WorldWideScience

Sample records for fuel-oil study weatherization

  1. Experimental plan for the fuel-oil study. Weatherization Assistance Program: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.; Brown, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    An up-to-date assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) is being performed by the US Department of Energy WAP Division and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Five studies form the evaluation. Major goals of the Fuel-Oil Study are to estimate the fuel oil saved by the WAP in the Northeast during the 1990 and 1991 program years, identify and quantify non-energy impacts of the WAP, assess the cost effectiveness of the WAP within this submarket, and assess factors which may cause savings and cost effectiveness to vary. The study will only analyze single-family houses in the nine states in the Northeast census region and will be carried out over two heating seasons (1990 and 1991 WAP program years). A split-winter, pre- and post-weatherization experimental design with a control group will be used. Houses will be monitored over one winter. Energy conservation measures will be installed in the weatherized houses in January of each winter by the local WAP subgrantee. One hundred twenty five weatherized houses and 75 control houses will be monitored over the 1990--1991 winter; a different set of 200 houses will be monitored over the 1991--1992 winter. The houses will be evenly distributed among 25 subgrantees. Space-heating fuel-oil consumption, indoor temperature, and outdoor temperature data will be collected for all houses. Fuel-oil delivery data will be collected for each house monitored over the 1990--1991 winter for at least a year before weatherization. The delivery data will be analyzed to determine if the accuracy of the study can be improved by collecting fuel-oil delivery data on a larger sample of houses over the 1991--1992 winter. Detailed survey information will be obtained on all the houses. This information includes descriptive details of the house and its mechanical systems, details on household size and other demographics, and occupant answers to questions regarding comfort, safety, and operation of their space-heating system and house.

  2. Impacts of the Weatherization Assistance Program in fuel-oil heated houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levins, W.P.; Ternes, M.P.

    1994-09-01

    The U.S. DOE Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) Division requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory to help design and conduct an up-to-date assessment of the Program. The evaluation includes five separate studies; the fuel oil study is the subject of this paper. The primary goal of the fuel-oil study was to provide a region-wide estimate of the space-heating fuel oil saved by the Program in the Northeast during the 1991 and 1992 program years. Other goals include assessing the cost effectiveness of the Program within the fuel-oil submarket, and identifying factors which caused fuel-oil savings to vary. This paper reports only the highlights from the fuel-oil study`s final report.

  3. Impacts of the Weatherization Assistance Program in fuel-oil heated houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levins, W.P.; Ternes, M.P.

    1994-10-01

    In 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a national evaluation of its lowincome Weatherization Assistance Program. This report, which is one of five parts of that evaluation, evaluates the energy savings and cost-effectiveness of the Program as it had been applied to single-family houses heated primarily by fuel-oil. The study was based upon a representative sample (41 local weatherization agencies, 222 weatherized and 115 control houses) from the nine northeastern states during 1991 and 1992 program years. Dwelling-specific and agency-level data on measures installed, costs, and service delivery procedures were collected from the sampled agencies. Space-heating fuel-oil consumption, indoor temperature, and outdoor temperature were monitored at each house. Dwelling characteristics, air-leakage measurements, space-heating system steady-state efficiency measurements, safety inspections, and occupant questionnaires were also collected or performed at each monitored house. We estimate that the Program weatherized a total of 23,400 single-family fuel-oil heated houses in the nine northeastern states during program years 1991 and 1992. Annual fuel-oil savings were calculated using regression techniques to normalize the savings to standard weather conditions. For the northeast region, annual net fuel-oil savings averaged 160 gallons per house, or 17.7% of pre-weatherization consumption. Although indoor temperatures changed in individual houses following weatherization, there was no average change and no significant difference as compared to the control houses; thus, there was no overall indoor temperature takeback effect influencing fuel-oil savings. The weatherization work was performed cost effectively in these houses from the Program perspective, which included both installation costs and overhead and management costs but did not include non-energy benefits (such as employment and environmental).

  4. Impacts of the Weatherization Assistance Program in Fuel-Oil Heated Houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levins, W.P.

    1994-01-01

    In 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a national evaluation of its low-income Weatherization Assistance Program. This report, which is one of five parts of that evaluation, evaluates the energy savings and cost-effectiveness of the Program as it had been applied to single-family houses heated primarily by fuel-oil. The study was based upon a representative sample (41 local weatherization agencies, 222 weatherized and 115 control houses) from the nine northeastern states during 1991 and 1992 program years. Dwelling-specific and agency-level data on measures installed, costs, and service delivery procedures were collected from the sampled agencies. Space-heating fuel-oil consumption, indoor temperature, and outdoor temperature were monitored at each house. Dwelling characteristics, air-leakage measurements, space-heating system steady-state efficiency measurements, safety inspections, and occupant questionnaires were also collected or performed at each monitored house. We estimate that the Program weatherized a total of 23,400 single-family fuel-oil heated houses in the nine northeastern states during program years 1991 and 1992. Annual fuel-oil savings were calculated using regression techniques to normalize the savings to standard weather conditions. For the northeast region, annual net fuel-oil savings averaged 160 gallons per house, or 17.7% of pre-weatherization consumption. Although indoor temperatures changed in individual houses following weatherization, there was no average change and no significant difference as compared to the control houses; thus, there was no overall indoor temperature takeback effect influencing fuel-oil savings. The weatherization work was performed cost effectively in these houses from the Program perspective, which included both installation costs and overhead and management costs but did not include non-energy benefits (such as employment and environmental). Total average costs were $1819 per house ($1192 for

  5. Fuel oil-induced adrenal hypertrophy in ranch mink (Mustela vison): effects of sex, fuel oil weathering, and response to adrenocorticotropic hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, F C; Lasley, B; Bursian, S

    2010-01-01

    Environmental contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons from anthropogenic sources can be a cause of stress for free-ranging wildlife. The response of wildlife to chemical contaminants requires that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis be precisely regulated to allow for proper glucocorticoid-mediated adaptive responses. Chronic oral exposure to low concentrations of bunker C fuel oil causes the development of adrenal hypertrophy in male ranch mink (Mustela vison) without increasing serum or fecal glucocorticoid concentrations. This hypertrophy is an adaptive response to fuel oil-induced adrenal insufficiency. To determine if the same phenomenon occurs in female mink or male mink exposed to artificially weathered fuel oil, female mink were fed 0 ppm (mineral oil) or 420 ppm fuel oil and male mink were exposed to 0 ppm, 420 ppm fuel oil, or 480 ppm artificially weathered fuel oil in the diet for 60-62 days. At the end of the exposure, serum glucocorticoid concentrations were assayed along with body and organ weight measurements. Fecal glucocorticoid concentrations were assayed at time points throughout the exposure. Male mink fed fuel oil or weathered fuel oil and female mink fed fuel oil had adrenal enlargement without any significant increases in the serum or fecal concentration of glucocorticoids, which is consistent with fuel oil-induced adrenal insufficiency. To address the physiological consequences of adrenal insufficiency, fuel oil-exposed male mink were administered an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test. Fuel oil-exposed animals had a smaller incremental increase in serum glucocorticoid concentration after ACTH challenge compared to control animals. Our findings provide further evidence that the HPA axis of fuel oil-exposed animals is compromised and, therefore, not able to respond appropriately to the diverse stressors found in the environment.

  6. Experimental plan for the fuel-oil study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.; Brown, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    An up-to-date assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) is being performed by the US Department of Energy WAP Division and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Five studies form the evaluation. Major goals of the Fuel-Oil Study are to estimate the fuel oil saved by the WAP in the Northeast during the 1990 and 1991 program years, identify and quantify non-energy impacts of the WAP, assess the cost effectiveness of the WAP within this submarket, and assess factors which may cause savings and cost effectiveness to vary. The study will only analyze single-family houses in the nine states in the Northeast census region and will be carried out over two heating seasons (1990 and 1991 WAP program years). A split-winter, pre- and post-weatherization experimental design with a control group will be used. Houses will be monitored over one winter. Energy conservation measures will be installed in the weatherized houses in January of each winter by the local WAP subgrantee. One hundred twenty five weatherized houses and 75 control houses will be monitored over the 1990--1991 winter; a different set of 200 houses will be monitored over the 1991--1992 winter. The houses will be evenly distributed among 25 subgrantees. Space-heating fuel-oil consumption, indoor temperature, and outdoor temperature data will be collected for all houses. Fuel-oil delivery data will be collected for each house monitored over the 1990--1991 winter for at least a year before weatherization. The delivery data will be analyzed to determine if the accuracy of the study can be improved by collecting fuel-oil delivery data on a larger sample of houses over the 1991--1992 winter. Detailed survey information will be obtained on all the houses. This information includes descriptive details of the house and its mechanical systems, details on household size and other demographics, and occupant answers to questions regarding comfort, safety, and operation of their space-heating system and house.

