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Sample records for full level laboratory

  1. Development and Deployment of a Full-Scale Cross-Flow Filtration System for Treatment of Liquid Low-Level Waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent, T.E.

    2000-05-12

    A full-scale modular solid/liquid separation (SLS) system was designed, fabricated, installed, and successfully deployed for treatment of liquid low-level waste from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The SLS module, utilizing cross-flow filtration, was operated as part of an integrated tank waste pretreatment system (otherwise known as the Wastewater Triad) to remove suspended solids and prevent fouling of ion-exchange materials and heat exchange surfaces. The information gained from this testing was used to complete design specifications for the full-scale modular SLS system in May 1997. The contract for detailed design and fabrication of the system was awarded to NUMET in July 1997, and the design was completed in January 1998. Fabrication began in March 1998, and the completed system was delivered to ORNL on December 29, 1998. Installation of the system at the MVST facility was completed in May 1999. After completing an operational readiness assessment, approval was given to commence hot operations on June 7, 1999. Operations involving two of the eight MVSTs were performed safely and with very little unscheduled downtime. Filtration of supernatant from tank W-31 was completed on June 24, 1999 and W-26 processing was completed on August 20, 1999. The total volume processed during these two campaigns was about 45,000 gal. The suspended solids content of the liquid processed from tank W-31 was lower than expected, resulting in higher-than-expected filtrate production for nearly the entire operation. The liquid processed from tank W-26 was higher in suspended solids content, and filtrate production was lower, but comparable to the rates expected based on the results of previous pilot-scale, single-element filtration tests. The quality of the filtrate consistently met the requirements for feed to the downstream ion-exchange and evaporation processes. From an equipment and controls standpoint, the modular system (pumps

  2. Full scale prototype laboratory for architecture students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekhout, A.C.J.M.; Van Swieten, P.M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Innovation in prefabrication with new technologies in product development of building components together with the important role materialization is playing in the education of architectural engineers and building technology designers are the main motifs for full scale material prototyping in the

  3. Monitoring of biogas plants - experiences in laboratory and full scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Habermann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To control and regulate the biogas process there are online process parameters and offline process parameters, which basically don’t differ between pilot biogas plants and industrial biogas plants. Generally, temperature, pH-value, volume flow rate and sometimes redox potential are measured online. An online-measurement of the dissolved volatile fatty acids and an online-detection of dissolved hydrogen both directly in the liquid phase as well as near-infrared spectroscopy are under development. FOS/TAC-analysis is the most common offline-analysis of the biogas process and normally it is carried out by the plant operator directly at the biogas plant. For example dry matter, organic dry matter, nitrogen and fatty acids are other analyses, which are carried out but by a laboratory. Microbiological analyses of biogas plants are very expensive and time-consuming and are therefore in Germany very rare. Microbiological analyses are mainly for research purposes. For example the Fluorescence in situ Hybridiation (FISH is used for characterization of the populations. Electric-optical measurement should be established as a new method to investigate the vitality of the methane producing microorganisms. In a cooperation project, which is promoted by the German ministry for technology, between IASP and Chair of Bioprocess Engineering at TU Berlin, this method is proper investigated using a device from the firm EloSystems. The microorganisms are brought in an electrical field of different frequencies. In this field the microorganisms direct themselves differently according to their physiological state. At the end of this project an early detection of process disturbance will be possible with the help of this method. In this presentation the result of the first tests are presented.

  4. Field and laboratory investigations for full depth reclamation projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Full-depth reclamation (FDR) offers a timely, cost-effective solution to restore a pavements condition. : However, FDR represents only one technique in the engineers toolkit available for addressing deteriorating : pavement conditions. The purp...

  5. Level-1 muon trigger performance with the full 2017 dataset

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This document describes the performance of the CMS Level-1 Muon Trigger with the full dataset of 2017. Efficiency plots are included for each track finder (TF) individually and for the system as a whole. The efficiency is measured to be greater than 90% for all track finders.

  6. On the dominant noise components of tactical aircraft: Laboratory to full scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Aubert, Allan C.; Spyropoulos, John T.; Powers, Russell W.

    2018-05-01

    This paper investigates the dominant noise components of a full-scale high performance tactical aircraft. The present study uses acoustic measurements of the exhaust jet from a single General Electric F414-400 turbofan engine installed in a Boeing F/A-18E Super Hornet aircraft operating from flight idle to maximum afterburner. The full-scale measurements are to the ANSI S12.75-2012 standard employing about 200 microphones. By comparing measured noise spectra with those from hot supersonic jets observed in the laboratory, the dominant noise components specific to the F/A-18E aircraft at different operating power levels are identified. At intermediate power, it is found that the dominant noise components of an F/A-18E aircraft are essentially the same as those of high temperature supersonic laboratory jets. However, at military and afterburner powers, there are new dominant noise components. Their characteristics are then documented and analyzed. This is followed by an investigation of their origin and noise generation mechanisms.

  7. Umbilical cord blood glucose levels in full-term newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Karpova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the investigation was to determine the umbilical cord venous blood level of glucose in full-term newborns and its relationship to the mode of delivery. The investigation included 102 full-term newborn infants, including 33 and 69 babies born via cesar-ean and vaginal delivery, respectively. Umbilical cord serum glucose levels were determined by the glucose oxidase test using a Sap-phire-400 biochemical analyzer. In healthy full-term newborns, the mean umbilical cord blood glucose levels were 4,29±0,88 mmol/1 (minimum, 2,9 mmol/1 and maximum, 5,9 mmol/1. In the babies born via cesarean delivery, the umbilical cord blood concentration of glucose was ascertained to be significantly lower than in those born vaginally (3,84+0,71 mmol/1 versus 4,51+0,87 mmol/1; /><0,0001. Abdominal delivery can be apparently considered to be a risk factor for hypoglycemia in neonatal infants.

  8. Implementation of the full-scale emplacement (FE) experiment at the Mont Terri rock laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, H.R.; Garitte, B.; Vogt, T.; and others

    2017-04-15

    Opalinus Clay is currently being assessed as the host rock for a deep geological repository for high-level and low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in Switzerland. Within this framework, the 'Full-Scale Emplacement' (FE) experiment was initiated at the Mont Terri rock laboratory close to the small town of St-Ursanne in Switzerland. The FE experiment simulates, as realistically as possible, the construction, waste emplacement, backfilling and early post-closure evolution of a spent fuel/vitrified high-level waste disposal tunnel according to the Swiss repository concept. The main aim of this multiple heater test is the investigation of repository-induced thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupled effects on the host rock at this scale and the validation of existing coupled THM models. For this, several hundred sensors were installed in the rock, the tunnel lining, the bentonite buffer, the heaters and the plug. This paper is structured according to the implementation timeline of the FE experiment. It documents relevant details about the instrumentation, the tunnel construction, the production of the bentonite blocks and the highly compacted 'granulated bentonite mixture' (GBM), the development and construction of the prototype 'backfilling machine' (BFM) and its testing for horizontal GBM emplacement. Finally, the plug construction and the start of all 3 heaters (with a thermal output of 1350 Watt each) in February 2015 are briefly described. In this paper, measurement results representative of the different experimental steps are also presented. Tunnel construction aspects are discussed on the basis of tunnel wall displacements, permeability testing and relative humidity measurements around the tunnel. GBM densities achieved with the BFM in the different off-site mock-up tests and, finally, in the FE tunnel are presented. Finally, in situ thermal conductivity and temperature measurements recorded during the first heating months

  9. IRMM low level underground laboratory in HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouchel, D. [CEC-JRC, Inst. for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Geel (Belgium); Wordel, R. [CEC-JRC, Inst. for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Geel (Belgium)

    1997-03-01

    The operation of low background HPGe detectors at a depth of 225 m, reduced the background by two orders of magnitude; a large amount of the remaining background is still attributable to the cosmic rays. The selection of radiopure materials, the characterization of reference matrices and the measurements of low radioactivities in environmental samples are performed. Coupling the low level spectrometry with additional techniques, e.g. neutron activation, will allow to measure extremely low radioactivities. (orig.)

  10. Full range nuclear power plant steam generator level control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geets, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    In a method of controlling feedwater level in a steam generator of a pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant, the steam generator having secondary loop feedwater lines. The method is described including the steps of outputting a first signal from a first three-mode controller to control feedwater flow through the secondary loop feedwater lines at reactor power levels below a predetermined percentage, and outputting a second signal from a second three-mode controller to control feedwater flow through the secondary loop feedwater lines at reactor power levels above the predetermined percentage. The improvement in combination therewith comprises: receiving the first and second signals at a transition controller means; generating a first feedwater temperature-dependent function; operating on the first input signal with the first temperature dependent function to produce a third signal; generating a second feedwater temperature-dependent function; operating on the second input signal with the second temperature-dependent function to produce a fourth signal; and adding the third and fourth signals resulting from the operating steps to control the feedwater flow through the secondary loop feedwater lines throughout an entire range of reactor load

  11. Two of a Kind or a Full House? Reproductive Suppression and Alloparenting in Laboratory Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P Garner

    Full Text Available Alloparenting, a behavior in which individuals other than the actual parents act in a parental role, is seen in many mammals, including house mice. In wild house mice, alloparental care is only seen when familiar sibling females simultaneously immigrate to a male's territory, so in the laboratory, when a pair of unfamiliar female wild mice are mated with a male, alloparenting does not occur because one female will typically be reproductively suppressed. In contrast, laboratory mice are assumed to alloparent regardless of familiarity or relatedness and are therefore routinely trio bred to increase productivity. Empirical evidence supporting the presence of alloparental care in laboratory mice is lacking. Albino and pigmented inbred mice of the strain C57BL/6NCrl (B6 and outbred mice of the stock Crl:CF1 (CF1 were used to investigate alloparenting in laboratory mice since by mating pigmented and albino females with albino males of the same stock or strain, maternal parentage was easily determined. We housed pairs (M:F or trios (M:2F of mice in individually ventilated cages containing nesting material and followed reproductive performance for 16 weeks. Females in trios were tested to determine dominance at the start of the experiment, and again 5 days after the birth of a litter to determine if a female's dominance shifted with the birth of pups. Results showed a significant and expected difference in number of offspring produced by B6 and CF1 (p < 0.0001. Pigmented mice nursed and nested with albino pups and vice-versa, confirming empirical observations from many that group nesting and alloparenting occurs in unrelated laboratory mice. When overall production of both individual mice and cages was examined, reproductive suppression was seen in trio cages. Dominance testing with the tube test did not correlate female reproduction with female dominance in a female-female dyad. Due to the reproductive suppression noted in trios, on a per-mouse basis

  12. The Master level optics laboratory at the Institute of Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Per

    2017-08-01

    The master level optics laboratory is a biannual, intensive laboratory course in the fields of geometrical, physical and modern optics. This course is intended for the master level student though Ph.D. advisors which often recommend it to their advisees. The students are required to complete five standard laboratory experiments and an independent project during a semester. The goals of the laboratory experiments are for the students to get hands-on experience setting up optical laboratory equipment, collecting and analyzing data, as well as to communicate key results. The experimental methods, analysis, and results of the standard experiments are submitted in a journal style report, while an oral presentation is given for the independent project.

  13. Full-scale laboratory drilling tests on sandstone and dolomite. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, A.D.; Green, S.J.; Rogers, L.A.

    1977-12-01

    Full-scale laboratory drilling experiments were performed under simulated downhole conditions to determine what effect changing various drilling parameters has on penetration rate. The two rock types, typical of deep oil and gas reservoirs, used for the tests were Colton Sandstone and Bonne Terre Dolomite. Drilling was performed with standard 7/sup 7///sub 8/ inch rotary insert bits and water base mud. The results showed the penetration rate to be strongly dependent on bit weight, rotary speed, and borehole mud pressure. There was only a small dependence on mud flow rate. The drilling rate decreased rapidly with increasing borehole mud pressure for borehole pressures up to about 2,000 psi. Above this pressure, the borehole pressure and rotary speeds had a smaller effect on penetration rate. The penetration rate was then dependent mostly on the bit weight. Penetration rate per horsepower input was also shown to decrease at higher mud pressures and bit weights. The ratio of horizontal confining stress to axial overburden stress was maintained at 0.7 for simulated overburden stresses between 0 and 12,800 psi. For this simulated downhole stress state, the undrilled rock sample was within the elastic response range and the confining pressures were found to have only a small or negligible effect on the penetration rate. Visual examination of the bottomhole pattern of the rocks after simulated downhole drilling, however, revealed ductile chipping of the Sandstone, but more brittle behavior in the Dolomite.

  14. Pair housing for female longtailed and rhesus macaques in the laboratory: behavior in protected contact versus full contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kate C; Crockett, Carolyn M; Lee, Grace H; Oettinger, Brooke C; Schoof, Valérie; Thom, Jinhee P

    2012-01-01

    Pair housing for caged macaques in the laboratory generally allows unrestricted tactile contact but, less commonly, may involve limited contact via grooming-contact bars or perforated panels. The purpose of using this protected contact housing, which prevents entry into pair-mates' cages, typically is to accommodate research and management requirements. The study used behavioral data collected on 12 pairs of female longtailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) at the Washington National Primate Research Center and 7 pairs of female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) housed at the Tulane National Primate Research Center to assess the relative benefits of protected versus full protected contact. The study collected data in stable pairs housed first in protected contact followed by full contact. Species combined, the study found the presence of the panel was associated with lower levels of social grooming and higher levels of self-grooming, abnormal behavior, and tension-related behavior. Within species, only the protected- versus full-contact contrasts for abnormal and tension were statistically significant-and only for rhesus macaques. Results suggest that for female rhesus macaques, potential disadvantages or inconveniences of full contact should be balanced against the improved behavioral profile in comparison to protected contact. The use of protected contact among female longtailed macaques does not appear to require the same cost-benefit analysis. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  15. The Laser Level as an Optics Laboratory Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Mickey

    2013-01-01

    For decades now, the laser has been used as a handy device for performing ray traces in geometrical optics demonstrations and laboratories. For many ray- trace applications, I have found the laser level 3 to be even more visually compelling and easy for student use than the laser pointer.

  16. Laboratory methods for evaluating the effect of low level laser ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory methods for evaluating the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in wound healing. D Hawkins, H Abrahamse. Abstract. The basic tenet of laser therapy is that laser radiation has a wavelength dependent capability to alter cellular behaviour in the absence of significant heating. Low intensity radiation can inhibit ...

  17. Groundwater level status report for 2010, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2011-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2010 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 194 monitoring wells, including 63 regional aquifer wells (including 10 regional/intermediate wells), 34 intermediate wells, 97 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 162 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells and seasonal responses to snowmelt runoff observed in intermediate wells.

  18. Groundwater level status report for 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2009-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2008 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 28 intermediate wells, 8 regional/intermediate wells, 106 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 166 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  19. Groundwater level status report for 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2010-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2009 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 55 regional aquifer wells (including 11 regional/intermediate wells), 26 intermediate wells, 98 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 161 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  20. A core laboratory offering full evaluation of new boron compounds. A service to the BNCT community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamenhof, R.G.; Patel, H.; Palmer, M.R.; Lin, H.C.; Busse, P.M.; Harling, O.; Binns, P.J.; Riley, K.J.; Bernard, J.

    2000-01-01

    A joint project by the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center at Harvard Medical School and The Nuclear Reactor Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is proposed which would provide a core laboratory for the evaluation of new boron compounds. Federal agency funding has been applied for to support such a facility. The facility's evaluation of candidate boron compounds will include: quantitative cellular boron uptake; cell survival curve analysis (using a thermal neutron beam); small or large animal pharmacokinetic analysis; macro- and micro boron distribution analysis using high-resolution autoradiography, prompt gamma analysis and ICP-AES; small or large animal in vivo tumor control studies (using thermal or epithermal neutron beams); and pharmacological in vivo toxicity evaluation. The laboratory will include small and large animal surgical facilities and resources for additional boron compound chemistry as required by the evaluation procedure. This facility will be open to the BNCT research community. (author)

  1. Five Level Laboratory var Compensator With Separated Floating DC Voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tonny Wederberg

    1997-01-01

    The paper discuss a IGBT model of a 10kvar five level non clamped compensator build to in-vestigate principles about multilevel system. Pulse wide modulation with selective harmonic elimination for multilevel converter is described where one of the solution is made in the labo-ratory model. Also...... the DC voltage sharing between the capacitors from the model is shown and methods for this regulation is given....

  2. The development of hunger and fullness during a laboratory meal in patients with Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Francine; Zimmerli, Ellen J.; Devlin, Michael J.; Kissileff, Harry R.; Walsh, B. Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to test the hypothesis that, compared to similarly obese participants without BED, individuals with BED have a disturbance in the development of fullness and reduction of hunger during the course of a standard meal of large size. Method Thirteen patients with BED and 14 obese control participants consumed 975 grams of a milkshake. Participants received no information about how much they had eaten or how much of the meal remained to be consumed. Participants were interrupted after every 75 g consumed to rate hunger and fullness. Results Final fullness ratings were higher in patients with BED, but there were no differences in mean duration or mean rate of eating, or in changes in subjective ratings of hunger and fullness per gram of food. Conclusion The current study reports the surprising finding of no difference in reports of hunger and fullness between patients with BED and obese controls. PMID:18803172

  3. Speakers’ comfort and voice level variation in classrooms: Laboratory research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelegrin Garcia, David; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Teachers adjust their voice levels under different classroom acoustics conditions, even in the absence of background noise. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in order to understand further this relationship and to determine optimum room acoustic conditions for speaking. Under simulated...... from 0.93 dB/dB, with free speech, to 0.1 dB/dB with other less demanding communication tasks as reading and talking at short distances. The room effect for some individuals can be as strong as 1.7 dB/dB. A questionnaire investigation showed that the acoustic comfort for talking in classrooms...

  4. Preliminary results about Electrodeposition of Cobalt at laboratory level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo, N.

    1992-01-01

    As of an organic compound, an extraction and Cobalt electrodeposition method had been developed as a part of fabrication aim of a sealed radioactive source with objective to the construction of density meter prototype. It was performed preliminary test of electrodeposition in the laboratory level in a simple cell. The used electrolyte had been a sulphate solution obtained by extraction of an organic solution. It is obtained a Co film by electrodeposition at 55 o C temperature and with an approximately Co concentration in 70 g/lt. (Author) 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  5. Full Scale Earth Fault Experiments on 10 kV laboratory network with comparative Measurements on Conventional CT's and VT's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Stefan; Nielsen, Hans Ove; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a result of a full scale earth fault carried out on the 10 kV research/laboratory distribution network at Kyndbyvaerket Denmark in May 2001. The network is compensated through a Petersen-Coil and current and voltage measurements were measured on conventional current...

  6. Laboratory evolution of a biotin-requiring Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for full biotin prototrophy and identification of causal mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bracher, J.M.; de Hulster, A.F.; van den Broek, M.A.; Daran, J.G.; van Maris, A.J.A.; Pronk, J.T.

    2017-01-01

    Biotin prototrophy is a rare, incompletely understood, and industrially relevant characteristic of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The genome of the haploid laboratory strain CEN.PK113-7D contains a full complement of biotin biosynthesis genes, but its growth in biotin-free synthetic medium is

  7. Effect of mixing on the rheological characteristics of conditioned sludge and liquid stream: laboratory and full-scale studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu Orf, M.M. [Nablus, An-Najah National Univ., Palestina (Country unknown/Code not available). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Dentel, S.K. [Newark, Univ. of Delaware (United States). Dept. of Civil Environmental Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Conditioning of wastewater sludges with polyelectrolyte prior to dewatering is necessary to increase the sludge`s dewaterability. During this conditioning process adequate mixing of the conditioner and the sludge must be attained. The research reports on results from laboratory and full-scale experiments conducted to examine the effect of mixing parameters upon the conditioned sludge and liquid stream rheological characteristics.

  8. Digitization and simulation realization of full range control system for steam generator water level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Hong; Ye Jianhua; Qian Fei; Li Chao

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a full range digital control system for the steam generator water level is designed by a control scheme of single element control and three-element cascade feed-forward control, and the method to use the software module configuration is proposed to realize the water level control strategy. This control strategy is then applied in the operation of the nuclear power simulation machine. The simulation result curves indicate that the steam generator water level maintains constant at the stable operation condition, and when the load changes, the water level changes but finally maintains the constant. (authors)

  9. The Effect of Chemistry Laboratory Activities on Students' Chemistry Perception and Laboratory Anxiety Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogdu, Cemil

    2017-01-01

    Chemistry lesson should be supported with experiments to understand the lecture effectively. For safety laboratory environment and to prevent laboratory accidents; chemical substances' properties, working principles for chemical substances' usage should be learnt. Aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of experiments which depend on…

  10. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory High-Level Waste Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) High-Level Waste (HLW) Roadmap takes a strategic look at the entire HLW life-cycle starting with generation, through interim storage, treatment and processing, transportation, and on to final disposal. The roadmap is an issue-based planning approach that compares ''where we are now'' to ''where we want and need to be.'' The INEL has been effectively managing HLW for the last 30 years. Calcining operations are continuing to turn liquid HLW into a more manageable form. Although this document recognizes problems concerning HLW at the INEL, there is no imminent risk to the public or environment. By analyzing the INEL current business operations, pertinent laws and regulations, and committed milestones, the INEL HLW Roadmap has identified eight key issues existing at the INEL that must be resolved in order to reach long-term objectives. These issues are as follows: A. The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs a consistent policy for HLW generation, handling, treatment, storage, and disposal. B. The capability for final disposal of HLW does not exist. C. Adequate processes have not been developed or implemented for immobilization and disposal of INEL HLW. D. HLW storage at the INEL is not adequate in terms of capacity and regulatory requirements. E. Waste streams are generated with limited consideration for waste minimization. F. HLW is not adequately characterized for disposal nor, in some cases, for storage. G. Research and development of all process options for INEL HLW treatment and disposal are not being adequately pursued due to resource limitations. H. HLW transportation methods are not selected or implemented. A root-cause analysis uncovered the underlying causes of each of these issues

  11. Control and design of full-bridge three-level converter for renewable energy sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Zhilei; Xu, Jing; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    Output voltage of renewable energy sources, such as fuel cell and PV cell, is often low and varies widely with load and environmental conditions. Therefore, the high step-up DC-DC converter is needed between renewable energy sources and the grid-connected inverter. However, voltage stress...... of rectifier diodes is high and filter is large in traditional voltage-source converters in a wide input-voltage range. In order to solve the aforementioned problems, a full-bridge (FB) three-level (TL) converter is proposed. It can operate at both two-level and three-level modes, so it is suitable for wide...

  12. A Development of Interfacing System between Level 2 and Level 3 PSA for Integrated Analysis of Full Scope PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seok Jung

    2011-01-01

    An integrated assessment of full scope and entire level PSA including level 1, 2 and 3 PSA is an essential issue of the current PSA implementation for operating and developing nuclear power plants. In order to perform an integrated assessment under restricted resources for PSA, integrated and automation assessment tools are essentially required. For this purpose, KAERI is in the development of an integrated PSA assessment software package named by OCEANS. As a part of OCEANS, an interfacing system linked between level 2 and level 3 PSA was developed. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an overview of the currently developing interfacing system with a concept of link method. This interfacing system was designed as a subsidiary tool of SARA program which is a supporting utility of level 3 PSA with Microsoft Window based- program

  13. Laboratory Evolution of a Biotin-Requiring Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain for Full Biotin Prototrophy and Identification of Causal Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracher, Jasmine M; de Hulster, Erik; Koster, Charlotte C; van den Broek, Marcel; Daran, Jean-Marc G; van Maris, Antonius J A; Pronk, Jack T

    2017-08-15

    Biotin prototrophy is a rare, incompletely understood, and industrially relevant characteristic of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The genome of the haploid laboratory strain CEN.PK113-7D contains a full complement of biotin biosynthesis genes, but its growth in biotin-free synthetic medium is extremely slow (specific growth rate [μ] ≈ 0.01 h -1 ). Four independent evolution experiments in repeated batch cultures and accelerostats yielded strains whose growth rates (μ ≤ 0.36 h -1 ) in biotin-free and biotin-supplemented media were similar. Whole-genome resequencing of these evolved strains revealed up to 40-fold amplification of BIO1 , which encodes pimeloyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase. The additional copies of BIO1 were found on different chromosomes, and its amplification coincided with substantial chromosomal rearrangements. A key role of this gene amplification was confirmed by overexpression of BIO1 in strain CEN.PK113-7D, which enabled growth in biotin-free medium (μ = 0.15 h -1 ). Mutations in the membrane transporter genes TPO1 and/or PDR12 were found in several of the evolved strains. Deletion of TPO1 and PDR12 in a BIO1 -overexpressing strain increased its specific growth rate to 0.25 h -1 The effects of null mutations in these genes, which have not been previously associated with biotin metabolism, were nonadditive. This study demonstrates that S. cerevisiae strains that carry the basic genetic information for biotin synthesis can be evolved for full biotin prototrophy and identifies new targets for engineering biotin prototrophy into laboratory and industrial strains of this yeast. IMPORTANCE Although biotin (vitamin H) plays essential roles in all organisms, not all organisms can synthesize this vitamin. Many strains of baker's yeast, an important microorganism in industrial biotechnology, contain at least some of the genes required for biotin synthesis. However, most of these strains cannot synthesize biotin at all or do so at rates that are

  14. Laboratory methods for evaluating the effect of low level laser ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low energy laser irradiation alters the cellular function by effecting protein synthesis, cell growth and differentiation, cell motility, membrane potential and binding affinities, neurotransmitter release, ATP synthesis and prostaglandin synthesis. Laboratory findings provide scientific rati onale of laser therapy and the effect of ...

  15. Increased circulating full-length betatrophin levels in drug-naïve metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Li, Sheyu; He, He; Yu, Chuan; Li, Xiaodan; Liang, Libo; Chen, Yi; Li, Jianwei; Li, Jianshu; Sun, Xin; Tian, Haoming; An, Zhenmei

    2017-03-14

    Betatrophin is a newly identified circulating adipokine playing a role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism. But its role in metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains unknown. Therefore, we aimed to compare the circulating betatrophin concentrations between patients with MetS and healthy controls. We recruited 47 patients with MetS and 47 age and sex matched healthy controls. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements were performed, and serum betatrophin levels were detected by ELISA. Full-length betatrophin levels in patients with MetS were significantly higher than those in controls (694.84 ± 365.51 pg/ml versus 356.64 ± 287.92 pg/ml; P <0.001). While no significant difference of total betatrophin levels was found between the two groups (1.20 ± 0.79 ng/ml versus 1.31 ± 1.08 ng/ml; P = 0.524). Full-length betatrophin level was positively correlated with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (r = 0.357, P = 0.014) and 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) (r = 0.38, P <0.01). Binary logistic regression models indicated that subjects in the tertile of the highest full-length betatrophin level experienced higher odds of having MetS (OR, 8.6; 95% CI 2.8-26.8; P <0.001). Our study showed that full-length betatrophin concentrations were increased in drug-naïve MetS patients.

  16. Performance of a Modified Shear Box Apparatus for Full Scale Laboratory Study of Segmental Retaining Wall Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Zahidul Islam Bhuiyan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper outlines the performance of a modified large scale shear box apparatus, which is mainly used to execute full scale laboratory study of segmental retaining walls. A typical apparatus has already been adopted by the current ASTM and NCMA test protocols and by literature studying of those test protocols, it is found that protocols recommend a fixed vertical actuator with roller or airbag configuration as a proposed vertical loading assembly. Previous research study demonstrated that vertical loading arrangement greatly influences the interface shear capacity of block systems and fixed vertical actuator with flexible airbag shows better loading arrangement for the blocks which have dilatant behavior. However, airbag arrangement is strenuous and time-consuming loading assembly compared to fixed vertical actuator which increases normal load with shear displacement due to bending of vertical actuator locked with the top block during shear loading. For the drawbacks of fixed vertical loading arrangement, the apparatus used in this study was fully redesigned and modified in terms of normal loading arrangement specially. A moveable vertical loading assembly is used in the modified apparatus which allows the piston movement with the top blocks during shear testing. The results outlined in this paper report that normal load remains constant over the period of shear testing for a wide range of surcharge loading. It could easily be concluded that the modified apparatus might be a better alternative to the existing apparatus used in the test protocols.

  17. A new formalism of full tracking in dimuon high level trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indranil; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan

    2009-01-01

    In order to appreciate the complexities of full tracking of the Dimuon High Level Trigger, it is important to have a brief idea about High Level Trigger and Dimuon Spectrometer of ALICE. The aim of High Level Trigger (abbreviated as HLT) is to provide software triggers for the events of physics interest, on the basis of fast but approximate online reconstruction of events. This will reduce the data to be stored in GRID for detail Offline analysis. The online analysis of the binary data is performed on a PC farm which collects the zero-suppressed data from 1.1 million channels of the Tracking Chambers of Dimuon Spectrometer through the optical fibres called Detector Data Link (in sort DDL). The HLT decisions are sent back to during event building

  18. Upper-Level Undergraduate Chemistry Students' Goals for Their Laboratory Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKorver, Brittland K.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to reform undergraduate chemistry laboratory coursework typically focus on the curricula of introductory-level courses, while upper-level courses are bypassed. This study used video-stimulated recall to interview 17 junior- and senior- level chemistry majors after they carried out an experiment as part of a laboratory course. It is assumed…

  19. Storage of high-level wastes, investigations in underground laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouzounian, G.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews the different collaborations made by ANDRA (national agency for the management of radioactive wastes) in the fields of underground radioactive waste storage. ANDRA has taken part in various experimental research programs performed in laboratories such as Mol in Belgium, Aspo in Sweden, Pinawa in Canada and Grimsel in Switzerland. This article details the experiments led at Mol since 1984. ANDRA is commissioned by the 30.12.91 decree to study the possibility of storage in deep geological layers. A thorough knowledge of the matter requires the building of underground laboratories in order to test and validate technological choices on a real scale. 6 themes will have to be investigated: 1) the capacity to seal up the storage facility after its use in order to assure the protection of man and environment, 2) the effects of geological perturbations on the confining properties of the site, 3) the confining ability of the Callovian-Oxfordian geological formation, 4) the transfer of radionuclides from the geological formation to the biosphere, 5) the constructing possibility of an underground storage facility, and 6) the possibility of retrieving the stored packages. (A.C.)

  20. High Estradiol Levels During Postmenopause - Pitfalls in Laboratory Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebes, I; Graf, M; Kellner, M; Keck, C; Segerer, S E

    2015-09-01

    A 54-year-old woman was admitted with a result of high serum estradiol levels (> 4300 pg/ml) and typical postmenopausal symptoms. She had a history of an adnexectomy (normal histopathology) due to the elevated estradiol levels. After surgery, estradiol levels were as high as before. Analyzing the anti-mullerian hormone (AMH), inhibin B, DHEA-S and estrone, typical postmenopausal levels were found. Serum estradiol levels were controlled several times with rabbit-derived polyclonal as well as monoclonal antibodies to optimize the selectivity of the test system. Secondary, a radioimmunoassay was performed to exclude interferences of the detection system where lower, but still elevated estradiol levels (186 pg/ml) were found. Hypothesizing that our patient underwent a cross reaction with irregular antibodies, a control was done using sheep-derived antibodies, which proved a postmenopausal hormone level (estradiol level irregular antibodies (> 200 mg/l; reference < 30 mg/l). This case depicts the pitfalls of estradiol measurement detecting false elevated estradiol levels in a postmenopausal woman.

  1. Effects of full-scale beach renovation on fecal indicator levels in shoreline sand and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Rafael J; Hernandez, Yasiel; Jimenez, Nasly H; Piggot, Alan M; Klaus, James S; Feng, Zhixuan; Reniers, Ad; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

    2014-01-01

    Recolonization of enterococci, at a non-point source beach known to contain high background levels of bacteria, was studied after a full-scale beach renovation project. The renovation involved importation of new exogenous sand, in addition to infrastructure improvements. The study's objectives were to document changes in sand and water quality and to evaluate the relative contribution of different renovation activities towards these changes. These objectives were addressed: by measuring enterococci levels in the sand and fecal indicator bacteria levels (enterococci and fecal coliform) in the water, by documenting sediment characteristics (mineralogy and biofilm levels), and by estimating changes in observable enterococci loads. Analysis of enterococci levels on surface sand and within sediment depth cores were significantly higher prior to beach renovation (6.3-72 CFU/g for each sampling day) when compared to levels during and after beach renovation (0.8-12 CFU/g) (P < 0.01). During the renovation process, sand enterococci levels were frequently below detection limits (<0.1 CFU/g). For water, exceedances in the regulatory thresholds that would trigger a beach advisory decreased by 40% for enterococci and by 90% for fecal coliform. Factors that did not change significantly between pre- and post- renovation included the enterococci loads from animals (approx. 3 × 10(11) CFU per month). Factors that were observed to change between pre- and post- renovation activities included: the composition of the beach sand (64% versus 98% quartz, and a significant decrease in biofilm levels) and loads from direct stormwater inputs (reduction of 3 × 10(11) CFU per month). Overall, this study supports that beach renovation activities contributed to improved sand and water quality resulting in a 50% decrease of observable enterococci loads due to upgrades to the stormwater infrastructure. Of interest was that the change in the sand mineralogy also coincided with changes in biofilm

  2. Biotechnology by Design: An Introductory Level, Project-Based, Synthetic Biology Laboratory Program for Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale L. Beach

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology offers an ideal opportunity to promote undergraduate laboratory courses with research-style projects, immersing students in an inquiry-based program that enhances the experience of the scientific process. We designed a semester-long, project-based laboratory curriculum using synthetic biology principles to develop a novel sensory device. Students develop subject matter knowledge of molecular genetics and practical skills relevant to molecular biology, recombinant DNA techniques, and information literacy. During the spring semesters of 2014 and 2015, the Synthetic Biology Laboratory Project was delivered to sophomore genetics courses. Using a cloning strategy based on standardized BioBrick genetic “parts,” students construct a “reporter plasmid” expressing a reporter gene (GFP controlled by a hybrid promoter regulated by the lac-repressor protein (lacI. In combination with a “sensor plasmid,” the production of the reporter phenotype is inhibited in the presence of a target environmental agent, arabinose. When arabinose is absent, constitutive GFP expression makes cells glow green. But the presence of arabinose activates a second promoter (pBAD to produce a lac-repressor protein that will inhibit GFP production. Student learning was assessed relative to five learning objectives, using a student survey administered at the beginning (pre-survey and end (post-survey of the course, and an additional 15 open-ended questions from five graded Progress Report assignments collected throughout the course. Students demonstrated significant learning gains (p < 0.05 for all learning outcomes. Ninety percent of students indicated that the Synthetic Biology Laboratory Project enhanced their understanding of molecular genetics. The laboratory project is highly adaptable for both introductory and advanced courses. Editor's Note:The ASM advocates that students must successfully demonstrate the ability to explain and practice safe

  3. Performance Evaluation of Lower-Energy Energy Storage Alternatives for Full-Hybrid Vehicles; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonder, J.; Cosgrove, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-02-11

    Automakers have been mass producing hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) for well over a decade, and the technology has proven to be very effective at reducing per-vehicle fuel use. However, the incremental cost of HEVs such as the Toyota Prius or Ford Fusion Hybrid remains several thousand dollars higher than the cost of comparable conventional vehicles, which has limited HEV market penetration. The b b b b battery energy storage device is typically the component with the greatest contribution toward this cost increment, so significant cost reductions/performance improvements to the energy storage system (ESS) can correspondingly improve the vehicle-level cost/benefit relationship. Such an improvement would in turn lead to larger HEV market penetration and greater aggregate fuel savings. The United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Program managers asked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collaborate with a USABC Workgroup and analyze the trade-offs between vehicle fuel economy and reducing the decade-old minimum energy requirement for power-assist HEVs. NREL’s analysis showed that significant fuel savings could still be delivered from an ESS with much lower energy storage than the previous targets, which prompted USABC to issue a new set of lower-energy ESS (LEESS) targets that could be satisfied by a variety of technologies. With support from DOE, NREL has developed an HEV test platform for in-vehicle performance and fuel economy validation testing of the hybrid system using such LEESS devices. This presentation describes development of the vehicle test platform, and laboratory as well as in-vehicle evaluation results with alternate energy storage configurations as compared to the production battery system. The alternate energy storage technologies considered include lithium-ion capacitors -- i.e., asymmetric electrochemical energy storage devices possessing one electrode with battery

  4. Low level waste management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, A.D.; Truitt, D.J.; Logan, J.A.; Brown, R.M.

    1986-02-01

    EG and G Idaho, Inc. is the lead contractor for the Department of Energy (DOE) National Low Level Waste Management Program, established in 1979. In this role, the company uses its waste management expertise to provide management and technical direction to support the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) in a manner that protects the environment and the public health and safety while improving efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Program activities are divided into two areas: defense-related and commercial nuclear reactor programs. The defense program was established to develop technology improvements, provide technology transfer, and to ensure a more efficient and uniform system for low level waste disposal. To achieve the program's goals, it is necessary to improve, document, and, where necessary, develop new methods for waste generation reduction, waste treatment, shallow-land burial, greater confinement disposal, and measures to correct existing site deficiencies. The commercial low level waste management program provides support to assist the states in developing an effective national low level waste management system and provides technical assistance for siting of regional commercial LLW disposal sites. The program provides technical and informational support to state officials, low level waste generators, managers, and facility operators to resolve low level waste problems and to improve the systems' overall effectiveness. Procedures are developed and documented and made available to commercial users through this program. Additional work is being conducted to demonstrate the stabilization and closure of low level radioactive waste disposal sites and develop the criteria and procedures for acceptance of such sites by the Department of Energy after closure has been completed. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  5. Generic calculation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodsell, Mark D. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06 (France); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Sorbonne Univ., Paris (France); Liebler, Stefan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Staub, Florian [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Physics

    2017-04-15

    We describe a fully generic implementation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level in the SARAH and SPheno framework compatible with most supported models. It incorporates fermionic decays to a fermion and a scalar or a gauge boson as well as scalar decays into two fermions, two gauge bosons, two scalars or a scalar and a gauge boson. We present the relevant generic expressions for virtual and real corrections. Whereas wavefunction corrections are determined from on-shell conditions, the parameters of the underlying model are by default renormalised in a DR (or MS) scheme. However, the user can also define model-specific counter-terms. As an example we discuss the renormalisation of the electric charge in the Thomson limit for top-quark decays in the standard model. One-loop induced decays are also supported. The framework additionally allows the addition of mass and mixing corrections induced at higher orders for the involved external states. We explain our procedure to cancel infra-red divergences for such cases, which is achieved through an infra-red counter-term taking into account corrected Goldstone boson vertices. We compare our results for sfermion, gluino and Higgs decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) against the public codes SFOLD, FVSFOLD and HFOLD and explain observed differences. Radiative induced gluino and neutralino decays are compared against the original implementation in SPheno in the MSSM. We exactly reproduce the results of the code CNNDecays for decays of neutralinos and charginos in R-parity violating models. The new version SARAH 4.11.0 by default includes the calculation of two-body decay widths at the full one-loop level. Current limitations for certain model classes are described.

  6. Generic calculation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodsell, Mark D.; Liebler, Stefan; Staub, Florian; Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen

    2017-04-01

    We describe a fully generic implementation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level in the SARAH and SPheno framework compatible with most supported models. It incorporates fermionic decays to a fermion and a scalar or a gauge boson as well as scalar decays into two fermions, two gauge bosons, two scalars or a scalar and a gauge boson. We present the relevant generic expressions for virtual and real corrections. Whereas wavefunction corrections are determined from on-shell conditions, the parameters of the underlying model are by default renormalised in a DR (or MS) scheme. However, the user can also define model-specific counter-terms. As an example we discuss the renormalisation of the electric charge in the Thomson limit for top-quark decays in the standard model. One-loop induced decays are also supported. The framework additionally allows the addition of mass and mixing corrections induced at higher orders for the involved external states. We explain our procedure to cancel infra-red divergences for such cases, which is achieved through an infra-red counter-term taking into account corrected Goldstone boson vertices. We compare our results for sfermion, gluino and Higgs decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) against the public codes SFOLD, FVSFOLD and HFOLD and explain observed differences. Radiative induced gluino and neutralino decays are compared against the original implementation in SPheno in the MSSM. We exactly reproduce the results of the code CNNDecays for decays of neutralinos and charginos in R-parity violating models. The new version SARAH 4.11.0 by default includes the calculation of two-body decay widths at the full one-loop level. Current limitations for certain model classes are described.

  7. Generic calculation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodsell, Mark D. [Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7589, LPTHE, Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7589, LPTHE, Paris (France); Liebler, Stefan [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Staub, Florian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP), Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Physics (IKP), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We describe a fully generic implementation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level in the SARAH and SPheno framework compatible with most supported models. It incorporates fermionic decays to a fermion and a scalar or a gauge boson as well as scalar decays into two fermions, two gauge bosons, two scalars or a scalar and a gauge boson. We present the relevant generic expressions for virtual and real corrections. Whereas wave-function corrections are determined from on-shell conditions, the parameters of the underlying model are by default renormalised in a DR (or MS) scheme. However, the user can also define model-specific counter-terms. As an example we discuss the renormalisation of the electric charge in the Thomson limit for top-quark decays in the standard model. One-loop-induced decays are also supported. The framework additionally allows the addition of mass and mixing corrections induced at higher orders for the involved external states. We explain our procedure to cancel infrared divergences for such cases, which is achieved through an infrared counter-term taking into account corrected Goldstone boson vertices. We compare our results for sfermion, gluino and Higgs decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) against the public codes SFOLD, FVSFOLD and HFOLD and explain observed differences. Radiatively induced gluino and neutralino decays are compared against the original implementation in SPheno in the MSSM. We exactly reproduce the results of the code CNNDecays for decays of neutralinos and charginos in R-parity violating models. The new version SARAH 4.11.0 by default includes the calculation of two-body decay widths at the full one-loop level. Current limitations for certain model classes are described. (orig.)

  8. Generic calculation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, Mark D.; Liebler, Stefan; Staub, Florian

    2017-11-01

    We describe a fully generic implementation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level in the SARAH and SPheno framework compatible with most supported models. It incorporates fermionic decays to a fermion and a scalar or a gauge boson as well as scalar decays into two fermions, two gauge bosons, two scalars or a scalar and a gauge boson. We present the relevant generic expressions for virtual and real corrections. Whereas wave-function corrections are determined from on-shell conditions, the parameters of the underlying model are by default renormalised in a \\overline{ {DR}} (or \\overline{ {MS}}) scheme. However, the user can also define model-specific counter-terms. As an example we discuss the renormalisation of the electric charge in the Thomson limit for top-quark decays in the standard model. One-loop-induced decays are also supported. The framework additionally allows the addition of mass and mixing corrections induced at higher orders for the involved external states. We explain our procedure to cancel infrared divergences for such cases, which is achieved through an infrared counter-term taking into account corrected Goldstone boson vertices. We compare our results for sfermion, gluino and Higgs decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) against the public codes SFOLD, FVSFOLD and HFOLD and explain observed differences. Radiatively induced gluino and neutralino decays are compared against the original implementation in SPheno in the MSSM. We exactly reproduce the results of the code CNNDecays for decays of neutralinos and charginos in R-parity violating models. The new version SARAH 4.11.0 by default includes the calculation of two-body decay widths at the full one-loop level. Current limitations for certain model classes are described.

  9. Development and optimization of psychological stress model in mice using 2 level full factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Manika; Shaikh, Muhammad Vaseem; Nivsarkar, Manish

    Psychological stress has long been a silent killer, impairing normal physiological functions and leading to a variety of diseased conditions. However, the existing animal models for studying psychological stress have been marred by their inherent limitations warranting further research in their development and optimization. In this study 2 5 full factorial design was utilized for the development and optimization of psychological stress model in mice by applying different stressors viz., slanted cage(X 1 ), restraint(X 2 ), no bedding(X 3 ), dirty bedding(X 4 ) and isolation(X 5 ) at two time duration levels of 30 and 60min. The development of behavioral changes like depression, anxiety and anhedonia was taken as criteria for development of stress. These responses were analyzed using Design Expert 7.1.6. (Stat-Ease, Inc., USA). The maximum effective responses obtained were taken as a criterion for optimization. The optimized model was applied to measure the change in serum cortisol level to confirm the stress development. The statistical data showed that a quadratic model was fitted to the data obtained. All the factors were found to have a significant role in the development of stress among which restraint, slanted cage and dirty bedding were found to be more causal (pstressed mice of optimized model (ppsychological stress development in mice. The study could lay a strong platform for the use of quality by design approach in the development of robust, efficient and resourceful animal models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. SSHAC Level 1 Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, Suzette Jackson [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coppersmith, Ryan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coppersmith, Kevin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rodriguez-Marek, Adrian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Falero, Valentina Montaldo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Youngs, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) was completed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC), Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The PSHA followed the approaches and procedures for Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 1 study and included a Participatory Peer Review Panel (PPRP) to provide the confident technical basis and mean-centered estimates of the ground motions. A new risk-informed methodology for evaluating the need for an update of an existing PSHA was developed as part of the Seismic Risk Assessment (SRA) project. To develop and implement the new methodology, the SRA project elected to perform two SSHAC Level 1 PSHAs. The first was for the Fuel Manufacturing Facility (FMF), which is classified as a Seismic Design Category (SDC) 3 nuclear facility. The second was for the ATR Complex, which has facilities classified as SDC-4. The new methodology requires defensible estimates of ground motion levels (mean and full distribution of uncertainty) for its criteria and evaluation process. The INL SSHAC Level 1 PSHA demonstrates the use of the PPRP, evaluation and integration through utilization of a small team with multiple roles and responsibilities (four team members and one specialty contractor), and the feasibility of a short duration schedule (10 months). Additionally, a SSHAC Level 1 PSHA was conducted for NRF to provide guidance on the potential use of a design margin above rock hazard levels for the Spent Fuel Handling Recapitalization Project (SFHP) process facility.

  11. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer

  12. Circulating levels of sclerostin but not DKK1 associate with laboratory parameters of CKD-MBD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert J Behets

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence indicates that a disturbed Wnt-β-catenin signaling may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone and mineral disorder (CKD-MBD. Data on the impact of CKD on circulating levels of the Wnt antagonists sclerostin and Dickkopf related protein 1 (DKK1 and the relationship with laboratory parameters of CKD-MBD are incomplete.We analyzed serum sclerostin and DKK1 in 308 patients across the stages of chronic kidney disease (kDOQI stage 1-2 n = 41; CKD stage 3 n = 54; CKD stage 4-5 n = 54; hemodialysis n = 100; peritoneal dialysis n = 59 as well as in 49 healthy controls. We investigated associations with demographics, renal function, parameters of mineral metabolism including 25(OH vitamin D, 1,25(OH2 vitamin D, biointact fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23, and parathyroid hormone (PTH, and bone turnover markers.Serum sclerostin, but not DKK1, increases in more advanced stages of CKD and associates with PTH, phosphate, and 1,25(OH2 vitamin D concentrations. Bone turnover markers are highest in hemodialysis patients presenting the combination of high PTH with low sclerostin level. Serum DKK1 levels are lower in CKD patients than in controls and are not associated with laboratory parameters of mineral metabolism. Interestingly, a direct association between DKK1 and platelet count was observed.In CKD, serum levels of the Wnt inhibitors DKK1 and sclerostin are unrelated, indicating different sites of origin and/ or different regulatory mechanisms. Sclerostin, as opposed to DKK1, may qualify as a biomarker of CKD-MBD, particularly in dialysis patients. DKK1 serum levels, remarkably, correlate almost uniquely with blood platelet counts.

  13. Sustainable Treatment and Reuse of Diluted Pig Manure Streams in Russia: From Laboratory Trials to Full-Scale Implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalyuzhnyi, S.; Sklyar, V.; Epov, A.; Arkhipchenko, I.; Barboulina, I.; Orlova, O.; Kovalev, A.; Nozhevnikova, A.; Klapwijk, A.

    2003-01-01

    This article summarizes the results obtained during the laboratory and pilot development of integrated biologic and physicochemical treatment and reuse of diluted pig manure streams. The application of a straw filter was an effective means to separate the solid and liquid fractions of raw wastewater

  14. TEACHING PHYSICS: Demonstrating cosmic ray induced electromagnetic cascades in the A-level laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This article indicates how the study of sea-level cosmic ray phenomena can have a role in A-level physics. It describes a simple but far reaching particle physics experiment that can be carried out in the A-level physics laboratory. A simple model of electron-positron-photon cascades, suitable for use at A-level, is described.

  15. Multiweek Cell Culture Project for Use in Upper-Level Biology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Rebecca E.; Gardner, Grant E.; Parks, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a laboratory protocol for a multiweek project piloted in a new upper-level biology laboratory (BIO 426) using cell culture techniques. Human embryonic kidney-293 cells were used, and several culture media and supplements were identified for students to design their own experiments. Treatments included amino acids, EGF,…

  16. Advantage of low-background laboratory in low-level activity samples measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukanac, I.; Djurasevic, M.; Kandic, A.; Udovicic, V.; Banjanac, R.

