-grade composition of tungsten, nickel, and cobalt induced a highly-aggressive, metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into the leg muscle of laboratory rats to simulate a shrapnel wound. The early genetic changes occurring in response to embedded metal fragments are not known. In this study, we utilized two cultured rodent myoblast cell lines, exposed to soluble tungsten alloys and the individual metals comprising the alloys, to study the genotoxic effects. By profiling cell transcriptomes using microarray, we found slight, yet distinct and unique, gene expression changes in rat myoblast cells after 24 h metal exposure, and several genes were identified that correlate with impending adverse consequences of ongoing exposure to weapons-grade tungsten alloy. These changes were not as apparent in the mouse myoblast cell line. This indicates a potential species difference in the cellular response to tungsten alloy, a hypothesis supported by current findings with in vivo model systems. Studies examining genotoxic-associated gene expression changes in cells from longer exposure times are warranted.

  17. Process for the recovery of tungsten in a pure form from tungsten-containing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchter, M.; Moscovici, A.

    1986-12-16

    A process is described for the recovery of tungsten from tungsten-containing materials which comprises the steps of (i) admixing the tungsten-containing material with a melt at a temperature of between 680/sup 0/C and 750/sup 0/C. The melt consists of a salt selected from the group consisting of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite and mixtures thereof in a substantially stoichiometrical amount to the tungsten constituent of the tungsten-containing material. This is done to disintegrate the tungsten-containing material and to form sodium tungstate, cooling the melt, and leaching the cooled melt with water to obtain an aqueous solution of sodium tungstate; (ii) admixing a solution of calcium chloride with the aqueous solution of sodium tungstate at a temperature of between 40/sup 0/C and 95/sup 0/C to form a calcium tungstate precipitate and separating the calcium tungstate; (iii) admixing the calcium tungstate with a preheated concentrated hydrochloric acid solution to form a tungstic acid precipitate and a CaCl/sub 2/ solution having a concentration of between 80 g/l and 180 g/l free HCl and separating the tungstic acid precipitate and obtaining tungstic acid which is substantially free of calcium ions, and (iv) calcining the tungstic acid to convert it to tungstic oxide and reducing the tungstic oxide to form metallic tungsten.

  18. The Newly Released Export Quota for Tungsten Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>China’s Ministry of Commerce recently announced the second lot of export quota for tungsten products in 2005. Based on the new quota, the second lot for Ammonium Paratung-state (APT) and Ammonium Metatungstate (AMT) will be 1,232 tons. The second lot for tungsten trioxide and blue tungsten oxide will be 1,480 tons and the second lot for tungsten powder and its products will be 428 tons.

  19. Advanced walling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The question addressed by this chapter is: How should advanced walling systems be planned, designed, built, refurbished, and end their useful lives, to classify as smart, sustainable, green or eco-building environments?...

  20. Study of tungsten based positron moderators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucio, O.G. de; Pérez, M.; Mendoza, U.; Morales, J.G.; Cruz, J.C. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México DF (Mexico); DuBois, R.D. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Positrons and how they interact with matter has a growing interest in many fields. Most of their uses require the production of slow positron beams with a well-defined energy, but since these particles are usually generated by means of a radioactive source, they are fast and with a broad distribution of energies. For this reason it is necessary to moderate them to lower energies via inelastic collisions. Then, they can be accelerated to the desired energies. This requires the use of a moderator. Tungsten is one of the most commonly used moderator materials because of its reasonable efficiency and relatively low cost. In this work we present different methods of producing transmission tungsten-based moderators, with particular interest in a combination of tungsten thin foils and grids. We also show results about the characterization of these moderators by ion beam analysis and microscopy techniques along with their relative moderation efficiencies.

  1. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  2. Interface behavior of tungsten coating on stainless steel by electro spark deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yuangang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of electro spark deposition method was put forward, which was based on the theory of electro spark deposition by changing the polarity in the liquid. Tungsten coating layers was produced on surface of Stainless Steel by electro spark deposition. The micro hardness, microstructure, chemical composition and phases of the coating layer were examined by means of hardness test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS analysis. The results showed that there was tungsten coating in the surface, which was discontinuous. Microhardness of the coating layer was about 3 times more than that of the substrate. The combination between coating layer and substrate was metallurgical bond.

  3. Novel Approach: Tungsten Oxide Nanoparticle as a Catalyst for Malonic Acid Ester Synthesis via Ozonolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal A. Wasmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malonic acid ester was synthesized via the one-step ozonolysis of palm olein. Malonic acid ester was spectroscopically characterized using gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. Tungsten oxide nanoparticles were used as the catalyst, which was characterized via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM. Tungsten oxide provided several advantages as a catalyst for the esterification malonic acid such as simple operation for a precise ozonation method, an excellent yield of approximately 10%, short reaction times of 2 h, and reusability due to its recyclability.

  4. Aging Thermal Treatment in the Inconel 725 Brazed Incorporating Tungsten Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Hdz-García

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractures in blade sections of Inconel 725 were impregnated with tungsten nanoparticles and jointed by the brazing process. In order to evaluate their effect over the microstructure, aging thermal treatments at 750°C for 2, 6, 10, and 14 h were done. BNi-9 was selected as brazing filler metal and was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray fluorescence. Before brazing, the fractures were impregnated with a mixture of tungsten NPs in ethanol. Measurements of Vickers microhardness showed an increase in the melting zone of samples with aging thermal treatment for 14 h, which is attributed to the precipitation of the γ′ phase with a typical size of ca. 100 nm. Likewise, the tungsten NPs modified the size and morphology of Cr-Ni eutectics into finer and uniformly distributed microstructures.

  5. Overview of processing technologies for tungsten-steel composites and FGMs for fusion applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matějíček Jiří

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten is a prime candidate material for the plasma-facing components in future fusion devices, e.g. ITER and DEMO. Because of the harsh and complex loading conditions and the differences in material properties, joining of the tungsten armor to the underlying construction and/or cooling parts is a complicated issue. To alleviate the thermal stresses at the joint, a sharp interface may be replaced by a gradual one with a smoothly varying composition. In this paper, several techniques for the formation of tungsten-steel composites and graded layers are reviewed. These include plasma spraying, laser cladding, hot pressing and spark plasma sintering. Structure, composition and selected thermal and mechanical properties of representative layers produced by each of these techniques are presented. A summary of advantages and disadvantages of the techniques and an assessment of their suitability for the production of plasma-facing components is provided.

  6. Heat load and deuterium plasma effects on SPS and WSP tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilémová Monika

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten is a prime choice for armor material in future nuclear fusion devices. For the realization of fusion, it is necessary to address issues related to the plasma–armor interactions. In this work, several types of tungsten material were studied, i.e. tungsten prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS and by water stabilized plasma spraying (WSP technique. An intended surface porosity was created in the samples to model hydrogen/helium bubbles. The samples were subjected to a laser heat loading and a radiation loading of deuterium plasma to simulate edge plasma conditions of a nuclear fusion device (power density of 108 W/cm2 and 107 W/cm2, respectively, in the pulse intervals up to 200 ns. Thermally induced changes in the morphology and the damage to the studied surfaces are described. Possible consequences for the fusion device operation are pointed out.

  7. Raman scattering from rapid thermally annealed tungsten silicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Samhita; Jackson, Howard E.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1987-01-01

    Raman scattering as a technique for studying the formation of tungsten silicide is presented. The tungsten silicide films have been formed by rapid thermal annealing of thin tungsten films sputter deposited on silicon substrates. The Raman data are interpreted by using data from resistivity measurements, Auger and Rutherford backscattering measurements, and scanning electron microscopy.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  9. Determination of elastic modulus and residual stress of plasma-sprayed tungsten coating on steel substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, J.H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmann Street 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: jeong-ha.you@ipp.mpg.de; Hoeschen, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmann Street 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lindig, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmann Street 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed tungsten, which is a candidate material for the first wall armour, shows a porous, heterogeneous microstructure. Due to its characteristic morphology, the properties are significantly different from those of its dense bulk material. Measurements of the elastic modulus of this coating have not been reported in the literature. In this work Young's modulus of highly porous plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings deposited on steel (F82H) substrates was measured. For the fabrication of the coating system the vacuum plasma-spray process was applied. Measurements were performed by means of three-point and four-point bending tests. The obtained modulus values ranged from 53 to 57 GPa. These values could be confirmed by the test result of a detached coating strip, which was 54 GPa. The applied methods produced consistent results regardless of testing configurations and specimen sizes. The errors were less than 1%. Residual stress of the coating was also estimated.

  10. Determination of elastic modulus and residual stress of plasma-sprayed tungsten coating on steel substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J. H.; Höschen, T.; Lindig, S.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed tungsten, which is a candidate material for the first wall armour, shows a porous, heterogeneous microstructure. Due to its characteristic morphology, the properties are significantly different from those of its dense bulk material. Measurements of the elastic modulus of this coating have not been reported in the literature. In this work Young's modulus of highly porous plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings deposited on steel (F82H) substrates was measured. For the fabrication of the coating system the vacuum plasma-spray process was applied. Measurements were performed by means of three-point and four-point bending tests. The obtained modulus values ranged from 53 to 57 GPa. These values could be confirmed by the test result of a detached coating strip, which was 54 GPa. The applied methods produced consistent results regardless of testing configurations and specimen sizes. The errors were less than 1%. Residual stress of the coating was also estimated.

  11. Investigation of the Phase Composition of Samples Sintered from Tungsten-containing Composite Micro - and Nanopowders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Ageev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Presents the results of research of phase composition of samples sintered from tungsten-containing composite micro- and nano-powders obtained by mixing a powder VK8 (70 % and PRS powder (30 % obtained in kerosene lighting. It is established that the main phase of the sintered sample are the WC and Fe3С.

  12. Construction of Tungsten Halogen, Pulsed LED, and Combined Tungsten Halogen-LED Solar Simulators for Solar Cell I-V Characterization and Electrical Parameters Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anon Namin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available I-V characterization of solar cells is generally done under natural sunlight or solar simulators operating in either a continuous mode or a pulse mode. Simulators are classified on three features of irradiance, namely, spectral match with respect to air mass 1.5, spatial uniformity, and temporal stability. Commercial solar simulators use Xenon lamps and halogen lamps, whereas LED-based solar simulators are being developed. In this work, we build and test seven simulators for solar cell characterization, namely, one tungsten halogen simulator, four monochromatic (red, green, blue, and white LED simulators, one multicolor LED simulator, and one tungsten halogen-blue LED simulator. The seven simulators provide testing at nonstandard test condition. High irradiance from simulators is obtained by employing elevated supply voltage to tungsten halogen lamps and high pulsing voltages to LEDs. This new approach leads to higher irradiance not previously obtained from tungsten halogen lamps and LEDs. From I-V curves, electrical parameters of solar cell are made and corrected based on methods recommended in the IEC 60891 Standards. Corrected values obtained from non-STC measurements are in good agreement with those obtained from Class AAA solar simulator.

  13. Thermal cycling and high power density hydrogen ion beam irradiation of tungsten layers on tungsten substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Gretskaya, I. Yu; Grunin, A. V.; Dyachenko, M. Yu; Puntakov, N. A.; Sadovskiy, Ya A.

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten layers with iron impurity were deposited on tungsten substrates modeling re-deposited layers in a fusion device. The samples were tested by thermocycling and hydrogen ion beam tests. Thermocycling revealed globule formation on the surface. The size of the globules depended on iron impurity content in the coating deposited. Pore formation was observed which in some cases lead to exfoliation of the coatings. Hydrogen ion irradiation lead to formation of blisters on the coating and finally its exfoliation.

  14. Aluminum-tungsten fiber composites with cylindrical geometry and controlled architecture of tungsten reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Lucchese, Carl Joesph

    2010-01-01

    A aluminum matrix-W rod/wire structural material in support of DARPA initiative BAA 08-23 was developed and its density and mechanical strength ascertained, both being part of the DARPA matrices. Aluminum tubes and four 90 degree cross-ply tungsten fiber layers were arranged such that under extreme static pressure conditions the aluminum would viscoplastically flow into the tungsten arrangement to create a metal matrix composite. It was found that a cold isostatic process induced "Brazilian" ...

  15. A Study of Scandia Doped Tungsten Nano-Powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Scandia and rhenium doped tungsten powders were prepared by solid-liquid doping combined with two-step reduction method. The particle size of doped tungsten and distribution of scandia and rhenium were studied by SEM, EDS, XRD and granularity analysis. Experimental results showed that scandia distributed evenly on the surface of tungsten particles. Addition of scandia and rhenium decreased the particle size of doped tungsten, and the more the content of scandia and rhenium, the smaller the doped tungsten particles. Tungsten powders doped with 3% Sc2O3 and 3% Re (mass fraction) had an average size of about 80 nm in diameter. The mechanism of the decrease in the tungsten particle size was discussed.

  16. Visible light photoinactivation of bacteria by tungsten oxide nanostructures formed on a tungsten foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasempour, Fariba; Azimirad, Rouhollah; Amini, Abbas; Akhavan, Omid

    2015-05-01

    Antibacterial activity of tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods were studied against Escherichia coli bacteria under visible light irradiation and in dark. A two-step annealing process at temperatures up to 390 °C and 400-800 °C was applied to synthesize the tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods on tungsten foils using KOH as a catalyst. Annealing the foils at 400 °C in the presence of catalyst resulted in formation of tungsten oxide nanorods (with diameters of 50-90 nm and crystalline phase of WO3) on surface of tungsten foils. By increasing the annealing temperature up to 800 °C, tungsten oxide microrods with K2W6O19 crystalline phase were formed on the foils. The WO3 nanorods showed a strong antibacterial property under visible light irradiation, corresponding to >92% bacterial inactivation within 24 h irradiation at room temperature, while the K2W6O19 microrods formed at 800 °C could inactivate only ∼45% of the bacteria at the same conditions.

  17. Deuterium implantation into tungsten at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas; Balden, Martin; Schmid, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    To study the interaction of hydrogen isotopes with tungsten many experiments are conducted in linear plasma devices, which provide high enough hydrogen fluxes to supersaturate the tungsten sample and create defects such as blister. Here an alternative approach is presented. Instead of achieving a high deuterium concentration via high flux exposure, the sample temperature is reduced and the implantation energy of deuterium into tungsten is increased. The lower temperature associated with a reduction in diffusivity as well as the deeper implantation of deuterium lead to an increase of deuterium concentration within the implantation zone. Deuterium is stepwise implanted into polycrystalline tungsten up to a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 22} D/m{sup 2} with an energy of 3.0 keV/D at a sample temperature of 134 K. The retained deuterium is measured in-situ by nuclear reaction analysis. For low fluence approximately 100 % of the implanted deuterium is retained, while for higher fluence the retention saturates. Close to the surface deuterium concentrations up to 64 % are reached. This leads to massive grain orientation dependent blistering with blister sizes between 100-1000 nm at depths between 30-150 nm. Besides the characterization of the blisters their influence on deuterium transport is studied.

  18. OPAL Example Segment of Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  19. Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David W.; Brown, William F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  20. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 2.64E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  1. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.7E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  2. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.85E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  3. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 2E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  4. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.3E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  5. Titanium tungsten coatings for bioelectrochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Amato, Letizia; Łopacińska, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of titanium tungsten (TiW) coatings and their applicability as components of biosensing systems. The focus is put on using TiW as an electromechanical interface layer between carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and silicon nanograss (SiNG) cell scaffolds. Cytotoxicity...

  6. Fabrication of high aspect ratio tungsten nanostructures on ultrathin c-Si membranes for extreme UV applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delachat, F; Le Drogoff, B; Constancias, C; Delprat, S; Gautier, E; Chaker, M; Margot, J

    2016-01-15

    In this work, we demonstrate a full process for fabricating high aspect ratio diffraction optics for extreme ultraviolet lithography. The transmissive optics consists in nanometer scale tungsten patterns standing on flat, ultrathin (100 nm) and highly transparent (>85% at 13.5 nm) silicon membranes (diameter of 1 mm). These tungsten patterns were achieved using an innovative pseudo-Bosch etching process based on an inductively coupled plasma ignited in a mixture of SF6 and C4F8. Circular ultra-thin Si membranes were fabricated through a state-of-the-art method using direct-bonding with thermal difference. The silicon membranes were sputter-coated with a few hundred nanometers (100-300 nm) of stress-controlled tungsten and a very thin layer of chromium. Nanoscale features were written in a thin resist layer by electron beam lithography and transferred onto tungsten by plasma etching of both the chromium hard mask and the tungsten layer. This etching process results in highly anisotropic tungsten features at room temperature. The homogeneity and the aspect ratio of the advanced pattern transfer on the membranes were characterized with scanning electron microscopy after focus ion beam milling. An aspect ratio of about 6 for 35 nm size pattern is successfully obtained on a 1 mm diameter 100 nm thick Si membrane. The whole fabrication process is fully compatible with standard industrial semiconductor technology.

  7. Wonderful Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  8. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how wall...

  9. Gas-driven permeation of deuterium through tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchenauer, Dean A., E-mail: dabuche@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Karnesky, Richard A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Fang, Zhigang Zak; Ren, Chai [University of Utah, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Oya, Yasuhisa [Shizuoka University, Graduate School of Science, Shizuoka (Japan); Otsuka, Teppei [Kyushu University, Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamauchi, Yuji [Hokkaido University, Third Division of Quantum Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Sapporo (Japan); Whaley, Josh A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We have designed and performed initial studies on a high temperature gas-driven permeation cell capable of operating at temperatures up to 1150 °C and at pressures between 0.1–1 atm. • Permeation measurements on ITER grade tungsten compare well with past studies by Frauenfelder and Zahkarov in the temperature range from 500 to 1000 °C. • First permeation measurements on Ti dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grained tungsten show higher permeation at 500 °C, but very similar permeation with ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. Diffusion along grain boundaries may be playing a role for this type of material. - Abstract: To address the transport and trapping of hydrogen isotopes, several permeation experiments are being pursued at both Sandia National Laboratories (deuterium gas-driven permeation) and Idaho National Laboratories (tritium gas- and plasma-driven tritium permeation). These experiments are in part a collaboration between the US and Japan to study the performance of tungsten at divertor relevant temperatures (PHENIX). Here we report on the development of a high temperature (≤1150 °C) gas-driven permeation cell and initial measurements of deuterium permeation in several types of tungsten: high purity tungsten foil, ITER-grade tungsten (grains oriented through the membrane), and dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grain (UFG) tungsten being developed in the US. Experiments were performed at 500–1000 °C and 0.1–1.0 atm D{sub 2} pressure. Permeation through ITER-grade tungsten was similar to earlier W experiments by Frauenfelder (1968–69) and Zaharakov (1973). Data from the UFG alloy indicates marginally higher permeability (< 10×) at lower temperatures, but the permeability converges to that of the ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. The permeation cell uses only ceramic and graphite materials in the hot zone to reduce the possibility for oxidation of the sample membrane. Sealing pressure is applied externally, thereby allowing for elevation

  10. Improved fracture behavior and microstructural characterization of thin tungsten foils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladica Nikolic

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused towards the development of the technique for investigating the fracture behaviour of 100µm thick rolled tungsten foils, with a purity of 99.97%. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD scans reveal that the grains are elongated along the rolling direction of the foil, which has a very strong {100} texture. The test specimens were fabricated by electrical discharge machining (EDM and cracks were initiated by consecutively using a diamond wire saw, a razor blade and a focused ion beam (FIB workstation. Fracture experiments were performed at temperatures from −196°C to 800°C. The investigation of fracture appearance shows an improved behavior and significantly higher values of conditional fracture toughness Kq compared to bulk W-materials, which can be related to a higher degree of deformation during the production process. A high toughness at room temperature (RT and 200°C, slowly decreases when approaching the highest testing temperature of 800°C. The most significant result reveals that the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT is around RT, which is an extraordinary result for any tungsten material. The fracture surfaces, investigated with a scanning electron microscope (SEM, show a transition from cleavage fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature, through pronounced delamination within the foil plane at ambient temperatures to ductile fracture at the highest testing temperatures.

  11. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D. [STMicroelectronics, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Influence of tungsten on the carbon nanotubes growth by CVD process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Mariano [Instituto de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia, CONICET-UBA, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina); LP and MC, Dep. De Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina)], E-mail: mescobar@qi.fcen.uba.ar; Rubiolo, Gerardo H. [LP and MC, Dep. De Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina); Unidad de Actividad Materiales, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (1650), Bs As (Argentina); Moreno, M. Sergio [Centro Atomico Bariloche, (8400) S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Goyanes, Silvia [LP and MC, Dep. De Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina); Candal, Roberto [Instituto de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia, CONICET-UBA, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina)

    2009-06-24

    The effect of tungsten (W) on the growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process over a metal Fe-W catalyst incorporated into a silica matrix is reported. A W molar content in Fe/SiO{sub 2} up to 10% was studied. The incorporation of only 2% of W substantially modifies the crystalline phases and the crystalline degree of the catalyst during the MWNTs synthesis. This fact seems to have a strong influence on the type and yield of the carbonaceous species obtained by the CVD of acetylene, at 600 deg. C and 180 Torr, over each catalyst. Tungsten interacts with iron within the matrix, diminishing the catalytic activity of the metal nanoparticles, and both, carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers, are obtained when tungsten is present. The results obtained support the hypothesis of a base growth model for carbon nanotubes indicating a strong interaction between silica matrix and Fe/W nanoparticles, independently of the content of W.

  13. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo hybrid simulation for fuzzy tungsten nanostructure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, A. M.; Takayama, A.; Oda, Y.; Tamura, T.; Kobayashi, R.; Hattori, T.; Ogata, S.; Ohno, N.; Kajita, S.; Yajima, M.; Noiri, Y.; Yoshimoto, Y.; Saito, S.; Takamura, S.; Murashima, T.; Miyamoto, M.; Nakamura, H.

    2015-07-01

    For the purposes of long-term use of tungsten divertor walls, the formation process of the fuzzy tungsten nanostructure induced by exposure to the helium plasma was studied. In the present paper, the fuzzy nanostructure's formation has been successfully reproduced by the new hybrid simulation method in which the deformation of the tungsten material due to pressure of the helium bubbles was simulated by the molecular dynamics and the diffusion of the helium atoms was simulated by the random walk based on the Monte Carlo method. By the simulation results, the surface height of the fuzzy nanostructure increased only when helium retention was under the steady state. It was proven that the growth of the fuzzy nanostructure was brought about by bursting of the helium bubbles. Moreover, we suggest the following key formation mechanisms of the fuzzy nanostructure: (1) lifting in which the surface lifted up by the helium bubble changes into a convexity, (2) bursting by which the region of the helium bubble changes into a concavity, and (3) the difference of the probability of helium retention by which the helium bubbles tend to appear under the concavity. Consequently, the convex-concave surface structure was enhanced and grew to create the fuzzy nanostructure.

  14. Study of the temperature dependent nitrogen retention in tungsten surfaces by XPS-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plank, Ulrike [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fakultaet fuer Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Schellingstrasse 4, D-80799 Muenchen (Germany); Meisl, Gerd; Hoeschen, Till [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    To reduce the power load on the divertor of fusion experiments, nitrogen (N) is puffed into the plasma. As a side effect, nitrogen gets implanted into the tungsten (W) walls of the reactor and forms nitride layers. Their formation and, therefore, the N accumulation in W showed an unexpected temperature dependence in previous experiments. To study the nitrogen retention, we implanted N ions with an energy of 300 eV into W and observed the evolution of the surface composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We find that the N content does not change when the sample is annealed up to 800 K after implantation at lower temperatures. In contrast, the N concentration decreases with increasing implantation temperature. At 800 K implantation temperature, the N saturation level is about 5 times lower compared to 300 K implantation. A possible explanation for this difference is an enhanced diffusion during ion bombardment due to changes in the structure or in the chemical state of the tungsten nitride system. Ongoing tungsten nitride erosion experiments shall help to clarify whether the strong temperature dependence is the result of enhanced diffusion or of phase changes.

  15. Numerical simulation and experiment on split tungsten carbide cylinder of high pressure apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfei; Li, Mingzhe; Liu, Zhiwei; Wang, Bolong

    2015-12-01

    A new high pressure device with a split cylinder was investigated on the basis of the belt-type apparatus. The belt-type die is subjected to excessive tangential tensile stress and the tungsten carbide cylinder is easily damaged in the running process. Taking into account the operating conditions and material properties of the tungsten carbide cylinder, it is divided into 6 blocks to eliminate the tangential tensile stress. We studied two forms of the split type: radial split and tangential split. Simulation results indicate that the split cylinder has more uniform stress distribution and smaller equivalent stress compared with the belt-type cylinder. The inner wall of the tangential split cylinder is in the situation that compressive stress is distributed in the axial, radial, and tangential directions. It is similar to the condition of hydrostatic pressure, and it is the best condition for tungsten carbide materials. The experimental results also verify that the tangential split die can bear the highest chamber pressure. Therefore, the tangential split structure can increase the pressure bearing capacity significantly.

  16. Chamber wall materials response to pulsed ions at power-plant level fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renk, T. J.; Provencio, P. P.; Tanaka, T. J.; Olson, C. L.; Peterson, R. R.; Stolp, J. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Knowles, T. R.

    2005-12-01

    Candidate dry-wall materials for the reactor chambers of future laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plants have been exposed to ion pulses from RHEPP-1, located at Sandia National Laboratories. These pulses simulate the MeV-level ion pulses with fluences of up to 20 J/cm 2 that can be expected to impinge on the first wall of such future plants. Various forms of tungsten and tungsten alloy were subjected to up to 1600 pulses, usually while being heated to 600 °C. Other metals were exposed as well. Thresholds for roughening and material removal, and evolution of surface morphology were measured and compared with code predictions for materials response. Powder-metallurgy (PM) tungsten is observed to undergo surface roughening and subsurface crack formation that evolves over hundreds of pulses, and which can occur both below and above the melt threshold. This roughening is worse than for other metals, and worse than for either tungsten alloyed with rhenium (W25Re), or for CVD and single-crystal forms of tungsten. Carbon, particularly the form used in composite material, appears to suffer material loss well below its sublimation point. Some engineered materials were also investigated. It appears that some modification to PM tungsten is required for its successful use in a reactor environment.

  17. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  18. Femtosecond fiber laser additive manufacturing of tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian; Yang, Pei; Zhai, Meiyu; Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is promising to produce complex shaped components, including metals and alloys, to meet requirements from different industries such as aerospace, defense and biomedicines. Current laser AM uses CW lasers and very few publications have been reported for using pulsed lasers (esp. ultrafast lasers). In this paper, additive manufacturing of Tungsten materials is investigated by using femtosecond (fs) fiber lasers. Various processing conditions are studied, which leads to desired characteristics in terms of morphology, porosity, hardness, microstructural and mechanical properties of the processed components. Fully dense Tungsten part with refined grain and increased hardness was obtained and compared with parts made with different pulse widths and CW laser. The results are evidenced that the fs laser based AM provides more dimensions to modify mechanical properties with controlled heating, rapid melting and cooling rates compared with a CW or long pulsed laser. This can greatly benefit to the make of complicated structures and materials that could not be achieved before.

  19. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  20. Epitaxial growth of tungsten nanoparticles on alumina and spinel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Suarez, T; Lopez-Esteban, S; Pecharroman, C; Esteban-Cubillo, A; Moya, J S [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), C/ Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Diaz, L A; Torrecillas, R [Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Research Center (CINN), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), C/ Francisco Pintado Fe 26, 33011, Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Gremillard, L [Universite de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, 20 avenue Albert Einstein, Villeurbanne F-69621 (France)], E-mail: jsmoya@icmm.csic.es

    2008-05-28

    Isolated tungsten nanoparticles ({alpha}-W and {beta}-W phase) were synthesized and epitaxially grown on alumina and spinel particle surfaces with an average tungsten size of {<=}20 nm for a low tungsten content (of {<=}1.5 vol%). Using tungsten (VI) ethoxide alcoholic solutions, tungsten trioxide hydrated precursors were attached to a ceramic grains surface as a nanoparticle coating. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) micrographs showed epitaxial interfaces between alumina, spinel and metallic tungsten. This epitaxial growth is assumed to be due to the effect of water vapour on the sublimation of ortho-tungstic acid during the reduction process in a hydrogen atmosphere. The planes involved in the epitaxy were found to be (22-bar 0){sub Al2O3} parallel (121){sub W} and (311){sub MgAl2O4} parallel (110){sub W}.

  1. Synthesis and electrical characterization of tungsten oxide nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Rui; Zhu Jing; Yu Rong

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten oxide nanowires of diameters ranging from 7 to 200 nm are prepared on a tungsten rod substrate by using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method with vapour-solid (VS) mechanism. Tin powders are used to control oxygen concentration in the furnace, thereby assisting the growth of the tungsten oxide nanowires. The grown tungsten oxide nanowires are determined to be of crystalline W18O49. Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves are measured by an in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) to investigate the electrical properties of the nanowires. All of the Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves observed are symmetric, which reveals that the tungsten oxide nanowires are semiconducting. Quantitative analyses of the experimental I V curves by using a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) model give some intrinsic parameters of the tungsten oxide nanowires, such as the carrier concentration, the carrier mobility and the conductivity.