  7. The Biomarker Changes of a Heavy Fuel Oil After Different Weathering Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qimin; NI Zhanglin; YU Zhigang

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of composition changes of heavy fuel oil by simulating weathering in static seawater under natural environmental conditions. The results indicate: n-C10 to n-C15 were lost gradually in 24 weeks and the relative abundance of alkanes with long chains (n-C19) increased markedly. The aromatic compounds with less than two rings (except C4N) were completely lost in 24 weeks and CnP and CnD became the main aromatics in the heavy fuel oil after 24 weeks. The ratios of n-C17/Pristane (Pr) and n-C18/Phytane (Ph) were suitable for identifying lightly weathered (3 weeks) heavy fuel oil. The ratios of n-C17/n-C18 and Pr/Ph were suitable for identifying moderately weathered heavy fuel oil (12 weeks); the ratios of C2D/C2P and C3D/C3P did not change significantly in 24 weeks and were more suitable for identifying moderately weathered heavy fuel oil (24 weeks).

  8. The comparison of two heavy fuel oils in composition and weathering pattern, based on IR, GC-FID and GC-MS analyses: application to the Prestige wreackage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Varela, R; Andrade, J M; Muniategui, S; Prada, D; Ramírez-Villalobos, F

    2009-03-01

    This paper compares the weathering patterns of two similar fuel oils: a fuel oil spilled after a ship accident (Prestige-Nassau, off the Galician coast -NW Spain-) and a fuel designed to cope with the numerous quests for samples to carry out scientific studies (IFO). Comparative studies were made to evaluate the capability of common fingerprinting analytical techniques to differentiate the fuels, as well as their capabilities to monitor their weathering. The two products were spilled under controlled conditions during ca. four months to assess how they evolved on time. Mid-IR spectrometry and gas chromatography (flame ionization and mass spectrometry detectors) were used. IR indexes related to total aromaticity, type of substituents (branched or linear chains) and degree of aromatic substitution reflected well the differences between the fuels during weathering. Regarding the chromatographic measurements, the n-alkanes became highly reduced for both fuel oils and it was found that the PAHs of the synthetic fuel (IFO) were more resistant to weathering. Regarding biomarkers, the different profiles of the steranes, diasteranes and triaromatic steroids allowed for a simple differentiation amongst the two products. The %D2/P2 ratio differentiated both products whereas the %N3/P2 one ordered the samples according to the extent of their weathering.

  9. Study of the competitive viability of minority fuel oil marketers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-30

    Previous studies on the competitive viability of the fuel oil heating market had addressed some of the unique problems facing minority fuel oil marketers (MFMs) within the total market sector (TMS). This study focused on identifying and developing quantitative information on MFMs in the TMS. The specific objective was to determine whether the business problems experienced by MFMs were directly related to their minority status or were characterstic of any firm in the TMS operating under comparable conditions. As an overall conclusion, thorough investigation of the MFMs considered to constitute the universe of minoriy firms within the TMS did not reveal any evidence of overt discrimination affecting the competitive viability of MFMs. Upon analysis, the problems reported by MFMs could not be reasonably ascribed to discrimination on the basis of their minority business status. The study, however, did point up problems unique to MFMs as the result of typical operational and financial characteristics. For example, MFMs, compared to the TMS norm, have not been in the market as long and are smaller in terms of total assets, number of employees, number of trucks, number of accounts and annual volume of oil delivered. Their primary customers are low-income families in urban areas. Financial indicators suggest that the average MFM does not have long-term financial stability. The basis for this overall conclusion, derived by analyses of information from MFMs, as well as many independent sources, is summarized in three parts: (1) MFM industry profile; (2) financial analyses; and (3) problem analyses.

  10. A case study on fuel oil contamination in a mangrove swamp in Hong Kong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, N.F.Y.; Wong, T.W.Y.; Wong, Y.S. [City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong). Department of Biology

    2005-07-01

    Mangroves commonly found along tropical and subtropical coastlines are susceptible to oil pollution. In December 2000, around 500 1 m tall Kandelia candel saplings at the age of 3-5 years old located at the foreshore region of Sheung Pak Nai swamp, Hong Kong SAR, were found to be damaged by oil pollution. More than 80% of the saplings were either dead or washed away and leaving less than 5% healthy saplings with dense green leaves. Elevated concentrations of light n-alkanes (ranging from n-C{sub 14} to n-C{sub 20}), pristane and phytane were recorded in surface sediments collected in December 2000. The ratio between light and total n-alkanes was 0.4. The total petroleum hydrocarbons (60-80 {mu}g g{sup -1} TPH) and unresolved complex mixtures (60-70 {mu}g g{sup -1} UCM) were higher than the background values of other mangrove sediments in Hong Kong, which were 40 and 20 {mu}g g{sup -1}, respectively. In certain root zone sediments, TPH concentrations were above 1000 {mu}g g{sup -1}. These results suggest that surface sediments in Sheung Pak Nai were contaminated by petroleum oil, most likely by illegal discharge of fuel oil which occurred between 1998 and 2002. One year later, in December 2001, unhealthy saplings had recovered and re-grown. The concentrations of TPH and UCM in sediments declined to around 40 {mu}g g{sup -1}, pristane and phytane dropped by 80%, and the ratio of light to total n-alkanes was 0.15, suggesting that residual oil in sediments was weathered leading to a remarkable recovery of the unhealthy saplings. (author)

  11. A case study on fuel oil contamination in a mangrove swamp in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Nora F Y; Wong, Teresa W Y; Wong, Y S

    2005-01-01

    Mangroves commonly found along tropical and subtropical coastlines are susceptible to oil pollution. In December 2000, around 500 1 m tall Kandelia candel saplings at the age of 3-5 years old located at the foreshore region of Sheung Pak Nai swamp, Hong Kong SAR, were found to be damaged by oil pollution. More than 80% of the saplings were either dead or washed away and leaving less than 5% healthy saplings with dense green leaves. Elevated concentrations of light n-alkanes (ranging from n-C14 to n-C20), pristane and phytane were recorded in surface sediments collected in December 2000. The ratio between light and total n-alkanes was 0.4. The total petroleum hydrocarbons (60-80 microg g(-1) TPH) and unresolved complex mixtures (60-70 microg g(-1) UCM) were higher than the background values of other mangrove sediments in Hong Kong, which were 40 and 20 microg g(-1), respectively. In certain root zone sediments, TPH concentrations were above 1000 microg g(-1). These results suggest that surface sediments in Sheung Pak Nai were contaminated by petroleum oil, most likely by illegal discharge of fuel oil which occurred between 1998 and 2002. One year later, in December 2001, unhealthy saplings had recovered and re-grown. The concentrations of TPH and UCM in sediments declined to around 40 microg g(-1), pristane and phytane dropped by 80%, and the ratio of light to total n-alkanes was 0.15, suggesting that residual oil in sediments was weathered leading to a remarkable recovery of the unhealthy saplings.

  12. TG/DTG, FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry, and NMR Spectroscopy Study of Heavy Fuel Oil

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2015-11-12

    There is an increasing interest in the comprehensive study of heavy fuel oil (HFO) due to its growing use in furnaces, boilers, marines, and recently in gas turbines. In this work, the thermal combustion characteristics and chemical composition of HFO were investigated using a range of techniques. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was conducted to study the nonisothermal HFO combustion behavior. Chemical characterization of HFO was accomplished using various standard methods in addition to direct infusion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (APCI-FTICR MS), high resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 13C NMR, and two-dimensional heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) spectroscopy. By analyzing thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) results, three different reaction regions were identified in the combustion of HFO with air, specifically, low temperature oxidation region (LTO), fuel deposition (FD), and high temperature oxidation (HTO) region. At the high end of the LTO region, a mass transfer resistance (skin effect) was evident. Kinetic analysis in LTO and HTO regions was conducted using two different kinetic models to calculate the apparent activation energy. In both models, HTO activation energies are higher than those for LTO. The FT-ICR MS technique resolved thousands of aromatic and sulfur containing compounds in the HFO sample and provided compositional details for individual molecules of three major class species. The major classes of compounds included species with one sulfur atom (S1), with two sulfur atoms (S2), and purely hydrocarbons (HC). The DBE (double bond equivalent) abundance plots established for S1 and HC provided additional information on their distributions in the HFO sample. The 1H NMR and 13C NMR results revealed that nearly 59% of the 1H nuclei were distributed as paraffinic CH2 and 5% were in aromatic groups. Nearly 21% of 13C nuclei were

  13. Fuel oil quality task force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laisy, J.; Turk, V. [R.W. Beckett Corp., Elyria, OH (United States)

    1997-09-01

    In April, 1996, the R.W. Beckett Corporation became aware of a series of apparently unrelated symptoms that made the leadership of the company concerned that there could be a fuel oil quality problem. A task force of company employees and industry consultants was convened to address the topic of current No. 2 heating oil quality and its effect on burner performance. The task force studied changes in fuel oil specifications and trends in properties that have occurred over the past few years. Experiments were performed at Beckett and Brookhaven National Laboratory to understand the effect of changes in some fuel oil properties. Studies by other groups were reviewed, and field installations were inspected to gain information about the performance of fuel oil that is currently being used in the U.S. and Canada. There was a special concern about the use of red dye in heating oils and the impact of sulfur levels due to the October, 1993 requirement of low sulfur (<0.05%) for on-highway diesel fuel. The results of the task force`s efforts were published in July, 1996. The primary conclusion of the task force was that there is not a crisis or widespread general problem with fuel oil quality. Localized problems that were seen may have been related to refinery practices and/or non-traditional fuel sources. System cleanliness is very important and the cause of many oil burner system problems. Finally, heating oil quality should get ongoing careful attention by Beckett engineering personnel and heating oil industry groups.