    2009-01-01

    Detailed analyse of advantages of low-background laboratory in low-level activity samples measurements, over standard gamma spectrometry laboratory is presented in this paper. Comparative measurements were performed with two semiconductor HPGe spectrometers. Detection systems were with very similar characteristics. (author) [sr

  17. Recommendations for future low-level and mixed waste management practices at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennrich, E.A.; Klein, R.B.; Murphy, E.S.; Shuman, R.; Hickman, W.W.; Rutz, A.C.; Uhl, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes recommendations concerning the management of low-level radioactive wastes and mixtures at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Performance assessments, characterization, site disposal design, shipment, and storage are discussed

  18. Low-level waste incineration at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillins, R.L.; Davis, J.N.; Maughan, R.Y.; Logan, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    A facility for the incineration of low-level beta/gamma contaminated combustible waste has been constructed at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The incineration facility was established to: (1) reduce the volume of currently generated contaminated combustible waste being disposed at the INEL's radioactive waste disposal site and thereby prolong the site's useful life; and (2) develop waste processing technology by providing a facility where full-size processes and equipment can be demonstrated and proven during production-scale operations. Cold systems testing has been completed, and contaminated operations began in September of 1984. Currently the facility is processing waste packaged in 2 x 2 x 2 ft cardboard boxes and measuring <10mR/h at contact. 3 figs

  19. Male convict cichlid 11-ketotestosterone levels throughout the reproductive cycle: an exploratory profile study in laboratory and field populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie April van Breukelen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The convict cichlid (Amatitlania nigrofasciata has been extensively examined in relation to many behavioral topics, such as courtship, pair-bonding, bi-parental care, and territoriality. Recently, this model species has been utilized in studies on genetics, endocrinology, and neuroanatomy, with an ultimate goal of connecting behavior with its underlying mechanisms. The goal of this study was two-fold: (1 profile the circulating levels of plasma 11KT in the male convict cichlid at multiple points during the reproductive cycle and (2 generally compare the hormonal profiles of the widely used laboratory populations and those of a free-living population in the streams of Costa Rica. The results of the field experiment showed that male convict cichlids had higher levels of circulating 11KT during courtship and lower during the parental care and non-breeding phases. The profile of the laboratory population was similar to the profile of the free-living individuals, with significantly higher levels of 11KT occurring during courtship than during parental care, though the level of 11KT during non-breeding phase was elevated in the laboratory. The high levels of 11KT during courtship and low levels of 11KT during parental care found in both the field and the laboratory is similar to what has been reported in other species of teleosts, and may suggest an important function of 11KT in the expression of courtship behavior and the subsequent onset of parental behaviors in this model species.

  20. Line C17: alpha and medium-level beta-gamma laboratory pilot facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calor, J.N.; Mauborgne, B.; Montuir, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Process Development Laboratory (LDP) uses the ATALANTE C17 line for integral testing in order to develop and validate spent fuel reprocessing methods and for overall qualification of calculation codes. Line C 17 comprises shielded cells and glove boxes, equipped with centrifugal extractors and laboratory-scale mixer-settlers to test liquid-liquid extraction processes in an alpha and medium-level beta-gamma environment. The high reliability and precision of the process instrumentation and control system allow full control of operating parameters and comprehensive operating data recording, meeting the experimentation quality requirements necessary for qualifying calculation codes. Direct online spectrophotometric analysis at various points in the process provides real-time concentration data for vital elements, some of which are difficult to analyze offline because of their poor chemical stability. Online analyses, supplemented when necessary by gamma spectrometry, provide valuable process control input for reaching stabilized operating conditions. Fifteen radioactive test campaigns have been successfully completed since line C 17 was commissioned in June 1995. (authors)

  1. The Development of a Tactical-Level Full Range Leadership Measurement Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Behavioral Theory of Charismatic Leadership in Organizational Settings,” Academy of Management Review, 12: 637- 647 (1987). Conger, Jay A. and Rabindra...full range leadership theory has become established as the predominant and most widely researched theory on leadership . The most commonly used survey...instrument to assess full range leadership theory is the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, originally developed by Bass in 1985. Although much

  2. Biosafety level-2 laboratory diagnosis of Zaire Ebola virus disease imported from Liberia to Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olumuyiwa B. Salu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Global travel is an efficient route of transmission for highly infectious pathogens and increases the chances of such pathogens moving from high disease-endemic areas to new regions. We describe the rapid and safe identification of the first imported case of Ebola virus disease in a traveler to Lagos, Nigeria, using conventional reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in a biosafety level (BSL-2 facility. Case presentation: On 20 July 2014, a traveler arrived from Liberia at Lagos International Airport and was admitted to a private hospital in Lagos, with clinical suspicion of Ebola virus disease. Methodology and Outcome: Blood and urine specimens were collected, transported to the Virology Unit Laboratory at the College of Medicine, University of Lagos, and processed under stringent biosafety conditions for viral RNA extraction. RT-PCR was set-up to query the Ebola, Lassa and Dengue fever viruses. Amplicons for pan-filoviruses were detected as 300 bp bands on a 1.5% agarose gel image; there were no detectable bands for Lassa and Dengue viral RNA. Nucleotide BLAST and phylogenetic analysis of sequence data of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L gene confirmed the sequence to be Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV/Hsap/ NGA/2014/LIB-NIG 01072014; Genbank: KM251803.1. Conclusion: Our BSL-2 facility in Lagos, Nigeria, was able to safely detect Ebola virus disease using molecular techniques, supporting the reliability of molecular detection of highly infectious viral pathogens under stringent safety guidelines in BSL-2 laboratories. This is a significant lesson for the many under-facilitated laboratories in resource-limited settings, as is predominantly found in sub-Saharan Africa.

  3. ACOS GOSAT/TANSO-FTS Level 2 Full Physics Standard Product V2.9

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Carbon Dioxide (CO2) column averaged dry air mole fraction for all soundings for which retrieval was attempted. These are the highest-level...

  4. Modification of the method for determining protein solubility of heat treated full-fat soybeans using extraction in potassium hydroxide: Inter-laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palić Dragan V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Among a number of laboratory methods used to estimate the adequacy of heat treatment applied to full-fat soybean (FFSB protein solubility in potassium hydroxide (PSKOH is an unofficial method, but it is used by many laboratories due to its simplicity. It has been reported that the results of PSKOH analysis of the same sample of FFSB on the degree of heat treatment vary widely between laboratories. In this study, the original PSKOH method has been modified and subjected to an inter-laboratory test, with participation of 9 laboratories. Eight FFBS samples were processed by dry extrusion at temperatures ranging from 110 to 164°C and analysed on PSKOH. Processed FFSB samples were also assessed in a growth trial with broilers. Analysis of FFSB by the PSKOH method generated for adequately-processed FFSB values between 67.1 and 76.5%. The values above 76.5% corresponded to under-processed and below 67.1% to over-processed FFSB. The PSKOH method generated good precision, i.e. the repeatability and reproducibility limits of 3.48 and 10.86 %, respectively. The modified PSKOH method can be recommended as a reliable indicator for quality control of heat processed FFSB for the use in routine laboratory practice. This study could pave the way for establishing PSKOH as an official method for determining the nutritional value of FFSB following heat treatment.

  5. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a Containment Level-III Laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabani Amin M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3 laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating /chemical fixation may not consistently kill MTB organisms. Methods An inclusive viability study (n = 226 was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Results Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7% of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80°C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18, resulting in 0% viability. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a

  6. Full length cluster level swell data at pressures from 2 to 40 bar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, K.G.

    1987-11-01

    This paper gives results of level swell experiments at pressures up to 40 bar, performed at Winfrith in 1981 as described elsewhere. The results have been used by a number of workers to develop voidage correlations and to assess safety codes. The experiment and experimental rig used are described. The results are tabulated. (author)

  7. Atomic-level molybdenum oxide nanorings with full-spectrum absorption and photoresponsive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Yang, Yang; Chen, Shuangming; Lu, Qichen; Song, Li; Wei, Yen; Wang, Xun

    2017-11-16

    Superthin nanostructures, particularly with atomic-level thicknesses, typically display unique optical properties because of their exceptional light-matter interactions. Here, we report a facile strategy for the synthesis of sulfur-doped molybdenum oxide nanorings with an atomic-level size (thickness of 0.5 nm) and a tunable ring-in-ring architecture. These atomic-level nanorings displayed strong photo-absorption in both the visible and infrared-light ranges and acted as a photothermal agent. Under irradiation with an 808 nm laser with an intensity of 1 W/cm 2 , a composite of the nanorings embedded in polydimethylsiloxane showed an ultrafast photothermal effect, delivering a local temperature of up to 400 °C within 20 s, which to the best of our knowledge is the highest temperature by light irradiation reported to date. Meanwhile, the resulting nanorings were also employed as a photoinitiator to remotely induce a visible-light shape memory response, self-healing, reshaping performance and reversible actuation of dynamic three-dimensional structures. This study demonstrates an advancement towards controlling atomic-level-sized nanostructures and achieving greatly enhanced optical performances for optoelectronics.

  8. Low-level counting techniques in the underground laboratory `Felsenkeller` in Dresden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niese, S. [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc., Dresden (Germany); Koehler, M. [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc., Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Low radioactivity measurements are characterized by low detection limits. They are mainly determined by the background. The contribution of cosmic rays may be reduced drastically by installation of measurement devices in an underground laboratory. In 1982 we installed a chamber with a shield of ultramafic rock for low-level measurements within a cave of an old brewery named `Felsenkeller`. In this laboratory we used low-level {gamma}-spectrometry for the measurement of neutron activated samples of semiconductor silicon (Niese (1986)), of cosmic induced radioactivity in meteorites, chemically separated long-lived nuclides in low-level wastes, contaminated materials and of environmental samples. (orig./DG)

  9. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

  10. Radon measurements during the building of a low-level laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Antanasijevic, R; Bikit, I; Banjanac, R; Dragic, A; Joksimovic, D; Krmpotic, D; Udovicic, V; Vukovic, J

    1999-01-01

    Radon measurements were provided during the different stages of building of a low-level laboratory in Belgrade. The depth of the laboratory is 12 m, equivalent to 30 m of water with an area of 45 m sup 2. The whole of the laboratory is hermetically lined with 1 mm A1 foil and is ventilated with filtered air. Radon concentrations were measured with the CR-39 detector as well as via the gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements. The radon concentrations in the air were achieved to 20 Bqm sup - sup 3 and reduction of secondary and tertiary cosmic-ray fluxes is five times when ventilation, filtering and sealing was applied.

  11. Low-level radioactive waste disposal operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) from various activities: research and development, sampling and storage of TRU wastes, decommissioning and decontamination of facilities, and from LANL's major role in stockpile stewardship. The Laboratory has its own active LLW disposal facility located at Technical Area 54, Area G. This paper will identify the current operations of the facility and the issues pertaining to operating a disposal facility in today's compliance and cost-effective environment

  12. U.S. High-Level Isolation Unit Clinical Laboratory Capabilities Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herstein, Jocelyn J; Iwen, Peter C; Jelden, Katelyn C; Biddinger, Paul D; Gibbs, Shawn G; Le, Aurora B; Hewlett, Angela L; Lowe, John J

    2018-02-01

    In late 2014, 56 hospitals in the United States were designated by state and federal public health authorities as specially designed high-level isolation units (HLIUs) equipped with advanced infrastructure, laboratory capabilities, and trained staff to care for patients with highly hazardous communicable diseases (HHCDs), such as Ebola virus disease. This survey describes the clinical laboratory support capabilities of U.S. HLIUs, including the specific test menus that HLIUs have identified to safely manage HHCD patients and the locations where such testing would be performed. In spring 2016, a survey was electronically distributed, as a fillable pdf file, to the 56 U.S. HLIUs. Site representatives completed the surveys, and data were coded and analyzed in an electronic spreadsheet, using descriptive statistics. Thirty-six HLIUs (64%) responded, and 33 completed the laboratory capabilities section. Thirty-one HLIUs (94%) had performed risk analyses for all laboratory procedures and equipment. Twenty-nine (88%) had decontamination procedures specified for all laboratory equipment used for patients with suspected or confirmed HHCDs. On-site laboratories in 27 HLIUs (81%) had the capacity to inventory and to securely store HHCD patient specimens. Ten HLIUs (31%) had at least one test they would conduct within the patient isolation room. The high-risk nature of HHCDs and the occupational exposures that may occur in clinical laboratories demand advanced preparation and risk assessment of work practices, laboratory equipment, and instrumentation by HLIU laboratories. Although risk analyses of clinical laboratory testing and equipment that HLIUs have conducted have likely focused on those for Ebola virus, HLIUs must be prepared to revise their current procedures for other HHCDs. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Accelerator-based techniques for the support of senior-level undergraduate physics laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. R.; Clark, J. C.; Isaacs-Smith, T.

    2001-07-01

    Approximately three years ago, Auburn University replaced its aging Dynamitron accelerator with a new 2MV tandem machine (Pelletron) manufactured by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC). This new machine is maintained and operated for the University by Physics Department personnel, and the accelerator supports a wide variety of materials modification/analysis studies. Computer software is available that allows the NEC Pelletron to be operated from a remote location, and an Internet link has been established between the Accelerator Laboratory and the Upper-Level Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory in the Physics Department. Additional software supplied by Canberra Industries has also been used to create a second Internet link that allows live-time data acquisition in the Teaching Laboratory. Our senior-level undergraduates and first-year graduate students perform a number of experiments related to radiation detection and measurement as well as several standard accelerator-based experiments that have been added recently. These laboratory exercises will be described, and the procedures used to establish the Internet links between our Teaching Laboratory and the Accelerator Laboratory will be discussed.

  14. Accelerator-based techniques for the support of senior-level undergraduate physics laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.R.; Clark, J.C.; Isaacs-Smith, T.

    2001-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, Auburn University replaced its aging Dynamitron accelerator with a new 2MV tandem machine (Pelletron) manufactured by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC). This new machine is maintained and operated for the University by Physics Department personnel, and the accelerator supports a wide variety of materials modification/analysis studies. Computer software is available that allows the NEC Pelletron to be operated from a remote location, and an Internet link has been established between the Accelerator Laboratory and the Upper-Level Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory in the Physics Department. Additional software supplied by Canberra Industries has also been used to create a second Internet link that allows live-time data acquisition in the Teaching Laboratory. Our senior-level undergraduates and first-year graduate students perform a number of experiments related to radiation detection and measurement as well as several standard accelerator-based experiments that have been added recently. These laboratory exercises will be described, and the procedures used to establish the Internet links between our Teaching Laboratory and the Accelerator Laboratory will be discussed

  15. Potential impact of a 2-person security rule on BioSafety Level 4 laboratory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeDuc, James W; Anderson, Kevin; Bloom, Marshall E; Carrion, Ricardo; Feldmann, Heinz; Fitch, J Patrick; Geisbert, Joan B; Geisbert, Thomas W; Holbrook, Michael R; Jahrling, Peter B; Ksiazek, Thomas G

    2009-07-01

    Directors of all major BioSafety Level 4 (BSL-4) laboratories in the United States met in 2008 to review the current status of biocontainment laboratory operations and to discuss the potential impact of a proposed 2-person security rule on maximum-containment laboratory operations. Special attention was paid to the value and risks that would result from a requirement that 2 persons be physically present in the laboratory at all times. A consensus emerged indicating that a video monitoring system represents a more efficient, economical standard; provides greater assurance that pathogens are properly manipulated; and offers an increased margin of employee safety and institutional security. The 2-person security rule (1 to work and 1 to observe) may decrease compliance with dual responsibilities of safety and security by placing undue pressure on the person being observed to quickly finish the work, and by placing the observer in the containment environment unnecessarily.

  16. Laboratory development of methods for centralized treatment of liquid low-level waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.D.; Bostick, D.T.; Burgess, M.W.; Taylor, P.A.; Perona, J.J.; Kent, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    Improved centralized treatment methods are needed in the management of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). LLLW, which usually contains radioactive contaminants at concentrations up to millicurie-per-liter levels, has accumulated in underground storage tanks for over 10 years and has reached a volume of over 350,000 gal. These wastes have been collected since 1984 and are a complex mixture of wastes from past nuclear energy research activities. The waste is a highly alkaline 4-5 M NaNO 3 solution with smaller amounts of other salts. This type of waste will continue to be generated as a consequence of future ORNL research programs. Future LLLW (referred to as newly generated LLLW or NGLLLW) is expected to a highly alkaline solution of sodium carbonate and sodium hydroxide with a smaller concentration of sodium nitrate. New treatment facilities are needed to improve the manner in which these wastes are managed. These facilities must be capable of separating and reducing the volume of radioactive contaminants to small stable waste forms. Treated liquids must meet criteria for either discharge to the environment or solidification for onsite disposal. Laboratory testing was performed using simulated waste solutions prepared using the available characterization information as a basis. Testing was conducted to evaluate various methods for selective removal of the major contaminants. The major contaminants requiring removal from Melton Valley Storage Tank liquids are 90 Sr and 137 Cs. Principal contaminants in NGLLLW are 9O Sr, 137 Cs, and 106 Ru. Strontium removal testing began with literature studies and scoping tests with several ion-exchange materials and sorbents

  17. Laboratory scale vitrification of low-level radioactive nitrate salts and soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.; Anderson, B.

    1993-07-01

    INEL has radiologically contaminated nitrate salt and soil waste stored above and below ground in Pad A and the Acid Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Pad A contain uranium and transuranic contaminated potassium and sodium nitrate salts generated from dewatered waste solutions at the Rocky Flats Plant. The Acid Pit was used to dispose of liquids containing waste mineral acids, uranium, nitrate, chlorinated solvents, and some mercury. Ex situ vitrification is a high temperature destruction of nitrates and organics and immobilizes hazardous and radioactive metals. Laboratory scale melting of actual radionuclides containing INEL Pad A nitrate salts and Acid Pit soils was performed. The salt/soil/additive ratios were varied to determine the range of glass compositions (resulted from melting different wastes); maximize mass and volume reduction, durability, and immobilization of hazardous and radioactive metals; and minimize viscosity and offgas generation for wastes prevalent at INEL and other DOE sites. Some mixtures were spiked with additional hazardous and radioactive metals. Representative glasses were leach tested and showed none. Samples spiked with transuranic showed low nuclide leaching. Wasteforms were two to three times bulk densities of the salt and soil. Thermally co-processing soils and salts is an effective remediation method for destroying nitrate salts while stabilizing the radiological and hazardous metals they contain. The measured durability of these low-level waste glasses approached those of high-level waste glasses. Lab scale vitrification of actual INEL contaminated salts and soils was performed at General Atomics Laboratory as part of the INEL Waste Technology Development and Environmental Restoration within the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program

  18. Is Laboratory Based Instruction in Beginning College-Level Chemistry Worth the Effort and Expense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilosky, Alexandra; Sutman, Frank; Schmuckler, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    The authors report on one of a series of studies related to seeking a more effective role for laboratory experience in science instruction. This particular study addresses the status of laboratory based instruction in chemistry at the beginning college level for majors and nonmajors. The study is of interest to those who seek effective means of reforming beginning college level chemistry instruction in ways that give greater emphasis to laboratory based experiences. The study sample consists of 24 college chemistry instructors, and 3000 students from 24 laboratory sessions in 16 institutions of higher education (IHE) located throughout 5 states in the Northeast region of the U.S. An additional IHE in Germany was included for purposes of comparison because of the knowledge that the approach to chemistry instruction in Germany differed substantially from those practiced in the U.S. Pre-, post and actual laboratory sessions were videotaped. Teaching behaviors were analyzed and categorized using the validated MR-STBI (Modified-Revised Science Teacher Behavior Inventory). The fit between instructors' expectations and students' cognitive levels were also examined. This study describes 15 behaviors most and least frequently practiced; a comparison between U.S. and german instruction; and recommendations for instructional reform in the U.S.

  19. Efficient handling of high-level radioactive cell waste in a vitrification facility analytical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, D.W.; Collins, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Savannah River Site''s (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, South Carolina, is the world''s largest and the United State''s first high level waste vitrification facility. For the past 1.5 years, DWPF has been vitrifying high level radioactive liquid waste left over from the Cold War. The vitrification process involves the stabilization of high level radioactive liquid waste into borosilicate glass. The glass is contained in stainless steel canisters. DWPF has filled more than 200 canisters 3.05 meters (10 feet) long and 0.61 meters (2 foot) diameter. Since operations began at DWPF in March of 1996, high level radioactive solid waste continues to be generated due to operating the facility''s analytical laboratory. The waste is referred to as cell waste and is routinely removed from the analytical laboratories. Through facility design, engineering controls, and administrative controls, DWPF has established efficient methods of handling the high level waste generated in its laboratory facility. These methods have resulted in the prevention of undue radiation exposure, wasted man-hours, expenses due to waste disposal, and the spread of contamination. This level of efficiency was not reached overnight, but it involved the collaboration of Radiological Control Operations and Laboratory personnel working together to devise methods that best benefited the facility. This paper discusses the methods that have been incorporated at DWPF for the handling of cell waste. The objective of this paper is to provide insight to good radiological and safety practices that were incorporated to handle high level radioactive waste in a laboratory setting

  20. Deployment of a Full-Scope Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulator at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Boring; Julius Persensky; Kenneth Thomas

    2011-09-01

    The INL operates the HSSL to conduct research in the design and evaluation of advanced reactor control rooms, integration of intelligent support systems to assist operators, development and assessment of advanced human performance models, and visualizations to assess advanced operational concepts across various infrastructures. This advanced facility consists of a reconfigurable simulator and a virtual reality capability (known as the Computer-Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE)) (Figure 2). It supports human factors research, including human-in-the-loop performance, HSI, and analog and digital hybrid control displays. It can be applied to the development and evaluation of control systems and displays for complex systems such as existing and advanced NPP control rooms, command and control systems, and advance emergency operations centers. The HSSL incorporates a reconfigurable control room simulator, which is currently housed in the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a joint venture of the DOE and the Idaho University System. The simulator is a platform- and plant-neutral environment intended for full-scope and part-task testing of operator performance in various control room configurations. The simulator is not limited to a particular plant or even simulator architecture. It can support engineering simulator platforms from multiple vendors using digital interfaces. Due to its ability to be reconfigured, it is possible to switch the HSI - not just to digital panels but also to different control modalities such as those using greater plant automation or intelligent alarm filtering. The simulator currently includes three operator workstations, each capable of driving up to eight 30-inch monitors. The size and number of monitors varies depending on the particular front-end simulator deployed for a simulator study. These operator workstations would typically be used for the shift supervisor or senior reactor operator, reactor operator, and assistant reactor

  1. Deployment of a Full-Scope Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulator at the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boring, Ronald; Persensky, Julius; Thomas, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The INL operates the HSSL to conduct research in the design and evaluation of advanced reactor control rooms, integration of intelligent support systems to assist operators, development and assessment of advanced human performance models, and visualizations to assess advanced operational concepts across various infrastructures. This advanced facility consists of a reconfigurable simulator and a virtual reality capability (known as the Computer-Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE)) (Figure 2). It supports human factors research, including human-in-the-loop performance, HSI, and analog and digital hybrid control displays. It can be applied to the development and evaluation of control systems and displays for complex systems such as existing and advanced NPP control rooms, command and control systems, and advance emergency operations centers. The HSSL incorporates a reconfigurable control room simulator, which is currently housed in the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a joint venture of the DOE and the Idaho University System. The simulator is a platform- and plant-neutral environment intended for full-scope and part-task testing of operator performance in various control room configurations. The simulator is not limited to a particular plant or even simulator architecture. It can support engineering simulator platforms from multiple vendors using digital interfaces. Due to its ability to be reconfigured, it is possible to switch the HSI - not just to digital panels but also to different control modalities such as those using greater plant automation or intelligent alarm filtering. The simulator currently includes three operator workstations, each capable of driving up to eight 30-inch monitors. The size and number of monitors varies depending on the particular front-end simulator deployed for a simulator study. These operator workstations would typically be used for the shift supervisor or senior reactor operator, reactor operator, and assistant reactor

  2. Variation of DNA damage levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated in different laboratories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godschalk, Roger W L; Ersson, Clara; Stępnik, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    collected in the same way and processed using the same blood isolation procedure. The inter-laboratory variation was the prominent contributor to the overall variation. The inter-laboratory coefficient of variation decreased for both DNA strand breaks (from 68 to 26%) and FPG sensitive sites (from 57 to 12......This study investigated the levels of DNA strand breaks and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) sensitive sites, as assessed by the comet assay, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy women from five different countries in Europe. The laboratory in each country (referred......%) by standardisation of the primary comet assay endpoint with calibration curve samples. The level of DNA strand breaks in the samples from two of the centres (0.56-0.61 lesions/10(6) bp) was significantly higher compared with the other three centres (0.41-0.45 lesions/10(6) bp). In contrast, there was no difference...

  3. Quality assurance program plan for low-level waste at the WSCF Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for the implementation of the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the management of low-level waste at the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) Laboratory Complex as required by WHC-CM-4-2, Quality Assurance Manual, which is based on Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities, NQA-1 (ASME)

  4. An Evaluation of Noise Levels in College Welding Laboratories and Its Effect on Student Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontynen, Burton Ahlstrom

    The purpose of this study was to determine what noise levels existed at selected work stations in college welding laboratories while students were working and whether this noise exposure had any effect on the hearing acuity of students. Audiometric tests were administered to an experimental group of welding students in the noise of a welding…

  5. Solubility and Solubility Product Determination of a Sparingly Soluble Salt: A First-Level Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, Raffaele P.; Tabbi, Giovanni; Vagliasindi, Laura I.

    2012-01-01

    A simple experiment was devised to let students determine the solubility and solubility product, "K"[subscript sp], of calcium sulfate dihydrate in a first-level laboratory. The students experimentally work on an intriguing equilibrium law: the constancy of the product of the ion concentrations of a sparingly soluble salt. The determination of…

  6. To What Extent Does A-Level Physics Prepare Students for Undergraduate Laboratory Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alaric

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a summary of a small-scale research project carried out to investigate the transition from A-level to university physics, with a specific focus on practical or laboratory skills. A brief description of the methods used precedes the headline findings of the research. A non-evidential discussion of the possible reasons behind any…

  7. Investigating Macroscopic, Submicroscopic, and Symbolic Connections in a College-Level General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadison, Felicia Culver

    2011-01-01

    Explanations of chemical phenomena rely on understanding the behavior of submicroscopic particles. Because this level is "invisible," it is described using symbols such as models, diagrams and equations. For this reason, students often view chemistry as a "difficult" subject. The laboratory offers a unique opportunity for the students to…

  8. Laboratory Rodent Diets Contain Toxic Levels of Environmental Contaminants: Implications for Regulatory Tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Mesnage

    Full Text Available The quality of diets in rodent feeding trials is crucial. We describe the contamination with environmental pollutants of 13 laboratory rodent diets from 5 continents. Measurements were performed using accredited methodologies. All diets were contaminated with pesticides (1-6 out of 262 measured, heavy metals (2-3 out of 4, mostly lead and cadmium, PCDD/Fs (1-13 out of 17 and PCBs (5-15 out of 18. Out of 22 GMOs tested for, Roundup-tolerant GMOs were the most frequently detected, constituting up to 48% of the diet. The main pesticide detected was Roundup, with residues of glyphosate and AMPA in 9 of the 13 diets, up to 370 ppb. The levels correlated with the amount of Roundup-tolerant GMOs. Toxic effects of these pollutants on liver, neurodevelopment, and reproduction are documented. The sum of the hazard quotients of the pollutants in the diets (an estimator of risk with a threshold of 1 varied from 15.8 to 40.5. Thus the chronic consumption of these diets can be considered at risk. Efforts toward safer diets will improve the reliability of toxicity tests in biomedical research and regulatory toxicology.

  9. Management and disposition of off-site laboratory-generated mixed/low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.L.

    1993-10-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is the first Department of Energy (DOE) site to take back mixed and low level waste generated at commercial laboratories from chemical analyses and treatability studies on samples taken from the site. This paper discusses the steps addressed and the issues resolved in order to initiate the task of taking back mixed/low level waste. Such issues included regulatory, waste management and contractual issues

  10. Ambient radiation levels in a microPET/CT research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmento, D.M.; Rodrigues, D.L.; Sanches, M.P.; Carneiro, J.C.G.G.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on initial radiological evaluation and the exposure situation related to the worker task in a micro-positron emission tomography/computed tomography laboratory (microPET/CT). Selected and calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD, of CaSO 4 :Dy were used to measure room radiation levels. The detectors were placed in several selected points inside the microPET/CT laboratory and adjacent rooms. In addition, the occupationally exposed workers were monthly evaluated for external and internal exposures. In none of the selected points the dose values exceeded the radiation dose limit established for supervised area, as well as the values obtained in individual monitoring. (author)

  11. Low-level waste certification plan for the WSCF Laboratory Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    The solid, low-level waste certification plan for the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) describes the organization and methodology for the certification of the solid low-level waste (LLW) that is transferred to the Hanford Site 200 Areas Storage and Disposal Facilities. This plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, including up-front minimization, and end product treatment to reduce the volume or toxicity of the waste. The plan also includes segregation of different waste types. This low-level waste certification plan applies only to waste generated in, or is the responsibility of the WSCF Laboratory Complex. The WSCF Laboratory Complex supports technical activities performed at the Hanford Site. Wet Chemical and radiochemical analyses are performed to support site operations, including environmental and effluent monitoring, chemical processing, RCRA and CERCLA analysis, and waste management activities. Environmental and effluent samples include liquid effluents, ground and surface waters, soils, animals, vegetation, and air filters

  12. The dominant acetate degradation pathway/methanogenic composition in full-scale anaerobic digesters operating under different ammonia levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia is a major environmental factor influencing biomethanation in full-scale anaerobic digesters. In this study, the effect of different ammonia levels on methanogenic pathways and methanogenic community composition of full-scale biogas plants was investigated. Eight full-scale digesters...... operating under different ammonia levels were sampled, and the residual biogas production was followed in fed-batch reactors. Acetate, labelled in the methyl group, was used to determine the methanogenic pathway by following the 14CH4 and 14CO2 production. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation was used...... to determine the methanogenic communities’ composition. Results obtained clearly demonstrated that syntrophic acetate oxidation coupled with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway in all digesters with high ammonia levels (2.8–4.57 g NH4 +-N L−1), while acetoclastic methanogenic pathway...

  13. Multiweek cell culture project for use in upper-level biology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Rebecca E; Gardner, Grant E; Parks, Lisa D

    2012-06-01

    This article describes a laboratory protocol for a multiweek project piloted in a new upper-level biology laboratory (BIO 426) using cell culture techniques. Human embryonic kidney-293 cells were used, and several culture media and supplements were identified for students to design their own experiments. Treatments included amino acids, EGF, caffeine, epinephrine, heavy metals, and FBS. Students researched primary literature to determine their experimental variables, made their own solutions, and treated their cells over a period of 2 wk. Before this, a sterile technique laboratory was developed to teach students how to work with the cells and minimize contamination. Students designed their experiments, mixed their solutions, seeded their cells, and treated them with their control and experimental media. Students had the choice of manipulating a number of variables, including incubation times, exposure to treatment media, and temperature. At the end of the experiment, students observed the effects of their treatment, harvested and dyed their cells, counted relative cell numbers in control and treatment flasks, and determined the ratio of living to dead cells using a hemocytometer. At the conclusion of the experiment, students presented their findings in a poster presentation. This laboratory can be expanded or adapted to include additional cell lines and treatments. The ability to design and implement their own experiments has been shown to increase student engagement in the biology-related laboratory activities as well as develop the critical thinking skills needed for independent research.

  14. Design and performance of a full-scale spray calciner for nonradioactive high-level-waste-vitrification studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, F.A.

    1981-06-01

    In the spray calcination process, liquid waste is spray-dried in a heated-wall spray dryer (termed a spray calciner), and then it may be combined in solid form with a glass-forming frit. This mixture is then melted in a continuous ceramic melter or in an in-can melter. Several sizes of spray calciners have been tested at PNL- laboratory scale, pilot scale and full scale. Summarized here is the experience gained during the operation of PNL's full-scale spray calciner, which has solidified approx. 38,000 L of simulated acid wastes and approx. 352,000 L of simulated neutralized wastes in 1830 h of processing time. Operating principles, operating experience, design aspects, and system descriptions of a full-scale spray calciner are discussed. Individual test run summaries are given in Appendix A. Appendices B and C are studies made by Bechtel Inc., under contract by PNL. These studies concern, respectively, feed systems for the spray calciner process and a spray calciner vibration analysis. Appendix D is a detailed structural analysis made at PNL of the spray calciner. These appendices are included in the report to provide a complete description of the spray calciner and to include all major studies made concerning PNL's full-scale spray calciner

  15. Full formula for heavy quarkonium energy levels at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kiyo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We derive a full formula for the energy level of a heavy quarkonium state identified by the quantum numbers n, ℓ, s and j, up to O(αs5m and O(αs5mlog⁡αs in perturbative QCD. The QCD Bethe logarithm is given in a one-parameter integral form. The rest of the formula is given as a combination of rational numbers, transcendental numbers (π, ζ(3, ζ(5 and finite sums (besides the 3-loop constant a¯3 of the static potential whose full analytic form is still unknown. A derivation of the formula is given.

  16. Visual performance in cataract patients with low levels of postoperative astigmatism: full correction versus spherical equivalent correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehmann RP

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Robert P Lehmann1, Diane M Houtman21Lehmann Eye Center, Nacogdoches, TX, 2Alcon Research Ltd, Fort Worth, TX, USAPurpose: To evaluate whether visual performance could be improved in pseudophakic subjects by correcting low levels of postoperative astigmatism.Methods: An exploratory, noninterventional study was conducted using subjects who had been implanted with an aspheric intraocular lens and had 0.5–0.75 diopter postoperative astigmatism. Monocular visual performance using full correction was compared with visual performance using spherical equivalent correction. Testing consisted of high- and low-contrast visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and reading acuity and speed using the Radner Reading Charts.Results: Thirty-eight of 40 subjects completed testing. Visual acuities at three contrast levels (100%, 25%, and 9% were significantly better using full correction than when using spherical equivalent correction (all P < 0.001. For contrast sensitivity testing under photopic, mesopic, and mesopic with glare conditions, only one out of twelve outcomes demonstrated a significant improvement with full correction compared with spherical equivalent correction (at six cycles per degree under mesopic without glare conditions, P = 0.046. Mean reading speed was numerically faster with full correction across all print sizes, reaching statistical significance at logarithm of the reading acuity determination (logRAD 0.2, 0.7, and 1.1 (P , 0.05. Statistically significant differences also favored full correction in logRAD score (P = 0.0376, corrected maximum reading speed (P < 0.001, and logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution/logRAD ratio (P < 0.001.Conclusions: In this study of pseudophakic subjects with low levels of postoperative astigmatism, full correction yielded significantly better reading performance and high- and low-contrast visual acuity than spherical equivalent correction, suggesting that cataractous patients may benefit from surgical

  17. Full-length huntingtin levels modulate body weight by influencing insulin-like growth factor 1 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Xie, Yuanyun; Skotte, Niels Henning

    2010-01-01

    Levels of full-length huntingtin (FL htt) influence organ and body weight, independent of polyglutamine length. The growth hormone-insulin like growth factor-1 (GH-IGF-1) axis is well established as a regulator of organ growth and body weight. In this study, we investigate the involvement...... and decreases the body weight of YAC128 animals to WT levels. Furthermore, given the ubiquitous expression of IGF-1 within the central nervous system, we also examined the impact of FL htt levels on IGF-1 expression in different regions of the brain, including the striatum, cerebellum of YAC18, YAC128...

  18. A Double Phase-Shift Control Strategy for A Full-Bridge Three-Level DC/DC Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dong; Deng, Fujin; Gong, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a double phase-shift control strategy is proposed for the full-bridge three-level (FBTL) DC/DC converter applied into DC distribution systems with the medium DC bus voltage. By utilizing the proposed control strategy, the voltage change rate dv/dt and voltage stress of the transfor...

  19. Control of improved full-bridge three-level DC/DC converter for wind turbines in a DC grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Fujin; Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an improved full-bridge three-level (IFBTL) dc/dc converter for a wind turbine in a dc grid by inserting a passive filter into the dc/dc converter to improve the performance of the converter. The passive filter can effectively reduce the voltage stress of the medium frequency...

  20. Biosafety and Biosecurity in European Containment Level 3 Laboratories: Focus on French Recent Progress and Essential Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Pastorino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Even if European Union (EU Member States are obliged to implement EU Directives 2000/54/EC on the protection of workers from risks related to exposure to biological agents at work, national biosafety regulations and practices varied from country to country. In fact, EU legislation on biological agents and genetically modified microorganisms is often not specific enough to ensure harmonization leading to difficulties in implementation for most laboratories. In the same way, biosecurity is a relatively new concept and a few EU Member States are known to have introduced national laboratory biosecurity legislation. In France, recent regulations have reinforced biosafety/biosecurity in containment level 3 (CL-3 laboratories but they concern a specific list of pathogens with no correlation in other European Members States. The objective of this review was to summarize European biosafety/biosecurity measures concerning CL-3 facilities focusing on French specificities. Essential requirements needed to preserve efficient biosafety measures when manipulating risk group 3 biological agents are highlighted. In addition, International, European and French standards related to containment laboratory planning, operation or biosafety equipment are described to clarify optimal biosafety and biosecurity requirements.

  1. A Comparison of Full and Empirical Bayes Techniques for Inferring Sea Level Changes from Tide Gauge Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piecuch, C. G.; Huybers, P. J.; Tingley, M.

    2016-12-01

    Sea level observations from coastal tide gauges are some of the longest instrumental records of the ocean. However, these data can be noisy, biased, and gappy, featuring missing values, and reflecting land motion and local effects. Coping with these issues in a formal manner is a challenging task. Some studies use Bayesian approaches to estimate sea level from tide gauge records, making inference probabilistically. Such methods are typically empirically Bayesian in nature: model parameters are treated as known and assigned point values. But, in reality, parameters are not perfectly known. Empirical Bayes methods thus neglect a potentially important source of uncertainty, and so may overestimate the precision (i.e., underestimate the uncertainty) of sea level estimates. We consider whether empirical Bayes methods underestimate uncertainty in sea level from tide gauge data, comparing to a full Bayes method that treats parameters as unknowns to be solved for along with the sea level field. We develop a hierarchical algorithm that we apply to tide gauge data on the North American northeast coast over 1893-2015. The algorithm is run in full Bayes mode, solving for the sea level process and parameters, and in empirical mode, solving only for the process using fixed parameter values. Error bars on sea level from the empirical method are smaller than from the full Bayes method, and the relative discrepancies increase with time; the 95% credible interval on sea level values from the empirical Bayes method in 1910 and 2010 is 23% and 56% narrower, respectively, than from the full Bayes approach. To evaluate the representativeness of the credible intervals, empirical Bayes and full Bayes methods are applied to corrupted data of a known surrogate field. Using rank histograms to evaluate the solutions, we find that the full Bayes method produces generally reliable error bars, whereas the empirical Bayes method gives too-narrow error bars, such that the 90% credible interval

  2. Factors influencing biosafety level and lai among the staff of medical laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kozajda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to assess the biological risks of medical laboratory employees with particular focus on laboratory acquired infection (LAI, activities having the greatest risk, accidents with biological material, post exposure procedure, preventive measures and workers' knowledge about biological exposure. Materials and Methods: The study involved 9 laboratories. A questionnaire survey was attended by 123 employees and 9 heads of these units with the use of two questionnaires for laboratory workers and the managers. Results: 32.5% of the respondents (40 persons had an accident at least once. Needlestick or a broken glass injury covered 18.7% respondents (23 persons, while splashing the skin, mucous membranes or conjunctivae related to 22.8% (28 persons. Among the employees who had an accident, only 45% of the respondents (18 persons reported this to the manager. Microbes dominant in the biological material were known only to 57 respondents (46.3%, less than half could correctly give an example of a disease (57 persons, 46.3%. More than half of the respondents admitted that they do not know all of the possible routes of infection while working in the laboratory (68 persons, 55.3%. Conclusions: In the study population, a high incidence of accidents was observed, usually during blood sampling and transfer of biological material. Condition of the workers' equipment with personal protective measures and laboratory facilities in devices to reduce the risk of infection and procedures for handling the potentially infectious material should be considered as insufficient. Lack of basic knowledge of the employees about biohazards at workplaces was shown. Med Pr 2013;64(4:473–486

  3. Derived concentration guideline levels for Argonne National Laboratory's building 310 area.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamboj, S., Dr.; Yu, C ., Dr. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-08-12

    The derived concentration guideline level (DCGL) is the allowable residual radionuclide concentration that can remain in soil after remediation of the site without radiological restrictions on the use of the site. It is sometimes called the single radionuclide soil guideline or the soil cleanup criteria. This report documents the methodology, scenarios, and parameters used in the analysis to support establishing radionuclide DCGLs for Argonne National Laboratory's Building 310 area.

  4. Removal of radioruthenium from alkaline intermediate level radioactive waste solution : a laboratory investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, S.K.; Theyyunni, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    Various methods were investigated in the laboratory for the removal of radioruthenium from alkaline intermediate level radioactive waste solutions of reprocessing plant origin. The methods included batch equilibration with different ion exchangers and sorbents, column testing and chemical precipitation. A column method using zinc-activated carbon mixture and a chemical precipitation method using ferrous salt along with sodium sulphite were found to be promising for plant scale application. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Analysis, scale modeling, and full-scale tests of low-level nuclear-waste-drum response to accident environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta, M.; Lamoreaux, G.H.; Romesberg, L.E.; Yoshimura, H.R.; Joseph, B.J.; May, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes extensive full-scale and scale-model testing of 55-gallon drums used for shipping low-level radioactive waste materials. The tests conducted include static crush, single-can impact tests, and side impact tests of eight stacked drums. Static crush forces were measured and crush energies calculated. The tests were performed in full-, quarter-, and eighth-scale with different types of waste materials. The full-scale drums were modeled with standard food product cans. The response of the containers is reported in terms of drum deformations and lid behavior. The results of the scale model tests are correlated to the results of the full-scale drums. Two computer techniques for calculating the response of drum stacks are presented. 83 figures, 9 tables.

  6. Analysis, scale modeling, and full-scale tests of low-level nuclear-waste-drum response to accident environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, M.; Lamoreaux, G. H.; Romesberg, L. E.; Yoshimura, H. R.; Joseph, B. J.; May, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive full scale and scale model testing of 55 gallon drums used for shipping low level radioactive waste materials are described. The tests conducted include static crush, single can impact tests, and side impact tests of eight stacked drums. Static crush forces were measured and crush energies calculated. The tests were performed in full, quarter, and eight scale with different types of waste materials. The full scale drums were modeled with standard food product cans. The response of the containers is reported in terms of drum deformations and lid behavior. The results of the scale model tests are correlated to the results of the full scale drums. Two computer techniques for calculating the response of drum stacks are presented.

  7. Effects of Different Levels of Full Fat Safflower Seed on Performance of 21-42 Days Old Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Malekian

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different dietary levels of full fat safflower seed (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% of diet on performance, carcass characteristics and selected blood metabolites of broiler chickens from Arbor Acres Plus strain. The experiment was designed with 350 commercial one-day-old male broiler chickens using completely randomized design with 5 dietary treatments and 5 replications. Prior to the study, a commercial starter diet was fed to broiler chickens for 3 weeks. On day 21 of age 14 birds were allocated to each experimental unit (1.5×1.5 m floor pen. Experimental diets for the five treatments were prepared to be iso-caloric and iso-nitrogenous. Broiler chickens were provided with feed and water ad libitum. Data on weight gain, feed consumption and feed efficiency were recorded weekly basis. At the end of the experiment (42 days of age one bird from each replication was selected randomly, blood sample was collected and the birds were slaughtered to determine carcass parameters. Inclusion of full fat safflower seed in experimental diets, did not significantly affect weight gain, feed consumption and feed efficiency. Breast yield, thighs, empty gastrointestinal tract, liver, gizzard and abdominal fat pad percentages to live weight were not affected by dietary treatments. Serum triglyceride was numerically decreased as the full fat safflower seed was increased in the diets. 20% full fat safflower seed diet significantly decreased total serum cholesterol in compare to control group but other levels had no significant difference with control group. In conclusion, feeding different levels of full fat safflower seed did not show any negative effect on performance, carcass characteristics and blood metabolites of broiler chickens.

  8. Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: technology development - annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, D.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report provides a collection of annotated bibliographies for documents prepared under the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification (Plant) Program. The bibliographies are for documents from Fiscal Year 1983 through Fiscal Year 1995, and include work conducted at or under the direction of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The bibliographies included focus on the technology developed over the specified time period for vitrifying Hanford pretreated high-level waste. The following subject areas are included: General Documentation; Program Documentation; High-Level Waste Characterization; Glass Formulation and Characterization; Feed Preparation; Radioactive Feed Preparation and Glass Properties Testing; Full-Scale Feed Preparation Testing; Equipment Materials Testing; Melter Performance Assessment and Evaluations; Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter; Cold Crucible Melter; Stirred Melter; High-Temperature Melter; Melter Off-Gas Treatment; Vitrification Waste Treatment; Process, Product Control and Modeling; Analytical; and Canister Closure, Decontamination, and Handling

  9. Photolithography and Micro-Fabrication/ Packaging Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Photolithography and Micro-Fabrication/Packaging laboratories provide research level semiconductor processing equipment and facilities that do not require a full...

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory's Sister Laboratory Collaborations on Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, D. L.; Sinkule, B. J.; Apt, K. E.

    2003-02-25

    The DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) ''Sister Laboratory'' program allows for bilateral technical cooperation in peaceful uses of nuclear energy for developing nations. The program establishes a direct line of communication between U.S. scientists and the nuclear research and scientific communities in participating countries.

  11. Laboratory meter-scale seismic monitoring of varying water levels in granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquet, S.; Bodet, L.; Bergamo, P.; Guérin, R.; Martin, R.; Mourgues, R.; Tournat, V.

    2016-12-01

    Laboratory physical modelling and non-contacting ultrasonic techniques are frequently proposed to tackle theoretical and methodological issues related to geophysical prospecting. Following recent developments illustrating the ability of seismic methods to image spatial and/or temporal variations of water content in the vadose zone, we developed laboratory experiments aimed at testing the sensitivity of seismic measurements (i.e., pressure-wave travel times and surface-wave phase velocities) to water saturation variations. Ultrasonic techniques were used to simulate typical seismic acquisitions on small-scale controlled granular media presenting different water levels. Travel times and phase velocity measurements obtained at the dry state were validated with both theoretical models and numerical simulations and serve as reference datasets. The increasing water level clearly affects the recorded wave field in both its phase and amplitude, but the collected data cannot yet be inverted in the absence of a comprehensive theoretical model for such partially saturated and unconsolidated granular media. The differences in travel time and phase velocity observed between the dry and wet models show patterns that are interestingly coincident with the observed water level and depth of the capillary fringe, thus offering attractive perspectives for studying soil water content variations in the field.

  12. Laboratory evaluation of two bi-level toothbrush products for subgingival access and gingival margin cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankell, S L; Shi, X; Emling, R C; Bucker, R; Loudin, S

    2000-01-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled the production of split or feathered endings of individual toothbrush filaments. The purpose of this laboratory study was to compare a bi-level manual toothbrush containing standard end-rounded bristles with the same shaped toothbrush containing feathered filaments, 3 mm deep, on the outer raised bi-level rows to achieve subgingival access (SA) and remove artificial plaque at the gingival margin, or gingival margin cleaning (GMC). Simulated gingivae were prepared with a 0.2 mm space between the gingivae and tooth surface. The toothbrushes were aligned with the papillae at the gingival margin, and were tested using wet brushing conditions for 60 seconds at two strokes per second with a 15 mm stroke. Four toothbrushes of each type were evaluated four times, for a total of 16 assays per design. The SA maximum depth was recorded on pressure-sensitive paper under the simulated gingivae, and the length of gingival margin cleaning was recorded as the GMC efficacy. Readings were performed with 3x magnification by one investigator. In these laboratory assays, the bi-level toothbrush with feathered outer-row bristles significantly (p toothbrush with end-rounded bristles.

  13. Irritability Levels of Field and Laboratory Population of Culex pipiens Complex in Tehran to Different Groups of Insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The irritant effect of some insecticides can cause a proportion of mosquitoes to leave the sprayed rooms before acquiring a lethal dose, so the repeated contact al sub-lethal dose may lead to extent the resistance.Methods: Larvae and pupae of Culex pipiens complex were collected in mass from open canals of waste water in capital city Tehran and reared to obtain the first generation at laboratory. Sugar-fed 2–3 days female mosquitoes were used for the experiments and compared with laboratory strain. The irritability tests of insecticides impregnated pa­pers were measured in plastic conical exposure chambers placed which implemented at controlled conditions ac­cording  to  the  method  described  by WHO .Number of take-offs were counted during 15  minutes of exposure  time.Results: DDT had the most irritancy effect against field population of Cx. pipiens. DDT, permethrin and deltamethrin was moderately irritable against laboratory strain, whereas, addition to three previous insecticides, malathion, cyfluthrin and propoxur should be also considered as moderately irritable insecticides for field population of. Irritability level of etofenprox, fenithrothion, bendiocarb, and lambdacyhalothrin did not differ from control group.Conclusion: The irritability response of mosquitoes may have a negative impact on control measures. Periodical execution of irritability tests with insecticides that routinely used in vector control program is highly recommended.