  2. Tungsten Speciation in Firing Range Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    thus are composed of single minerals. Iron minerals used in fitting included ferrihydrite, hematite , goethite, biotite, hornblende, and pyrite, which...tungstate adsorbing on ferrihy- drite. Ferrihydrite was selected for these tests as earlier X-ray microprobe studies indicated that this was the primary ...Camp Edwards soil profile 31T as a function of depth. The spectra all indicate that the primary coordination sphere of tungsten is dominated by

  3. Tungsten Ions in Plasmas: Statistical Theory of Radiative-Collisional Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Demura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The statistical model for calculations of the collisional-radiative processes in plasmas with tungsten impurity was developed. The electron structure of tungsten multielectron ions is considered in terms of both the Thomas-Fermi model and the Brandt-Lundquist model of collective oscillations of atomic electron density. The excitation or ionization of atomic electrons by plasma electron impacts are represented as photo-processes under the action of flux of equivalent photons introduced by E. Fermi. The total electron impact single ionization cross-sections of ions Wk+ with respective rates have been calculated and compared with the available experimental and modeling data (e.g., CADW. Plasma radiative losses on tungsten impurity were also calculated in a wide range of electron temperatures 1 eV–20 keV. The numerical code TFATOM was developed for calculations of radiative-collisional processes involving tungsten ions. The needed computational resources for TFATOM code are orders of magnitudes less than for the other conventional numerical codes. The transition from corona to Boltzmann limit was investigated in detail. The results of statistical approach have been tested by comparison with the vast experimental and conventional code data for a set of ions Wk+. It is shown that the universal statistical model accuracy for the ionization cross-sections and radiation losses is within the data scattering of significantly more complex quantum numerical codes, using different approximations for the calculation of atomic structure and the electronic cross-sections.

  4. The WEST project: Current status of the ITER-like tungsten divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missirlian, M., E-mail: marc.missirlian@cea.fr; Bucalossi, J.; Corre, Y.; Ferlay, F.; Firdaouss, M.; Garin, P.; Grosman, A.; Guilhem, D.; Gunn, J.; Languille, P.; Lipa, M.; Richou, M.; Tsitrone, E.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We presented the ITER-like W components occurred for the WEST divertor. • The main features including key elements of the design were detailed. • The main results of studies investigating the integration constraints or issues were reported. • The WEST ITER-like divertor design reached a mature stage to enable the launching of the procurement phase. - Abstract: The WEST (W – for tungsten – Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) project is an upgrade of Tore Supra from a limiter based tokamak with carbon PFCs into an X-point divertor tokamak with full-tungsten armour while keeping its long discharge capability. The WEST project will primarily offer the key capability of testing for the first time the ITER technology in real plasma environment. In particular, the main divertor (i.e. the lower divertor) of the WEST project will be based on actively cooled tungsten monoblock components and will follow as closely as possible the design and the assembling technology, foreseen for the ITER divertor units. The current design of WEST ITER-like tungsten divertor has now reached a mature stage following the 2013 WEST Final Design Review. This paper presents the key elements of the design, reports the technological requirements and reviews the main design and integration issues.

  5. Effect of composition on the high rate dynamic behaviour of tungsten heavy alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Kesemen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten heavy alloys are currently used as kinetic energy penetrators in military applications due to their high density and superior mechanical properties. In the literature, quasi-static properties of different tungsten heavy alloys based on W-Ni-Cu and W-Ni-Fe ternary systems are well documented and presented. However, comparison of the dynamic behaviour of these alloys in terms of the correlation between quasi-static mechanical characterization and dynamical properties is lacking. In the present study, dynamic properties of tungsten heavy alloys having different binder phase compositions (90W-7Ni-3Cu and 90W-8Ni-2Fe at different projectile velocities were investigated. The examined and tested alloys were produced through the conventional powder metallurgy route of mixing, cold compaction and sintering. Mechanical characterization of these alloys was performed. In the ballistic tests, cylindrical tungsten heavy alloys with L/D ratio of 3 were impacted to hardened steel target at different projectile velocities. After the ballistic tests, deformation characteristics of test specimens during dynamic loading were evaluated by comparing the change of length and diameter of the specimens versus kinetic energy densities. The study concluded that 90W-8Ni-2Fe alloy has better perforation characteristics than 90W-7Ni-3Cu alloy.

  6. Controlled nanostructuration of polycrystalline tungsten thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, B. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Institut de Recherche en Genie Civil et Mecanique (UMR CNRS 6183), LUNAM Universite, Universite de Nantes, Centrale Nantes, CRTT, 37 Bd de l' Universite, BP 406, 44602 Saint-Nazaire Cedex (France); Eyidi, D.; Goudeau, P.; Guerin, P.; Bourhis, E. Le; Renault, P.-O. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Sauvage, T. [CEMHTI/CNRS (UPR 3079 CNRS), Universite d' Orleans, 3A rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-05-07

    Nanostructured tungsten thin films have been obtained by ion beam sputtering technique stopping periodically the growing. The total thickness was maintained constant while nanostructure control was obtained using different stopping periods in order to induce film stratification. The effect of tungsten sublayers' thicknesses on film composition, residual stresses, and crystalline texture evolution has been established. Our study reveals that tungsten crystallizes in both stable {alpha}- and metastable {beta}-phases and that volume proportions evolve with deposited sublayers' thicknesses. {alpha}-W phase shows original fiber texture development with two major preferential crystallographic orientations, namely, {alpha}-W<110> and unexpectedly {alpha}-W<111> texture components. The partial pressure of oxygen and presence of carbon have been identified as critical parameters for the growth of metastable {beta}-W phase. Moreover, the texture development of {alpha}-W phase with two texture components is shown to be the result of a competition between crystallographic planes energy minimization and crystallographic orientation channeling effect maximization. Controlled grain size can be achieved for the {alpha}-W phase structure over 3 nm stratification step. Below, the {beta}-W phase structure becomes predominant.

  7. The microstructure of chromium-tungsten steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueh, R. L.; Maziasz, P. J.

    1989-03-01

    Chromium-tungsten steels are being developed to replace the Cr-Mo steels for fusion-reactor applications. Eight experimental steels were produced and examined by optical and electron microscopy. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9 and 12 pct were used. Steels with these chromium compositions and with 2 pct W and 0.25 pct V were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, three other 2.25Cr steels were produced as follows: an alloy with 2 pct W and 0 pct V and alloys with 0 and 1 pct W and 0.25 pct V. A 9Cr steel containing 2 pct W, 0.25 pct V, and 0.07 pct Ta also was studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1 pct. Two pct tungsten was required in the 2.25Cr steels to produce 100 pct bainite (no polygonal ferrite). The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100 pct martensite, but the 12Cr steel contained about 25 pct delta-ferrite. Precipitate morphology and precipitate types varied, depending on the chromium content. For the 2.25Cr steels, M3C and M7C3 were the primary precipitates; for the 9Cr and 12Cr steels, M23C6 was the primary precipitate. The 5Cr steel contained M7C3 and M23C6. All of the steels with vanadium also contained MC.

  8. Defect and electrical properties of nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xin-Sheng; Wang Yu; Dong Liang; Qi Li-Zhen; Zhang Feng

    2004-01-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide particles were prepared by a wet-chemical method. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis shows that the average grain size is about 15nm. The oxygen deficiency of nanometre-sized sample is higher than that of ordinary tungsten trioxide. The electric conductivity increases because of high oxygen deficiency. Ironic relaxation polarization and crystallographic shear (CS) planes theory were used to explain the unusual dielectric characteristic of nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide.

  9. Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten-bearing Alloys and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS-6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-14-73 Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten ...Technology, Boise State University, Army Research Laboratory Project Title: Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten -bearing Alloys and Composites...strength, we made them better suited to study the mechanical alloying of tungsten -transition metal couples in which interdiffusion during mechanical

  10. The Tungsten Demand and Supply Situation in Recent Years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>Tungsten is an important and valuable resource listed by the State as a kind of special minerals under the State protection. By the end of 2005, China had 310 tungsten mining areas with the total tungsten deposit amounting to 5.69 million tons. Among the total deposit, wolframite accounts for approximately 20.8 per cent and scheelite accounts for about 70 per cent with

  11. Chemical vapour deposition of tungsten and tungsten silicide layers for applications in novel silicon technology

    CERN Document Server

    Li, F X

    2002-01-01

    This work was a detailed investigation into the Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) of tungsten and tungsten silicide for potential applications in integrated circuit (IC) and other microelectronic devices. These materials may find novel applications in contact schemes for transistors in advanced ICs, buried high conductivity layers in novel Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology and in power electronic devices. The CVD techniques developed may also be used for metal coating of recessed or enclosed features which may occur in novel electronic or electromechanical devices. CVD of tungsten was investigated using the silicon reduction reaction of WF sub 6. W layers with an optimum self-limiting thickness of 100 nm and resistivity 20 mu OMEGA centre dot cm were produced self-aligned to silicon. A hydrogen passivation technique was developed as part of the wafer pre-clean schedule and proved essential in achieving optimum layer thickness. Layers produced by this approach are ideal for intimate contact to shallow junct...

  12. Tungsten-induced carcinogenesis in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulicht, Freda; Brocato, Jason; Cartularo, Laura; Vaughan, Joshua; Wu, Feng; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Oksuz, Betul Akgol; Shen, Steven; Paena, Massimilano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    Metals such as arsenic, cadmium, beryllium, and nickel are known human carcinogens; however, other transition metals, such as tungsten (W), remain relatively uninvestigated with regard to their potential carcinogenic activity. Tungsten production for industrial and military applications has almost doubled over the past decade and continues to increase. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate tungsten’s ability to induce carcinogenic related endpoints including cell transformation, increased migration, xenograft growth in nude mice, and the activation of multiple cancer related pathways in transformed clones as determined by RNA seq. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) exposed to tungsten developed carcinogenic properties. In a soft agar assay, tungsten-treated cells formed more colonies than controls and the tungsten-transformed clones formed tumors in nude mice. RNA-sequencing data revealed that the tungsten-transformed clones altered the expression of many cancer-associated genes when compared to control clones. Genes involved in lung cancer, leukemia, and general cancer genes were deregulated by tungsten. Taken together, our data shows the carcinogenic potential of tungsten. Further tests are needed, including in vivo and human studies, in order to validate tungsten as a carcinogen to humans. PMID:26164860

  13. Toxicologic evaluation of tungsten: 28-day inhalation study of tungsten blue oxide in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Narayanan; Hu, Shu-Chieh; Sullivan, Dennis; Muzzio, Miguel; Detrisac, Carol J; Venezia, Carmen

    2012-12-01

    The toxicity and toxicokinetics of tungsten blue oxide (TBO) were examined. TBO is an intermediate in the production of tungsten powder, and has shown the potential to cause cellular damage in in vitro studies. However, in vivo evidence seems to indicate a lack of adverse effects. The present study was undertaken to address the dearth of longer-term inhalation toxicity studies of tungsten oxides by investigating the biological responses induced by TBO when administered via nose-only inhalation to rats at levels of 0.08, 0.325, and 0.65 mg TBO/L of air for 6 h/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day recovery period. Inhaled TBO was absorbed systemically and blood levels of tungsten increased as inhaled concentration increased. Among the tissues analyzed for tungsten levels, lung, femur and kidney showed increased levels, with lung at least an order of magnitude greater than kidney or femur. By exposure day 14, tungsten concentration in tissues had reached steady-state. Increased lung weight was noted for both terminal and recovery animals and was attributed to deposition of TBO in the lungs, inducing a macrophage influx. Microscopic evaluation of tissues revealed a dose-related increase in alveolar pigmented macrophages, alveolar foreign material and individual alveolar foamy macrophages in lung. After a recovery period there was a slight reduction in the incidence and severity of histopathological findings. Based on the absence of other adverse effects, the increased lung weights and the microscopic findings were interpreted as nonadverse response to exposure and were not considered a specific reaction to TBO.

  14. Results of high heat flux tests and structural analysis of the new solid tungsten divertor tile for ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaksic, Nikola, E-mail: nikola.jaksic@ipp.mpg.de; Greuner, Henri; Herrmann, Albrecht; Böswirth, Bernd; Vorbrugg, Stefan

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The main motivation for the HHF investigation of tungsten tiles was an untypical deformation of some specimens under thermal loading, observed during the previous tests in GLADIS test facility. • A nonlinear finite element (FE) model for simulations of the GLADIS tests has been built. • The unexpected plastic deformations are mainly caused by internal stresses due to the manufacturing process. The small discrepancies among the FEA investigated and measured plastic deformations are most likely caused, beside of the practical difficulties by measuring of low items, also by tile internal stresses. • The influences of the residual stresses caused by special production processes have to be taken into account by design of the structural part made of solid tungsten. - Abstract: Tungsten as plasma-facing material for fusion devices is currently the most favorable candidate. In general solid tungsten is used for shielding the plasma chamber interior against the high heat generated from the plasma. For the purposes of implementation at ASDEX Upgrade and as a contribution to ITER the thermal performance of tungsten tiles has been extensively tested in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS during the development phase and beyond. These tests have been performed on full scale tungsten tile prototypes including their clamping and cooling structure. Simulating the adiabatically thermal loading due to plasma operation in ASDEX Upgrade, the tungsten tiles have been subjected to a thermal load with central heat flux of 10–24 MW/m{sup 2} and absorbed energy between 370 and 680 kJ. This loading results in maximum surface temperatures between 1300 °C and 2800 °C. The tests in GLADIS have been accompanied by intensive numerical investigations using FEA methods. For this purpose a multiple nonlinear finite element model has been set up. This paper discusses the main results of the high heat flux final tests and their numerical simulation. Moreover, first

  15. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Buzhinskiy, O. I. [State Research Center Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation); Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400–1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  16. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinskiy, O. I.; Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400-1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  17. Radiative Recombination and Photoionization Data for Tungsten Ions. Electron Structure of Ions in Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malvina B. Trzhaskovskaya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical studies of tungsten ions in plasmas are presented. New calculations of the radiative recombination and photoionization cross-sections, as well as radiative recombination and radiated power loss rate coefficients have been performed for 54 tungsten ions for the range W6+–W71+. The data are of importance for fusion investigations at the reactor ITER, as well as devices ASDEX Upgrade and EBIT. Calculations are fully relativistic. Electron wave functions are found by the Dirac–Fock method with proper consideration of the electron exchange. All significant multipoles of the radiative field are taken into account. The radiative recombination rates and the radiated power loss rates are determined provided the continuum electron velocity is described by the relativistic Maxwell–Jüttner distribution. The impact of the core electron polarization on the radiative recombination cross-section is estimated for the Ne-like iron ion and for highly-charged tungsten ions within an analytical approximation using the Dirac–Fock electron wave functions. The effect is shown to enhance the radiative recombination cross-sections by ≲20%. The enhancement depends on the photon energy, the principal quantum number of polarized shells and the ion charge. The influence of plasma temperature and density on the electron structure of ions in local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas is investigated. Results for the iron and uranium ions in dense plasmas are in good agreement with previous calculations. New calculations were performed for the tungsten ion in dense plasmas on the basis of the average-atom model, as well as for the impurity tungsten ion in fusion plasmas using the non-linear self-consistent field screening model. The temperature and density dependence of the ion charge, level energies and populations are considered.

  18. Dynamical domain wall and localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Toyozato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the previous works (Toyozato et al., 2013 [24]; Higuchi and Nojiri, 2014 [25], we investigate the localization of the fields on the dynamical domain wall, where the four-dimensional FRW universe is realized on the domain wall in the five-dimensional space–time. Especially we show that the chiral spinor can localize on the domain wall, which has not been succeeded in the past works as the seminal work in George et al. (2009 [23].

  19. Design, manufacture and initial operation of the beryllium components of the JET ITER-like wall

    CERN Document Server

    Riccardo, V; Matthews, G F; Nunes, I; Thompson, V; Villedieu, E; Contributors, JET EFDA

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the JET ITER-like Wall Project was to provide JET with the plasma facing material combination now selected for the DT phase of ITER (bulk beryllium main chamber limiters and a full tungsten divertor) and, in conjunction with the upgraded neutral beam heating system, to achieve ITER relevant conditions. The design of the bulk Be plasma facing components had to be compatible with increased heating power and pulse length, as well as to reuse the existing tile supports originally designed to cope with disruption loads from carbon based tiles and be installed by remote handling. Risk reduction measures (prototypes, jigs, etc) were implemented to maximize efficiency during the shutdown. However, a large number of clashes with existing components not fully captured by the configuration model occurred. Restarting the plasma on the ITER-like Wall proved much easier than for the carbon wall and no deconditioning by disruptions was observed. Disruptions have been more threatening than expected due to the redu...

  20. Wall Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  1. Investigation on the formation of tungsten carbide in tungsten-containing diamond like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strondl, C.; Carvalho, N.M.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Kolk, G.J. van der

    2003-01-01

    A series of tungsten-containing diamond-like carbon (Me-DLC) coatings have been produced by unbalanced magnetron sputtering using a Hauzer HTC-1000 production PVD system. Sputtering from WC targets has been used to form W-C:H coatings. The metal to carbon ratio has been varied to study changes in th

  2. Influence of Wall Material on VUV Emission from Hydrogen Plasma in H- Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacal, M.; Glass-Maujean, M.; Ivanov, A. A., Jr; Nishiura, M.; Sasao, M.; Wada, M.

    2002-11-01

    The study of VUV emission from a hydrogen plasma produced in a filament discharge in a magnetic multicusp device showed that the use of tantalum and tungsten filaments leads to significant differences in the spectra. The effect of the filament material is interpreted in terms of the fresh film of this material, deposited on the wall. The synthetic spectrum convoluted with our apparatus function for the conditions of this experiment (gas temperature 500 K, electron energy 100 eV) agrees roughly well with the spectrum obtained with tungsten covered walls, but not with the spectrum obtained with tantalum covered walls. We show that in the case of tungsten covered walls the E-V singlet excitation is indeed a two-step Franck-Condon transition, going through either B or C state from an initial H2 molecule with v"=0, added to a Franck-Condon transition to highly excited states cascading to the B or C states. The excitation process to high v" states in the case of tantalum covered walls is a three step process, in which the first step is the formation by recombinative desorption on the wall of a vibrationally excited molecule with v"=1 or 2, which serves as the initial molecule in the subsequent E-V excitation through the B state. The results indicate a larger recombination coefficient of atoms on the tantalum covered wall.

  3. Stress in tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon (WC-DLC) multilayer coatings have been prepared by sputter deposition from a tungsten-carbide target and periodic switching on and off of the reactive acetylene gas flow. The stress in the resulting WC-DLC multilayers has been studied by substrate curvature. Peri

  4. Preparation and Electrocatalytic Activity of Tungsten Carbide Nanorod Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    High density tungsten carbide nanorod arrays have been prepared by magnetron sputtering (MS) using the aluminum lattice membrane (ALM) as template. Electrocatalytic properties of nitromethane electroreduction on the tungsten carbide nanorod arrays electrode were investigated by electrochemical method, and their electrocatalytic activity is approached to that of the Pt foil electrode.

  5. High-strength tungsten alloy with improved ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, W. D.; Raffo, P. L.; Rubenstein, L. S.; Witzke, W. R.

    1967-01-01

    Alloy combines superior strength at elevated temperatures with improved ductility at lower temperatures relative to unalloyed tungsten. Composed of tungsten, rhenium, hafnium, and carbon, the alloy is prepared by consumable electrode vacuum arc-melting and can be fabricated into rod, plate, and sheet.

  6. Tungsten and other refractory metals for VLSI applications II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on tungsten and other refractory metals for VLSI applications. Topics include the following: Selectivity loss and nucleation on insulators, fundamental reaction and growth studies, chemical vapor deposition of tungsten, chemical vapor deposition of molybdenum, reactive ion etching of refractory metal films; and properties of refractory metals deposited by sputtering.

  7. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  8. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  9. Microstructure and tensile properties of tungsten at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tielong; Dai, Yong; Lee, Yongjoong

    2016-01-01

    In order to support the development of the 5 MW spallation target for the European Spallation Source, the effect of fabrication process on microstructure, ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), tensile and fracture behaviour of powder-metallurgy pure tungsten materials has been investigated. A hot-rolled (HR) tungsten piece of 12 mm thickness and a hot-forged (HF) piece of about 80 mm thickness were used to simulate the thin and thick blocks in the target. The two tungsten pieces were characterized with metallography analysis, hardness measurement and tensile testing. The HR piece exhibits an anisotropic grain structure with an average size of about 330 × 140 × 40 μm in rolling, long transverse and short transverse (thickness) directions. The HF piece possesses a bimodal grain structure with about 310 × 170 × 70 μm grain size in deformed part and about 25 μm sized grains remained from sintering process. Hardness (HV0.2) of the HR piece is slightly greater than that of the HF one. The ductility of the HR tungsten specimens is greater than that of the HF tungsten. For the HF tungsten piece, specimens with small grains in gauge section manifest lower ductility but higher strength. The DBTT evaluated from the tensile results is 250-300 °C for the HR tungsten and about 350 °C for the HF tungsten.

  10. GAMMA-RAY COMPTON SPECTROSCOPY OF TUNGSTEN USING 662 KeV GAMMA-RAY RADIATION А

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir A. Hamouda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Compton profile measurement of Tungsten polycrystalline sample has been performed with 662 KeV γ-radiation from a cesium-137 source scattered at 900. The Spectrometer calibration and data corrections for the high energy experiment are discussed. The data are compared with the augmented-plane-wave (APW band theoretical Compton profile of Tungsten. Theoretical predictions show the band theory overestimates the momentum density at low momenta and underestimates it at intermediate momenta. The discrepancies between experiment and theory were attributed to some non-local exchange-correlation effects and the spin-orbital interaction effect which were neglected in the theoretical calculation.

  11. Double phase conjugation in tungsten bronze crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, E J; Clark Iii, W W; Miller, M J; Wood, G L; Monson, B; Salamo, G J; Neurgaonkar, R R

    1990-02-20

    In this paper we report a new method for double phase conjugation particularly suited to the tungsten bronze crystal strontium barium niobate. It has also been observed to produce conjugate waves in BaTiO(3) and BSKNN. This new arrangement is called the bridge conjugator because the two beams enter opposing [100] crystal faces and fan together to form a bridge without reflection off a crystal face. Our measurements indicate that the bridge conjugator is competitive with previously reported double phase conjugate mirrors in reflectivity, response time, ease of alignment, and fidelity.

  12. Electrical properties of complex tungsten bronze ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhee, R.; Das, Piyush R.

    2014-09-01

    This paper highlights the electrical properties of two new complex tungsten bronze ceramics (K2Pb2Eu2W2Ti4Nb4O30 and K2Pb2Pr2W2Ti4Nb4O30) which were prepared by high temperature mixed oxide method. Variation of impedance parameters with temperature (27-500 °C) and frequency (1 kHz to 5 MHz) shows the grain and grain boundary effects in the samples. The variation of dielectric parameters with frequency is also studied. The ac conductivity variation with temperature clearly exhibits that the materials have thermally activated transport properties of Arrhenius type.

  13. A study on consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun; Wang Yuxin; Feng Jicai

    2009-01-01

    A consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding method has been studied. This method is different from the traditional TIG welding because it introduces an MIG welding torch into the traditional TIG welding system. An indirect arc is generated between the consumable electrode of the MIG welding torch and the tungsten electrode of the TIG welding torch, but not generated between the tungsten electrode of the welding torch and the base metal. Welding current flows from the consumable electrode to the tungsten electrode in the free-burning indirect arc. The consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding not only rapidly melts the welding wire but also effectively restrains the excessive fusion of the base metal. The welding experiment and the theoretical analysis confirm that this method can obtain a high deposition rate and a low dilution ratio during the welding process.

  14. Plasma spray forming of tungsten coatings on copper electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xian-liang(蒋显亮); F.Gitzhofer; M.I.Boulos

    2004-01-01

    Both direct current dc plasma and radio frequency induction plasma were used to deposit tungsten coatings on copper electrodes. Fine tungsten powder with mean particle size of 5μm and coarse tungsten powder with particle size in the range from 45 μm to 75 μm were used as plasma spray feedstock. It is found that dc plasma is only applicable to spray the fine tungsten powder and induction plasma can be used to spray both the coarse powder and the fine powder. The tungsten coating deposited by the induction plasma spraying of the coarse powder is extremely dense. Such a coating with an interlocking structure and an integral interface with the copper substrate demonstrates high cohesion strength and adhesion strength.

  15. Tungsten recycling in the United States in 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2011-01-01

    This report, which is one of a series of reports on metals recycling, defines and quantifies the flow of tungsten-bearing materials in the United States from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition in 2000, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap). Because of tungsten's many diverse uses, numerous types of scrap were available for recycling by a wide variety of processes. In 2000, an estimated 46 percent of U.S. tungsten supply was derived from scrap. The ratio of tungsten consumed from new scrap to that consumed from old scrap was estimated to be 20:80. Of all the tungsten in old scrap available for recycling, an estimated 66 percent was either consumed in the United States or exported to be recycled.

  16. Overview of the JET results with the ITER-like wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanelli, F.; Madsen, Jens; Naulin, Volker;

    2013-01-01

    Following the completion in May 2011 of the shutdown for the installation of the beryllium wall and the tungsten divertor, the first set of JET campaigns have addressed the investigation of the retention properties and the development of operational scenarios with the new plasma-facing materials....

  17. Heat transport in cold-wall single-wafer low pressure chemical-vapor-deposition reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasper, A.; Schmitz, J.E.J.; Holleman, J.; Verweij, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    A model is formulated to understand and predict wafer temperatures in a tungsten low pressure chemical‐vapor‐deposition (LPCVD) single‐wafer cold‐wall reactor equipped with hot plate heating. The temperature control is usually carried out on the hot plate temperature. Large differences can occur

  18. Microstructural characterization and field emission properties of tungsten oxide and titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chia-Hsiang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Su, Cherng-Yuh, E-mail: cysu@ntut.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yan-Fu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-03-01

    Tungsten oxide and titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires were synthesized by using the DC magnetron sputtering and infrared furnace annealing processes. Scanning election microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to evaluate the topography and sizes. X-ray diffraction (XRD), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were used to analyze the composition and structure. From the results of HRTEM, it was discovered that the prepared nanowires have a monoclinic single-crystal phase of W{sub 18}O{sub 49} with lattice growth along the (010) lattice plane, and the lattice spacing is 0.378 nm, which agrees with XRD and GI-XRD results. The prepared tungsten oxide and titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires have turn-on voltage of 3.06 V/μm and 1.46 V/μm respectively. They also possess superior field enhancement factors of 5103 and 10667 respectively. Their behavior thus follows the Fowler-Nordheim expression for tunneling. - Highlights: • A simple method to prepare tungsten oxide nanowires by annealing tungsten film. • High aspect ratio of the 1D titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires. • High field enhancement factor of titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires.

  19. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  20. Hydrogen in tungsten as plasma-facing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joachim; Schmid, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Materials facing plasmas in fusion experiments and future reactors are loaded with high fluxes (1020-1024 m-2 s-1) of H, D and T fuel particles at energies ranging from a few eV to keV. In this respect, the evolution of the radioactive T inventory in the first wall, the permeation of T through the armour into the coolant and the thermo-mechanical stability after long-term exposure are key parameters determining the applicability of a first wall material. Tungsten exhibits fast hydrogen diffusion, but an extremely low solubility limit. Due to the fast diffusion of hydrogen and the short ion range, most of the incident ions will quickly reach the surface and recycle into the plasma chamber. For steady-state operation the solute hydrogen for the typical fusion reactor geometry and wall conditions can reach an inventory of about 1 kg. However, in short-pulse operation typical of ITER, solute hydrogen will diffuse out after each pulse and the remaining inventory will consist of hydrogen trapped in lattice defects, such as dislocations, grain boundaries and irradiation-induced traps. In high-flux areas the hydrogen energies are too low to create displacement damage. However, under these conditions the solubility limit will be exceeded within the ion range and the formation of gas bubbles and stress-induced damage occurs. In addition, simultaneous neutron fluxes from the nuclear fusion reaction D(T,n)α will lead to damage in the materials and produce trapping sites for diffusing hydrogen atoms throughout the bulk. The formation and diffusive filling of these different traps will determine the evolution of the retained T inventory. This paper will concentrate on experimental evidence for the influence different trapping sites have on the hydrogen inventory in W as studied in ion beam experiments and low-temperature plasmas. Based on the extensive experimental data, models are validated and applied to estimate the contribution of different traps to the tritium inventory in

  1. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  2. Phase Transformations upon Doping in Tungsten Trioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wennie; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is an emerging semiconductor material, with a growing number of applications in Li-ion batteries, photocatalysis, gas sensors and electrochromic devices. As an electrochromic material, WO3 turns from transparent to blue upon doping with monovalent species. Due to it having an empty A-site in the ABO3 perovskite structure, high doping concentrations are possible through intercalation. Tungsten trioxide has been experimentally shown to transform from the ground-state monoclinic symmetry to cubic symmetry with increasing monovalent doping. We use first-principles calculations to understand this transformation. Our calculations show that the addition of electrons to the conduction band is a primary driver of the phase transformation. We quantify the energetics and structural aspects of this transformation using density functional theory, allowing us to elucidate the mechanism. Comparison with experiment, role of the dopant species, and implications of structural changes for device applications will be discussed. This work is supported by the DOE and NSF GRFP.

  3. Concentration dependent hydrogen diffusion in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren, T.; Bukonte, L.

    2016-10-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten is studied as a function of temperature, hydrogen concentration and pressure using Molecular Dynamics technique. A new analysis method to determine diffusion coefficients that accounts for the random oscillation of atoms around the equilibrium position is presented. The results indicate that the hydrogen migration barrier of 0.25 eV should be used instead of the presently recommended value of 0.39 eV. This conclusion is supported by both experiments and density functional theory calculations. Moreover, the migration volume at the saddle point for H in W is found to be positive: ΔVm ≈ 0.488 Å3, leading to a decrease in the diffusivity at high pressures. At high H concentrations, a dramatic reduction in the diffusion coefficient is observed, due to site blocking and the repulsive H-H interaction. The results of this study indicates that high flux hydrogen irradiation leads to much higher H concentrations in tungsten than expected.

  4. Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

    2005-04-01

    The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

  5. Arc erosion of full metal plasma facing components at the inner baffle region of ASDEX Upgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rohde

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available At the inner baffle of the AUG divertor massive polished inserts of tungsten and P92 steel were installed to measure the erosion by arcing. For tungsten most of the traces are less than 0.4µm deep and a similar amount of tungsten is deposited close to the traces. Few craters up to 4µm resulting in an average erosion rate of 2×1013 at cm−2s−1 are observed. The behaviour for P92 steel is quite different: most of the traces are 4µm deep, up to 80µm were observed. An average erosion rate of 400×1013 at cm−2s−1, i.e. more than a factor of hundred higher compared to tungsten, is found. Therefore, erosion by arcing has to be taken into account to determine the optimal material mix for future fusion devices.