  14. Keys to success: Ten case studies of effective weatherization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Kolb, J.O.; White, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F.; Wilson, T. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    In 1990, DOE initiated a nationwide evaluation of its Weatherization Program, with assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an advisory group of 40 weatherization professionals, program managers, and researchers. The evaluation is comprised of three impact studies covering the Program`s major market segments: Single-family homes, mobile homes, and dwellings in small (2 to 4-unit) multifamily buildings (the Single-Family Study), Single-family homes heated primarily with fuel oil (the Fuel-Oil Study), and Dwellings in buildings with five or more units (the Multifamily Study). The Single-Family Study, the subject of this report, is a critical part of this coordinated evaluation effort. Its focus on single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and dwellings in small multifamily buildings covers 83% of the income-eligible population and 96% of the dwellings weatherized during Program Year 1989. The first phase of the Single-Family Study involved the analysis of a massive data base of information collected from 368 local weatherization agencies and 543 electric and gas utilities. This analysis resulted in energy-saving and cost-effectiveness estimates for the Weatherization Program and the identification of a set of ten high-performing agencies located throughout the country. The second phase, which is the subject of this report, involves a ``process`` evaluation of these ten high performers, aimed at identifying those weatherization practices that explain their documented success.

  15. Acute toxicity, histopathology, and bioconcentration-retention studies with No. 2 fuel oil and the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus Rathbun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melzian, B.D.

    1982-01-01

    Adult male blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus Rathbun) were exposed in a flow-through system to five concentrations, nominally 0.0 (control), 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, or 20.0 ppm of the water accommodated fraction (WAF) of No. 2 fuel oil. The 96-hour LC/sub 5//sup 0/ was 14.1 ppm. All crabs in the 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 ppm tanks exhibited abnormal behavior prior to death including periodic beating of the maxillipedal flagella, hyperactivity, ataxia, and equilibrium loss. The ability of adult male and female blue crabs to bioconcentrate and retain No. 2 fuel oil compounds was examined after crabs were exposed for two weeks or 30-35 days in flow-through systems to three sublethal No. 2 fuel oil WAF concentrations, nominally 0.00 (control), 0.01, or 1.0 ppm. Gill, hepatopancreas, and muscle tissues were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Trace amounts of fuel oil hydrocarbons were detected in gill and hepatopancreas at 0.01 ppm exposures. All tissues bioconcentrated fuel oil compounds during 1.0 ppm WAF exposure periods, and with the exception of the gills, little depuration or metabolism of the bioconcentrated compounds occurred during a period of 30 days in clean, running seawater.

  16. Experimental study on fuel oil combustion in circulating fluidized bed; Estudio experimental sobre la combustion de combustoleo en lecho fluidizado circulante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Rangel, Ricardo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    The Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) developed a circulating fluidized bed combustor of 0.5 thermal MW unique in its type in Latin America. The Bachelor`s thesis entitled ``Experimental Study on Fuel Oil Combustion in Circulating Fluidized Bed`` was performed operating this combustor with the purpose of determining the feasibility of burning heavy fuel oil in a stable and sustained form, as well as the effect of the addition of calcium carbonate to the combustor. The results of the experimental trials showed heavy fuel oil can be burned in a circulating fluidized bed, with low sulfur dioxide emissions. During the conduction of the experiments a sulfur retention of 43% was achieved with a Ca/S relationship of 4.5. [Espanol] El Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) desarrollo un combustor de lecho fluidizado circulante de 0.5 MW termicos de potencia, unico en su tipo en Latinoamerica. La tesis de licenciatura titulada Estudio Experimental sobre la Combustion de Combustoleo en Lecho Fluidizado Circulante se realizo operando dicho combustor, con el proposito de determinar la factibilidad de quemar combustoleo pesado en forma estable y autosostenida, asi como la influencia que tiene la adicion de carbonato de calcio al lecho. Los resultados de los ensayos experimentales mostraron que se puede quemar combustoleo pesado en un lecho fluidizado circulante, con bajas emisiones de bioxido de azufre. Durante la experimentacion se logro una retencion de azufre del 43%, con una relacion Ca/S de 4.5.

  17. Experimental and simulation studies of combustion of blended fuel oil for use in industrial gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, A.; Ani, F.N. [Teknologi Malaysia Univ., Johor (Malaysia). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering; Mamat, Z.A.; Zardi, Z. [TNB Research, Selangor (Malaysia); Aziz, A. [Prai Power Station, Penang (Malaysia)

    2006-07-01

    This paper described a preliminary investigation of the combustion properties of palm olein distillate blended with diesel in a combustion chamber. The aim of the study was to examine the efficacy of the fuel for use in industrial gas turbines with an unmodified gas system. Experiments were conducted for 100 per cent diesel and blends of diesel with 20, 40, and 50 per cent palm olein distillate. Combustion firing experiments were also conducted for 100 per cent palm olein distillates. Results of the study demonstrated that nitroge oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions ranged from between 30 and 55 ppm. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling was conducted in order to compare the performance of the various blends. Results showed that flow and temperature contours for fuels with lower palm olein percentages had a more uniform combustion process due to a higher rate of fuel vaporization. It was concluded that palm olein distillate blends of more than 40 per cent are not recommended, as the soot particles of higher blends cause damage to turbine casings. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  18. Mutagenic assessment of Prestige fuel oil spilled on the shore and submitted to field trials of bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueiro, Rosa Ana; Garrido, Manuel Joaquín; Araujo, Manuel

    2011-11-01

    The mutagenicy of the slightly weathered fuel oil from the Prestige oil spill and the effects of different bioremediation products (nutrients and/or microorganisms and biodiesel) on the potential mutagenic activity of this heavy fuel oil spilled on the shore were evaluated for a period of 1 year using the Ames Salmonella assay with strains TA98, TA100, TA1535 and TA1537 in the absence and presence of exogenous metabolic activation (S9 fraction from rat liver). The in situ bioremediation experiment was performed using tiles located in the supra-littoral and intertidal zones of a beach seriously affected by the fuel oil spill. The results obtained showed the mutagenic activity of the slightly weathered fuel oil extracts at the beginning of the experiment in strain TA98 that persisted for more than 150 days in both the untreated control and treated tiles independently of the zone of the beach considered. However, after 360 days neither the control nor the treated tiles in the intertidal zone showed mutagenic activity and a weak positive response in strain TA98 was detected for the control fuel oil extracts from supra-littoral tiles. The application of biodiesel to accelerate the biodegradation of this type of fuel oil may constitute a further genotoxic hazard to the environment, since the mutagenic response achieved from the biodiesel-fuel oil mixture in the first samplings (days 0 and 30) was more potent than that obtained from the control tiles. The mutagenic activity was detected along the study with S. typhimurium TA98 in both the presence and absence of S9 microsomal fraction, but the addition of S9 fraction in the assay always increased the number of revertants induced. In general, these findings suggest that the bioremediation strategies used were not effective in eliminating the genotoxic hazard associated with this heavy fuel oil attached to rocky substrate since they did not achieve a decrease in the mutagenic response with respect to the untreated control

  19. Conversion of fuel-oil in gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payamaras, Jahangir; Payamara, Aria [Shahed University, Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], Email: jahangirpayamara@yahoo.com

    2011-07-01

    Refining heavy petroleum requires significant amounts of energy, up to 4800 MJ/t. This energy is traditionally provided by petroleum with up to 18% of it being burnt down for heat support, resulting in the emission of large amounts of greenhouse gases. Currently research is focused on developing other energy sources such as solar energy to power refineries. The aim of this paper is to study the pyrolysis and gasification processes of fuel-oil in a solar furnace. This study was carried out over a temperature range of 500 to 1000 degrees celsius and with the use of a concentrator for solar radiation. Results showed that 65% of fuel-oil is converted at pyrolysis and 84% at gasification and that the gaseous products are 20% hydrogen and 40% olefin; the processes reached 67% power efficiency. This study presented the use of solar energy to power heavy oil refineries.