  14. Use of laboratory anaerobic digesters to simulate the increase of treatment rate in full-scale high nitrogen content sewage sludge and co-digestion biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampio, Elina; Ervasti, Satu; Paavola, Teija; Rintala, Jukka

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of increasing feedstock treatment rate on the performance of full-scale anaerobic digestion using laboratory-scale reactors with digestate and feedstock from full-scale digesters. The studied nitrogen-containing feedstocks were i) a mixture of industrial by-products and pig slurry, and ii) municipal sewage sludge, which digestion was studied at 41 and 52°C, respectively. This study showed the successful reduction of hydraulic retention times from 25 and 20days to around 15days, which increased organic loading rates from 2 to 3.5kg volatile solids (VS)/m(3)d and 4 to 6kgVS/m(3)d. As a result, the optimum retention time in terms of methane production and VS removal was 10-15% lower than the initial in the full-scale digesters. Accumulation of acids during start-up of the co-digestion reactor was suggested to be connected to the high ammonium nitrogen concentration and intermediate temperature of 41°C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Full blood count reference values in children of 8 to 12 years old residing at 2,760 m above sea level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armando García-Miranda, L; Contreras, I; Estrada, J A

    2014-04-01

    To determine reference values for full blood count parameters in a population of children 8 to 12 years old, living at an altitude of 2760 m above sea level. Our sample consisted of 102 individuals on whom a full blood count was performed. The parameters included: total number of red blood cells, platelets, white cells, and a differential count (millions/μl and %) of neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils and basophils. Additionally, we obtained values for hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, concentration of corpuscular hemoglobin and red blood cell distribution width. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric test, to divide the sample in quartiles and obtain the lower and upper limits for our intervals. Moreover, the values for the intervals obtained from this analysis were compared to intervals obtained estimating+- 2 standard deviations above and below from our mean values. Our results showed significant differences compared to normal interval values reported for the adult Mexican population in most of the parameters studied. The full blood count is an important laboratory test used routinely for the initial assessment of a patient. Values of full blood counts in healthy individuals vary according to gender, age and geographic location; therefore, each population should have its own reference values. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Association Between Laboratory Calibration of a Serum Bilirubin Assay, Neonatal Bilirubin Levels, and Phototherapy Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzniewicz, Michael W; Greene, Dina N; Walsh, Eileen M; McCulloch, Charles E; Newman, Thomas B

    2016-06-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics treatment recommendations for neonatal jaundice are based on age-specific total serum bilirubin (TSB) levels. In May 2012, Ortho Clinical Diagnostics adjusted the calibrator values for Vitros Chemistry Products BuBc Slides (Ortho Clinical Diagnostics), a widely used method to quantify TSB, after concerns of positively biased results. To investigate the association between recalibration of a reflectance spectrophotometry serum bilirubin assay and TSB levels and phototherapy use among newborns. Descriptive study comparing TSB levels and phototherapy use before and after recalibration at Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a large, integrated health care delivery system. The study evaluated live births at or after 35 weeks' gestation at 12 facilities that used universal serum bilirubin screening before (January 1, 2010, through April 30, 2012; n = 61 677) and after (July 1, 2012, through December 31, 2013; n = 42 571) recalibration. The analysis took place in December 2015. Recalibration of bilirubin testing instruments. Proportions of newborns with (1) at least 1 TSB value at or above 15 mg/dL; (2) at least 1 TSB level exceeding the American Academy of Pediatrics phototherapy threshold; (3) phototherapy during the birth hospitalization; and (4) at least 1 readmission for phototherapy. In 104 420 infants (61 677 in the prerecalibration period and 42 511 in the postrecalibration period), a TSB was obtained in 99.2% of infants during birth and in 99.5% of infants within the first 30 days after birth. The postrecalibration period was associated with a 1.25 mg/dL (95% CI, 1.19-1.31; P led to a 39% relative reduction (from 20.4% to 12.4%) in infants with a TSB level of 15 mg/dL or more and a 51% relative reduction (from 9.3% to 4.5%) in infants with a TSB level that was at or above the American Academy of Pediatrics phototherapy threshold. Phototherapy during birth hospitalizations was reduced by 59% (absolute risk

  17. Introduction to the level-set full field modeling of laths spheroidization phenomenon in α/β titanium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polychronopoulou D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragmentation of α lamellae and subsequent spheroidization of α laths in α/β titanium alloys occurring during and after deformation are well known phenomena. We will illustrate the development of a new finite element methodology to model them. This new methodology is based on a level set framework to model the deformation and the ad hoc simultaneous and/or subsequent interfaces kinetics. We will focus, at yet, on the modeling of the surface diffusion at the α/β phase interfaces and the motion by mean curvature at the α/α grain interfaces.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of the PURE-LAMP test for pulmonary tuberculosis at the county-level laboratory in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xichao Ou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early and effective detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB, particularly in smear-negative tuberculosis (TB, is a priority for global TB control. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification with a procedure for ultra rapid DNA extraction (PURE-LAMP can detect TB in sputum samples rapidly and with high sensitivity and specificity. However, the PURE-LAMP test has not been effectively evaluated, especially in resource-limited laboratories. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the PURE-LAMP test for TB detection in TB suspects from two county-level TB dispensaries in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From April 2011 to February 2012, patients with suspected TB were continuously enrolled from two county-level TB laboratories in China. Three sputum samples (spot, night, and morning sputum were collected from each recruited patient. Detection of MTB by PURE-LAMP was compared to a reference standard L-J culture. The results showed that the sensitivity of the PURE-LAMP test based on spot sputum for MTB detection was 70.67%, while the sensitivity of the PURE-LAMP test based on spot sputum for MTB detection in smear positive and culture positive patients and smear negative and culture positive patients was 92.12% and 53.81%, respectively. The specificity of PURE-LAMP based on spot sputum for MTB detection was 98.32%. The sensitivity and specificity of the PURE-LAMP test based on three sputa combination for MTB detection was 88.80% and 96.86%, respectively. The results also showed that the PURE-LAMP test had a significantly lower contamination rate than did solid culture. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The study suggested that, in peripheral-level TB laboratories in China, the PURE-LAMP test showed high sensitivity and specificity for TB detection in TB suspects, making it a more effective, rapid, and safe method worthy of broader use in the future.

  19. GLUCOSE AND TOTAL PROTEIN LEVEL IN LABORATORY RATS UNDER CONDITIONS OF SHORT-TERM FASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Suljević

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Glucose level (UV enzymatic method and total protein level (Biuret method were measured in the blood samples of the rats exposed to short-term starvation. We found a statistically significant increase in the glucose level in experimental animals during starvation, which is also evident in males and females in the experimental group (p <0.05, while decrease in the total protein level was not statistically significant. During starvation, more significant weight loss was observed in females compared to males.Key words: glucose, total protein, serum, Rattus

  20. Investigating macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic connections in a college-level general chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadison, Felicia Culver

    Explanations of chemical phenomena rely on understanding the behavior of submicroscopic particles. Because this level is "invisible," it is described using symbols such as models, diagrams and equations. For this reason, students often view chemistry as a "difficult" subject. The laboratory offers a unique opportunity for the students to experience chemistry macroscopically as well as symbolically. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how chemistry lab students explained chemical phenomenon on the macroscopic, submicroscopic, and representational/symbolic level. The participants were undergraduate students enrolled in an introductory level general chemistry lab course. Students' background information (gender, the number of previous chemistry courses), scores on final exams, and final average for the course were collected. Johnstone's triangle of representation guided the design and implementation of this study. A semi-structured interview was also conducted to bring out student explanations. The questionnaires required students to draw a molecule of water, complete acid base reaction equations, represent, submicroscopically, the four stages of an acid-base titration, and provide definitions of various terms. Students were able represent the submicroscopic level of water. Students were not able to represent the submicroscopic level of the reaction between an acid and a base. Students were able to represent the macroscopic level of an acid base reaction. Students were able to symbolically represent the reaction of an acid and a base. These findings indicate that students can use all three levels of chemical representation. However, students showed an inability to connect the levels in relation to acid-base chemistry. There was no relationship between a student's ability to use the levels and his or her final score in the course.

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory low-level waste systems performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    This Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Systems Performance Assessment (PA) presents a systematic analysis of the potential risks posed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) waste management system. Potential risks to the public and environment are compared to established performance objectives as required by DOE Order 5820.2A. The report determines the associated maximum individual committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) to a member of the public from LLW and mixed waste. A maximum annual CEDE of 0.01 mrem could result from routine radioactive liquid effluents. A maximum annual CEDE of 0.003 mrem could result from routine radioactive gaseous effluents. No other pathways for radiation exposure of the public indicated detectable levels of exposure. The dose rate, monitoring, and waste acceptance performance objectives were found to be adequately addressed by the LLNL Program. 88 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

  2. Assessment of Burnout Levels among Working Undergraduate Nursing Students in Turkey: Being a Full Time Employee and Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal Tugutlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burnout originates in social work environment which causes numerous health problems in people.Objective: The purpose of this research was to determine the burnout levels of working undergraduate students who actually work as health care staff at hospitals and attending full time education in School of Health in North West region of Turkey.Results: More than half of the students (56.6 % were satisfied by working and studying at the same time. Majority of the students (84.8 % reported that they like their profession. We found that, years in profession and income levels did not affect emotional exhaustion (p>0.05, whilst having negative feelings about professionincreased emotional exhaustion among working students (p<0.01.Conclusion: Being a student and working at the same time as health care staff is a cause of burnout among students. Adding assertiveness, positive thinking, development of self-control to nursing curricula may help overwhelmed and burnout students to get along with problems they face.

  3. Comparing the relative benefits of grooming-contact and full-contact pairing for laboratory-housed adult female Macaca fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Grace H; Thom, Jinhee P; Chu, Katherine L; Crockett, Carolyn M

    2012-03-01

    Tactile social contact is the most effective form of environmental enrichment for promoting normal behavior in captive primates. For laboratory macaques housed indoors, pair housing is the most common method for socialization. Pairs can be housed either in full contact (FC), or in protected contact (PC). At Washington National Primate Research Center, PC is provided by grooming-contact (GC) cages whereby two partners are housed individually in adjacent cages with access to each other through widely spaced vertical bars. Grooming-contact has been used to accommodate research protocol restrictions and improve the likelihood of compatibility for various pairings, in part by enabling male-female pairs. This study compares the benefits between the two housing types by video recording 14 pairs of adult female Macaca fascicularis in four sequential housing phases following an ABBA design: baseline grooming-contact, full contact shortly after introduction, 1-month-later full contact, and after reversion to grooming-contact. Prior to this study, pairs had been housed compatibly in GC. Twelve of the 14 long-term pairs transitioned successfully to full contact and data presented exclude the two failed pairs. Allogrooming increased significantly when pairs first switched from GC to FC (P = 0.018), but the effect did not last through the on 1-month-later FC phase suggesting that the initial improvement in affiliative behavior was a transitory novelty response that did not persist. Self-grooming significantly decreased between the first GC and first FC phases (P = 0.016), likely due to redirected allogrooming. Non-contact affiliative behavior towards partner or other conspecifics in the room did not differ, nor did agonism towards partner or others in the room. Occurrence of abnormal, tension, manipulation, miscellaneous active, and inactive behaviors did not differ significantly across housing phases. Proximity measurements indicated that pairs were significantly out of arm

  4. Level trend analysis summary report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory inactive liquid low-level waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory facilities have produced liquid low-level waste (LLLW) that is radioactive and/or hazardous. Storage tanks have been used to collect and store these wastes. Most of the collection system, including the tanks, is located below the ground surface. Many of the systems have been removed from service (i.e., are not inactive) but contain residual amounts of waste liquid and sludges. A plan of action has been developed by DOE to ensure that environmental impacts from the waste remaining in the inactive tanks system are minimized. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) does not require any type of testing or monitoring for the inactive LLLW tanks that are removed from service but does require waste characterization of tanks contents, risk characterization of tanks removed from service, and remediation of the inactive tanks and their contents. This report is form information only and is not required by the FFA. It includes a description of the methodology and results of level trend analyses for the Category D tanks listed in the FFA that currently belong to the Environmental Restoration Program

  5. The Relationship between Serum Zonulin Level and Clinical and Laboratory Parameters of Childhood Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küme, Tuncay; Acar, Sezer; Tuhan, Hale; Çatlı, Gönül; Anık, Ahmet; Gürsoy Çalan, Özlem; Böber, Ece; Abacı, Ayhan

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between zonulin levels and clinical and laboratory parameters of childhood obesity. The study included obese children with a body mass index (BMI) >95 th percentile and healthy children who were of similar age and gender distribution. Clinical (BMI, waist circumferences, mid-arm circumference, triceps skinfold, percentage of body fat, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure) and biochemical (glucose, insulin, lipid levels, thyroid function tests, cortisol, zonulin and leptin levels) parameters were measured. A total of 43 obese subjects (23 males, mean age: 11.1±3.1 years) and 37 healthy subjects (18 males, mean age: 11.5±3.5 years) were included in this study. Obese children had significantly higher insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, triglyceride, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), zonulin and leptin levels than healthy children (p0.05). Comparison of the obese children with and without insulin resistance showed no statistically significant differences for zonulin levels (p>0.05). Zonulin levels were found to negatively correlate with HDL-C and positively correlate with leptin levels, after adjusting for age and BMI. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study investigating the relationship between circulating zonulin level (as a marker of intestinal permeability) and insulin resistance and leptin (as markers of metabolic disturbances associated with obesity) in childhood obesity. The results showed that zonulin was significantly higher in obese children when compared to healthy children, a finding indicating a potential role of zonulin in the etiopathogenesis of obesity and related disturbances.

  6. Biosafety level-2 laboratory diagnosis of Zaire Ebola virus disease imported from Liberia to Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salu, Olumuyiwa B; James, Ayorinde B; Oke, Bamidele O; Orenolu, Mercy R; Anyanwu, Roosevelt A; Abdullah, Maryam A; Happi, Christian; Idris, Jide; Abdus-Salam, Ismail A; Nasidi, Abdul-Salam; Ogunsola, Folashade T; Tomori, Oyewale; Omilabu, Sunday A

    2016-01-01

    Global travel is an efficient route of transmission for highly infectious pathogens and increases the chances of such pathogens moving from high disease-endemic areas to new regions. We describe the rapid and safe identification of the first imported case of Ebola virus disease in a traveler to Lagos, Nigeria, using conventional reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in a biosafety level (BSL)-2 facility. On 20 July 2014, a traveler arrived from Liberia at Lagos International Airport and was admitted to a private hospital in Lagos, with clinical suspicion of Ebola virus disease. Blood and urine specimens were collected, transported to the Virology Unit Laboratory at the College of Medicine, University of Lagos, and processed under stringent biosafety conditions for viral RNA extraction. RT-PCR was set-up to query the Ebola, Lassa and Dengue fever viruses. Amplicons for pan-filoviruses were detected as 300 bp bands on a 1.5% agarose gel image; there were no detectable bands for Lassa and Dengue viral RNA. Nucleotide BLAST and phylogenetic analysis of sequence data of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L) gene confirmed the sequence to be Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV/Hsap/NGA/2014/LIB-NIG 01072014; Genbank: KM251803.1). Our BSL-2 facility in Lagos, Nigeria, was able to safely detect Ebola virus disease using molecular techniques, supporting the reliability of molecular detection of highly infectious viral pathogens under stringent safety guidelines in BSL-2 laboratories. This is a significant lesson for the many under-facilitated laboratories in resource-limited settings, as is predominantly found in sub-Saharan Africa.

  7. Obesity And Laboratory Diets Affects Tissue Malondialdehyde (MDA) Levels In Obese Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Parimal; Scott, Joseph; Holley, Andy; Hakkak, Reza

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the interaction of obesity and laboratory diets on tissue malondialdehyde levels in rats. Female Zucker obese and lean rats were maintained on either regular grain-based diet or purified casein diet for two weeks, orally gavaged at day 50 with 65 mg/kg DMBA and sacrificed 24 hrs later. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured in blood and harvested tissues. Data were recorded as mean ± SEM and analyzed statistically. Results show that the obese group on purified casein diet had reduction of MDA levels in the brain, duodenum, liver, lung and kidney tissues as compared to lean group, p <0.05. Obese group on grain-based diet showed significant increase in MDA levels only in the duodenum, p <0.05. We conclude that dietary intervention differentially affects the oxidative markers in obese rats. It appears that purified casein diets were more effective than grain-based diet in reduction of oxidative stress in obese rats.

  8. Low level radioactive waste produced from the Radioisotope Production Laboratory in Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elwaer, S.M.; Sharif, M.F.

    2005-01-01

    The Radioisotope Production Laboratory was established in 1980. The Production program depends mainly on the research reactor IRT. At the start of operation 131 I, 51 Cr, 35 S, 24 Na , 198 Au and 32 P were produced and supplied to the users. In the Last years some facilities had been upgraded in cooperation with IAEA such as the production of 99 mTc, 131 I, and 82 Br. Little and low level radioactive waste are produced during these activities. These radioactive wastes which produced after the production are: Cation resin column, glass- wool, Alumina column, Membrane filter, Disposal Filter Assembly, Syringe and needle, Na 2 99 MoO 4 solution after repeated extraction of 99 mTc from Na 2 99 MoO 4 solution for 5-7 days. TeO 2 Target after distillation of 131 I, laboratory glassware and vials, the aluminum containers which used for irradiation and the contaminated water used for the vacuum pump during the method of dry distillation of 131 I and Animal waste, including carcasses or other biological or pathological wastes contaminated with radioisotopes. The solid waste accumulated in suitable container for storage, shipment, further treatment, or disposal. Removal of over 99% of most long and short-lived products has been achieved in this manner by using anion and cation-exchange resin. (author)

  9. Technical Function and Operation of the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory, Building 3525, Rev. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1961-01-31

    This report is concerned with the nature and. scope of the technical services to be rendered. and the general plan proposed for operation of Building 3525, High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL) . The role of postirradiation examination in implementing the over-all task of irradiation testing for various programs under way at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the importance of this effort to the United States reactor development program are stressed. The shielded-cell complex with provisions for remote decontamination, hot- equipment storage , and maintenance is described, as well as other supporting activities which are incorporated into the facility . The proposed technical functions include general observation, mensuration, nondestructive testing, burnup and induced-activity measurements, fission-gas sampling and analysis, corrosion evaluation and related measurements, disassembly and cutup, metallographic examination, mechanical-property determinations, and x -ray diffraction analyses . Equipment design and operational features to improve detection and measurement of selected properties in radioactive materials are described, also . The current status on design, procurement, construction, and preoperational testing of in-cell equipment in the mockup is presented along with a forecast of future needs. The mode of operation, manpower requirements, and management of the facility are discussed.

  10. Technical Function and Operation of the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory, Building 3525

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1961-01-31

    This report is concerned with the nature and scope of the technical services to be rendered and the general plan proposed for operation of Building 3525, High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL). The role of postirradiation examination in implementing the over- all task of irradiation testing for various programs under way at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the importance of this effort to the United Stat es reactor development program are stressed . The shielded-cell complex with provisions for remote decontamination, hot-equipment storage, and maintenance is described, as well as other supporting activities which are incorporated into the facility. The proposed technical functions include general observation, mensuration, nondestructive testing, burnup and induced-activity measurements, fission-gas sampling and analysis, corrosion evaluation and related measurements, disassembly and cutup, metallographic examination, mechanical-property determinations , and x -ray diffraction analyses. Equipment design and operational features to improve detection and measurement of selected properties in radioactive material s are described, also. The current status on design, procurement, construction, and preoperational testing of in- cell equipment in the mockup is presented along with a forecast of future needs. The mode of operation, manpower requirements, and management of the facility are discussed.

  11. The emergency avoidance solidification campaign of liquid low-level waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrick, T.E.; Helms, R.E.; Scanlan, T.F.; Schultz, R.M.; Scott, C.B.; Williams, L.C.; Homan, F.J.; Keigan, M.V.; Monk, T.H.; Morrow, R.W.; Van Hoesen, S.D.; du Mont, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    Since the beginning of nuclear research and development activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1943, the generation, collection, treatment, storage, and disposal of the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) stream has been an integral part of ORNL's waste management operations. This waste stream, consisting principally of a high nitrate (4.5 molar), high pH (pH 13--14) mixture of reactor, hot cell, and research laboratory liquid radioactive wastes (<5 Ci/gal), has been treated and disposed of in a variety of ways over the years. Most recently, the hydrofracture technology had been used for deep-well disposal of a grout mix of LLLW, cement, fly ash, and other additives. In 1984, this disposal technique was discontinued due to regulatory permitting issues and the need for extensive facility modifications for future operations. With loss of this disposal capability and the continued generation of LLLW by ORNL research activities, the limited tank storage capacity was rapidly being depleted

  12. Two-body decays of gluino at full one-loop level in the quark-flavour violating MSSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Helmut; Ginina, Elena; Hidaka, Keisho

    2017-01-01

    We study the two-body decays of the gluino at full one-loop level in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with quark-flavour violation (QFV) in the squark sector. The renormalisation is done in the [Formula: see text] scheme. The gluon and photon radiations are included by adding the corresponding three-body decay widths. We discuss the dependence of the gluino decay widths on the QFV parameters. The main dependence stems from the [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] mixing in the decays to up-type squarks, and from the [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] mixing in the decays to down-type squarks due to the strong constraints from B-physics on the other quark-flavour-mixing parameters. The full one-loop corrections to the gluino decay widths are mostly negative and of the order of about -10%. The QFV part stays small in the total width but can vary up to -8% for the decay width into the lightest [Formula: see text] squark. For the corresponding branching ratio the effect is somehow washed out by at least a factor of two. The electroweak corrections can be as large as 35% of the SUSY QCD corrections.

  13. An efficient method for energy levels calculation using full symmetry and exact kinetic energy operator: Tetrahedral molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, A. V.; Rey, M.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2015-03-01

    A simultaneous use of the full molecular symmetry and of an exact kinetic energy operator (KEO) is of key importance for accurate predictions of vibrational levels at a high energy range from a potential energy surface (PES). An efficient method that permits a fast convergence of variational calculations would allow iterative optimization of the PES parameters using experimental data. In this work, we propose such a method applied to tetrahedral AB4 molecules for which a use of high symmetry is crucial for vibrational calculations. A symmetry-adapted contracted angular basis set for six redundant angles is introduced. Simple formulas using this basis set for explicit calculation of the angular matrix elements of KEO and PES are reported. The symmetric form (six redundant angles) of vibrational KEO without the sin(q)-2 type singularity is derived. The efficient recursive algorithm based on the tensorial formalism is used for the calculation of vibrational matrix elements. A good basis set convergence for the calculations of vibrational levels of the CH4 molecule is demonstrated.

  14. Electrochromic Radiator Coupon Level Testing and Full Scale Thermal Math Modeling for Use on Altair Lunar Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Erika T.; Bower, Chad E.; Sheth, Rubik; Stephan, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    In order to control system and component temperatures, many spacecraft thermal control systems use a radiator coupled with a pumped fluid loop to reject waste heat from the vehicle. Since heat loads and radiation environments can vary considerably according to mission phase, the thermal control system must be able to vary the heat rejection. The ability to "turn down" the heat rejected from the thermal control system is critically important when designing the system. Electrochromic technology as a radiator coating is being investigated to vary the amount of heat rejected by a radiator. Coupon level tests were performed to test the feasibility of this technology. Furthermore, thermal math models were developed to better understand the turndown ratios required by full scale radiator architectures to handle the various operation scenarios encountered during a mission profile for the Altair Lunar Lander. This paper summarizes results from coupon level tests as well as the thermal math models developed to investigate how electrochromics can be used to increase turn down ratios for a radiator. Data from the various design concepts of radiators and their architectures are outlined. Recommendations are made on which electrochromic radiator concept should be carried further for future thermal vacuum testing.

  15. Uncertainty analysis for low-level radioactive waste disposal performance assessment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.W.; Yambert, M.W.; Kocher, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    A performance assessment of the operating Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA 6) facility for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been prepared to provide the technical basis for demonstrating compliance with the performance objectives of DOE Order 5820.2A, Chapter 111.2 An analysis of the uncertainty incorporated into the assessment was performed which addressed the quantitative uncertainty in the data used by the models, the subjective uncertainty associated with the models used for assessing performance of the disposal facility and site, and the uncertainty in the models used for estimating dose and human exposure. The results of the uncertainty analysis were used to interpret results and to formulate conclusions about the performance assessment. This paper discusses the approach taken in analyzing the uncertainty in the performance assessment and the role of uncertainty in performance assessment.

  16. Investigating sea level rise due to global warming in the teaching laboratory using Archimedes’ principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen; Pearce, Darren

    2015-11-01

    A teaching laboratory experiment is described that uses Archimedes’ principle to precisely investigate the effect of global warming on the oceans. A large component of sea level rise is due to the increase in the volume of water due to the decrease in water density with increasing temperature. Water close to 0 °C is placed in a beaker and a glass marble hung from an electronic balance immersed in the water. As the water warms, the weight of the marble increases as the water is less buoyant due to the decrease in density. In the experiment performed in this paper a balance with a precision of 0.1 mg was used with a marble 40.0 cm3 and mass of 99.3 g, yielding water density measurements with an average error of -0.008 ± 0.011%.

  17. Determination of serum hCG levels by radioreactor assay in the clinical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyko, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The radioreceptorassay (RRA) has been used for measuring human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in sera from 751 individuals. The RRA is shown to be sensitive (98%) and specific (99.8%) in detecting hCG in a wide variety of conditions, including normal pregnancy and threatened or missed abortions. As a rapid qualitative or semiquantitative assay for hCG, the RRA is a valuable adjunct in the laboratory to less sensitive tests for hCG. Variation among different quantitative assays for hCG is examined, and it is concluded that the same assay system should be used for monitoring hCG levels in a single individual over a period of time in order to avoid inconsistent results. Application of the quantitative RRA for hCG in detecting the midcycle luteinizing hormone surge in infertillity is also presented

  18. Low-level waste incineration: experience at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohrer, H.A.; Dalton, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) is a low level radioactive waste treatment facility being operated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A key component of the facility is a dual chambered controlled air incinerator with a dry off-gas treatment system. The incinerator began processing radioactive waste in September, 1984. Limited operations continued from that data until October, 1985, at which time all INEL generators began shipping combustible waste for incineration. The incinerator is presently processing all available INEL combustible Dry Active Waste (DAW) (approximately 1700 m 3 per year) operating about five days per month. Performance to date has demonstrated the effectiveness, viability and safety of incineration as a volume reduction method of DAW. 3 figures

  19. FY 1995 separation studies for liquid low-level waste treatment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, D.T.; Arnold, W.D.; Burgess, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    During FY 1995, studies were continued to develop improved methods for centralized treatment of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Focus in this reporting period was on (1) identifying the parameters that affect the selective removal of 90 Sr and 137 Cs, two of the principal radioactive contaminants expected in the waste; (2) validating the effectiveness of the treatment methods by testing an ac Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernate; (3) evaluating the optimum solid/liquid separation techniques for the waste; (4) identifying potential treatment methods for removal of technetium from LLLW; and (5) identifying potential methods for stabilizing the high-activity secondary solid wastes generated by the treatment

  20. Commercial disposal options for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, C.L.; Widmayer, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-operated site. Significant quantities of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) have been generated and disposed of onsite at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The INEL expects to continue generating LLW while performing its mission and as aging facilities are decommissioned. An on-going Performance Assessment process for the RWMC underscores the potential for reduced or limited LLW disposal capacity at the existing onsite facility. In order to properly manage the anticipated amount of LLW, the INEL is investigating various disposal options. These options include building a new facility, disposing the LLW at other DOE sites, using commercial disposal facilities, or seeking a combination of options. This evaluation reports on the feasibility of using commercial disposal facilities

  1. Two low-level gamma spectrometry systems of the IAEA Safeguards Analytical Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parus, J.L. [IAEA, SAL, Vienna (Austria); Raab, W. [IAEA, SAL, Vienna (Austria); Donohue, D. [IAEA, SAL, Vienna (Austria); Jansta, V. [IAEA, SAL, Vienna (Austria); Kierzek, J. [IAEA, SAL, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-03-01

    A gamma spectrometry system designed for the measurement of samples with low and medium radioactivity (activity from a few to about 10{sup 4} Bq in the energy range from 25 to 2700 keV) has been installed at the IAEA Safeguards Analytical Laboratory in Seibersdorf. The system consists of 3 low level detectors: (1) n-type coaxial Ge with 42.4% relative efficiency, 1.85 keV FWHM at 1.33 MeV (2) planar Ge with 2000 mm{sup 2} area and 20 mm thickness, 562 eV FWHM at 122 keV (3) NaI(Tl) annulus of 25.4 cm diameter and 25.4 cm height, hole diameter 90 mm. (orig./DG)

  2. A feasibility study of the Xpert MTB/RIF test at the peripheral level laboratory in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xichao Ou

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions: The introduction of MTB/RIF could increase the accuracy of detection of MTB and rifampin resistance in peripheral-level TB laboratories in China. One single specimen is adequate for TB diagnosis by MTB/RIF.

  3. Boring of full scale deposition holes at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Operational experiences including boring performance and a work time analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Christer; Johansson, Aasa

    2002-12-01

    Thirteen experimental deposition holes similar to those in the present KBS-3 design have been bored at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Oskarshamn, Sweden. The objective with the boring program was to test and demonstrate the current technique for boring of large vertical holes in granitic rock. Conclusions and results from this project is used in the planning process for the deposition holes that will be bored in the real repository for spent nuclear fuel. The boreholes are also important for three major projects. The Prototype Repository, the Canister Retrieval Test and the Demonstration project will all need full-scale deposition holes for their commissioning. The holes are bored in full scale and have a radius of 1.75 m and a depth of 8.5 m. To bore the holes an existing TBM design was modified to produce a novel type Shaft Boring Machine (SBM) suitable for boring 1.75 m diameter holes from a relatively small tunnel. The cutter head was equipped with two types of roller cutters: two row carbide button cutters and disc cutters. Removal of the cuttings was made with a vacuum suction system. The boring was monitored and boring parameters recorded by a computerised system for the evaluation of the boring performance. During boring of four of the holes temperature, stress and strain measurements were performed. Acoustic emission measurements were also performed during boring of these four holes. The results of these activities will not be discussed in this report since they are reported separately. Criteria regarding nominal borehole diameter, deviation of start and end centre point, surface roughness and performance of the machine were set up according to the KBS-3 design and were fulfilled with a fair margin. The average total time for boring one deposition hole during this project was 105 hours

  4. Laboratory corrosion tests on candidate high-level waste container materials: Results from the Belgian programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druyts, F.; Kursten, B.; Iseghem, P. Van

    2004-01-01

    The Belgian SAFIR-2 concept foresees the geological disposal of conditioned high-level radioactive waste in stainless steel containers and overpacks placed in a concrete gallery backfilled with Boom clay or a bentonite-type backfill. In addition to earlier in situ experiments, we used a laboratory approach to investigate the corrosion properties of selected stainless steels in Boom clay and bentonite environments. In the SAFIR-2 concept, AISI 316L hMo is the main candidate overpack material. As an alternative, we also investigated the higher alloyed stainless steel UHB 904L. Our study focused on localised corrosion and in particular pitting. We used cyclic potentiodynamic polarisation measurements to determine the pit nucleation potential E NP and the protection potential E PP . The evolution of the corrosion potential with time was determined by monitoring the open circuit potential in synthetic clay-water over extended periods. In this paper we present and discuss some results from our laboratory programme, focusing on long-term interactions between the stainless steel overpack and the backfill materials. We describe in particular the influence of chloride and thio-sulphate ions on the pitting corrosion behaviour. The results show that, under geochemical conditions typical for geological disposal, i.e. [Cl-] ∼ 30 mg/L for a Boom clay backfill and [Cl-] ∼ 90 mg/L for a bentonite backfill, neither AISI 316L hMo nor UHB 904L is expected to present pitting problems. An important factor in the long-term prediction of the corrosion behaviour however, is the robustness of the model for the evolution of the geochemistry of the backfill. Indeed, at chloride levels higher than 1000 mg/L, we predict pitting corrosion for AISI 316L hMo. (authors)

  5. Performance Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

    2012-05-01

    This performance assessment for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the facility. This assessment evaluates compliance with the applicable radiological criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involve modeling transport of radionuclides from buried waste to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses are calculated for both offsite receptors and individuals who inadvertently intrude into the waste after site closure. The results of the calculations are used to evaluate the future performance of the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide input for establishment of waste acceptance criteria. In addition, one-factor-at-a-time, Monte Carlo, and rank correlation analyses are included for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The comparison of the performance assessment results to the applicable performance objectives provides reasonable expectation that the performance objectives will be met

  6. Providing critical laboratory results on time, every time to help reduce emergency department length of stay: how our laboratory achieved a Six Sigma level of performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blick, Kenneth E

    2013-08-01

    To develop a fully automated core laboratory, handling samples on a "first in, first out" real-time basis with Lean/Six Sigma management tools. Our primary goal was to provide services to critical care areas, eliminating turnaround time outlier percentage (TAT-OP) as a factor in patient length of stay (LOS). A secondary goal was to achieve a better laboratory return on investment. In 2011, we reached our primary goal when we calculated the TAT-OP distribution and found we had achieved a Six Sigma level of performance, ensuring that our laboratory service can be essentially eliminated as a factor in emergency department patient LOS. We also measured return on investment, showing a productivity improvement of 35%, keeping pace with our increased testing volume. As a result of our Lean process improvements and Six Sigma initiatives, in part through (1) strategic deployment of point-of-care testing and (2) core laboratory total automation with robotics, middleware, and expert system technology, physicians and nurses at the Oklahoma University Medical Center can more effectively deliver lifesaving health care using evidence-based protocols that depend heavily on "on time, every time" laboratory services.

  7. SSHAC Level 1 Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, Suzette [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coppersmith, Ryan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coppersmith, Kevin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rodriguez-Marek, Adrian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Falero, Valentina Montaldo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Youngs, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) was completed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC), Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) (Figure 1-1). The PSHA followed the approaches and procedures appropriate for a Study Level 1 provided in the guidance advanced by the Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) NUREG/CR-6372 and NUREG-2117 (NRC, 1997; 2012a). The SSHAC Level 1 PSHAs for MFC and ATR were conducted as part of the Seismic Risk Assessment (SRA) project (INL Project number 31287) to develop and apply a new-risk informed methodology, respectively. The SSHAC Level 1 PSHA was conducted for NRF to provide guidance on the potential use of a design margin above rock hazard levels. The SRA project is developing a new risk-informed methodology that will provide a systematic approach for evaluating the need for an update of an existing PSHA. The new methodology proposes criteria to be employed at specific analysis, decision, or comparison points in its evaluation process. The first four of seven criteria address changes in inputs and results of the PSHA and are given in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Standard, DOE-STD-1020-2012 (DOE, 2012a) and American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society (ANSI/ANS) 2.29 (ANS, 2008a). The last three criteria address evaluation of quantitative hazard and risk-focused information of an existing nuclear facility. The seven criteria and decision points are applied to Seismic Design Category (SDC) 3, 4, and 5, which are defined in American Society of Civil Engineers/Structural Engineers Institute (ASCE/SEI) 43-05 (ASCE, 2005). The application of the criteria and decision points could lead to an update or could determine that such update is not necessary.

  8. SSHAC Level 1 Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, Suzette; Coppersmith, Ryan; Coppersmith, Kevin; Rodriguez-Marek, Adrian; Falero, Valentina Montaldo; Youngs, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) was completed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC), Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) (Figure 1-1). The PSHA followed the approaches and procedures appropriate for a Study Level 1 provided in the guidance advanced by the Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) NUREG/CR-6372 and NUREG-2117 (NRC, 1997; 2012a). The SSHAC Level 1 PSHAs for MFC and ATR were conducted as part of the Seismic Risk Assessment (SRA) project (INL Project number 31287) to develop and apply a new-risk informed methodology, respectively. The SSHAC Level 1 PSHA was conducted for NRF to provide guidance on the potential use of a design margin above rock hazard levels. The SRA project is developing a new risk-informed methodology that will provide a systematic approach for evaluating the need for an update of an existing PSHA. The new methodology proposes criteria to be employed at specific analysis, decision, or comparison points in its evaluation process. The first four of seven criteria address changes in inputs and results of the PSHA and are given in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Standard, DOE-STD-1020-2012 (DOE, 2012a) and American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society (ANSI/ANS) 2.29 (ANS, 2008a). The last three criteria address evaluation of quantitative hazard and risk-focused information of an existing nuclear facility. The seven criteria and decision points are applied to Seismic Design Category (SDC) 3, 4, and 5, which are defined in American Society of Civil Engineers/Structural Engineers Institute (ASCE/SEI) 43-05 (ASCE, 2005). The application of the criteria and decision points could lead to an update or could determine that such update is not necessary.

  9. A teaching intervention for reading laboratory experiments in college-level introductory chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Maria Kristine

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects that a pre-laboratory guide, conceptualized as a "scientific story grammar," has on college chemistry students' learning when they read an introductory chemistry laboratory manual and perform the experiments in the chemistry laboratory. The participants (N = 56) were students enrolled in four existing general chemistry laboratory sections taught by two instructors at a women's liberal arts college. The pre-laboratory guide consisted of eight questions about the experiment, including the purpose, chemical species, variables, chemical method, procedure, and hypothesis. The effects of the intervention were compared with those of the traditional pre-laboratory assignment for the eight chemistry experiments. Measures included quizzes, tests, chemistry achievement test, science process skills test, laboratory reports, laboratory average, and semester grade. The covariates were mathematical aptitude and prior knowledge of chemistry and science processes, on which the groups differed significantly. The study captured students' perceptions of their experience in general chemistry through a survey and interviews with eight students. The only significant differences in the treatment group's performance were in some subscores on lecture items and laboratory items on the quizzes. An apparent induction period was noted, in that significant measures occurred in mid-semester. Voluntary study with the pre-laboratory guide by control students precluded significant differences on measures given later in the semester. The groups' responses to the survey were similar. Significant instructor effects on three survey items were corroborated by the interviews. The researcher's students were more positive about their pre-laboratory tasks, enjoyed the laboratory sessions more, and were more confident about doing chemistry experiments than the laboratory instructor's groups due to differences in scaffolding by the instructors.

  10. Application of spectral summing to indeterminate suspect low-level drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veilleux, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucero, Randy P [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION; Seamans, Jr, J. V. [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPATION; Clapham, M. J. [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION

    2011-01-27

    The spectral summing technique developed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation (PSC) is a unique modeling technique that is being employed by the Waste Disposition Project - Low Level Waste Disposition (WDP-LLWD) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technique has been used to disposition low-level radioactive waste that has dropped out of the transuranic (TRU) category and has no disposal path unless it can be proven to be LLW and not TRU. The TRU program at LANL run by Mobile Characterization Services (MCS) employs High Efficiency Neutron Counters (HENC) with built-in gamma assay systems to assay radioactive waste for shipment and disposal as TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad, New Mexico. As well as being certified for WIPP assays, the HENC systems can also be used for low-level waste assays for disposal at LANL or off-site disposal facilities, such as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Some of the waste processed through the HENC systems cannot be confirmed TRU due to the absence of detected TRU alpha emitters above the TRU cutoff of 100 nCi/g. This waste becomes suspect low-level waste (SLLW). In many cases, the waste also can't be classified as LLW because the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of TRU radionuclides is above the 100 nCi/g level. These wastes that do not have enough detectable TRU activity to be classified as TRU waste and have TRU MDAs > 100nCi/g enter a radioactive waste characterization indeterminate state that prevents their dispositioning as either TRU waste or LLW. Spectral summing allows an experienced gamma spectroscopy analyst to add the HENC gamma spectra of a number of similar waste items together to form a consolidated (summed) spectrum. This summed spectrum contains the assay results of the group of items rather than the individual item, and gamma peaks that were not discemable in the individual spectra become quantifiable in the summed spectrum and the MDA for the group sum is reduced. The

  11. Building Design Guidelines of Interior Architecture for Bio safety Levels of Biology Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElDib, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the pivotal role of the Interior Architecture As one of the scientific disciplines minute to complete the Architectural Sciences, which relied upon the achievement and development of facilities containing scientific research laboratories, in terms of planning and design, particularly those containing biological laboratories using radioactive materials, adding to that, the application of the materials or raw materials commensurate with each discipline of laboratory and its work nature, and by the discussion the processing of design techniques and requirements of interior architecture dealing with Research Laboratory for electronic circuits an their applications with the making of its prototypes

  12. Undergraduate Student Attitudes and Perceptions toward Low- and High-Level Inquiry Exercise Physiology Teaching Laboratory Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henige, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare student attitudes toward two different science laboratory learning experiences, specifically, traditional, cookbook-style, low-inquiry level (LL) activities and a high-inquiry level (HL) investigative project. In addition, we sought to measure and compare students' science-related attitudes and…

  13. NEW APPROACHES: Measurement of the mean lifetime of cosmic ray muons in the A-level laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Peter; Costich, David; O'Sullivan, Sean

    1998-09-01

    The Turning Points in Physics module from the NEAB A-level Modular Physics syllabus requires students to have an understanding of relativistic time dilation and offers the measurement of the mean lifetime of cosmic ray muons as an example of supporting experimental evidence. This article describes a direct measurement of muon lifetime carried out in the A-level laboratory.

  14. Feasible modifications for the low-level waste treatment plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chilton, J.M.

    1984-06-01

    Aqueous, low-level, radioactive wastes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contain small amounts of /sup 60/Co, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, and trace amounts of other radionuclides. These wastes are processed by passage through beds of a strong-acid cation exchange resin, and the treated water is then discharged to the environment. Studies show that pretreatment of the waste with a weak-acid cation exchange resin would result in a significant decrease in regeneration reagents and a saving of manpower. This can be accomplished in the present plant by piping changes on the existing columns. The effluent from the cation treatment process contains all of the radionuclides that are present in anionic form. Routinely, this consists only of approximately one-half of the /sup 60/Co. Under certain conditions, other anions (such as /sup 131/I) could be present. Studies show that these can be removed by use of an anion exchange resin bed at the end of the process. This would require the construction of an additional column, if the head-end treatment described above is also installed. 2 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Leak testing plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low- level waste system (active tanks)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, D.G.; Wise, R.F.; Starr, J.W.; Maresca, J.W. Jr.

    1992-06-01

    A leak testing plan for a portion of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is provided in the two volumes that form this document. This plan was prepared in response to the requirements of the Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) between the US Department of Energy and two other agencies, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of this agreement was 1 January 1992. The LLLW system is an interconnected complex of tanks and pipelines. The FFA distinguishes four different categories of tank and pipeline systems within this complex: new systems (Category A), doubly contained systems (Category B), singly contained systems (Category C), and inactive systems (Category D). The FFA's specific requirements for leak testing of the Category C systems is addressed in this plan. The plan also addresses leak testing of the Category B portions of the LLLW system. Leak testing of the Category B components was brought into the plan to supplement the secondary containment design demonstration effort that is under way for these components

  16. Cultural Resource Investigations for the Remote Handled Low Level Waste Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace; Hollie Gilbert; Julie Braun Williams; Clayton Marler; Dino Lowrey; Cameron Brizzee

    2010-06-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is considering options for construction of a facility for disposal of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) generated remote-handled low-level waste. Initial screening has resulted in the identification of two recommended alternative locations for this new facility: one near the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex and one near the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Disposal Facility (ICDF). In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, intensive archaeological field surveys, and initial coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by new construction within either one of these candidate locations. This investigation showed that construction within the location near the ATR Complex may impact one historic homestead and several historic canals and ditches that are potentially eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. No resources judged to be of National Register significance were identified in the candidate location near the ICDF. Generalized tribal concerns regarding protection of natural resources were also documented in both locations. This report outlines recommendations for protective measures to help ensure that the impacts of construction on the identified resources are not adverse.

  17. Characterization of low level mixed waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepworth, E.; Montoya, A.; Holizer, B.

    1995-01-01

    The characterization program was conducted to maintain regulatory compliance and support ongoing waste treatment and disposal activities. The characterization team conducted a characterization review of wastes stored at the Laboratory that contain both a low-level radioactive and a hazardous component. The team addressed only those wastes generated before January 1993. The wastes reviewed, referred to as legacy wastes, had been generated before the implementation of comprehensive waste acceptance documentation procedures. The review was performed to verify existing RCRA code assignments and was required as part of the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA). The review entailed identifying all legacy LLMW items in storage, collecting existing documentation, contacting and interviewing generators, and reviewing code assignments based upon information from knowledge of process (KOP) as allowed by RCRA. The team identified 7,546 legacy waste items in the current inventory, and determined that 4,200 required further RCRA characterization and documentation. KOP characterization was successful for accurately assigning RCRA codes for all but 117 of the 4,200 items within the scope of work. As a result of KOP interviews, 714 waste items were determined to be non-hazardous, while 276 were determined to be non-radioactive. Other wastes were stored as suspect radioactive. Many of the suspect radioactive wastes were certified by the generators as non-radioactive and will eventually be removed

  18. Level 3 baseline risk evaluation for Building 3506 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golden, K.M.; Robers, S.K.; Cretella, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Level 3 Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) performed on Building 3506 located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This BRE is intended to provide an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects (current or future) posed by contaminants at the facility. The decision was made to conduct a Level 3 (least rigorous) BRE because only residual contamination exists in the building. Future plans for the facility (demolition) also preclude a rigorous analysis. Site characterization activities for Building 3506 were conducted in fall of 1993. Concrete core samples were taken from the floors and walls of both the cell and the east gallery. These cores were analyzed for radionuclides and organic and inorganic chemicals. Smear samples and direct radiation measurements were also collected. Sediment exists on the floor of the cell and was also analyzed. To adequately characterize the risks posed by the facility, receptors for both current and potential future land uses were evaluated. For the current land use conditions, two receptors were evaluated. The first receptor is a hypothetical maintenance worker who spends 250 days (8 hours/day) for 25 years working in the facility. The remaining receptor evaluated is a hypothetical S and M worker who spends 2 days (8 hours/day) per year for 25 years working within the facility. This particular receptor best exemplifies the current worker scenario for the facility. The two current exposure scenarios and parameters of exposure (e.g., inhalation and ingestion rates) have been developed to provide a conservative (i.e. health protective) estimate of potential exposure.

  19. Level 3 baseline risk evaluation for Building 3506 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, K.M.; Robers, S.K.; Cretella, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Level 3 Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) performed on Building 3506 located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This BRE is intended to provide an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects (current or future) posed by contaminants at the facility. The decision was made to conduct a Level 3 (least rigorous) BRE because only residual contamination exists in the building. Future plans for the facility (demolition) also preclude a rigorous analysis. Site characterization activities for Building 3506 were conducted in fall of 1993. Concrete core samples were taken from the floors and walls of both the cell and the east gallery. These cores were analyzed for radionuclides and organic and inorganic chemicals. Smear samples and direct radiation measurements were also collected. Sediment exists on the floor of the cell and was also analyzed. To adequately characterize the risks posed by the facility, receptors for both current and potential future land uses were evaluated. For the current land use conditions, two receptors were evaluated. The first receptor is a hypothetical maintenance worker who spends 250 days (8 hours/day) for 25 years working in the facility. The remaining receptor evaluated is a hypothetical S and M worker who spends 2 days (8 hours/day) per year for 25 years working within the facility. This particular receptor best exemplifies the current worker scenario for the facility. The two current exposure scenarios and parameters of exposure (e.g., inhalation and ingestion rates) have been developed to provide a conservative (i.e. health protective) estimate of potential exposure

  20. Design Study of Full Scale Accelerator Driven System (ADS, for Transmuting High Level Waste of MA/Pu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsodi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The ADS system used in this study consisting of a high intensity proton linear accelerator, a spallation target, and a sub-critical reactor core. The Pb-Bi spallation target is bombarded by high intensity protons coming from the accelerator. The fast neutrons generated from the spallation reaction were used to drive the sub-critical reactor core. In this ADS system, the neutron source is in the center of reactor core region, so that the neutron distribution was concentrated in the center of core region. In this case, the B/T of MA/Pu could be performed effectively in the center of core region. The neutron energy in the outer region of reactor core was decreased due to the moderation of fuel and coolant materials. Such condition gives a chance to perform Burning and/or Transmutation of LLFPs.The basic parameters of this system are shown in the form of neutronic design, neutron spectrum and B/T rate, including other aspects related to the safety operation system. Furthermore, the analysis of the ADS system was accomplished using ATRAS computer code of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, JAERI[1]. Due to the complexity of the reactor calculation codes, the author has carried out only those calculations needed for analyzing the neutronics system and some parameters related to the safety system. Design study of the transmutation system was a full-scale power level system of 657.53 MWt sub-critical reactor for an accelerator-driven transmutation system. The liquid Pb-Bi was used together as the spallation target materials and coolant of the system, because of some advantages of Pb-Bi in the system concerning the comparison with the sodium coolant. Moreover, they have a possibility to achieve a hard neutron energy spectrum, avoid a positive void reactivity coefficient, allow much lower system operating temperatures, and are favorable for safety in the event of coolant leakage. The multiplication factor of sub-critical core design was adjusted

  1. HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK CLOSURE PROJECT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigley, K.D.; Wessman, D.

    2003-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is in the process of closing two underground high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and Department of Energy orders. Closure of these two tanks is scheduled for 2004 as the first phase in closure of the eleven 1.14 million liter (300,000 gallon) tanks currently in service at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF) Closure sequence consists of multiple steps to be accomplished through the existing tank riser access points. Currently, the tank risers contain steam and process waste lines associated with the steam jets, corrosion coupons, and liquid level indicators. As necessary, this equipment will be removed from the risers to allow adequate space for closure equipment and activities. The basic tank closure sequence is as follows: Empty the tank to the residual heel using the existing jets; Video and sample the heel; Replace steam jets with new jet at a lower position in the tank, and remove additional material; Flush tank, piping and secondary containment with demineralized water; Video and sample the heel; Evaluate decontamination effectiveness; Displace the residual heel with multiple placements of grout; and Grout piping, vaults and remaining tank volume. Design, development, and deployment of a remotely operated tank cleaning system were completed in June 2002. The system incorporates many commercially available components, which have been adapted for application in cleaning high-level waste tanks. The system is cost-effective since it also utilizes existing waste transfer technology (steam jets), to remove tank heel solids from the tank bottoms during the cleaning operations. Remotely operated directional spray nozzles, automatic rotating wash balls, video monitoring equipment, decontamination spray-rings, and

  2. Green Chemistry Decision-Making in an Upper-Level Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Landon J. G.; Koroluk, Katherine J.; Golmakani, Mehrnaz; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    A self-directed independent synthesis experiment was developed for a third-year undergraduate organic laboratory. Students were provided with the CAS numbers of starting and target compounds and devised a synthetic plan to be executed over two 4.5 h laboratory periods. They consulted the primary literature in order to develop and carry out an…

  3. POPs analysis reveals issues in bringing laboratories in developing countries to a higher quality level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van S.P.J.; Bavel, van B.; Abad, E.; Leslie, H.A.; Fiedler, H.; Boer, de J.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the performance of laboratories in 18 developing countries in analyzing persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in environmental and human samples, as part of a capacity-building program with the goal of helping laboratories increase proficiency in the types of analyses required for the

  4. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory High-Level Waste Roadmap. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) High-Level Waste (HLW) Roadmap takes a strategic look at the entire HLW life-cycle starting with generation, through interim storage, treatment and processing, transportation, and on to final disposal. The roadmap is an issue-based planning approach that compares ``where we are now`` to ``where we want and need to be.`` The INEL has been effectively managing HLW for the last 30 years. Calcining operations are continuing to turn liquid HLW into a more manageable form. Although this document recognizes problems concerning HLW at the INEL, there is no imminent risk to the public or environment. By analyzing the INEL current business operations, pertinent laws and regulations, and committed milestones, the INEL HLW Roadmap has identified eight key issues existing at the INEL that must be resolved in order to reach long-term objectives. These issues are as follows: A. The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs a consistent policy for HLW generation, handling, treatment, storage, and disposal. B. The capability for final disposal of HLW does not exist. C. Adequate processes have not been developed or implemented for immobilization and disposal of INEL HLW. D. HLW storage at the INEL is not adequate in terms of capacity and regulatory requirements. E. Waste streams are generated with limited consideration for waste minimization. F. HLW is not adequately characterized for disposal nor, in some cases, for storage. G. Research and development of all process options for INEL HLW treatment and disposal are not being adequately pursued due to resource limitations. H. HLW transportation methods are not selected or implemented. A root-cause analysis uncovered the underlying causes of each of these issues.