  6. Synthesis of Tungsten Oxide Nanorod, Its Application on Textile Material, and Study of Its Functional Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Azeem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterial and its application in textiles are emerging as vast and diverse field due to enhanced functionalized characteristics. This study emphasizes the fabrication of tungsten trioxide nanostructured rods and analyzes its electrostatic and ultraviolet resistance properties. These nanorods are synthesized by hydrothermal method. Through hydrothermal method rod like nanostructures were grown on polyester fabric as it withstands curing temperature easily. The growth mechanism of the film is investigated. Electrostatic analysis of treated polyester fabric was failed but the analysis of seeded solution revealed that it has tunable transmittance modulation under different voltages and repetitive cyclic between the clear and blue states. Ultraviolet resistance of 100% seeded polyester fabric was higher than untreated fabric with respect to increasing concentration of nanorods. Results show that although the seeded solution is perfect, the conductivity of tungsten trioxide cannot be achieved on textiles.

  7. Detection of deuterium trapping sites in tungsten by thermal desorption spectroscopy and positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sato

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS of tungsten implanted with D2+ ions was performed after irradiation with 8 MeV-electrons, 5.0keV-D2+, and 6.0 MeV-Fe3+. The release peak temperatures of the TDS spectra are discussed. Positron annihilation lifetime (PAL measurements of electron-irradiated tungsten were also performed, showing that single vacancies migrate a sufficient distance to arrive at a sink or meet interstitial-type defects during annealing at 673K. A decrease in the PAL was detected for single vacancies that contain deuterium atoms. The peak temperature of deuterium release from dislocations was lower than that from single vacancies. In samples irradiated with 6.0 MeV-Fe3+, the effect of Fe contamination on deuterium trapping and the deuterium release from voids were detected. These tendencies correspond to previous works.

  8. Transition in velocity and grouping of arc spot on different nanostructured tungsten electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogyun Hwangbo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavior of arc spots was investigated in detail using a nanostructured tungsten specimen with different thicknesses of the nanostructured layer. From the observation using a fast framing camera, it was found that the velocity of the arc spots significantly altered as passing the boundary of the two layers. The changes in spot velocity and spot width were discussed theoretically using the ecton model. The fractal dimension of the arc trail evaluated by using a box-counting method was significantly changed. Also, the width of arc trail was increased with the nanostructured layer thickness. From the SEM analysis of the specimen, the amount of tungsten eroded by arcing for two different thickness cases was estimated, and the erosion rates were discussed.

  9. Mechanical and thermal properties of tungsten carbide – graphite nanoparticles nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornaus Kamil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies concerning pure tungsten carbide polycrystalline materials revealed that nanolayers of graphite located between WC grains improve its thermal properties. What is more, pressure-induced orientation of graphene nano platelets (GNP in hot pressed silicon nitride-graphene composites results in anisotropy of thermal conductivity. Aim of this study was to investigate if addition of GNP to WC will improve its thermal properties. For this purpose, tungsten carbide with 0.5–6 wt.% of GNP(12-additive underwent hot pressing. The microstructure observations performed by SEM microscopy. The anisotropy was determined via ultrasonic measurements. The following mechanical properties were evaluated: Vickers hardness, bending strength, fracture toughness KIc. The influence of GNP(12 addition on oxidation resistance and thermal conductivity was examined. It was possible to manufacture hot-pressed WC-graphene composites with oriented GNP(12 particles, however, the addition of graphene decreased both thermal and mechanical properties of the material.

  10. Characterization of an integrally wound tungsten and aluminum filament for physical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, William; Ortiz, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    As part of the effort to increase the reliability of the MMT Observatory (MMTO) 6.5m Primary Mirror Coating System, the specified filament has changed from a configuration in which the aluminum charge is hand wound around a tungsten filament to a configuration in which the aluminum is integrally wound with the tungsten at the time of filament manufacture. In the MMTO configuration, this filament consists of the three strands of tungsten wire and one strand of aluminum wire. In preparation of a full system test utilizing two hundred filaments fired simultaneously, an extensive testing program was undertaken to characterize these filaments using a four filament configuration in the MMTO small coating chamber (0.5m) and then a forty filament configuration in the University of Arizona Steward Observatory coating chamber (2m). The testing using the smaller coating chambers has shown these filaments provide very predicable coatings from test to test, and with the proper heating profile, these filaments greatly reduce the likelihood of aluminum drips. The initial filament design was modified during the course of testing by shortening the unwound filament length to closer match the aluminum load required in the MMTO coating chamber. This change increased the aluminum deposition rates without increasing the power delivered of the filament power supplies (commercial welders). Filament power levels measured at the vacuum chamber feed throughs, currents, and deposition rates from multiple coating tests, including a full system test, are presented.

  11. Full-scale fire resistance tests on load-bearing C-shape cold-formed steel wall systems%C形冷弯薄壁型钢承重组合墙体足尺耐火试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶继红; 陈伟; 尹亮

    2013-01-01

    Fire performance of Cold-Formed Steel (CFS) load-bearing walls is the key problem encountered when popularizing and applying multi-storey CFS structures in China.This paper presents a detailed experimental investigation on ten full-scale load-bearing walls with C-shape CFS frame to efficiently improve their fire performance.The influences of the type of wall panels,insulation and load levels were also investigated.The results show that:① The disadvantage of calcium silicate board is its bursting feature at high temperatures,oriented strand boards (OSB) may burn in the fire resistance tests of CFS walls,bolivian magnesium board and autoclaved lightweight concrete (ALC) board,however,exhibit excellent fire performance ; ② When non-cavity insulated CFS walls with bolivian magnesium boards as base layer and gypsum plasterboards as face layer are exposed to a fire,different load levels may result in completely different failure modes and affect the fire resistance time of CFS walls; ③ By using aluminum silicate wool as external insulation in which the aluminum silicate wool was located outside the CFS frame and sandwiched between two layers of boards on the fire side,a noticeable reduction of heat transfer to the surface of steel stud and a considerable improvement of fire performance of CFS walls can be achieved.For the present specimens of CFS wall with aluminum silicate wool as external insulation on the fire side,the maximum fire resistance time was 165 minutes when the load ratio was 0.65,satisfying the fire resistance requirement of 120 minutes for load-bearing walls of multi-story structures in China.%冷弯薄壁型钢承重组合墙体抗火研究是多层冷弯薄壁型钢结构在我国推广应用的关键问题.文章共设计完成了十片C形冷弯薄壁型钢承重墙体足尺耐火试验,旨在经济高效地提高此类墙体耐火性能.试验同时考察了墙板类型、填充层情况、荷载水平等因素对墙体耐火性能的影响.

  12. COMPUTER NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TUNGSTEN HEAVY ALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A microstructure model of tungsten heavy alloys has been developed. On the basis of the model and several assumptions, the macro-mechanical properties of 90 W heavy alloy under quasi-static tensile deformation and the effects of microstructural parameters (mechanical properties of the matrix phase and tungsten content) on them have been analyzed by computer numerical simulation. The mechanical properties of the alloy have been found to be dependent on the mechanical parameters of the matrix phase. As the elastic modulus and yield strength of the matrix phase increase, the tensile strength of the alloy increases, while the elongation decreases. If the mechanical parameters except the tensile strength of the matrix phase are constant, both the tensile strength and the elongation of the alloy increase linearly with the increase of tensile strength of the matrix phase. The properties of the alloy are very sensitive to the hardening modulus of the matrix phase. As the hardening modulus increases, both the tensile strength and the elongation of the alloy exponentially decrease. The elongation of the alloys monotonically decreases with the increase of tungsten content, while the decrease of tensile strength is not monotonic. When the tungsten content < 85 %, the strength of tungsten heavy alloys increases with the increase of tungsten content, while decreases when the tungsten content >85 %. The maximum of tensile strength of the alloys appears at the tungsten content of 85 %. The results showed that the binder phase with a higher strength and a lower hardening modulus is advantageous to obtaining an optimum combination of mechanical properties of tungsten heavy alloys.

  13. Obtaining of films of tungsten trioxide (WO3) by resistive heating of a tungsten filament

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Thin film of tungsten oxide (WO3) has been studied extensively as an electrochromic material and has numerous applications in electrochromic devices, smart windows, gas sensors and optical windows. In order to explore the possibility of using it in electrochromic devices, thorough study the optical properties of the WO3 is an important step. The WO3 layers have been grown by hot-filament metal oxide deposition technique under atmospheric pressure and an oxygen atmosphere. By FTIR and Raman sc...

  14. The preparation, characterisation and catalytic activity of tungsten bronzes

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Sheena

    1987-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. The structure and catalytic aspects of tungsten bronzes have been considered. A series of potassium tungsten bronzes, KxW03, 0.05 =< x =< 0.8, and the corresponding series of sodium tungsten bronzes, NaxW03, 0.05 =< x =< 0.8 were prepared by a thermal method. The thermal stability of the prepared samples was studied in the presence of both an oxidising and a reducing gas. The number and...

  15. Electrode potentials of tungsten in fused alkali chlorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A. B.; Volkovich, V. A.; Poskryakov, D. A.; Vasin, B. D.; Griffiths, T. R.

    2016-09-01

    Anodic dissolution of tungsten was studied at 823-1173 K in the melts based on NaCl-CsCl, NaCl-KCl-CsCl and LiCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic mixtures. The process results in the formation of W(IV) ions. Prolonged contact with silica results in oxidation W(IV) ions and decreasing tungsten concentration in the electrolyte due to formation of volatile higher oxidation state chloro- and oxychloro-species. Tungsten electrode potentials were measured in NaCl-CsCl and NaCl-KCl-CsCl based melts using potentiometry.

  16. Preparation of nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode by swaging technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王发展; 诸葛飞; 张晖; 丁秉钧

    2002-01-01

    By using the high energy ball milling method,the nanosized ThO2 powders were obtained.Through mixing powders,sintering and hot swaging processing,a nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode was fabricated.The relative density of the nanocomposite material is near 100%.The microstructure of nanocomposite cathode is quite different from that of conventional thoriated tungsten cathode.Most of thoria particles are less than 100 nm in diameter,and distribute on the boundaries of tungsten grains.The nanocomposite cathode shows a much lower arc starting field than that of conventional cathode,which will improve the performance of the cathode significantly.

  17. Tungsten Export Price Raised Due to Customs Tax Regulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Affected by the export tax rise, China’s tungsten export price rose by about 40 per cent in the first 10 months of 2006. The average price of Ammonium Paratungstate (APT) was US$23,000/MT, up by 43.5 per cent year-on-year, and that of ferro-tungsten, blue tungsten oxide as well as yellow oxide also increased by 32.4 per cent to US$24,000/MT, 27.4 per cent to US$25,000/MT and 42.6 per cent to US$26,000/MT respectively.

  18. Tensile behavior of tungsten and tungsten-alloy wires from 1300 to 1600 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Man Yun

    1988-01-01

    The tensile behavior of a 200-micrometer-diameter tungsten lamp (218CS-W), tungsten + 1.0 atomic percent (a/o) thoria (ST300-W), and tungsten + 0.4 a/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) wires was determined over the temperature range 1300 t0 1600 K at strain rates of 3.3 X 10 to the -2 to 3.3 X 10 to the -5/sec. Although most tests were conducted on as-drawn materials, one series of tests was undertaken on ST300-W wires in four different conditions: as-drawn and vacuum-annealed at 1535 K for 1 hr, with and without electroplating. Whereas heat treatment had no effect on tensile properties, electropolishing significantly increased both the proportional limit and ductility, but not the ultimate tensile strength. Comparison of the behavior of the three alloys indicates that the HfC-dispersed material possesses superior tensile properties. Theoretical calculations indicate that the strength/ductility advantage of WHfC is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.

  19. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructural development of tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Fukuda, Makoto; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei

    2016-04-01

    Data on the microstructural development of tungsten (W) and tungsten rhenium (Re) alloys were obtained after neutron irradiation at 400-800 °C in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), the experimental fast test reactor Joyo, and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for irradiation damage levels in the range of 0.09-1.54 displacement per atom (dpa). Microstructural observations showed that a small amount of Re (3-5%) in W-Re alloys is effective in suppressing void formation. In W-Re alloys with Re concentrations greater than 10%, acicular precipitates are the primary structural defects. In the HFIR-irradiated specimen, in which a large amount of Re was expected to be produced by the nuclear transmutation of W to Re because of the reactor's high thermal neutron flux, voids were not observed even in pure W. The synergistic effects of displacement damage and solid transmutation elements on microstructural development are discussed, and the microstructural development of tungsten materials utilized in fusion reactors is predicted.

  20. Density-functional studies of tungsten trioxide, tungsten bronzes, and related systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ingham, B; Chong, S V; Tallon, J L

    2005-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide adopts a variety of structures which can be intercalated with charged species to alter the electronic properties, thus forming `tungsten bronzes'. Similar optical effects are observed upon removing oxygen from WO_3, although the electronic properties are slightly different. Here we present a computational study of cubic and hexagonal alkali bronzes and examine the effects on cell size and band structure as the size of the intercalated ion is increased. With the exception of hydrogen (which is predicted to be unstable as an intercalate), the behaviour of the bronzes are relatively consistent. NaWO_3 is the most stable of the cubic systems, although in the hexagonal system the larger ions are more stable. The band structures are identical, with the intercalated atom donating its single electron to the tungsten 5d valence band. Next, this was extended to a study of fractional doping in the Na_xWO_3 system (0 < x < 1). A linear variation in cell parameter, and a systematic change in the po...

  1. Tungsten disulfide nanotubes reinforced biodegradable polymers for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Henslee, Allan M; Farshid, Behzad; Parmar, Priyanka; Lin, Liangjun; Qin, Yi-Xian; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the efficacy of inorganic nanotubes as reinforcing agents to improve the mechanical properties of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) composites as a function of nanomaterial loading concentration (0.01-0.2 wt.%). Tungsten disulfide nanotubes (WSNTs) were used as reinforcing agents in the experimental group. Single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) were used as positive controls, and crosslinked PPF composites were used as the baseline control. Mechanical testing (compression and three-point bending) shows a significant enhancement (up to 28-190%) in the mechanical properties (compressive modulus, compressive yield strength, flexural modulus and flexural yield strength) of WSNT-reinforced PPF nanocomposites compared to the baseline control. In comparison to the positive controls, significant improvements in the mechanical properties of WSNT nanocomposites were also observed at various concentrations. In general, the inorganic nanotubes (WSNTs) showed mechanical reinforcement better than (up to 127%) or equivalent to that of carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs). Sol fraction analysis showed significant increases in the crosslinking density of PPF in the presence of WSNTs (0.01-0.2 wt.%). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis on thin sections of crosslinked nanocomposites showed the presence of WSNTs as individual nanotubes in the PPF matrix, whereas SWCNTs and MWCNTs existed as micron-sized aggregates. The trend in the surface area of nanostructures obtained by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis was SWCNTs>MWCNTs>WSNTs. The BET surface area analysis, TEM analysis and sol fraction analysis results taken together suggest that chemical composition (inorganic vs. carbon nanomaterials), the presence of functional groups (such as sulfide and oxysulfide) and individual dispersion of the nanomaterials in the polymer matrix (absence of aggregation of the reinforcing agent) are the key parameters

  2. Thin Wall Austempered Ductile Iron (TWADI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Górny

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the analysis of thin walled castings made of ductile iron is considered. It is shown that thin wall austempered ductile iron can be obtained by means of short-term heat treatment of thin wall castings without addition of alloying elements. Metallographic examinations of 2 mm thin walled castings along with casting with thicker wall thickness (20x28 mm after different austempring conditions are presented. It has been proved that short-term heat treatment amounted 20 minutes of austenitizing at 880 oC followed by holding at 400 oC for 5 minutes causes ausferrite matrix in 2 mm wall thickness castings, while casting with thicker wall thickness remain untransformed and martensite is still present in a matrix. Finally there are shown that thin wall ductile iron is an excellent base material for austempering heat treatments. As a result high mechanical properties received in thin wall plates made of austempered ductile iron.

  3. Laser irradiation of carbon-tungsten materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, A.; Avotina, L.; Marin, A.; Lungu, C. P.; Grigorescu, C. E. A.; Demitri, N.; Ursescu, D.; Porosnicu, C.; Osiceanu, P.; Kizane, G.; Grigoriu, C.

    2014-09-01

    Carbon-tungsten layers deposited on graphite by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) were directly irradiated with a femtosecond terawatt laser. The morphological and structural changes produced in the irradiated area by different numbers of pulses were systematically explored, both along the spots and in their depths. Although micro-Raman and Synchrotron-x-ray diffraction investigations have shown no carbide formation, they have shown the unexpected presence of embedded nano-diamonds in the areas irradiated with high fluencies. Scanning electron microscopy images show a cumulative effect of the laser pulses on the morphology through the ablation process. The micro-Raman spatial mapping signalled an increased percentage of sp3 carbon bonding in the areas irradiated with laser fluencies around the ablation threshold. In-depth x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations suggested a weak cumulative effect on the percentage increase of the sp2-sp3 transitions with the number of laser pulses just for nanometric layer thicknesses.

  4. Magneto photoluminescence measurements of tungsten disulphide monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnert, Jan; Rahimi-Iman, Arash; Heimbrodt, Wolfram

    2017-03-01

    Layered transition-metal dichalcogenides have attracted great interest in the last few years. Thinned down to the monolayer limit they change from an indirect band structure to a direct band gap in the visible region. Due to the monolayer thickness the inversion symmetry of the crystal is broken and spin and valley are coupled to each other. The degeneracy between the two equivalent valleys, K and K‧, respectively, can be lifted by applying an external magnetic field. Here, we present photoluminescence measurements of CVD-grown tungsten disulphide (WS2) monolayers at temperatures of 2 K. By applying magnetic fields up to 7 T in Faraday geometry, a splitting of the photoluminescence peaks can be observed. The magnetic field dependence of the A-exciton, the trion and three bound exciton states is discussed and the corresponding g-factors are determined.

  5. Tungsten-doped thin film materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Hauyee; Gao, Chen; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Schultz, Peter G.

    2003-12-09

    A dielectric thin film material for high frequency use, including use as a capacitor, and having a low dielectric loss factor is provided, the film comprising a composition of tungsten-doped barium strontium titanate of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0. Also provided is a method for making a dielectric thin film of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3 and doped with W, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0, a substrate is provided, TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr are deposited on the substrate, and the substrate containing TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr is heated to form a low loss dielectric thin film.

  6. Xiamen Tungsten Co.,Ltd Verified the Largest Tungsten Mine Worldwide with a Potential Value Topping 300 Billion Yuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>On June 5,the Ministry of Land and Resources announced that,in Dahutang area of Wuning County,Jiujiang City.Jiangxi Province,a tungsten mine with a reserve of 1.06 million tonnes has been prospected;it is the largest tungsten mine in the world today.One of the investors of this prospecting activity is Xiamen Tungsten Co.,Ltd,a public listed company from Fujian Province.According to data of The Ministry of Land and Resources,

  7. Enhanced toughness and stable crack propagation in a novel tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite produced by chemical vapour infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Höschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch; Wurster, S.; You, J.-H.

    2014-04-01

    Tungsten is a promising candidate for the plasma-facing components of a future fusion reactor, but its use is strongly restricted by its inherent brittleness. An innovative concept to overcome this problem is tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite. In this paper we present the first mechanical test of such a composite material using a sample containing multiple fibres. The in situ fracture experiment was performed in a scanning electron microscope for close observation of the propagating crack. Stable crack propagation accompanied with rising load bearing capacity is observed. The fracture toughness is estimated using the test results and the surface observation.

  8. Optimization of the machining parameters for EDM wire cutting of Tungsten Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical discharge machining is a thermal erosion process which is based on thermoelectric energy between the work piece and electrode. Its capability of machining in hard and difficult to cut materials has made it most popular. Tungsten carbide is widely used in industry due to its unique properties combination of hardness and wear resistance. But the machining of the tungsten carbide is very difficult. In our research we tried to find optimized procedure to cut the Tungsten carbide by variation of different parameters so that process can be carried out in maximum Material Removal Rate (MRR with better surface finish. During the experimentation, Brass wire is used for cutting.. The experiment is designed with the help of Taguchi method and further analysis done with the help of ANOVA. In this experiment we find that the minimum mean of surface roughness is 2.214 achieved at Tension- 0.6 N, Feed- 10m/min, Flushing Pressure- 3kg/cm2, Current- 80A.

  9. Collisional-Radiative Modeling of Tungsten at Temperatures of 1200–2400 eV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Colgan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss new collisional-radiative modeling calculations of tungsten at moderate temperatures of 1200 to 2400 eV. Such plasma conditions are relevant to ongoing experimental work at ASDEX Upgrade and are expected to be relevant for ITER. Our calculations are made using the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL collisional-radiative modeling ATOMIC code. These calculations formed part of a submission to the recent NLTE-8 workshop that was held in November 2013. This series of workshops provides a forum for detailed comparison of plasma and spectral quantities from NLTE collisional-radiative modeling codes. We focus on the LANL ATOMIC calculations for tungsten that were submitted to the NLTE-8 workshop and discuss different models that were constructed to predict the tungsten emission. In particular, we discuss comparisons between semi-relativistic configuration-average and fully relativistic configuration-average calculations. We also present semi-relativistic calculations that include fine-structure detail, and discuss the difficult problem of ensuring completeness with respect to the number of configurations included in a CR calculation.

  10. Electron Impact Excitation and Dielectronic Recombination of Highly Charged Tungsten Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwen Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Electron impact excitation (EIE and dielectronic recombination (DR of tungsten ions are basic atomic processes in nuclear fusion plasmas of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER tokamak. Detailed investigation of such processes is essential for modeling and diagnosing future fusion experiments performed on the ITER. In the present work, we studied total and partial electron-impact excitation (EIE and DR cross-sections of highly charged tungsten ions by using the multiconfiguration Dirac–Fock method. The degrees of linear polarization of the subsequent X-ray emissions from unequally-populated magnetic sub-levels of these ions were estimated. It is found that the degrees of linear polarization of the same transition lines, but populated respectively by the EIE and DR processes, are very different, which makes diagnosis of the formation mechanism of X-ray emissions possible. In addition, with the help of the flexible atomic code on the basis of the relativistic configuration interaction method, DR rate coefficients of highly charged W37+ to W46+ ions are also studied, because of the importance in the ionization equilibrium of tungsten plasmas under running conditions of the ITER.

  11. Covalent attachment of diamondoid phosphonic acid dichlorides to tungsten oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei Hua; Fabbri, Jason D; Yurchenko, Raisa I; Mileshkin, Alexander N; Hohman, J Nathan; Yan, Hao; Yuan, Hongyuan; Tran, Ich C; Willey, Trevor M; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Dahl, Jeremy E P; Carlson, Robert M K; Fokin, Andrey A; Schreiner, Peter R; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicolas A

    2013-08-06

    Diamondoids (nanometer-sized diamond-like hydrocarbons) are a novel class of carbon nanomaterials that exhibit negative electron affinity (NEA) and strong electron-phonon scattering. Surface-bound diamondoid monolayers exhibit monochromatic photoemission, a unique property that makes them ideal electron sources for electron-beam lithography and high-resolution electron microscopy. However, these applications are limited by the stability of the chemical bonding of diamondoids on surfaces. Here we demonstrate the stable covalent attachment of diamantane phosphonic dichloride on tungsten/tungsten oxide surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed that diamondoid-functionalized tungsten oxide films were stable up to 300-350 °C, a substantial improvement over conventional diamondoid thiolate monolayers on gold, which dissociate at 100-200 °C. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light stimulated photoemission from these diamondoid phosphonate monolayers exhibited a characteristic monochromatic NEA peak with 0.2 eV full width at half-maximum (fwhm) at room temperature, showing that the unique monochromatization property of diamondoids remained intact after attachment. Our results demonstrate that phosphonic dichloride functionality is a promising approach for forming stable diamondoid monolayers for elevated temperature and high-current applications such as electron emission and coatings in micro/nano electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS).

  12. Underwater explosive welding of thin tungsten foils and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manikandan, P., E-mail: manikandan_exp@yahoo.com [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Lee, J.O.; Mizumachi, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Mori, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sojo University, 4-22-1 Ikeda, Kumamoto 860-0082 (Japan); Raghukandan, K. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar, Cuddalore District, Tamilnadu 608 002 (India); Hokamoto, K. [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Underwater explosive welding was used to clad tungsten and copper. > The preset inclination was varied and the microstructure was observed. > Microstructure reveals a clear wavy interface for higher preset inclination. > High pressure and high strain rate leads to plastic flow of tungsten. - Abstract: This study demonstrates the ability to clad pure tungsten foils on copper plate using underwater shock waves generated by the detonation of explosive. Microstructural characterization revealed that a higher preset inclination results in wavy morphology. Weld formed at lower inclination exhibit a planar interfacial layer comprising fine grained particles of both components. The plastic flow of tungsten is ascribed to the synergistic influence of high pressure and high strain rate at the collision point.

  13. Advances in Thermionic Cathode of Tungsten and Molybdenum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Several kinds of tungsten thermonic cathodes have been introduced. As a promising alternative for thoriated tungsten, rare earth doped molybdenum cathode has been studied. Compared with the traditional thoriated tungsten, La-Mo cathode has higher emission current density at lower temperature, but it has poor emission stability. In order to improve the emission stability, systematical study on the emission mechanism of La-Mo cathode has been carried out. The life of La-Mo cathode has been improved and has achieved 1400 h, which exceeds the minimum life for practical uses (1000 h). As another alternative for thoriated tungsten cathode, Y-Mo cathode has shown better performance. The thermionic emission capability of Y-Mo cathode is between that of La-Mo cathode and Th-W cathode.

  14. Preparation and catalytic properties of tungsten oxides with different morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi Yunfei, E-mail: beiyf2003@yahoo.com.cn [Research Institute of Petroleum Processing, SINOPEC, 18 Xue Yuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Li Dadong; Nie Hong [Research Institute of Petroleum Processing, SINOPEC, 18 Xue Yuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China)

    2010-09-01

    Tungsten oxides with different morphologies including platelet-like sheets, nanobelts, and nanoparticles have been successfully prepared by changing the ions in the synthetic solution. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared analysis and N{sub 2} adsorption were employed to reveal the morphological evolution, and results show that the morphological evolution can be attributed to the alteration of coordination environment of tungstenic cations contained in the synthetic solution. Furthermore, these products have been applied into hydrodesulfurization measurement to investigate the relationship between the morphologies of tungsten oxides and their catalytic properties. It is concluded that the catalysts originating from nanobelt-like tungsten oxides have highest catalytic activity and excellent selectivity due to their scrolled character and strong metallic edges.

  15. Calibration and temperature profile of a tungsten filament lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Izarra, Charles [Groupe de Recherche sur l' Energetique des Milieux Ionises, UMR6606 Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, Faculte des Sciences, Site de Bourges, rue Gaston Berger, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France); Gitton, Jean-Michel, E-mail: Charles.De_Izarra@univ-orleans.f [College Littre, 10 rue Littre, Bourges (France)

    2010-07-15

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament lamp (lamp used in automotive lighting) and then tested on a standard tungsten ribbon lamp. The calibration procedure developed was checked by determining the calibration point of the tungsten ribbon lamp with an accuracy of 2%. In addition, for low current intensity, it was observed that the temperature of the filament was not uniform; an explanation is proposed by considering a simple heat transfer model.

  16. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding; Le soudage TIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-09-15

    After having recalled the Tungsten Inert Gas process principle and the different alternative TIG processes, the author explains the advantages and limits of this process. The applications and recent developments are given. (O.M.)

  17. Tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy and method of producing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, James M.; Riley, Robert E.

    1977-03-15

    An improved tungsten alloy having a tungsten content of approximately 95 weight percent, a nickel content of about 3 weight percent, and the balance being cobalt of about 2 weight percent is described. A method for producing said tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy is further described and comprises (a) coating the tungsten particles with a nickel-cobalt alloy, (b) pressing the coated particles into a compact shape, (c) heating said compact in hydrogen to a temperature in the range of 1400.degree. C and holding at this elevated temperature for a period of about 2 hours, (d) increasing this elevated temperature to about 1500.degree. C and holding for 1 hour at this temperature, (e) cooling to about 1200.degree. C and replacing the hydrogen atmosphere with an inert argon atmosphere while maintaining this elevated temperature for a period of about 1/2 hour, and (f) cooling the resulting alloy to room temperature in this argon atmosphere.

  18. INDUCTION PLASMA REACTIVE DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTENCARBIDE FROM TUNGSTEN METAL POWDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.L. Jiang; M.I. Boulos

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results are reported on the primary carburization reaction between the tungsten powder and methane in the induction plasma, and the secondary carburization of the deposit on substrate at high temperature. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine the microstructures of starting tungsten powder, carburized powder, and deposit. X-ray diffraction analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis and microhardness measurement were used to characterize the structures and properties of the powder and the deposit. It is found that the primary carburization reaction in the induction plasma starts from the surface of tungsten particles when the particles are melted. Tungsten particles are partially carburized inside the reactive plasma. Complete carburization is achieved through the secondary carburization reaction of the deposit on substrate at high temperature.``

  19. Self-passivating bulk tungsten-based alloys manufactured by powder metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ruiz, P.; Ordás, N.; Lindig, S.; Koch, F.; Iturriza, I.; García-Rosales, C.

    2011-12-01

    Self-passivating tungsten-based alloys are expected to provide a major safety advantage compared to pure tungsten, which is at present the main candidate material for the first wall armour of future fusion reactors. WC10Si10 alloys were manufactured by mechanical alloying (MA) in a Planetary mill and subsequent hot isostatic pressing (HIP), achieving densities above 95%. Different MA conditions were studied. After MA under optimized conditions, a core with heterogeneous microstructure was found in larger powder particles, resulting in the presence of some large W grains after HIP. Nevertheless, the obtained microstructure is significantly refined compared to previous work. First MA trials were also performed on the Si-free system WCr12Ti2.5. In this case a very homogeneous structure inside the powder particles was obtained, and a majority ternary metastable bcc phase was found, indicating that almost complete alloying occurred. Therefore, a very fine and homogeneous microstructure can be expected after HIP in future work.