  20. Fuel oil and LPG; Fioul et GPL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippon, A. [UFIP, Union Francaise des Industries Petroliere, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    The impacts of new environmental regulations on the heavy fuel oil and refining French markets, are studied. Illustrated with numerous diagrams concerning oil price evolution, fuel price comparison, market shares, consumption data, etc., it is shown that a brutal elimination of high sulfur content oil fuels would cause an extremely negative impact for the refining industry and for the French economy. Sulfur content limits should be kept at their present levels and users should be free to select technical choices in order to keep within these limits, either through fume desulfurization either through fuel-natural gas mixed combustion

  1. Development of a chromatographic method for the study of the stability and compatibility of Mexican fuel oils; Desarrollo de un metodo cromatografico para el estudio de estabilidad y compatibilidad de combustoleos mexicanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blass Amador, Georgina; Panama Tirado, Luz Angelica [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1992-11-01

    In Mexico, the largest part of the generated electric energy comes from the use of residual heavy oils known as fuel oils which have suffered quality degradation due to a combination of factors, among which stands out the changes in the refining process. It is necessary to develop methods capable of indicating the instability (formation of sediment or viscosity increase during storage or heating) or incompatibility (formation of sediment in mixing two or more fuel oils) of the fuel oils employed in fossil fuel power plants. This work objective was to develop an alternative test for the study of the compatibility and/or stability of Mexican fuel oils using high resolution liquid chromatography (CLAR) and so to determine structural aspects of the fuel oil that determine its stability. Since the formation of sediments occurs when the dissolving ability of the fuel is inadequate to keep the asphaltenes in solution, it is important to know the solvent power degree or aromaticity of the diluent; so, in the first part of this work the attention was centered in the determination of the profile of aromatic compounds of the fuel oil diluents, the other part was dedicated to the determination of the distribution profile the molecular weights of the asphaltenes present in the fuel oils. The profiles of the aromatic fraction, as well as of the molecular weight distribution were determined using liquid chromatography, in which a variety of columns and solvents were used. A combination of routine tests was accomplished, such as asphaltenes content, toluene equivalence, viscosity, etc., in order to obtain correlation with the chromatographic method developed. In this article it is only discussed the section corresponding to the obtainment of the profile of aromatics content in the fuel oils. It has been found a correlation among the asphaltenes content, toluene equivalence, aromaticity profiles and stability. As a direct consequence, it is expected to be able to predict the

  2. Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1997 report provides information, illustrations and state-level statistical data on end-use sales of kerosene; No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 distillate fuel oil; and residual fuel oil. State-level kerosene sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, farm, and all other uses. State-level distillate sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, oil company, railroad, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, farm, on-highway, off highway construction, and other uses. State-level residual fuel sales include volumes for commercial, industrial, oil company, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, and other uses. 24 tabs.

  3. Role of dispersion in fuel oil bioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderhorst, J.R.; Gibson, C.I.; Moore, L.J.

    1976-01-01

    Three methods of oil-seawater contact were used to measure aqueous phase concentrations of No. 2 fuel oil and the resulting mortality of shrimp, PANDALUS DANAE. Oil--water entry methods included: (1) separate inflow below the water surface, (2) mixture inflow above the water surface, and (3) separate inflow above the water surface. The importance of standardizing the conditions under which oil and water are mixed prior to use in bioassay studies and the amount of dispersion that occurs during the exposure period was noted. Under the three sets of mixing conditions, identical volumes of oil and water resulted in significant differences in observed mortality and measured amounts of oil in the water column, as either total or soluble oil.

  4. Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-29

    This publication contains the 1992 survey results of the ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report`` (Form EIA-821). This is the fourth year that the survey data have appeared in a separate publication. Prior to the 1989 report, the statistics appeared in the Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) for reference year 1988 and the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM for reference years 1984 through 1987. The 1992 edition marks the ninth annual presentation of the results of the ongoing ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report`` survey. Except for the kerosene and on-highway diesel information, data presented in Tables 1 through 12 (Sales of Fuel Oil and Kerosene) present results of the EIA-821 survey. Tables 13 through 24 (Adjusted Sales of Fuel Oil and Kerosene) include volumes that are based on the EIA-821 survey but have been adjusted to equal the products supplied volumes published in the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA).

  5. Bioremediation of contaminated mixtures of desert mining soil and sawdust with fuel oil by aerated in-vessel composting in the Atacama Region (Chile).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Faúndez, Alex; Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca; Reyes-Bozo, Lorenzo; Camaño, Andrés; Sáez-Navarrete, César

    2008-03-01

    Since early 1900s, with the beginning of mining operations and especially in the last decade, small, although repetitive spills of fuel oil had occurred frequently in the Chilean mining desert industry during reparation and maintenance of machinery, as well as casual accidents. Normally, soils and sawdust had been used as cheap readily available sorbent materials of spills of fuel oil, consisting of complex mixtures of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Chilean legislation considers these fuel oil contaminated mixtures of soil and sawdust as hazardous wastes, and thus they must be contained. It remains unknown whether it would be feasible to clean-up Chilean desert soils with high salinity and metal content, historically polluted with different commercial fuel oil, and contained during years. Thus, this study evaluated the feasibility of aerated in-vessel composting at a laboratory scale as a bioremediation technology to clean-up contaminated desert mining soils (fuel concentration>50,000 mg kg(-1)) and sawdust (fuel concentration>225,000 mg kg(-1)) in the Atacama Region. The composting reactors were operated using five soil to sawdust ratios (S:SD, 1:0, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, 0:1, on a dry weight basis) under mesophilic temperatures (30-40 degrees C), constant moisture content (MC, 50%) and continuous aeration (16 l min(-1)) during 56 days. Fuel oil concentration and physico-chemical changes in the composting reactors were monitored following standard procedures. The highest (59%) and the lowest (35%) contaminant removals were observed in the contaminated sawdust and contaminated soil reactors after 56 days of treatment, respectively. The S:SD ratio, time of treatment and interaction between both factors had a significant effect (p<0.050) on the contaminant removal. The results of this research indicate that bioremediation of an aged contaminated mixture of desert mining soil and sawdust with fuel oil is feasible. This study recommends a S:SD ratio 1:3 and a correct

  6. Bioremediation of contaminated mixtures of desert mining soil and sawdust with fuel oil by aerated in-vessel composting in the Atacama Region (Chile)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godoy-Faundez, Alex [Department of Chemical Engineering and Bioprocesses, Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Chile (Chile)], E-mail: agodoy@puc.cl; Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca [Department of Water and Environment Science and Technology, University of Bulevar Ronda Rufino Peon, 39316 Torrelavega, Cantabria (Spain)], E-mail: b_antizar@hotmail.com; Reyes-Bozo, Lorenzo [Department of Chemical Engineering and Bioprocesses, Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Chile (Chile); Camano, Andres [Minera Escondida Ltd. (Chile); Saez-Navarrete, Cesar [Department of Chemical Engineering and Bioprocesses, Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Chile (Chile)], E-mail: csaez@ing.puc.cl

    2008-03-01

    Since early 1900s, with the beginning of mining operations and especially in the last decade, small, although repetitive spills of fuel oil had occurred frequently in the Chilean mining desert industry during reparation and maintenance of machinery, as well as casual accidents. Normally, soils and sawdust had been used as cheap readily available sorbent materials of spills of fuel oil, consisting of complex mixtures of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Chilean legislation considers these fuel oil contaminated mixtures of soil and sawdust as hazardous wastes, and thus they must be contained. It remains unknown whether it would be feasible to clean-up Chilean desert soils with high salinity and metal content, historically polluted with different commercial fuel oil, and contained during years. Thus, this study evaluated the feasibility of aerated in-vessel composting at a laboratory scale as a bioremediation technology to clean-up contaminated desert mining soils (fuel concentration > 50,000 mg kg{sup -1}) and sawdust (fuel concentration > 225,000 mg kg{sup -1}) in the Atacama Region. The composting reactors were operated using five soil to sawdust ratios (S:SD, 1:0, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, 0:1, on a dry weight basis) under mesophilic temperatures (30-40 deg. C), constant moisture content (MC, 50%) and continuous aeration (16 l min{sup -1}) during 56 days. Fuel oil concentration and physico-chemical changes in the composting reactors were monitored following standard procedures. The highest (59%) and the lowest (35%) contaminant removals were observed in the contaminated sawdust and contaminated soil reactors after 56 days of treatment, respectively. The S:SD ratio, time of treatment and interaction between both factors had a significant effect (p < 0.050) on the contaminant removal. The results of this research indicate that bioremediation of an aged contaminated mixture of desert mining soil and sawdust with fuel oil is feasible. This study recommends a S:SD ratio 1

  7. Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-27

    This publication contains the 1994 survey results of the ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report`` (Form EIA-821). This is the sixth year that the survey data have appeared in a separate publication. Prior to the 1989 report, the statistics appeared in the Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA)for reference year 1988 and the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) for reference years 1984 through 1987. The 1994 edition marks the 11th annual presentation of the results of the ongoing ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report`` survey. Distillate and residual fuel oil sales continued to move in opposite directions during 1994. Distillate sales rose for the third year in a row, due to a growing economy. Residual fuel oil sales, on the other hand, declined for the sixth year in a row, due to competitive natural gas prices, and a warmer heating season than in 1993. Distillate fuel oil sales increased 4.4 percent while residual fuel oil sales declined 1.6 percent. Kerosene sales decreased 1.4 percent in 1994.