  5. Familial influences on the full range of variability in attention and activity levels during adolescence: A longitudinal twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chun-Zi; Grant, Julia D; Heath, Andrew C; Reiersen, Angela M; Mulligan, Richard C; Anokhin, Andrey P

    2016-05-01

    To investigate familial influences on the full range of variability in attention and activity across adolescence, we collected maternal ratings of 339 twin pairs at ages 12, 14, and 16, and estimated the transmitted and new familial influences on attention and activity as measured by the Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Normal Behavior Scale. Familial influences were substantial for both traits across adolescence: genetic influences accounted for 54%-73% (attention) and 31%-73% (activity) of the total variance, and shared environmental influences accounted for 0%-22% of the attention variance and 13%-57% of the activity variance. The longitudinal stability of individual differences in attention and activity was largely accounted for by familial influences transmitted from previous ages. Innovations over adolescence were also partially attributable to familial influences. Studying the full range of variability in attention and activity may facilitate our understanding of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder's etiology and intervention.

  6. W4E HYDROPOWER DIRECT DRIVE IN-LINE HYDROTURBINE GENERATOR FULL SCALE PROTOTYPE VALIDATION TESTING REPORT MAY 2013 ALDEN LABORATORIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Chad W [GZA GeoEnvironmental,Inc.

    2013-09-24

    The W4E is a patent-pending, direct-drive, variable force turbine/generator. The equipment generates electricity through the water dependent engagement of a ring of rotating magnets with coils mounted on a stator ring. Validation testing of the W4e was performed at Alden Laboratories in the Spring of 2013. The testing was independently observed and validated by GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. The observations made during testing and the results of the testing are included in the Test Summary Report

  7. A study of full width at half maximum (FWHM) according to the filter's cut off level in SPECT camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soung Ock; Kwon, Soo Il

    2003-01-01

    Filtering is necessary to reduce statistical noise and to increase image quality in SPECT images. Noises controlled by low-pass filter designed to suppress high spatial frequency in SPECT image. Most SPECT filter function control the degree of high frequency suppression by choosing a cut off frequency. The location of cut off frequency determines the affect image noise and spatial resolution. If select the low cut off frequency, its provide good noise suppression but insufficient image quantity and high cut off frequencies increase the image resolution but insufficient noise suppression. The purpose of this study was to determines the optimum cut off level with comparison of FWHM according to cut off level in each filters-Band-limited, Sheep-logan, Sheep-logan Hanning, Generalized Hamming, Low pass cosine, Parazen and Butterworth filter in SPECT camera. We recorded image along the X, Y, Z-axis with 99m TcO 4 point source and measured FWHM by use profile curve. We find averaged length is 9.16 mm ∼ 18.14 mm of FWHM in X, Y, and Z-axis, and Band-limited and Generalized Hamming filters measures 9.16 mm at 0.7 cycle/pixel cut off frequency

  8. Quantitative Fermi level tuning in amorphous organic semiconductor by molecular doping: Toward full understanding of the doping mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jin-Peng, E-mail: yangjp@yzu.edu.cn, E-mail: uenon@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Wang, Wen-Qing; Cheng, Li-Wen; Zeng, Xiang-Hua [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangzhou University, Jiangsu 225009 (China); Bussolotti, Fabio [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Li, Yan-Qing; Tang, Jian-Xin [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Kera, Satoshi [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263–8522 (Japan); Ueno, Nobuo, E-mail: yangjp@yzu.edu.cn, E-mail: uenon@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263–8522 (Japan)

    2016-08-29

    The doping mechanism in organic-semiconductor films has been quantitatively studied via ultrahigh-sensitivity ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of N,N-bis(1-naphthyl)-N,N-diphenyl-1,1-biphenyl-4,4-diamine (α-NPD) films doped with hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile [HAT(CN){sub 6}]. We observed that HOMO of α-NPD shifts to the Fermi level (E{sub F}) in two different rates with the doping concentration of HAT(CN){sub 6}, but HOMO distributions of both pristine and doped amorphous α-NPD films are excellently approximated with a same Gaussian distribution without exponential tail states over ∼5 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} eV{sup −1}. From the theoretical simulation of the HAT(CN){sub 6}-concentration dependence of the HOMO in doped films, we show that the passivation of Gaussian-distributed hole traps, which peak at 1.1 eV above the HOMO onset, occurs at ultralow doping [HAT(CN){sub 6} molecular ratio (MR) < 0.01], leading to a strong HOMO shift of ∼0.40 eV towards E{sub F}, and MR dependence of HOMO changes abruptly at MR ∼ 0.01 to a weaker dependence for MR > 0.01 due to future of the dopant acceptor level.

  9. Triage and management of accidental laboratory exposures to biosafety level-3 and -4 agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahrling, Peter; Rodak, Colleen; Bray, Mike; Davey, Richard T

    2009-06-01

    The recent expansion of biocontainment laboratory capacity in the United States has drawn attention to the possibility of occupational exposures to BSL-3 and -4 agents and has prompted a reassessment of medical management procedures and facilities to deal with these contingencies. A workshop hosted by the National Interagency Biodefense Campus was held in October 2007 and was attended by representatives of all existing and planned BSL-4 research facilities in the U.S. and Canada. This report summarizes important points of discussion and recommendations for future coordinated action, including guidelines for the engineering and operational controls appropriate for a hospital care and isolation unit. Recommendations pertained to initial management of exposures (ie, immediate treatment of penetrating injuries, reporting of exposures, initial evaluation, and triage). Isolation and medical care in a referral hospital (including minimum standards for isolation units), staff recruitment and training, and community outreach also were addressed. Workshop participants agreed that any unit designated for the isolation and treatment of laboratory employees accidentally infected with a BSL-3 or -4 pathogen should be designed to maximize the efficacy of patient care while minimizing the risk of transmission of infection. Further, participants concurred that there is no medically based rationale for building care and isolation units to standards approximating a BSL-4 laboratory. Instead, laboratory workers accidentally exposed to pathogens should be cared for in hospital isolation suites staffed by highly trained professionals following strict infection control procedures.

  10. Mission Need Statement for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvego, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory proposes to establish replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability to meet Nuclear Energy and Naval Reactors mission-critical, remote-handled low-level waste disposal needs beyond planned cessation of existing disposal capability at the end of Fiscal Year 2015. Remote-handled low-level waste is generated from nuclear programs conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory, including spent nuclear fuel handling and operations at the Naval Reactors Facility and operations at the Advanced Test Reactor. Remote-handled low-level waste also will be generated by new programs and from segregation and treatment (as necessary) of remote-handled scrap and waste currently stored in the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex. Replacement disposal capability must be in place by Fiscal Year 2016 to support uninterrupted Idaho operations. This mission need statement provides the basis for the laboratory's recommendation to the Department of Energy to proceed with establishing the replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability, project assumptions and constraints, and preliminary cost and schedule information for developing the proposed capability. Without continued remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability, Department of Energy missions at the Idaho National Laboratory would be jeopardized, including operations at the Naval Reactors Facility that are critical to effective execution of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program and national security. Remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability is also critical to the Department of Energy's ability to meet obligations with the State of Idaho

  11. Evaluation of the lower incisor inclination during alignment and leveling using superelastic NiTi archwires: a laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Baratieri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this laboratory study is to evaluate the influence of the shape and the length limitation of superelastic nickel-titanium (NiTi archwires on lower incisors inclination during alignment and leveling. METHODS: Metal teeth mounted on a typodont articulator device were used to simulate a malocclusion of the mandibular arch (-3.5 mm model discrepancy. Three different shapes (Standard, Accuform and Ideal of superelastic NiTi archwires (Sentalloy, GAC, USA were tested. Specimens were divided in two groups: Group I, with no limitation of the archwire length; and Group II, with distal limitation. Each group had thirty specimens divided into three subgroups differentiated by the archwire shape. All groups used round wires with diameters of 0.014-in, 0.016-in, 0.018-in and 0.020-in. The recording of all intervals was accomplished using standardized digital photographs with orthogonal norm in relation to median sagittal plane. The buccolingual inclination of the incisor was registered using photographs and software CorelDraw. RESULTS: The results were obtained using ANOVA and Tukey's test at a significant level of 5%. The inclination of the lower incisor increased in both groups and subgroups. The shape of the archwire had statistically significant influence only in Group I - Standard (11.76º, Ideal (5.88º and Accuform (1.93º. Analyzing the influence of the length limitation, despite the mean incisor tipping in Group II (3.91º had been smaller than Group I (6.52º, no statistically significant difference was found, except for Standard, 3.89º with limitation and 11.76º without limitation. The greatest incisor tipping occurred with the 0.014-in archwires.

  12. FULL SCALE TESTING TECHNOLOGY MATURATION OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR FOR HIGH-LEVEL LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT AT HANFORD - 12125

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEDESCHI AR; CORBETT JE; WILSON RA; LARKIN J

    2012-01-26

    Simulant testing of a full-scale thin-film evaporator system was conducted in 2011 for technology development at the Hanford tank farms. Test results met objectives of water removal rate, effluent quality, and operational evaluation. Dilute tank waste simulant, representing a typical double-shell tank supernatant liquid layer, was concentrated from a 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.5 using a 4.6 m{sup 2} (50 ft{sup 2}) heated transfer area Rototherm{reg_sign} evaporator from Artisan Industries. The condensed evaporator vapor stream was collected and sampled validating efficient separation of the water. An overall decontamination factor of 1.2E+06 was achieved demonstrating excellent retention of key radioactive species within the concentrated liquid stream. The evaporator system was supported by a modular steam supply, chiller, and control computer systems which would be typically implemented at the tank farms. Operation of these support systems demonstrated successful integration while identifying areas for efficiency improvement. Overall testing effort increased the maturation of this technology to support final deployment design and continued project implementation.

  13. Laboratory performance testing of an extruded bitumen containing a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based, low-level aqueous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, A.J.; Kaczmarsky, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory results of a comprehensive, regulatory performance test program, utilizing an extruded bitumen and a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based waste, have been compiled at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Using a 53 millimeter, Werner and Pfleiderer extruder, operated by personnel of WasteChem Corporation of Paramus, New Jersey, laboratory-scale, molded samples of type three, air blown bitumen were prepared for laboratory performance testing. A surrogate, low-level, mixed liquid waste, formulated to represent an actual on-site waste at ORNL, containing about 30 wt % sodium nitrate, in addition to eight heavy metals, cold cesium and strontium was utilized. Samples tested contained three levels of waste loading: that is, forty, fifty and sixty wt % salt. Performance test results include the ninety day ANS 16.1 leach test, with leach indices reported for all cations and anions, in addition to the EP Toxicity test, at all levels of waste loading. Additionally, test results presented also include the unconfined compressive strength and surface morphology utilizing scanning electron microscopy. Data presented include correlations between waste form loading and test results, in addition to their relationship to regulatory performance requirements

  14. [A full economic evaluation of extensive vaccination against rotavirus with RIX4414 vaccine at National and Regional level in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, F; Barbieri, M; Dirodi, B; Vitali Rosati, G; Franco, E

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination of all healthy children against rotavirus (RV) has been recommended, since the availability of vaccines, both in Europe (PIDJ) and Italy (pediatricians). The aims of universal vaccination against RV include the protection of children against moderate/severe gastroenteritis forms by RV (GARV), prevent hospitalizations, reduce the severity and duration of the disease, and reduce morbidity and socioeconomic costs. Payers need to informed regarding the efficacy and the healthcare utilization related to RV vaccination in order to decide in favour of its extensive implementation. The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical and financial impact of the extensive vaccination aganist RV both at National and Regional level. Particular attention, compared to the previous analysis (Standaert et al, 2008) has been given to the influence of herd immunity (HI) on cost-utility results of vaccination against-RV. Methods. The analysis was conducted with the Markovian model previously used by Standaert B et al and updated for comparing costs and benefits associated with a situation of vaccination anti-RV that includes efficacy data due to HI, with a situation without vaccination. For the base case is assumed an annual coverage of 90%, where the effect of HI is present in the population at risk (0-5 years) and extended to children who have not been vaccinated, adding as conservative assumption, a further 10% to the efficacy of the vaccine, compared to 15% determined by several published studies. Two analysis have been made based on this model: a cost-utility analysis that compared vaccination with two doses of RIX441410 administered at 2 and 3 months after birth compared with no vaccination from National Health Service and Society perspective; a budget impact analysis at National and Regional level. The evaluation has as its main element the reduction of cases of infection through universal vaccination and consequent reduction of Garv events and nosocomial infections

  15. Laboratory- and field-based testing as predictors of skating performance in competitive-level female ice hockey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriksson T

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tommy Henriksson,1,2 Jason D Vescovi,3 Anncristine Fjellman-Wiklund,4 Kajsa Gilenstam1 1Sport Medicine Unit, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2The National Graduate School of Gender Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 3Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 4Physiotherapy Unit, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine whether field-based and/or laboratory-based assessments are valid tools for predicting key performance characteristics of skating in competitive-level female hockey players.Design: Cross-sectional study.Methods: Twenty-three female ice hockey players aged 15–25 years (body mass: 66.1±6.3 kg; height: 169.5±5.5 cm, with 10.6±3.2 years playing experience volunteered to participate in the study. The field-based assessments included 20 m sprint, squat jump, countermovement jump, 30-second repeated jump test, standing long jump, single-leg standing long jump, 20 m shuttle run test, isometric leg pull, one-repetition maximum bench press, and one-repetition maximum squats. The laboratory-based assessments included body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, maximal aerobic power, and isokinetic strength (Biodex. The on-ice tests included agility cornering s-turn, cone agility skate, transition agility skate, and modified repeat skate sprint. Data were analyzed using stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to establish the relationship between key performance characteristics of skating and the predictor variables.Results: Regression models (adj R2 for the on-ice variables ranged from 0.244 to 0.663 for the field-based assessments and from 0.136 to 0.420 for the laboratory-based assessments. Single-leg tests were the strongest predictors for key performance characteristics of skating. Single leg standing

  16. The effect of technological levels on profits of milk production systems participating in the full bucket program: a multicase study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Aurélio Lopes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se analisar o efeito do nível tecnológico na rentabilidade de 20 unidades demonstrativas (UD participantes do programa “Balde Cheio”, no estado do RJ, no período de janeiro a dezembro de 2011. Pretendeu-se, ainda, identificar os componentes que exerceram maior influência sobre os custos total e operacional efetivo e o impacto de cada um deles na receita. Os dados foram analisados utilizando-se o software PASW 18.0. Utilizou-se o modelo de regressão linear múltipla com o método stepwise, para identificar os componentes do custo de produção que mais influenciaram na margem líquida, na lucratividade e na rentabilidade. O nível tecnológico influenciou na lucratividade e rentabilidade. Na análise econômica, por apresentar resultado positivo, o estrato com médio nível tecnológico teve viabilidade econômica e condições de produzir no curto, médio e longo prazos, com consequente capitalização dos pecuaristas; enquanto que os estratos com baixo e alto níveis tecnológicos apresentaram resultado negativo, indicando que os produtores estão se descapitalizando, pois as receitas auferidas não foram suficientes para pagar seus custos totais. Os itens componentes do custo operacional efetivo que exerceram maiores representatividades nos estratos médios e alto nível tecnológico, em ordem decrescente, foram a alimentação, mão de obra e despesas diversas; enquanto que no estrato baixo nível tecnológico foram a alimentação, despesas diversas e mão de obra. Com relação aos itens componentes do custo total, foram a alimentação, mão de obra e remuneração do capital investido.

  17. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Interpretation of conductive features at the -450 m level, Aespoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markstroem, Ingemar; Bockgaard, Niklas (Golder Associates (Sweden)); Hardenby, Carljohan (Vattenfall Power Consultant, Stockholm (Sweden)); Hultgren, Peter (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-05-15

    The interpretation of conductive features at the -450 m described in this report concerns a part of the tunnel system of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (Aespoe HRL). The result of the modelling work is presented as an RVS-model (Rock Visualization System). When drilling some bore holes for the Mini-Can Project in the NASA3384A niche at Aespoe HRL some highly transmissive structures were penetrated. This gave a pressure drop response particularly in the Micobe experiment area (the end of TASJ-tunnel) but also in some adjacent areas at the same level. To better understand the complex hydraulic conditions of this part of the tunnel system it was understood that a new interpretation of conductive features was needed. The length axis of the model volume runs along the TASA-tunnel from section 3/260-3/600 m (end of tunnel in the Prototype repository). Laterally the model volume reaches 80 m perpendicular to the length axis in both directions and vertically it reaches to the 350 m and 500 m level respectively. All major water-bearing structures recorded by previously performed geological mapping of the tunnels and drifts (TASF, TASI, TASJ, TASG, TASQ and TASA) at this level of the Aespoe HRL were considered and formed the base for the modelling work. Also some potentially water-bearing open fractures in the tunnels were taken into account. Structures considered as large are those that can be traced over most of a tunnel periphery. No particular concern has been taken about deformation zones unless they were water bearing or acted as hydraulic barriers. A total of 212 cored boreholes penetrated or were identified close to the model volume. 39 of these were intersected by the modelled structures. Various features such as open fractures, fractures identified by bore hole radar, RQD, water inflow etc. were used in the modelling work. A number of earlier RVS-models such as the Geomod, the APSE, the Prototype, the TRUE BS model etc. that have been created within or close to

  18. Development of low-level environmental sampling capabilities for uranium at Brazilian and Argentine laboratories by ABACC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidicini, Olga Mafra; Hembree Junior, Doyle M.; Carter, Joel A.; Hayes, Susan; Whitaker, Michael; Olsen, Khris

    2003-01-01

    The Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC) with assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began a program to evaluate environmental sampling capabilities at laboratories in Argentina and Brazil in June 1998. The program included staff training conducted in South America and the United States. Several laboratory evaluation exercises were also conducted using standard swipe samples prepared by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and a National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 1547, Peach Leaves. The results of these exercises demonstrated that several laboratories were capable of accurately determining the total uranium and uranium isotopic distribution in the peach leaves. To build on these successes, another exercise using standard swipe samples prepared by the IAEA was conducted. A total of 8 sets of 15 swipe samples were prepared and distributed to the six ABACC support laboratories and to two of DOE's Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL) that support IAEA's environmental sampling program Throughout this project, the ABACC laboratories have shown steady progress in contamination control and improvements to the accuracy and precision of their measurements. The results of the latest exercises demonstrate that ABACC now has support laboratories in both Argentina and Brazil that have the capability to measure both the amount and isotopic composition of uranium at levels expected in typical environmental samples (i.e., sub-microgram quantities). This presentation will discuss the final results for the exercise with uranium swipe samples and discuss future activities to develop measurement capabilities for total and isotopic plutonium in environmental samples. (author)

  19. Correlation between predicted and observed levels of airborne tritium at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory site boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeken, C.L.; Silver, W.J.; Toy, A.J.; White, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    At the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, a computer code based on the Gaussian plume model is used to estimate radiation doses from routine or accidental release of airborne radioactive material. Routine releases of tritium have been used as a test of the overall uncertainty associated with these estimates. The ration of concentration to release rate at distances from the two principal release points to each of six site boundary sampling locations has been calcuated using local meteorological data. The concentration of airborne tritiated water vapor is continuously measured at the six sampling stations as part of the Laboratory's environmental monitoring program. Comparison of predicted with observed annual tritiated water concentrations in 1978 showed an average ratio of 2.6 with a range of from 0.97 to 5.8

  20. Low-level waste characterization plan for the WSCF Laboratory Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, J.A.

    1994-10-04

    The Waste Characterization Plan for the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) complex describes the organization and methodology for characterization of all waste streams that are transferred from the WSCF Laboratory Complex to the Hanford Site 200 Areas Storage and Disposal Facilities. Waste generated at the WSCF complex typically originates from analytical or radiological procedures. Process knowledge is derived from these operations and should be considered an accurate description of WSCF generated waste. Sample contribution is accounted for in the laboratory waste designation process and unused or excess samples are returned to the originator for disposal. The report describes procedures and processes common to all waste streams; individual waste streams; and radionuclide characterization methodology.

  1. Suomi NPP CrIS Level 1B Full Spectral Resolution V1 (SNPPCrISL1BFSR) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Level 1B Full Spectral Resolution (FSR) data files contain radiance measurements along with ancillary spacecraft, instrument,...

  2. Safety Study of the X-Ray Reference Laboratory for Radiation Protection Levels (IR-14D)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a study about the safety of the X-ray reference laboratory that has been recently constructed in the building 2 of the CIEMAT. After a brief description of the apparatus, we present the method used to calculate the exposure and absorbed dose rates in the most characteristic points of the laboratory. This method takes into account the spectral distribution of the radiation beams as a function of the accelerating voltage. The built-up factors of the absorbent materials have been considered to calculate the transmission of the radiation beams through the filters and shielding. Scattered radiations has been introduced in the calculations by means of a semiempirical method. This model supposes that multiple scattering processes give an isotropic contribution to the reflected beams and the single scattered can be described in terms of the differential cross section of Klein-Nishina. The results of this study have been applied to determine the maximum dose equivalent that the personnel of the laboratory could receive in normal operation conditions. (Author) 5 refs

  3. Bulk and molecular-level characterization of laboratory-aged biomass burning organic aerosol from oak leaf and heartwood fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Fortenberry

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The chemical complexity of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA greatly increases with photochemical aging in the atmosphere, necessitating controlled laboratory studies to inform field observations. In these experiments, BBOA from American white oak (Quercus alba leaf and heartwood samples was generated in a custom-built emissions and combustion chamber and photochemically aged in a potential aerosol mass (PAM flow reactor. A thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG was used in parallel with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS to analyze BBOA chemical composition at different levels of photochemical aging. Individual compounds were identified and integrated to obtain relative decay rates for key molecules. A recently developed chromatogram binning positive matrix factorization (PMF technique was used to obtain mass spectral profiles for factors in TAG BBOA chromatograms, improving analysis efficiency and providing a more complete determination of unresolved complex mixture (UCM components. Additionally, the recently characterized TAG decomposition window was used to track molecular fragments created by the decomposition of thermally labile BBOA during sample desorption. We demonstrate that although most primary (freshly emitted BBOA compounds deplete with photochemical aging, certain components eluting within the TAG thermal decomposition window are instead enhanced. Specifically, the increasing trend in the decomposition m∕z 44 signal (CO2+ indicates formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in the PAM reactor. Sources of m∕z 60 (C2H4O2+, typically attributed to freshly emitted BBOA in AMS field measurements, were also investigated. From the TAG chemical speciation and decomposition window data, we observed a decrease in m∕z 60 with photochemical aging due to the decay of anhydrosugars (including levoglucosan and other compounds, as well as an increase in m∕z 60 due to the formation of

  4. Detailed description of an SSAC at the facility level for research laboratory facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.J.

    1985-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of a system for the accounting for and control of nuclear material in a research laboratory facility which can be used by a facility operator to establish his own system to comply with a national system for nuclear material accounting and control and to facilitate application of IAEA safeguards. The scope of this document is limited to descriptions of the following SSAC elements: (1) Nuclear Material Measurements; (2) Measurement Quality; (3) Records and Reports; (4) Physical Inventory Taking; (5) Material Balance Closing

  5. Mission Need Statement for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego

    2009-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory proposes to establish replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability to meet Nuclear Energy and Naval Reactors mission-critical, remote-handled low-level waste disposal needs beyond planned cessation of existing disposal capability at the end of Fiscal Year 2015. Remote-handled low-level waste is generated from nuclear programs conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory, including spent nuclear fuel handling and operations at the Naval Reactors Facility and operations at the Advanced Test Reactor. Remote-handled low-level waste also will be generated by new programs and from segregation and treatment (as necessary) of remote-handled scrap and waste currently stored in the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex. Replacement disposal capability must be in place by Fiscal Year 2016 to support uninterrupted Idaho operations. This mission need statement provides the basis for the laboratory’s recommendation to the Department of Energy to proceed with establishing the replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability, project assumptions and constraints, and preliminary cost and schedule information for developing the proposed capability. Without continued remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability, Department of Energy missions at the Idaho National Laboratory would be jeopardized, including operations at the Naval Reactors Facility that are critical to effective execution of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program and national security. Remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability is also critical to the Department of Energy’s ability to meet obligations with the State of Idaho.

  6. Environmental assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico offsite transportation of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company. SNL/NM is located on land owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) within the boundaries of the Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The major responsibilities of SNL/NM are the support of national security and energy projects. Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) is generated by some of the activities performed at SNL/NM in support of the DOE. This report describes potential environmental effects of the shipments of low-level radioactive wastes to other sites

  7. Biosafety and Biosecurity in European Containment Level 3 Laboratories: Focus on French Recent Progress and Essential Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorino, Boris; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Charrel, Rémi

    2017-01-01

    Even if European Union (EU) Member States are obliged to implement EU Directives 2000/54/EC on the protection of workers from risks related to exposure to biological agents at work , national biosafety regulations and practices varied from country to country. In fact, EU legislation on biological agents and genetically modified microorganisms is often not specific enough to ensure harmonization leading to difficulties in implementation for most laboratories. In the same way, biosecurity is a relatively new concept and a few EU Member States are known to have introduced national laboratory biosecurity legislation. In France, recent regulations have reinforced biosafety/biosecurity in containment level 3 (CL-3) laboratories but they concern a specific list of pathogens with no correlation in other European Members States. The objective of this review was to summarize European biosafety/biosecurity measures concerning CL-3 facilities focusing on French specificities. Essential requirements needed to preserve efficient biosafety measures when manipulating risk group 3 biological agents are highlighted. In addition, International, European and French standards related to containment laboratory planning, operation or biosafety equipment are described to clarify optimal biosafety and biosecurity requirements.

  8. Education: a microfluidic platform for university-level analytical chemistry laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greener, Jesse; Tumarkin, Ethan; Debono, Michael; Dicks, Andrew P; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2012-02-21

    We demonstrate continuous flow acid-base titration reactions as an educational microfluidic platform for undergraduate and graduate analytical chemistry courses. A series of equations were developed for controlling and predicting the results of acid-base neutralisation reactions conducted in a microfluidic format, including the combinations of (i) a strong base and a strong acid, (ii) a strong base and a weak acid, and (iii) a strong base and a multiprotic acid. Microfluidic titrations yielded excellent repeatability. The small experimental footprint is advantageous in crowded teaching laboratories, and it offers limited waste and exposure to potentially hazardous acids and bases. This platform will help promote the utilisation of microfluidics at an earlier stage of students' careers.

  9. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratoriesThe Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  10. Utilizing an Artificial Outcrop to Scaffold Learning Between Laboratory and Field Experiences in a College-Level Introductory Geology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Meredith

    Geologic field trips are among the most beneficial learning experiences for students as they engage the topic of geology, but they are also difficult environments to maximize learning. This action research study explored one facet of the problems associated with teaching geology in the field by attempting to improve the transition of undergraduate students from a traditional laboratory setting to an authentic field environment. Utilizing an artificial outcrop, called the GeoScene, during an introductory college-level non-majors geology course, the transition was studied. The GeoScene was utilized in this study as an intermediary between laboratory and authentic field based experiences, allowing students to apply traditional laboratory learning in an outdoor environment. The GeoScene represented a faux field environment; outside, more complex and tangible than a laboratory, but also simplified geologically and located safely within the confines of an educational setting. This exploratory study employed a mixed-methods action research design. The action research design allowed for systematic inquiry by the teacher/researcher into how the students learned. The mixed-methods approach garnered several types of qualitative and quantitative data to explore phenomena and support conclusions. Several types of data were collected and analyzed, including: visual recordings of the intervention, interviews, analytic memos, student reflections, field practical exams, and a pre/post knowledge and skills survey, to determine whether the intervention affected student comprehension and interpretation of geologic phenomena in an authentic field environment, and if so, how. Students enrolled in two different sections of the same laboratory course, sharing a common lecture, participated in laboratory exercises implementing experiential learning and constructivist pedagogies that focused on learning the basic geological skills necessary for work in a field environment. These laboratory

  11. An examination of low level activity laboratories and calibration of the whole-body counter at the State Institute of Radiation Hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunde, T.B.

    1981-01-01

    Two low-background laboratories have been examined with regard to methods in obtaining low background radiation. Low level counters and low level counting is described. A method for the calibration of a whole-body counter is reported. (RF)

  12. Effect of the Level of Inquiry on Student Interactions in Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haozhi; Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    The central goal of our exploratory study was to investigate differences in college chemistry students' interactions during lab experiments with different levels of inquiry. This analysis was approached from three major analytic dimensions: (i) functional analysis; (ii) cognitive processing; and (iii) social processing. According to our results,…

  13. Organic Contaminant Levels in Three Fish Species Downchannel from the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, G.J.; Fresquez, P.R.; Beveridge, J.W.

    1999-06-01

    The LANL contribution, if any, to organic contaminant levels in the common carp, the channel catfish, and the white sucker in the Rio Grande appear to be small; however, low sample sizes, high variation, and potential interaction of species effect with location treatment effect require additional sampling and analysis.

  14. Effects of low levels of road traffic noise during the night: a laboratory study on number of events, maximum noise levels and noise sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhrström, E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the laboratory study presented here was to elucidate the importance of the number of noise events of a relatively low maximum noise level for sleep disturbance effects (body movements, subjective sleep quality, mood and performance). Twelve test persons slept eight nights under home-like laboratory settings. During four of these nights, each test person was exposed to 16, 32, 64 and 128 noise events respectively from recorded road traffic noise at a maximum noise level of 45 dB(A). All test persons (aged 20-42 years) considered themselves rather or very sensitive towards noise. The results show a significant decrease in subjective sleep quality at 32 noise events per night. At 64 noise events, 50% of the test persons experienced difficulties in falling asleep and, as compared with quiet nights, the time required to fall asleep was on average 12 minutes longer. The occurrence of body movements was significantly related to the reported number of awakenings, and the number of body movements was three times higher during the noisy periods of the night as compared with the quiet periods, indicating acute noise effects. The results of a vigilance test indicate that noise during the night might prolong the time needed to solve the test. Finally, and regardless of number of noise events, a significant increase in tiredness during the day was found after nights with noise exposure. In the paper comparisons are also made with earlier experiments using maximum noise levels of 50 and 60 dB(A).

  15. Forage yield and nitrogen nutrition dynamics of warm-season native forage genotypes under two shading levels and in full sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Santiago Barro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The successful achievement of a highly productive understorey pasture in silvopastoral systems depends on the use of well-adapted forage genotypes, showing good agronomic performance and persistence under shading and grazing. In this study, the herbage dry matter yield (DMY and nitrogen nutrition dynamics were determined in three native warm-season grasses (Paspalum regnellii, Paspalum dilatatum and Paspalum notatum and a forage legume (Arachis pintoi under two shading levels compared with full sun. The experiment was conducted in the Campanha region, Bagé, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, during two evaluation cycles (2008/2009 and 2009/2010. Three shade cloth levels (0%, 50% and 80% of light restriction were applied to the forage genotypes in a split plot design, in which shading levels were the main plot and forage genotypes were the subplots, with three replications. P. regnellii showed the highest accumulated DMY (1500 and 1700 g m-2, respectively, for the first and second evaluation cycles at all shading levels and showed no DMY decreased under the heavy shade (80%. Average DMY over the four genotypes under the 50% shade level was higher or equal compared with full sun. Influence of rainfall was observed on the DMY performance of all genotypes: the positive effect of moderate shading (50% on P. dilatatum and P. notatum DMY was associated to a low soil water availability status. Increased shading level resulted in high nitrogen nutrition index values on grasses, in comparison with full sun. All genotypes performed well under the moderate shading level, but the DMY of both P. regnellii and P. dilatatum and the herbage N content in P. notatum and A. pintoi of all genotypes stood out, showing that those main genotypes are promising to grow in silvopastoral systems at the Campanha region in southern Brazil.

  16. Preliminary siting criteria for the proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgenson-Waters, M.

    1992-09-01

    The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project was established in 1991 by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office. This facility will provide treatment capabilities for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level mixed waste and low-level waste. This report identifies the siting requirements imposed on facilities that treat and store these waste types by Federal and State regulatory agencies and the US Department of Energy. Site selection criteria based on cost, environmental, health and safety, archeological, geological and service, and support requirements are presented. These criteria will be used to recommend alternative sites for the new facility. The National Environmental Policy Act process will then be invoked to evaluate the alternatives and the alternative sites and make a final site determination

  17. Development of site suitability criteria for the high level waste repository for Lawrence Livermore Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    Results of our mining, geological and geotechnical studies provided in support of the development of site suitability criteria for the high level waste repository are presented. The primary purpose of the work was the identification and development of appropriate geotechnical descriptors and coefficients required for the Site Suitability Repository Model. This model was developed by The Analytic Sciences Corporation (TASC) of Reading, Massachusetts and is not described in this report

  18. Evaluation of ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography in microPET/CT laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmento, Daniele Martins

    2016-01-01

    Micro PET/CT scanner is an essential tool generally used for small animal molecular imaging. Fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose is the most widely used radioisotope in this technique. The present study aimed to evaluate the radiation levels in a micro PET/CT research laboratory of the Radiopharmacy Center at IPEN-CNEN / SP, in order to accomplish both national standards and international recommendations. The radioprotection team has classified the laboratory as supervised area; even this laboratory does not require the adoption of specific measures for protection and safety, should be done regular re-evaluation of the conditions of occupational exposures. Workplace monitoring and individual control assessment were carried out to ensure the radiological protection of all workers directly involved in handling the scanner. Initially, there was conducted a radiometric survey, as well as measurements of the external radiation level in the workplace and its surroundings. To achieve this goal, there were placed nine thermoluminescent dosimeters of CaSO 4 :Dy in preselected locations. Monthly evaluations of the occupationally exposed individuals were carried out through the use of TL dosimeters, ported in the workers' chest. Moreover, whole body measurements were performed every six months. The study period was about two-years which started in April 2014. All tests to evaluate micro PET/CT performance were based on the standard protocol of the equipment in accordance with the standard developed by the Animal PET Standard Task Force. Present study's results demonstrated that the ambient radiation levels (ambient and effective estimated radiation dose), as well as the effective shielding equipment are both adequate. This study emphasizes that it is essential to strictly follow the principles of radioprotection in workplace, whenever researches involve radioactive unsealed sources. (author)

  19. [Impact of Lean methodology to improve care processes and levels of satisfaction in patient care in a clinical laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morón-Castañeda, L H; Useche-Bernal, A; Morales-Reyes, O L; Mojica-Figueroa, I L; Palacios-Carlos, A; Ardila-Gómez, C E; Parra-Ardila, M V; Martínez-Nieto, O; Sarmiento-Echeverri, N; Rodríguez, C A; Alvarado-Heine, C; Isaza-Ruget, M A

    2015-01-01

    The application of the Lean methodology in health institutions is an effective tool to improve the capacity and workflow, as well as to increase the level of satisfaction of patients and employees. To optimise the time of outpatient care in a clinical laboratory, by implementing a methodology based on the organisation of operational procedures to improve user satisfaction and reduce the number of complaints for delays in care. A quasi-experimental before and after study was conducted between October 2011 to September 2012. XBar and S charts were used to observe the mean service times and standard deviation. The user satisfaction was assessed using service questionnaires. A reduction of 17 minutes was observed in the time of patient care from arrival to leaving the laboratory, and a decrease of 60% in complaints of delay in care. Despite the high staff turnover and 38% increase in the number of patients seen, a culture of empowerment and continuous improvement was acquired, as well as greater efficiency and productivity in the care process, which was reflected by maintaining standards 12 months after implementation. Lean is a viable methodology for clinical laboratory procedures, improving their efficiency and effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Network Experiences from a Cross-Sector Biosafety Level-3 Laboratory Collaboration: A Swedish Forum for Biopreparedness Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelaus, Johanna; Lindberg, Anna; Thisted Lambertz, Susanne; Byström, Mona; Forsman, Mats; Lindmark, Hans; Knutsson, Rickard; Båverud, Viveca; Bråve, Andreas; Jureen, Pontus; Lundin Zumpe, Annelie; Melefors, Öjar

    The Swedish Forum for Biopreparedness Diagnostics (FBD) is a network that fosters collaboration among the 4 agencies with responsibility for the laboratory diagnostics of high-consequence pathogens, covering animal health and feed safety, food safety, public health and biodefense, and security. The aim of the network is to strengthen capabilities and capacities for diagnostics at the national biosafety level-3 (BSL-3) laboratories to improve Sweden's biopreparedness, in line with recommendations from the EU and WHO. Since forming in 2007, the FBD network has contributed to the harmonization of diagnostic methods, equipment, quality assurance protocols, and biosafety practices among the national BSL-3 laboratories. Lessons learned from the network include: (1) conducting joint projects with activities such as method development and validation, ring trials, exercises, and audits has helped to build trust and improve communication among participating agencies; (2) rotating the presidency of the network steering committee has fostered trust and commitment from all agencies involved; and (3) planning for the implementation of project outcomes is important to maintain gained competencies in the agencies over time. Contacts have now been established with national agencies of the other Nordic countries, with an aim to expanding the collaboration, broadening the network, finding synergies in new areas, strengthening the ability to share resources, and consolidating long-term financing in the context of harmonized European biopreparedness.

  1. Network Experiences from a Cross-Sector Biosafety Level-3 Laboratory Collaboration: A Swedish Forum for Biopreparedness Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Anna; Thisted Lambertz, Susanne; Byström, Mona; Forsman, Mats; Lindmark, Hans; Knutsson, Rickard; Båverud, Viveca; Bråve, Andreas; Jureen, Pontus; Lundin Zumpe, Annelie; Melefors, Öjar

    2017-01-01

    The Swedish Forum for Biopreparedness Diagnostics (FBD) is a network that fosters collaboration among the 4 agencies with responsibility for the laboratory diagnostics of high-consequence pathogens, covering animal health and feed safety, food safety, public health and biodefense, and security. The aim of the network is to strengthen capabilities and capacities for diagnostics at the national biosafety level-3 (BSL-3) laboratories to improve Sweden's biopreparedness, in line with recommendations from the EU and WHO. Since forming in 2007, the FBD network has contributed to the harmonization of diagnostic methods, equipment, quality assurance protocols, and biosafety practices among the national BSL-3 laboratories. Lessons learned from the network include: (1) conducting joint projects with activities such as method development and validation, ring trials, exercises, and audits has helped to build trust and improve communication among participating agencies; (2) rotating the presidency of the network steering committee has fostered trust and commitment from all agencies involved; and (3) planning for the implementation of project outcomes is important to maintain gained competencies in the agencies over time. Contacts have now been established with national agencies of the other Nordic countries, with an aim to expanding the collaboration, broadening the network, finding synergies in new areas, strengthening the ability to share resources, and consolidating long-term financing in the context of harmonized European biopreparedness. PMID:28805472

  2. Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington

  3. Low-level multicounter β/γ systems with external guards in surface and shallow underground laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorsson, P.

    1997-01-01

    When weak samples are measured it is important that they can be given ample counting time in order to obtain satisfactory accuracy and that the background count rate can be checked well. This calls for a high counting capacity, which multidetectors can bring us. I will discuss development possibilities of low-level β/γ multidetector systems with an external anticosmic shield that will in many cases be operated in underground laboratories. These simple and low-cost system can frequently help us in increasing the number of detectors. Three concepts are combined in these systems: (1) multidetectors, (2) an external anticosmic (or guard) detector arrangement and (3) overburden shielding. (orig.)

  4. Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-10

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington.

  5. Low-level multicounter {beta}/{gamma} systems with external guards in surface and shallow underground laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorsson, P. [Iceland Univ. (Iceland). Science Inst.

    1997-03-01

    When weak samples are measured it is important that they can be given ample counting time in order to obtain satisfactory accuracy and that the background count rate can be checked well. This calls for a high counting capacity, which multidetectors can bring us. I will discuss development possibilities of low-level {beta}/{gamma} multidetector systems with an external anticosmic shield that will in many cases be operated in underground laboratories. These simple and low-cost system can frequently help us in increasing the number of detectors. Three concepts are combined in these systems: (1) multidetectors, (2) an external anticosmic (or guard) detector arrangement and (3) overburden shielding. (orig.)

  6. Solid low-level radioactive waste volume projections at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Art, K.; Minton-Hughes, J.; Peper, C.

    1995-01-01

    In response to regulatory requirements, the current economic environment, and diminishing on-site low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal capacity, LANL needed to develop a system to collect data on future LLW generation that would comply with DOE Order 5820. 2A and be an effective facility planning tool. The LANL Volume Projections Project (VPP) was created to meet these needs. This paper describes objectives, scope, and components of the VPP that will provide information essential to future facility planning and development

  7. Rapid deployment of a mobile biosafety level-3 laboratory in Sierra Leone during the 2014 Ebola virus epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Gong, Yan; Wang, Chengyu; Liu, Wensen; Wang, Zhongyi; Xia, Zhiping; Bu, Zhaoyang; Lu, Huijun; Sun, Yang; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Cao, Yuxi; Yang, Fan; Su, Haoxiang; Hu, Yi; Deng, Yongqiang; Zhou, Bo; Zhao, Zongzheng; Fu, Yingying; Kargbo, David; Dafae, Foday; Kargbo, Brima; Kanu, Alex; Qian, Jun; Guo, Zhendong

    2017-01-01

    Background Ebola virus emerged in West Africa in December 2013. The high population mobility and poor public health infrastructure in this region led to the development of the largest Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak to date. Methodology/Principal findings On September 26, 2014, China dispatched a Mobile Biosafety Level-3 Laboratory (MBSL-3 Lab) and a well-trained diagnostic team to Sierra Leone to assist in EVD diagnosis using quantitative real-time PCR, which allowed the diagnosis of suspected EVD cases in less than 4 hours from the time of sample receiving. This laboratory was composed of three container vehicles equipped with advanced ventilation system, communication system, electricity and gas supply system. We strictly applied multiple safety precautions to reduce exposure risks. Personnel, materials, water and air flow management were the key elements of the biosafety measures in the MBSL-3 Lab. Air samples were regularly collected from the MBSL-3 Lab, but no evidence of Ebola virus infectious aerosols was detected. Potentially contaminated objects were also tested by collecting swabs. On one occasion, a pipette tested positive for EVD. A total of 1,635 suspected EVD cases (824 positive [50.4%]) were tested from September 28 to November 11, 2014, and no member of the diagnostic team was infected with Ebola virus or other pathogens, including Lassa fever. The specimens tested included blood (69.2%) and oral swabs (30.8%) with positivity rates of 54.2% and 41.9%, respectively. The China mobile laboratory was thus instrumental in the EVD outbreak response by providing timely and reliable diagnostics. Conclusions/Significance The MBSL-3 Lab significantly contributed to establishing a suitable laboratory response capacity during the emergence of EVD in Sierra Leone. PMID:28505171

  8. Rapid deployment of a mobile biosafety level-3 laboratory in Sierra Leone during the 2014 Ebola virus epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Gong, Yan; Wang, Chengyu; Liu, Wensen; Wang, Zhongyi; Xia, Zhiping; Bu, Zhaoyang; Lu, Huijun; Sun, Yang; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Cao, Yuxi; Yang, Fan; Su, Haoxiang; Hu, Yi; Deng, Yongqiang; Zhou, Bo; Zhao, Zongzheng; Fu, Yingying; Kargbo, David; Dafae, Foday; Kargbo, Brima; Kanu, Alex; Liu, Linna; Qian, Jun; Guo, Zhendong

    2017-05-01

    Ebola virus emerged in West Africa in December 2013. The high population mobility and poor public health infrastructure in this region led to the development of the largest Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak to date. On September 26, 2014, China dispatched a Mobile Biosafety Level-3 Laboratory (MBSL-3 Lab) and a well-trained diagnostic team to Sierra Leone to assist in EVD diagnosis using quantitative real-time PCR, which allowed the diagnosis of suspected EVD cases in less than 4 hours from the time of sample receiving. This laboratory was composed of three container vehicles equipped with advanced ventilation system, communication system, electricity and gas supply system. We strictly applied multiple safety precautions to reduce exposure risks. Personnel, materials, water and air flow management were the key elements of the biosafety measures in the MBSL-3 Lab. Air samples were regularly collected from the MBSL-3 Lab, but no evidence of Ebola virus infectious aerosols was detected. Potentially contaminated objects were also tested by collecting swabs. On one occasion, a pipette tested positive for EVD. A total of 1,635 suspected EVD cases (824 positive [50.4%]) were tested from September 28 to November 11, 2014, and no member of the diagnostic team was infected with Ebola virus or other pathogens, including Lassa fever. The specimens tested included blood (69.2%) and oral swabs (30.8%) with positivity rates of 54.2% and 41.9%, respectively. The China mobile laboratory was thus instrumental in the EVD outbreak response by providing timely and reliable diagnostics. The MBSL-3 Lab significantly contributed to establishing a suitable laboratory response capacity during the emergence of EVD in Sierra Leone.

  9. Evaporation studies on Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, V.L. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perona, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Evaporation studies were performed with Melton Valley storage tank liquid low-level radioactive waste concentrate and with surrogates (nonradioactive) to determine the feasibility of a proposed out-of-tank-evaporation project. Bench-scale tests indicated that volume reductions ranging from 30 to 55% could be attained. Vendor-site tests were conducted (with surrogate waste forms) using a bench-scale single-stage, low-pressure (subatmospheric), low-temperature (120 to 173{degree}F) evaporator similar to units in operation at several nuclear facilities. Vendor tests were successful; a 30% volume reduction was attained with no crystallization of solids and no foaming, as would be expected from a high pH solution. No fouling of the heat exchanger surfaces occurred during these tests. It is projected that 52,000 to 120,000 gal of water could be evaporated from the supernate stored in the Melton and Bethel Valley liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) storage tanks with this type of evaporator.

  10. Evaporation studies on Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, V.L.; Perona, J.J.

    1993-03-01

    Evaporation studies were performed with Melton Valley storage tank liquid low-level radioactive waste concentrate and with surrogates (nonradioactive) to determine the feasibility of a proposed out-of-tank-evaporation project. Bench-scale tests indicated that volume reductions ranging from 30 to 55% could be attained. Vendor-site tests were conducted (with surrogate waste forms) using a bench-scale single-stage, low-pressure (subatmospheric), low-temperature (120 to 173 degree F) evaporator similar to units in operation at several nuclear facilities. Vendor tests were successful; a 30% volume reduction was attained with no crystallization of solids and no foaming, as would be expected from a high pH solution. No fouling of the heat exchanger surfaces occurred during these tests. It is projected that 52,000 to 120,000 gal of water could be evaporated from the supernate stored in the Melton and Bethel Valley liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) storage tanks with this type of evaporator

  11. Comparative Vibration Levels Perceived Among Species in a Laboratory Animal Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, John N; Kinard, Will L; Reynolds, Randall P

    2011-01-01

    The current study was performed to determine the vibration levels that were generated in cages on a ventilated rack by common construction equipment in frequency ranges likely to be perceived by humans, rats, and mice. Vibration generated by the ventilated rack blower caused small but significant increases in some of the abdominal, thoracic, and head resonance frequency ranges (RFR) and sensitivity frequency ranges (SFR) in which each species is most likely to be affected by and perceive vibration, respectively. Vibration caused by various items of construction equipment at 3 ft from the cage were evaluated relative to the RFR and SFR of humans, rats, and mice in 3 anatomic locations. In addition, the vibration levels in the RFR and SFR that resulted from the use of a large jackhammer and were measured at various locations and distances in the facility and evaluated in terms of humans, rats, and mice in 3 anatomic locations. Taken together, the data indicate that a given vibration source generates vibration in frequency ranges that are more likely to affect rats and mice as compared with humans. PMID:22330711

  12. The Effects of One-Stage Full-Mouth Disinfection and Qua-drant-Wise Scaling and Root Planing on Serum Levels of IL-17 and IL-1β and Clinical Parameters (A randomized Controlled Trial Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adileh Shirmohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: One-stage full-mouth disinfection technique (FMD has been introduced to avoid cross-contamination between the treated and untreated regions between treatment sessions. Considering the role of inflammatory mediators in periodontitis, the aim of the present study was to compare the effects of FMD with the quadrant-wise scaling and root planing (Q-SRP on serum levels of IL-17 and IL-1β in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis.Materials and Methods: Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis were selected randomly and based on inclusion criteria in each group. In order to evaluate the periodontal status, the clinical parameters of bleeding on probing (BOP, clinical attachment level (CAL, probing depth (PD and modified gingival index (MGI were measured and recorded before treatment and at 2- and 4-month intervals after treatment. Immunologic parameters of the study such as IL-17 and IL-1β serum levels were determined by special laboratory kits at the same intervals. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15 statistical software. Statistical significance was defined at p0.05. In the evaluation of periodontal parameters, all parameters exhibited clinical improvements in both groups, with no statistically significant differences between the two study groups (p>0.05.Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study it was concluded that both FMD and Q-SRP techniques result in improvements in periodontal indexes and decreases in the serum levels of IL-17 and IL-1β inflammatory mediators.