  20. Manufacturing of self-passivating tungsten based alloys by different powder metallurgical routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, A.; Ordás, N.; Iturriza, I.; Pastor, J. Y.; Tejado, E.; Palacios, T.; García-Rosales, C.

    2016-02-01

    Self-passivating tungsten based alloys will provide a major safety advantage compared to pure tungsten when used as first wall armor of future fusion reactors, due to the formation of a protective oxide layer which prevents the formation of volatile and radioactive WO3 in case of a loss of coolant accident with simultaneous air ingress. Bulk WCr10Ti2 alloys were manufactured by two different powder metallurgical routes: (1) mechanical alloying (MA) followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of metallic capsules, and (2) MA, compaction, pressureless sintering in H2 and subsequent HIPing without encapsulation. Both routes resulted in fully dense materials with homogeneous microstructure and grain sizes of 300 nm and 1 μm, respectively. The content of impurities remained unchanged after HIP, but it increased after sintering due to binder residue. It was not possible to produce large samples by route (2) due to difficulties in the uniaxial compaction stage. Flexural strength and fracture toughness measured on samples produced by route (1) revealed a ductile-to-brittle-transition temperature (DBTT) of about 950 °C. The strength increased from room temperature to 800 °C, decreasing significantly in the plastic region. An increase of fracture toughness is observed around the DBTT.

  1. Metallic Tungsten Nanostructures and Highly Nanostructured Thin Films by Deposition of Tungsten Oxide and Subsequent Reduction in a Single Hot-Wire CVD Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; Houweling, Z.S.; de Jong, M.M.; Kuang, Y; Geus, J.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of metallic tungsten nanostructures and highly nanostructured thin films is presented. Crystalline tungsten oxide nanostructures are deposited on glassy carbon substrates kept at 700 100 8C by oxidizing resistively heated tungsten filaments in an air flow under subatmospheric pressures

  2. Underwater explosive welding of thin tungsten foils and copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, P.; Lee, J. O.; Mizumachi, K.; Mori, A.; Raghukandan, K.; Hokamoto, K.

    2011-11-01

    This study demonstrates the ability to clad pure tungsten foils on copper plate using underwater shock waves generated by the detonation of explosive. Microstructural characterization revealed that a higher preset inclination results in wavy morphology. Weld formed at lower inclination exhibit a planar interfacial layer comprising fine grained particles of both components. The plastic flow of tungsten is ascribed to the synergistic influence of high pressure and high strain rate at the collision point.

  3. Hydrodynamic Analysis to Process of Hydrostatic Extrusion for Tungsten Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuchi WANG; Zhaohui ZHANG; Shukui LI

    2001-01-01

    The hydrodynamic analysis to the process of the hydrostatic extrusion for tungsten alloy is carried through the hydrodynamic lubrication theory and Reynolds equation in this paper. The critical velocity equation when the hydrodynamic lubrication conditions appear between the surfaces of the work- piece and the die is obtained, and the relationship between the critical velocity and the extrusion parameters is discussed, which build the theoretical bases to the application of the hydrostatic extrusion for tungsten alloy.

  4. China Limits the Mining Quantity of Tungsten and Rare Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>Based on a notice issued by the Ministry of Land Resources, China’s tungsten mining quantity in 2006 will be controlled to 59,060 tons in concentrates form, which include 4,250 tons of recycled tungsten. And the rare earth mining quantity in 2006 will also be controlled to 86,620 tons (REO) including 8,320 tons of heavy rare earth and 78,200 tons of light rare earth.

  5. Development of high poloidal beta, steady-state scenario with ITER-like tungsten divertor on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, A. M.; Gong, X. Z.; Qian, J.; Chen, J.; Li, G.; Li, K.; Li, M. H.; Zhai, X.; Bonoli, P.; Brower, D.; Cao, L.; Cui, L.; Ding, S.; Ding, W. X.; Guo, W.; Holcomb, C.; Huang, J.; Hyatt, A.; Lanctot, M.; Lao, L. L.; Liu, H.; Lyu, B.; McClenaghan, J.; Peysson, Y.; Ren, Q.; Shiraiwa, S.; Solomon, W.; Zang, Q.; Wan, B.

    2017-07-01

    Recent experiments on EAST have achieved the first long pulse H-mode (61 s) with zero loop voltage and an ITER-like tungsten divertor, and have demonstrated access to broad plasma current profiles by increasing the density in fully-noninductive lower hybrid current-driven discharges. These long pulse discharges reach wall thermal and particle balance, exhibit stationary good confinement (H 98y2 ~ 1.1) with low core electron transport, and are only possible with optimal active cooling of the tungsten armors. In separate experiments, the electron density was systematically varied in order to study its effect on the deposition profile of the external lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), while keeping the plasma in fully-noninductive conditions and with divertor strike points on the tungsten divertor. A broadening of the current profile is found, as indicated by lower values of the internal inductance at higher density. A broad current profile is attractive because, among other reasons, it enables internal transport barriers at large minor radius, leading to improved confinement as shown in companion DIII-D experiments. These experiments strengthen the physics basis for achieving high performance, steady state discharges in future burning plasmas.

  6. Chemical vapour deposition of tungsten oxide thin films from single-source precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Warren Bradley

    This thesis describes the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of tungsten oxide thin films on glass from a wide range of single-source precursors. Chapter 1 describes previous work that has motivated this research. Chapter 2 discusses the synthesis of conventional style candidates for single-source precursors. Reactions of WOCl4 with 3-methyl salicylic acid (MesaliH2) and 3,5-di-iso-propyl salicylic acid (di-i-PrsaliH2) yielded the ditungsten complexes [WO(Mesali)(MesaliH)2(mu-O)], 1, and [WO(di-i-Prsali)(di-i-PrsaliH)2(mu-O)], 2, and the monotungsten complex [WO(di-i-Pr sali)(di-i-PrsaliH)Cl], 3. Tungsten(VI) dioxo complexes were prepared by ligand exchange reactions of [WO2(acac)2], 4, yielding [WO2(catH)2], 5, and [WO2(malt)2], 6, (catH2 = 3,5-di-tert-butyl-catechol; maltH = maltol). Chapter 3 describes thermal analyses of the complexes 1 - 6 and tungsten hexaphenoxide, and consequently their suitability for CVD. The use of [W(OPh)6] and 2 - 6 in aerosol assisted CVD is reported in Chapter 4. Brown tungsten oxide was deposited from 2 and 3 at 600 °C; blue partially-reduced WO3-x thin films were deposited from [W(OPh)6] from 300 to 500 °C, from 4 at 600 °C and 6 at 620 °C. Sintering all of the coatings in air at 550 °C afforded yellow films of stoichiometric WO3. Raman spectroscopy and glancing angle XRD showed that coatings deposited from [W(OPh)6] at 300 °C were amorphous, whereas all the other films were the monoclinic phase gamma-tungsten oxide. Taking full advantage of the aerosol vaporisation technique led to the CVD of tungsten oxide films from polyoxometalate single-source precursors, as described in Chapter 5. The isopolyanion [nBu4N]2[W6O19], 7, afforded WO3 at 410 °C; the heteropolyanions [nBu4N]4H3[PW11O39], 8, and [nBu4N]4[PNbW11O40], 9, were used to deposit doped WO3 thin films in a highly-controlled manner at 480 °C. Thus, the unprecedented use of large, charged clusters for CVD was demonstrated. Chapter 6 describes investigations of the

  7. Degradation of tungsten under the action of a plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A. V.; Sud'enkov, Yu. V.; Semenov, B. N.; Atroshenko, S. A.; Naumova, N. S.

    2014-07-01

    The degradation of the surface and structure of single-crystal tungsten and sintered powder tungsten during the action of a pulsed plasma jet is studied. It is shown that the degradation of a tungsten target during the action of a plasma jet with an energy flux density of 0.25-1 MJ/m2 is accompanied by surface evaporation and melting and the fracture of surface layers on scales of 150-250 μm. The results of a numerical simulation of the thermomechanical processes that occur in a tungsten target during the action of a plasma jet are presented. The degradation of tungsten during the action of a plasma jet is shown to proceed almost continuously from the action (evaporation, melting) to the times that are more than three orders of magnitude longer than the action time, which is caused by the thermomechanical processes occurring in the tungsten target. Moreover, the action of thermal stresses leads to structural and morphological changes throughout the sample volume, and these changes are accompanied by recrystallization in adiabatic shear bands.

  8. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0 × 1025 n/m2, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  9. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780°C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0×1025 n/m2, E>0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22°C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22°C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  10. Domain Walls in SU(5)

    CERN Document Server

    Poghosian, L E; Pogosian, Levon; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2000-01-01

    We consider the Grand Unified SU(5) model with a small or vanishing cubic term in the adjoint scalar field in the potential. This gives the model an approximate or exact Z$_2$ symmetry whose breaking leads to domain walls. The simplest domain wall has the structure of a kink across which the Higgs field changes sign ($\\Phi \\to -\\Phi$) and inside which the full SU(5) is restored. The kink is shown to be perturbatively unstable for all parameters. We then construct a domain wall solution that is lighter than the kink and show it to be perturbatively stable for a range of parameters. The symmetry in the core of this domain wall is smaller than that outside. The interactions of the domain wall with magnetic monopole is discussed and it is shown that magnetic monopoles with certain internal space orientations relative to the wall pass through the domain wall. Magnetic monopoles in other relative internal space orientations are likely to be swept away on collision with the domain walls, suggesting a scenario where ...

  11. Refining Tungsten Purification by Electron Beam Melting Based on the Thermal Equilibrium Calculation and Tungsten Loss Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Luping; Liu, Wensheng; Ma, Yunzhu; Liu, Ye; Liu, Shuhua

    2015-10-01

    Electron beam melting (EBM) technology has been considered as one of the key steps for preparing high purity tungsten, and reasonable setting of process parameters is the premise. In this paper, the optimum process parameters obtained from thermal equilibrium calculation and evaporation loss control of tungsten are presented. Effective power is closely related to melting temperature, and the required power for maintaining the superheating melt linearly increases with the increase of melt superheat temperature. The evaporation loss behavior of tungsten is significantly influenced by melting rate and melting temperature. Analysis of experiments show that the best results are realized at melting rate of 1.82 g/s, melting temperature of 4200 K, and the corresponding melting power of 130 kW, in which the main impurity elements in tungsten, such as As, Cd, Mg and Sn, present high removal ratio of 90%, 95%, 85.7% and 90%, respectively.

  12. Effect of Wall Material on H– Production in a Plasma Sputter-Type Ion Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. M. Ponce

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of wall material on negative hydrogen ion (H– production was investigated in a multicusp plasma sputter-type ion source (PSTIS. Steady-state cesium-seeded hydrogen plasma was generated by a tungsten filament, while H– was produced through surface production using a molybdenum sputter target. Plasma parameters and H– yields were determined from Langmuir probe and Faraday cup measurements, respectively. At an input hydrogen pressure of 1.2 mTorr and optimum plasma discharge parameters Vd = –90 V and Id = –2.25 A, the plasma parameters ne was highest and T–e was lowest as determined from Langmuir probe measurements. At these conditions, aluminum generates the highest ion current density of 0.01697 mA/cm2, which is 64% more than the 0.01085 mA/cm2 that stainless steel produces. The yield of copper, meanwhile, falls between the two materials at 0.01164 mA/cm2. The beam is maximum at Vt = –125 V. Focusing is achieved at VL = –70 V for stainless steel, Vt = –60 V for aluminum, and Vt = –50 V for copper. The results demonstrate that proper selection of wall material can greatly enhance the H– production of the PSTIS.

  13. The Influence of Impurities in Tungsten and Matrix Composition on the Tungsten-Matrix Interfacial Properties of Heavy Metal Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    Impurities in Tungsten and Nov 79 - Nov 82 Matrix Composition on the Tungsten-Matrix Interfacial Properties of Heavy Metal Alloys 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...fundamental change both in structure of the heavy metal and in fracture behaviour: The samples which were merely pre-reduced or sintered for very short...features of a satisfactory heavy metal : mainly transgranular fracture, considerable binder deformation and only rather few and small sintering necks in

  14. Jiangxi Discovered a Large Tungsten Mine Which May Create the World’s Largest Tungsten Mineral Deposit Reserve Record

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    It has been learned from the Jiangxi Province Geological and Mineral Resource Bureau Work Conference for 2015 held on January 21 that,the Zhuxi Tungsten and Copper Mine Project confirmed by the bureau at Fuliang County in Jingdezhen,Jiangxi in 2014 might create the world’s largest tungsten deposit reserve record.According to Peng Zezhou,Director of Jiangxi Province Geological and Mineral Resource

  15. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning tungsten powder preparation and processing. Studies include sintering, densification, shrinkage, phase analysis, and heat treatment. The physical and mechanical properties of tungsten powder metal products are included. The effects of additives and particle size on the sintering and sintered articles are also described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  16. Influences of Hydraulic Fracturing on Fluid Flow and Mineralization at the Vein-Type Tungsten Deposits in Southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangchong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolframite is the main ore mineral at the vein-type tungsten deposits in the Nanling Range, which is a world-class tungsten province. It is disputed how wolframite is precipitated at these deposits and no one has yet studied the links of the mechanical processes to fluid flow and mineralization. Finite element-based numerical experiments are used to investigate the influences of a hydraulic fracturing process on fluid flow and solubility of CO2 and quartz. The fluids are aqueous NaCl solutions and fluid pressure is the only variable controlling solubility of CO2 and quartz in the numerical experiments. Significant fluctuations of fluid pressure and high-velocity hydrothermal pulse are found once rock is fractured by high-pressure fluids. The fluid pressure drop induced by hydraulic fracturing could cause a 9% decrease of quartz solubility. This amount of quartz deposition may not cause a significant decrease in rock permeability. The fluid pressure decrease after hydraulic fracturing also reduces solubility of CO2 by 36% and increases pH. Because an increase in pH would cause a major decrease in solubility of tungsten, the fluid pressure drop accompanying a hydraulic fracturing process facilitates wolframite precipitation. Our numerical experiments provide insight into the mechanisms precipitating wolframite at the tungsten deposits in the Nanling Range as well as other metals whose solubility is strongly dependent on pH.

  17. Effects of heat treatment on mechanical properties and microstructure of tungsten fi ber reinforced grey cast iron matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng jianHong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, grey cast iron matrix composites reinforced by different volume fractions of tungsten fibers (Vr = 0.95 %, 1.90 %, 2.85 %, 3.80 % were investigated in as-cast and under the heat treatment temperatures of 1,000℃ and 1,100℃. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the composites were analyzed and tested by means of SEM, micro-hardness tester and three-point bend testing. The results show that with increasing of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers, the composites reinforced by the tungsten fiber have higher fl exural strength and modulus than that of cast iron without reinforcement, and the fl exural strength increases with the increasing of heat treatment temperatures. Due to diffusion reaction between matrix and reinforcing phases, the process of heat treatment, the number of graphite fl akes in the matrix seemingly becomes lower; and some hard carbide particles are formed around the residual tungsten fi bers. Not only does the hardness of both matrix and reinforcement change tremendously, but also the region of reinforcement is also extended from the original 0.11 mm to 0.19 mm in radius.

  18. Study on in-situ WC particles/tungsten wire reinforced iron matrix composites under electromagnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Libin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available By applying electromagnetic field to a system consisting of tungsten wires and grey cast iron melt, the grey cast iron matrix composite reinforced by either in-situ WC particles or the combination of in-situ WC particles and the residual tungsten wire was obtained. By means of differential thermal analysis (DTA, the pouring temperature of iron melt was determined at 1,573 K. The microstructures of the composites were analyzed by using of X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with an energy dispersive spectrum (EDS and pin-on-disc abrasive wear test. The obtained results indicated that, with the enhancing frequency of electromagnetic field, the amount of in-situ WC particles gradually increases, leading to continuous decrease of the residual tungsten wires. When the electromagnetic field frequency was up to 4 kHz, tungsten wires reacted completely with carbon atoms in grey cast iron melt, forming WC particals. The electromagnetic field appeared to accelerate the elemental diffusion in the melt, to help relatively quick formation of a series of small Fe-W-C ternary zones and to improve the kinetic condition of in-situ WC fabrication. As compared with the composite prepared without the electromagnetic field, the composite fabricated at 4 kHz presented good wear resistance.

  19. The influence of neon or argon impurities on deuterium permeation in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, M., E-mail: ishida@st.eie.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Lee, H.T.; Ueda, Y.

    2015-08-15

    Nitrogen (N) or neon (Ne) in the divertor and argon (Ar) puffing in the first wall have been proposed to reduce the local power loads on tungsten (W) plasma facing components. The impurities sputter and modify the W surface, which can affect hydrogen (H, D, T) transport in W. In this study, mixed D + Ne or D + Ar ion driven permeation experiments were performed to investigate the influence of Ne or Ar impurities on D transport. The D permeation flux for mixed irradiation was lower in comparison to D-only irradiation at T > 500 K, opposite to trends observed for N. The reason for the observed decrease in permeation flux was interpreted to arise from combined effects of sputtering and possible precipitation. The lag times for D + Ne case was slower than D-only case, while D + Ar was faster. This indicates Ne precipitation effects may influence the H transport in W similar to helium.

  20. T-1018 UCLA Spacordion Tungsten Powder Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trentalange, Stephen; Tsai, Oleg; Igo, George; Huang, Huan; Pan, Yu Xi; Dunkelberger, Jay; Xu, Wen Qin; /UCLA; Soha, Aria; /Fermilab; Heppelmann, Steven; /Penn State U.; Gagliardi, Carl; /Texas A-M

    2011-11-16

    The present experiments at the BNL-RHIC facility are evolving towards physics goals which require the detection of medium energy electromagnetic particles (photons, electrons, neutral pions, eta mesons, etc.), especially at forward angles. New detectors will place increasing demands on energy resolution, hadron rejection and two-photon resolution and will require large area, high performance electromagnetic calorimeters in a variety of geometries. In the immediate future, either RHIC or JLAB will propose a facility upgrade (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC) with physics goals such as electron-heavy ion collisions (or p-A collisions) with a wide range of calorimeter requirements. An R and D program based at Brookhaven National Laboratory has awarded the group funding of approximately $110,000 to develop new types of calorimeters for EIC experiments. The UCLA group is developing a method to manufacture very flexible and cost-effective, yet high quality calorimeters based on scintillating fibers and tungsten powder. The design and features of the calorimeter can be briefly stated as follows: an arbitrarily large number of small diameter fibers (< 0.5 mm) are assembled as a matrix and held rigidly in place by a set of precision screens inside an empty container. The container is then back-filled with tungsten powder, compacted on a vibrating table and infused with epoxy under vacuum. The container is then removed. The resulting sub-modules are extremely uniform and achieve roughly the density of pure Lead. The sub-modules are stacked together to achieve a final detector of the desired shape. There is no dead space between sub-modules and the fibers can be in an accordion geometry bent to prevent 'channeling' of the particles due to accidental alignment of their track with the module axis. This technology has the advantage of being modular and inexpensive to the point where the construction work may be divided among groups the size of typical university physics

  1. ELM induced tungsten melting and its impact on tokamak operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, J. W.; Arnoux, G.; Bazylev, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Jachmich, S.; Balboa, I.; Clever, M.; Dejarnac, R.; Coffey, I.; Corre, Y.; Devaux, S.; Frassinetti, L.; Gauthier, E.; Horacek, J.; Knaup, M.; Komm, M.; Krieger, K.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Pitts, R. A.; Puetterich, T.; Rack, M.; Stamp, M.; Sergienko, G.; Tamain, P.; Thompson, V.

    2015-08-01

    In JET-ILW dedicated melt exposures were performed using a sequence of 3MA/2.9T H-Mode JET pulses with an input power of PIN = 23 MW, a stored energy of ∼6 MJ and regular type I ELMs at ΔWELM = 0.3 MJ and fELM ∼ 30 Hz. In order to assess the risk of starting ITER operations with a full W divertor, one of the task was to measure the consequences of W transients melting due to ELMs. JET is the only tokamak able to produce transients/ ELMs large enough (>300 kJ per ELM) to facilitate melting of tungsten. Such ELMs are comparable to mitigated ELMs expected in ITER. By moving the outer strike point (OSP) onto a dedicated leading edge the base temperature was raised within ∼1 s to allow transient ELM-driven melting during the subsequent 0.5 s. Almost 1 mm (∼6 mm3) of W was moved by ∼ 150 ELMs within 5 subsequent discharges. Significant material losses in terms of ejections into the plasma were not observed. There is indirect evidence that some small droplets (∼ 80 μm) were ejected. The impact on the main plasma parameters is minor and no disruptions occurred. The W-melt gradually moved along the lamella edge towards the high field side, driven by j × B forces. The evaporation rate determined is 100 times less than expected from steady state melting and thus only consistent with transient melting during individual ELMs. IR data, spectroscopy, as well as melt modeling point to transient melting. Although the type of damage studied in these JET experiments is unlikely to be experienced in ITER, the results do strongly support the design strategy to avoid exposed edges in the ITER divertor. The JET experiments required a surface at normal incidence and considerable pre-heating to produce tungsten melting. They provide unique experimental evidence for the absence of significant melt splashing at events resembling mitigated ELMs on ITER and establish a unique experimental benchmark for the simulations being used to study transient shallow melting on ITER W

  2. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  3. Development of a mirror-based endoscope for divertor spectroscopy on JET with the new ITER-like wall (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, A; Brezinsek, S; Mertens, Ph; Schweer, B; Sergienko, G; Terra, A; Arnoux, G; Balshaw, N; Clever, M; Edlingdon, T; Egner, S; Farthing, J; Hartl, M; Horton, L; Kampf, D; Klammer, J; Lambertz, H T; Matthews, G F; Morlock, C; Murari, A; Reindl, M; Riccardo, V; Samm, U; Sanders, S; Stamp, M; Williams, J; Zastrow, K D; Zauner, C

    2012-10-01

    A new endoscope with optimised divertor view has been developed in order to survey and monitor the emission of specific impurities such as tungsten and the remaining carbon as well as beryllium in the tungsten divertor of JET after the implementation of the ITER-like wall in 2011. The endoscope is a prototype for testing an ITER relevant design concept based on reflective optics only. It may be subject to high neutron fluxes as expected in ITER. The operating wavelength range, from 390 nm to 2500 nm, allows the measurements of the emission of all expected impurities (W I, Be II, C I, C II, C III) with high optical transmittance (≥ 30% in the designed wavelength range) as well as high spatial resolution that is ≤ 2 mm at the object plane and ≤ 3 mm for the full depth of field (± 0.7 m). The new optical design includes options for in situ calibration of the endoscope transmittance during the experimental campaign, which allows the continuous tracing of possible transmittance degradation with time due to impurity deposition and erosion by fast neutral particles. In parallel to the new optical design, a new type of possibly ITER relevant shutter system based on pneumatic techniques has been developed and integrated into the endoscope head. The endoscope is equipped with four digital CCD cameras, each combined with two filter wheels for narrow band interference and neutral density filters. Additionally, two protection cameras in the λ > 0.95 μm range have been integrated in the optical design for the real time wall protection during the plasma operation of JET.

  4. Development of a mirror-based endoscope for divertor spectroscopy on JET with the new ITER-like wall (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Mertens, Ph.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Terra, A.; Clever, M.; Lambertz, H. T.; Samm, U. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Arnoux, G.; Balshaw, N.; Edlingdon, T.; Farthing, J.; Matthews, G. F.; Riccardo, V.; Sanders, S.; Stamp, M.; Williams, J.; Zastrow, K. D. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Egner, S. [Kayser-Threde GmbH, D-81379 Munich (Germany); and others

    2012-10-15

    A new endoscope with optimised divertor view has been developed in order to survey and monitor the emission of specific impurities such as tungsten and the remaining carbon as well as beryllium in the tungsten divertor of JET after the implementation of the ITER-like wall in 2011. The endoscope is a prototype for testing an ITER relevant design concept based on reflective optics only. It may be subject to high neutron fluxes as expected in ITER. The operating wavelength range, from 390 nm to 2500 nm, allows the measurements of the emission of all expected impurities (W I, Be II, C I, C II, C III) with high optical transmittance ({>=}30% in the designed wavelength range) as well as high spatial resolution that is {<=}2 mm at the object plane and {<=}3 mm for the full depth of field ({+-}0.7 m). The new optical design includes options for in situ calibration of the endoscope transmittance during the experimental campaign, which allows the continuous tracing of possible transmittance degradation with time due to impurity deposition and erosion by fast neutral particles. In parallel to the new optical design, a new type of possibly ITER relevant shutter system based on pneumatic techniques has been developed and integrated into the endoscope head. The endoscope is equipped with four digital CCD cameras, each combined with two filter wheels for narrow band interference and neutral density filters. Additionally, two protection cameras in the {lambda} > 0.95 {mu}m range have been integrated in the optical design for the real time wall protection during the plasma operation of JET.

  5. Nano magnetic vortex wall guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A concept of nano magnetic vortex wall guide is introduced. Two architectures are proposed. The first one is properly designed superlattices while the other one is bilayer nanostrips. The concept is verified by micromagnetic simulations. Both guides can prevent the vortex core in a magnetic vortex wall from colliding with sample surface so that the information stored in the vortex core can be preserved during its transportation from one location to another one through the guides.

  6. Actinomycosis - Left Post Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kafil Akhtar, M. Naim, S. Shamshad Ahmad, Nazoora Khan, Uroos Abedi, A.H. Khan*

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A forty year old female of weak body built presented with recurring small hard lumps in let posteriorchest wall for 3 years and discharging ulcers for 3 months duration. Clinically, the provisional diagnosiswas malignancy with secondary infection. FNAC showed features suggestive of dysplasia buthistopathology confirmed the diagnosis as actinomycosis. The present case is reported due to rare incidenceof actinomycosis at post chest wall with muscle involvement.

  7. DYNAMIC STRENGTH AND STRAIN RATE EFFECTS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF TUNGSTEN AND TUNGSTEN ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Zurek, A; G. Gray

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the stress-strain response as a function of strain rate, spall strength, and dynamic fracture behavior of pure W, W-26Re, W-Ni- Fe and W-Ni-Fe-Co has been performed. Spall strength measurements, obtained in symmetric-impact tests, showed an increase in spall strength from 0.4 GPa for pure tungsten to 3.8 GPa for 90W-7Ni-3Fe. Concurrent with the increase in spall strength was a change in fracture mode from cleavage (for pure W) to a mixture of transgranular and intergranula...

  8. Annealing effects on deuterium retention behavior in damaged tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sakurada

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Effects of annealing after/under iron (Fe ion irradiation on deuterium (D retention behavior in tungsten (W were studied. The D2 TDS spectra as a function of heating temperature for 0.1dpa damaged W showed that the D retention was clearly decreased as the annealing temperature was increased. In particular, the desorption of D trapped by voids was largely reduced by annealing at 1173K. The TEM observation indicated that the size of dislocation loops was clearly grown, and its density was decreased by the annealing above 573K. After annealing at 1173K, almost all the dislocation loops were recovered. The results of positron annihilation spectroscopy suggested that the density of vacancy-type defects such as voids, was decreased as the annealing temperature was increased, while its size was increased, indicating that the D retention was reduced by the recovery of the voids. Furthermore, it was found that the desorption temperature of D trapped by the voids for damaged W above 0.3dpa was shifted toward higher temperature side. These results lead to a conclusion that the D retention behavior is controlled by defect density. The D retention in the samples annealed during irradiation was less than that annealed after irradiation. This result shows that defects would be quickly annihilated before stabilization by annealing during irradiation.

  9. Understanding metal–insulator transition in sodium tungsten bronze

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanhita Paul; Satyabrata Raj

    2015-06-01

    We have carried out angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and spectromicroscopy studies to understand the metal–insulator transition (MIT) observed in sodium tungsten bronzes, NaWO3. The experimentally determined band structure is compared with the theoretical calculation based on full-potential linear augmented plane-wave method. It has been found that there is a good gross agreement between experiment and theory. ARPES spectra on the insulating sample show that the states near F are localized due to the random distribution of Na in WO3 lattice which causes strong disorder in the system. Our spectromicroscopy measurements on both insulating and metallic samples do not approve percolation model to explain MIT in NaWO3. Photoemission spectroscopy on metallic samples does not show any Na-induced impurity band (level), which was one of the models to explain MIT. Electron-like Fermi surface(s) has been found from our experiment for metallic samples at the (X) point which shows good agreement with band calculation.

  10. Tungsten and Scintillating Fiber Electromagnetic Calorimeter for sPHENIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Utilizing the products of relativistic heavy ion collisions, one can shed light on the physics behind the earliest stages of the universe. Consisted of unbounded quarks and gluons, the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) results from the collisions of heavy ions. The use of electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry is an option for studying the strong interactions which govern the QGP. The sPHENIX detector is planned for use at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) which detects jets from the collisions of large nuclei. The sPHENIX EMCal will consist of a tungsten absorber and scintillating fibers and will be read out with silicon photomultipliers. Made up of many individual towers, the EMCal covers full ϕ and large η. We will discuss the production process of these towers as well as the projectivity of the towers. Towers projective in one dimension (ϕ) have been produced and tested in beam at Fermilab. We will present recent developments in the first two dimensionally projective towers and future plans.