  8. Model for the calculation of pressure loss through heavy fuel oil transfer pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Luis Laurencio-Alfonso,

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Considering the limitations of methodologies and empirical correlations in the evaluation of simultaneous effects produced by viscous and mix strength during the transfer of fluids through pipelines, this article presents the functional relationships that describe the pressure variations for the non-Newtonian fuel oil flowrate. The experimental study was conducted based on a characterization of the rheological behavior of fuel oil and modeling for a pseudoplastic behavior. The resulting model describes temperature changes, viscous friction effects and the effects of blending flow layers; which is therefore the basis of calculation for the selection, evaluation and rationalization of transport of heavy fuel oil by pipelines.

  9. Toxicity of Water Accommodated Fractions of Estonian Shale Fuel Oils to Aquatic Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinova, Irina; Kanarbik, Liina; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Kahru, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Estonia is the worldwide leading producer of the fuel oils from the oil shale. We evaluated the ecotoxicity of water accommodated fraction (WAF) of two Estonian shale fuel oils ("VKG D" and "VKG sweet") to aquatic species belonging to different trophic levels (marine bacteria, freshwater crustaceans and aquatic plants). Artificial fresh water and natural lake water were used to prepare WAFs. "VKG sweet" (lower density) proved more toxic to aquatic species than "VKG D" (higher density). Our data indicate that though shale oils were very toxic to crustaceans, the short-term exposure of Daphnia magna to sub-lethal concentrations of shale fuel oils WAFs may increase the reproductive potential of survived organisms. The weak correlation between measured chemical parameters (C10-C40 hydrocarbons and sum of 16 PAHs) and WAF's toxicity to studied species indicates that such integrated chemical parameters are not very informative for prediction of shale fuel oils ecotoxicity.

  10. Bunker C. fuel oil reduces mallard egg hatchability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaro, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    Assessment of the effect of Bunker C fuel oil on artificially-incubated mallard eggs. Eggshell applications of 5-50 ul of Bunker C fuel oil were made on day 8 of incubation; measured hatching success.

  11. 46 CFR 169.234 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations. 169.234 Section 169... VESSELS Inspection and Certification Drydocking Or Hauling Out § 169.234 Integral fuel oil tank examinations. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located within...

  12. Flash pyrolysis fuel oil: BIO-POK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, S. [Neste Oy, Porvoo (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    Flash pyrolysis oil from Ensyn Tech., Canada and Union Fenosa, Spain was combusted with simple pressure atomisation equipment commonly used with light fuel oils in intermediate size (0.1-1 MW) boilers. With a number of modifications to the combustion system, carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrous oxide (NO{sub x}) could be reduced to acceptable levels: CO < 30 ppm and NO{sub x} < 140 ppm. Particulate emissions which were initially very high (Bacharach 4-5) were reduced (Bach. 2-3) by system changes but are still higher than from light fuel oil (Bach. <1). The modifications to the combustion system were: acid resistant progressive cavity pump, higher oil preheat temperature and higher oil pressure than for light fuel oils, refractory section between burner and boiler warmed up to at least 800 deg C. In addition, it was necessary to store pyrolysis oil samples under inert conditions to prevent oxidation and to rinse nozzles with alcohol after shutdown to prevent coking. The complexity and cost of these system modifications are considered to be too great for current grades of flash pyrolysis oil to be sold as a light fuel oil replacement. Improvements to fuel quality will be necessary. The main improvements are lowering of viscosity and improving of stability

  13. Flash pyrolysis fuel oil: bio-pok

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, S. [Neste Oy, Porvoo (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    Samples of flash pyrolysis liquid produced by Union Fenosa, Spain from pine and straw and samples produced by Ensyn of Canada from mixed hardwoods were combusted with simple pressure atomization equipment commonly used with light fuel oils in intermediate size (0.1-1 MW) boilers. With a number of modifications to the combustion system, carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrous oxide (NO{sub x}) could be reduced to acceptable levels: CO < 30 ppm and NO{sub x} < 140 ppm. Particulate emissions which were initially very high (Bacharach 4-5) were reduced (Bach. 2-3) by system improvements but are still higher than from light fuel oil (Bach. <1). The modifications to the combustion system were: refractory section between burner and boiler, acid resistant progressive cavity pump, higher liquid preheat temperature and higher pressure than for light fuel oils. The main problems with pyrolysis liquids concerns their instability or reactivity. At temperatures above 100 deg C they begin to coke, their viscosity increases during storage and oxygen from air causes skin formation. This requires that special handling procedures are developed for fuel storage, delivery and combustion systems. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of soy based heavy fuel oil emulsifiers for energy efficiency and environmental improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, P.K.; Szuhaj, B.F. [Central Soya Company, Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Diego, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    It is known that the emulsification of water into heavy fuel oil (No. 6) can result in improved atomization of the fuel in a combustion chamber, which results in several benefits. In this study, two soybean lecithin based emulsifiers were evaluated. The emulsifiers were added to the No. 6 fuel at 0.5% and 1 % levels and emulsions of 10% and 15% water were prepared and burned in a pilot scale combustion chamber. The results showed a significant decrease in NO{sub x} emissions, and a reduction in carbon particulates, as well as a decrease in the excess oxygen requirement when the emulsions were burned when compared to fuel oil alone and a fuel oil/water mixture without the emulsifier. It was concluded that the use of a soybean lecithin based emulsifier may be used to increase the burning efficiency of heavy fuel oils, reduce emissions and particulates, and reduce down time for cleaning. This can be very important in utility plants which burn large volumes of heavy fuel oil and are located near urban areas.

  15. 46 CFR 58.01-10 - Fuel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel oil. 58.01-10 Section 58.01-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-10 Fuel oil. (a) The following limits apply to the use of oil as fuel: (1) Except as otherwise permitted by this section, no fuel oil with a flashpoint of less than 60...

  16. 46 CFR 78.17-75 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 78.17-75 Section 78.17-75..., Drills, and Inspections § 78.17-75 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log be made of each supply of fuel oil received on board, stating...

  17. 19 CFR 10.62 - Bunker fuel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bunker fuel oil. 10.62 Section 10.62 Customs... Equipment for Vessels § 10.62 Bunker fuel oil. (a) Withdrawal under section 309, Tariff Act of 1930, as... section 309, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1309), when all the bunker fuel oil in a...

  18. 46 CFR 97.15-55 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 97.15-55 Section 97.15-55... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 97.15-55 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log to be made of each supply of fuel oil received...

  19. An FTIR method for the analysis of crude and heavy fuel oil asphaltenes to assist in oil fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Brenden J; Lennard, Chris; Fuller, Stephen; Spikmans, Val

    2016-09-01

    A proof-of-concept spectroscopic method for crude and heavy fuel oil asphaltenes was developed to complement existing methods for source determination of oil spills. Current methods rely on the analysis of the volatile fraction of oils by Gas Chromatography (GC), whilst the non-volatile fraction, including asphaltenes, is discarded. By discarding the non-volatile fraction, important oil fingerprinting information is potentially lost. Ten oil samples representing various geographical regions were used in this study. The asphaltene fraction was precipitated from the oils using excess n-pentane, and analysed by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Based on visual interpretation of FTIR spectra along with peak height ratio comparisons, all ten oil samples could be differentiated from one another. Furthermore, ATR-FTIR was not able to differentiate a weathered crude oil sample from its source sample, demonstrating significant potential for the application of asphaltenes in oil fingerprinting.

  20. Results of industrial tests of carbonate additive to fuel oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvereva, E. R.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Shageev, M. F.; Akhmetvalieva, G. R.

    2017-08-01

    Fuel oil plays an important role in the energy balance of our country. The quality of fuel oil significantly affects the conditions of its transport, storage, and combustion; release of contaminants to atmosphere; and the operation of main and auxiliary facilities of HPPs. According to the Energy Strategy of Russia for the Period until 2030, the oil-refining ratio gradually increases; as a result, the fraction of straight-run fuel oil in heavy fuel oils consistently decreases, which leads to the worsening of performance characteristics of fuel oil. Consequently, the problem of the increase in the quality of residual fuel oil is quite topical. In this paper, it is suggested to treat fuel oil by additives during its combustion, which would provide the improvement of ecological and economic indicators of oil-fired HPPs. Advantages of this method include simplicity of implementation, low energy and capital expenses, and the possibility to use production waste as additives. In the paper, the results are presented of industrial tests of the combustion of fuel oil with the additive of dewatered carbonate sludge, which is formed during coagulation and lime treatment of environmental waters on HPPs. The design of a volume delivery device is developed for the steady additive input to the boiler air duct. The values are given for the main parameters of the condition of a TGM-84B boiler plant. The mechanism of action of dewatered carbonate sludge on sulfur oxides, which are formed during fuel oil combustion, is considered. Results of industrial tests indicate the decrease in the mass fraction of discharged sulfur oxides by 36.5%. Evaluation of the prevented damage from sulfur oxide discharged into atmospheric air shows that the combustion of the fuel oil of 100 brand using carbonate sludge as an additive (0.1 wt %) saves nearly 6 million rubles a year during environmental actions at the consumption of fuel oil of 138240 t/year.