  13. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification

  14. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

  15. Level III baseline risk evaluation for Building 3505 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostella, W.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    The Level III Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) for Building 3505, the ORNL Metal Recovery Facility, provides an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects, current or future, associated with the presence of hazardous substances in the building. The Metal Recovery Facility was used from 1952 through 1960 to process large quantities of radioactive material using the PUREX process for the recovery of uranium-238, plutonium-239, neptunium-237, and americium-241. The facility consists of seven process cells (A through G), a canal, a dissolver room, a dissolver pit, an office, locker room, storage area, control room, electrical gallery, shop, and makeup area. The cells were used to house the nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment, and the canal was constructed to be used as a water-shielded transfer canal. Currently, there are no known releases of radioactive contaminants from Building 3505. To perform the BRE, historical radiological survey data were used to estimate the concentration of alpha- and beta/gamma emitting radionuclides in the various cells, rooms, and other areas in Building 3505. Data from smear surveys were used to estimate the amount of transferable contamination (to which receptors can be exposed via inhalation and ingestion), and data from probe surveys were used to estimate the amount of both fixed and transferable contamination (from which receptors can receive external exposure). Two land use scenarios, current and future, and their subsequent exposure scenarios were explored in the BRE. Under the current land use scenario, two exposure scenarios were evaluated. The first was a worst-case industrial exposure scenario in which the receptor is a maintenance worker who works 8 hours/day, 350 days/year in the building for 25 years. In the second, more realistic exposure scenario, the receptor is a surveillance and maintenance (S&M) worker who spends two 8-hour days/year in the building for 25 years.

  16. The Development of Low-Level Measurement Capabilities for Total and Isotopic Uranium in Environmental Samples at Brazilian and Argentine Laboratories by ABACC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidicini, Olga M.; Olsen, Khris B.; Hembree, Doyle M.; Carter, Joel A.; Whitaker, Michael; Hayes, Susan M.

    2005-01-01

    In June 1998, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), with assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), began a program to assess environmental sampling and analysis capabilities at laboratories in Argentina and Brazil. The program began with staff training conducted in South America and the United States by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Both laboratories are participating members of DOE's Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL) that support IAEA's environmental sampling program. During the initial planning meeting, representatives from ABACC and all the participating analytical laboratories supporting ABACC were briefed on how the first exercise would be managed and on key aspects necessary to analyze low-level environmental samples for uranium. Subsequent to this training, a laboratory evaluation exercise (Exercise 1) was conducted using standard swipe samples prepared for this exercise by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The results of Exercise 1 determined that sample contamination was a major factor in the analysis, and a thorough review of laboratory procedures was required to reduce the level of contamination to acceptable levels. Following modification of sample preparation procedures, the laboratories performed Exercise 2, an analysis of a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1547, Peach Leaves. The results of Exercise 2 demonstrated that several laboratories were capable of accurately determining the total uranium and uranium isotopic distribution in the peach leaves. To build on these successes, Exercise 3 was performed using a series of standard swipe samples prepared by the IAEA and distributed to laboratories supporting ABACC and to PNNL and ORNL. The results of Exercise 3 demonstrate that ABACC now has support laboratories in both Argentina and Brazil, which are capable of

  17. Design and Laboratory Level Production of High Energy Survival Tablets for Athletes, Tourists and People who Faced Natural Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nezami Asl

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People affected by natural disasters like flood or earthquakes and also athletes like mountain climbers and also sailors who continuously go to jungles or deserts, might get into trouble in the nature and need help to get back to their home and therefore, they might need high energy supplements to keep them alive up to the time they find a food source. The goal of this study was to design and make these laboratory prototypes of high energy tablets. Methods: For making tablets 15 different formulations were designed and made in the laboratory and then were tested to be suit. We objected to design formulations that could provide at least 20 kcal per each tab and amount of daily protein (about 25 grams, Tablets were design to provide not only the minimum energy needed but also the minimum protein needs and daily requirements of some vitamins and minerals of a healthy male adult. Results: Laboratory samples of 5 gram high energy (21 Kcal were produced. The best formulation that had the capacity to be converted into tablets consisted of olive oil (16%, maltodextrin (36%, high biological value protein powder (25%, sesame seed (17% and wheat germ (6%. 25 tablets should be taken each day which provides 525 kcal energy, 25g protein and different vitamins and minerals, daily; therefore, they will provide the minimum energy needs for at least 10 days if provided in 1.2 kg packs.  Conclusion: The production of high energy tab rations can provide minimum energy needs for at least 7 days for athletes, tourists and people who face natural disasters when there is no access to any other food resources because they occupy the minimum volume and their production is accessible in Iran.

  18. Environmental Regulation of Plant Gene Expression: An Rt-qPCR Laboratory Project for an Upper-Level Undergraduate Biochemistry or Molecular Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickelberg, Garrett J.; Fisher, Alison J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel laboratory project employing "real-time" RT-qPCR to measure the effect of environment on the expression of the "FLOWERING LOCUS C" gene, a key regulator of floral timing in "Arabidopsis thaliana" plants. The project requires four 3-hr laboratory sessions and is aimed at upper-level undergraduate…

  19. The influence of risk perception on biosafety level-2 laboratory workers' hand-to-face contact behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James D; Eggett, Dennis; Johnson, Michele J; Reading, James C

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen transmission in the laboratory is thought to occur primarily through inhalation of infectious aerosols or by direct contact with mucous membranes on the face. While significant research has focused on controlling inhalation exposures, little has been written about hand contamination and subsequent hand-to-face contact (HFC) transmission. HFC may present a significant risk to workers in biosafety level-2 (BSL-2) laboratories where there is typically no barrier between the workers' hands and face. The purpose of this study was to measure the frequency and location of HFC among BSL-2 workers, and to identify psychosocial factors that influence the behavior. Research workers (N = 93) from 21 BSL-2 laboratories consented to participate in the study. Two study personnel measured workers' HFC behaviors by direct observation during activities related to cell culture maintenance, cell infection, virus harvesting, reagent and media preparation, and tissue processing. Following observations, a survey measuring 11 psychosocial predictors of HFC was administered to participants. Study personnel recorded 396 touches to the face over the course of the study (mean = 2.6 HFCs/hr). Of the 93 subjects, 67 (72%) touched their face at least once, ranging from 0.2-16.0 HFCs/hr. Among those who touched their face, contact with the nose was most common (44.9%), followed by contact with the forehead (36.9%), cheek/chin (12.5%), mouth (4.0%), and eye (1.7%). HFC rates were significantly different across laboratories F(20, 72) = 1.85, p = 0.03. Perceived severity of infection predicted lower rates of HFC (p = 0.03). For every one-point increase in the severity scale, workers had 0.41 fewer HFCs/hr (r = -.27, P perceptions had a modest impact on their HFC behaviors, but other factors not considered in this study, including social modeling and work intensity, may play a stronger role in predicting the behavior. Mucous membrane protection should be considered as part of the BSL-2 PPE

  20. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-06-24

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

  1. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-01-01

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps

  2. Cultural Resource Protection Plan for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, Brenda Ringe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gilbert, Hollie Kae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This plan addresses cultural resource protection procedures to be implemented during construction of the Remote Handled Low Level Waste project at the Idaho National Laboratory. The plan proposes pre-construction review of proposed ground disturbing activities to confirm avoidance of cultural resources. Depending on the final project footprint, cultural resource protection strategies might also include additional survey, protective fencing, cultural resource mapping and relocation of surface artifacts, collection of surface artifacts for permanent curation, confirmation of undisturbed historic canal segments outside the area of potential effects for construction, and/or archaeological test excavations to assess potential subsurface cultural deposits at known cultural resource locations. Additionally, all initial ground disturbing activities will be monitored for subsurface cultural resource finds, cultural resource sensitivity training will be conducted for all construction field personnel, and a stop work procedure will be implemented to guide assessment and protection of any unanticipated discoveries after initial monitoring of ground disturbance.

  3. FEBEX project: full-scale engineered barriers experiment for a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberid, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Campos, R.; Cuevas, A. M.; Fernandez, E. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    FEBEX has the multiple objective of demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing, handling and constructing the engineered barriers and of developing codes for the thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical performance assessment of a deep geological repository for high level radioactive wastes. These objectives require integrated theoretical and experimental development work. The experimental work consists of three parts: an in situ test, a mock-up test and a series of laboratory tests. The experiments is based on the Spanish reference concept for crystalline rock, in which the waste capsules are placed horizontally in drifts surround by high density compacted bentonite blocks. In the two large-scale tests, the thermal effects of the wastes were simulated by means of heaters; hydration was natural in the in situ test and controlled in the mock-up test. The large-scale tests, with their monitoring systems, have been in operation for more than two years. the demonstration has been achieved in the in situ test and there are great expectation that numerical models sufficiently validated for the near-field performance assessment will be achieved. (Author)

  4. FEBEX project: full-scale engineered barriers experiment for a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Campos, R.; Cuevas, A. M.; Fernandez, E.

    2000-01-01

    FEBEX has the multiple objective of demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing, handling and constructing the engineered barriers and of developing codes for the thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical performance assessment of a deep geological repository for high level radioactive wastes. These objectives require integrated theoretical and experimental development work. The experimental work consists of three parts: an in situ test, a mock-up test and a series of laboratory tests. The experiments is based on the Spanish reference concept for crystalline rock, in which the waste capsules are placed horizontally in drifts surround by high density compacted bentonite blocks. In the two large-scale tests, the thermal effects of the wastes were simulated by means of heaters; hydration was natural in the in situ test and controlled in the mock-up test. The large-scale tests, with their monitoring systems, have been in operation for more than two years. the demonstration has been achieved in the in situ test and there are great expectation that numerical models sufficiently validated for the near-field performance assessment will be achieved. (Author)

  5. Removal of radiocesium from low level radioactive effluents by hexacyanoferrate loaded synthetic zeolite. Laboratory to pilot plant scale demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Dayamoy; Rao, Manjula A.; Khot, Shantinath A.; Shah, Jayesh G.; Banerjee, Kalyan [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Nuclear Recycle Group; Pawaskar, Chandrahas S.; Gangadharan, Anand; Rao, Shankar N.; Jain, Savita [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2017-06-01

    Present paper reports removal of radiocesium from low level waste using a modified sorbent (13X-CFC) prepared by in-situ precipitation of potassium copper hexacyanoferrate(II) inside the macropores of a synthetic zeolite. The Cs exchange isotherm of the sorbent is established and it found to follow Fruendlich absorption isotherm equation. It is varified that presence of hexacyanoferrate on zeolite facilitates rapid Cs uptake performance. This is further confirmed in laboratory scale column tests, wherein excellent Cs removal performance from low level waste simulant was observed even at higher flow rates (40 bed volumes per hour). The utility of the sorbent is established through successful demonstration in a pilot scale (50 L) trial with almost complete removal of {sup 137}Cs from more than 14,000 bed volumes of actual low level waste. The sorbent, owing to its low cost and excellent {sup 137}Cs removal performance, is expected to find application in treatment of very low active waste streams.

  6. [Two-step synthesis of the full length Aspergillus niger lipase gene lipA leads to high-level expression in Pichia pastoris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiangke; Yan, Xiangxiang; Zhang, Zhengping; Jiang, Xueqing; Yan, Yunjun

    2009-03-01

    Aspergillus niger lipases are important biocatalysis widely used in industries for food processing and pharmaceutical preparation. High-level expression recombinants can lead to cost effective lipase large scale production. Full length gene synthesis is an efficient measure to enhance the expression level of the gene. In order to reduce the non-specific binding between oligonucleotides and bases mutation caused by the complicate secondary structure of DNA and excessive PCR amplification, a frequently phenomenon in one-step gene synthesis, we used a two-step method including assembly PCR (A-PCR) and digestion-ligation step to synthesis Aspergillus niger lipase gene lipA. Assisted by DNA2.0 and Gene2Oliga software, we optimized the codon usage and secondary structure of RNA and induced enzyme sites Cla I (237 site) and Pst I (475 site) into the gene. In the first step, fragments F1 (237 bp), F2 (238 bp) and F3 (422 bp) were separately synthesized by assembly PCR. In the second step, fragments F1, F2 and F3 were separately digested by Cla I and Pst I, and then ligated into a full length lipA gene. Two-step method efficiently enhanced successful ratio for full-length gene synthesis and dispersed the risk for gene redesign. The synthesized gene was cloned into pPIC9K vector and transferred into Pichia pastoris. After methanol inducement, the expression level of the codon optimized lipA-syn gene reached 176.0 U/mL, 10.8-fold of the original lipA gene (16.3 U/mL) in Pichia pastoris GS1115. The recombinant offers the possibility for lipase large-scale production.

  7. Supplementation of broiler diets with high levels of microbial protease and phytase enables partial replacement of commercial soybean meal with raw, full-fat soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdaw, M M; Perez-Maldonado, R A; Iji, P A

    2018-02-22

    A 3 × 3 + 1 factorial, involving three levels of protease (0, 15,000 or 30,000 PROT/kg) and three levels of phytase (1,000, 2,000 or 3,000 FYT/kg), was used to evaluate the effect of replacing commercial soybean meal (SBM) with raw, full-fat soybean (RFSB) at 75 g/kg of diet for broilers. A control diet was used for comparison. Each treatment was replicated six times, with nine birds per replicate. The concentration of trypsin inhibitors (TIs) in the test diets was approximately 10,193.4 TIU/kg. Regardless of enzyme supplementation, feed intake (FI) and body weight gain (BWG) of birds in the control group were superior to those on the test diets. Birds that received the protease-free test diets had reduced FI and BWG, but when supplemented with protease, were similar to the control diet in BWG, FI (except 0-35 days) and feed conversion ratio (FCR). When the test diet was supplemented with elevated levels (extradose) of protease and phytase, the BWG was improved during 0-10 days (p = .05) and 0-24 days (p replace SBM in broiler diets, provided the diets are supplemented with elevated levels of protease and phytase. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Medical operating personnel exposition levels during intracoronary irradiation using a Re188 full filled balloon catheter after percutaneous transluminal coronary artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponce V, F.; Peix G, A.; Llerena R, L.; Santana V, L. [Instituto de Cardiologia, La Habana (Cuba); Lopez D, A. [Hospital Hermanos Amejeiras, La Habana (Cuba)

    2006-07-01

    The intracoronary irradiation using a full filled conventional balloon catheter with Rhenium 188 (Re188) after Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Artery (PTCA) is a new relative treatment technique to reduce restenosis where the medical operating personnel are exposed to additional radiation ionizing level in the cath lab. In this study a radiation exposure level to medical operating personnel in the cath lab were measured with a Geiger Muller detector in 7 place to different distance from patient (to chest and abdominal region) catheter tabletop during a randomized clinical trial carried out in 25 patients whose were treated. The average concentrated Re188 activity used and treatment time were 5256{+-}2371 MBq/ml in 1.5-2 ml and 466{+-}195 seconds. At 3 cm from right arm patient the average maximum exposition rate were 0,63 mSv/h and 0,51 mSv h, to chest and abdominal patient level, respectively, where also average exposed dose per treated patient was 0,06 mSv and 0,05 mSv, respectively. Our results show that intracoronary irradiation with Re188 in the cath lab do not increase significatively the exposure radiation level to medical operating staff during treatment procedure and it is safe according national and international radiation protection regulations. (Author)

  9. Measurements of Chlorpyrifos Levels in Forager Bees and Comparison with Levels that Disrupt Honey Bee Odor-Mediated Learning Under Laboratory Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urlacher, Elodie; Monchanin, Coline; Rivière, Coraline; Richard, Freddie-Jeanne; Lombardi, Christie; Michelsen-Heath, Sue; Hageman, Kimberly J; Mercer, Alison R

    2016-02-01

    Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphate pesticide used around the world to protect food crops against insects and mites. Despite guidelines for chlorpyrifos usage, including precautions to protect beneficial insects, such as honeybees from spray drift, this pesticide has been detected in bees in various countries, indicating that exposure still occurs. Here, we examined chlorpyrifos levels in bees collected from 17 locations in Otago, New Zealand, and compared doses of this pesticide that cause sub-lethal effects on learning performance under laboratory conditions with amounts of chlorpyrifos detected in the bees in the field. The pesticide was detected at 17 % of the sites sampled and in 12 % of the colonies examined. Amounts detected ranged from 35 to 286 pg.bee(-1), far below the LD50 of ~100 ng.bee(-1). We detected no adverse effect of chlorpyrifos on aversive learning, but the formation and retrieval of appetitive olfactory memories was severely affected. Chlorpyrifos fed to bees in amounts several orders of magnitude lower than the LD50, and also lower than levels detected in bees, was found to slow appetitive learning and reduce the specificity of memory recall. As learning and memory play a central role in the behavioral ecology and communication of foraging bees, chlorpyrifos, even in sublethal doses, may threaten the success and survival of this important insect pollinator.

  10. Bioaccumulation and trophodynamics of the antidepressants sertraline and fluoxetine in laboratory-constructed, 3-level aquatic food chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Marja L; Ugge, Gustaf; Jönsson, Jan Åke; Berglund, Olof

    2017-04-01

    Although reports of pharmaceutical bioconcentration in aquatic organisms are increasing, less is known about trophic transfer in aquatic food webs. The bioaccumulation and trophodynamics of sertraline and fluoxetine, 2 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) frequently detected in aquatic environments, were tested by exposing constructed aquatic food chains to SSRIs under controlled laboratory conditions. Both of these ionizable, weak base pharmaceuticals showed lower bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) with increasing trophic level (i.e., no biomagnifications) in 2 3-level food chains (Acer platanoides, fed to Asellus aquaticus, in turn fed to Notonecta glauca or Pungitius pungitius). Mean sertraline BAFs in A. platanoides, A. aquaticus, N. glauca, and P. pungitus were 2200 L/kg, 360 L/kg, 26 L/kg, and 49 L/kg, respectively, and mean fluoxetine BAFs 1300 L/kg, 110 L/kg, 11 L/kg, and 41 L/kg, respectively. The weak influence of diet was further demonstrated by measured BAFs being equal to or lower than measured bioconcentration factors (BCFs). Organism lipid content was not positively correlated with BAFs, suggesting that other processes are driving interspecific differences in SSRI bioaccumulation. The empirically derived parameter values were introduced into a proposed bioaccumulation model, and a poor correlation was found between modeled and empirical BAFs (predicted r 2  = -0.63). In conclusion, the apparent lack of biomagnification of these ionizable pharmaceuticals suggests that environmental concern should not necessarily focus only on higher trophic levels, but also on species showing high BCFs at any trophic level. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1029-1037. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  11. Choropleth Mapping of Cervical Cancer Screening in South Africa Using Healthcare Facility-level Data from the National Laboratory Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makura, Caroline B T; Schnippel, Kathryn; Michelow, Pamela; Chibwesha, Carla J.; Goeieman, Bridgette; Jordaan, Suzette; Firnhaber, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Background In South Africa, cervical cancer remains among the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer death. Co-infection with HIV increases the risk of developing cervical pre-cancer and cancer. We analysed National Health Laboratory Service cervical cytology data to investigate geographic variations of Pap smear coverage, quality, and high grade lesions. Methods Facility-level data were extracted from the NHLS for April 2013–March 2014. We present results and choropleth maps detailing coverage, adequacy and high-grade Pap smear cytology abnormalities defined as Pap smears suspicious for invasive carcinoma, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) or atypical squamous cells: cannot exclude HSIL (ASC-H). Results 4,562 facilities submitted 791,067 cytology slides. The interquartile range (IQR) for Pap smear coverage among HIV-infected women was 26–41%; similar to coverage in women aged 30 and older (IQR: 26–42%). 6/52 districts had adequacy rates above the national standard (70%) and 2/52 districts had adequacy rates below 35%. We observed marked variation in Pap smear abnormalities across the country, with the proportion of high-grade cytology abnormalities ≥0.3% in 17/52 districts. Conclusion Using district-level choropleth maps, we are able to display variations in Pap smear coverage, quality, and results across South Africa. This approach may be used to improve resource allocation, achieving better equity in cervical cancer prevention. PMID:29546199

  12. Full and sub-waveform retracking to assess the ability of pulse limited altimeter in monitoring water level variations of inland water body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohi, Shirzad; Sneeuw, Nico; Tseng, Kuo-Hsin; Shum, CK

    2014-05-01

    Pulse-limited-satellite altimetry was originally designed for oceanographic observations but has been extended to monitor inland water bodies. So far, studying water level variations of inland water bodies, e.g. lakes, has been a challenge for this type of altimetry in terms of data quality. The returned altimetry waveforms could be seriously contaminated by topography and environmental error sources. Retracking is an efficacious method against this contamination to improve the accuracy of range measurement and consequently robust water level determination. In addition, the choice of an optimal retracking algorithm appropriate for the specific regional water bodies is very important in this respect. In this study we processed 18 Hz Envisat RA2 altimetry data, i.e. Sensor Geophysical Data records (SGDR), with respective different retrackers and 1 Hz Geophysical Data Records (GDRs) of this mission by on-board retrackers. First, for a given waveform the whole waveform, called full-waveform, was processed to estimate retracked water level variation using OCOG, Threshold and β-parameter retrackers. In the next step we assumed that the reflecting surface inside the radar foot print is a complex surface with different responses. Therefore a given waveform considered as a combination of a number of small waveforms, called sub-waveform. Each sub-waveform was processed by all of the mentioned retrackers to determine water level variations. Finally the result of different retracked heights were compared with on-board retrackers, and with available in-situ gauge data. The largest salt lake in the middle east, Urmia lake, has been selected as a testing area in this study. This lake is drying up due to climate change and human activities, e.g. irrigation and dam construction. Our retracking analysis shows that the sub-waveform retracking outperforms the full-waveform retracking. The minimum RMS, i.e. 18 cm, was obtained by sub-waveform, retracked with Threshold 50% algorithm

  13. A Full Dynamic Compound Inverse Method for output-only element-level system identification and input estimation from earthquake response signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioldi, Fabio; Rizzi, Egidio

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a new output-only element-level system identification and input estimation technique, towards the simultaneous identification of modal parameters, input excitation time history and structural features at the element-level by adopting earthquake-induced structural response signals. The method, named Full Dynamic Compound Inverse Method (FDCIM), releases strong assumptions of earlier element-level techniques, by working with a two-stage iterative algorithm. Jointly, a Statistical Average technique, a modification process and a parameter projection strategy are adopted at each stage to achieve stronger convergence for the identified estimates. The proposed method works in a deterministic way and is completely developed in State-Space form. Further, it does not require continuous- to discrete-time transformations and does not depend on initialization conditions. Synthetic earthquake-induced response signals from different shear-type buildings are generated to validate the implemented procedure, also with noise-corrupted cases. The achieved results provide a necessary condition to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed identification method.

  14. High Level Waste Tank Farm Replacement Project for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0831, for the construction and operation of the High-Level Waste Tank Farm Replacement (HLWTFR) Project for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The HLWTFR Project as originally proposed by the DOE and as analyzed in this EA included: (1) replacement of five high-level liquid waste storage tanks with four new tanks and (2) the upgrading of existing tank relief piping and high-level liquid waste transfer systems. As a result of the April 1992 decision to discontinue the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel at INEL, DOE believes that it is unlikely that the tank replacement aspect of the project will be needed in the near term. Therefore, DOE is not proposing to proceed with the replacement of the tanks as described in this-EA. The DOE's instant decision involves only the proposed upgrades aspect of the project described in this EA. The upgrades are needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act requirements, and the Department's obligations pursuant to the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement and Consent Order among the Environmental Protection Agency, DOE, and the State of Idaho. The environmental impacts of the proposed upgrades are adequately covered and are bounded by the analysis in this EA. If DOE later proposes to proceed with the tank replacement aspect of the project as described in the EA or as modified, it will undertake appropriate further review pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act

  15. The Potential of Non-Formal Laboratory Environments for Innovating the Chemistry Curriculum and Promoting Secondary School Level Students Education for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Garner

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing skills and attitudes among students in terms of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD requires that educators address issues of sustainability in both formal and non-formal education. However, up to now, ESD seems to have been insufficiently implemented in secondary science education in many countries in general, and in high school chemistry learning in particular. A lack of suitable experiments, coupled with missing teaching and learning materials and insufficient teacher professional development have been identified as the reasons for this gap. This paper describes a project of innovation and research in the field of ESD for secondary school chemistry education. Within the project, both half- and full-day learning environments have been developed for non-formal, laboratory-based learning of secondary level students at the university. The research-based development focuses on teaching-learning modules which link formal and non-formal learning. The pedagogy employed is both learner-centered and inquiry-based. All the modules focus on sustainability issues in chemistry-related contexts. Data was collected by questionnaires from teachers and students both prior to and after the visit of the non-formal learning environment. Likert-items were analyzed statistically and the evaluation of the open-ended questions was done by Qualitative Content Analysis. An overview of the project, a case from the non-formal laboratory setting, and findings from accompanying research and evaluation are discussed in this paper. Potential impacts on teacher professional development and curriculum innovation are also outlined.

  16. Quantifying the role of climate variability on extreme total water level impacts: An application of a full simulation model to Ocean Beach, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, K.; Ruggiero, P.; Stockdon, H. F.; Barnard, P.; Long, J.

    2014-12-01

    Many coastal communities worldwide are vulnerable to flooding and erosion driven by extreme total water levels (TWL), potentially dangerous events produced by the combination of large waves, high tides, and high non-tidal residuals. The West coast of the United States provides an especially challenging environment to model these processes due to its complex geological setting combined with uncertain forecasts for sea level rise (SLR), changes in storminess, and possible changes in the frequency of major El Niños. Our research therefore aims to develop an appropriate methodology to assess present-day and future storm-induced coastal hazards along the entire U.S. West coast, filling this information gap. We present the application of this framework in a pilot study at Ocean Beach, California, a National Park site within the Golden Gate National Recreation Area where existing event-scale coastal change data can be used for model calibration and verification. We use a probabilistic, full simulation TWL model (TWL-FSM; Serafin and Ruggiero, in press) that captures the seasonal and interannual climatic variability in extremes using functions of regional climate indices, such as the Multivariate ENSO index (MEI), to represent atmospheric patterns related to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In order to characterize the effect of climate variability on TWL components, we refine the TWL-FSM by splitting non-tidal residuals into low (monthly mean sea level anomalies) and high frequency (storm surge) components. We also develop synthetic climate indices using Markov sequences to reproduce the autocorrelated nature of ENSO behavior. With the refined TWL-FSM, we simulate each TWL component, resulting in synthetic TWL records providing robust estimates of extreme return level events (e.g., the 100-yr event) and the ability to examine the relative contribution of each TWL component to these extreme events. Extreme return levels are then used to drive storm impact models

  17. Statistical Description of Liquid Low-Level Waste System Transssuranic Wastes at Oak Ridge Nation Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The US DOE has presented plans for processing liquid low-level wastes (LLLW) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the LLLW tank system. These wastes are among the most hazardous on the Oak Ridge reservation and exhibit both RCRA toxic and radiological hazards. The Tennessee Department of Health and Environment has mandated that the processing of these wastes must begin by the year 2002 and the the goal should be permanent disposal at a site off the Oak Ridge Reservation. To meet this schedule, DOE will solicit bids from various private sector companies for the construction of a processing facility on land located near the ORNL Melton Valley Storage Tanks to be operated by the private sector on a contract basis. This report will support the Request for Proposal process and will give potential vendors information about the wastes contained in the ORNL tank farm system. The report consolidates current data about the properties and composition of these wastes and presents methods to calculate the error bounds of the data in the best technically defensible manner possible. The report includes information for only the tank waste that is to be included in the request for proposal.

  18. Bulk and molecular-level characterization of laboratory-aged biomass burning organic aerosol from oak leaf and heartwood fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortenberry, Claire F.; Walker, Michael J.; Zhang, Yaping; Mitroo, Dhruv; Brune, William H.; Williams, Brent J.

    2018-02-01

    The chemical complexity of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) greatly increases with photochemical aging in the atmosphere, necessitating controlled laboratory studies to inform field observations. In these experiments, BBOA from American white oak (Quercus alba) leaf and heartwood samples was generated in a custom-built emissions and combustion chamber and photochemically aged in a potential aerosol mass (PAM) flow reactor. A thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) was used in parallel with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to analyze BBOA chemical composition at different levels of photochemical aging. Individual compounds were identified and integrated to obtain relative decay rates for key molecules. A recently developed chromatogram binning positive matrix factorization (PMF) technique was used to obtain mass spectral profiles for factors in TAG BBOA chromatograms, improving analysis efficiency and providing a more complete determination of unresolved complex mixture (UCM) components. Additionally, the recently characterized TAG decomposition window was used to track molecular fragments created by the decomposition of thermally labile BBOA during sample desorption. We demonstrate that although most primary (freshly emitted) BBOA compounds deplete with photochemical aging, certain components eluting within the TAG thermal decomposition window are instead enhanced. Specifically, the increasing trend in the decomposition m/z 44 signal (CO2+) indicates formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the PAM reactor. Sources of m/z 60 (C2H4O2+), typically attributed to freshly emitted BBOA in AMS field measurements, were also investigated. From the TAG chemical speciation and decomposition window data, we observed a decrease in m/z 60 with photochemical aging due to the decay of anhydrosugars (including levoglucosan) and other compounds, as well as an increase in m/z 60 due to the formation of thermally labile organic

  19. Gestating sows have greater digestibility of energy in full fat rice bran and defatted rice bran than growing gilts regardless of level of feed intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, G A; Stein, H H

    2017-07-01

    The first objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of GE and nutrients in full fat rice bran (FFRB) and defatted rice bran (DFRB) determined in gestating sows is greater if feed is provided at 1.5 × the ME required for maintenance than at 3.5 × the ME requirement. The second objective was to test the hypothesis that the ATTD of GE and nutrients and the concentrations of DE and ME in FFRB and DFRB is not different between growing gilts and gestating sows if both groups of animals are fed 3.5 × the maintenance requirement for ME. Forty eight gestating sows (parity 2 to 6) were allotted to 3 diets and 2 levels of feed intake (i.e., 1.5 or 3.5 × the maintenance requirement for ME) in a randomized complete block design, with 4 blocks of 12 sows and 2 replicate sows per block for a total of 8 replicate sows per diet. Twenty four growing gilts (51.53 ± 3.1 kg BW) were randomly allotted to the same 3 diets, but all gilts were fed at 3.5 × the maintenance requirement for ME. A basal diet containing corn and soybean meal and 2 diets that consisted of 60% basal diet and 40% FFRB or DFRB were used. Results of the experiment indicated that there were no effects of level of feed intake of sows on ATTD of GE, DM, OM, or NDF, or on concentrations of DE and ME. However, concentrations of DE and ME were greater ( gilts. Concentrations of DE and ME in the diets were also greater ( gilts. The ATTD of GE and the concentrations of DE and ME of FFRB were greater ( gilts. In conclusion, the level of feed intake by gestating sows did not affect the digestibility of GE and nutrients or the concentrations of DE and ME in diets or in FFRB or DFRB, but the ATTD of GE and the concentration of DE and ME in diets and in FFRB and DFRB were greater in gestating sows than in growing gilts.

  20. Facing Challenges for Monte Carlo Analysis of Full PWR Cores : Towards Optimal Detail Level for Coupled Neutronics and Proper Diffusion Data for Nodal Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttin, A.; Capellan, N.; David, S.; Doligez, X.; El Mhari, C.; Méplan, O.

    2014-06-01

    Safety analysis of innovative reactor designs requires three dimensional modeling to ensure a sufficiently realistic description, starting from steady state. Actual Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport codes are suitable candidates to simulate large complex geometries, with eventual innovative fuel. But if local values such as power densities over small regions are needed, reliable results get more difficult to obtain within an acceptable computation time. In this scope, NEA has proposed a performance test of full PWR core calculations based on Monte Carlo neutron transport, which we have used to define an optimal detail level for convergence of steady state coupled neutronics. Coupling between MCNP for neutronics and the subchannel code COBRA for thermal-hydraulics has been performed using the C++ tool MURE, developed for about ten years at LPSC and IPNO. In parallel with this study and within the same MURE framework, a simplified code of nodal kinetics based on two-group and few-point diffusion equations has been developed and validated on a typical CANDU LOCA. Methods for the computation of necessary diffusion data have been defined and applied to NU (Nat. U) and Th fuel CANDU after assembly evolutions by MURE. Simplicity of CANDU LOCA model has made possible a comparison of these two fuel behaviours during such a transient.

  1. Detailed leak detection test plan and schedule for Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste active tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a plan and schedule for leak testing a portion of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. It is a concise version of a more general leak testing plan that was prepared in response to the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). This plan includes a schedule for the initial reporting of the leak test results from the various tanks that will be tested. The FFA distinguishes four categories of tank and pipeline systems: new systems (Category A), doubly contained systems (Category B), singly contained systems (Category C), and inactive systems (Category D). The FFA specifically requires leak testing of the Category C systems; there are 14 such tanks addressed in this plan, plus one tank (W-12) that has been temporarily returned to service based on EPA and TDEC concurrence. A schedule for testing these tanks is also included. The plan and schedule also addresses an additional 15 Category B tanks have been demonstrated to meet secondary containment requirements. While these 15 tanks are addressed in this plan for the sake of completeness, they have been removed from the leak testing program based on the design demonstrations that show secondary containment. It is noted that the general plan included 42 tanks. Since that report was issued, 26 of those tanks have passed secondary containment design demonstrations and subsequently have been removed from this leak testing plan. In addition, one tank (LA-104) has been removed from service. Accordingly, this document addresses 15 of the LLLW tanks in the system; plans for testing the pipelines will be described in a separate document

  2. Detailed leak detection test plan and schedule for Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste active tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a plan and schedule for leak testing a portion of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. It is a concise version of a more general leak testing plan that was prepared in response to the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). This plan includes a schedule for the initial reporting of the leak test results from the various tanks that will be tested. The FFA distinguishes four categories of tank and pipeline systems: new systems (Category A), doubly contained systems (Category B), singly contained systems (Category C), and inactive systems (Category D). The FFA specifically requires leak testing of the Category C systems; there are 14 such tanks addressed in this plan, plus one tank (W-12) that has been temporarily returned to service based on EPA and TDEC concurrence. A schedule for testing these tanks is also included. The plan and schedule also addresses an additional 15 Category B tanks have been demonstrated to meet secondary containment requirements. While these 15 tanks are addressed in this plan for the sake of completeness, they have been removed from the leak testing program based on the design demonstrations that show secondary containment. It is noted that the general plan included 42 tanks. Since that report was issued, 26 of those tanks have passed secondary containment design demonstrations and subsequently have been removed from this leak testing plan. In addition, one tank (LA-104) has been removed from service. Accordingly, this document addresses 15 of the LLLW tanks in the system; plans for testing the pipelines will be described in a separate document.

  3. Comprehensive evaluation of contemporary assisted reproduction technology laboratory operations to determine staffing levels that promote patient safety and quality care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikani, Mina; Go, Kathryn J; McCaffrey, Caroline; McCulloh, David H

    2014-11-01

    To consider how staffing requirements have changed with evolving and increasingly more complex assisted reproduction technology (ART) laboratory practice. Analysis by four laboratory directors from three different ART programs of the level of complexity and time requirements for contemporary ART laboratory activities to determine adequate staffing levels. University-based and private ART programs. None. None. Human resource requirements for ART procedures. Both complexity and time required for completion of a contemporary ART cycle have increased significantly compared with the same requirements for the "traditional cycle" of the past. The latter required roughly 9 personnel hours, but a contemporary cycle can require up to 20 hours for completion. Consistent with this increase, a quantitative analysis shows that the number of embryologists required for safe and efficient operation of the ART laboratory has also increased. This number depends on not only the volume but also the types of procedures performed: the higher the number of complex procedures, the more personnel required. An interactive Personnel Calculator is introduced that can help determine staffing needs. The increased complexity of the contemporary ART laboratory requires a new look at the allocation of human resources. Our work provides laboratory directors with a practical, individualized tool to determine their staffing requirements with a view to increasing the safety and efficiency of operations. The work could serve as the basis for revision of the 2008 American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) staffing guidelines. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Achievements and experience in Laboratory for Low Level Measurements, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Croatia, during the IAEA QA/QC program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obelic, B.; Horvatincic, N.; Krajcar Bronic, I.

    2002-01-01

    In this summary we explain our motivation for joining the IAEA Program on Quality Assurance and Quality Control in Nuclear Analytical Techniques, the situation in the Laboratory before joining the program, and achievements during this 2-year program. We also describe our experience and difficulties with implementation of the quality system in the Laboratory, as well as with the quality system at the Rudjer Boskovic Institute. Finally, we present our plans for the future

  5. Contamination Levels and Identification of Bacteria in Milk Sampled from Three Regions of Tanzania: Evidence from Literature and Laboratory Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Msalya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Milk in Tanzania has been reported to be contaminated with large number of bacteria. This is because (1 milk is obtained from animals with unknown health status, (2 good milking and handling practices are to a large extent not observed, and (3 marketing and distribution are done in informal channels. These factors are potential causes of milk-borne diseases and milk quality loss. The aim of this study was to assess nutritional risks in milk as reported in literature over a period of 20 years and through analyses of samples collected during the present study. The issues highlighted in literature were high bacteria and coliform counts exceeding standard levels in East Africa, prevalence of bacteria and drug residues in milk, and adulteration. Based on performed analyses, total bacterial count 1.0×107 colony forming units per millilitre (cfu/ml and total coliform count 1.1×107 cfu/ml, also greater than recommended levels, were found. Ten bacteria types were isolated from milk samples (five, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, Listeria ivanovii, and Klebsiella spp. are reported in Tanzanian for the first time. Two drugs tetracycline and sulphur were detected. Therefore, it is worth noting that integrated research is needed to evaluate the situation and address these challenges.

  6. Comparison of species-level identification and antifungal susceptibility results from diagnostic and reference laboratories for bloodstream Candida surveillance isolates, South Africa, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naicker, Serisha D; Govender, Nevashan; Patel, Jaymati; Zietsman, Inge L; Wadula, Jeannette; Coovadia, Yacoob; Kularatne, Ranmini; Seetharam, Sharona; Govender, Nelesh P

    2016-11-01

    From February 2009 through August 2010, we compared species-level identification of bloodstream Candida isolates and susceptibility to fluconazole, voriconazole, and caspofungin between diagnostic and reference South African laboratories during national surveillance for candidemia. Diagnostic laboratories identified isolates to genus/species level and performed antifungal susceptibility testing, as indicated. At a reference laboratory, viable Candida isolates were identified to species-level using automated systems, biochemical tests, or DNA sequencing; broth dilution susceptibility testing was performed. Categorical agreement (CA) was calculated for susceptibility results of isolates with concordant species identification. Overall, 2172 incident cases were detected, 773 (36%) by surveillance audit. The Vitek 2 YST system (bioMérieux Inc, Marcy l'Etoile, France) was used for identification (360/863, 42%) and susceptibility testing (198/473, 42%) of a large proportion of isolates. For the five most common species (n = 1181), species-level identification was identical in the majority of cases (Candida albicans: 98% (507/517); Candida parapsilosis: 92% (450/488); Candida glabrata: 89% (89/100); Candida tropicalis: 91% (49/54), and Candida krusei: 86% (19/22)). However, diagnostic laboratories were significantly less likely to correctly identify Candida species other than C. albicans versus C. albicans (607/664, 91% vs. 507/517, 98%; P Diagnostic laboratories significantly under-reported fluconazole resistance in C. parapsilosis (225/393, 57% vs. 239/393, 61%; P Diagnostic laboratories were less likely to correctly identify Candida species other than C. albicans, under-reported fluconazole resistance for C. parapsilosis and over-reported fluconazole resistance for C. albicans. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A Western Blot-based Investigation of the Yeast Secretory Pathway Designed for an Intermediate-Level Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-DeGrenier, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in…

  8. Determination of the Acid Dissociation Constant of a Phenolic Acid by High Performance Liquid Chromatography: An Experiment for the Upper Level Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboh, Ghada

    2018-01-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiment for the upper level analytical chemistry laboratory is described. The students consider the effect of mobile-phase composition and pH on the retention times of ionizable compounds in order to determine the acid dissociation constant, K[subscript a], of a phenolic acid. Results are analyzed…

  9. High-level rapid production of full-size monoclonal antibodies in plants by a single-vector DNA replicon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhong; Phoolcharoen, Waranyoo; Lai, Huafang; Piensook, Khanrat; Cardineau, Guy; Zeitlin, Larry; Whaley, Kevin J.; Arntzen, Charles J.

    2010-01-01

    Plant viral vectors have great potential in rapid production of important pharmaceutical proteins. However, high-yield production of heterooligomeric proteins that require the expression and assembly of two or more protein subunits often suffers problems due to the “competing” nature of viral vectors derived from the same virus. Previously we reported that a bean yellow dwarf virus (BeYDV)-derived, three-component DNA replicon system allows rapid production of single recombinant proteins in plants (Huang et al. 2009). In this article, we report further development of this expression system for its application in high-yield production of oligomeric protein complexes including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in plants. We showed that the BeYDV replicon system permits simultaneous efficient replication of two DNA replicons and thus, high-level accumulation of two recombinant proteins in the same plant cell. We also demonstrated that a single vector that contains multiple replicon cassettes was as efficient as the three-component system in driving the expression of two distinct proteins. Using either the non-competing, three-vector system or the multi-replicon single vector, we produced both the heavy and light chain subunits of a protective IgG mAb 6D8 against Ebola virus GP1 (Wilson et al. 2000) at 0.5 mg of mAb per gram leaf fresh weight within 4 days post infiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. We further demonstrated that full-size tetrameric IgG complex containing two heavy and two light chains was efficiently assembled and readily purified, and retained its functionality in specific binding to inactivated Ebola virus. Thus, our single-vector replicon system provides high-yield production capacity for heterooligomeric proteins, yet eliminates the difficult task of identifying non-competing virus and the need for co-infection of multiple expression modules. The multi-replicon vector represents a significant advance in transient expression technology for

  10. Technical report on levels of electromagnetic fields created by Linky meters. Part 1: laboratory measurements; Part 2: laboratory additional measurements; Part 3: field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-05-01

    The first part of this study reports measurements of electromagnetic radiations induced by remote-metering reading devices present in new power meters and using the Power-Line Communication (PLC or, in French, CPL) technology, such as the Linky meter. After a recall of legislation regarding exposure to electromagnetic waves, this first part present the two tested meters (Linky of first and third generation, G1 and G3), the performed tests, measurements devices and method. It more precisely reports investigations performed on these both meters, and a comparison with other home appliances. The second part reports additional measurements performed with both meters according to the same methodology, but with the use of a new electric field probe which allows more precise measurements. Maximum electric and magnetic fields have been measured. The third part reports field measurements performed with the same methodology but in dwellings equipped with Linky meters of first generation (G1). Exposure levels have been measured at the vicinity of meters and in other parts of the dwelling

  11. Ab Initio Determinations of Photoelectron Spectra Including Vibronic Features: An Upper-Level Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Richard L.; Davis, Lisa; Millam, Evan L.; Brown, Eric; Offerman, Chad; Wray, Paul; Green, Susan M. E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a first-principles determination of the photoelectron spectra of water and hypochlorous acid as a laboratory exercise accessible to students in an undergraduate physical chemistry course. This paper demonstrates the robustness and user-friendliness of software developed for the Franck-Condon factor calculation. While the calculator is…

  12. Quality Assurance in Nuclear Fuel Research at the Laboratory of High- and Medium-level Activity at SCK-CEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannen, L.; Gys, A.; Verwerft, M.

    1999-10-01

    Quality assurance in nuclear fuel research demands specific calibration and validation methodologies. Indeed the analytical experiments in hot-cells on highly radioactive objects are non-standard and many times unique. The standards and validation methods developed for and applied to the main nuclear fuel research experiments in the hot laboratories of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are outlined

  13. Quality Assurance in Nuclear Fuel Research at the Laboratory of High- and Medium-level Activity at SCK-CEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sannen, L.; Gys, A.; Verwerft, M

    1999-10-01

    Quality assurance in nuclear fuel research demands specific calibration and validation methodologies. Indeed the analytical experiments in hot-cells on highly radioactive objects are non-standard and many times unique. The standards and validation methods developed for and applied to the main nuclear fuel research experiments in the hot laboratories of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are outlined.

  14. Development of a Semester-Long, Inquiry-Based Laboratory Course in Upper-Level Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pushpalatha P. N.; Thompson, Martin; Hungwe, Kedmon

    2014-01-01

    A semester-long laboratory course was designed and implemented to familiarize students with modern biochemistry and molecular biology techniques. The designed format involved active student participation, evaluation of data, and critical thinking, and guided students to become independent researchers. The first part of the course focused on…

  15. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

  16. Full Spectrum Operations - The Continuation of Major Combat Operations by Other Means: Making the Transition to Stability and Reconstruction Operations at the Division Level

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hilmes, Andrew C

    2007-01-01

    .... Army division to successfully transition from MCO to SRO. The thesis investigates the experiences of three higher echelon headquarters, operating at the tactical level of war, required to make the transition...

  17. KURT, a small-scale underground research laboratory for the research on a high-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Won-Jin; Kwon, Sangki; Park, Jung-Hwa

    2008-01-01

    To obtain information on an underground environment and to investigate the behavior of repository barriers in an underground environment, a small-scale underground research laboratory named KURT was constructed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Geological survey including a seismic refraction survey, an electronic resistivity survey, and a borehole drilling as well as in situ and laboratory tests were carried out. Using the geological survey results, the design of KURT and an analysis of its mechanical stability to confirm the validity of the design were performed. The construction of KURT was started in May 2005 and it was successfully completed in July 2006. Also, the operation of KURT was started in November 2006. The research programs in KURT are introduced here

  18. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns

  19. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

  20. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 1, Waste streams and treatment technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

  1. Full institutionalisation of regionalism in Denmark:From national governed over multi-level governed to regional-based governed regional policy

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Peter Wilgaard; Galland, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    As an ism referring to “political movements which demand greater control over the affairs of the regional territory by the people residing in that territory” (Keating, 1997:5), regionalism has influenced policy makers on EU, national, and regional levels to denote regions the intrinsic role as crucibles of economic development and prime focus of economic policy (Salone, 2010: 1213; Webb & Collis, 2000:857). This endogenous growth-inspired connotation of regionalism as an [superior] answer...

  2. University-level Non-proliferation and Safeguards Education and Human Capital Development Activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachner K. M.; Pepper, S.; Gomera, J.; Einwechter, M.; Toler, L. T.