  11. Photodecomposition of Molybdenum andTungsten Carbonyl Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamer A. Alwani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The photodecomposition of four different colored organometallic molybdenum and tungsten carbonyl complexes, i.e. [Mo(CO52LA] (complex I, [(Mo(CO3(bipy2LB] (complex II, [(W(CO3(tmen2LB] (complex III and [Mo(CO2LC]2 (complex I V where LA 2-phenyl-1,3-indandionebis(2-methyl anilines, LB 2-phenyl-1,3-indandione bis (4-hydroxy anilines and LCbis (2-hydroxo-benzalydine benzidine ion have been performed at 365 nm in chloroform at 25 °C under oxygen atmosphere. The absorbance spectrum of these complexes has been recorded with the time of irradiation in order to examine the kinetics of photodecomposition. The rate of the photodecomposition process was investigated and the relative values of the rate constants of dissociation (Kd for the first-order reaction are tabulated. The apparent rate constant of photodecomposition was found to be (8.33-11.50 × 10-5 s-1.

  12. Spatial heterogeneity of tungsten transmutation in a fusion device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, M. R.; Sublet, J.-Ch.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2017-04-01

    Accurately quantifying the transmutation rate of tungsten (W) under neutron irradiation is a necessary requirement in the assessment of its performance as an armour material in a fusion power plant. The usual approach of calculating average responses, assuming large, homogenised material volumes, is insufficient to capture the full complexity of the transmutation picture in the context of a realistic fusion power plant design, particularly for rhenium (Re) production from W. Combined neutron transport and inventory simulations for representative spatially heterogeneous high-resolution models of a fusion power plant show that the production rate of Re is strongly influenced by the surrounding local spatial environment. Localised variation in neutron moderation (slowing down) due to structural steel and coolant, particularly water, can dramatically increase Re production because of the huge cross sections of giant resolved resonances in the neutron-capture reaction of 186W at low neutron energies. Calculations using cross section data corrected for temperature (Doppler) effects suggest that temperature may have a relatively lesser influence on transmutation rates.

  13. Beryllium plasma-facing components for the ITER-like wall project at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, M J; Sundelin, P [Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, Association Euratom-VR (Sweden); Bailescu, V [Nuclear Fuel Plant, Pitesti (Romania); Coad, J P; Matthews, G F; Pedrick, L; Riccardo, V; Villedieu, E [Culham Science Centre, Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Hirai, T; Linke, J [IEF-2, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association Euratom-FZJ, Juelich (Germany); Likonen, J [VTT, Association Euratom-Tekes, 02044 VTT (Finland); Lungu, C P [NILPRP, Association Euratom-MEdC, Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: rubel@kth.se

    2008-03-15

    ITER-Like Wall Project has been launched at the JET tokamak in order to study a tokamak operation with beryllium components on the main chamber wall and tungsten in the divertor. To perform this first comprehensive test of both materials in a thermonuclear fusion environment, a broad program has been undertaken to develop plasma-facing components and assess their performance under high power loads. The paper provides a concise report on scientific and technical issues in the development of a beryllium first wall at JET.

  14. Deuterium accumulation in tungsten at high fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibrov, Mikhail [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Balden, Martin; Matej, Matej [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bystrov, Kirill; Morgan, Thomas [FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    The data on the deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) at high fluences (≥ 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}) are scarce and the existing results are contradictory. Since retention in W is known to be flux-dependent, the laboratory experiments addressing this issue should be carried out in reactor-relevant conditions (high fluxes of low-energy ions). In this work the samples made of polycrystalline W were exposed to D plasmas in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI at temperatures ranging from 360 K to 1140 K to fluences in the range of 0.3-8.7 x 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}. It was observed that at exposure temperatures of 360 K and 580 K the D retention was only slightly dependent on the ion fluence. In addition, the presence of blister-like structures was found after the exposures, and their density and size distributions were also only weakly dependent on the fluence. In the case of exposure at 1140 K no surface modifications of the samples after plasma exposure were detected and the concentrations of retained D were very small. At all temperatures used the total amounts of retained D were smaller compared to those obtained by other researchers at lower ion flux densities, which indicates that the incident ion flux may play an important role in the total D retention in W.

  15. Anthocyanins facilitate tungsten accumulation in Brassica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, K.L.

    2002-11-01

    Accumulation of molybdenum in Brassica was recently found to be correlated with anthocyanin content, involving the formation of a blue complex. Here the role of anthocyanins in tungsten sequestration was investigated using three species of Brassica: B. rapa (cv. Fast plants), B. juncea (Indian mustard) and B. oleracea (red cabbage). Seedlings of B. rapa and B. juncea turned blue when supplied with colourless tungstate. The blue compound co-localized with anthocyanins in the peripheral cell layers, and the degree of blueness was correlated with anthocyanin content. The direct involvement of anthocyanins in the blue coloration was evident when purified anthocyanins showed a colour change from pink to blue in vitro upon addition of tungstate, over a wide pH range. Anthocyanin production was upregulated 3-fold by W in B. juncea, possibly reflecting a function for anthocyanins in W tolerance or sequestration. The presence of anthocyanins facilitated W accumulation in B. rapa: anthocyanin-containing seedlings accumulated 3-fold more W than an anthocyaninless mutant. There was no correlation between anthocyanin content and W tolerance under these conditions. The nature of the interaction between anthocyanins and tungstate was investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed no change in the local chemical environment of Wupon uptake of tungstate by the plant; HPLC analysis of purified anthocyanin with or without tungstate showed no peak shift after metal treatment.

  16. Tungsten Oxides for Photocatalysis, Electrochemistry, and Phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhen-Feng; Song, Jiajia; Pan, Lun; Zhang, Xiangwen; Wang, Li; Zou, Ji-Jun

    2015-09-23

    The conversion, storage, and utilization of renewable energy have all become more important than ever before as a response to ever-growing energy and environment concerns. The performance of energy-related technologies strongly relies on the structure and property of the material used. The earth-abundant family of tungsten oxides (WOx ≤3 ) receives considerable attention in photocatalysis, electrochemistry, and phototherapy due to their highly tunable structures and unique physicochemical properties. Great breakthroughs have been made in enhancing the optical absorption, charge separation, redox capability, and electrical conductivity of WOx ≤3 through control of the composition, crystal structure, morphology, and construction of composite structures with other materials, which significantly promotes the efficiency of processes and devices based on this material. Herein, the properties and synthesis of WOx ≤3 family are reviewed, and then their energy-related applications are highlighted, including solar-light-driven water splitting, CO2 reduction, and pollutant removal, electrochromism, supercapacitors, lithium batteries, solar and fuel cells, non-volatile memory devices, gas sensors, and cancer therapy, from the aspect of function-oriented structure design and control.

  17. Growth of silicon on tungsten diselenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qirong; van Bremen, Rik; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Here, we report a scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy study of the growth of silicon on a tungsten diselenide (WSe2) substrate. We have found convincing experimental evidence that silicon does not remain on the WSe2 substrate but rather intercalates between the top layers of WSe2. Upon silicon deposition, the flat WSe2 surface converts into a surface with a hill-and-valley structure. The lattice constant of the hill-and-valley structure is identical to the lattice constant of WSe2 and the transition from hills to valleys is very gradual, suggesting that the top layer is composed of pristine WSe2. In order to verify this conjecture, we have removed the height information from our scanning tunneling microscopy signal and obtained chemical contrast of the surface by recording dI/dz, rather than the conventional regulation voltage of the z-piezo. The spatially resolved dI/dz maps provide compelling evidence that the deposited silicon does indeed not reside on top of the WSe2 substrate.

  18. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The calculus of variations is employed to find steady divergence-free velocity fields that maximize transport of a tracer between two parallel walls held at fixed concentration for one of two constraints on flow strength: a fixed value of the kinetic energy or a fixed value of the enstrophy. The optimizing flows consist of an array of (convection) cells of a particular aspect ratio Gamma. We solve the nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations analytically for weak flows and numerically (and via matched asymptotic analysis in the fixed energy case) for strong flows. We report the results in terms of the Nusselt number Nu, a dimensionless measure of the tracer transport, as a function of the Peclet number Pe, a dimensionless measure of the energy or enstrophy of the flow. For both constraints the maximum transport Nu_{MAX}(Pe) is realized in cells of decreasing aspect ratio Gamma_{opt}(Pe) as Pe increases. For the fixed energy problem, Nu_{MAX} \\sim Pe and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Pe^{-1/2}, while for the fixed enstrophy scen...

  19. VARIATION OF RESOLVED PROPORTIONAL LIMIT WITH MOSAIC ANGLE FROM 77K TO 973K IN ZONE REFINED TUNGSTEN,

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUNGSTEN, *FRACTOGRAPHY), (*CRYSTAL SUBSTRUCTURE, TUNGSTEN), ZONE MELTING, DISLOCATIONS, GRAIN BOUNDARIES, ELECTRON BEAM MELTING , STRAIN(MECHANICS), IMPURITIES, TENSILE PROPERTIES, SINGLE CRYSTALS, CRYOGENICS, HIGH TEMPERATURE

  20. Tungsten Contact and Line Resistance Reduction with Advanced Pulsed Nucleation Layer and Low Resistivity Tungsten Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, Anand; Chen, Feng; Lin, Jasmine; Humayun, Raashina; Wongsenakhum, Panya; Chang, Sean; Danek, Michal; Itou, Takamasa; Nakayama, Tomoo; Kariya, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Masazumi; Hizume, Shunichi

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes electrical testing results of new tungsten chemical vapor deposition (CVD-W) process concepts that were developed to address the W contact and bitline scaling issues on 55 nm node devices. Contact resistance (Rc) measurements in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices indicate that the new CVD-W process for sub-32 nm and beyond - consisting of an advanced pulsed nucleation layer (PNL) combined with low resistivity tungsten (LRW) initiation - produces a 20-30% drop in Rc for diffused NiSi contacts. From cross-sectional bright field and dark field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, such Rc improvement can be attributed to improved plugfill and larger in-feature W grain size with the advanced PNL+LRW process. More experiments that measured contact resistance for different feature sizes point to favorable Rc scaling with the advanced PNL+LRW process. Finally, 40% improvement in line resistance was observed with this process as tested on 55 nm embedded dynamic random access memory (DRAM) devices, confirming that the advanced PNL+LRW process can be an effective metallization solution for sub-32 nm devices.

  1. Laser inertial fusion dry-wall materials response to pulsed ions at power-plant level fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renk, T. J.; Tanaka, T. J.; Olson, C. L.; Peterson, R. R.; Knowles, T. R.

    2004-08-01

    Pulses of MeV-level ions with fluences of up to 20 J/cm 2 can be expected to impinge on the first-wall of future laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plants. To simulate the effect of these ions, we have exposed candidate dry-wall materials to ion pulses from RHEPP-1, located at Sandia National Laboratories. Various forms of tungsten and tungsten alloy were exposed to up to 1000 pulses, with some samples heated to 600 °C. Thresholds for roughening and material removal, and evolution of surface morphology were measured and compared with code predictions for materials response. Tungsten is observed to undergo surface roughening and subsurface crack formation that evolves over hundreds of pulses, and which can occur both below and above the melt threshold. Heating and Re-alloying mitigate, but do not eliminate, these apparently thermomechanically-caused effects. Use of a 3-D geometry, and/or use of the tungsten in thin-film form may offer improved survivability compared to bulk tungsten.

  2. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics studies of He Bubble Growth in Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uberuaga, Blas; Sandoval, Luis; Perez, Danny; Voter, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how materials respond to extreme environments is critical for predicting and improving performance. In materials such as tungsten exposed to plasmas for nuclear fusion applications, novel nanoscale fuzzes, comprised of tendrils of tungsten, form as a consequence of the implantation of He into the near surface. However, the detailed mechanisms that link He bubble formation to the ultimate development of fuzz are unclear. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insight into the He implantation process, but are necessarily performed at implantation rates that are orders of magnitudes faster than experiment. Here, using accelerated molecular dynamics methods, we examine the role of He implantation rates on the physical evolution of He bubbles in tungsten. We find that, as the He rate is reduced, new types of events involving the response of the tungsten matrix to the pressure in the bubble become competitive and change the overall evolution of the bubble as well as the subsequent morphology of the tungsten surface. We have also examined how bubble growth differs at various microstructural features. These results highlight the importance of performing simulations at experimentally relevant conditions in order to correctly capture the contributions of the various significant kinetic processes and predict the overall response of the material.

  3. Measurements and modelling of hydrogen dynamics in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas; Schmid, Klaus; Toussaint, Udo von; Jacob, Wolfgang [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Although hydrogen retention in defect free tungsten is low it can be significantly altered by plasma wetting. Thus understanding the interaction and dynamics of hydrogen in tungsten becomes an important issue. Present understanding distinguishes between solute and trapped hydrogen inventory. The solute hydrogen is located in the tetrahedral interstitial sites of bbc tungsten and can diffuse rapidly due to the low activation energy of 0.2-0.4 eV. The trapped hydrogen inventory resides at defects like vacancies, grain boundaries or dislocations, with de-trapping energies between 0.8-2.0 eV and is therefore less mobile. Common ex-situ experiments only allow the investigation of hydrogen retained in traps, while the solute is out of experimental reach due to its fast out-gassing at ambient temperatures. In this study the dynamics of the solute hydrogen in tungsten is measured in-situ for the first time. Diffusion/trapping simulations reveal that for low temperature e.g. 200 K, the solute hydrogen dominates the total inventory and its out-gassing after implantation is slowed down to the timescale of hours. Therefore in-situ hydrogen implantation and nuclear reaction analysis of tungsten samples are conducted at temperatures down to 140 K investigating experimentally the dynamics of solute hydrogen.

  4. 75 FR 75694 - Certain Semiconductor Integration Circuits Using Tungsten Metallization and Products Containing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Integration Circuits Using Tungsten Metallization and Products Containing... United States after importation of certain semiconductor integrated circuits using tungsten metallization... following six respondents ] remained in the investigation: Tower Semiconductor, Ltd. of Israel;...

  5. Mechanical-property evaluation of a series of commercial tungsten alloys. Memorandum report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruchey, W.J.; Montiel, D.M.

    1987-06-01

    A series of commercially available tungsten alloys ranging in tungsten content from 75% to 95% were evaluated. Typical tensile and compressive engineering properties are reported. These tests were conducted in support of penetrator ballistic-test programs.

  6. Largest domestic tungsten and molybdenum deep processing project finding its home in Luan-chuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Recently, a tungsten and molybdenum deep processing project was formally executed with a joint investment of 300 million yuan from Luanchuan Molybdenum Mining & Smelting Co., Ltd, Beijing Tian-Long Tungsten & Mo-

  7. Microwave synthesis of ultrafine and nanosized powders of tungsten oxide and carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaenko, Irina; Kedin, Nikolay; Shveikin, Gennadii; Polyakov, Evgenii [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of Solid State Chemistry

    2014-03-15

    A new method of synthesis of nanosized and ultrafine tungsten oxide and carbide powders is offered, which combines carbon carrier supported classical liquid-phase precipitation and low-temperature microwave treatment. The full range of intermediate substances obtained during thermolysis, reduction and carburization of precursors to final products is presented. It is shown that cooling of ammonium tungstate solution to 4 C and the use of carbon carrier at the precipitation stage can increase the specific surface area from 20 to 100 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. (orig.)

  8. Tungsten Data for Current and Future Uses in Fusion and Plasma Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Beiersdorfer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We give a brief overview of our recent experimental and theoretical work involving highly charged tungsten ions in high-temperature magnetically confined plasmas. Our work includes X-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy, state-of-the-art structure calculations, the generation of dielectronic recombination rate coefficients, collisional-radiative spectral modeling and assessments of the atomic data need for X-ray diagnostics monitoring of the parameters of the core plasma of future tokamaks, such as ITER. We give examples of our recent results in these areas.

  9. Activated flux tungsten inert gas welding of 8 mm-thick AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘观辉; 刘美华; 易耀勇; 张宇鹏; 罗子艺; 许磊

    2015-01-01

    AISI 304 stainless steel plates were welded with activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) method by utilizing self-developed activated flux. It is indicated from the experimental results that for 8 mm-thick AISI 304 stainless steel plate, weld joint of full penetration and one-side welding with good weld appearance can be obtained in a single pass without groove preparation by utilizing A-TIG welding. Moreover, activated flux powders do not cause significant effect on the microstructure of TIG weld and the mechanical properties of A-TIG weld joints are also superior to those of C-TIG (conventional TIG) welding.

  10. Study of the interactions of pions in the CALICE silicon-tungsten calorimeter prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C; Repond, J; Yu, J; Eigen, G; Mikami, Y; Watson, N K; Wilson, J A; Goto, T; Mavromanolakis, G; Thomson, M A; Ward, D R; Yan, W; Benchekroun, D; Hoummada, A; Khoulaki, Y; Apostolakis, J; Ribon, A; Uzhinskiy, V; Benyamna, M; Carloganu, C; Fehr, F; Gay, P; Blazey, G C; Chakraborty, D; Dyshkant, A; Francis, K; Hedin, D; Lima, J G; Zutshi, V; Hostachy, J Y; Krastev, K; Morin, L; D'Ascenzo, N; Cornett, U; David, D; Fabbri, R; Falley, G; Gadow, K; Garutti, E; Gottlicher, P; Jung, T; Karstensen, S; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lutz, B; Meyer, N; Morgunov, V; Reinecke, M; Sefkow, F; Smirnov, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Wattimena, N; Wendt, O; Feege, N; Groll, M; Haller, J; Heuer, R D; Morozov, S; Richter, S; Samson, J; Kaplan, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Shen, W; Tadday, A; Bilki, B; Norbeck, E; Onel, Y; Kim, E J; Kim, G; Kim, D W; Lee, K; Lee, S C; Kawagoe, K; Tamura, Y; Dauncey, P D; Magnan, A M; Yilmaz, H; Zorba, O; Bartsch, V; Postranecky, M; Warren, M; Wing, M; Green, M G; Salvatore, F; Bedjidian, M; Kieffer, R; Laktineh, I; Fouz, M C; Bailey, D S; Barlow, R J; Kelly, M; Thompson, R J; Danilov, M; Tarkovsky, E; Baranova, N; Karmanov, D; Korolev, M; Merkin, M; Voronin, A; Frey, A; Lu, S; Seidel, K; Simon, F; Soldner, C; Weuste, L; Bonis, J; Bouquet, B; Callier, S; Cornebise, P; Doublet, Ph; Faucci Giannelli, M; Fleury, J; Li, H; Martin-Chassard, G; Richard, F; de la Taille, Ch; Poeschl, R; Raux, L; Seguin-Moreau, N; Wicek, F; Anduze, M; Boudry, V; Brient, J C; Gaycken, G; Jeans, D; Mora de Freitas, P; Musat, G; Reinhard, M; Rouge, A; Ruan, M; Vanel, J C; Videau, H; Park, K H; Zacek, J; Cvach, J; Gallus, P; Havranek, M; Janata, M; Marcisovsky, M; Polak, I; Popule, J; Tomasek, L; Tomasek, M; Ruzicka, P; Sicho, P; Smolik, J; Vrba, V; Zalesak, J; Belhorma, B; Belmir, M; Nam, S W; Park, I H; Yang, J; Chai, J S; Kim, J T; Kim, G B; Kang, J; Kwon, Y J

    2010-01-01

    A prototype silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter for an ILC detector was tested in 2007 at the CERN SPS test beam. Data were collected with electron and hadron beams in the energy range 8 to 80 GeV. The analysis described here focuses on the interactions of pions in the calorimeter. One of the main objectives of the CALICE program is to validate the Monte Carlo tools available for the design of a full-sized detector. The interactions of pions in the Si-W calorimeter are therefore confronted with the predictions of various physical models implemented in the GEANT4 simulation framework.

  11. Influence of tungsten and titanium on the structure of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the as-cast state structure of chromium cast iron designed for operation under harsh impact-abrasive conditions. In the process of chromium iron castings manufacture, very strong influence on the structure of this material have the parameters of the technological process. Among others, adding to the Fe-Cr-C alloy the alloying elements like tungsten and titanium leads to the formation of additional carbides in the structure of this cast iron, which may favourably affect the casting properties, including the resistance to abrasive wear.

  12. From the Chloride of Tungsten to the Upper Limit of the Periodic Table of Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of the physical chemical properties and the technology of manufac- turing chemically clean hexachloride of tungsten has led to unexpected results. It was found that each element of the Periodic Table of Elements has its own hyperbola in the graph “molecular mass — content of the element”. The hyperbolas differ according to the atomic mass of the elements. Lagrange’s theorem shows that the tops of the hyper- bolas approach to an upper limit. This upper limit means the heaviest element, which is possible in the Table. According to the calculation, its atomic mass is 411.66, while its number is 155.

  13. Structure of MMCs with SiC Particles after Gas-tungsten Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przełożyńska E.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The gas-tungsten arc (GTA welding behaviors of a magnesium matrix composite reinforced with SiC particles were examined in terms of microstructure characteristics and process efficiencies. This study focused on the effects of the GTAW process parameters (like welding current in the range of 100/200 A on the size of the fusion zone (FZ. The analyses revealed the strong influence of the GTA welding process on the width and depth of the fusion zone and also on the refinement of the microstructure in the fusion zone. Additionally, the results of dendrite arm size (DAS measurements were presented.

  14. Spontaneous Behaviors and Wall-Curvature Lead to Apparent Wall Preference in Planarian.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaro Akiyama

    Full Text Available The planarian Dugesia japonica tends to stay near the walls of its breeding containers and experimental dishes in the laboratory, a phenomenon called "wall preference". This behavior is thought to be important for environmental adaptation, such as hiding by planarians in nature. However, the mechanisms regulating wall-preference behavior are not well understood, since this behavior occurs in the absence of any particular stimulation. Here we show the mechanisms of wall-preference behavior. Surprisingly, planarian wall-preference behavior was also shown even by the head alone and by headless planarians. These results indicate that planarian "wall-preference" behavior only appears to be a "preference" behavior, and is actually an outcome of spontaneous behaviors, rather than of brain function. We found that in the absence of environmental cues planarians moved basically straight ahead until they reached a wall, and that after reaching a wall, they changed their direction of movement to one tangential to the wall, suggesting that this spontaneous behavior may play a critical role in the wall preference. When we tested another spontaneous behavior, the wigwag movement of the planarian head, using computer simulation with various wigwag angles and wigwag intervals, large wigwag angle and short wigwag interval reduced wall-preference behavior. This indicated that wigwag movement may determine the probability of staying near the wall or leaving the wall. Furthermore, in accord with this simulation, when we tested planarian wall-preference behavior using several assay fields with different curvature of the wall, we found that concavity and sharp curvature of walls negatively impacted wall preference by affecting the permissible angle of the wigwag movement. Together, these results indicate that planarian wall preference may be involuntarily caused by the combination of two spontaneous planarian behaviors: moving straight ahead until reaching a wall and

  15. Mathematical Modelling of the Process of Tungsten Fluorides Reduction by Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Brendakov Roman; Shvab Alexander; Brendakov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The process of tungsten fluorides reduction by hydrogen is a component part of Fluoride technology of tungsten conversion. Nowadays the researchers are definitely interested in studying this process. It is connected with common use of metal tungsten products in different sectors of the economy, which is the result of unique qualities of this metal. With the help of physical and mathematical modelling of the process of tungsten hexafluoride reduction by hydrogen, it becomes possible to create ...

  16. The effect of vanadium-carbon monolayer on the adsorption of tungsten and carbon atoms on tungsten-carbide (0001 surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moitra A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a first-principles calculations to study the effect of a vanadium-carbon (VC monolayer on the adsorption process of tungsten (W and carbon (C atoms onto tungsten-carbide (WC (0001 surface. The essential configuration for the study is a supercell of hexagonal WC with a (0001 surface. When adding the VC monolayer, we employed the lowest energy configuration by examining various configurations. The total energy of the system is computed as a function of the W or C adatoms’ height from the surface. The adsorption of a W and C adatom on a clean WC (0001 surface is compared with that of a W and C adatom on a WC (0001 surface with VC monolayer. The calculations show that the adsorption energy increased for both W and C adatoms in presence of the VC monolayer. Our results provide a fundamental understanding that can explain the experimentally observed phenomena of inhibited grain growth during sintering of WC or WC-Co powders in presence of VC.

  17. Properties of drawn W wire used as high performance fibre in tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Fuhr, M.; Gietl, H.; Han, Y.; Höschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch; Travitzky, N.; Zhao, P.; Neu, R.

    2016-07-01

    High strength and creep resistance also at high temperature, combined with a high thermal conductivity and high melting point make tungsten (W) an ideal material for highly loaded areas in future fusion reactors. However, as a typical bcc metal tungsten features an intrinsic brittleness up to very high temperature and is prone to operational embrittlement. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite (Wf/W) utilizes extrinsic toughening mechanisms similar to ceramic fibre-reinforced ceramics and therefore overcomes the brittleness problem. The properties of the composite are to a large extend determined by the properties of the drawn tungsten wire used as reinforcement fibres. W wire exhibits a superior strength and shows ductile behaviour with exceptional local plasticity. Beside the typical mechanisms observed for ceramic composites the ductile deformation of the fibres is therefore an additional very effective toughening mechanism. Tension tests were used to investigate this phenomenon in more detail. Results show that there is a region of enhanced localized plastic deformation. The specific energy consumption in this region was estimated and used to suggest optimisation options for Wf/W composites.

  18. 3D-microscopy of hydrogen in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeper, K., E-mail: katrin.peeper@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany); Moser, M.; Reichart, P. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany); Markina, E.; Mayer, M.; Lindig, S.; Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    The mapping of hydrogen distributions in 3 dimensions and its correlation with structural features allow further insight into mechanisms of hydrogen trapping in tungsten. We studied hydrogen distributions in 25 μm thick polycrystalline tungsten foils by 3D hydrogen microscopy using a proton–proton-scattering method. Two types of tungsten samples were prepared: (i) at 1200 K annealed foils and using 1.8 MeV implantation energy (ii) at 2000 K annealed foils using 200 eV implantation energy. It has been found that large variations of surface hydrogen contamination occur within different samples. Nevertheless, a statistically significant variation of the hydrogen content across grain boundaries has been observed.

  19. Field-emission spectroscopy of beryllium atoms adsorbed on tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czyzewski, J.J.; Grzesiak, W.; Krajniak, J. (Politechnika Wroclawska (Poland))

    1981-01-01

    Field emission energy distributions (FEED) have been measured for the beryllium-tungsten (023) adsorption system over the 78-450 K temperature range. A temperature dependence of the normalized half-width, ..delta../d, of FEED peaks changed significantly due to beryllium adsorption; and the curve, ..delta../d vs p, for the Be/W adsorption system was identical in character to the calculated curve based on the free electron model in contrast to the curve for the clean tungsten surface. In the last part of this paper Gadzuk's theory of the resonance-tunneling effect is applied to the beryllium atom on tungsten. Experimental and theoretical curves of the enhancement factor as a function of energy have been discussed.

  20. Tungsten-microdiamond composites for plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livramento, V.; Nunes, D.; Correia, J. B.; Carvalho, P. A.; Mardolcar, U.; Mateus, R.; Hanada, K.; Shohoji, N.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Alves, E.

    2011-09-01

    Tungsten is considered as one of promising candidate materials for plasma facing component in nuclear fusion reactors due to its resistance to sputtering and high melting point. High thermal conductivity is also a prerequisite for plasma facing components under the unique service environment of fusion reactor characterised by the massive heat load, especially in the divertor area. The feasibility of mechanical alloying of nanodiamond and tungsten, and the consolidation of the composite powders with Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) was previously demonstrated. In the present research we report on the use of microdiamond instead of nanodiamond in such composites. Microdiamond is more favourable than nanodiamond in view of phonon transport performance leading to better thermal conductivity. However, there is a trade off between densification and thermal conductivity as the SPS temperature increases tungsten carbide formation from microdiamond is accelerated inevitably while the consolidation density would rise.

  1. Recombination of open-f-shell tungsten ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, C.; Badnell, N. R.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Wolf, A.

    2017-03-01

    We review experimental and theoretical efforts aimed at a detailed understanding of the recombination of electrons with highly charged tungsten ions characterised by an open 4f sub-shell. Highly charged tungsten occurs as a plasma contaminant in ITER-like tokamak experiments, where it acts as an unwanted cooling agent. Modelling of the charge state populations in a plasma requires reliable thermal rate coefficients for charge-changing electron collisions. The electron recombination of medium-charged tungsten species with open 4f sub-shells is especially challenging to compute reliably. Storage-ring experiments have been conducted that yielded recombination rate coefficients at high energy resolution and well-understood systematics. Significant deviations compared to simplified, but prevalent, computational models have been found. A new class of ab initio numerical calculations has been developed that provides reliable predictions of the total plasma recombination rate coefficients for these ions.

  2. Dielectric response of tungsten modified Ba(Ti0.90Zr0.10O3 ceramics obtained by mixed oxide method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Moura

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrical response of Ba(Ti0.90Zr0.10O3 (BZT ceramics obtained by the mixed oxide method as a function of tungsten content was investigated. According to X-ray diffraction analysis the single phase BZT1W (1 wt.% W doped BZT and BZT2W (2 wt.% W doped BZT ceramics, crystallized in a perovskite structure, were obtained. It is also shown that tungsten substituted ceramics can be sintered at a reduced temperature when compared to the undoped BZT. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR analyses reveals that substitution of Ti4+ by W6+ causes distortion in the crystal structure changing lattice parameter. Substitution of W6+ on B-site of ABO3 perovskite BZT ceramics shifted the phase transition to lower temperatures up to a tungsten content of 2 wt.% leading to a relaxor-like behaviour.

  3. Microstructure and Texture Changes of Tungsten-Rhenium coated on Carbon Fiber Composite during Annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUXiang; XUZengyu; S.Tamura; N.Yoshida

    2002-01-01

    Since tungsten was chose as the divertor tiles of 1TER, the investigation of tungsten and its coating as plasma facing material (PFM) have been paid more attentions by fusion scientists all over the world. Recent years, tungsten coatings have been successfully

  4. Effect of neon plasma pre-irradiation on surface morphology and deuterium retention of tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.; De Temmerman, G.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Ji, G.; Zhou, H. B.; Wang, B.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Lu, G. H.