  1. Five case studies of multifamily weatherization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, L; Wilson, T.; Lewis, G. [Synertech Systems Corp. (United States); MacDonald, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The multifamily case studies that are the subject of this report were conducted to provide a better understanding of the approach taken by program operators in weatherizing large buildings. Because of significant variations in building construction and energy systems across the country, five states were selected based on their high level of multifamily weatherization. This report summarizes findings from case studies conducted by multifamily weatherization operations in five cities. The case studies were conducted between January and November 1994. Each of the case studies involved extensive interviews with the staff of weatherization subgrantees conducting multifamily weatherization, the inspection of 4 to 12 buildings weatherized between 1991 and 1993, and the analysis of savings and costs. The case studies focused on innovative techniques which appear to work well.

  2. China's Fuel Oil Output Drops But Import Jumps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Fuel oil is one of the varieties in the oil products highly marketed in China. The price of fuel oil has been entirely deregulated on the basis of marketing since China's Planning Commission released the new oil prizing methods on October 15, 2001, basically linking the domestic price to the international market.

  3. The economics of sulphur in heavy fuel oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, T. (Coopers and Lybrand Deloitte (GB))

    1991-01-01

    The sulphur premium, the price differential between high and low sulphur fuel oil, has trended upwards in recent years as Western governments have imposed increasingly tighter limits on both the quality of fuel oil supplied and emissions of polluting gases from the burning of fuel oil. This trend has had a significant impact on the relative prices of sweet and sour crudes and the economics of refining and power generation, in addition to the prices of natural gas index-linked partly to heavy fuel oil under long-term contracts. In this article, an analysis is made of the economics of sulphur content in heavy fuel oil, the outlook for the sulphur premium in Western Europe and the broader implications for the oil and gas industries. It is argued that, in spite of ever-tightening environmental controls, there is probably only relatively limited scope for a further rise in the sulphur premium over the coming years. (author).

  4. The recuperation of the fuel oil of the Prestige; Recuperacion del fuel oil del Prestige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remon, M. A.

    2003-07-01

    It is not lacking to remember the catastrophe of the PRESTIGE, because it has been object of the constant attention of communication media form the month of November of the year 2002. when it was produced the sinking. The purpose of this article is to deal with an aspect very concrete of this sinister, the recuperation of the fuel-oil that still remains in the sunken boat. (Author)

  5. 46 CFR 31.10-24 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL. 31.10-24... CERTIFICATION Inspections § 31.10-24 Integral fuel oil tank examinations—T/ALL. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located within the hull (integral fuel oil tank) is...

  6. Response of meiofauna to petroleum hydrocarbon of three fuel oils

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A.; Farshchi, P.; Badesab, S.

    Oil spills are recurrent problem in marine system. Effects of oil pollution are many. The present paper evaluates the effect of Petroleum Hydrocarbon of three fuel oils on metazoan meiofauna. The results suggest significant variations in the toxic...

  7. Key findings of the national weatherization evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.

    1994-10-01

    In 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, the nation`s largest residential energy conservation program. The primary goal of the evaluation was to establish whether the Program meets the objectives of its enabling legislation and fulfills its mission statement, to reduce the heating and cooling costs for low-income families-particularly the elderly, persons with disabilities, and children by improving the energy-efficiency of their homes and ensuring their health and safety. Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed a five-part study which produced a series of documents evaluating the Program. The objective of this document is to summarize the findings of the five-part National Weatherization Evaluation. The five studies were as follows: (1) Network Study-this study characterized the weatherization network`s leveraging, capabilities, procedures, staff, technologies, and innovations; (2) Resources and Population Study-this study profiled low-income weatherization resources, the weatherized population, and the population remaining to be served; (3) Multifamily Study-this study described the nature and extent of weatherization activities in larger multifamily buildings; (4) Single-family Study-this study estimated the national savings and cost- effectiveness of weatherizing single-family and small multifamily dwellings that use natural gas or electricity for space heating; (5) Fuel-Oil Study-this study estimated the savings and cost-effectiveness of weatherizing single-family homes, located in nine northeastern states, that use fuel oil for space heating. This paper provides a brief overview of each study`s purposes, research methods and most important findings.

  8. Effects of exposure to Prestige-like heavy fuel oil and to perfluorooctane sulfonate on conventional biomarkers and target gene transcription in the thicklip grey mullet Chelon labrosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilbao, E.; Raingeard, D.; Diaz de Cerio, O.; Ortiz-Zarragoitia, M.; Ruiz, P.; Izagirre, U.; Orbea, A.; Marigomez, I.; Cajaraville, M.P. [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Histology, Department of Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, School of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Cancio, I., E-mail: ibon.cancio@ehu.es [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Histology, Department of Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, School of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Thicklip grey mullets Chelon labrosus inhabit coastal and estuarine areas where they can be chronically exposed to commonly released pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and perfluorinated compounds. These pollutants can also originate from accidental spills, such as the Prestige oil spill in 2002, which resulted in the release of a heavy fuel oil that affected coastal ecosystems in the Bay of Biscay. Peroxisome proliferation (PP), induced biotransformation metabolism, immunosuppression and endocrine disruption are some of the possible biological effects caused by such chemicals. With the aim of studying the effects of organic toxic chemicals on such biological processes at the transcriptional and at the cell/tissue level, juvenile mullets were exposed to the typical mammalian peroxisome proliferator perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and to fresh (F) and weathered (WF) Prestige-like heavy fuel oil for 2 and 16 days. First, fragments of genes relevant to biotransformation, immune/inflammatory and endocrine disruption processes were cloned using degenerate primers. Fuel oil elicited a significant PP response as proved by the transcriptional upregulation of palmitoyl-CoA oxidase (aox1), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor {alpha} (ppar{alpha}) and retinoic X receptor, by the AOX1 activity induction and by the increased peroxisomal volume density. PFOS only elicited a significant induction of AOX1 activity at day 2 and of PPAR{alpha} mRNA expression at day 16. All treatments significantly increased catalase mRNA expression at day 16 in liver and at day 2 in gill. Cyp1a transcription (liver and gill) and EROD activity were induced in fuel oil treated organisms. In the case of phase II metabolism only hepatic glutathione S-transferase mRNA was overexpressed in mullets exposed to WF for 16 days. Functionally, this response was reflected in a significant accumulation of bile PAH metabolites. WF treated fish accumulated mainly high molecular

  9. Space Weather Studies at Istanbul Technical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymaz, Zerefsan

    2016-07-01

    This presentation will introduce the Upper Atmosphere and Space Weather Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University (ITU). It has been established to support the educational needs of the Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 2011 to conduct scientific research in Space Weather, Space Environment, Space Environment-Spacecraft Interactions, Space instrumentation and Upper Atmospheric studies. Currently the laboratory has some essential infrastructure and the most instrumentation for ionospheric observations and ground induced currents from the magnetosphere. The laboratory has two subunits: SWIFT dealing with Space Weather Instrumentation and Forecasting unit and SWDPA dealing with Space Weather Data Processing and Analysis. The research area covers wide range of upper atmospheric and space science studies from ionosphere, ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling, magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms, distant magnetotail, magnetopause and bow shock studies, as well as solar and solar wind disturbances and their interaction with the Earth's space environment. We also study the spacecraft environment interaction and novel plasma instrument design. Several scientific projects have been carried out in the laboratory. Operational objectives of our laboratory will be carried out with the collaboration of NASA's Space Weather Laboratory and the facilities are in the process of integration to their prediction services. Educational and research objectives, as well as the examples from the research carried out in our laboratory will be demonstrated in this presentation.

  10. The refining industry and the future of the fuel oils; L'industrie du raffinage et le devenir des fiouls lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleille, S

    2004-01-15

    The fuel oils consumption decrease in France since 1970, because of the two petroleum crisis, the nuclear energy competition and the air pollution. The fuel oils industry is then looking other export possibilities. This report aims to offer a first approach of the problem and presents the main challenges. The first part is devoted to the technical context (definition, production and outlet. The second part presents the environmental context and the fuel oils market. In the third part the market is studied at the world scale, in the fourth at the french scale and in the fifth at the scale of other countries as United States, Japan and european Union. A synthesis tables is given in the last part to compare and propose some hypothesis concerning the future of fuel oils and the french refining industry. (A.L.B.)