    2016-07-24

    BNL has offered Nuclear Nonproliferation, Safeguards and Security in the 21st Century,? referred to as NNSS, every year since 2009 for graduate students in technical and policy fields related to nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. The course focuses on relevant policy issues, in addition to technical components, and is part of a larger NGSI short course initiative that includes separate courses that are delivered at three other national laboratories and NNSA headquarters. [SCHOLZ and ROSENTHAL] The course includes lectures from esteemed nonproliferation experts, tours of various BNL facilities and laboratories, and in-field and table-top exercises on both technical and policy subjects. Topics include the history of the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and other relevant treaties, the history of and advances in international nuclear safeguards, current relevant political situations in countries such as Iran, Iraq, and the Democratic Peoples? Republic of Korea (DPRK), nuclear science and technology, instrumentation and techniques used for verification activities, and associated research and development. The students conduct a mock Design Information Verification (DIV) at BNL?s decommissioned Medical Research Reactor. The capstone of the course includes a series of student presentations in which students act as policy advisors and provide recommendations in response to scenarios involving a current nonproliferation related event that are prepared by the course organizers. ?The course is open to domestic and foreign students, and caters to students in, entering, or recently having completed graduate school. Interested students must complete an application and provide a resume and a statement describing their interest in the course. Eighteen to 22 students attend annually; 165 students have completed the course to date. A stipend helps to defray students? travel and subsistence expenses. In 2015, the course was shortened from three weeks to

  3. Umbilical cord blood levels of maternal antibodies reactive with p200 and full-length Ro 52 in the assessment of risk for cardiac manifestations of neonatal lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Joanne H; Clancy, Robert M; Lee, Kristen H; Saxena, Amit; Izmirly, Peter M; Buyon, Jill P

    2012-09-01

    Maternal anti-Ro autoantibodies are associated with cardiac manifestations of neonatal lupus (cardiac NL), yet only 2% of women with this reactivity have an affected child. Identification of a more specific marker would channel intense monitoring to fetuses at greater risk. This study aimed to determine whether autoantibodies against Ro 52 amino acids 200-239 (p200) confer added risk over autoantibodies to full-length Ro 52, Ro 60, or La. Anti-Ro-exposed pregnancies resulting in cardiac NL or no cardiac manifestations were identified from the Research Registry for Neonatal Lupus and the PR Interval and Dexamethasone Evaluation study. Umbilical cord (n = 123) and maternal (n = 115) samples were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The frequencies of p200, Ro 52, Ro 60, and La autoantibodies were not significantly different between affected and unaffected children. However, neonatal anti-Ro 52 and Ro 60 titers were highest in cardiac NL and their unaffected siblings compared to unaffected neonates without a cardiac NL sibling. Although both maternal anti-Ro 52 and p200 autoantibodies were less than 50% specific for cardiac NL, anti-p200 was the least likely of the Ro autoantibodies to be false-positive in mothers who have never had an affected child. Titers of anti-Ro 52 and p200 did not differ during a cardiac NL or unaffected pregnancy from the same mother. Maternal reactivity to p200 does not confer an added risk to fetal conduction defects over full-length Ro 52 or Ro 60 autoantibodies. Mothers who may never be at risk for having an affected child have lower anti-Ro 60 titers and may require less stringent echocardiographic monitoring compared to women with high-titer autoantibodies. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Adolescent Women Induce Lower Blood Alcohol Levels Than Men in a Laboratory Alcohol Self-Administration Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jünger, Elisabeth; Gan, Gabriela; Mick, Inge; Seipt, Christian; Markovic, Alexandra; Sommer, Christian; Plawecki, Martin H; O'Connor, Sean; Smolka, Michael N; Zimmermann, Ulrich S

    2016-08-01

    Adolescence is a critical period for the development of alcohol use disorders; drinking habits are rather unstable and genetic influences, such as male sex and a positive family history of alcoholism (FH), are often masked by environmental factors such as peer pressure. We investigated how sex and FH modulate alcohol use in a sample of 18- to 19-year-olds from the Dresden Longitudinal Study on Alcohol use in Young Adults. Adolescents reported their real-life drinking in a TimeLine Follow-Back interview. They subsequently completed a training and an experimental session of free-access intravenous alcohol self-administration (i.v. ASA) using the computer-assisted alcohol infusion system to control for environmental cues as well as for biological differences in alcohol pharmacokinetics. During i.v. ASA, we assessed subjective alcohol effects at 8 time points. Women reported significantly less real-life drinking than men and achieved significantly lower mean arterial blood alcohol concentrations (aBACs) in the laboratory. At the same time, women reported greater sedation relative to men and rated negative effects as high as did men. A positive FH was associated with lower real-life drinking in men but not in women. In the laboratory, FH was not linked to i.v. ASA. Greater real-life drinking was significantly positively associated with higher mean aBACs in the laboratory, and all i.v. ASA indices were highly correlated across the 2 sessions. We conclude that adolescent women chose lower aBACs because they experienced adverse alcohol effects, namely sedation and negative effects, at lower aBACs than men. A positive FH was not apparent as risk factor for drinking in our young sample. The i.v. ASA method demonstrated good external validity as well as test-retest reliability, the latter indicating that a separate training session is not required when employing the i.v. ASA paradigm. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  5. Low-level waste drum staging building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Environmental Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The proposed action is to place a 3 meter (m) by 4.5 m (10 ft x 15 ft) prefabricated storage building (transportainer) adjacent to the existing Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) at Technical Area (TA-) 16, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and to use the building as a staging site for sealed 55 galllon drums of noncompactible waste contaminated with low levels of tritium (LLW). Up to eight drums of waste would be accumulated before the waste is moved by LANL Waste Management personnel to the existing on-site LLW disposal area at TA-54. The drum staging building would be placed on a bermed asphalt pad, near other existing accumulation structures for office trash and compactible LLW. The no-action alternative is to continue storing drums of LLW in the WETF laboratories where they occupy valuable work space, hamper movement of personnel and equipment, and require waste management personnel to enter those laboratories in order to remove filled drums. No new waste would be generated by implementing the proposed action; no changes or increases in WETF operations or waste production rate are anticipated as a result of staging drums of LLW outside the main laboratory building. The site for the LLW drum staging building would not impact any sensitive areas. Tritium emissions from the drums of LLW were included within the source term for normal operations at the WETF; the cumulative impacts would not be increased

  6. Environmental restoration and management of low-level radioactive and mixed waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendrick, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    Management of radioactive waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) must address several major challenges. First, contaminants from some disposed wastes are leaching into the groundwater and these disposal sites must be remediated. Second, some of these ''legacy'' wastes, as well as currently generated radioactive wastes, are also contaminated with chemicals, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), solvents, and metals (i.e., mixed waste). Third, wastes containing long-lived radionuclides in concentrations above established limits have been determined unsuited for disposal on the Oak Ridge Reservation. Reflecting these challenges, ORNL's strategy for managing its radioactive wastes continues to evolve with the development of improved technologies and site-specific adaptation of some standard technologies

  7. Full-Scale Testing Technology Maturation Of A Thin Film Evaporator For High-Level Liquid Waste Management At Hanford - 12125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedeschi, A.R.; Corbett, J.E.; Wilson, R.A.; Larkin, J.

    2012-01-01

    Simulant testing of a full-scale thin-film evaporator system was conducted in 2011 for technology development at the Hanford tank farms. Test results met objectives of water removal rate, effluent quality, and operational evaluation. Dilute tank waste simulant, representing a typical double-shell tank supernatant liquid layer, was concentrated from a 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.5 using a 4.6 m 2 (50 ft 2 ) heated transfer area Rototherm(reg s ign) evaporator from Artisan Industries. The condensed evaporator vapor stream was collected and sampled validating efficient separation of the water. An overall decontamination factor of 1.2E+06 was achieved demonstrating excellent retention of key radioactive species within the concentrated liquid stream. The evaporator system was supported by a modular steam supply, chiller, and control computer systems which would be typically implemented at the tank farms. Operation of these support systems demonstrated successful integration while identifying areas for efficiency improvement. Overall testing effort increased the maturation of this technology to support final deployment design and continued project implementation.

  8. Effect of the electrostatic surface potential on the oligomerization of full-length human recombinant prion protein at single-molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bin; Xu, Bingqian, E-mail: bxu@engr.uga.edu [Single Molecule Study Laboratory, College of Engineering and Nanoscale Science, and Engineering Center, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30605 (United States); Lou, Zhichao [Single Molecule Study Laboratory, College of Engineering and Nanoscale Science, and Engineering Center, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30605 (United States); College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Zhang, Haiqian [College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2016-03-21

    The electrostatic surface potential (ESP) of prion oligomers has critical influences on the aggregating processes of the prion molecules. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) and structural simulation were combined to investigate the molecular basis of the full-length human recombinant prion oligomerization on mica surfaces. The high resolution non-intrusive AFM images showed that the prion oligomers formed different patterns on mica surfaces at different buffer pH values. The basic binding units for the large oligomers were determined to be prion momoners (Ms), dimers (Ds), and trimers (Ts). The forming of the D and T units happened through the binding of hydrophobic β-sheets of the M units. In contrast, the α-helices of these M, D, and T units were the binding areas for the formation of large oligomers. At pH 4.5, the binding units M, D, and T showed clear polarized ESP distributions on the surface domains, while at pH 7.0, they showed more evenly distributed ESPs. Based on the conformations of oligomers observed from AFM images, the D and T units were more abundantly on mica surface at pH 4.5 because the ESP re-distribution of M units helped to stabilize these larger oligomers. The amino acid side chains involved in the binding interfaces were stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions. The detailed analysis of the charged side chains at pH 4.5 indicated that the polarized ESPs induced the aggregations among M, D, and T to form larger oligomers. Therefore, the hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions worked together to form the stabilized prion oligomers.

  9. Effect of the electrostatic surface potential on the oligomerization of full-length human recombinant prion protein at single-molecule level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Lou, Zhichao; Zhang, Haiqian; Xu, Bingqian

    2016-03-01

    The electrostatic surface potential (ESP) of prion oligomers has critical influences on the aggregating processes of the prion molecules. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) and structural simulation were combined to investigate the molecular basis of the full-length human recombinant prion oligomerization on mica surfaces. The high resolution non-intrusive AFM images showed that the prion oligomers formed different patterns on mica surfaces at different buffer pH values. The basic binding units for the large oligomers were determined to be prion momoners (Ms), dimers (Ds), and trimers (Ts). The forming of the D and T units happened through the binding of hydrophobic β-sheets of the M units. In contrast, the α-helices of these M, D, and T units were the binding areas for the formation of large oligomers. At pH 4.5, the binding units M, D, and T showed clear polarized ESP distributions on the surface domains, while at pH 7.0, they showed more evenly distributed ESPs. Based on the conformations of oligomers observed from AFM images, the D and T units were more abundantly on mica surface at pH 4.5 because the ESP re-distribution of M units helped to stabilize these larger oligomers. The amino acid side chains involved in the binding interfaces were stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions. The detailed analysis of the charged side chains at pH 4.5 indicated that the polarized ESPs induced the aggregations among M, D, and T to form larger oligomers. Therefore, the hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions worked together to form the stabilized prion oligomers.

  10. Proposal for an Experiment at the National Accelerator Laboratory Nuclear Levels as Analyzers of High Energy Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, B.; Kirk, P.; Marraffino, J.; Mehlhop, W.; Murty, S.; Piccioni, O.; Bowles, P.; Scipione, D.; Sebek, J.; /California U.

    1972-06-06

    We propose to study diffractive phenomena caused by 100 BeV pions, using a new technique, which consists in associating with the high energy interaction, the detection of photons resulting from the de-excitation of nuclear levels. Knowledge of the quantum numbers both for the ground state and the nuclear levels of the nuclei used, adds information as to the type of interaction. In particular, the use of the 4.4 MeV level of Carbon guarantees that the exchange quantum has isotopic spin 0. In addition, evidence resulting from our tests at Berkeley seems to further encourage the notion that this level selects to a good extent phenomena of the diffractive type. We ask for 150 hours of running on a 100 BeV/c pion beam.

  11. In-situ active/passive bioreclamation of vadose zone soils contaminated with gasoline and waste oil using soil vapor extraction/bioventing: Laboratory pilot study to full scale site operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachary, S.P.; Everett, L.G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of soil venting to supply oxygen and remove metabolites from the biodegradation of light hydrocarbons is a cost effective in-situ remediation approach. To date, little data exists on the effective in-situ bioreclamation of vadose zone soil contaminated with waste/hydraulic oil without excavation or the addition of water or nutrients to degrade the heavy petroleum contaminants. Gasoline and waste/hydraulic oil contaminated soils below an active commercial building required an in-situ non-disruptive remediation approach. Initial soil vapor samples collected from the vadose zone revealed CO 2 concentrations in excess of 16% and O 2 concentrations of less than 1% by volume. Soil samples were collected from below the building within the contaminated vadose zone for laboratory chemical and physical analysis as well as to conduct a laboratory biotreatability study. The laboratory biotreatability study was conducted for 30 days to simulate vadose zone bioventing conditions using soil taken from the contaminated vadose zone. Results of the biotreatability study revealed that the waste oil concentrations had been reduced from 960 mg/Kg to non-detectable concentrations within 30 days and the volatile hydrocarbon content had decreased exponentially to less than 0.1% of the original concentration. Post treatability study biological enumeration revealed an increase in the microbial population of two orders of magnitude

  12. Environmental regulation of plant gene expression: an RT-qPCR laboratory project for an upper-level undergraduate biochemistry or molecular biology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickelberg, Garrett J; Fisher, Alison J

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel laboratory project employing "real-time" RT-qPCR to measure the effect of environment on the expression of the FLOWERING LOCUS C gene, a key regulator of floral timing in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. The project requires four 3-hr laboratory sessions and is aimed at upper-level undergraduate students in biochemistry or molecular biology courses. The project provides students with hands-on experience with RT-qPCR, the current "gold standard" for gene expression analysis, including detailed data analysis using the common 2-ΔΔCT method. Moreover, it provides a convenient starting point for many inquiry-driven projects addressing diverse questions concerning ecological biochemistry, naturally occurring genetic variation, developmental biology, and the regulation of gene expression in nature. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Feasibility of disposal of high-level radioactive waste into the seabed. volume 7: Review of laboratory investigations of radionuclide migration through deep-sea sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brush, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    One of the options suggested for disposal of high-level radioactive waste resulting from the generation of nuclear power is burial beneath the deep ocean floor in geologically stable sediment formations which have no economic value. The 8-volume series provides an assessment of the technical feasibility and radiological safety of this disposal concept based on the results obtained by ten years of co-operation and information exchange among the Member countries participating in the NEA Seabed Working Group. This volume contains a review of the laboratory investigations of radionuclide migration through deep-sea sediments. In addition, it discusses the data selected for the radiological assessment, on the basis of both field and laboratory studies

  14. Multi-method characterization of low-level radioactive waste at two Sandia National Laboratories environmental restoration sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E. Jr.; Galloway, R.B.; Dotson, P.W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of multiple characterization methods to radioactive wastes generated by the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Environmental Restoration (ER) Project during the excavation of buried materials at the Classified Waste Landfill (CWLF) and the Radioactive Waste Landfill (RWL). These waste streams include nuclear weapon components and other refuse that are surface contaminated or contain sealed radioactive sources with unknown radioactivity content. Characterization of radioactive constituents in RWL and CWLF waste has been problematic, due primarily to the lack of documented characterization data prior to burial. A second difficulty derives from the limited information that ER project personnel have about weapons component design and testing that was conducted in the early days of the Cold War. To reduce the uncertainties and achieve the best possible waste characterization, the ER Project has applied both project-specific and industry-standard characterization methods that, in combination, serve to define the types and quantities of radionuclide constituents in the waste. The resulting characterization data have been used to develop waste profiles for meeting disposal site waste acceptance criteria

  15. Measuring the level of agreement between a veterinary and a human point-of-care glucometer and a laboratory blood analyzer in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acierno, Mark J; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas N

    2012-12-01

    Although abnormalities in blood glucose concentrations in avian species are not as common as they are in mammals, the inability to provide point-of-care glucose measurement likely results in underreporting and missed treatment opportunities. A veterinary glucometer that uses different optimization codes for specific groups of animals has been produced. To obtain data for a psittacine bird-specific optimization code, as well as to calculate agreement between the veterinary glucometer, a standard human glucometer, and a laboratory analyzer, blood samples were obtained from 25 Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) in a 2-phase study. In the initial phase, blood samples were obtained from 20 parrots twice at a 2-week interval. For each sample, the packed cell volume was determined, and the blood glucose concentration was measured by the veterinary glucometer. The rest of each sample was placed into a lithium heparin microtainer tube and centrifuged, and plasma was removed and frozen at -30 degrees C. Within 5 days, tubes were thawed, and blood glucose concentrations were measured with a laboratory analyzer. The data from both procedures were used to develop a psittacine bird-specific code. For the second phase of the study, the same procedure was repeated twice at a 2-week interval in 25 birds to determine agreement between the veterinary glucometer, a standard human glucometer, and a laboratory analyzer. Neither glucometer was in good agreement with the laboratory analyzer (veterinary glucometer bias, 9.0; level of agreement, -38.1 to 56.2; standard glucometer bias, 69.4; level of agreement -17.8 to 156.7). Based on these results, the use of handheld glucometers in the diagnostic testing of Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and other psittacine birds cannot be recommended.

  16. Beetroot Juice Improves On-Water 500 M Time-Trial Performance, and Laboratory-Based Paddling Economy in National and International-Level Kayak Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeling, Peter; Cox, Gregory R; Bullock, Nicola; Burke, Louise M

    2015-06-01

    We assessed the ingestion of a beetroot juice supplement (BR) on 4-min laboratory-based kayak performance in national level male (n = 6) athletes (Study A), and on 500 m on-water kayak time-trial (TT) performance in international level female (n = 5) athletes (Study B). In Study A, participants completed three laboratory-based sessions on a kayak ergometer, including a 7 × 4 min step test, and two 4 min maximal effort performance trials. Two and a half hours before the warm-up of each 4 min performance trial, athletes received either a 70 ml BR shot containing ~4.8 mmol of nitrate, or a placebo equivalent (BRPLA). The distance covered over the 4 min TT was not different between conditions; however, the average VO2 over the 4 min period was significantly lower in BR (p = .04), resulting in an improved exercise economy (p = .05). In Study B, participants completed two field-based 500 m TTs, separated by 4 days. Two hours before each trial, athletes received either two 70 ml BR shots containing ~9.6 mmol of nitrate, or a placebo equivalent (BRPLA). BR supplementation significantly enhanced TT performance by 1.7% (p = .01). Our results show that in national-level male kayak athletes, commercially available BR shots (70 ml) containing ~4.8 mmol of nitrate improved exercise economy during laboratory-based tasks predominantly reliant on the aerobic energy system. Furthermore, greater volumes of BR (140 ml; ~9.6 mmol nitrate) provided to international-level female kayak athletes resulted in enhancements to TT performance in the field.

  17. Product Evaluation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory offers the services of highly trained and experienced specialists that have a full complement of measuring equipment. It is equipped with two optical...

  18. Salivary cortisol levels, subjective stress, and tinnitus intensity in tinnitus sufferers during noise exposure in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Sylvie; Lupien, Sonia J

    2009-01-01

    Tinnitus, a chronic internal noise, is thought to increase in intensity during or following external noise exposure. Yet there is no empirical evidence for this complaint in the extant literature. Recently, cortisol has been advanced as a useful tool for studying the physiological effects of noise on stress, but few, if any, studies have examined the short-term effects of noise on cortisol levels in tinnitus sufferers. This study assesses the effects of noise exposure on cortisol levels and subjective stress in tinnitus participants and controls without tinnitus. Twenty tinnitus participants and 20 controls without tinnitus were exposed to a 20-min broadband noise with amplified low frequencies. Saliva samplings for cortisol analysis and subjective stress and tinnitus intensity ratings (for tinnitus participants) were performed at regular intervals throughout testing. Results show higher cortisol levels for both groups immediately before, immediately after, and 10min after the end of noise than at other time points. The tinnitus group had lower overall cortisol levels than controls. In contrast, subjective stress ratings were higher for the tinnitus group, and higher at midpoint and immediately after the noise ended. Tinnitus subjective intensity increased throughout testing, especially for the group with high tinnitus-related distress. Overall results show that noise exposure influences cortisol response, subjective stress, and tinnitus intensity.

  19. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  20. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics LaboratoryThe Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose of...

  1. [Identification of mycobacteria to the species level by molecular methods in the Public Health Laboratory of Bogotá, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Toloza, Johana Esther; Rincón-Serrano, María de Pilar; Celis-Bustos, Yamile Adriana; Aguillón, Claudia Inés

    2016-01-01

    Global epidemiology of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is unknown due to the fact that notification is not required in many countries, however the number of infection reports and outbreaks caused by NTM suggest a significant increase in the last years. Traditionally, mycobacteria identification is made through biochemical profiles which allow to differentiate M. tuberculosis from NTM, and in some cases the mycobacteria species. Nevertheless, these methods are technically cumbersome and time consuming. On the other hand, the introduction of methods based on molecular biology has improved the laboratory diagnosis of NTM. To establish the NTM frequency in positive cultures for acid-fast bacilli (AAFB) which were sent to Laboratorio de Salud Pública de Bogotá over a 12 month period. A total of 100 positive cultures for acid-fast bacilli from public and private hospitals from Bogotá were identified by both biochemical methods and the molecular methods PRA (PCR-restriction enzyme analysis) and multiplex-PCR. Furthermore, low prevalence mycobacteria species and non-interpretable results were confirmed by 16SrDNA sequentiation analysis. Identification using the PRA method showed NMT occurrence in 11% of cultures. In addition, this molecular methodology allowed to detect the occurrence of more than one mycobacteria in 4% of the cultures. Interestingly, a new M. kubicae pattern of PCR-restriction analysis is reported in our study. Using a mycobacteria identification algorithm, which includes the molecular method PRA, improves the diagnostic power of conventional methods and could help to advance both NTM epidemiology knowledge and mycobacteriosis control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  2. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-level Waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-06-30

    The DOE proposes to construct, operate, and decontaminate/decommission a TRU Waste Treatment Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The four waste types that would be treated at the proposed facility would be remote-handled TRU mixed waste sludge, liquid low-level waste associated with the sludge, contact-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids, and remote-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids. The mixed waste sludge and some of the solid waste contain metals regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and may be classified as mixed waste. This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with five alternatives--No Action, the Low-Temperature Drying Alternative (Preferred Alternative), the Vitrification Alternative, the Cementation Alternative, and the Treatment and Waste Storage at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Alternative.

  3. Laboratory studies on leaching of low grade uranium ores and treatment of low level liquid waste generated by leaching experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palabrica, O.T.; Antonino, E.J.; Caluag, L.A.; Villamater, D.

    1980-07-01

    Acid leaching experiments of preconcentrated uranium ore were carried out at a pulp density of 50% solids, using sulfuric acid with sodium chlorate as oxidant. The different leaching parameters considered in this work were temperature, oxidant level and leaching time. In the experimental procedure, the concentration of oxidant and the temperature were varied to determine how they affect the leaching process. Experimental results are illustrated in tabulated form for better interpretation. Uranium analyses were done by fluorimetric and delayed-neutron activation analysis. An anion exchange method using Dowex 1 x 8, 200-400 mesh (Cl - ) was used in treating the low-level liquid waste generated by leaching experiments. The purpose of this treatment was to minimize radioactive contamination in the waste materials and also to recover some of the uranium left in the liquid waste. (author)

  4. Modeling Photovoltaic Module-Level Power Electronics in the System Advisor Model; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-07-01

    Module-level power electronics, such as DC power optimizers, microinverters, and those found in AC modules, are increasing in popularity in smaller-scale photovoltaic (PV) systems as their prices continue to decline. Therefore, it is important to provide PV modelers with guidelines about how to model these distributed power electronics appropriately in PV modeling software. This paper extends the work completed at NREL that provided recommendations to model the performance of distributed power electronics in NREL’s popular PVWatts calculator [1], to provide similar guidelines for modeling these technologies in NREL's more complex System Advisor Model (SAM). Module-level power electronics - such as DC power optimizers, microinverters, and those found in AC modules-- are increasing in popularity in smaller-scale photovoltaic (PV) systems as their prices continue to decline. Therefore, it is important to provide PV modelers with guidelines about how to model these distributed power electronics appropriately in PV modeling software.

  5. Screening level model for ecological risk assessment at EF-Site Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alldredge, A.W.; Kirchner, T.B.; McLendon, T.

    1995-12-01

    In response to a paucity of data on the chemical toxicity of uranium to plants, a factorial experiment employing five uranium concentrations (0, 50, 500, 5000, 25000 ppm) and three moisture regimes (low, medium, high) was performed using three native grasses. Buchloe dactyloides (buffalograss-mid/late seral), Schizachyrium scoparium (little bluestem-late seral), and Aristida longiseta (purple threeawn-early/mid seral) were grown in monocultures and every mixture of two species under all combinations of uranium and moisture levels. This design allows for the analysis of uranium effects, as well as possible compound effects due to moisture stress. Several measures of plant health and viability were made, including: percent emergence, survivability of seedlings and mature plants, root and shoot biomass, and the number and mass of inflorescences. No significant differences between uranium levels were observed in terms of emergence and seedling survival. Effects are evident for plant biomass, fecundity, and long-term survivability

  6. Screening level model for ecological risk assessment at EF-Site Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alldredge, A.W.; Kirchner, T.B.; McLendon, T. [and others

    1995-12-01

    In response to a paucity of data on the chemical toxicity of uranium to plants, a factorial experiment employing five uranium concentrations (0, 50, 500, 5000, 25000 ppm) and three moisture regimes (low, medium, high) was performed using three native grasses. Buchloe dactyloides (buffalograss-mid/late seral), Schizachyrium scoparium (little bluestem-late seral), and Aristida longiseta (purple threeawn-early/mid seral) were grown in monocultures and every mixture of two species under all combinations of uranium and moisture levels. This design allows for the analysis of uranium effects, as well as possible compound effects due to moisture stress. Several measures of plant health and viability were made, including: percent emergence, survivability of seedlings and mature plants, root and shoot biomass, and the number and mass of inflorescences. No significant differences between uranium levels were observed in terms of emergence and seedling survival. Effects are evident for plant biomass, fecundity, and long-term survivability.

  7. Electro-Deposition Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The electro-deposition laboratory can electro-deposit various coatings onto small test samples and bench level prototypes. This facility provides the foundation for...

  8. Development and Testing of a Laboratory Spray Table Methodology to Bioassay Simulated Levels of Aerial Spray Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    applied glyphosate at deposition levels ranging from 1/3 to 1/100 of labeled rate at droplet sizes of 100 µm in a spray table environment. These drift...plant location under the nozzle. Ten replications were conducted at each targeted rate applying glyphosate to container grown-plant samples. Deposition...limited to, wheat 14, sugarcane 15, alfalfa 16, soybeans 17, maize 18, native plants 19, insects such as bees 20 and butterflies 21, and

  9. Evaluation of uranium removal by Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle from low level nuclear waste under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Bhainsa, K C

    2016-02-01

    The present study evaluated uranium (U) removal ability and tolerance to low level nuclear waste (LLNW) of an aquatic weed Hydrilla verticillata. Plants were screened for growth in 10%-50% waste treatments up to 3 d. Treatments of 20% and 50% waste imposed increasing toxicity with duration assessed in terms of change in fresh weight and in the levels of photosynthetic pigments and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. U concentration, however, did not show a progressive increase and was about 42 μg g(-1) dw from 20% to 50% waste at 3 d. This suggested that a saturation stage was reached with respect to U removal due to increasing toxicity. However, in another experiment with 10% waste and 10% waste+10 ppm U treatments, plants showed an increase in U concentration with the maximum level approaching 426 μg g(-1) dw at 3 d without showing any toxicity as compared to that at 20% and 50% waste treatments. Hence, plants possessed significant potential to take up U and toxicity of LLNW limited their U removal ability. This implies that the use of Hydrilla plants for U removal from LLNW is feasible at low concentrations and would require repeated harvesting at short intervals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Implementation Plan for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document summarizes the progress that has been made to date in implementing the plans and schedules for meeting the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These commitments were initially submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand Dl, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Information presented in this document provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present plans and schedules associated with remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service. ORNL has a comprehensive program underway to upgrade the LLLW system as necessary to meet the FFA requirements. The tank systems that are removed from service are being investigated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Waste and risk characterizations have been submitted. Additional data will be prepared and submitted to EPA/TDEC as tanks are taken out of service and as required by the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. The plans and schedules for implementing the FFA compliance program that were submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand Dl, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste tanks Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, are updated in this document. Chapter 1 provides general background information and philosophies that lead to the plans and schedules that appear in Chaps. 2 through 5

  11. Implementation plan for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Plans and schedules for meeting the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were initially submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand D1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The information presented in the current document summarizes the progress that has been made to date and provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present the plans and schedules associated with the remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service. A comprehensive program is under way at ORNL to upgrade the LLLW system as necessary to meet the FFA requirements. The tank systems that are removed from service are being investigated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Waste and risk characterizations have been submitted. Additional data will be submitted to the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (EPA/TDEC) as tanks are taken out of service and as required by the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. The plans and schedules for implementing the FFA compliance program that were originally submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand D 1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste tanks Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, are updated in the present document. Chapter I provides general background information and philosophies that lead to the plans and schedules that appear in Chaps. 2 through 5

  12. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater level monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Groundwater level monitoring will be conducted at 129 sites within the WAG. All of the sites will be manually monitored on a semiannual basis. Forty-five of the 128 wells, plus one site in White Oak Lake, will also be equipped with automatic water level monitoring equipment. The 46 sites are divided into three groups. One group will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level, conductivity, and temperature. The other two groups will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level only. The equipment will be rotated between the two groups. The data collected from the water level monitoring will be used to support determination of the contaminant flux at WAG 6.

  13. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater level monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Groundwater level monitoring will be conducted at 129 sites within the WAG. All of the sites will be manually monitored on a semiannual basis. Forty-five of the 128 wells, plus one site in White Oak Lake, will also be equipped with automatic water level monitoring equipment. The 46 sites are divided into three groups. One group will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level, conductivity, and temperature. The other two groups will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level only. The equipment will be rotated between the two groups. The data collected from the water level monitoring will be used to support determination of the contaminant flux at WAG 6

  14. Laboratory-scale vitrification and leaching of Hanford high-level waste for the purpose of simulant and glass property models validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, E.V.; Elliott, M.L.; Tingey, J.M.

    1993-02-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being built to process the high-level and TRU waste into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Testing programs have been established within the Project to verify process technology using simulated waste. A parallel testing program with actual radioactive waste is being performed to confirm the validity of using simulates and glass property models for waste form qualification and process testing. The first feed type to be processed by and the first to be tested on a laboratory-scale is pretreated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW). The NCAW is a neutralized high-level waste stream generated from the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel in the Plutonium and Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant at Hanford. As part of the fuel reprocessing, the high-level waste generated in PUREX was denitrated with sugar to form current acid waste (CAW). Sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite were added to the CAW to minimize corrosion in the tanks, thus yielding neutralized CAW. The NCAW contains small amounts of plutonium, fission products from the irradiated fuel, stainless steel corrosion products, and iron and sulfate from the ferrous sulfamate reductant used in the PUREX process. This paper will discuss the results and status of the laboratory-scale radioactive testing

  15. Auditable safety analysis: High Radiation Level Chemical Development Facility (Buildings 4507 and 4556), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platfoot, J.H.

    1998-07-01

    The High-Radiation-Level Chemical Development Facility includes Buildings 4507 and 4556. Building 4507, located immediately to the west of Building 4500N and to the south of Building 4505, is a doubly contained three-level structure constructed in 1957. The most recent use of the facility was for recovery of multi-gram quantities of 244 Cm during the early 1970s and for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuel studies in the late 1970s. It has remained in safe standby since 1980. Building 4556 is a below-grade filter pit located to the southwest of Building 4507 and was constructed in 1972. Ventilation from the cells in Building 4507 is passed through high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration in this building prior to being exhausted to the Building 3039 stack system. This building remains in operation to support ventilation requirements for Building 4507. This Auditable Safety Analysis (ASA) was developed in accordance with the requirements in Energy Systems Program Description FS-103PD, Safety Documentation, Revision 1. This ASA identifies and screens all hazards associated with Buildings 4507 and 4556. The only hazard not screened out and requiring further analysis following the initial screening process is radioactive material in the form of surface contamination. The results of this ASA indicate that the hazards associated with Buildings 4507 and 4556 do not pose a significant threat to workers, the public, or the environment

  16. Diagnostic virology laboratory within a microbiology setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, S J

    1984-01-01

    The virology section at St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Connecticut, is not a separate laboratory division but is a part of the microbiology division and is supervised by the same personnel who supervise bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and serology. Current volume is over 1,000 cultures yearly with 12 to 24 percent positive. Isolates are confirmed and typed by the Connecticut State Health Department Laboratory. Specimen distribution, percentage positive specimens, and distribution of viral isolates are similar to those reported from microbiology laboratories with separate virology laboratories directed by a full-time doctoral-level virologist. Our seven years' experience demonstrates that a microbiology laboratory without a full-time doctoral-level virologist can provide clinically useful virologic information.

  17. Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This document is an annual revision of the plans and schedules for implementing the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) compliance program, originally submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand D1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This document summarizes the progress that has been made to date in implementing the plans and schedules for meeting the FFA commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Information presented in this document provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present plans and schedules associated with remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service. ORNL has a comprehensive program underway to upgrade the LLLW system as necessary to meet the FFA requirements. The tank systems that are removed from service are being investigated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Waste and risk characterizations have been submitted. Additional data will be prepared and submitted to EPA/TDEC as tanks are taken out of service and as required by the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. Chapter 1 provides general background information and philosophies that lead to the plans and schedules that appear in Chapters 2 through 5

  18. Potential impact of DOE's performance objective for protection of inadvertent intruders on low-level waste disposals at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    Performance objectives for disposal of low-level radioactive waste at Department of Energy (DOE) sites include limits on radiation dose to inadvertent intruders. This paper investigates the potential impact of DOE's performance objective for protection of inadvertent intruders on the acceptability of low-level waste disposals at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The analysis is based on waste volumes and radionuclide inventories for recent disposals and estimated doses to an inadvertent intruder for assumed exposure scenarios. The analysis indicates that more than 99% of the total volume of waste in recent disposals meets the performance objective for inadvertent intruders, and the volume of waste found to be unacceptable for disposal is only about 16 m 3 . Therefore, DOE's performance objective for protection of inadvertent intruders probably will not have unreasonably adverse impacts on acceptable waste disposals at ORNL

  19. Laboratory evaluations of a bi-level, extremely tapered bristled toothbrush and a conventional uniform bristled toothbrush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Caren M; Covey, David A; Shi, Xiuren; Yankell, Samuel L

    2009-04-01

    To compare a uniquely shaped tapered-bristle manual toothbrush to a toothbrush with bristles uniform in height and diameter for the ability to remove artificial plaque deposits in areas of the mouth that are difficult to access; interproximal areas, the gingival margin and subgingival. This study compared a GUM Summit+ Compact toothbrush featuring extremely tapered bristles and conventional bristle ends in a bi-level design. The upper, longest tapered bristles have the final 6 mm tapered to 0.01 diameter mm at the end. The conventional rounded end bristles have less than 0.5 mm tapered down to 0.02 mm diameter. The comparison manual toothbrush (Oral-B 40 Indicator) has bristles that are uniform in height and diameter. Interproximal access efficacy was evaluated using a pressure-sensitive artificial plaque substrate placed around simulated anterior and posterior teeth. Subgingival access and gingival margin cleaning were determined by using simulated gingiva prepared with a 0.2 mm space between the gingiva and the artificial plaque substrate on tooth surfaces and results were recorded as the artificial plaque removed below the gingiva or around the gingival margin. Interproximal access values were significantly (P toothbrush was statistically significantly more effective for removing plaque from the interproximal areas, at the gingival margin and subgingivally than the Oral-B 40 Indicator toothbrush.

  20. Preliminary results from the laboratory study of a flow-through fluorometer for measuring oil-in-water levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, P.; Fieldhouse, B.; Wang, Z.; Fingas, M.; Pearson, L.; Collazzi, E.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive bench-scale test program was conducted to evaluate the performance of the Turner Instruments flow-through model 10AU and model 10 fluorometers for measuring real-time concentrations of oil in water. The results were compared with alternative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) methods. The 10AU model was equipped with a long wavelength optical kit, the other with the short wavelength optical kit for diesel fuels and light refined oil products. The oils tested were Alberta Sweet Mixed Blend crude oil, Prudhoe Bay crude oil, Bunker C fuel oil and diesel fuel. It was determined that the long wavelength optical kit has minimal capacity to detect and quantify diesel fuels compared to the short wavelength kit, although the latter exhibits a lower performance level. A calibration procedure was also established for oil-in-water to convert the real-time fluorometer data to oil concentrations. Initial comparisons of these tests with standard infrared and gas chromatography procedures were promising. It was determined that fluorometer data can differentiate between various oil-in-water concentrations, but regularly gives concentration values double those of the solvent extraction, infrared or gas chromatography methods. Future studies are being planned to relate the results of this study to the chemical composition of various oils. 16 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  1. Structural integrity assessments for the category C liquid low-level waste tank systems at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document provides a report of the efforts made to satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the structural integrity certification of 14 Category C Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) Tank Systems on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Within this document, each tank system is described including the associated pipeline segments evaluated as a part of those tank systems. A separate structural integrity assessment was conducted for each of the LLLW Tank Systems, four of which are located in Melton Valley, and ten of which are located in Bethel Valley. The results of the structural integrity assessments are reported herein. The assessments are based on (1) a review of available tank design drawings, (2) a qualitative assessment of corrosion on the tank and pipelines, and primarily, and (3) leak testing program results. Design plans and specifications were reviewed for a general description of the tanks and associated pipelines. Information of primary significance included tank age, material of construction, tank design and construction specifications. Design plans were also reviewed for the layouts and materials of pipeline constructions, and ages of pipelines. Next, a generic corrosion assessment was conducted for each tank system. Information was gathered, when available, related to the historical use of the tank and the likely contents. The corrosion assessments included a qualitative evaluation of the walls of each tank and pipelines associated with each tank, as well as the welds and joints of the systems. A general discussion of the stainless steel types encountered is included in Section 4.0 of this report. The potential for soils to have caused corrosion is also evaluated within the sections on the individual tank systems.

  2. Surface radiological investigations of Trench 6 and low-level waste Line Leak Site 7. 4b at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uziel, M.S.; Tiner, P.F.; Williams, J.K.

    1991-08-01

    A surface radiological investigation of Trench 6 and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) Line Leak Site 7.4b was conducted in July and August 1989 and January 1990 by the Measurement Applications and Development Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purposes of this survey were (1) to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination and (2) to recommend interim corrective action to limit human exposures to radioactivity and minimize the potential for contaminant dispersion. Highest surface gamma levels encountered during the survey (39 mR/h) were found just south of the asphalt covering LLW Line Leak Site 7.4b. Elevated surface gamma levels (measuring 28 to 560 {mu}R/h) extended from this area to a width of 100 ft, westward 250 ft, and beyond the survey boundary. Beta-gamma levels up to 17 mrad/h measured on contact with the trunks of trees growing in the area southwest of Trench 6 suggest that three roots are reaching contamination deep within the ground. Since no gamma activity is associated with the trees or their leaves, the elevated beta levels are probably due to the uptake of residual {sup 90}Sr originating from the documented seepage at the Trench 6/Leak Site 7.4b area. Beta activity present in the leaf litter and surface soil indicate that decaying leaves are depositing measurable contaminants on the ground surface. Recommendations for corrective actions are included. 7 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Laboratory calibration and field testing of the Chemcatcher-Metal for trace levels of rare earth elements in estuarine waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jördis; Pröfrock, Daniel; Paschke, Albrecht; Broekaert, Jose A C; Prange, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Little knowledge is available about water concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) in the marine environment. The direct measurement of REEs in coastal waters is a challenging task due to their ultra-low concentrations as well as the high salt content in the water samples. To quantify these elements at environmental concentrations (pg L(-1) to low ng L(-1)) in coastal waters, current analytical techniques are generally expensive and time consuming, and require complex chemical preconcentration procedures. Therefore, an integrative passive sampler was tested as a more economic alternative sampling approach for REE analysis. We used a Chemcatcher-Metal passive sampler consisting of a 3M Empore Chelating Disk as the receiving phase, as well as a cellulose acetate membrane as the diffusion-limiting layer. The effect of water turbulence and temperature on the uptake rates of REEs was analyzed during 14-day calibration experiments by a flow-through exposure tank system. The sampling rates were in the range of 0.42 mL h(-1) (13 °C; 0.25 m s(-1)) to 4.01 mL h(-1) (13 °C; 1 m s(-1)). Similar results were obtained for the different REEs under investigation. The water turbulence was the most important influence on uptake. The uptake rates were appropriate to ascertain time-weighted average concentrations of REEs during a field experiment in the Elbe Estuary near Cuxhaven Harbor (exposure time 4 weeks). REE concentrations were determined to be in the range 0.2 to 13.8 ng L(-1), where the highest concentrations were found for neodymium and samarium. In comparison, most of the spot samples measured along the Chemcatcher samples had REE concentrations below the limit of detection, in particular due to necessary dilution to minimize the analytical problems that arise with the high salt content in marine water samples. This study was among the first efforts to measure REE levels in the field using a passive sampling approach. Our results suggest that passive samplers could be

  4. Experimental infection of laboratory mice with two Bartonella tribocorum strains from wild Mus species: a homologous host-bacteria model system at the genus level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, L; Kosoy, M

    2013-01-01

    To date no experimental infection studies have been conducted in laboratory mice using Mus spp. bartonella strains. Therefore we designed a study to evaluate the in vivo infection characteristics of 2 Bartonella tribocorum strains from wild Mus spp. in laboratory mice with the aim of developing a mouse model that reproduces characteristics of naturally acquired bartonella infections in rodents. Groups of outbred CD1 female mice were subcutaneously inoculated with low doses of 2 mouse bartonella strains (10, 100, and 1000 bacteria/mouse). Blood was collected weekly for 27 weeks to evaluate bacteraemia kinetics in infected mice. Mouse urine collected during weeks 3-6 post-inoculation was also tested for viable bacteria to determine whether urine might serve as a source of bacterial transmission. Mice were susceptible to infection with both strains. Bacteraemias in mice lasted up to 25 weeks, sometimes with abacteraemic intervals, and achieved levels up to 107 cfu/ml of blood. Temporal lags in bacteraemia onset of up to 19 weeks in length were noted at different inoculum doses. No viable bacteria were detected in mouse urine. Bacteraemic mice displayed characteristics of infection similar to those observed in natural rodent hosts during longitudinal field studies. This mouse model of persistent bacteraemia should be suitable for a variety of experimental uses.

  5. FInal Report - Characterization Survey Of The SPRU Lower Level Hillside Area At The Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, Niskayuna, New York DCN: 5146-SR-01-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harpeneau, Evan

    2011-01-01

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) is located within the boundary of Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) at 2425 River Road, Niskayuna, Schenectady County, New York (Figure A-1). SPRU was designed and developed to research an efficient process to chemically separate plutonium and uranium from processed fuel. Buildings H2 and G2 were the primary research and process facilities. SPRU operated between February 1950 and October 1953 at which time the research was successful in developing useable reduction oxidation and plutonium uranium extraction processes. These processes were subsequently moved to the Hanford and the Savannah River sites for full-scale operations. Building H2 was used by KAPL after the SPRU process ceased until the late 1990s for radioactive wastewater processing and Building G2 was utilized for offices. Process areas and equipment were maintained in a safe condition under a surveillance and maintenance program.

  6. FINAL REPORT – CHARACTERIZATION SURVEY OF THE SPRU LOWER LEVEL HILLSIDE AREA AT THE KNOLLS ATOMIC POWER LABORATORY, NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK DCN 5146-SR-01-0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-08-29

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) is located within the boundary of Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) at 2425 River Road, Niskayuna, Schenectady County, New York (Figure A-1). SPRU was designed and developed to research an efficient process to chemically separate plutonium and uranium from processed fuel. Buildings H2 and G2 were the primary research and process facilities. SPRU operated between February 1950 and October 1953 at which time the research was successful in developing useable reduction oxidation and plutonium uranium extraction processes. These processes were subsequently moved to the Hanford and the Savannah River sites for full-scale operations. Building H2 was used by KAPL after the SPRU process ceased until the late 1990s for radioactive wastewater processing and Building G2 was utilized for offices. Process areas and equipment were maintained in a safe condition under a surveillance and maintenance program.

  7. Laboratory investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handin, J.

    1980-01-01

    Our task is to design mined-repository systems that will adequately secure high-level nuclear waste for at least 10,000 yr and that will be mechanically stable for 50 to 100-yr periods of retrievability during which mistakes could be corrected and a valuable source of energy could be reclaimed, should national policy on the reprocessing of spent fuel ever change. The only credible path for the escape of radionuclides from the repository to the biosphere is through ground-water, and in hard rock, bulk permeability is largely governed by natural and artificial fracture systems. Catastrophic failure of an excavation in hard rock is likely to occur at the weakest links - the discontinuities in the rock mass that is perturbed first by mining and then by radiogenic heating. The laboratory can contribute precise measurements of the pertinent thermomechanical, hydrological and chemical properties and improve our understanding of the fundamental processes through careful experiments under well controlled conditions that simulate the prototype environment. Thus laboratory investigations are necessary, but they are not sufficient, for conventional sample sizes are small relative to natural defects like joints - i.e., the rock mass is not a continuum - and test durations are short compared to those that predictive modeling must take into account. Laboratory investigators can contribute substantially more useful data if they are provided facilities for testing large specimens(say one cubic meter) and for creep testing of all candidate host rocks. Even so, extrapolations of laboratory data to the field in neither space nor time are valid without the firm theoretical foundations yet to be built. Meanwhile in-situ measurements of structure-sensitive physical properties and access to direct observations of rock-mass character will be absolutely necessary

  8. Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1, Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P. [ed.

    1993-12-01

    This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste. Although numerous caveats must be placed on the results, the general findings were as follows: Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

  9. Feasibility study on the solidification of liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trussell, S. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Spence, R.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to help determine the feasibility of solidifying a liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this report is to facilitate a decision on the disposition of these wastes by identifying any waste constituents that might (1) compromise the strength or stability of the waste form or (2) be highly leachable. Furthermore, its goal is to identify ways to circumvent interferences and to decrease the leachability of the waste constituents. This study has sought to provide an understanding of inhibition of cement set by identifying the fundamental chemical mechanisms by which this inhibition takes place. From this fundamental information, it is possible to draw some conclusions about the potential effects of waste constituents, even in the absence of particular studies on specific compounds.

  10. Feasibility study on the solidification of liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trussell, S.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to help determine the feasibility of solidifying a liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this report is to facilitate a decision on the disposition of these wastes by identifying any waste constituents that might (1) compromise the strength or stability of the waste form or (2) be highly leachable. Furthermore, its goal is to identify ways to circumvent interferences and to decrease the leachability of the waste constituents. This study has sought to provide an understanding of inhibition of cement set by identifying the fundamental chemical mechanisms by which this inhibition takes place. From this fundamental information, it is possible to draw some conclusions about the potential effects of waste constituents, even in the absence of particular studies on specific compounds

  11. Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechard, R.P.

    1993-12-01

    This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste. Although numerous caveats must be placed on the results, the general findings were as follows: Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories

  12. Waste characterization data manual for the inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    This Waste Characterization Data Manual contains the results of an analysis of the contents of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service in accordance with the requirements of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), Sect. IX.G.1. This manual contains the results of sampling activities that were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1988. Thirty-three tanks were sampled and analyzed at that time. Sampling of the remaining inactive tanks is currently underway, and data from these tanks will be added to this manual as they become available. Data are presented from analysis of volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, radiochemical compounds, and inorganic compounds.

  13. Waste characterization data manual for the inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    This Waste Characterization Data Manual contains the results of an analysis of the contents of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service in accordance with the requirements of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), Sect. IX.G.1. This manual contains the results of sampling activities that were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1988. Thirty-three tanks were sampled and analyzed at that time. Sampling of the remaining inactive tanks is currently underway, and data from these tanks will be added to this manual as they become available. Data are presented from analysis of volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, radiochemical compounds, and inorganic compounds.

  14. Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste systems under the FFA for Fiscal years 1996 and 1997 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA was January 1, 1992. Section IX and Appendix F of the agreement impose design and operating requirements on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) tank systems and identify several plans, schedules, and assessments that must be submitted to EPA/TDEC for review of approval. The issue of ES/ER-17&D1 Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee in March 1992 transmitted to EPA/TDEC those plans and schedules that were required within 60 to 90 days of the FFA effective date. This document updates the plans, schedules, and strategy for achieving compliance with the FFA as presented in ES/ER-17&D I and summarizes the progress that has been made to date. This document supersedes all updates of ES/ER- 17&D 1. Chapter 1 describes the history and operation of the ORNL LLLW System and the objectives of the FFA. Chapters 2 through 5 contain the updated plans and schedules for meeting FFA requirements. This document will continue to be periodically reassessed and refined to reflect newly developed information and progress.

  15. Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste systems under the FFA for Fiscal years 1996 and 1997 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA was January 1, 1992. Section IX and Appendix F of the agreement impose design and operating requirements on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) tank systems and identify several plans, schedules, and assessments that must be submitted to EPA/TDEC for review of approval. The issue of ES/ER-17 ampersand D1 Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee in March 1992 transmitted to EPA/TDEC those plans and schedules that were required within 60 to 90 days of the FFA effective date. This document updates the plans, schedules, and strategy for achieving compliance with the FFA as presented in ES/ER-17 ampersand D I and summarizes the progress that has been made to date. This document supersedes all updates of ES/ER- 17 ampersand D 1. Chapter 1 describes the history and operation of the ORNL LLLW System and the objectives of the FFA. Chapters 2 through 5 contain the updated plans and schedules for meeting FFA requirements. This document will continue to be periodically reassessed and refined to reflect newly developed information and progress

  16. Photometrics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Photometrics Laboratory provides the capability to measure, analyze and characterize radiometric and photometric properties of light sources and filters,...

  17. Blackroom Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables evaluation and characterization of materials ranging from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared (LWIR).DESCRIPTION: The Blackroom Laboratory is...

  18. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  19. Analysis of Precipitation (Rain and Snow) Levels and Straight-line Wind Speeds in Support of the 10-year Natural Phenomena Hazards Review for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dewart, Jean Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Deola, Regina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-10

    This report provides site-specific return level analyses for rain, snow, and straight-line wind extreme events. These analyses are in support of the 10-year review plan for the assessment of meteorological natural phenomena hazards at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These analyses follow guidance from Department of Energy, DOE Standard, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities (DOE-STD-1020-2012), Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800, 2007) and ANSI/ ANS-2.3-2011, Estimating Tornado, Hurricane, and Extreme Straight-Line Wind Characteristics at Nuclear Facility Sites. LANL precipitation and snow level data have been collected since 1910, although not all years are complete. In this report the results from the more recent data (1990–2014) are compared to those of past analyses and a 2004 National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration report. Given the many differences in the data sets used in these different analyses, the lack of statistically significant differences in return level estimates increases confidence in the data and in the modeling and analysis approach.

  20. The Fast-Growing Brucella suis Biovar 5 Depends on Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase and Pyruvate Phosphate Dikinase but Not on Fbp and GlpX Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphatases or Isocitrate Lyase for Full Virulence in Laboratory Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaia Zúñiga-Ripa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Brucella infect a range of vertebrates causing a worldwide extended zoonosis. The best-characterized brucellae infect domestic livestock, behaving as stealthy facultative intracellular parasites. This stealthiness depends on envelope molecules with reduced pathogen-associated molecular patterns, as revealed by the low lethality and ability to persist in mice of these bacteria. Infected cells are often engorged with brucellae without signs of distress, suggesting that stealthiness could also reflect an adaptation of the parasite metabolism to use local nutrients without harming the cell. To investigate this, we compared key metabolic abilities of Brucella abortus 2308 Wisconsin (2308W, a cattle biovar 1 virulent strain, and B. suis 513, the reference strain of the ancestral biovar 5 found in wild rodents. B. suis 513 used a larger number of C substrates and showed faster growth rates in vitro, two features similar to those of B. microti, a species phylogenomically close to B. suis biovar 5 that infects voles. However, whereas B. microti shows enhanced lethality and reduced persistence in mice, B. suis 513 was similar to B. abortus 2308W in this regard. Mutant analyses showed that B. suis 513 and B. abortus 2308W were similar in that both depend on phosphoenolpyruvate synthesis for virulence but not on the classical gluconeogenic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases Fbp-GlpX or on isocitrate lyase (AceA. However, B. suis 513 used pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PpdK and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PckA for phosphoenolpyruvate synthesis in vitro while B. abortus 2308W used only PpdK. Moreover, whereas PpdK dysfunction causes attenuation of B. abortus 2308W in mice, in B. suis, 513 attenuation occurred only in the double PckA-PpdK mutant. Also contrary to what occurs in B. abortus 2308, a B. suis 513 malic enzyme (Mae mutant was not attenuated, and this independence of Mae and the role of PpdK was confirmed by the lack of

  1. Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P. [ed.