    2015-01-01

    Neon and deuterium plasma irradiation of polycrystalline tungsten targets have been performed at high fluxes of ∼1024 ions m−2 s−1 to study the interaction of neon with tungsten and the influence of neon on deuterium retention. Tungsten exposure to neon plasma leads to the

  5. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  6. 40 CFR 440.60 - Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... tungsten ore subcategory. 440.60 Section 440.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Tungsten Ore Subcategory § 440.60 Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  7. 75 FR 39678 - Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing....: 13163-000. c. Date filed: April 3, 2008. d. Applicant: Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC. e. Name of.... Hicks, Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC, 9050 Pine Creek Road, Bishop, CA 93514, phone (760) 387-2080....

  8. Loss of Balance between Tungsten Reserve and Mining, China’s Resource Advantage Is Weakening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>China’s tungsten reserve, product output, export trade volume and consumption all rank top in the world. By offering supply for more than 80% global tungsten consumption with less than 50% of global tungsten ore resource, China has made significant contribution to the development of

  9. 75 FR 66082 - Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit... October 20, 2010. On November 9, 2009, Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC filed an application for a... Tungsten Development, LLC, 725 9050 Pine Creek Road, Bishop, CA 93514; phone: (706) 387-2080. FERC...

  10. 75 FR 66079 - Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2010. On November 9, 2009, Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC filed an application for a preliminary... be 26,300,000 kilowatt-hours. Applicant Contact: Douglas A. Hicks, Bishop Tungsten Development,...

  11. Determination of the emissivity of the tungsten hexa-ethoxide pyrolysis flame using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mudau, AE

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available of the Tungsten Hexa-Ethoxide Pyrolysis Flame using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy Azwitamisi E Mudau1, Bonex W Mwakikunga2, Neels Brink3, Cornelius J Willers1, Andrew Forbes2, Lerato Shikwambana2, Malcolm Govender2 1Defence, Peace... effects. The later is negligible in the setup used. In this paper we present the emissivity of the flame determined from the transmissivity measured using the FTIR Spectroscopy. 1. Introduction Laser pyrolysis is a versatile non...

  12. Hydrogen retention and erosion behaviour of tungsten-doped carbon films (a-C:W); Wasserstoffrueckhaltung und Erosionsverhalten von wolframdotierten Kohlenstofffilmen (a-C:W)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauter, Philipp Andre

    2012-06-13

    In this study tungsten-doped carbon films (a-C:W) were investigated with respect on hydrogen retention and erosion under deuterium (D) impact. a-C:W was used as model system for mixed layers, which will be deposited on the inner wall of the fusion reactor ITER. The erosion is lowered by the successive enrichment of tungsten at the surface and only mildly depends on the dopant concentration and the temperature. The hydrogen retention is determined by the diffusion of D into depth, which increases with temperature. The resulting successive accumulation of D in a-C:W is insensitive on enrichment for high fluences and in line with the accumulation of D in C.

  13. L-SHELL IONIZATION MEASUREMENT OF TUNGSTEN BY ELECTRON IMPACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG XIU-FENG; HE FU-QING; LONG XIAN-GUAN

    2000-01-01

    L-shell partial production cross sections of Lα- , Lβ-, Lγ- rays by electron impact were measured by observing the counts of X-ray from impacted thin tungsten target. Total production cross sections and mean ionization cross sections were deduced from these measured results. The electron beam energy range was from 11 to 36 keV. Tungsten was sputtered onto a carbon backing to reduce bremsstrahlung of the backing. The effect of electrons reflected by the backing has been corrected. Comparison with two theoretical calculations has performed. The experimental results agree rather well with the theoretical predications.

  14. Vacuum arc melting of tungsten-hafnium-carbon alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammon, R. L.; Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The vacuum arc casting of tungsten alloys, which contain carbon as an alloy addition, require special melting procedures in order to produce melts of consistent controlled levels of alloy content. A melting procedure will be described in which elemental components of a tungsten 0.35% HfC alloy are assembled to form an electrode for ac vacuum arc melting to produce 3-in.-diam ingots. Melting procedures and analytical chemistry are discussed and compared with data for ingots produced by other techniques.

  15. The WiZard/CAPRICE silicon-tungsten calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocciolini, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Celletti, F. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Finetti, N. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Grandi, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Papini, P. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Perego, A. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Piccardi, S. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Spillantini, P. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Bidoli, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); Candusso, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); Casolino, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); Morselli, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); Picozza, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); Sparvoli, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); Basini, G. [Laboratori Nazionali INFN, Frascati (Italy); Mazzenga, G. [Laboratori Nazionali INFN, Frascati (Italy); Ricci, M. [Laboratori Nazionali INFN, Frascati (Italy); Bronzini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `La Sapienza`, and Sezione INFN di Roma (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita, Trieste and Sezione INFN di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Boezio, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita, Trieste and Sezione INFN di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Bravar, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita, Trieste and Sezione INFN di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Fratnik, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita, Trieste and Sezione INFN di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Schiavon, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita, Trieste and Sezione INFN di Trie (Italy)

    1996-02-21

    A silicon-tungsten calorimeter has been developed to be flown in the WiZard/CAPRICE balloon borne experiment to measure the flux of antiprotons, positrons and light nuclei in the cosmic radiation. The calorimeter is composed of 8 x,y silicon sampling planes [active area (48 x 48) cm{sup 2}] interleaved with 7 tungsten absorbers (7 radiation lengths); it provides the topology of the interacting events together with an independent measurement of the deposited energy. Details of the front-end electronics and of the read-out system are given and the overall performances during pre-flight ground operations are described as well. (orig.).

  16. The WiZard/CAPRICE silicon-tungsten calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocciolini, M.; Celletti, F.; Finetti, N.; Grandi, M.; Papini, P.; Perego, A.; Piccardi, S.; Spillantini, P. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Bidoli, V.; Candusso, M. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione di Roma II (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    A silicon-tungsten calorimeter has been developed to be flown in the WiZard/ CAPRICE balloon borne experiment to measure the flux of antiprotons, positrons and light nuclei in the cosmic radiation. The calorimeter is composed of 8 x, y silicon sampling planes (active area (48x48) cm{sup 2}) interleaved with 7 tungsten absorbers (7 radiation lengths); it provides the topology of the interacting events together with an independent measurement of the deposited energy. Details of the front-end electronics and of the read-out system are given and the overall performances during pre-flight ground operations are described as well.

  17. Temperature and distortion transients in gas tungsten-arc weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glickstein, S.S.; Friedman, E.

    1979-10-01

    An analysis and test program to develop a fundamental understanding of the gas tungsten-arc welding process has been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to develop techniques to determine and control the various welding parameters and weldment conditions so as to result in optimum weld response characteristics. These response characteristics include depth of penetration, weld bead configuration, weld bead sink and roll, distortion, and cracking sensitivity. The results are documented of that part of the program devoted to analytical and experimental investigations of temperatures, weld bead dimensions, and distortions for moving gas tungsten-arc welds applied to Alloy 600 plates.

  18. Effects of laser ablation on cemented tungsten carbide surface quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, J.L.; Butler, D.L.; Sim, L.M.; Jarfors, A.E.W. [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-11-15

    Although laser micromachining has been touted as being the most promising way to fabricate micro tools, there has been no proper evaluation of the effects of laser ablation on bulk material properties. The current work demonstrates the effects of laser ablation on the properties of a cemented tungsten carbide surface. Of particular interest is the resultant increase in compressive residual stresses in the ablated surface. From this study it is seen that there are no adverse effects from laser ablation of cemented tungsten carbide that would preclude its use for the fabrication of micro-tools but a finishing process may not be avoidable. (orig.)

  19. Effects of laser ablation on cemented tungsten carbide surface quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J. L.; Butler, D. L.; Sim, L. M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.

    2010-11-01

    Although laser micromachining has been touted as being the most promising way to fabricate micro tools, there has been no proper evaluation of the effects of laser ablation on bulk material properties. The current work demonstrates the effects of laser ablation on the properties of a cemented tungsten carbide surface. Of particular interest is the resultant increase in compressive residual stresses in the ablated surface. From this study it is seen that there are no adverse effects from laser ablation of cemented tungsten carbide that would preclude its use for the fabrication of micro-tools but a finishing process may not be avoidable.

  20. Electronic transport and scattering times in tungsten-decorated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Jamie A.; Henriksen, Erik A.

    2017-02-01

    The electronic transport properties of a monolayer graphene device have been studied before and after the deposition of a dilute coating of tungsten adatoms on the surface. For coverages up to 2.5% of a monolayer, we find tungsten adatoms simultaneously donate electrons to graphene and reduce the carrier mobility, impacting the zero- and finite-field transport properties. Two independent transport analyses suggest the adatoms lie nearly 1 nm above the surface. The presence of adatoms is also seen to impact the low-field magnetoresistance, altering the signatures of weak localization.

  1. Quantum-Accurate Molecular Dynamics Potential for Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Mitchell; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this short contribution is to report on the development of a Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP) for tungsten. We have focused on the characterization of elastic and defect properties of the pure material in order to support molecular dynamics simulations of plasma-facing materials in fusion reactors. A parallel genetic algorithm approach was used to efficiently search for fitting parameters optimized against a large number of objective functions. In addition, we have shown that this many-body tungsten potential can be used in conjunction with a simple helium pair potential1 to produce accurate defect formation energies for the W-He binary system.

  2. Polaron transitions in charge intercalated amorphous tungsten oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenger, M.F.; Hofmann, T.; Schubert, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, and Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln (United States); Hoeing, T. [Flabeg GmbH and Co. KG, Furth im Wald (Germany)

    2008-04-15

    We present a parametric dielectric function model in dependence of the intercalated charge per tungsten ion ratio x, which excellently describes the ellipsometric experimental data, and allows the identification of two polaron modes corresponding to transitions between W{sup 4+} and W{sup 5+} and between W{sup 5+} and W{sup 6+} tungsten ion sites. A competitive relation between the two polaron transitions is found. An empirical relation for the amplitude of the polaron transitions is found useful to provide a good description of the polaron transition dependence on x. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. [Murine peritoneal neutrophil activation upon tungsten nanoparticles exposure in vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinova, E A; Baranov, V I

    2014-01-01

    Two examples of tungsten carbide nanoparticles (d = 15 nm, 50 nm) and tungsten carbide nanoparticles with 8% cobalt (d = 50 nm) have been found to induce the neutrophil activation 3 h and 36 h after intraperitoneal administration in the doses 0.005; 0.025; 0.05; 0.25; 0.5; 1; 2.5 and 5 microgram per 1 gram body weight to FVB mice. Neutrophil activation was calculated based on the CD11b and S100 antigen expression. Effect of nanoparticles is bimodal for all tested examples.

  4. Dislocation mechanism of deuterium retention in tungsten under plasma implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinko, V I; Grigorev, P; Bakaev, A; Terentyev, D; van Oost, G; Gao, F; Van Neck, D; Zhurkin, E E

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a new theoretical model for deuterium (D) retention in tungsten-based alloys on the basis of its being trapped at dislocations and transported to the surface via the dislocation network with parameters determined by ab initio calculations. The model is used to explain experimentally observed trends of D retention under sub-threshold implantation, which does not produce stable lattice defects to act as traps for D in conventional models. Saturation of D retention with implantation dose and effects due to alloying of tungsten with, e.g. tantalum, are evaluated, and comparison of the model predictions with experimental observations under high-flux plasma implantation conditions is presented.

  5. Engineered Surface Properties of Porous Tungsten from Cryogenic Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoop, Julius Malte

    Porous tungsten is used to manufacture dispenser cathodes due to it refractory properties. Surface porosity is critical to functional performance of dispenser cathodes because it allows for an impregnated ceramic compound to migrate to the emitting surface, lowering its work function. Likewise, surface roughness is important because it is necessary to ensure uniform wetting of the molten impregnate during high temperature service. Current industry practice to achieve surface roughness and surface porosity requirements involves the use of a plastic infiltrant during machining. After machining, the infiltrant is baked and the cathode pellet is impregnated. In this context, cryogenic machining is investigated as a substitutionary process for the current plastic infiltration process. Along with significant reductions in cycle time and resource use, surface quality of cryogenically machined un-infiltrated (as-sintered) porous tungsten has been shown to significantly outperform dry machining. The present study is focused on examining the relationship between machining parameters and cooling condition on the as-machined surface integrity of porous tungsten. The effects of cryogenic pre-cooling, rake angle, cutting speed, depth of cut and feed are all taken into consideration with respect to machining-induced surface morphology. Cermet and Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) cutting tools are used to develop high performance cryogenic machining of porous tungsten. Dry and pre-heated machining were investigated as a means to allow for ductile mode machining, yet severe tool-wear and undesirable smearing limited the feasibility of these approaches. By using modified PCD cutting tools, high speed machining of porous tungsten at cutting speeds up to 400 m/min is achieved for the first time. Beyond a critical speed, brittle fracture and built-up edge are eliminated as the result of a brittle to ductile transition. A model of critical chip thickness ( hc ) effects based on cutting

  6. Structural, electrochemical and optical comparisons of tungsten oxide coatings derived from tungsten powder-based sols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isik, Dilek, E-mail: e145342@metu.edu.t [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, METU, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Ak, Metin, E-mail: metinak@pamukkale.edu.t [Department of Chemistry, Pamukkale University, 20017 Denizli (Turkey); Durucan, Caner, E-mail: cdurucan@metu.edu.t [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, METU, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-11-02

    Tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) electrochromic coatings have been formed on indium tin oxide-coated glass substrates by aqueous routes. Coating sols are obtained by dissolving tungsten powder in acetylated (APTA) or plain peroxotungstic acid (PTA) solutions. The structural evolution and electrochromic performance of the coatings as a function of calcination temperature (250 {sup o}C and 400 {sup o}C) have been reported. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction have shown that amorphous WO{sub 3} films are formed after calcination at 250 {sup o}C for both processing routes; however, the coatings that calcined at 400 {sup o}C were crystalline in both cases. The calcination temperature-dependent crystallinity of the coatings results in differences in optical properties of the coatings. Higher coloration efficiencies can be achieved with amorphous coatings than could be seen in the crystalline coatings. The transmittance values (at 800 nm) in the colored state are 35% and 56% for 250 {sup o}C and 400 {sup o}C-calcined coatings, respectively. The electrochemical properties are more significantly influenced by the method of sol preparation. The ion storage capacities designating the electrochemical properties are found in the range of 1.62-2.74 x 10{sup -3} (mC cm{sup -2}) for APTA coatings; and 0.35-1.62 x 10{sup -3} (mC cm{sup -2}) for PTA coatings. As a result, a correlation between the microstructure and the electrochromic performance has been established.

  7. Seismic displacement of gravity retaining walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Seismic displacement of gravity walls had been studied using conventional static methods for controlled displacement design. In this study plain strain numerical analysis is performed using Plaxis dynamic program where prescribed displacement is applied at the bottom boundary of the soil to simulate the applied seismic load. Constrained absorbent side boundaries are introduced to prevent any wave reflection. The studied soil is chosen dense granular sand and modeled as elasto-plastic material according to Mohr–Column criteria while the gravity wall is assumed elastic. By comparing the resulted seismic wall displacements calculated by numerical analysis for six historical ground motions with that calculated by the pseudo-static method, it is found that numerical seismic displacements are either equal to or greater than corresponding pseudo-static values. Permissible seismic wall displacement calculated by AASHTO can be used for empirical estimation of seismic displacement. It is also found that seismic wall displacement is directly proportional with the positive angle of inclination of the back surface of the wall, soil flexibility and with the earthquake maximum ground acceleration. Seismic wall sliding is dominant and rotation is negligible for rigid walls when the ratio between the wall height and the foundation width is less than 1.4, while for greater ratios the wall becomes more flexible and rotation (rocking increases till the ratio reaches 1.8 where overturning is susceptible to take place. Cumulative seismic wall rotation increases with dynamic time and tends to be constant at the end of earthquake.

  8. Analysis of flat slab building with and without shear wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanaji R. Chavan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The analytical research carried out to study the behaviour flat slab building with and without shear wall reported in the present work. For analysis 15 storied flat slab building is analyzed for seismic behaviour. Response spectrum method is used for analysis considering different shear wall positions using ETABS software. Five different positions of shear wall were studied for analysis. From this analysis shear wall at core having square shape is most suitable case for construction of shear wall.

  9. Microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze. 2. Dehydration dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Vittorio; Griffith, Christopher S; Hanna, John V

    2009-07-06

    Low-temperature (25-600 degrees C) thermal transformations have been studied for hydrothermally prepared, microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) phases A(x)WO(3+x/2).zH(2)O as a function of temperature, where A is an exchangeable cation (in this case Na(+) or Cs(+)) located in hexagonal structural tunnels. Thermal treatment of the as-prepared sodium- and cesium-exchanged phases in air were monitored using a conventional laboratory-based X-ray diffractometer, while thermal transformations in vacuum were studied using synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction. Concurrent thermogravimetric, diffuse reflectance infrared (DRIFT), and (23)Na and (133)Cs magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopic studies have also been undertaken. For the cesium variant, cell volume contraction occurred from room temperature to about 350 degrees C, the regime in which water was "squeezed" out of tunnel sites. This was followed by a lattice expansion in the 350-600 degrees C temperature range. Over the entire temperature range, a net thermal contraction was observed, and this was the result of an anisotropic change in the cell dimensions which included a shortening of the A-O2 bond length. These changes explain why Cs(+) ions are locked into tunnel positions at temperatures as low as 400 degrees C, subsequently inducing a significant reduction in Cs(+) extractability under low pH (nitric acid) conditions. The changing Cs(+) speciation as detected by (133)Cs MAS NMR showed a condensation from multiple Cs sites, presumably associated with differing modes of Cs(+) hydration in the tunnels, to a single Cs(+) environment upon thermal transformation and water removal. While similar lattice contraction was observed for the as-prepared sodium variant, the smaller radius of Na(+) caused it to be relatively easily removed with acid in comparison to the Cs(+) variant. From (23)Na MAS NMR studies of the parent material, complex Na(+) speciation was observed with dehydrated and various

  10. Tailoring of fuzzy nanostructures on porous tungsten skeleton by helium plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Shin; Tanaka, Hirohiko; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2017-03-01

    Porous tungsten skeleton, which was fabricated by sintering of tungsten powder, was exposed to helium plasmas, and the fuzzy nanostructures were tailored on the surface. The hemispherical optical reflectance of the samples was measured at the wavelength of 633 nm. It was shown that the optical reflectance of the porous tungsten skeleton was lower than that of flat tungsten samples. The minimum reflectance was ∼0.4%, suggesting that the darkest metallic material was fabricated. The advantage of the porous tungsten skeleton with nanostructures for optical application is discussed.

  11. Operation of JET with an ITER-like Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Lorne, E-mail: Lorne.Horton@jet.uk [EFDA-CSU Culham, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); European Commission, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • JET has entered the second phase of operation with an ITER-like Wall. • Boundaries of safe plasma operation are being explored. • Studies have focused on material migration and erosion, disruptions and runaway electron beams, and optimisation of plasma and divertor performance. • Strong influence of the wall material on plasma performance but with significant scope for optimisation. - Abstract: The JET Programme in Support of ITER has entered its second phase, in which the boundaries for safe plasma operation with an ITER-like Wall are being explored. A key element of these studies is the benchmarking of the codes that are being used for ITER to predict plasma–wall interactions and, more generally, the influence of wall material on plasma performance and regimes of operation. Studies have focused on material migration and erosion, disruptions and runaway electron beams, and optimisation of plasma and divertor performance. In addition, a dedicated tungsten divertor melt experiment was carried out and provided key information for the ITER decision to begin operation with an all-W divertor. Initial results underline the strong influence that the wall material has on plasma performance and regimes of operation but show that there is significant scope for optimisation by careful discharge design. The future JET programme will concentrate on completing this optimisation and demonstrating the resulting performance in deuterium–tritium plasmas, thus providing the best possible preparation of ITER operation.

  12. Simultaneous impact of neutron irradiation and sputtering on the surface structure of self–damaged ITER–grade tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Belyaeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous effects of neutron irradiation and long–term sputtering on the surface relief of ITER–grade tungsten were studied. The effects of neutron–induced displacement damage have been simulated by irradiation of tungsten target with W6 + ions of 20 MeV energy. Ar+ ions with energy 600 eV were used as imitation of charge exchange atoms in ITER. The surface relief was studied after each sputtering act. The singularity in the WJ–IG surface relief was ascertained experimentally at the first time, which determines the law of roughness extension under sputtering. As follows from the experimental data, the neutron irradiation has not to make a decisive additional contribution in the processes developing under impact of charge exchange atoms only.

  13. Hollow Sodium Tungsten Bronze (Na0.15WO3 Nanospheres: Preparation, Characterization, and Their Adsorption Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuo Guanke

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report herein a facile method for the preparation of sodium tungsten bronzes hollow nanospheres using hydrogen gas bubbles as reactant for chemical reduction of tungstate to tungsten and as template for the formation of hollow nanospheres at the same time. The chemical composition and the crystalline state of the as-prepared hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres were characterized complementarily, and the hollow structure formation mechanism was proposed. The hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres showed large Brunauer–Emment–Teller specific area (33.8 m2 g−1, strong resistance to acids, and excellent ability to remove organic molecules such as dye and proteins from aqueous solutions. These illustrate that the hollow nanospheres of Na0.15WO3should be a useful adsorbent.

  14. A minimally invasive method for induction of myocardial infarction in an animal model using tungsten spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, Daniel; Laule, Michael; Kaufels, Nicola; Schnorr, Jörg; Taupitz, Matthias; Hamm, Bernd; Dewey, Marc

    2009-06-01

    Most animal models use surgical thoracotomy with ligation of a coronary artery to induce myocardial infarction. Incision of the chest wall and myocardium affect remodeling after myocardial infarction. The aim of our study was to evaluate a new minimally invasive technique for inducing acute myocardial infarction in pigs. To this end, coronary angiography using a 6-F cardiac catheter was performed in 20 pigs. The cardiac catheter was advanced into the left circumflex artery (LCX) under electrocardiographic monitoring and small tungsten spirals were deployed in the vessel. LCX occlusion was verified by coronary angiography. Two days later, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to estimate the extent of infarction. Thereafter, all animals were euthanized and the hearts stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride for histologic measurement of infarct size. Tungsten spirals were successfully placed in the LCX in all 20 pigs. About 13 of the 20 animals survived until the end of the experiment. The mean infarct size in the area supplied by the LCX was 4.4 +/- 2.3 cm(3) at MRI and 4.3 +/- 2.2 cm(3) at histology (r = 0.99, P < 0.001). No other myocardial regions showed infarction in any of the 13 pigs. Five of nine pigs requiring defibrillation due to ventricular fibrillation died because defibrillation was unsuccessful. One animal each died from pericarditis and pneumonia. Our results show that the minimally invasive method presented here enables reliable induction of myocardial infarction in a fairly straightforward manner. The 25% mortality rate associated with induction of myocardial infarction in our study is comparable to that reported by other investigators.

  15. Molybdenum incorporation in tungsten aldehyde oxidoreductase enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M; Bevers, L.E.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Krijger, G.C.; Wolterbeek, H.T.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Hagen, W.R.; Hagedoorn, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus expresses five aldehyde oxidoreductase (AOR) enzymes, all containing a tungsto-bispterin cofactor. The growth of this organism is fully dependent on the presence of tungsten in the growth medium. Previous studies have suggested that molybdenum is no

  16. New tungsten alloy has high strength at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Tungsten-hafnium-carbon alloy has tensile strengths of 88,200 psi at 3000 deg F and 62,500 psi at 3500 deg F. Possible industrial applications for this alloy would include electrical components such as switches and spark plugs, die materials for die casting steels, and heating elements.

  17. Helium effects on tungsten surface morphology and deuterium retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ueda, Y.; H. Y. Peng,; H. T. Lee,; N. Ohno,; S. Kajita,; Yoshida, N.; Doerner, R.; De Temmerman, G.; V. Alimov,; G. Wright,

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental results on tungsten surface morphology, especially nano-structure (fuzz), induced by helium plasma exposure at temperatures between 1000 K and 2000 K are reviewed. This structure was firstly reported in 2006. In this review, most of experimental results reported

  18. Technogenic hydrogeochemical anomalies of tungsten deposits in Kykylbey ore region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leonid V.Zamana; Larisa P.Chechel

    2004-01-01

    Peculiarities of the tungsten deposits drainage flow chemical composition formation, the development of which was ceased almost 40 years ago, have been considered. Migration peculiarities of ore components have been covered, and forms of their migration have been calculated. Inertial characteristics of the surface flow contamination are shown.

  19. Geochemistry of the Panasqueira tungsten-tin deposit, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussink, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Major tin-tungsten deposits in Portugal are related to intrusions of the Younger Series (300-280 Ma) of Hercynian granitoids. Mineralized granites are 'specialized' by a specific increase or decrease of major, minor and trace element contents in comparison with non-mineralized occurrences. Component

  20. Geochemistry of the Panasqueira tungsten-tin deposit, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussink, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Major tin-tungsten deposits in Portugal are related to intrusions of the Younger Series (300-280 Ma) of Hercynian granitoids. Mineralized granites are 'specialized' by a specific increase or decrease of major, minor and trace element contents in comparison with non-mineralized occurrences.

  1. Geochemistry of the Panasqueira tungsten-tin deposit, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussink, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Major tin-tungsten deposits in Portugal are related to intrusions of the Younger Series (300-280 Ma) of Hercynian granitoids. Mineralized granites are 'specialized' by a specific increase or decrease of major, minor and trace element contents in comparison with non-mineralized occurrences. Component

  2. Molybdenum incorporation in tungsten aldehyde oxidoreductase enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M; Bevers, L.E.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Krijger, G.C.; Wolterbeek, H.T.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Hagen, W.R.; Hagedoorn, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus expresses five aldehyde oxidoreductase (AOR) enzymes, all containing a tungsto-bispterin cofactor. The growth of this organism is fully dependent on the presence of tungsten in the growth medium. Previous studies have suggested that molybdenum is no

  3. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  4. Thermal Desorption of Helium Implanted in Tungsten at RT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGFu; XUZengyu; LIUXiang; CHENJiming; XUYing; N.Yoshida; H.Iwakiri

    2002-01-01

    Tungsten is envisaged as one of the main candidate materials for divertor plate of ITER and future fusion reactors. Due to D-T reaction, PFMs would suffer helium irradiation from plasma additional to the high heat loads. Helium retention and thermal desorption behavior are largely concerned.

  5. Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Arnoldbik, W.M.; Sloof, W.G.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings, sputter deposited in a reactive argon/acetylene plasma, has been studied as a function of the acetylene partial pressure. Stress and microstructure have been investigated by wafer curvature and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) whe

  6. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This welding curriculum guide treats two topics in detail: the care of tungsten electrodes and the entire concept of contamination control and the hafnium electrode and its importance in dual-air cutting systems that use compressed shop air for plasma arc cutting activities. The guide contains three units of instruction that cover the following…

  7. Volume and surface photoemission from tungsten. II. Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuerbacher, B.; Egede Christensen, N.

    1974-01-01

    Energy-distribution spectra of photoelectrons emitted normal to three single-crystal faces of tungsten have been measured for photon energies between 7.7 and 21.2 eV. The results are interpreted in terms of one-dimensional electronic properties along the symmetry lines in k space that correspond...

  8. Tungsten-yttria carbide coating for conveying copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Albert J.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for providing a carbided-tungsten-yttria coating on the interior surface of a copper vapor laser. The surface serves as a wick for the condensation of liquid copper to return the condensate to the interior of the laser for revolatilization.

  9. Tungsten disrupts root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana by PIN targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P

    2014-08-15

    Tungsten is a heavy metal with increasing concern over its environmental impact. In plants it is extensively used to deplete nitric oxide by inhibiting nitrate reductase, but its presumed toxicity as a heavy metal has been less explored. Accordingly, its effects on Arabidopsis thaliana primary root were assessed. The effects on root growth, mitotic cell percentage, nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide levels, the cytoskeleton, cell ultrastructure, auxin and cytokinin activity, and auxin carrier distribution were investigated. It was found that tungsten reduced root growth, particularly by inhibiting cell expansion in the elongation zone, so that root hairs emerged closer to the root tip than in the control. Although extensive vacuolation was observed, even in meristematic cells, cell organelles were almost unaffected and microtubules were not depolymerized but reoriented. Tungsten affected auxin and cytokinin activity, as visualized by the DR5-GFP and TCS-GFP expressing lines, respectively. Cytokinin fluctuations were similar to those of the mitotic cell percentage. DR5-GFP signal appeared ectopically expressed, while the signals of PIN2-GFP and PIN3-GFP were diminished even after relatively short exposures. The observed effects were not reminiscent of those of any nitric oxide scavengers. Taken together, inhibition of root growth by tungsten might rather be related to a presumed interference with the basipetal flow of auxin, specifically affecting cell expansion in the elongation zone.

  10. Solar Walls for concrete renovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Lotte; Vejen, Niels Kristian; Olsen, Lars

    1996-01-01

    This repport gives a short presentation of three full-scale testing solar walls, the construction including the architectural design, materials and components, transportation and storage of solar enegy, the effect on the construction behind, statics and practical experience.The results...

  11. Solar Walls for concrete renovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Lotte; Vejen, Niels Kristian; Olsen, Lars

    1996-01-01

    This repport gives a short presentation of three full-scale testing solar walls, the construction including the architectural design, materials and components, transportation and storage of solar enegy, the effect on the construction behind, statics and practical experience.The results of the mea...

  12. Fandom and the fourth wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Kathryn Ballinger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available I use the Teen Wolf fandom as an example to examine the ways social media has created a more complicated, nuanced relationship with fans. The collapse of the fourth wall between fans and The Powers That Be can have both positive and negative impacts, depending on the willingness of participants to maintain mutual respect and engage in meaningful dialogue.