  11. THE COMPARISION OF SOMA LIGNITE COAL AN FUEL-OIL WITH GEOTHERMAL ENERGY FOR HEATING BUILDINGS

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNTÜRKÜN, Rüstü

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a house that has four storeys and one hundred square meters flat was taken sample. Because this house can be heated with three different alternatives Soma lignite coal, fuel oil and geothermal, necessary first investment and annual heating costs were investigated. In addition, at heating building of geothermal energy whether became economic was researched. Economic analysis of used fuels at heating to a flat that is one hundred square meters been done. According to result of...

  12. Monitoring of Olympic National Park Beaches to determine fate and effects of spilled bunker C fuel oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, J.A.; Cullinan, V.I.; Crecelius, E.A.; Fortman, T.J.; Citterman, R.J.; Fleischmann, M.L.

    1990-10-01

    On December 23, 1988, the barge Nestucca was accidentally struck by its tow, a Souse Brothers Towing Company tug, releasing approximately 230,000 gallons of Bunker C fuel oil and fouling beaches from Grays Harbor north to Vancouver Island. Affected beaches in Washington included a 40-mile-long strip that has been recently added to Olympic National Park. The purpose of the monitoring program documented in this report was to determine the fate of spilled Bunker C fuel oil on selected Washington coastal beaches. We sought to determine (1) how much oil remained in intertidal and shallow subtidal habitats following clean-up and weathering, (2) to what extent intertidal and/or shallow subtidal biotic assemblages have been contaminated, and (3) how rapidly the oil has left the ecosystem. 45 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Injection of heavy fuel oil into the blast furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paloposki, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland); Hakala, J.; Mannila, P.; Laukkanen, J. [Oulu Univ. (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    This study deals with the injection and combustion of heavy fuel oil in blast furnaces. The injection of the oil was studied experimentally in a small-scale test rig. The combustion of the oil was analysed with a commercial computer program for flow and combustion simulations. Results from computer simulations show that the combustion of the oil can be improved by decreasing the size of the oil drops and by enhancing the mixing between the oil drops and the hot blast. The devolatilization rate of the oil mainly depends on the size of the oil drops. The combustion rate of the volatiles mainly depends on the effectiveness of turbulent mixing with combustion air. Methods to decrease the size of the oil drops were sought in the experimental part of the study. Experimental results show that the size of the oil drops increases with increasing mass flow rate of the oil and decreases with increasing velocity of the hot blast. Methods to improve the mixing between the oil drops and the hot blast are suggested but have not yet been experimentally tested. (author) (4 refs.)

  14. Environmental effects of soil contamination by shale fuel oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanarbik, Liina; Blinova, Irina; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Künnis-Beres, Kai; Kahru, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Estonia is currently one of the leading producers of shale oils in the world. Increased production, transportation and use of shale oils entail risks of environmental contamination. This paper studies the behaviour of two shale fuel oils (SFOs)--'VKG D' and 'VKG sweet'--in different soil matrices under natural climatic conditions. Dynamics of SFOs' hydrocarbons (C10-C40), 16 PAHs, and a number of soil heterotrophic bacteria in oil-spiked soils was investigated during the long-term (1 year) outdoor experiment. In parallel, toxicity of aqueous leachates of oil-spiked soils to aquatic organisms (crustaceans Daphnia magna and Thamnocephalus platyurus and marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri) and terrestrial plants (Sinapis alba and Hordeum vulgare) was evaluated. Our data showed that in temperate climate conditions, the degradation of SFOs in the oil-contaminated soils was very slow: after 1 year of treatment, the decrease of total hydrocarbons' content in the soil did not exceed 25 %. In spite of the comparable chemical composition of the two studied SFOs, the VKG sweet posed higher hazard to the environment than the heavier fraction (VKG D) due to its higher mobility in the soil as well as higher toxicity to aquatic and terrestrial species. Our study demonstrated that the correlation between chemical parameters (such as total hydrocarbons or total PAHs) widely used for the evaluation of the soil pollution levels and corresponding toxicity to aquatic and terrestrial organisms was weak.

  15. Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Flow Field Measurement Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, H.; Dentz, J.; Doty, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

  16. Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Field Measurement Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Hugh [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative (ARIES), New York, NY (United States); Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative (ARIES), New York, NY (United States); Doty, Chris [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative (ARIES), New York, NY (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

  17. China's Fuel Oil Imports Continues to Hit Record High

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ China, the world's second-largest oil consumer, has managed to set a new full-year record for fuel oil imports in just 10 months, a clear sign of its appetite for refined oil products will continue unabated next year. According to data issued in late-November by China's General Administration of Customs, the country imported 2.1 million metric tons of fuel oil in October, up 26 percent from the same month last year, bringing total imports in the first 10 months to 24.76million tons.

  18. Multi-objective optimization of fuel oil blending using the jumping gene adaptation of genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khosla, Dinesh K.; Gupta, Santosh K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Saraf, Deoki N. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun 248007 (India)

    2007-01-15

    Production and marketing of heavy fuel oil (HFO) are an easy, effective and economical way to dispose off certain very heavy refinery streams such as short residue (SR, available from the bottom of vacuum distillation units) and clarified liquid oil (CLO, available from the bottom of the main fractionators of fluidized-bed catalytic crackers). Certain lighter streams such as heavy cycle oil (HCO), light cycle oil (LCO) and kerosene, are added to the heavy residual stock to improve its quality in terms of fluidity, combustibility, etc., to be marketed as fuel oil. The present study aims at optimization of the fuel oil blending process to maximize profit, minimize quality give-away, maximize production, minimize use of lighter products such as LCO and kerosene, and maximize the calorific value, etc. Several multi-objective optimization problems have been formulated comprising of two and three-objective functions and solved using the elitist non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II). This evolutionary technique produces a set of non-dominating (equally good) Pareto optimal solutions from which the operator can choose the one that is most suitable (preferred point). Also, a fixed-length macro-macro mutation operator, inspired by jumping genes in natural genetics, has been used with NSGA-II to solve this problem. This modified algorithm leads to a significant reduction in the computational effort. Indeed, this adaptation can be of immense use in reducing the computational effort for other problems in chemical engineering. (author)

  19. An Empirical Analysis of the Price Discovery Function of Shanghai Fuel Oil Futures Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhen; Liu Zhenhai; Chen Chao

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes the role of price discovery of Shanghai fuel oil futures market by using methods, such as unit root test, co-integration test, error correction model, Granger causality test, impulse-response function and variance decomposition. The results showed that there exists a strong relationship between the spot price of Huangpu fuel oil spot market and the futures price of Shanghai fuel oil futures market. In addition, the Shanghai fuel oil futures market exhibits a highly effective price discovery function.

  20. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the mixing of fuel oil with air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, A.; Bombach, R.; Hubschmid, W.; Kaeppeli, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    We report on measurements of the mixing of fuel oil with air at atmospheric pressure in an industrial premixed gas turbine burner. The concentration of the vaporized fuel oil was measured with laser induced fluorescence. We reason that the fuel oil concentration can be considered with good accuracy as proportional to the fluorescence intensity. (author) 6 fig., 3 refs.

  1. 32 CFR 766.13 - Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and... aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies. (a) General policy. In accordance with sections 1107 and 1108 of... Aviation fuel, oil, services, and supplies are not sold to civil aircraft in competition with...

  2. 46 CFR 167.15-40 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL. 167.15-40... PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Inspections § 167.15-40 Integral fuel oil tank examinations—T/ALL. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located within the hull...

  3. China Kicks off Fuel Oil Futures in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ China, the world's No. 2 oil consumer only after the United States, rolled out fuel oil futures for the first time in a decade on August 25, offering hedging tools to firms wincing at sky-high prices and paving the way for crude oil derivatives.

  4. The prestige oil spill. I. Biodegradation of a heavy fuel oil under simulated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Sergi; Sabatté, Jordi; Viñas, Marc; Bayona, Josep M; Solanas, Anna M; Albaigés, Joan

    2005-09-01

    In vitro biodegradation of the Prestige heavy fuel oil has been carried out using two microbial consortia obtained by enrichment in different substrates to simulate its environmental fate and potential utility for bioremediation. Different conditions, such as incubation time (i.e., 20 or 40 d), oil weathering, and addition of an oleophilic fertilizer (S200), were evaluated. Weathering slowed down the degradation of the fuel oil, probably because of the loss of lower and more labile components, but the addition of S200 enhanced significantly the extension of the biodegradation. n-Alkanes, alkylcyclohexanes, alkylbenzenes, and the two- to three-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were degraded in 20 or 40 d of incubation of the original oil, whereas the biodegradation efficiency decreased for higher PAHs and with the increase of alkylation. Molecular markers were degraded according to the following sequence: Acyclic isoprenoids > diasteranes > C27-steranes > betabeta-steranes > homohopanes > monoaromatic steranes > triaromatic steranes. Isomeric selectivity was observed within the C1- and C2-phenanthrenes, dibenzothiophenes, pyrenes, and chrysenes, providing source and weathering indices for the characterization of the heavy oil spill. Acyclic isoprenoids, C27-steranes, C1- and C2-naphthalenes, phenanthrenes, and dibenzothiophenes were degraded completely when S200 was used. The ratios of the C2- and C3-alkyl homologues of fluoranthene/pyrene and chrysene/benzo[a]anthracene are proposed as source ratios in moderately degraded oils. The 4-methylpyrene and 3-methylchrysene were refractory enough to serve as conserved internal markers in assessing the degradation of the aromatic fraction in a manner similar to that of hopane, as used for the aliphatic fraction.