    1993-12-01

    This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste, as mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The waste forms comprised about 700 metric tons of initial heavy metal (or equivalent units) stored at the INEL: graphite spent fuel, experimental low enriched and highly enriched spent fuel, and high-level waste generated during reprocessing of some spent fuel. Five different waste treatment options were studied; in the analysis, the options and resulting waste forms were analyzed separately and in combination as five waste disposal groups. When the waste forms were studied in combination, the repository was assumed to also contain vitrified high-level waste from three DOE sites for a common basis of comparison and to simulate the impact of the INEL waste forms on a moderate-sized repository, The performance of the waste form was assessed within the context of a whole disposal system, using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191, promulgated in 1985. Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

  2. Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechard, R.P.

    1993-12-01

    This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste, as mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The waste forms comprised about 700 metric tons of initial heavy metal (or equivalent units) stored at the INEL: graphite spent fuel, experimental low enriched and highly enriched spent fuel, and high-level waste generated during reprocessing of some spent fuel. Five different waste treatment options were studied; in the analysis, the options and resulting waste forms were analyzed separately and in combination as five waste disposal groups. When the waste forms were studied in combination, the repository was assumed to also contain vitrified high-level waste from three DOE sites for a common basis of comparison and to simulate the impact of the INEL waste forms on a moderate-sized repository, The performance of the waste form was assessed within the context of a whole disposal system, using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191, promulgated in 1985. Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories

  3. A report documenting the completion of the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the ASC level II milestone ""Visualization on the supercomputing platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patchett, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lo, Li - Ta [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mr Marle, David [KITWARE INC.; Brownlee, Carson [UNIV OF UTAH

    2011-01-24

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Los Alamos portion of the ASC Level II 'Visualization on the Supercomputing Platform' milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The milestone text is shown in Figure 1 with the Los Alamos portions highlighted in boldfaced text. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is the most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors (GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the perfromance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. In conclusion, we improved CPU-based rendering performance by a a factor of 2-10 times on our tests. In addition, we evaluated CPU and CPU-based rendering performance. We encourage production visualization experts to consider

  4. High Level Waste Tank Farm Replacement Project for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0831, for the construction and operation of the High-Level Waste Tank Farm Replacement (HLWTFR) Project for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The HLWTFR Project as originally proposed by the DOE and as analyzed in this EA included: (1) replacement of five high-level liquid waste storage tanks with four new tanks and (2) the upgrading of existing tank relief piping and high-level liquid waste transfer systems. As a result of the April 1992 decision to discontinue the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel at INEL, DOE believes that it is unlikely that the tank replacement aspect of the project will be needed in the near term. Therefore, DOE is not proposing to proceed with the replacement of the tanks as described in this-EA. The DOE`s instant decision involves only the proposed upgrades aspect of the project described in this EA. The upgrades are needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act requirements, and the Department`s obligations pursuant to the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement and Consent Order among the Environmental Protection Agency, DOE, and the State of Idaho. The environmental impacts of the proposed upgrades are adequately covered and are bounded by the analysis in this EA. If DOE later proposes to proceed with the tank replacement aspect of the project as described in the EA or as modified, it will undertake appropriate further review pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act.

  5. How Full is Full Employment? : How Tools and Not Theory Explained Full Employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, P.

    2016-01-01

    The post-war debate on full employment policy was blurred and unclear since the concept of full employment itself was theoretically unclear and un-operational. Unable to theoretically determine the unemployment level of full employment, economists tried to find more empirically based ways to

  6. Full in vitro fertilization laboratory mechanization: toward robotic assisted reproduction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meseguer, Marcos; Krühne, Ulrich; Laursen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the current efforts made to standardize different steps of assisted reproductive technology processes by the introduction of new technologies for the nonsubjective sperm selection process, oocyte denudation by mechanical removal of cumulus cells, oocyte positioning, sperm...

  7. Full page fax print

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    The synthesis of natural compounds and biologically active molecules has always been a challenging problem, as they occur in specific geometric form that is often hard to reproduce in the laboratory. Taking up such challenging synthetic work is the very nature of Dr. A V Rama. Rao. While working in the National Chemical ...

  8. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for the environmental monitoring plan at waste area grouping 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document is the Groundwater Level Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Note that this document is referred to as a SAP even though no sampling and analysis will be conducted. The term SAP is used for consistency. The procedures described herein are part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for WAG 6, which also includes monitoring tasks for seeps and springs, groundwater quality, surface water, and meteorological parameters. Separate SAPs are being issued concurrently to describe each of these monitoring programs. This SAP has been written for the use of the field personnel responsible for implementation of the EMP, with the intent that the field personnel will be able to take these documents to the field and quickly find the appropriate steps required to complete a specific task. In many cases, Field Operations Procedures (FOPs) will define the steps required for an activity. The FOPs for the EMP are referenced and briefly described in the relevant sections of the SAPs, and are contained within the FOP Manual. Both these documents (the SAP and the FOP Manual) will be available to personnel in the field.

  9. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for the environmental monitoring plan at waste area grouping 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document is the Groundwater Level Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Note that this document is referred to as a SAP even though no sampling and analysis will be conducted. The term SAP is used for consistency. The procedures described herein are part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for WAG 6, which also includes monitoring tasks for seeps and springs, groundwater quality, surface water, and meteorological parameters. Separate SAPs are being issued concurrently to describe each of these monitoring programs. This SAP has been written for the use of the field personnel responsible for implementation of the EMP, with the intent that the field personnel will be able to take these documents to the field and quickly find the appropriate steps required to complete a specific task. In many cases, Field Operations Procedures (FOPs) will define the steps required for an activity. The FOPs for the EMP are referenced and briefly described in the relevant sections of the SAPs, and are contained within the FOP Manual. Both these documents (the SAP and the FOP Manual) will be available to personnel in the field

  10. Final deactivation project report on the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility, Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility (Building 3019B) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities. This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This document provides a history and description of the facility prior to the commencement of deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S ampersand M) Plan, remaining hazardous materials inventory, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3019B will require access to perform required S ampersand M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3019B was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 Program, only a minimal S ampersand M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S ampersand M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S ampersand M until decommissioning activities begin

  11. Field methods and quality-assurance plan for water-quality activities and water-level measurements, U.S. Geological Survey, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Maimer, Neil V.; Wehnke, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    Water-quality activities and water-level measurements by the personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Project Office coincide with the USGS mission of appraising the quantity and quality of the Nation’s water resources. The activities are carried out in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office. Results of the water-quality and hydraulic head investigations are presented in various USGS publications or in refereed scientific journals and the data are stored in the National Water Information System (NWIS) database. The results of the studies are used by researchers, regulatory and managerial agencies, and interested civic groups. In the broadest sense, quality assurance refers to doing the job right the first time. It includes the functions of planning for products, review and acceptance of the products, and an audit designed to evaluate the system that produces the products. Quality control and quality assurance differ in that quality control ensures that things are done correctly given the “state-of-the-art” technology, and quality assurance ensures that quality control is maintained within specified limits.

  12. Risk evaluation of embedded, single-walled liquid low-level waste piping at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. ESD Publication 4315

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    Four categories of liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) systems are defined in the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Categories A and B are new and fully compliant existing systems, respectively: Category C is singly contained and must be removed from service, and Category D is inactive. The FFA requires that secondary containment and leak detection be provided for all Category A and B piping in the LLLW System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); however, as noted in the D2 revision of the secondary containment design demonstration report (DOE 1994), some sections of single-walled embedded piping in Category B underground vaults at three ORNL facilities do not meet this requirement. A risk evaluation was performed in order compare the potential radiation dose to a member of the public that could result from a postulated leak in the single-walled pipes with projected radiation exposure to the workers who would modify the piping to meet FFA requirements. The risk to human health from replacing segments of embedded, single-walled piping in the LLW system is higher than the risk of leaving the piping as it is

  13. Laboratory Performance of Five Selected Soil Moisture Sensors Applying Factory and Own Calibration Equations for Two Soil Media of Different Bulk Density and Salinity Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matula, Svatopluk; Báťková, Kamila; Legese, Wossenu Lemma

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive soil water content determination is a fundamental component for many agricultural and environmental applications. The accuracy and costs of the sensors define the measurement scheme and the ability to fit the natural heterogeneous conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate five commercially available and relatively cheap sensors usually grouped with impedance and FDR sensors. ThetaProbe ML2x (impedance) and ECH2O EC-10, ECH2O EC-20, ECH2O EC-5, and ECH2O TE (all FDR) were tested on silica sand and loess of defined characteristics under controlled laboratory conditions. The calibrations were carried out in nine consecutive soil water contents from dry to saturated conditions (pure water and saline water). The gravimetric method was used as a reference method for the statistical evaluation (ANOVA with significance level 0.05). Generally, the results showed that our own calibrations led to more accurate soil moisture estimates. Variance component analysis arranged the factors contributing to the total variation as follows: calibration (contributed 42%), sensor type (contributed 29%), material (contributed 18%), and dry bulk density (contributed 11%). All the tested sensors performed very well within the whole range of water content, especially the sensors ECH2O EC-5 and ECH2O TE, which also performed surprisingly well in saline conditions. PMID:27854263

  14. Feasibility of establishing a biosafety level 3 tuberculosis culture laboratory of acceptable quality standards in a resource-limited setting: an experience from Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssengooba, Willy; Gelderbloem, Sebastian J; Mboowa, Gerald; Wajja, Anne; Namaganda, Carolyn; Musoke, Philippa; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Joloba, Moses Lutaakome

    2015-01-15

    Despite the recent innovations in tuberculosis (TB) and multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) diagnosis, culture remains vital for difficult-to-diagnose patients, baseline and end-point determination for novel vaccines and drug trials. Herein, we share our experience of establishing a BSL-3 culture facility in Uganda as well as 3-years performance indicators and post-TB vaccine trials (pioneer) and funding experience of sustaining such a facility. Between September 2008 and April 2009, the laboratory was set-up with financial support from external partners. After an initial procedure validation phase in parallel with the National TB Reference Laboratory (NTRL) and legal approvals, the laboratory registered for external quality assessment (EQA) from the NTRL, WHO, National Health Laboratories Services (NHLS), and the College of American Pathologists (CAP). The laboratory also instituted a functional quality management system (QMS). Pioneer funding ended in 2012 and the laboratory remained in self-sustainability mode. The laboratory achieved internationally acceptable standards in both structural and biosafety requirements. Of the 14 patient samples analyzed in the procedural validation phase, agreement for all tests with NTRL was 90% (P 80% in all years from NTRL, CAP, and NHLS, and culture was 100% for CAP panels and above regional average scores for all years with NHLS. Quarterly DST scores from WHO-EQA ranged from 78% to 100% in 2010, 80% to 100% in 2011, and 90 to 100% in 2012. From our experience, it is feasible to set-up a BSL-3 TB culture laboratory with acceptable quality performance standards in resource-limited countries. With the demonstrated quality of work, the laboratory attracted more research groups and post-pioneer funding, which helped to ensure sustainability. The high skilled experts in this research laboratory also continue to provide an excellent resource for the needed national discussion of the laboratory and quality management systems.

  15. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  16. National laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscati, G.

    1983-01-01

    The foundation of a 'National Laboratory' which would support a Research center in synchrotron radiation applications is proposed. The essential features of such a laboratory differing of others centers in Brazil are presented. (L.C.) [pt

  17. Geomechanics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geomechanics Laboratory allows its users to measure rock properties under a wide range of simulated service conditions up to very high pressures and complex load...

  18. Quality control of parasitology stool examination in Tabriz clinical laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shahram Khademvatan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of quality control program was to make doctors and laboratory personnel trust in laboratory results and consequently increasing confidence in laboratory achievements. The quality assurance means raising the level of quality in all tests that lead to raising the level of work efficiency and laboratories including minimum expense for society and minimum time for lab personnel. This study aimed to assess and determine the accuracy and precision of results in Tabriz medical diagnostic laboratories. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 790 stool samples were selected randomly and tested by standard methods.Student t- test, SPSS software and sensitivity and accuracy formulas were used for data analysis. Results: The sensitivity was 62%, 22% and 8% with 95% confidence intervals for worm's eggs, protozoan cysts and trophozoite detection respectively. Conclusion: To elevate quality assurance in clinical diagnostic laboratory, monitoring and check of the laboratories by standard methods continually should be done.

  19. Full closure strategic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The full closure strategic analysis was conducted to create a decision process whereby full roadway : closures for construction and maintenance activities can be evaluated and approved or denied by CDOT : Traffic personnel. The study reviewed current...

  20. Análise laboratorial de marcha na mielomeningocele de nível lombar baixo e instabilidade unilateral do quadril Laboratorial analysis of the myelomeningocele gait of lower lumbar level and unilateral hip instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula T. Gabrieli

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo examina a influência da instabilidade unilateral do quadril sobre a marcha de pacientes portadores de mielomeningocele, nível lombar baixo e instabilidade unilateral do quadril. Foram estudados através da análise laboratorial de marcha, 20 pacientes deambuladores comunitários utilizando goteiras e muletas, com luxação ou subluxação unilateral do quadril. , Os pacientes foram sub divididos em dois grupos. Grupo 1 (10 pacientes , que não apresentavam contraturas do quadril (flexão e/ou adução ou as apresentavam de forma simétrica entre os lados; e Grupo 2 (10 pacientes, que apresentavam contraturas assimétricas de quadril A cinemática do quadril e da pelve foi analisada no sentido de se avaliar a simetria entre o lado envolvido e o oposto. Sete pacientes do Grupo 1 e 2 do Grupo 2 apresentaram marcha simétrica. Marcha assimétrica foi encontrada em 3 pacientes do Grupo 1 e 7 pacientes do Grupo 2. A assimetria na marcha relacionou-se principalmente com a presença de contraturas de quadril unilaterais ou bilaterais mas assimétricas. Demonstrou-se que a assimetria da marcha não pode ser atribuída somente à instabilidade do quadril, mas parece estar mais relacionada com presença de contraturas unilaterais ou assimétricas e cujo tratamento deveria ser o objetivo em detrimento de reduções cirúrgicas do quadril.This study examines the influence of unilateral hip dislocation or subluxation in the gait of 20 low-lumbar myelomeningocele patients, community ambulators with AFOs and crutches, utilizing gait analysis. The patients were divided in two groups, Group 1 - 10 patients: complete absence or presence of symmetrical hip contractures (flexion and/or adduction and Group 2 -10 patients : presence of unilateral or asymmetrical hip contractures. Pelvic and hip kinematics were analyzed to assess the symmetry of them, between the involved and the non-involved side. Gait was considered symmetrical in 7 studies in Group 1

  1. Logical Full Abstraction and PCF

    OpenAIRE

    Longley, John R; Plotkin, Gordon

    2000-01-01

    We introduce the concept of logical full abstraction, generalising the usual equational notion. We consider the language PCF and two extensions with “parallel” operations. The main result is that, for standard interpretations, logical full abstraction is equivalent to equational full abstraction together with universality; the proof involves constructing enumeration operators. We also consider restrictions on logical complexity and on the level of types.

  2. Status of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory new hydrofracture facility: Implications for the disposal of liquid low-level radioactive wastes by underground injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, C.S.; Stow, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    From 1982 to 1984, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) disposed of approximately 2.8 x 10 16 Bq (7.5 x 10 5 Ci) of liquid low-level radioactive wastes by underground injection at its new hydrofracture facility. This paper summarizes the regulatory and operational status of that ORNL facility and discusses its future outlook. Operational developments and regulatory changes that have raised major questions about the continued operation of the new hydrofracture facility include: (1) significant 90 Sr contamination of some groundwater in the injection formation; (2) questions about the design of the injection well, completed prior to the application of the underground injection control (UIC) regulations to the ORNL facility; (3) questions about the integrity of the reconfigured injection well put into service following the loss of the initial injection well; and (4) implementation of UIC regulations. Ultimately, consideration of the regulatory and operational factors led to the decision in early 1986 not to proceed with a UIC permit application for the ORNL facility. Subsequent to the decision not to proceed with a UIC permit application, closure activities were initiated for the ORNL hydrofracture facility. Closure of the facility will occur under both state of Tennessee and federal UIC regulations. The facility also falls under the provisions of part 3004(u) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act pertaining to corrective actions. Nationally, there is an uncertain outlook for the disposal of wastes by underground injection. All wells used for the injection of hazardous wastes (Class I wells) are being reviewed. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Determination of Optimum Sanitizer Levels for Prevention of Salmonella Cross-Contamination of Mature Round Tomatoes in a Laboratory Model Flume System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, Aswathy; Li, You; De, Jaysankar; Gutierrez, Alan; Silverberg, Rachael; Schneider, Keith R

    2017-09-01

    Salmonella has been reported to be involved in several foodborne illness outbreaks, many of which resulted from consumption of raw tomatoes. This research aimed to optimize and evaluate the concentration of free chlorine (hypochlorous acid [HOCl]) used as a sanitizer to prevent cross-contamination of tomatoes inoculated with a cocktail of five rifampin-resistant Salmonella enterica serovars in a laboratory-based model flume system. Organic load, prepared using sterilized Scotts Premium Topsoil, was added in different quantities to the flume wash water to simulate real-world packinghouse conditions. In a typical packinghouse operation utilizing a recirculating flume system, the organic matter washed from tomato surfaces accumulates over time. In this study, different concentrations (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm) of HOCl were used as sanitizers under three organic load conditions (0, 650, and 1,000 mg/L chemical oxygen demand). Results showed that 100 ppm of HOCl was necessary to prevent Salmonella cross-contamination of uninoculated tomatoes in the model flume system in the presence of organic loading. Also, when treated with 100 ppm of HOCl, Salmonella levels were reduced by >4.5 log CFU per tomato from inoculated tomatoes in the presence of organic load. At 75 ppm of HOCl, Salmonella cross-contamination was prevented, but only in the absence of organic loading. In studies in which plate counts were negative, whole tomato enrichment studies were performed. No cross-contamination of uninoculated tomatoes was recorded when 100 ppm of HOCl was used, even in the presence of high organic load (1,000 mg/L chemical oxygen demand). Although sanitizer application reduces contamination on tomato surfaces, the primary function of sanitizers in the wash water is to prevent cross-contamination.

  4. Federal Facility Agreement plans and schedules for liquid low-level radioactive waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA was January 1, 1992. Section 9 and Appendix F of the agreement impose design and operating requirements on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) tank systems and identify several plans, schedules, and assessments that must be submitted to EPA/TDEC for review or approval. The initial issue of this document in March 1992 transmitted to EPA/TDEC those plans and schedules that were required within 60 to 90 days of the FFA effective date. The current revision of this document updates the plans, schedules, and strategy for achieving compliance with the FFA, and it summarizes the progress that has been made over the past year. Chapter 1 describes the history and operation of the ORNL LLLW System, the objectives of the FFA, the organization that has been established to bring the system into compliance, and the plans for achieving compliance. Chapters 2 through 7 of this report contain the updated plans and schedules for meeting FFA requirements. This document will continue to be periodically reassessed and refined to reflect newly developed information and progress

  5. NOAA Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry Sea Level Rise Products: Global and regional sea level time series and trend maps for the major ocean basins and marginal seas, based on measurements from satellite radar altimeters, from 1992-12-17 to 2017-08-11 (NCEI Accession 0125535)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains global and regional mean sea level time series and trend maps calculated on a continual basis since December 1992 by Laboratory for...

  6. Propulsion Systems Laboratory, Bldg. 125

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) is NASAs only ground test facility capable of providing true altitude and flight speed simulation for testing full scale gas...

  7. Full-dimensional, high-level ab initio potential energy surfaces for H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O) and H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} with application to hydrogen clathrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homayoon, Zahra; Conte, Riccardo; Qu, Chen; Bowman, Joel M., E-mail: jmbowma@emory.edu [Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation and Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    New, full-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs), obtained using precise least-squares fitting of high-level electronic energy databases, are reported for intrinsic H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O) two-body and H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} three-body potentials. The database for H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O) consists of approximately 44 000 energies at the coupled cluster singles and doubles plus perturbative triples (CCSD(T))-F12a/haQZ (aug-cc-pVQZ for O and cc-pVQZ for H) level of theory, while the database for the three-body interaction consists of more than 36 000 energies at the CCSD(T)-F12a/haTZ (aug-cc-pVTZ for O, cc-pVTZ for H) level of theory. Two precise potentials are based on the invariant-polynomial technique and are compared to computationally faster ones obtained via “purified” symmetrization. All fits use reduced permutational symmetry appropriate for these non-covalent interactions. These intrinsic potentials are employed together with existing ones for H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and (H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, to obtain full PESs for H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O) and H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}. Properties of these full PESs are presented, including a diffusion Monte Carlo calculation of the zero-point energy and wavefunction, and dissociation energy of the H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O) dimer. These PESs together with an existing one for water clusters are used in a many-body representation of the PES of hydrogen clathrate hydrates, illustrated for H{sub 2}@(H{sub 2}O){sub 20}. An analysis of this hydrate is presented, including the electronic dissociation energy to remove H{sub 2} from the calculated equilibrium structure.

  8. Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  9. Analytical Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Analytical Labspecializes in Oil and Hydraulic Fluid Analysis, Identification of Unknown Materials, Engineering Investigations, Qualification Testing (to support...

  10. Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: To conduct fundamental studies of highway materials aimed at understanding both failure mechanisms and superior performance. New standard test methods are...

  11. Propulsion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Propulsion Lab simulates field test conditions in a controlled environment, using standardized or customized test procedures. The Propulsion Lab's 11 cells can...

  12. Psychology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides testing stations for computer-based assessment of cognitive and behavioral Warfighter performance. This 500 square foot configurable space can...

  13. Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Dynamics Lab replicates vibration environments for every Navy platform. Testing performed includes: Flight Clearance, Component Improvement, Qualification, Life...

  14. Visualization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Evaluates and improves the operational effectiveness of existing and emerging electronic warfare systems. By analyzing and visualizing simulation results...

  15. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment under the Federal Facility Agreement for Bethel Valley Low-Level Waste Collection and Transfer System upgrade for Building 2026 (High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory) and Building 2099 (Monitoring and Control Station) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This document presents a Design/Installation and Structural Integrity Assessment for a replacement tank system for portions of the Bethel Valley Low Level Waste (LLW) System, located at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This issue of the assessment covers the design aspects of the replacement tank system, and certifies that the design has sufficient structural integrity and is acceptable for the storing or treating of hazardous and/or radioactive substances. The present issue identifies specific activities that must be completed during the fabrication, installation, and testing of the replacement tank system in order to provide assurance that the final installation complies with governing requirements. Portions of the LLW system are several decades old, or older, and do not comply with current environmental protection regulations. Several subsystems of the LLW system have been designated to receive a state-of-the-art replacement and refurbishment. One such subsystem serves Building 2026, the High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory. This assessment focuses on the scope of work for the Building 2026 replacement LLW Collection and Transfer System, including the provision of a new Monitoring and Control Station (Building 2099) to receive, store, and treat (adjust pH) low level radioactive waste

  16. The Full Inclusion Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Rodney E.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Overviews background of the movement toward full inclusion of special education students into regular classrooms, including legal issues and successful educational practices. Suggests that full inclusion does not benefit all students and that inclusion should be one of several alternatives to meeting students' educational needs. Of approximately…

  17. Investigation of full-scale high-level waste containment glass blocks. Task 3 characterization of radioactive waste forms a series of final reports (1985-89) - no 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncouyoux, J.; Aure, A.; Ladirat, C.

    1991-01-01

    A two-year study of the degree of fracturation in full-scale high-level waste glass blocks was undertaken under contract Fl1W-0182. The project included a theoretical investigation of thermal and mechanical stresses arising in the glass and determination of the fracture-inducing stress distribution in the block, as well as an experimental study based on tomographic examinations performed at the BAM in Berlin on full-scale canisters containing glass cast at Marcoule and on water leach tests at 100 0 C to evaluate the fractured leachable surface area. The Castem code system was used to determine the temperature profiles versus time for the glass package. The mechanical study revealed the impact of removing the package from the furnace on the final stress loading. Controlled cooling of glass blocks must be extremely slow (less than 5 0 C per hour) to have a significant effect on the stress loading. Three series of tomographic experiments were carried out: two on a canister as cast, and a third after relieving the canister stresses. Static and dynamic leach tests were conducted to determine the fracturation factor of the glass blocks. Only static leaching provides satisfactory results. Fracturation factors of 10 to 15 were measured on industrial glass blocks. 50 figs.; 20 tabs.; 3 refs

  18. Full Length Research Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Ahmed

    essential component of diet (Baloch et al., 2000). Many developing regions of the world suffer from either ... facilities and general low level of personal hygiene have been attributed to have resulted in high level of enteric ..... The Effect of Phenol on the Distribution and. Relative abundance of Zooplankton in Romi Stream, ...

  19. Full Service Leasing

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Ján

    2009-01-01

    Aim of this master thesis is to describe the service of Full Service Leasing, as a modern form of financing and management of assets, primarily automobile fleet. Description of full service leasing is designed as a comprehensive and complete guide to support reader's position when deciding to finance and manage a fleet by this service. Whether the reader is an entrepreneur, CFO, fleet manager, new employee of leasing company, or anyone who is interested in this service, this master thesis wil...

  20. The Effect of Laboratory Training Model of Teaching and Traditional Method on Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Skills-Components of Achievement, Total Achievement and Retention Level in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badeleh, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at finding the effectiveness of the Laboratory Training Model of Teaching (LTM) and comparing it with the traditional methods of teaching chemistry to seventh standard students. It strived to determine whether the (LTM) method in chemistry would be significantly more effective than the Traditional method in respect to the…

  1. full on riot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Iten

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available “hey moses full on riot in lawson st the station’s on fire! been going since 4. molotov and more. full on,” reads an SMS message received on the backseat of a Tasmanian bus. What follows is a journey through the landscape of a Gunavidji, whose brothers have all gone to the land of the dead; metallic scraping in the glass cases of the Hobart Museum; a Palestinian woman giving up on her people; land-snails exposing cultural inaccuracies; photographing Australia’s war zone; entering the St Peter’s Basilica of Rome with bulldozers - all in the name of preparing to interview prominent Israeli writer Etgar Keret.

  2. Compressive full waveform lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiyi; Ke, Jun

    2017-05-01

    To avoid high bandwidth detector, fast speed A/D converter, and large size memory disk, a compressive full waveform LIDAR system, which uses a temporally modulated laser instead of a pulsed laser, is studied in this paper. Full waveform data from NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network) are used. Random binary patterns are used to modulate the source. To achieve 0.15 m ranging resolution, a 100 MSPS A/D converter is assumed to make measurements. SPIRAL algorithm with canonical basis is employed when Poisson noise is considered in the low illuminated condition.

  3. Laboratory Medicine is Faced with the Evolution of Medical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collinson Paul

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory medicine and clinical medicine are co-dependent components of medicine. Laboratory medicine functions most effectively when focused through a clinical lens. Me dical practice as a whole undergoes change. New drugs, treatments and changes in management strategies are introduced. New techniques, new technologies and new tests are developed. These changes may be either clinically or laboratory initiated, and so their introduction requires dialogue and interaction between clinical and laboratory medicine specialists. Treatment monitoring is integral to laboratory medicine, varying from direct drug measurement to monitoring cholesterol levels in response to treatment. The current trend to »personalised medicine« is an extension of this process with the development of companion diagnostics. Technological innovation forms part of modern laboratory practice. Introduction of new technology both facilitates standard laboratory approaches and permits introduction of new tests and testing strategies previously confined to the research laboratory only. The revolution in cardiac biomarker testing has been largely a laboratory led change. Flexibility in service provision in response to changing clinical practice or evolving technology provides a significant laboratory management challenge in the light of increasing expectations, shifts in population demographics and constraint in resource availability. Laboratory medicine practitioners are adept at meeting these challenges. One thing remains constant, that there will be a constant need laboratory medicine to meet the challenges of novel clinical challenges from infectious diseases to medical conditions developing from lifestyle and longevity.

  4. Full page insight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortsen, Rikke Platz

    2014-01-01

    Alan Moore and his collaborating artists often manipulate time and space by drawing upon the formal elements of comics and making alternative constellations. This article looks at an element that is used frequently in comics of all kinds – the full page – and discusses how it helps shape spatio-t...

  5. Full page fax print

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    different classes, alkaloids, terpenes, oxygen heterocycles and other systems. It is impossible to do full justice to his work and this article provides only a selection ...... India is home to bounteous varieties of plants. However, very few of them have been studied, a vast majority being untouched. The scope for research in this ...

  6. Full Length Research Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Out of the 320 male sheep examined, 87(27.2%) were infected, while 9(19.1%) of the 47 females examined were infected (Table 2). Infection varied from one abattoir to another. Age related distribution of P. cervi is shown in Table 3. Out of 356 adult sheep (>2yrs) examined, 35. Full Length Research Article. 12 ...

  7. Results of the 1999-2000 collaborative exercise and proficiency testing program on mitochondrial DNA of the GEP-ISFG: an inter-laboratory study of the observed variability in the heteroplasmy level of hair from the same donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Antonio; Salas, Antonio; Albarrán, Cristina; Arroyo, Eduardo; Castro, Azucena; Crespillo, Manuel; di Lonardo, Ana María; Lareu, María Victoria; Cubría, Carlos López; Soto, Manuel López; Lorente, José A; Semper, Marta Montesino; Palacio, Ana; Paredes, Manuel; Pereira, Luisa; Lezaun, Anna Pérez; Brito, José Pestano; Sala, Andrea; Vide, María Conceiçao; Whittle, Martín; Yunis, Juan J; Gómez, Josefina

    2002-01-24

    The Spanish and Portuguese working group (GEP) of international society for forensic genetics (ISFG) 1999-2000 collaborative exercise on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) included the analysis of four bloodstain samples and one hair shaft sample by 19 participating laboratories from Spain, Portugal and several Latin-American countries. A wide range of sequence results at position 16,093 of the HV1 (from T or C homoplasmy to different levels of heteroplasmy) were submitted by the different participating laboratories from the hair shaft sample during the first phase of this exercise. During the discussion of these results in the Annual GEP-ISFG 2000 Conference a second phase of this exercise was established with two main objectives: (i) to evaluate the incidence of the HV1 sequence heteroplasmy detected in Phase I across different sample types from the same donor including blood, saliva, and hair shafts, (ii) to perform a technical review of the electropherograms to evaluate the relative levels of heteroplasmies obtained by the different laboratories and also to examine the source of possible errors detected in Phase I. Anonymous review of the raw sequence data permitted the detection of three transcription errors and three errors due to methodological problems. Highly variable levels of heteroplasmy were found in the hair shaft and more stability in blood and saliva. Three laboratories found variable levels of heteroplasmy at position 16,093 across adjacent fragments from the same hair shaft. Two laboratories also described more than one heteroplasmic position from a single hair. The relevance of these findings for the interpretation of mtDNA data in the forensic context is also discussed.

  8. Elastomers Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Primary capabilities include: elastomer compounding in various sizes (micro, 3x5, 8x12, 8x15 rubber mills); elastomer curing and post curing (two 50-ton presses, one...

  9. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ... What are lab tests? Laboratory tests are medical devices that are intended for use on samples of blood, urine, or other tissues ...

  10. Audio Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment and facilities for auditory display research. A primary focus is the performance use of binaurally rendered 3D sound in conjunction...

  11. Full-text

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Based of SMART & D, 8 indicators of ecosystem features were provided for SFM evaluation. In the second section of the research, by expert's opinions, paired ... regeneration level in hectare per square meter were identified as capable indicators of SMART&D. The result of the first section of the research, the outcomes of ...

  12. download full text

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The participants for this research are lecturers of French language who frequently use technology in their classroom to support FFL learning for all the levels. Findings illustrate the ..... In particular, they noted how technology supported multiple learners, especially audio, visual, interpersonal learners. The participants agreed ...

  13. Full length Research Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Ahmed

    ABSTRACT. This paper considered contamination of aquifer resulting from petroleum spillage, which is a common phenomenal in the. Niger Delta area of Nigeria. We used the model given by. Bestman (1987) and assumed that some endogenous variables are built into the system. To achieve a level of desirable state, we ...

  14. download full text

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    What is the relationship that has emanated between the private primary schools teaching French and Cultural Centres due to lack of a Kenyan foreign language education policy? 3. Theoretical framework. This paper bases on the Threshold Level Hypothesis (Cummins: 1976, 1979) which dwells on bilingualism. Cummins ...

  15. download full text

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute administration of JEDDY decoction at the three dose levels (344, 667 and 1334 µl/kg/30 days, p.o.) also revealed no significant effects on locomotion activities when compared with the control but the ANOVA revealed that there was a significant decrease in grooming activities at the dose of 667 µl/kg only when ...

  16. Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory is a research laboratory which complements the Optical Measurements Laboratory. The laboratory provides for Hall...

  17. Establishment of Biosafety Level-3 (BSL-3 laboratory: Important criteria to consider while designing, constructing, commissioning & operating the facility in Indian setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra T Mourya

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the major steps involved in the process of construction of a BSL-3 laboratory in Indian settings, from freezing the concept of proposal to operationalization phase. The key to success of this kind of project is strong institutional commitment to biosafety norms, adequate fund availability, careful planning and designing, hiring good construction agency, monitoring by experienced consultancy agency and involvement of scientific and engineering personnel with biocontainment experience in the process.

  18. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

    1999-09-01

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics. but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his/her students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

  19. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory equipment to outside universities, industrial researchers, and elementary and secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division (RPSD) has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics, but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations

  20. ISABELLE full scale dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInturff, A.D.; Dahl, P.F.; Kassner, D.; Lasky, C.; Robins, K.; Sampson, W.B.

    1975-01-01

    Data are presented on the various cosine theta type magnet models constructed at BNL in the development of ring magnets for ISABELLE, a pair of intersecting 200 GeV proton accelerating storage rings. The rings are to be filled with 30 GeV protons from the AGS and then accelerated to 200 GeV. The acceleration period is a 120 sec ramp from approximately 0.5 T to 4 T. The effect of mechanical precompression on training was studied by varying the interference fit between the coil (ISA IV) and its iron shield. The results were used to optimize the mechanical design of the full-size magnet models

  1. Plate Full of Color

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-04

    The Eagle Books are a series of four books that are brought to life by wise animal characters - Mr. Eagle, Miss Rabbit, and Coyote - who engage Rain That Dances and his young friends in the joy of physical activity, eating healthy foods, and learning from their elders about health and diabetes prevention. Plate Full of Color teaches the value of eating a variety of colorful and healthy foods.  Created: 8/4/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/5/2008.

  2. Virtual, on-line, frog dissection vs. conventional laboratory dissection: A comparison of student achievement and teacher perceptions among honors, general ability, and foundations-level high school biology classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, Ronald H.

    2002-09-01

    Dissecting animal specimens has long been a tradition in biology classes. Objections by students, based on religious or ethical grounds, have been raised regarding the dissections of animals in classroom laboratories. A number of states now have legal proceedings or statewide policies requiring that alternatives to the actual dissection of laboratory animal specimens be permitted in their school districts. Alternatives to actual dissections have been developed in recent years. For a variety of reasons, performing an actual or conventional animal dissection may not be a desirable option. The purpose of this study was to investigate how a virtual On-line frog dissection compares with an actual laboratory dissection. What were the perceptions of the teacher's using it? How does student achievement compare among three the different ability levels on a pre and posttest regarding basic frog anatomy? Is a virtual On-line dissection a suitable alternative for students who, for whatever reason, do not participate in the actual laboratory experience? The subjects consisted of 218 biology students among three different ability levels, in a Northeastern suburban high school. Approximately half of the student groups participated in a virtual On-line dissection, the other half in an actual laboratory dissection. A pretest of basic frog anatomy was administered to the students two days before and the posttest one day after their dissection experience. Data were analyzed using matched pairs t-Tests, Analysis of Variance, Tukey HSD, and Squared Curvilinear Coefficients. Survey questionnaires were administered to the teachers after the dissection experiences were completed. There were no significant differences found in achievement between the virtual and conventional dissection groups. There were significant differences found in achievement score means among the three ability levels. There was no significant interaction between gender and achievement. Perceptions of the teacher

  3. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28

    for real world but creates the ability to test the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by

  4. Coming Full Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Lindsey; Carll-White, Allison; Harrell, James

    2017-04-01

    This article illustrates a collaborative, full cycle diagnostic postoccupancy evaluation (POE) conducted in an emergency department (ED) to demonstrate methods of planning a POE, conducting research to capture meaningful data, and applying outcomes through the use of a design charrette. POEs often end with the reporting of findings rather than suggesting how this knowledge feeds forward. A design charrette presents an opportunity to engage with POE evidence and integrate research into practice. Planning for the POE resulted in a multiphased, multimethodological study. Data collection and analysis utilized objective and subjective measures yielding both qualitative and quantitative data. The design charrette then served as an interactive method to assist design practitioners in both understanding and applying the research findings in the redesign of the entry/triage sequence of the ED. POE findings revealed four key issues impacting the ED experience. These include workflow, communication, privacy and confidentiality, and safety and security. In analyzing the use of the charrette to link POE findings to design application, it was determined that the charrette should include an all-inclusive, collaborative process, easily interpreted evidence, active participant engagement, and feasible outcomes grounded in research. Taking the POE process full cycle is a critical component in bridging the gap between research and its application to design. The charrette process offers a positive mark of completion to the POE and helps participants gain sensitivity to the importance of evidence-based decision-making.

  5. Human Safety in Veterinary Microbiology Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar B. P.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory work should be carried out with a minimum of risk to the health of the staff working in laboratory. This requires careful consideration of the risks involved in a particular procedure,followed by appropriate measures to minimise the risk of human disease. This concerned exclusively with risks from infectious agents, but physical and chemical injuries in microbiology laboratories must also be prevented. Risks from infection are reduced by good laboratory techniques and secured facilities which aid in the containment of pathogens. It is important to understand that containment of pathogens can be used for preventing disease in humans and animals. Often the same methods of containment are used for both preventing laboratory-acquired infection in humans and for preventing escape of pathogens that could cause an outbreak of animal disease. Although the methods, techniques and facilities required may be the same, the list of pathogens and categorization into levels of risk will differ depending on whether it is human or animal disease control that is the primary objective. Existing national and international reference laboratories have considerable experience in the operation of safe working practices and provision of appropriate facilities. When new laboratories are being established, it would be prudent to seek advice from the competent authorities at established institutes and it is important to comply with legislative requirements. [Vet. World 2009; 2(3.000: 113-117

  6. Kreisbewegung Coming Full Circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Hartewig

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Männer und Frauen des deutschen Widerstands und eine Kulturwissenschaftlerin aus der zweiten Generation der Holocaust-Überlebenden sprechen in diesem Buch über das Verhalten der Widerstandskämpfer gegenüber ihren jüdischen Mitbürgern. Im Mittelpunkt der Gruppengespräche steht die Frage, warum die Regime-Gegner die Verfolgung und Vernichtung der Juden in ihrem oppositionellen Handeln ausgeblendet haben.In this book, men and women of the German Resistance talk to a female scholar of cultural studies, belonging to the second generation of Holocaust survivors, about the members of the Resistance’s attitude towards their Jewish fellow citizens. Their group conversations mainly deal with the question why the opponents of the regime marginalized the problem of the prosecution and extermination of the Jews in their oppositional activities.

  7. Use of a phenolic-carboxylic acid cation resin in the treatment of low-level liquid waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilton, J.M.

    1981-09-01

    The loading capacity of CS-100 resin, using plant waste as feed, was found to be significantly reduced after 20 loading-elution cycles; one-fourth or less of the original capacity was retained after 30 cycles. No important differences were noted between an untreated column and a column that had been reconverted to the sodium form in the regeneration step. Omission of the sodium regeneration could not be adopted as a routine procedure because it produced a packing effect in the plant beds; however, reconversion to the sodium form is now achieved by using a stoichiometric amount of caustic rather than a 100% excess, as was previous practice. Since the distribution coefficients for calcium and strontium are about six times greater than that for cesium, no loss of 90 Sr would be expected while 137 Cs is loading. Laboratory results obtained by using plant conditions and feed indicate that a typical bed would remove 96% of 90 Sr in the feed. Cobalt-60 is generally the greatest contributor to the radioactivity of the plant effluent. Laboratory tests indicate that this 60 Co is present as a mixture of a soluble anionic complex and insoluble colloids. The anionic complex could be removed by placing an anion exchange column in the effluent from the CS-100 resin bed. In studies of the dynamics of loading on CS-100 resin, the contact time in plant operation (3 to 4 min per column volume) was found to be more than adequate to obtain the desired results. Effects of flow velocity were not investigated. Data from a series of laboratory experiments show that CS-100 resin can be eluted satisfactorily with 0.5 to 1.0 M formic or acetic acid, although a larger volume is required than for elution with 0.5 M nitric acid

  8. Isotope laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report from the Dutch Ministry of Health is an advisory document concerned with isotope laboratories in hospitals, in connection with the Dutch laws for hospitals. It discusses which hospitals should have isotope laboratories and concludes that as many hospitals as possible should have small laboratories so that emergency cases can be dealt with. It divides the Netherlands into regions and suggests which hospitals should have these facilities. The questions of how big each lab. is to be, what equipment each has, how each lab. is organised, what therapeutic and diagnostic work should be carried out by each, etc. are discussed. The answers are provided by reports from working groups for in vivo diagnostics, in vitro diagnostics, therapy, and safety and their results form the criteria for the licences of isotope labs. The results of a questionnaire for isotope labs. already in the Netherlands are presented, and their activities outlined. (C.F.)

  9. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

  10. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 2, Chemical constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

  11. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical

  12. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation of the liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be used during the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) RI/FS project to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The ES ampersand H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Energy Systems to direct and control implementation of the project ES ampersand H program. This report describes the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES ampersand H program to individual task remedial investigations, project facilities, and other major tasks assigned to the project

  13. Comparative evaluation of active learning and the traditional lectures in physiology: a case study of 200 level medical laboratory students of Imo State Unversity, Owerri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyaehie, U S B; Nwobodo, Ed; Njoku, C J; Inah, G A

    2007-01-01

    Currently, understanding of physiology and disease patterns is undergoing a fundamental paradigm shift with attendant shift in education of health professionals worldwide towards active learning to encourage exploration of connections and their relationships. We introduced problem-based learning to physiology teaching of medial laboratory students to confirm worldwide reports that active learning environments offer better learning opportunities over the traditional methods which is the predominant teaching method in Nigerian universities. Our findings indicate that problem-based learning increases students' attendance/participation in classes and performance in examination. We recommend the integration of active learning into physiology curriculum of Nigerian Universities.

  14. Implications of the introduction of laboratory demand management at primary care clinics in South Africa on laboratory expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozayr H. Mahomed

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to analyse current laboratory expenditures at the primary healthcare (PHC level in South Africa as processed by the National Health Laboratory Service and to determine the potential cost savings of introducing laboratory demand management. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional analysis of laboratory expenditures for the 2013/2014 financial year across 11 pilot National Health Insurance health districts was conducted. Laboratory expenditure tariff codes were cross-tabulated to the PHC essential laboratory tests list (ELL to determine inappropriate testing. Data were analysed using a Microsoft Access database and Excel software. Results: Approximately R35 million South African Rand (10% of the estimated R339 million in expenditures was for tests that were not listed within the ELL. Approximately 47% of expenditure was for laboratory tests that were indicated in the algorithmic management of patients on antiretroviral treatment. The other main cost drivers for non-ELL testing included full blood count and urea, as well as electrolyte profiles usually requested to support management of patients on antiretroviral treatment. Conclusions: Considerable annual savings of up to 10% in laboratory expenditure are possible at the PHC level by implementing laboratory demand management. In addition, to achieve these savings, a standardised PHC laboratory request form and some form of electronic gatekeeping system that must be supported by an educational component should be implemented.

  15. Calgary Laboratory Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Wright MD, PhD

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calgary Laboratory Services provides global hospital and community laboratory services for Calgary and surrounding areas (population 1.4 million and global academic support for the University of Calgary Cumming School of Medicine. It developed rapidly after the Alberta Provincial Government implemented an austerity program to address rising health care costs and to address Alberta’s debt and deficit in 1994. Over roughly the next year, all hospital and community laboratory test funding within the province was put into a single budget, fee codes for fee-for-service test billing were closed, roughly 40% of the provincial laboratory budget was cut, and roughly 40% of the pathologists left the province of Alberta. In Calgary, in the face of these abrupt changes in the laboratory environment, private laboratories, publicly funded hospital laboratories and the medical school department precipitously and reluctantly merged in 1996. The origin of Calgary Laboratory Services was likened to an “unhappy shotgun marriage” by all parties. Although such a structure could save money by eliminating duplicated services and excess capacity and could provide excellent city-wide clinical service by increasing standardization, it was less clear whether it could provide strong academic support for a medical school. Over the past decade, iterations of the Calgary Laboratory Services model have been implemented or are being considered in other Canadian jurisdictions. This case study analyzes the evolution of Calgary Laboratory Services, provides a metric-based review of academic performance over time, and demonstrates that this model, essentially arising as an unplanned experiment, has merit within a Canadian health care context.

  16. A Virtual Laboratory for Digital Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Ponta

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a virtual laboratory for digital design, specifically conceived for educational application and for supporting project work both locally and at distance: the Deeds. It covers combinational and sequential logic networks, finite state machines, microcomputer interfacing and programming at assembly level. The virtual lab is based on three simulator integrated together, combined with a large repository of application projects, available on the web. The paper contains an example of a laboratory session, structured accordingly to the Project Based Learning methodology.

  17. Full metal jacket!

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    Ten years ago, standard issue clothing only gave CERN firemen partial protection but today our fire-fighters are equipped with state-of-the-art, full personal protective equipment.   CERN's Fire Brigade team. For many years, the members of CERN's Fire Brigade went on call-outs clad in their work trousers and fire-rescue coats, which only afforded them partial protection. Today, textile manufacturing techniques have moved on a long way and CERN's firemen are now kitted out with state-of-the-art personal protective equipment. The coat and trousers are three-layered, comprising fire-resistant aramide, a protective membrane and a thermal lining. The CERN Fire Brigade' new state-of-the-art personal protection equipment. "This equipment is fully compliant with the standards in force and is therefore resistant to cuts, abrasion, electrical arcs with thermal effects and, of course, fire," explains Patrick Berlinghi, the CERN Fire Brigade's Logistics Officer. You might think that su...

  18. Full speed ahead!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2014-01-01

    When he’s not working at CERN, Jean-Yves Le Meur is a top-level skier. Fresh from the Winter Paralympics in Sochi and the French disability snowsport championship, he has agreed to answer a few questions.   Jean-Yves tackles a giant slalom. Image: @FFH. Few athletes can boast of having participated in the Olympic or Paralympic Games even once in their sporting career, let alone four times... But Jean-Yves Le Meur, a member of both CERN’s IT-CIS Group and the French disabled ski team, tells me modestly during our interview that this is what he has achieved. While the skier might act like it’s no big deal, it leaves me, amateur sportsperson that I am, dumbfounded. A few weeks ago in Sochi, the sun shining a little too brightly, Jean-Yves left his fourth Paralympics with the same enthusiasm he had for the previous three, and the same bitter taste in his mouth: “Just like in the 2010 Winter Paralympics in Vancouver, I failed to finish the sitting slalom, d...

  19. Results of ultra-low level 71ge counting for application in the Gallex-solar neutrino experiment at the Gran Sasso Underground Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, W.; Heusser, G.; Huebner, M.; Kiko, J.; Kirsten, T.; Schneider, K.; Schlotz, R.

    1985-01-01

    It has been experimentally verified that the Ultra-Low-Level Counting System for the Gallex solar neutrino experiment is capable of measuring the expected solar up silon-flux to plus or minus 12% during two years of operation.

  20. Serum calprotectin as a diagnostic marker of late onset sepsis in full ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    investigated only in one study as a marker of sepsis in very low birth weight neonates. Objective: This study aimed to measure the serum calprotectin level by ELISA in full-term neonates with late onset neonatal sepsis, its correlations with other laboratory markers of sepsis as interleukin-6, C-reactive protein. (CRP), total ...

  1. Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory (Saxton Laboratory) is a state-of-the-art facility for conducting transportation operations research. The laboratory...

  2. Culham Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    The report contains summaries of work carried out under the following headings: fusion research experiments; U.K. contribution to the JET project; supporting studies; theoretical plasma physics, computational physics and computing; fusion reactor studies; engineering and technology; contract research; external relations; staff, finance and services. Appendices cover main characteristics of Culham fusion experiments, staff, extra-mural projects supported by Culham Laboratory, and a list of papers written by Culham staff. (U.K.)