  13. Information extraction from FN plots of tungsten microemitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mussa, Khalil O. [Department of Physics, Mu' tah University, Al-Karak (Jordan); Mousa, Marwan S., E-mail: mmousa@mutah.edu.jo [Department of Physics, Mu' tah University, Al-Karak (Jordan); Fischer, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.fischer@physik.tu-chemnitz.de [Institut für Physik, Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    Tungsten based microemitter tips have been prepared both clean and coated with dielectric materials. For clean tungsten tips, apex radii have been varied ranging from 25 to 500 nm. These tips were manufactured by electrochemical etching a 0.1 mm diameter high purity (99.95%) tungsten wire at the meniscus of two molar NaOH solution. Composite micro-emitters considered here are consisting of a tungsten core coated with different dielectric materials—such as magnesium oxide (MgO), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), and zinc oxide (ZnO). It is worthwhile noting here, that the rather unconventional NaOH coating has shown several interesting properties. Various properties of these emitters were measured including current–voltage (IV) characteristics and the physical shape of the tips. A conventional field emission microscope (FEM) with a tip (cathode)–screen (anode) separation standardized at 10 mm was used to electrically characterize the electron emitters. The system was evacuated down to a base pressure of ∼10{sup −8}mbar when baked at up to ∼180°C overnight. This allowed measurements of typical field electron emission (FE) characteristics, namely the IV characteristics and the emission images on a conductive phosphorus screen (the anode). Mechanical characterization has been performed through a FEI scanning electron microscope (SEM). Within this work, the mentioned experimental results are connected to the theory for analyzing Fowler–Nordheim (FN) plots. We compared and evaluated the data extracted from clean tungsten tips of different radii and determined deviations between the results of different extraction methods applied. In particular, we derived the apex radii of several clean and coated tungsten tips by both SEM imaging and analyzing FN plots. The aim of this analysis is to support the ongoing discussion on recently developed improvements of the theory for analyzing FN plots related to metal field electron emitters, which in

  14. Comparative study of Trombe wall, water wall and trans wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodha, M.S.; Bansal, N.K.; Singh, S.; Ram, S.; Annamalai, M.; Iyer, M.V.; Nirmala, K.A.; Venkatesh, P.; Prasad, C.R.; Subramani, C.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal performances of three systems viz. Trombe wall: (1) without; and (2) with vents (forced air circulation), water wall and Transwall have been studied analytically interms of heat flux entering the living space (Maintained at 20/sup 0/C) corresponding to the meteriological data on January 19, 1981 at New Delhi (India), a typical cold winter day. Subsequent parametric studies using the simulation indicated that the Transwall system is the more efficient system for the passive heating of buildings.

  15. Damage to Preheated Tungsten Targets after Multiple Plasma Impacts Simulating ITER ELMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garkusha, I.E.; Bandura, A.N.; Byrka, O.V.; Chebotarev, V.V.; Makhlay, V.A.; Tereshin, V.I. [Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology, Inst. of Plasma Physics of National Science Center, Akademicheskaya street, 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S. [FZK-Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association Euratom-FZK, Technik und Umwelt, Postfach 3640, D-7602 1 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The energy loads onto ITER divertor surfaces associated with the Type I ELMs are expected to be up to 1 MJ/m{sup 2} during 0.1-0.5 ms, with the number of pulses about 103 per discharge. Tungsten is a candidate material for major part of the surface, but its brittleness can result in substantial macroscopic erosion after the repetitive heat loads. To minimize the brittle destruction, tungsten may be preheated above the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. In this work the behavior of preheated tungsten targets under repetitive ELM-like plasma pulses is studied in simulation experiments with the quasi-stationary plasma accelerator QSPA Kh-50. The targets have been exposed up to 450 pulses of the duration 0.25 ms and the heat loads either 0.45 MJ/m{sup 2} or 0.75 MJ/m{sup 2}, which is respectively below and above the melting threshold. During the exposures the targets were permanently kept preheated at 650 deg. C by a heater at target backside. In the course of exposures the irradiated surfaces were examined after regular numbers of pulses using the SEM and the optical microscopy. The profilometry, XRD, microhardness and weight loss measurements have been performed, as well as comparisons of surface damages after the heat loads both below and above the melting threshold. It is obtained that macro-cracks do not develop on the preheated surface. After the impacts with surface melting, a fine mesh of intergranular microcracks has appeared. The width of fine intergranular cracks grows with pulse number, achieving 1-1.5 microns after 100 pulses, and after 210 pulses the crack width increases up to 20 microns, which is comparable with grain sizes. Threshold changes in surface morphology resulting in corrugation structures and pits on the surface as well as importance of surface tension in resulted 'micro-brush' structures are discussed. Further evolution of the surface pattern is caused by loss of separated grains on exposed

  16. Development of a mirror-based endoscope for divertor spectroscopy on JET with the new ITER-like wall (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Mertens, Ph.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Terra, A.; Arnoux, G.; Balshaw, N.; Clever, M.; Edlingdon, T.; Egner, S.; Farthing, J.; Hartl, M.; Horton, L.; Kampf, D.; Klammer, J.; Lambertz, H. T.; Matthews, G. F.; Morlock, C.; Murari, A.; Reindl, M.; Riccardo, V.; Samm, U.; Sanders, S.; Stamp, M.; Williams, J.; Zastrow, K. D.; Zauner, C.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-01

    A new endoscope with optimised divertor view has been developed in order to survey and monitor the emission of specific impurities such as tungsten and the remaining carbon as well as beryllium in the tungsten divertor of JET after the implementation of the ITER-like wall in 2011. The endoscope is a prototype for testing an ITER relevant design concept based on reflective optics only. It may be subject to high neutron fluxes as expected in ITER. The operating wavelength range, from 390 nm to 2500 nm, allows the measurements of the emission of all expected impurities (W I, Be II, C I, C II, C III) with high optical transmittance (≥30% in the designed wavelength range) as well as high spatial resolution that is ≤2 mm at the object plane and ≤3 mm for the full depth of field (±0.7 m). The new optical design includes options for in situ calibration of the endoscope transmittance during the experimental campaign, which allows the continuous tracing of possible transmittance degradation with time due to impurity deposition and erosion by fast neutral particles. In parallel to the new optical design, a new type of possibly ITER relevant shutter system based on pneumatic techniques has been developed and integrated into the endoscope head. The endoscope is equipped with four digital CCD cameras, each combined with two filter wheels for narrow band interference and neutral density filters. Additionally, two protection cameras in the λ > 0.95 μm range have been integrated in the optical design for the real time wall protection during the plasma operation of JET.

  17. Results obtained during wall breaching research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hattingh, S

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available the operator on the charge side of the building. Test walls (double and single brick walls) 3m wide by 2m height were used for testing different charges and their effects due to the different charges. The loop charge was found to be the most promising solution...

  18. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, K. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: codl@sci.muni.cz; Stankova, A. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Haekkaenen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. BOX 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Otruba, V.; Kanicky, V. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-12-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r{sup 2} > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r{sup 2} = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  19. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, K.; Staňková, A.; Häkkänen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J.; Otruba, V.; Kanický, V.

    2007-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r2 > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r2 = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  20. Aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition of tungsten oxide films and nanorods from oxo tungsten(VI) fluoroalkoxide precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hankook; Bonsu, Richard O; O'Donohue, Christopher; Korotkov, Roman Y; McElwee-White, Lisa; Anderson, Timothy J

    2015-02-04

    Aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) of WOx was demonstrated using the oxo tungsten(VI) fluoroalkoxide single-source precursors, WO[OCCH3(CF3)2]4 and WO[OC(CH3)2CF3]4. Substoichiometric amorphous tungsten oxide thin films were grown on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates in nitrogen at low deposition temperature (100-250 °C). At growth temperatures above 300 °C, the W18O49 monoclinic crystalline phase was observed. The surface morphology and roughness, visible light transmittance, electrical conductivity, and work function of the tungsten oxide materials are reported. The solvent and carrier gas minimally affected surface morphology and composition at low deposition temperature; however, material crystallinity varied with solvent choice at higher temperatures. The work function of the tungsten oxide thin films grown between 150 and 250 °C was determined to be in the range 5.0 to 5.7 eV, according to ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS).

  1. Characterization of exposures among cemented tungsten carbide workers. Part I: Size-fractionated exposures to airborne cobalt and tungsten particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2009-07-01

    As many as 30,000 workers in the United States of America are exposed to cemented tungsten carbides (CTC), alloys composed primarily of tungsten carbide and cobalt, which are used in cutting tools. Inhalation of cobalt-containing particles may be sufficient for the development of occupational asthma, whereas tungsten carbide particles in association with cobalt particles are associated with the development of hard metal disease (HMD) and lung cancer. Historical epidemiology and exposure studies of CTC workers often rely only on measures of total airborne cobalt mass concentration. In this study, we characterized cobalt- and tungsten-containing aerosols generated during the production of CTC with emphasis on (1) aerosol "total" mass (n=252 closed-face 37 mm cassette samples) and particle size-selective mass concentrations (n=108 eight-stage cascade impactor samples); (2) particle size distributions; and (3) comparison of exposures obtained using personal cassette and impactor samplers. Total cobalt and tungsten exposures were highest in work areas that handled powders (e.g., powder mixing) and lowest in areas that handled finished product (e.g., grinding). Inhalable, thoracic, and respirable cobalt and tungsten exposures were observed in all work areas, indicating potential for co-exposures to particles capable of getting deposited in the upper airways and alveolar region of the lung. Understanding the risk of CTC-induced adverse health effects may require two exposure regimes: one for asthma and the other for HMD and lung cancer. All sizes of cobalt-containing particles that deposit in the lung and airways have potential to cause asthma, thus a thoracic exposure metric is likely biologically appropriate. Cobalt-tungsten mixtures that deposit in the alveolar region of the lung may potentially cause HMD and lung cancer, thus a respirable exposure metric for both metals is likely biologically appropriate. By characterizing size-selective and co-exposures as well as

  2. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Leitao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  3. Development of thick wall welding and cutting tools for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahira, Masataka; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Akou, Kentaro; Koizumi, Koichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-04-01

    The Vacuum Vessel, which is a core component of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is required to be exchanged remotely in a case of accident such as superconducting coil failure. The in-vessel components such as blanket and divertor are planned to be exchanged or fixed. In these exchange or maintenance operations, the thick wall welding and cutting are inevitable and remote handling tools are necessary. The thick wall welding and cutting tools for blanket are under developing in the ITER R and D program. The design requirement is to weld or cut the stainless steel of 70 mm thickness in the narrow space. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding, plasma cutting and iodine laser welding/cutting are selected as primary option. Element welding and cutting tests, design of small tools to satisfy space requirement, test fabrication and performance tests were performed. This paper reports the tool design and overview of welding and cutting tests. (author)

  4. Domain Walls on Singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2009-01-01

    We describe domain walls that live on $A_2$ and $A_3$ singularities. The walls are BPS if the singularity is resolved and non--BPS if it is deformed and fibered. We show that these domain walls may interpolate between vacua that support monopoles and/or vortices.

  5. The Lamportian cell wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. (Michigan State Univ. Plant Research Lab., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  6. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  7. A Typical Magnetohydrodynamic Flow of a Viscous Incompressible Fluid Between a Parallel Flat Wall and a Wavy Wall : Constant Suction Through the Former Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Maitra

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available A magnetohydrodynamic flow of a viscous, incompressible and slightly conducting fluid is developed between a parallel flat wall and a wavy wall whereas at the same time fluid is continuously sucked through the flat wall with a constant suction velocity. The velocity and temperature distribution are determined alongwith the pressure gradient and co-efficient of skin friction.

  8. Distribution and Morphology of Calcium-Binding Proteins Immunoreactive Neurons following Chronic Tungsten Multielectrode Implants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio M Freire

    Full Text Available The development of therapeutic approaches to improve the life quality of people suffering from different types of body paralysis is a current major medical challenge. Brain-machine interface (BMI can potentially help reestablishing lost sensory and motor functions, allowing patients to use their own brain activity to restore sensorimotor control of paralyzed body parts. Chronic implants of multielectrodes, employed to record neural activity directly from the brain parenchyma, constitute the fundamental component of a BMI. However, before this technique may be effectively available to human clinical trials, it is essential to characterize its long-term impact on the nervous tissue in animal models. In the present study we evaluated how chronic implanted tungsten microelectrode arrays impact the distribution and morphology of interneurons reactive to calcium-binding proteins calbindin (CB, calretinin (CR and parvalbumin (PV across the rat's motor cortex. Our results revealed that chronic microelectrode arrays were well tolerated by the nervous tissue, with recordings remaining viable for up to 6 months after implantation. Furthermore, neither the morphology nor the distribution of inhibitory neurons were broadly impacted. Moreover, restricted microglial activation was observed on the implanted sites. On the whole, our results confirm and expand the notion that tungsten multielectrodes can be deemed as a feasible candidate to future human BMI studies.

  9. BATCH INJECTION POTENTIOMETRY ASAM ASPARTAT, ASAM GLUTAMAT DAN ARGININ MENGGUNAKAN ELEKTRODA TUNGSTEN OKSIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeni Maulidah Muflihah

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The presence of aspartic acid, glutamic acid and arginine in solution can be detected by potentiometric method using tungsten oxide electrode in a batch system. Characterization of tungsten oxide electrode used include linear range, limit of detection, sensitivity and reproducibility. Buffer type and concentration effect also studied to optimize the measurement results. Optimum conditions for detecting arginine was at pH 6.0 with a phosphate buffer concentration of 0.5 x 10-3 M. Correlation coefficient was obtained for 0.9864, the detection limit of 5.24 x 10-6 M, sensitivity 16.1 mV/decade with reproducibility 0 –7 %. Glutamic acid has a correlation coefficient of 0.9789, the detection limit of 3.80 x 10-6 M, the sensitivity of 9.2 mV/decade and reproducibility of 0 – 6 %. Aspartic acid has a correlation coefficient of 0.9949, the detection limit of 7.76 x 10-6 M, sensitivity of 13.4 mV/decade and reproducibility of 0 – 5 %.

  10. On the mechanism of imine elimination from Fischer tungsten carbene complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Veit

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available (Aminoferrocenyl(ferrocenylcarbene(pentacarbonyltungsten(0 (CO5W=C(NHFcFc (W(CO5(E-2 is synthesized by nucleophilic substitution of the ethoxy group of (CO5W=C(OEtFc (M(CO5(1Et by ferrocenyl amide Fc-NH– (Fc = ferrocenyl. W(CO5(E-2 thermally and photochemically eliminates bulky E-1,2-diferrocenylimine (E-3 via a formal 1,2-H shift from the N to the carbene C atom. Kinetic and mechanistic studies to the formation of imine E-3 are performed by NMR, IR and UV–vis spectroscopy and liquid injection field desorption ionization (LIFDI mass spectrometry as well as by trapping experiments for low-coordinate tungsten complexes with triphenylphosphane. W(CO5(E-2 decays thermally in a first-order rate-law with a Gibbs free energy of activation of ΔG‡298K = 112 kJ mol−1. Three proposed mechanistic pathways are taken into account and supported by detailed (time-dependent densitiy functional theory [(TD-DFT] calculations. The preferred pathway is initiated by an irreversible CO dissociation, followed by an oxidative addition/pseudorotation/reductive elimination pathway with short-lived, elusive seven-coordinate hydrido tungsten(II intermediates cis(N,H-W(CO4(H(Z-15 and cis(C,H-W(CO4(H(Z-15.

  11. Advances of orbital gas tungsten arc welding for Brazilian space applications – experimental setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Orlowski de Garcia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes details of the several steps of the technology involved for the orbital Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW process of pure commercially titanium tubes. These pieces will be used to connect the several components of the propulsion system of the China-Brazilian Satellite CBERS, and is part of the Brazilian aerospace industry development. The implantation involved the steps of environment control; cut and facing of the base metal; cleaning procedures; piece alignment; choice of the type, geometry and installation of the tungsten electrode; system for the pressure of the purge gas; manual tack welding; choice of the welding parameters; and, finally, the qualification of welding procedures. Three distinct welding programs were studied, using pulsed current with increasing speed, continuous current and pulsed current with decreasing amperage levels. The results showed that the high quality criteria required to the aerospace segment is such that usual welding operations must be carefully designed and executed. The three welding developed programs generated welds free of defects and with adequate morphology, allowing to select the condition that better fits the Brazilian aerospace segment, and to be implanted in the welding of the CBERS Satellite Propulsion System.

  12. Recent Advances in the Deposition of Diamond Coatings on Co-Cemented Tungsten Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Polini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-cemented tungsten carbides, namely, hard metals are largely used to manufacture high wear resistant components in several manufacturing segments. Coating hard metals with superhard materials like diamond is of utmost interest as it can further extend their useful lifespan. The deposition of diamond coatings onto WC-Co can be extremely complicated as a result of poor adhesion. This can be essentially ascribed to (i the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients between diamond and WC-Co, at the typical high temperatures inside the chemical vapour deposition (CVD chamber, generates large residual stresses at the interface; (ii the role of surface Co inside the WC-Co matrix during diamond CVD, which promotes carbon dissolution and diffusion. The present investigation reviews the techniques by which Co-cemented tungsten carbides can be treated to make them prone to receive diamond coatings by CVD. Further, it proposes interesting ecofriendly and sustainable alternatives to further improve the diamond deposition process as well as the overall performance of the coated hard metals.

  13. Multifunctional Platform with CMOS-Compatible Tungsten Microhotplate for Pirani, Temperature, and Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A multifunctional platform based on the microhotplate was developed for applications including a Pirani vacuum gauge, temperature, and gas sensor. It consisted of a tungsten microhotplate and an on-chip operational amplifier. The platform was fabricated in a standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS process. A tungsten plug in standard CMOS process was specially designed as the serpentine resistor for the microhotplate, acting as both heater and thermister. With the sacrificial layer technology, the microhotplate was suspended over the silicon substrate with a 340 nm gap. The on-chip operational amplifier provided a bias current for the microhotplate. This platform has been used to develop different kinds of sensors. The first one was a Pirani vacuum gauge ranging from 1-1 to 105 Pa. The second one was a temperature sensor ranging from -20 to 70 °C. The third one was a thermal-conductivity gas sensor, which could distinguish gases with different thermal conductivities in constant gas pressure and environment temperature. In the fourth application, with extra fabrication processes including the deposition of gas-sensitive film, the platform was used as a metal-oxide gas sensor for the detection of gas concentration.

  14. Mineralogy and Trace Element Chemistry of Ferberite/Reinite from Tungsten Deposits in Central Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Muchez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten mineralization in hydrothermal quartz veins from the Nyakabingo,Gifurwe and Bugarama deposits in central Rwanda occurs as the iron-rich endmember ofthe wolframite solid solution series (ferberite and in the particular form of reinite, whichrepresents a pseudomorph of ferberite after scheelite. Primary ferberite, reinite and latesecondary ferberite are characterized by their trace element chemistry and rare earthelement patterns. The replacement of scheelite by ferberite is also documented in the traceelement composition. Primary ferberite shows high Mg, Zn, Sc, V, Nb, In and Snconcentrations, but very low Ca, Pb, Sr and Ba contents. Reinite and late secondaryferberite display an uncommon trace element composition containing high concentrationsof Ca, Pb, Sr, Ba, As and Ga, but very low levels in Sn, Zr, Hf, In, Ti, Sc, Nb, Ta, Mg andZn. Late secondary ferberite replacing primary ferberite is characterized by additionalenrichments in Bi, Pb, As and Sb. The rare earth element patterns of reinite and secondaryferberite are also similar to hydrothermal scheelite. The formation of the tungsten depositsin central Rwanda is interpreted to be epigenetic in origin, and the hydrothermalmineralizing fluids are related to the intrusion of the G4-granites.

  15. Numerical analyses of JT-60SA tokamak with tungsten divertor by COREDIV code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałązka, K.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Stępniewski, W.; Zagórski, R.; Neu, R.; Romanelli, M.; Nakano, T.

    2017-04-01

    An analysis of radiative power exhaust for the JT-60SA tokamak with a tungsten divertor is performed with the help of the self-consistent, core-edge integrated COREDIV code. Two scenarios of operation (low and high density) were investigated in the scope of different parameters (electron density at the separatrix and the perpendicular transport in the scrape-off layer) with impurity seeding (Ne and Kr). The calculations show that in the case of the tungsten divertor the power load to the divertor plate is mitigated and the central plasma dilution is smaller compared to the carbon divertor. In the most cases the energy flux through the separatrix is above the L–H transition threshold. For the high density case with neon seeding operation in full detachment mode is observed. Changing the diffusion coefficient in the SOL has a strong influence on the result of the calculations as increased radial transport causes stronger screening effect. Also by changing the electron density on the separatrix the influx of heavy impurities (W, Kr) into the core region can be reduced. The results demonstrate that it is easier to achieve sustainable conditions in the divertor region for the high density scenario, whereas for the low density one reducing the auxiliary heating power seems unavoidable to prevent damaging of the target plate, even for strong seeding gas influx.

  16. Laser-induced asymmetric faceting and growth of a nano-protrusion on a tungsten tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Yanagisawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation of a sharp tungsten tip by a femtosecond laser and exposed to a strong DC electric field led to reproducible surface modifications. By a combination of field emission microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we observed asymmetric surface faceting with sub-ten nanometer high steps. The presence of faceted features mainly on the laser-exposed side implies that the surface modification was driven by a laser-induced transient temperature rise on a scale of a couple of picoseconds in the tungsten tip apex. Moreover, we identified the formation of a nano-tip a few nanometers high located at one of the corners of a faceted plateau. The results of simulations emulating the experimental conditions are consistent with the experimental observations. The presented technique would be a new method to fabricate a nano-tip especially for generating coherent electron pulses. The features may also help to explain the origin of enhanced field emission, which leads to vacuum arcs, in high electric field devices such as radio-frequency particle accelerators.

  17. Analysis of process parametersin electro-discharge machining of Tungsten carbideby using taguchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonihal Singh Dhakry

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, tries have been made optimize process parameters in Electro-Discharge Machining (EDM of tungsten carbide (WC/CO using copper electrodes to development machining mode based on taguchi techniques. Four independent input parameters discharge current (Amp, pulse-on time (μs, duty cycle (%, and gap voltage (Volt were selected to assess the EDM process performance in terms of material removal rate (MRR: g/min has been used to design and examine the experiments. For each process response, a suitable second order decline equation was set up applying analysis of variance (ANOVA and student t-test procedure to check modeling goodness of fit and select proper forms of influentially significant process variables (main, two-way interaction. The MRR increases by selecting higher discharge current and higher duty cycle which capitals providing greater amounts of discharge energy inside gap region. In this paper we conduct the experiment on maximum possible combination of process parameter (Discharge current, Pulse-on time, Duty cycle,Gap voltage developed by taguchi method and find a set of optimal input parameters with maximum nearby MRR during ED Machining of WC/Co(tungsten carbide-cobalt composite material.

  18. Root Cause Analysis of Tungsten-Induced Protein Aggregation in Pre-filled Syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Swift, Rob; Torraca, Gianni; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser; Wen, Zai-Qing; Jiang, Yijia; Vance, Aylin; Mire-Sluis, Anthony; Freund, Erwin; Davis, Janice; Narhi, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Particles isolated from a pre-filled syringe containing a protein-based solution were identified as aggregated protein and tungsten. The origin of the tungsten was traced to the tungsten pins used in the supplier's syringe barrel forming process. A tungsten recovery study showed that the vacuum stopper placement process has a significant impact on the total amount of tungsten in solutions. The air gap formed in the syringe funnel area (rich in residual tungsten) becomes accessible to solutions when the vacuum is pulled. Leachable tungsten deposits that were not removed by the supplier's wash process are concentrated in this small area. Extraction procedures used to measure residual tungsten in empty syringes would under-report the tungsten quantity unless the funnel area is wetted during the extraction. Improved syringe barrel forming and washing processes at the supplier have lowered the residual tungsten content and significantly reduced the risk of protein aggregate formation. This experience demonstrates that packaging component manufacturing processes, which are outside the direct control of drug manufacturers, can have an impact on the drug product quality. Thus close technical communication with suppliers of product contact components plays an important role in making a successful biotherapeutic.

  19. Thermal reaction of SiC films with tungsten and tungsten-rhenium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, J.; Le Petitcorps, Y. [Univ Bordeaux 1, Lab Composites Thermostruct, CNRS-SAFRAN-CEA-UB1, UMR 5801, F-33600 Pessac, (France); Roger, J.; Audubert, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA/LTEC, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance, (France)

    2008-07-01

    Solid-state reactions between SiC films and W-xRe (x = 0, 5 and 25 at%) substrates on thermal annealing between 1673 K and 1873 K for various durations have been investigated. SiC coatings were deposited on metallic wires by hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) from a gas mixture of tetramethyl-silane (TMS) and hydrogen at 1373 K under normal pressure. The interface zones were characterized using scanning electron and optical microscopies, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe microanalysis. All analyses reveal that SiC reacts with substrates. Various metal silicides and carbides were formed in layered reaction and the presence of these phases was confirmed by electron probe microanalysis. The effects of rhenium on the reactivity were established by the determination of growth kinetics deducted from the thicknesses of reaction zones as a function of annealing time. It has been found that an increase in the diffusion kinetics and activation energy with the quantity of rhenium in the tungsten wire. (authors)

  20. Surface modification of tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloys exposed to high-flux deuterium plasma and its impact on deuterium retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zayachuk, Y.; Hoen, M. H. J. 't; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Terentyev, D.; Uytdenhouwen, I.; Van Oost, G.

    2013-01-01

    Samples of tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloy (with 5 mass per cent of Ta) were exposed to high-flux deuterium plasma at different fluences. The surface modification was studied with scanning electron microscopy, and deuterium retention was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). In the

  1. Mechanical properties of tantalum-tungsten interlayer between tungsten tile and thimble to prevent helium leak from He-cooled divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Shen, Weiping; Zhou, Yanan; Zhang, Qingling

    2013-03-01

    The tungsten parts made of pure tungsten tile and dispersion strengthened tungsten thimble with 3 mm interlayer of tantalum-tungsten alloy are fabricated by Spark Plasmas Sintering (SPS). The process of SPS is that the temperature is raised to 1700 °C at a rate of 100 °C/min and kept for 3 min, under a constant pressure of 50MPa along the Z-axis. The mechanical properties of the interlayer with different percent of tantalum are measured. The results show that with increasing percent of tantalum, the hardness first increases and then decreases; and as the indentation on the sample is closer to dispersion strengthened tungsten, the value of Vickers hardness is much higher. The Vickers hardness of interlayer is the highest when the content of tantalum is 50% and the indentation is next to dispersion strengthened tungsten. Bending strength drops with increasing content of tantalum, when the content of tantalum is 100% the value of bending strength is the lowest. The fracture toughness is highest as the content of tantalum is 25%, the value is 9.89MPa•m1/2. The toughening tungsten-tantalum interlayer between tungsten tile and thimble would better prevent helium leak from He-cooled divertor for DEMO.

  2. Study on wall recycling behaviour in CPD spherical tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyay, R. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)], E-mail: raju@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Zushi, H. [Research Institute of Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Hirooka, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Sakamoto, M. [Research Institute of Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Yoshinaga, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Okamoto, K. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kawasaki, S.; Hanada, K.; Sato, K.N.; Nakamura, K.; Idei, H. [Research Institute of Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Ryoukai, T. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A. [Research Institute of Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    Experiments to study wall recycling behaviour have been performed in the small spherical tokamak compact plasma-wall interaction experimental device (CPD) from the viewpoint of global as well as local plasma wall interaction condition. Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma of typically {approx}50 to 400 ms duration is produced using {approx}40 to 80 kW RF power. In order to study the global wall recycling behaviour, pressure measurements are carried out just before and after the ECR plasma in the absence of any external pumping. The recycling behaviour is found to change from release to pumping beyond a certain level of pressure value which is again found to be a function of shot history. The real-time local wall behaviour is studied in similar RF plasma using a rotating tungsten limiter, actively coated with lithium. Measurement of H{sub {alpha}} light intensity in front of the rotating surface has indicated a clear reduction ({approx}10%) in the steady-state hydrogen recycling with continuous Li gettering of several minutes.

  3. Wind Load Test of Earthbag Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Scott

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Earthbag construction is a sustainable, low-cost, housing option for developing countries. Earthbag structures are built of individual soil-filled fabric bags (i.e., sand bags stacked in a running bond pattern. Once stacked, earthbags are compacted and the soil inside the bags is dried in-place to form earthen bricks. Barbed wires are placed between each course to affect shear transfer within the wall. Results of an out-of-plane load test on a full-scale earthbag wall are presented in this paper. The wall was subjected to out-of-plane pressure up to 3.16 kPa, which resulted in plastic deformations up to 50 mm. The wall did not collapse during loading. Wall behavior and force transfer mechanisms are discussed.

  4. In situ observation of microstructure evolution in tungsten under 400 keV Kr{sup +} irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran, Guang, E-mail: gran@xmu.edu.cn [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Huang, Shilin; Huang, Zijing [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Yan, Qingzhi [Institute of Nuclear Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Xu, Jiangkun [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Taishan Nuclear Power Joint Venture Co., Ltd., Taishan City, Guangdong 529228 (China); Li, Ning [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Wang, Lumin, E-mail: lmwang@umich.edu [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Tungsten was irradiated with 400 keV Kr{sup +} ions using the IVEM-Tandem Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The evolution of microstructure and gas bubbles during the irradiation was observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy. Under irradiation, dislocation loops were created and grew into an increased density of network dislocations with increasing Kr{sup +} ion fluence. The irradiation induced final microstructure consists of dislocation cells ∼50 nm in diameter separated by dislocation walls. The irradiation also induced formation of Kr gas bubbles with an average diameter of 1.4 nm after 3.0 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} at 525 K. The gas bubbles were observed to grow to 2.6 nm diameter after additional Kr-irradiation of 5.0 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} at 815 K. The relationship between bubble size and irradiation time was obtained from experimental data obtained at 815 K and an empirical formula for calculating Kr bubble size was developed by fitting bubble growth equations with experiment data. The growth mechanisms of Kr gas bubbles in tungsten are discussed.

  5. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  6. [Preparation and optical properties of tantalum tungsten bronze].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wan-jun; Xie, Xiang; Li, Xing-liang; Zhang, Rui; Lü, Kai; Wei, Hong-yuan

    2015-01-01

    Tantalum tungsten bronze(TaxWO3)nanowires were successfully synthesized via hydrothermal method using TaCl5 and Na2WO4 . 2H20 as raw materials. The morphology, crystal structure and optical properties of synthesized products were characterized by means of XRD, TEM, SEM, UV-Vis and Raman technologies. The XRD results showed that TaxWO3 nanowire exhibited hexagonal structure. By increasing the doping content, the cell parameter was kept increasing gradually till Ta/W= 0. 04, then it remained almost constant. The UV-Vis diffraction spectrum analysis showed that the absorption peaks redshifted, the band gap energy decreased with increasing the doping content. The Raman peaks moved with a downshift, and the peak gradually became broader, which further proved the influence of the tantalum doping for tungsten oxide. The reactions of decomposing liquid rhodamine B solution showed that the nanosized TaxWO3 had a high photo-catalytic activity.

  7. Tungsten Scintillating Fibers Electromagnetic Calorimeters for sPHENIX upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siyang; Loggins, Vera; Phipps, Michael; Sickles, Anne

    2015-10-01

    sPHENIX, a planned new detector at RHIC, features electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry that covers | η| design is optimized for the study of jets in heavy ion collisions. The design includes a tungsten fiber EmCal that is made out of a tower array of plastic scintillating fiber embedded inside a mixture of tungsten powder and epoxy. For this calorimeter, silicon photomultipliers will be attached at the end of the module to convert scintillated optical photons into electrical signals. The sPHENIX group at Illinois is currently making samples of these modules to study the production process and achievable density. In addition, we have set up a silicon photomultiplier read out test system which will be used to evaluate the module performance. sPHENIX collaboration and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  8. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy for characterizing neutron irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.N. Taylor; M. Shimada; D.W. Akers; M.W. Drigert; B.J. Merrill; Y. Hatano

    2013-05-01

    Tungsten samples (6 mm diameter, 0.2 mm thick) were irradiated to 0.025 and 0.3 dpa with neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma in the tritium plasma experiment (TPE) at 100, 200 and 500ºC to a total fluence of 1 x 1026 m-2. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Doppler broadening positron annihilation spectroscopy (DB-PAS) were performed at various stages to characterize damage and retention. We present the first known results of neutron damaged tungsten characterized by DB-PAS in order to study defect concentration. Two positron sources, 22Na and 68Ge, probe ~58 µm and through the entire 200 µm thick samples, respectively. DB-PAS results reveal clear differences between the various irradiated samples. These results, and the calibration of DB-PAS to NRA data are presented.

  9. Preparation and electrocatalytic properties of tungsten carbide electrocatalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马淳安; 张文魁; 成旦红; 周邦新

    2002-01-01

    The tungsten carbide(WC) electrocatalysts with definite phase components and high specific surface area were prepared by gas-solid reduction method. The crystal structure, phase components and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared materials were characterized by XRD, BET(Brunauer Emmett and Teller Procedure) and electrochemical test techniques. It is shown that the tungsten carbide catalysts with definite phase components can be obtained by controlling the carburizing conditions including temperature, gas flowing rate and duration time. The electrocatalysts with the major phase of W2C show higher electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrocatalysts with the major phase of WC are suitable to be used as the anodic electrocatalyst for hydrogen anodic oxidation, which exhibit higher hydrogen anodic oxidation electrocatalytic properties in HCl solutions.

  10. A comparison of interatomic potentials for modeling tungsten nanocluster structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiannan; Shu, Xiaolin; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation is utilized to study the nanocluster and the fuzz structure on the PFM surface of tungsten. The polyhedral and linear cluster structures based on the icosahedron, cuboctahedron and rhombic dodecahedron are built up. Three interatomic potentials are used in calculating the relationship between the cluster energy and the number of atoms. The results are compared with first-principles calculation to show each potential's best application scale. Furthermore, the transition between the icosahedral and the cuboctahedral clusters is observed in molecular dynamic simulation at different temperatures, which follows a critical curve for different numbers of atoms. The linear structures are proved to be stable at experimental temperatures by thermodynamics. The work presents a selection of interatomic potentials in simulating tungsten cluster systems and helps researchers understand the growth and evolution laws of clusters and the fuzz-like structure formation process in fusion devices.

  11. Preparation and characterization of tungsten diselenide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouzet, J.; Bernede, J.C. (Lab. de Physique des Materiaux pour l' Electronique, Faculte des Sciences et des Techniques, 44 - Nantes (France)); Khellil, A. (Lab. de Micro-Optoelectronique, Univ. d' Oran-Es-Senia (Algeria)); Essaidi, H.; Benhida, S. (Lab. de Physique des Materiaux pour l' Electronique, Faculte des Sciences et des Techniques, 44 - Nantes (France))

    1992-02-28

    WSe{sub 2} layers synthesized by annealing tungsten foils and r.f.-sputtered tungsten thin films under selenium pressure have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), optical absorption and electrical resistance measurements. It has been found that stoichiometric layers are obtained after appropriate processing at a temperature lower than the glass melting temperature. The films crystallize in the hexagonal structure. The crystallites develop preferentially along the c axis. The binding energies deduced from the XPS lines were found to be in good agreement with those of the reference powder. The electrical resistance is governed by hopping conduction in the low temperature range (80-250 K) and by grain-boundary-scattering mechanisms at higher temperature. (orig.).

  12. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Lowell D.

    1984-01-01

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  13. Synthesis of one-dimensional potassium tungsten bronze with excellent near-infrared absorption property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chongshen; Yin, Shu; Huang, Lijun; Sato, Tsugio

    2011-07-01

    Potassium tungsten oxide nanofibers were successfully synthesized via a facile hydrothermal reaction route in the presence of sulfate. After reduction under a reductive atmosphere of H(2)(5 vol %)/N(2), the potassium tungsten oxide transformed to potassium tungsten bronze. Because of the lack of free electrons, the potassium tungsten oxide (K(x)WO(3+x/2)) showed no NIR shielding performance; however, the potassium tungsten bronze (K(x)WO(3)) showed promising optical characteristics such as high transmittance for visible light, as well as high shielding performance for near-infrared lights, indicating its potential application as a solar filter. Meanwhile, the potassium tungsten bronze (K(x)WO(3)) showed strong absorption of near-infrared light and instantaneous conversion of photoenergy to heat.

  14. STUDY OF PREPARATION PROCESS OF TUNGSTEN POWDER BY SHS WITH A MAGNESIUM THERMIT STAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.A.Zhang; Y.L.Wang; Z.H.Dou; H.Yang

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten powder was fabricated from the system CaWO4-Mg by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) with a magnesium thermit stage. The physic-chemical change during heating and the effects of pressure of sample and diluents (W powder) on product have been studied. The experimental results show that the porosity of combustion product and the particle size of final tungsten powder decrease with increasing pressure of sample. Addition of diluents could increase the particle size of final tungsten powder. The purity of tungsten is improved by leaching in NaOH solution. The results of spectral analysis and particle size distribution of final tungsten powder show that the final Tungsten powder has a median diameter of 0.87μn, specific surface area of 1.09m2/g and purity of above 99.0%.

  15. Structure and molecular modeling of tungsten borotellurate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rada, S., E-mail: Simona.Rada@phys.utcluj.ro [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca 400020 (Romania); Rada, M. [Nat. Inst. for R and D of Isotopic and Molec. Technologies, Cluj-Napoca 400293 (Romania); Culea, E., E-mail: eugen.culea@phys.utcluj.ro [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca 400020 (Romania)

    2013-03-05

    Highlights: ► The [WO{sub 6}] structural units are highly deformed. ► EPR spectra reveal the existence of W{sup +5} ions situated in distorted octahedral positions and the oxygen ions defects. ► The presence of W{sup +5} ions confers to the glass colors that change with composition. -- Abstract: Glasses of the xWO{sub 3} (100−x)[3TeO{sub 2}·2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}] system where x = 0–40 mol% WO{sub 3} were synthesized and characterized by investigations on FTIR, UV–VIS, EPR spectroscopy and molecular modeling calculations in order to obtain information about the structural changes of the glass network determined by the evolution of tungsten ions states, glass composition and WO{sub 3} concentration. Our spectroscopic data show that the incorporation of WO{sub 3} into borate–tellurate glasses causes both the formation of Te–O–W as well as B–O–W linkages and the increase of the number of non-bridging oxygens. The accommodation of the network with the excess of oxygen and the higher capacity of migration of the tungsten ions inside the host network can be associated with a change of tungsten coordination, from [WO{sub 4}] to [WO{sub 6}] structural units. This conversion is accompaniment of a large displacement of the tungsten atom from the centre of the octahedral geometry. EPR spectra reveal the existence of two signals associated with the presence of W{sup +5} ions situated in distorted octahedral positions and the oxygen ions defects. The presence of W{sup +5} ions confers to the glass colors that change with composition.

  16. Electrochromic behavior in CVD grown tungsten oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogova, D.; Iossifova, A.; Ivanova, T.; Dimitrova, Zl; Gesheva, K.

    1999-03-01

    Solid state electrochemical devices (ECDs) for smart windows, large area displays and automobile rearview mirrors are of considerable technological and commercial interest. In this paper, we studied the electrochromic properties of amorphous and polycrystalline CVD carbonyl tungsten oxide films and the possibility for sol-gel thin TiO 2 film to play the role of passive electrode in an electrochromic window with solid polymer electrolyte.

  17. Electrochromic behavior in CVD grown tungsten oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogova, D.; Iossifova, A.; Ivanova, T.; Gesheva, K.; Dimitrova, Z. [Central Laboratory for Solar Energy and New Energy Sources at Bulgarian Academy of Science, 72 Tzarigradsko shossee Blvd., Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1999-03-15

    Solid state electrochemical devices (ECDs) for smart windows, large area displays and automobile rearview mirrors are of considerable technological and commercial interest. In this paper, we studied the electrochromic properties of amorphous and polycrystalline CVD carbonyl tungsten oxide films and the possibility for sol-gel thinTiO{sub 2} film to play the role of passive electrode in an electrochromic window with solid polymer electrolyte

  18. Beam tests with the CALICE tungsten analog hadronic calorimeter prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, D; van der Kraaij, E

    2012-01-01

    The CALICE Analog Hadronic Calorimeter prototype has been equipped with layers of tungsten absorber. Together with the MICROMEGAS and T3B exper- iments the calorimeter was operated in test beams at the CERN PS and SPS with mixed beams of muons, electrons, pions, kaons and protons in an energy range from 1 to 300 GeV. This note describes the experimental configurations and data taking conditions.

  19. Blistering on tungsten surface exposed to high flux deuterium plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, H.Y.; Liu, W.; Luo, G. N.; Yuan, Y.; Jia, Y. Z.; Fu, B. Q.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-01-01

    The blistering behaviour of tungsten surfaces exposed to very high fluxes (1–2 × 1024/m2/s) of low energy (38 eV) deuterium plasmas was investigated as a function of ion fluence (0.2–7 × 1026 D/m2) and surface temperature (423–873 K). Blisters were observed under all conditions, especially up to

  20. Brush Plating of Nickel-Tungsten Alloy for Engineering Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    12 8 Nickel-Tungsten deposit properties Property Test method Result Microstructure XRD Nanocrystalline Structure Microscopy Micro-cracked...Composition Chemical Analysis Ni 60 wt.%: W 40 wt.% Residual Stress Bent strip 12 ~ 16 kpsi tensile Hardness Microhardness (Vickers) 660 ~ 690 HV Hydrogen...embrittlement ASTM F519 1a.1 notched bar Pass without bake Ductility Bend test 1.6% Abrasive wear Taber 14 mg/1000 cycle Friction coefficient

  1. Computer Control For Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kristinn; Springfield, James F.; Barnett, Robert J.; Cook, George E.

    1994-01-01

    Prototype computer-based feedback control system developed for use in gas/tungsten arc welding. Beyond improving welding technician's moment-to-moment general control of welding process, control system designed to assist technician in selecting appropriate welding-process parameters, and provide better automatic voltage control. Modular for ease of reconfiguration and upgrading. Modularity also reflected in software. Includes rack-mounted computer, based on VME bus, containing Intel 80286 and 80386 processors.

  2. Tungsten quasispherical wire loads with a profiled mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabovskii, E. V.; Dzhangobegov, V. V., E-mail: jvv88@triniti.ru; Oleinik, G. M.; Rodionov, R. N. [State Research Center of the Russian Federation Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Wire arrays made from micrometer tungsten wires with linear mass profiled along their height are developed for experiments on the generation of X-ray radiation upon pinch compression with a current of ∼3 MA at a pulse duration of ∼100 ns. Wires are imaged with a scanning electron microscope, and their diameter is determined. It is shown that the arrays have such a profile of height distribution of linear mass that allows for compact spherical compression upon current implosion.

  3. Fabrication of a tantalum-clad tungsten target for LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A.T., E-mail: atnelson@lanl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); O' Toole, J.A.; Valicenti, R.A. [Accelerator Operations and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Maloy, S.A. [Civilian Nuclear Program Office, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Development of a solid state bonding technique suitable to clad tungsten targets with tantalum was completed to improve operation of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Centers spallation target. Significant deterioration of conventional bare tungsten targets has historically resulted in transfer of tungsten into the cooling system through corrosion resulting in increased radioactivity outside the target and reduction of delivered neutron flux. The fabrication method chosen to join the tantalum cladding to the tungsten was hot isostatic pressing (HIP) given the geometry constraints of a cylindrical assembly and previous success demonstrated at KENS. Nominal HIP parameters of 1500 Degree-Sign C, 200 MPa, and 3 h were selected based upon previous work. Development of the process included significant surface engineering controls and characterization given tantalums propensity for oxide and carbide formation at high temperatures. In addition to rigorous acid cleaning implemented at each step of the fabrication process, a three layer tantalum foil gettering system was devised such that any free oxygen and carbon impurities contained in the argon gas within the HIP vessel was mitigated to the extent possible before coming into contact with the tantalum cladding. The result of the numerous controls and refined techniques was negligible coarsening of the native Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} surface oxide, no measureable oxygen diffusion into the tantalum bulk, and no detectable carburization despite use of argon containing up to 5 ppm oxygen and up to 40 ppm total CO, CO{sub 2}, or organic contaminants. Post bond characterization of the interface revealed continuous bonding with a few microns of species interdiffusion.

  4. Fabrication of a tantalum-clad tungsten target for LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A. T.; O'Toole, J. A.; Valicenti, R. A.; Maloy, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Development of a solid state bonding technique suitable to clad tungsten targets with tantalum was completed to improve operation of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Centers spallation target. Significant deterioration of conventional bare tungsten targets has historically resulted in transfer of tungsten into the cooling system through corrosion resulting in increased radioactivity outside the target and reduction of delivered neutron flux. The fabrication method chosen to join the tantalum cladding to the tungsten was hot isostatic pressing (HIP) given the geometry constraints of a cylindrical assembly and previous success demonstrated at KENS. Nominal HIP parameters of 1500 °C, 200 MPa, and 3 h were selected based upon previous work. Development of the process included significant surface engineering controls and characterization given tantalums propensity for oxide and carbide formation at high temperatures. In addition to rigorous acid cleaning implemented at each step of the fabrication process, a three layer tantalum foil gettering system was devised such that any free oxygen and carbon impurities contained in the argon gas within the HIP vessel was mitigated to the extent possible before coming into contact with the tantalum cladding. The result of the numerous controls and refined techniques was negligible coarsening of the native Ta2O5 surface oxide, no measureable oxygen diffusion into the tantalum bulk, and no detectable carburization despite use of argon containing up to 5 ppm oxygen and up to 40 ppm total CO, CO2, or organic contaminants. Post bond characterization of the interface revealed continuous bonding with a few microns of species interdiffusion.

  5. Improved fracture behavior and microstructural characterization of thin tungsten foils

    OpenAIRE

    Vladica Nikolic; Stefan Wurster; Daniel Firneis; Reinhard Pippan

    2016-01-01

    This study is focused towards the development of the technique for investigating the fracture behaviour of 100µm thick rolled tungsten foils, with a purity of 99.97%. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) scans reveal that the grains are elongated along the rolling direction of the foil, which has a very strong {100} texture. The test specimens were fabricated by electrical discharge machining (EDM) and cracks were initiated by consecutively using a diamond wire saw, a razor blade and a foc...

  6. Low-Temperature Strengths and Ductility of Various Tungsten Sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Yutaka Hiraoka; Hiroaki Kurishita

    2011-01-01

    We used three kinds of tungsten sheets in this study. First, we examined microstructure such as grain size distribution using an optical microscope. Secondly, we carried out three-point bend tests at temperatures between about 290 and 500 K. Then, we examined fracture surface of a failed specimen using a scanning electron microscope. Lastly, by analyzing all these results, we evaluated apparent intergranular and transgranular fracture strengths and discussed strengths and ductility of tungs...

  7. Rectangular Blocks vs Polygonal Walls in Archaeoseismology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus-G. Hinzen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Collapsed or deformed walls in ancient structures constitute important evidence in archaeoseismology, where damage is interpreted in terms of earthquake ground motion. A large variety of wall types have been developed during the millennia in different cultural backgrounds. Often walls with polygonal-shaped building blocks are regarded as more earthquake-resistant than a wall consisting of rectangular elements and, as is sometimes speculated, that the irregular wall types were intentionally developed for that purpose. We use simply structured discrete element models of four walls with different block geometries, perfect rectangular, an Inka-type structure and two polygonal designs, to test their dynamic behavior. In addition to an analytic calculation of ground motion, we use measured strong motion signals as boundary conditions for the 3D wall models with varying height to width ratios. At peak ground accelerations between 1.0 and 9.0 m/s2 and major frequencies of 0.5 to 3 Hz, numeric experiments with the horizontally applied analytic ground motions result in clear differences in the resistance of the four wall types with the rectangular block wall being most vulnerable. For more complex measured 3D motions the Inka-type wall proves more stable than the rectangular block wall; however, height to width ratio still has equally strong influence on the stability. Internal deformation of non-collapsed walls shows some correlation with the parameters of the driving motion. For simple impulsive ground motions, a peak ground displacement threshold exists between toppling and remaining upright for all four models but peak acceleration cannot be reliably back calculated.

  8. Angular distribution of the emission from ultrarelativistic electrons moving near crystallographic axes in diamond and tungsten crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleinik, A.N.; Vorobev, S.A.; Kalinin, B.N.; Kurkov, A.A.; Potylitsyn, A.P.

    1986-07-01

    Data on the angular distribution of the emission from ultrarelativistic electrons moving near crystallographic axes in diamond and tungsten crystals are reviewed. A graph is presented of the orientational dependence of soft gamma rays measured by a thin-walled ionization chamber sensitive to gamma rays with energies greater than 0.3 MeV and a radiative loss measured by a total-absorption Gauss quantometer with a threshold of about 5 MeV at an angle to the primary electron-beam direction of motion. It is concluded that knowledge of the scattering processes of ultrarelativistic electrons near crytal axes makes it easier to choose the optimum type and thickness of a crystal to achieve the maximum yield of gamma radiation into a given solid angle. 8 references.

  9. Shear-resistant behavior of light composite shear wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李升才; 董毓利

    2015-01-01

    Shear test results for a composite wall panel in a light composite structure system are compared with test results for shear walls in Japan. The analysis results show that this kind of composite wall panel works very well, and can be regarded as a solid panel. The composite wall panel with a hidden frame is essential for bringing its effect on shear resistance into full play. Comprehensive analysis of the shear-resistant behavior of the composite wall panel suggests that the shear of the composite shear wall panel can be controlled by the cracking strength of the web shearing diagonal crack.

  10. Shear-Resistant Behavior Analysis of Light Composite Shear Walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李升才; 江见鲸; 于庆荣

    2002-01-01

    Shear test results for a composite wall panel in a light composite structure system are compared with test results for shear walls in Japan in this paper. The analysis results show that this kind of composite wall panel works very well, and can be regarded as a solid panel. The composite wall panel with a hidden frame is essential for bringing its effect on shear resistance into full play. Comprehensive analysis of the shear-resistant behavior of the composite wall panel suggests that the shear of the composite shear wall panel can be controlled by the cracking strength of the web shearing diagonal crack.

  11. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, and structure of reduced tungsten chalcogenide cluster complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaobing, Xie

    1997-02-01

    Over the previous twenty years, ternary molybdenum chalcogenides of the general formula M{sub x}Mo{sub 6}Y{sub 8} (M = ternary metal cation; Y = chalcogenide), known as Chevrel phases, have been extensively studied. Many of these compounds have been found to have superconductivity, catalytic activity and ionic conductivity. The rich chemistry of the Chevrel phases raises considerable interest in finding the tungsten analogues of these phases. However, no such analogue has ever been synthesized, although the Chevrel phases are usually prepared directly from elements at high temperatures above 1000{degrees}C. The absence of the tungsten analogues may be caused by their thermodynamic instability at such high temperatures. Thus it might be necessary to avoid high-temperature synthetic procedures in order to establish the ternary and binary tungsten chalcogenides. A major focus of the McCarley research group has been on the preparation of M{sub 6}Y{sub 8}L{sub 6} (M = Mo, W; Y = S, Se, Te) cluster complexes as low temperature pathways to the Chevrel phases.

  13. Photoionization of the valence shells of the neutral tungsten atom

    CERN Document Server

    Ballance, Connor P

    2015-01-01

    Results from large-scale theoretical cross section calculations for the total photoionization of the 4f, 5s, 5p and 6s orbitals of the neutral tungsten atom using the Dirac Coulomb R-matrix approximation (DARC: Dirac-Atomic R-matrix codes) are presented. Comparisons are made with previous theoretical methods and prior experimental measurements. In previous experiments a time-resolved dual laser approach was employed for the photo-absorption of metal vapours and photo-absorption measurements on tungsten in a solid, using synchrotron radiation. The lowest ground state level of neutral tungsten is $\\rm 5p^6 5d^4 6s^2 \\; {^5}D_{\\it J}$, with $\\it J$=0, and requires only a single dipole matrix for photoionization. To make a meaningful comparison with existing experimental measurements, we statistically average the large-scale theoretical PI cross sections from the levels associated with the ground state $\\rm 5p^6 5d^4 6s^2 \\; {^5}D_{\\it J}[{\\it J}=0,1,2,3,4]$ levels and the $\\rm 5d^56s \\; ^7S_3$ excited metastable...

  14. Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composites: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdanels, David L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix (W/Cu) composites have served as an ideal model system with which to analyze the properties of metal matrix composites. A series of research programs were conducted to investigate the stress-strain behavior of W/Cu composites; the effect of fiber content on the strength, modulus, and conductivity of W/Cu composites; and the effect of alloying elements on the behavior of tungsten wire and of W/Cu composites. Later programs investigated the stress-rupture, creep, and impact behavior of these composites at elevated temperatures. Analysis of the results of these programs as allows prediction of the effects of fiber properties, matrix properties, and fiber content on the properties of W/Cu composites. These analyses form the basis for the rule-of-mixtures prediction of composite properties which was universally adopted as the criteria for measuring composite efficiency. In addition, the analyses allows extrapolation of potential properties of other metal matrix composites and are used to select candidate fibers and matrices for development of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite materials for high temperature aircraft and rocket engine turbine applications. The W/Cu composite efforts are summarized, some of the results obtained are described, and an update is provided on more recent work using W/Cu composites as high strength, high thermal conductivity composite materials for high heat flux, elevated temperature applications.

  15. Many-body central force potentials for tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D.; Bakaev, A.; Grigorev, P.; Van Neck, D.

    2014-07-01

    Tungsten and tungsten-based alloys are the primary candidate materials for plasma facing components in fusion reactors. The exposure to high-energy radiation, however, severely degrades the performance and lifetime limits of the in-vessel components. In an effort to better understand the mechanisms driving the materials' degradation at the atomic level, large-scale atomistic simulations are performed to complement experimental investigations. At the core of such simulations lies the interatomic potential, on which all subsequent results hinge. In this work we review 19 central force many-body potentials and benchmark their performance against experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. As basic features we consider the relative lattice stability, elastic constants and point-defect properties. In addition, we also investigate extended lattice defects, namely: free surfaces, symmetric tilt grain boundaries, the 1/2{1 1 0} and 1/2 {1 1 2} stacking fault energy profiles and the 1/2 screw dislocation core. We also provide the Peierls stress for the 1/2 edge and screw dislocations as well as the glide path of the latter at zero Kelvin. The presented results serve as an initial guide and reference list for both the modelling of atomically-driven phenomena in bcc tungsten, and the further development of its potentials.

  16. Silicon and tungsten oxide nanostructures for water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Gil, Karla R.; Spurgeon, Joshua M.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2009-08-01

    Inorganic semiconductors are promising materials for driving photoelectrochemical water-splitting reactions. However, there is not a single semiconductor material that can sustain the unassisted splitting of water into H2 and O2. Instead, we are developing a three part cell design where individual catalysts for water reduction and oxidation will be attached to the ends of a membrane. The job of splitting water is therefore divided into separate reduction and oxidation reactions, and each catalyst can be optimized independently for a single reaction. Silicon might be suitable to drive the water reduction. Inexpensive highly ordered Si wire arrays were grown on a single crystal wafer and transferred into a transparent, flexible polymer matrix. In this array, light would be absorbed along the longer axial dimension while the resulting electrons or holes would be collected along the much shorter radial dimension in a massively parallel array resembling carpet fibers on a microscale, hence the term "solar carpet". Tungsten oxide is a good candidate to drive the water oxidation. Self-organized porous tungsten oxide was successfully synthesized on the tungsten foil by anodization. This sponge-like structure absorbs light efficiently due to its high surface area; hence we called it "solar sponge".

  17. The Partitioning of Tungsten bwtween Aqueous Fluids and Silicate Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许永胜; 张本仁; 等

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out to determine the partition coefficients of tungsten between aqueous fluids and granitic melts at 800℃ and 1.5kb with natural granite as the starting material,The effects of the solution on the partition coefficients of tungsten show a wequence of P>co32->B>H2O.The effects are limited(generally KD<0.3)and the tungsten shows a preferential trend toward the melt over the aqueous fiuid.The value of KD increases with increasing concentration of phosphorus;the KD increases first and then reduces with the concentration of CO32-;when temperature decreases,the KD between the solution of CO32- and the silicate melt increases,and that between the solution of B4O72- and the silicate melt decreases.The partition coefficients of phosphorus and sodium between fluids and silicate melts have been calculated from the concentrations of the elements in the melts.The KD value for phosphorus is 0.38 and that for sodium is 0.56.Evidence shows that the elements tend to become richer and richer in the melts.

  18. Influence of particle flux on morphology changes of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzi, Luxherta; Schweer, Bernd; Terra, Alexis; Unterberg, Bernhard [Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Juelich (Germany); Temmerman, Greg de [FOM-DIFFER, Association EURATOM-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Oost, Guido van [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    Tungsten is currently considered as the main candidate material for high heat flux components of future fusion devices. Bombardment of tungsten surfaces by large fluences of low energy particles such as hydrogen isotopes and helium can lead to strong microstructural changes which are mechanically unstable. The occurrence of those effects is strongly dependent on the surface temperature and particle flux. In this contribution we present the experiments done at PSI-2 linear plasma device in order to generate surface modifications on tungsten. The power flux density delivered to the target at PSI-2 is up to 2 MWm{sup -2} and the ion flux density is of the order of 10{sup 22}-10{sup 23} m{sup -2}s{sup -1}. A dedicated actively heated sample holder was designed and tested in order to provide the required temperature range from 300 K to 1800 K. We present here the first measurements performed at PSI-2 whereas subsequent experiments are foreseen at Pilot-PSI and MAGNUM-PSI linear plasma devices with higher flux densities up to 10{sup 25} m{sup -2}s{sup -1}.

  19. Degradation of thin tungsten filaments at high temperature in HWCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigeri, P.A., E-mail: pfrigeri@phys.ethz.ch; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J.

    2015-01-30

    The degradation of the filaments is usually studied by checking the silicidation or carbonization status of the refractory metal used as catalysts, and their effects on the structural stability of the filaments. In this paper, it will be shown that the catalytic stability of a filament heated at high temperature is much shorter than its structural lifetime. The electrical resistance of a thin tungsten filament and the deposition rate of the deposited thin film have been monitored during the filament aging. It has been found that the deposition rate drops drastically once the quantity of dissolved silicon in the tungsten reaches the solubility limit and the silicides start precipitating. This manuscript concludes that the catalytic stability is only guaranteed for a short time and that for sufficiently thick filaments it does not depend on the filament radius. - Highlights: • A model for the electrical resistance of a tungsten filament during aging is presented. • Catalytic activity of the filament drops when W5Si3 precipitation takes place at its surface. • The catalytic stability of the filament does not depend on its radius in most practical situations.

  20. Porous tungsten oxide nanoflakes for highly alcohol sensitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, J; Liu, P; Liang, Y; Li, H B; Yang, G W

    2012-11-21

    Porous tungsten oxide (WO(3)) nanoflakes have been synthesized by a simple and green approach in an ambient environment. As a precursor solution a polycrystalline hydrated tungstite (H(2)WO(4)·H(2)O) nanoparticles colloid was first prepared by pulsed-laser ablation of a tungsten target in water. The H(2)WO(4)·H(2)O nanoflakes were produced by 72 h aging treatment at room temperature. Finally, porous WO(3) nanoflakes were synthesized by annealing at 800 °C for 4 h. Considering the large surface-to-volume ratio of porous nanoflakes, a porous WO(3) nanoflake gas sensor was fabricated, which exhibits an excellent sensor response performance to alcohol concentrations in the range of 20 to 600 ppm under low working temperature. This high response was attributed to the highly crystalline and porous flake-like morphology, which leads to effective adsorption and desorption, and provides more active sites for the gas molecules' reaction. These findings showed that the porous tungsten oxide nanoflake has great potential in gas-sensing performance.