  3. Plating laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seamster, A.G.; Weitkamp, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    The lead plating of the prototype resonator has been conducted entirely in the plating laboratory at SUNY Stony Brook. Because of the considerable cost and inconvenience in transporting personnel and materials to and from Stony Brook, it is clearly impractical to plate all the resonators there. Furthermore, the high-beta resonator cannot be accommodated at Stony Brook without modifying the set up there. Consequently the authors are constructing a plating lab in-house

  4. An analysis of TA-Student Interaction and the Development of Concepts in 3-d Space Through Language, Objects, and Gesture in a College-level Geoscience Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is twofold: 1) to describe how a teaching assistant (TA) in an undergraduate geology laboratory employs a multimodal system in order to mediate the students' understanding of scientific knowledge and develop a contextualization of a concept in three-dimensional space and 2) to describe how a linguistic awareness of gestural patterns can be used to inform TA training assessment of students' conceptual understanding in situ. During the study the TA aided students in developing the conceptual understanding and reconstruction of a meteoric impact, which produces shatter cone formations. The concurrent use of speech, gesture, and physical manipulation of objects is employed by the TA in order to aid the conceptual understanding of this particular phenomenon. Using the methods of gestural analysis in works by Goldin-Meadow, 2000 and McNeill, 1992, this study describes the gestures of the TA and the students as well as the purpose and motivation of the meditational strategies employed by TA in order to build the geological concept in the constructed 3-dimensional space. Through a series of increasingly complex gestures, the TA assists the students to construct the forensic concept of the imagined 3-D space, which can then be applied to a larger context. As the TA becomes more familiar with the students' meditational needs, the TA adapts teaching and gestural styles to meet their respective ZPDs (Vygotsky 1978). This study shows that in the laboratory setting language, gesture, and physical manipulation of the experimental object are all integral to the learning and demonstration of scientific concepts. Recognition of the gestural patterns of the students allows the TA the ability to dynamically assess the students understanding of a concept. Using the information from this example of student-TA interaction, a brief short course has been created to assist TAs in recognizing the mediational power as well as the assessment potential of gestural

  5. LHCb : Full Experiment System Test

    CERN Multimedia

    Cattaneo, M

    2009-01-01

    LHCb had been planning to commission its High Level Trigger software and Data Quality monitoring procedures using real collisions data from the LHC pilot run. Following the LHC incident on 19th September 2008, it was decided to commission the system using simulated data. This “Full Experiment System Test” consists of: - Injection of simulated minimum bias events into the full HLT farm, after selection by a simulated Level 0 trigger. - Processing in the HLT farm to achieve the output rate expected for nominal LHC luminosity running, sustained over the typical duration of an LHC fill. - Real time Data Quality validation of the HLT output, validation of calibration and alignment parameters for use in the reconstruction. - Transmission of the event data, calibration data and book-keeping information to Tier1 sites and full reconstruction of the event data. - Data Quality validation of the reconstruction output. We will report on the preparations and results of FEST09, and on the status of commissioning for no...

  6. 1997 structural integrity assessments for the Category C liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results of a series of evaluations to determine if the individual Category C tank systems retain sufficient structural integrity to continue being used for liquid storage. The approach used to reach the final certification/conclusion consisted of three phases, including: (1) Review of the original engineering design drawings and construction materials to determine whether the tank and line systems were capable of containing liquids without leaking (and also to check that the construction materials were compatible with liquids that might have been placed in these systems). While drawings in this report may be of poor quality, they are copies of the best available originals. (2) A qualitative corrosion assessment conducted in 1995 that further evaluated both the potential internal corrosion effects of materials in the tank and in the potential external corrosion effects of the backfill and native soil at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The ability to accurately measure or predict the amount of corrosion present on both the internal and external walls of the tanks and pipelines is extremely limited. However, when available, data were used to assess the historical tank contents and usage and the probable corrosive effects on the tank system materials of construction. (3) Performance of monthly leak tests were completed on the tanks and annual leak tests were completed on associated testable pipelines. This task was judged to be the most important criteria for determining structural integrity due to the proven performance of the technology and processes involved.

  7. 1997 structural integrity assessments for the Category C liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results of a series of evaluations to determine if the individual Category C tank systems retain sufficient structural integrity to continue being used for liquid storage. The approach used to reach the final certification/conclusion consisted of three phases, including: (1) Review of the original engineering design drawings and construction materials to determine whether the tank and line systems were capable of containing liquids without leaking (and also to check that the construction materials were compatible with liquids that might have been placed in these systems). While drawings in this report may be of poor quality, they are copies of the best available originals. (2) A qualitative corrosion assessment conducted in 1995 that further evaluated both the potential internal corrosion effects of materials in the tank and in the potential external corrosion effects of the backfill and native soil at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The ability to accurately measure or predict the amount of corrosion present on both the internal and external walls of the tanks and pipelines is extremely limited. However, when available, data were used to assess the historical tank contents and usage and the probable corrosive effects on the tank system materials of construction. (3) Performance of monthly leak tests were completed on the tanks and annual leak tests were completed on associated testable pipelines. This task was judged to be the most important criteria for determining structural integrity due to the proven performance of the technology and processes involved

  8. Characterization of yields for Pinus taeda genotypes at the half-sib, full-sib, and varietal levels of genetic improvement at two planting densities at age 5 in the upper coastal plain of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derek Dougherty; Michael Kane; Robert Teskey; Richard Daniels; Jeff Wright

    2012-01-01

    Seedling deployment options for the establishment of operational Pinus taeda plantations in the Southeastern U.S. now include half-sib families, full-sib crosses, and varietals. In 2005, a study to evaluate the effects of genotype and density on yield and quality was established on a moderately well-drained upland site in the Upper Coastal Plain in...

  9. A comparison of the effect of free access to reduced fat products or their full fat equivalents on food intake, body weight, blood lipids and fat-soluble antioxidants levels and haemostasis variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weststrate, J.A.; Hof, K.H. van het; Berg, H. van den; Velthuis-te-Wierik, E.J.M. te; Graaf, C. de; Zimmermanns, N.J.H.; Westerterp, K.R.; Westerterp-Plantenga, M.S.; Verboeket-Venne, W.P.H.G. van de

    1998-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effects of free access to reduced fat products or their full fat equivalents on fat and energy intake, body weight, plasma lipids and fat-soluble antioxidants concentrations and haemostasis variables. Design: A multicentre open randomised controlled trial in which

  10. Green Building Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailor, David Jean [Portland State Univ., Portland, OR (United States)

    2013-12-29

    This project provided support to the Green Building Research Laboratory at Portland State University (PSU) so it could work with researchers and industry to solve technical problems for the benefit of the green building industry. It also helped to facilitate the development of PSU’s undergraduate and graduate-level training in building science across the curriculum.

  11. Report of controls performed by the CRIIRAD laboratory level with the 'Les sauvages' source harnessing at Saint-Sylvestre (Haute-Vienne)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-05-01

    This document reports analyses performed on drinkable waters distributed in Saint-Sylvestre (France), and more particularly in situ measurements of radioactivity levels, performed within the so called 'Les sauvages' spring catchment. Several aspects are discussed: the volume activity of radon 222 in the water at different moments, and the need to protect the catchment exploitation personnel

  12. A multi-level approach of evaluating crew resource management training: a laboratory-based study examining communication skills as a function of team congruence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, J; Darioly, A; Mast, M Schmid; Schmid, P C; Bischof, N

    2010-11-01

    The article proposes a multi-level approach for evaluating communication skills training (CST) as an important element of crew resource management (CRM) training. Within this methodological framework, the present work examined the effectiveness of CST in matching or mismatching team compositions with regard to hierarchical status and competence. There is little experimental research that evaluated the effectiveness of CRM training at multiple levels (i.e. reaction, learning, behaviour) and in teams composed of members of different status and competence. An experiment with a two (CST: with vs. without) by two (competence/hierarchical status: congruent vs. incongruent) design was carried out. A total of 64 participants were trained for 2.5 h on a simulated process control environment, with the experimental group being given 45 min of training on receptiveness and influencing skills. Prior to the 1-h experimental session, participants were assigned to two-person teams. The results showed overall support for the use of such a multi-level approach of training evaluation. Stronger positive effects of CST were found for subjective measures than for objective performance measures. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This work provides some guidance for the use of a multi-level evaluation of CRM training. It also emphasises the need to collect objective performance data for training evaluation in addition to subjective measures with a view to gain a more accurate picture of the benefits of such training approaches.

  13. An Investigation into the Creation, Stability, and X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis of Early Photographic Processes: An Upper-Level Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, Corina E.; Bezur, Aniko

    2012-01-01

    Photography is one of the few fine art forms that were initially developed by scientists such as Herschel and Talbot; however, in the modern chemistry curriculum, photography has become divorced from its scientific beginnings and resides in the studio arts department of most universities. An upper-level undergraduate experiment is described in…

  14. Teaching Laboratory Renovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Zuhairi, Ali Jassim; Al-Dahhan, Wedad; Hussein, Falah; Rodda, Kabrena E.; Yousif, Emad

    2016-12-21

    Scientists at universities across Iraq are actively working to report actual incidents and accidents occurring in their laboratories, as well as structural improvements made to improve safety and security, to raise awareness and encourage openness, leading to widespread adoption of robust Chemical Safety and Security (CSS) practices. The improvement of students’ understanding of concepts in science and its applications, practical scientific skills and understanding of how science and scientists work in laboratory experiences have been considered key aspects of education in science for over 100 years. Facility requirements for the necessary level of safety and security combined with specific requirements relevant to the course to be conducted dictate the structural design of a particular laboratory, and the design process must address both. This manuscript is the second in a series of five case studies describing laboratory incidents, accidents, and laboratory improvements. We summarize the process used to guide a major renovation of the chemistry instructional laboratory facilities at Al-Nahrain University and discuss lessons learned from the project.

  15. Use of Multiple Innovative Technologies for Retrieval and Handling of Low-Level Radioactive Tank Wastes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble-Dial, J.; Riner, G.; Robinson, S.; Lewis, B.; Bolling, D.; Ganapathi, G.; Harper, M.; Billingsley, K.; Burks, B.

    2002-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully implemented an integrated tank waste management plan at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (1), which resulted in the cleanup, removal, or stabilization of 37 inactive underground storage tanks (USTs) since 1998, and the reduction of risk to human health and the environment. The integrated plan helped accelerate the development and deployment of innovative technologies for the retrieval of radioactive sludge and liquid waste from inactive USTs. It also accelerated the pretreatment of the retrieved waste and newly generated waste from ORNL research and development activities to provide for volume and contamination reduction of the liquid waste. The integrated plan included: retrieval of radioactive sludge, contaminated material, and other debris from USTs at ORNL using a variety of robotic and remotely operated equipment; waste conditioning and transfer of retrieved waste to pretreatment facilities and interim, double contained storage tanks; the development and deployment of technologies for pretreating newly generated and retrieved waste transferred to interim storage tanks; waste treatment and packaging for final off-site disposal; stabilization of the inactive USTs that did not meet the regulatory requirements of the Federal Facilities Agreement between the DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the continued monitoring of the active USTs that remain in long-term service. This paper summarizes the successful waste retrieval and tank stabilization operations conducted during two ORNL tank remediation projects (The Gunite Tanks Remediation Project and the Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks Remediation Project), the sludge retrieval operations from the active Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks, and pretreatment operations conducted for the tank waste. This paper also provides the status of ongoing activities conducted in preparation

  16. Laboratory evaluation of the Design Analysis Associates DAA H-3613i radar water-level sensor—Results of temperature, distance, and SDI-12 tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnley, Mark V.

    2016-09-30

    The Design Analysis Associates (DAA) DAA H-3613i radar water-level sensor (DAA H-3613i), manufactured by Xylem Incorporated, was evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) for conformance to manufacturer’s accuracy specifications for measuring a distance throughout the sensor’s operating temperature range, for measuring distances from 3 to 15 feet at ambient temperatures, and for compliance with the SDI-12 serial-to-digital interface at 1200-baud communication standard. The DAA H-3613i is a noncontact water-level sensor that uses pulsed radar to measure the distance between the radar and the water surface from 0.75 to 131 feet over a temperature range of −40 to 60 degrees Celsius (°C). Manufacturer accuracy specifications that were evaluated, the test procedures that followed, and the results obtained are described in this report. The sensor’s accuracy specification of ± 0.01 feet (± 3 millimeters) meets USGS requirements for a primary water-stage sensor used in the operation of a streamgage. The sensor met the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for water-level measurements during temperature testing at a distance of 8 feet from the target over its temperature-compensated operating range of −40 to 60 °C, except at 60 °C. At 60 °C, about half the measurements exceeded the manufacturer’s accuracy specification by not more than 0.005 feet.The sensor met the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for water-level measurements during distance-accuracy testing at the tested distances from 3 to 15 feet above the water surface at the HIF.

  17. Monitoring language laboratory work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. van der Walt

    1985-05-01

    Full Text Available Barely six years after the establishment of the first language laboratory at the University of Utah and five years after a similar language lab had been introduced at Ohio State University, E.H. Schneck complained that students who were supposed to stamp time-slips as evidence of their attendance "(got someone else to stamp a time-slip; or a student might stamp one when entering, leave the laboratory, and come back to stamp it several hours later" (1930:31.

  18. Evaluation of ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography in microPET/CT laboratory; Avaliacao dos niveis de radiacao ambiental no laboratorio de tomografia por emissao de positrons acoplada a tomografia computadorizada, microPET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, Daniele Martins

    2016-11-01

    Micro PET/CT scanner is an essential tool generally used for small animal molecular imaging. Fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose is the most widely used radioisotope in this technique. The present study aimed to evaluate the radiation levels in a micro PET/CT research laboratory of the Radiopharmacy Center at IPEN-CNEN / SP, in order to accomplish both national standards and international recommendations. The radioprotection team has classified the laboratory as supervised area; even this laboratory does not require the adoption of specific measures for protection and safety, should be done regular re-evaluation of the conditions of occupational exposures. Workplace monitoring and individual control assessment were carried out to ensure the radiological protection of all workers directly involved in handling the scanner. Initially, there was conducted a radiometric survey, as well as measurements of the external radiation level in the workplace and its surroundings. To achieve this goal, there were placed nine thermoluminescent dosimeters of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy in preselected locations. Monthly evaluations of the occupationally exposed individuals were carried out through the use of TL dosimeters, ported in the workers' chest. Moreover, whole body measurements were performed every six months. The study period was about two-years which started in April 2014. All tests to evaluate micro PET/CT performance were based on the standard protocol of the equipment in accordance with the standard developed by the Animal PET Standard Task Force. Present study's results demonstrated that the ambient radiation levels (ambient and effective estimated radiation dose), as well as the effective shielding equipment are both adequate. This study emphasizes that it is essential to strictly follow the principles of radioprotection in workplace, whenever researches involve radioactive unsealed sources. (author)

  19. Remote Laser Laboratory: First Demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Titov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote Laser Laboratory (RLL is hosted at Bauman Moscow State Technical University (BMSTU, Russia. Local laser engineering lab can be classified as complex, expensive and dangerous facility. Potentially it poses risks both for students and for laboratory itself when operated by unskilled users. This paper presents arguably the most optimal solution fitting great in both e-learning and safe remote operation paradigms: Remote Laser Laboratory. The emphasis here is placed on software part but hardware solutions are also described.

  20. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez J, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation detectors laboratory was established with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency which gave this the responsibility to provide its services at National and regional level for Latin America and it is located at the ININ. The more expensive and delicate radiation detectors are those made of semiconductor, so it has been put emphasis in the use and repairing of these detectors type. The supplied services by this laboratory are: selection consultant, detectors installation and handling and associated systems. Installation training, preventive and corrective maintenance of detectors and detection systems calibration. (Author)

  1. A self-teaching curriculum for the NRC/SNL [Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Sandia National Laboratory] low-level waste performance assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, M.S.Y.; Kozak, M.W.; Campbell, J.E.; Thompson, B.H.

    1991-01-01

    A performance assessment methodology has been developed for use by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in evaluating license applications for low-level waste disposal facilities. This report provides detailed guidance on input and output procedures for the computer codes recommended for use in the methodology. Seven sample problems are provided for various aspects of a performance assessment analysis of a simple hypothetical conceptual model. When combined, these sample problems demonstrate how the methodology is used to produce a dose history for the site under normal conditions, and to demonstrate an analysis of an intruder scenario. 20 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Implications of the introduction of laboratory demand management at primary care clinics in South Africa on laboratory expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Ozayr H; Lekalakala, Ruth; Asmall, Shaidah; Cassim, Naseem

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic health laboratory services are regarded as an integral part of the national health infrastructure across all countries. Clinical laboratory tests contribute substantially to health system goals of increasing quality of care and improving patient outcomes. This study aimed to analyse current laboratory expenditures at the primary healthcare (PHC) level in South Africa as processed by the National Health Laboratory Service and to determine the potential cost savings of introducing laboratory demand management. A retrospective cross-sectional analysis of laboratory expenditures for the 2013/2014 financial year across 11 pilot National Health Insurance health districts was conducted. Laboratory expenditure tariff codes were cross-tabulated to the PHC essential laboratory tests list (ELL) to determine inappropriate testing. Data were analysed using a Microsoft Access database and Excel software. Approximately R35 million South African Rand (10%) of the estimated R339 million in expenditures was for tests that were not listed within the ELL. Approximately 47% of expenditure was for laboratory tests that were indicated in the algorithmic management of patients on antiretroviral treatment. The other main cost drivers for non-ELL testing included full blood count and urea, as well as electrolyte profiles usually requested to support management of patients on antiretroviral treatment. Considerable annual savings of up to 10% in laboratory expenditure are possible at the PHC level by implementing laboratory demand management. In addition, to achieve these savings, a standardised PHC laboratory request form and some form of electronic gatekeeping system that must be supported by an educational component should be implemented.

  3. 1996 structural integrity assessments for the Category C Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This document provides a report of the efforts made to satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement for the structural integrity certification of ten Category C Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) tank systems on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Within this document, each Category C tank system is described including the associated pipeline segments evaluated as a part of those tank systems. A separate structural integrity assessment was conducted for each of the LLLW Tank Systems, four of which are located in Melton Valley, and six of which are located in Bethel Valley. The results of the structural integrity assessments are reported herein. The assessments are based on (1) a review of available tank design drawings, (2) a qualitative assessment of corrosion on the tank and pipelines, and primarily (3) leak testing program results.

  4. 1996 structural integrity assessments for the Category C Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This document provides a report of the efforts made to satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement for the structural integrity certification of ten Category C Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) tank systems on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Within this document, each Category C tank system is described including the associated pipeline segments evaluated as a part of those tank systems. A separate structural integrity assessment was conducted for each of the LLLW Tank Systems, four of which are located in Melton Valley, and six of which are located in Bethel Valley. The results of the structural integrity assessments are reported herein. The assessments are based on (1) a review of available tank design drawings, (2) a qualitative assessment of corrosion on the tank and pipelines, and primarily (3) leak testing program results

  5. Federal Facility Agreement plans and schedules for liquid low-level radioactive waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    Although the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) addresses the entire Oak Ridge Reservation, specific requirements are set forth for the liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) storage tanks and their associated piping and equipment, tank systems, at ORNL. The stated objected of the FFA as it relates to these tank systems is to ensure that structural integrity, containment and detection of releases, and source control are maintained pending final remedial action at the site. The FFA requires that leaking LLLW tank systems be immediately removed from service. It also requires the LLLW tank systems that do not meet the design and performance requirements established for secondary containment and leak detection be either upgraded or replaced. The FFA establishes a procedural framework for implementing the environmental laws. For the LLLW tank systems, this framework requires the specified plans and schedules be submitted to EPA and TDEC for approval within 60 days, or in some cases, within 90 days, of the effective date of the agreement

  6. The NRC/SNL [Nuclear Regulatory Commission]/[Sandia National Laboratory] performance assessment methodology for low-level radioactive waste facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    A performance assessment methodology has been developed for use by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in evaluating license applications for low-level waste disposal facilities. This paper provides a summary of the modeling approaches selected for the methodology, and includes discussions of the philosophy and structure of the methodology. The performance assessment methodology is designed to provide the NRC with a tool for performing confirmatory analyses in support of license reviews related to postclosure performance. The methodology allows analyses of dose to individuals from off-site releases under normal conditions as well as on-site doses to inadvertent intruders. Computer codes have been chosen for source-term analysis, for vadose-zone flow and transport, for saturated-zone flow and transport, for surface-water transport, for transport via the air pathway, and for food chain and dosimetry analyses. More than one computer code is recommended for each module in the methodology, which increases its flexibility, but also increases the amount of user effort required to provide interfaces between the modules. 25 refs., 2 figs

  7. Preliminary parametric performance assessment of potential final waste forms for alpha low-level waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.H.; Sussman, M.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Myers, J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; DeBiase, T.A.; Goodrich, M.T.; DeWitt, D. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report presents a preliminary parametric performance assessment (PA) of potential waste disposal systems for alpha-contaminated, mixed, low-level waste (ALLW) currently stored at the Transuranic Storage Area of INEL. The ALLW, which contains from 10 to 100 nCi/g of transuranic (TRU) radionuclides, is awaiting treatment and disposal. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of several parameters on the radiological-confinement performance of potential disposal systems for the ALLW. The principal emphasis was on the performance of final waste forms (FWFs). Three categories of FWF (cement, glass, and ceramic) were addressed by evaluating the performance of two limiting FWFs for each category. Performance at five conceptual disposal sites was evaluated to illustrate the effects of site characteristics on the performance of the total disposal system. Other parameters investigated for effects on receptor dose included inventory assumptions, TRU radionuclide concentration, FWF fracture, disposal depth, water infiltration rates, subsurface-transport modeling assumptions, receptor well location, intrusion scenario assumptions, and the absence of waste immobilization. These and other factors were varied singly and in some combinations. The results indicate that compliance of the treated and disposed ALLW with the performance objectives depends on the assumptions made, as well as on the FWF and the disposal site. Some combinations result in compliance, while others do not. The implications of these results for decision making relative to treatment and disposal of the INEL ALLW are discussed. The report compares the degree of conservatism in this preliminary parametric PA against that in four other PAs and one risk assessment. All of the assessments addressed the same disposal site, but different wastes. The report also presents a qualitative evaluation of the uncertainties in the PA and makes recommendations for further study.

  8. Preliminary parametric performance assessment of potential final waste forms for alpha low-level waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.H.; Sussman, M.E.; Myers, J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; DeBiase, T.A.; Goodrich, M.T.; DeWitt, D.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents a preliminary parametric performance assessment (PA) of potential waste disposal systems for alpha-contaminated, mixed, low-level waste (ALLW) currently stored at the Transuranic Storage Area of INEL. The ALLW, which contains from 10 to 100 nCi/g of transuranic (TRU) radionuclides, is awaiting treatment and disposal. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of several parameters on the radiological-confinement performance of potential disposal systems for the ALLW. The principal emphasis was on the performance of final waste forms (FWFs). Three categories of FWF (cement, glass, and ceramic) were addressed by evaluating the performance of two limiting FWFs for each category. Performance at five conceptual disposal sites was evaluated to illustrate the effects of site characteristics on the performance of the total disposal system. Other parameters investigated for effects on receptor dose included inventory assumptions, TRU radionuclide concentration, FWF fracture, disposal depth, water infiltration rates, subsurface-transport modeling assumptions, receptor well location, intrusion scenario assumptions, and the absence of waste immobilization. These and other factors were varied singly and in some combinations. The results indicate that compliance of the treated and disposed ALLW with the performance objectives depends on the assumptions made, as well as on the FWF and the disposal site. Some combinations result in compliance, while others do not. The implications of these results for decision making relative to treatment and disposal of the INEL ALLW are discussed. The report compares the degree of conservatism in this preliminary parametric PA against that in four other PAs and one risk assessment. All of the assessments addressed the same disposal site, but different wastes. The report also presents a qualitative evaluation of the uncertainties in the PA and makes recommendations for further study

  9. Laboratory determination of migration of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite–sand mixtures as buffer/backfill material for high-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Lang; Zhang, Huyuan; Yan, Ming; Chen, Hang; Zhang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    For the safety assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the migration of Eu(III) through compacted bentonite–sand mixtures was measured under expected repository conditions. Under the evaluated conditions, advection and dispersion is the dominant migration mechanism. The role of sorption on the retardation of migration was also evaluated. The hydraulic conductivities of compacted bentonite–sand mixtures were K=2.07×10 −10 –5.23×10 −10 cm/s, The sorption and diffusion of Eu(III) were examined using a flexible wall permeameter for a solute concentration of 2.0×10 −5 mol/l. The effective diffusion coefficients and apparent diffusion coefficients of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite–sand mixtures were in the range of 1.62×10 –12 –4.87×10 –12 m 2 /s, 1.44×10 –14 –9.41×10 –14 m 2 /s, respectively, which has a very important significance to forecast the relationship between migration length of Eu(III) in buffer/backfill material and time and provide a reference for the design of buffer/backfill material for HLW disposal in China. - Highlights: • The migration progress of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite–sand mixtures was researched. • The hydraulic conductivity of cominpacted bentonite–sand mixtures was measured. • The migration length of Eu(III) in buffer/backfill material after a certain period of time was forecasted

  10. Achieving and sustaining full employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, S M

    1995-01-01

    Human rights and public health considerations provide strong support for policies that maximize employment. Ample historical and conceptual evidence supports the feasibility of full employment policies. New factors affecting the labor force, the rate of technological change, and the globalization of economic activity require appropriate policies--international as well as national--but do not invalidate the ability of modern states to apply the measures needed. Among these the most important include: (I) systematic reduction in working time with no loss of income, (2) active labor market policies, (3) use of fiscal and monetary measures to sustain the needed level of aggregate demand, (4) restoration of equal bargaining power between labor and capital, (5) social investment in neglected and outmoded infrastructure, (6) accountability of corporations for decisions to shift or reduce capital investment, (7) major reductions in military spending, to be replaced by socially needed and economically productive expenditures, (8) direct public sector job creation, (9) reform of monetary policy to restore emphasis on minimizing unemployment and promoting full employment. None are without precedent in modern economies. The obstacles are ideological and political. To overcome them will require intellectual clarity and effective advocacy.

  11. Journal of Medical Laboratory Science: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Medical Laboratory Science: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > Journal of Medical Laboratory Science: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  12. Remote Microelectronics Fabrication Laboratory MEFLab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Machotka

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, there has been a move towards using remote laboratories in engineering education. The majority of these laboratories are static, involving limited user-controlled mechanical movements. The University of South Australia has developed such a laboratory, called NetLab that has been successfully utilized for teaching both on-campus and transnational programs in electrical and electronics engineering. Following this success, we are now developing a remote laboratory for microelectronic fabrication, MEFLab. The first stage of the development is a remote laboratory for visual inspection and testing of electronic circuits directly on the silicon wafer under a microscope which is normally conducted in a cleanroom. The major challenge of this project is the accurate positioning of micro-probes remotely over the internet. This paper presents the details of the setup of this new remote laboratory, with a particular emphasis on the development of the hardware, software and graphical user interface.

  13. FOOTWEAR PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory provides biomechanical and physical analyses for both military and commercial footwear. The laboratory contains equipment that is integral to the us...

  14. Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) is an extension of the power electronics testing capabilities of the Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  15. Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research performs preclinical characterization of nanomaterials...

  16. Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL's Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) houses 22 research laboratories for conducting a wide-range of research including catalyst formulation, chemical analysis,...

  17. Remote Laboratory in Photovoltaics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Samoila

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new concept of studying, understanding and teaching the performance of solar cells. Using NI ELVIS allows the realization of eight laboratory experiments which study all the important parameters of the solar cells. The model used for the equivalent circuit of the solar cell was the “one diode” model. For the realization of control, data acquisition and processing, a complex program was created, with a friendly interface, using the graphical programming language LabVIEW.

  18. Variation in interoperability across clinical laboratories nationwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vaishali; McNamara, Lauren; Dullabh, Prashila; Sawchuk, Megan E; Swain, Matthew

    2017-12-01

    To characterize nationwide variation and factors associated with clinical laboratories': (1) capabilities to send structured test results electronically to ordering practitioners' EHR systems; and (2) their levels of exchange activity, as measured by whether they sent more than three-quarters of their test results as structured data to ordering practitioners' EHR systems. A national survey of all independent and hospital laboratories was conducted in 2013. Using an analytic weighted sample of 9382 clinical laboratories, a series of logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify organizational and area characteristics associated with clinical laboratories' exchange capability and activity. Hospital-based clinical laboratories (71%) and larger clinical laboratories (80%) had significantly higher levels of capability compared to independent (58%) and smaller laboratories (48%), respectively; though all had similar levels of exchange activity, with 30% of clinical laboratories sending 75% or more of their test results electronically. In multivariate analyses, hospital and the largest laboratories had 1.87 and 4.40 higher odds, respectively, of possessing the capability to send results electronically compared to independent laboratories (pLaboratories located in areas with a higher share of potential exchange partners had a small but significantly greater capability to send results electronically and higher levels of exchange activity(pClinical laboratories' capability to exchange varied by size and type; however, all clinical laboratories had relatively low levels of exchange activity. The role of exchange partners potentially played a small but significant role in driving exchange capability and activity. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez J, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The National Institute for Nuclear Research has established a Radiation detector laboratory that has the possibility of providing to the consultants on the handling and applications of the nuclear radiation detectors. It has special equipment to repair the radiation detectors used in spectroscopy as the hyper pure Germanium for gamma radiation and the Lithium-silica for X-rays. There are different facilities in the laboratory that can become useful for other institutions that use radiation detectors. This laboratory was created to satisfy consultant services, training and repairing of the radiation detectors both in national and regional levels for Latin America. The laboratory has the following sections: Nuclear Electronic Instrumentation; where there are all kind of instruments for the measurement and characterization of detectors like multichannel analyzers of pulse height, personal computers, amplifiers and nuclear pulse preamplifiers, nuclear pulses generator, aleatories, computer programs for radiation spectra analysis, etc. High vacuum; there is a vacuum escape measurer, two high vacuum pumps to restore the vacuum of detectors, so the corresponding measurers and the necessary tools. Detectors cleaning; there is an anaerobic chamber for the detectors handling at inert atmosphere, a smoke extraction bell for cleaning with the detector solvents. Cryogenic; there are vessels and tools for handling liquid nitrogen which is used for cooling the detectors when they required it. (Author)

  20. Feasibility study on the solidification of liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trussell, S. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Spence, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to help determine the feasibility of solidifying a liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this report is to facilitate a decision on the disposition of these wastes by identifying any waste constituents that might (1) compromise the strength or stability of the waste form or (2) be highly leachable. Furthermore, its goal is to identify ways to circumvent interferences and to decrease the leachability of the waste constituents. This study has sought to provide an understanding of inhibition of cement set by identifying the fundamental chemical mechanisms by which this inhibition takes place. From this fundamental information, it is possible to draw some conclusions about the potential effects of waste constituents, even in the absence of particular studies on specific compounds.

  1. Adaptation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huq, Saleemul

    2011-11-15

    Efforts to help the world's poor will face crises in coming decades as climate change radically alters conditions. Action Research for Community Adapation in Bangladesh (ARCAB) is an action-research programme on responding to climate change impacts through community-based adaptation. Set in Bangladesh at 20 sites that are vulnerable to floods, droughts, cyclones and sea level rise, ARCAB will follow impacts and adaptation as they evolve over half a century or more. National and international 'research partners', collaborating with ten NGO 'action partners' with global reach, seek knowledge and solutions applicable worldwide. After a year setting up ARCAB, we share lessons on the programme's design and move into our first research cycle.

  2. Laboratory system strengthening and quality improvement in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun M. Hiwotu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2010, a National Laboratory Strategic Plan was set forth in Ethiopia to strengthen laboratory quality systems and set the stage for laboratory accreditation. As a result, the Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA programme was initiated in 45 Ethiopian laboratories. Objectives: This article discusses the implementation of the programme, the findings from the evaluation process and key challenges. Methods: The 45 laboratories were divided into two consecutive cohorts and staff from each laboratory participated in SLMTA training and improvement projects. The average amount of supportive supervision conducted in the laboratories was 68 hours for cohort I and two hoursfor cohort II. Baseline and exit audits were conducted in 44 of the laboratories and percent compliance was determined using a checklist with scores divided into zero- to five-star ratinglevels. Results: Improvements, ranging from < 1 to 51 percentage points, were noted in 42 laboratories, whilst decreases were recorded in two. The average scores at the baseline and exit audits were 40% and 58% for cohort I (p < 0.01; and 42% and 53% for cohort II (p < 0.01,respectively. The p-value for difference between cohorts was 0.07. At the exit audit, 61% ofthe first and 48% of the second cohort laboratories achieved an increase in star rating. Poor awareness, lack of harmonisation with other facility activities and the absence of a quality manual were challenges identified. Conclusion: Improvements resulting from SLMTA implementation are encouraging. Continuous advocacy at all levels of the health system is needed to ensure involvement of stakeholders and integration with other improvement initiatives and routine activities.

  3. Full-scale leaching study of commercial reactor waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a full-scale leaching experiment which has been conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to study the release of radionuclides from actual commercial reactor waste forms. While many studies characterizing the leaching behavior of simulated laboratory-scale waste forms have been performed, this program represents one of the first attempts in the United States to quantify activity releases for real, full-scale waste forms. 5 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  4. Impact of horizontal approach in vertical program: continuous quality improvement of malaria and tuberculosis diagnostic services at primary-level medical laboratories in the context of HIV care and treatment program in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinucci, Francesco; Manyazewal, Tsegahun; Paterniti, Antonio D; Medina-Moreno, Sandra; Wattleworth, Matthew; Hagembe, Juliana; Redfield, Robert R

    2013-03-01

    The use of standardized tools for continuous quality improvement of laboratory services is crucial to identify service gaps, plan targeted interventions, and prove successes. Laboratory quality improvement tools (LQITs) were developed and applied for 18 months at five health centers and one faith-based hospital laboratories in Southwest Showa Zone in Ethiopia to assess and monitor the quality of malaria and acid-fast bacilli (AFB) microscopy total testing processes. For the six laboratories, baseline malaria microscopy scores were 55%, 42%, 52%, 55%, 54%, and 61%. Similarly, baseline AFB microscopy scores were 49%, 41%, 46%, 58%, 44%, and 70%. On the sixth quarter for the first four laboratories and the fourth quarter for the last two laboratories, malaria microscopy scores were 89%, 88%, 88%, 90%, 88%, and 89%, whereas AFB microscopy scores were 90%, 88%, 89%, 95%, 88%, and 90%. All laboratories scored above 85% for both services at the end of interventions.

  5. Polyethylene encapsulation full-scale technology demonstration. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Lageraaen, P.R.

    1994-10-01

    A full-scale integrated technology demonstration of a polyethylene encapsulation process, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD), was conducted at the Environmental ampersand Waste Technology Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL.) in September 1994. As part of the Polymer Solidification National Effort, polyethylene encapsulation has been developed and tested at BNL as an alternative solidification technology for improved, cost-effective treatment of low-level radioactive (LLW), hazardous and mixed wastes. A fully equipped production-scale system, capable of processing 900 kg/hr (2000 lb/hr), has been installed at BNL. The demonstration covered all facets of the integrated processing system including pre-treatment of aqueous wastes, precise feed metering, extrusion processing, on-line quality control monitoring, and process control

  6. Leveraging Existing Laboratory Capacity towards Universal Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016 including francophone Burkina Faso and Benin,. Anglophone Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda among others. ... without laboratory infrastructure and inadequate staffing levels, point of care testing provided by non- ... However, laboratory services are challenged with low funding, poor laboratory infrastructure and low.

  7. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics. but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his/her students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations

  8. Laboratory diagnosis of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by pathogenic Leptospira species, for which humans are accidental hosts. It is endemic in the tropical urban areas including our country, where seasonal epidemics are becoming increasingly common. Laboratory tests are necessary to confirm the diagnosis of clinically suspected leptospirosis due to its varied symptomatology. Moreover, leptospirosis must always be considered during the differential diagnosis of other tropical febrile illnesses .Laboratory analysis depends on the samples available and temporal stage of the illness. A confusing array of laboratory tests is described for the detection of this spirochete and antibodies. The conventional tests include direct microscopy, culture and the most widely used reference standard method -the microscopic agglutination test. In addition a variety of newer serological tests and those based on molecular techniques have been described.This review has attempted to describe the basis of these techniques and discussed the relative advantages and drawbacks of these assays with special emphasis on the selection of the most appropriate specimen and test, and the correct interpretation of the test result

  9. System Quality Management in Software Testing Laboratory that Chooses Accreditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanet Brito R.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of software products will reach full maturity when executed by the scheme and provides third party certification. For the validity of the certification, the independent laboratory must be accredited for that function, using internationally recognized standards. This brings with it a challenge for the Industrial Laboratory Testing Software (LIPS, responsible for testing the products developed in Cuban Software Industry, define strategies that will permit it to offer services with a high level of quality. Therefore it is necessary to establish a system of quality management according to NC-ISO/IEC 17025: 2006 to continuously improve the operational capacity and technical competence of the laboratory, with a view to future accreditation of tests performed. This article discusses the process defined in the LIPS for the implementation of a Management System of Quality, from the current standards and trends, as a necessary step to opt for the accreditation of the tests performed.

  10. Biomedical laboratory science education: standardising teaching content in resource-limited countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Arneson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a worldwide shortage of qualified laboratory personnel to provide adequate testing for the detection and monitoring of diseases. In an effort to increase laboratory capacity in developing countries, new skills have been introduced into laboratory services. Curriculum revision with a focus on good laboratory practice is an important aspect of supplying entry-level graduates with the competencies needed to meet the current needs. Objectives: Gaps in application and problem-solving competencies of newly graduated laboratory personnel were discovered in Ethiopia, Tanzania and Kenya. New medical laboratory teaching content was developed in Ethiopia, Tanzania and Kenya using national instructors, tutors, and experts and consulting medical laboratory educators from the United States of America (USA. Method: Workshops were held in Ethiopia to create standardised biomedical laboratory science (BMLS lessons based on recently-revised course objectives with an emphasis on application of skills. In Tanzania, course-module teaching guides with objectives were developed based on established competency outcomes and tasks. In Kenya, example interactive presentations and lesson plans were developed by the USA medical laboratory educators prior to the workshop to serve as resources and templates for the development of lessons within the country itself. Results: The new teaching materials were implemented and faculty, students and other stakeholders reported successful outcomes. Conclusions: These approaches to updating curricula may be helpful as biomedical laboratory schools in other countries address gaps in the competencies of entry-level graduates.

  11. Availability of urinary albumin measurement in Southern Brazilian laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Aguiar Soares

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic kidney disease (DKD is the leading worldwide cause of end-stage renal disease. The current recommendation is to screen for DKD by evaluating estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and measuring urinary albumin (UA levels in a spot sample. The aim of this study was to evaluate the availability of UA measurement in Southern Brazilian laboratories.   Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the routine use of UA in all laboratories registered in the State Pharmacy Council ofRio Grande do Sul, the southernmost state ofBrazil. Data was collected by mail, e-mail, telephone, or personal interview. A sample size of at least 384 laboratories was necessary to achieve 5% precision at a 95% confidence level based on a fixed proportion of 0.5.   Results: Eight hundred and eighty laboratories currently registered in the state were invited to participate in the study; 548 (62% answered the technical specification questionnaire. Only 306 (55% of the 548 surveyed laboratories performed UA measurements. The laboratories were also required to provide the number of UA measurements performed per day, which ranged from less than one per week to 65 per day.  Conclusion: The availability of UA measurements is undesirably low inSouthern Brazil. This demonstrates the urgent need to increase the availability of this important test. It also reveals the gap between the current guidelines and the awareness about them among health care professionals.

  12. Denver District Laboratory (DEN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program CapabilitiesDEN-DO Laboratory is a multi-functional laboratory capable of analyzing most chemical analytes and pathogenic/non-pathogenic microorganisms found...

  13. Gun Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Gun Dynamics Laboratory is a research multi-task facility, which includes two firing bays, a high bay area and a second floor laboratory space. The high bay area...

  14. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a NASA funded facility, delivering heavy ion beams to a target area where scientists...

  15. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratoryThe Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  16. Lincoln Laboratory Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lincoln Laboratory Grid (LLGrid) is an interactive, on-demand parallel computing system that uses a large computing cluster to enable Laboratory researchers to...

  17. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  18. Laboratory of Chemical Physics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Current research in the Laboratory of Chemical Physics is primarily concerned with experimental, theoretical, and computational problems in the structure, dynamics,...

  19. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  20. Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory is equipped to investigate and characterize the lasing properties of semiconductor diode lasers. Lasing features such...

  1. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  2. Embedded Processor Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Embedded Processor Laboratory provides the means to design, develop, fabricate, and test embedded computers for missile guidance electronics systems in support...

  3. Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, researchers study how chemical looping combustion (CLC) can be applied to fossil energy systems....

  4. Geospatial Services Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: To process, store, and disseminate geospatial data to the Department of Defense and other Federal agencies.DESCRIPTION: The Geospatial Services Laboratory...

  5. [Theme: Using Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Jack; Braker, Clifton

    1982-01-01

    Pritchard discusses the opportunities for applied learning afforded by laboratories. Braker describes the evaluation of cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills in the agricultural mechanics laboratory. (SK)

  6. Wireless Emulation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Wireless Emulation Laboratory (WEL) is a researchtest bed used to investigate fundamental issues in networkscience. It is a research infrastructure that emulates...

  7. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  8. Space Weather Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Weather Computational Laboratory is a Unix and PC based modeling and simulation facility devoted to research analysis of naturally occurring electrically...

  9. Vehicle Development Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports the development of prototype deployment platform vehicles for offboard countermeasure systems.DESCRIPTION: The Vehicle Development Laboratory is...

  10. Fuels Processing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Fuels Processing Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, provides researchers with the equipment they need to thoroughly explore the catalytic issues associated with...

  11. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  12. FOOD SAFETY TESTING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory develops screening assays, tests and modifies biosensor equipment, and optimizes food safety testing protocols for the military and civilian sector...

  13. ANALYTICAL MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment that performs a broad array of microbiological analyses for pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. It performs challenge studies...

  14. Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory at the University of Maryland provides the state of the art facilities for realizing next generation products and educating the...

  15. COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory conducts basic and applied human research studies to characterize cognitive performance as influenced by militarily-relevant contextual and physical...

  16. Environmental Microbiology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Microbiology Laboratory, located in Bldg. 644 provides a dual-gas respirometer for measurement of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide evolution...

  17. Photovoltaic Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST's PV characterization laboratory is used to measure the electrical performance and opto-electronic properties of solar cells and modules. This facility consists...

  18. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  19. Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory is used to design and integrate computer hardware and software and related electronic subsystems for tactical vehicles....

  20. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  1. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  2. Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML) is one of the nation's leading research facilities for understanding aerosols, clouds, and their interactions. The AML...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 60 years, Sandia has delivered essential science and technology to resolve the nation's most challenging security issues.Sandia National Laboratories...

  4. Composites Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose of the Composites Characterization Laboratory is to investigate new and/or modified matrix materials and fibers for advanced composite applications both...

  5. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  6. Intelligent Optics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Intelligent Optics Laboratory supports sophisticated investigations on adaptive and nonlinear optics; advancedimaging and image processing; ground-to-ground and...

  7. Wind Structural Testing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides office space for industry researchers, experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, and space for assembling components...

  8. Central Laboratories Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The TVA Central Laboratories Services is a comprehensive technical support center, offering you a complete range of scientific, engineering, and technical services....

  9. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment under the Federal Facility Agreement for Bethel Valley low-level waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 2026 (High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory) and Building 2099 (Monitoring and Control Station) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This document presents a Design/Installation and Structural Integrity Assessment for a replacement tank system for portions of the Bethel Valley Low-Level Waste (LLW) System, located at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This issue of the assessment covers the design aspects of the replacement tank system, and certifies that the design has sufficient structural integrity and is acceptable for the storing or treating of hazardous and/or radioactive substances. This document will be reissued at a future date and will then include the assessment of the installation of the replacement tank system. The present issue identifies specific activities that must be completed during the fabrication, installation, and testing of the replacement tank system in order to provide assurance that the final installation complies with governing requirements

  10. Iranian Light Source Facility, A third generation light source laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rahighi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF project is the first large scale accelerator facility which is currently under planning in Iran. On the basis of the present design, circumference of the 3 GeV storage ring is 528 m. Beam current and natural beam emittance are 400 mA and 0.477 nm.rad, respectively. Some prototype accelerator components such as high power solid state radio frequency amplifiers, low level RF system, thermionic RF gun, H-type dipole and quadruple magnets, magnetic measurement laboratory and highly stable magnet power supplies have been constructed at ILSF R&D laboratory

  11. Principle extremum of full action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon I. Khmelnik

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A new variational principle extremum of full action is proposed, which extends the Lagrange formalism on dissipative systems. It is shown that this principle is applicable in electrical engineering, electrodynamics, mechanics and hydrodynamics, taking into account the friction forces. The proposed variational principle may be considered as a new formalism used as an universal method of physical equations derivation, and also as a method for solving these equations.

  12. Laboratory quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delvin, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    The elements (principles) of quality assurance can be applied to the operation of the analytical chemistry laboratory to provide an effective tool for indicating the competence of the laboratory and for helping to upgrade competence if necessary. When used, those elements establish the planned and systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence in each analytical result reported by the laboratory (the definition of laboratory quality assurance). The elements, as used at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), are discussed and they are qualification of analysts, written methods, sample receiving and storage, quality control, audit, and documentation. To establish a laboratory quality assurance program, a laboratory QA program plan is prepared to specify how the elements are to be implemented into laboratory operation. Benefits that can be obtained from using laboratory quality assurance are given. Experience at HEDL has shown that laboratory quality assurance is not a burden, but it is a useful and valuable tool for the analytical chemistry laboratory

  13. Argilas como catalisadores verdes na esterificação do colesterol: caracterização espectroscópica e identificação de polimorfos por métodos de análise térmica. Uma proposta laboratorial interdisciplinar para o 1º ciclo universitário Clays as green catalysts in the cholesterol esterification: spectroscopic characterization and polymorphs identification by thermal analysis methods. An interdisciplinary laboratorial proposal for the undergraduate level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa M. R. Maria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment that enables the professor to introduce the problematic of sustainable development in pharmaceutical chemistry to undergraduate students is proposed, using a simple synthetic procedure. Cholesteryl acetate is prepared by the esterification of cholesterol using Montmorillonite K10 as heterogeneous catalyst. Cholesterol and cholesteryl acetate are characterized by spectroscopic (¹H RMN, 13C RMN, FTIR and thermal analysis techniques. The thermal methods are used to introduce the concepts of polymorphism and the nature of mesophases.

  14. Rectilinear Full Steiner Tree Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariasen, Martin

    1999-01-01

    The fastest exact algorithm (in practice) for the rectilinear Steiner tree problem in the plane uses a two-phase scheme: First, a small but sufficient set of full Steiner trees (FSTs) is generated and then a Steiner minimum tree is constructed from this set by using simple backtrack search, dynamic...

  15. [Endoscopic full-thickness resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, B; Schmidt, A; Caca, K

    2016-08-01

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are powerful tools for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasms. However, those techniques are limited to the superficial layers of the GI wall (mucosa and submucosa). Lesions without lifting sign (usually arising from deeper layers) or lesions in difficult anatomic positions (appendix, diverticulum) are difficult - if not impossible - to resect using conventional techniques, due to the increased risk of complications. For larger lesions (>2 cm), ESD appears to be superior to the conventional techniques because of the en bloc resection, but the procedure is technically challenging, time consuming, and associated with complications even in experienced hands. Since the development of the over-the-scope clips (OTSC), complications like bleeding or perforation can be endoscopically better managed. In recent years, different endoscopic full-thickness resection techniques came to the focus of interventional endoscopy. Since September 2014, the full-thickness resection device (FTRD) has the CE marking in Europe for full-thickness resection in the lower GI tract. Technically the device is based on the OTSC system and combines OTSC application and snare polypectomy in one step. This study shows all full-thickness resection techniques currently available, but clearly focuses on the experience with the FTRD in the lower GI tract.

  16. Department of Energy multiprogram laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The Panel recommends the following major roles and missions for the laboratories: perform the Department's national trust fundamental research missions in the physical sciences, including high energy and nuclear physics, and the radiobiological sciences including nuclear medicine; sustain scientific staff core capabilities and specialized research facilities for laboratory research purposes and for use by other Federal agencies and the private sector; perform independent scientific and technical assessment or verification studies required by the Department; and perform generic research and development where it is judged to be in the public interest or where for economic or technical reasons industry does not choose to support it. Organizational efficiencies if implemented by the Department could contribute toward optimal performance of the laboratories. The Panel recommends that a high level official, such as a Deputy Under Secretary, be appointed to serve as Chief Laboratory Executive with authority to help determine and defend the research and development budget, to allocate resources, to decide where work is to be done, and to assess periodically laboratory performance. Laboratory directors should be given substantially more flexibility to deploy resources and to initiate or adapt programs within broad guidelines provided by the Department. The panel recommends the following actions to increase the usefulness of the laboratories and to promote technology transfer to the private sector: establish user groups for all major mission programs and facilities to ensure greater relevance for Department and laboratory efforts; allow the laboratories to do more reimbursable work for others (other Federal agencies, state and local governments, and industry) by relaxing constraints on such work; implement vigorously the recently liberalized patent policy; permit and encourage joint ventures with industry

  17. Research and Progress on Virtual Cloud Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jian Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, cloud computing technology has experienced continuous development and improvement, and has gradually expanded to the education sector. First, this paper will introduce the background knowledge of the current virtual cloud laboratory; by comparing the advantages and disadvantages between traditional laboratory and virtual cloud laboratory, and comparing the application, advantages and disadvantages, and development trend of OpenStack technology and VMWare technology in safety, performance, design, function, use case, and value of virtual cloud laboratory, this paper concludes that application based on OpenStack virtual cloud laboratory in universities and research institutes and other departments is essential.

  18. Half Empty or Half Full?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Tyler; Rohr, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Previously appearing in this journal were photographs of a physics apparatus, developed circa 1880, that was believed to be used to demonstrate the "Bernoulli effect." Drawings of these photographs appear here and show that when there is no flow, the water level h[subscript PT2] in the piezometer tube at location (2) is at the same level…

  19. Energy Materials Research Laboratory (EMRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energy Materials Research Laboratory at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) creates a cross-disciplinary laboratory facility that lends itself to the...

  20. Risk management at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.; Strait, R.S.

    1993-10-01

    Managing risks at a large national laboratory presents a unique set of challenges. These challenges include the management of a broad diversity of activities, the need to balance research flexibility against management control, and a plethora of requirements flowing from regulatory and oversight bodies. This paper will present the experiences of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in risk management and in dealing with these challenges. While general risk management has been practiced successfully by all levels of Laboratory management, this paper will focus on the Laboratory's use of probabilistic safety assessment and prioritization techniques and the integration of these techniques into Laboratory operations