  5. Asphaltenes in Mexican fuel oils; Asfaltenos en combustoleos mexicanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longoria Ramirez, Rigoberto [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    In this article the main aspects in which the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) has worked to contribute to the solution of problems due to the presence of asphaltenes in national fuel oils, are emphasized. The increment of these compounds, that concentrate harmful elements, in the last ten years has reached 22% by weight of the fuel oil. It is demonstrated that the quantification of asphaltenes depends on the type of solvent employed. [Espanol] En este articulo se subrayan los principales aspectos en los que el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) ha trabajado para contribuir a la solucion de problemas debidos a la presencia de asfaltenos en combustoleos nacionales. El incremento de estos compuestos, que concentran elementos nocivos, en los ultimos diez anos ha llegado hasta un 22% del peso del combustoleo. Se demuestra que la cuantificacion de los asfaltenos depende del tipo de solvente utilizado.

  6. Quality Improvement of an Acid Treated Fuel Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Jumoke ETERIGHO

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The work on the quality improvement of fuel oil using acid treatment was carried out. The improvement of the fuel oil was done using sulphuric acid to remove contaminants. Sulphuric acid at different concentrations were mixed with the oil and kept at 45°C for four hours in the agitator vessel to allow reaction to take place. Acidic sludge was then drained off from the agitator and the oil was neutralized with sodium hydroxide. Centrifugation operation was used to extract the sulphonate dispersed in the oil. The treated and untreated oils were characterized for various properties and the results showed that the viscosity, total sulphur of fuel oil decreased from 6.0 to before 5.0 cst after acid treatment and 2.57 to 1.2225% w/w respectively while the flash point increased from 248 to 264°F. The water and sediment content increased from trace before to 0.6 after treatment. In addition, the calorific value increased from initial value of 44,368 to 44,805 and 44,715 kJ/kg at 50% and 75% conc. H2SO4 while decreasing with 85% and 90% conc. H2SO4. However, both carbon residue and ash content decreases with an increase in acid concentration.

  7. 用废弃生物质快速生产生物燃油新工艺及转锥式裂解装置设计%Study on Fast Producting Bio-fuel-oil New Technology and Designon ZKR500 Rotating Cone Reactor for Flash Pyrolysis/Liquefaction of Biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王述洋; 谭文英; 陈爱军

    2000-01-01

    研究探讨了一种能够将废弃生物质快速液化转换成生物质液化燃油的新技术方法,并研究设计出适用于该工艺的关键设备"ZKR-500型转锥式废弃生物质快速裂解液化反应器"·%A new process for fast producing bio-fuel-oil by solid biomass and design of the key equipment of the process ZKR500 Rotating Cone Reactor for Flash Pyrolysis Liquefaction of Biomass were studied in the paper.

  8. Desulfurization of fuel oils using an advanced oxidation method; Desulfuracion de combustibles usando un metodo de oxidacion avanzada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Velazquez, Roberto; Rodas Grapain, Arturo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, the oxidative desulfurization of fuel oils assisted by ultrasound was analyzed. It was studied the effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration, the fuel oil to aqueous solution volumetric ratio, and type of catalyst. The Fenton-like catalysts studied were ferric chloride and copper sulfate. [Spanish] En esta investigacion se analiza la desulfuracion oxidativa de combustoleo asistida con ultrasonido. Tambien se estudia el efecto de la concentracion de peroxido de hidrogeno (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), la relacion volumetrica combustoleo/solucion acuosa y el tipo de catalizador. Los catalizadores tipo Fenton que se estudiaron fueron el cloruro ferrico (FeCl{sub 3}) y el sulfato de cobre (CuSO{sub 4}).

  9. Storage of Residual Fuel Oil in Underground Unlined Rock Caverns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    Francaise des Petroles BP, Elf Union, Shell Francaise, and Compagnie Francaise de Raffinage (Total). The company and its subsidiaries were formed with...DEC 80 D C BANKS UNCLASSIFIED WES/NP/S4.-8O-19 ti. LE VEL MISCELLANEOUS PAPER GL-80-19 31 STORAGE OF RESIDUAL FUEL OIL IN UNDERGROUND UNLINED ROCK...Ruimaia.~ indl a riiirI( le ol Air in1 wi r’ hve en coIit’Icted to enc1ouraige muiliriershnpl I[I the i 5kRM. 1) By Innf t-Ii .fi’ I ’I.]%- I "W

  10. Study on Hail Weather Analysis and Forecast in Guilin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The hail weather and forecast storm in Guilin were studied. [Method] In allusion to the occurrence of hailstorm in Guilin and considering the observation data of a new generation of Doppler weather radar in Guilin, the weather situation and radar echo characteristics in Guilin was summarized so as to explore the short time forecast method. [Result] There were one or two icy storms every year in Guilin. The occurrence of icy storm was distinctly influenced by terrain. A new generation of Doppler ...

  11. A case study on fine weather in Western Antarctic Peninsula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄耀荣; 许淙; 尹涛; 张海影

    2001-01-01

    Great Wall Station, the local fine weather was studied. Pressure, temperature and humidity field, and aerological stratification were analyzed synoptically. Two kinds of fine weather with different physical characteristics were found; one was caused by the spreading of subtropical high with high temerature and high humidity, and another was connected with polar highwith low temperature and low humidity. The research provide a synoptic background for the local fine weather forecast.

  12. Physical characterization of biomass-based pyrolysis liquids. Application of standard fuel oil analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oasmaa, A.; Leppaemaeki, E.; Koponen, P.; Levander, J.; Tapola, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-31

    The main purpose of the study was to test the applicability of standard fuel oil methods developed for petroleum-based fuels to pyrolysis liquids. In addition, research on sampling, homogeneity, stability, miscibility and corrosivity was carried out. The standard methods have been tested for several different pyrolysis liquids. Recommendations on sampling, sample size and small modifications of standard methods are presented. In general, most of the methods can be used as such but the accuracy of the analysis can be improved by minor modifications. Fuel oil analyses not suitable for pyrolysis liquids have been identified. Homogeneity of the liquids is the most critical factor in accurate analysis. The presence of air bubbles may disturb in several analyses. Sample preheating and prefiltration should be avoided when possible. The former may cause changes in the composition and structure of the pyrolysis liquid. The latter may remove part of organic material with particles. The size of the sample should be determined on the basis of the homogeneity and the water content of the liquid. The basic analyses of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) include water, pH, solids, ash, Conradson carbon residue, heating value, CHN, density, viscosity, pourpoint, flash point, and stability. Additional analyses are carried out when needed. (orig.) 53 refs.

  13. Catalytic transformation of waste polymers to fuel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Waste not, want not: The increase in waste polymer generation, which continues to exceed recycle, represents a critical environmental burden. However, plastic waste may be viewed as a potential resource and, with the correct treatment, can serve as hydrocarbon raw material or as fuel oil, as described in this Minireview.Effective waste management must address waste reduction, reuse, recovery, and recycle. The consumption of plastics continues to grow, and, while plastic recycle has seen a significant increase since the early 1990s, consumption still far exceeds recycle. However, waste plastic can be viewed as a potential resource and can serve, with the correct treatment, as hydrocarbon raw material or as fuel oil. This Minireview considers the role of catalysis in waste polymer reprocessing and provides a critical overview of the existing waste plastic treatment technologies. Thermal pyrolysis results in a random scissioning of the polymer chains, generating products with varying molecular weights. Catalytic degradation provides control over the product composition/distribution and serves to lower significantly the degradation temperature. Incineration of waste PVC is very energy demanding and can result in the formation of toxic chloro emissions. The efficacy of a catalytic transformation of PVC is also discussed.

  14. 75 FR 38487 - Order Finding That the Fuel Oil-180 Singapore Swap Contract Traded on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... participants keep abreast of fuel oil prices worldwide in order to take advantage of arbitrage opportunities... accounting for transportation costs. Market participants may find it profitable to ship fuel oil from one... Commission first examines trading activity as a general measurement of the contract's size and...

  15. Acute aquatic toxicity of heavy fuel oils. Summary of relevant test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comber, M.I.H.; Den Haan, K.; Djemel, N.; Eadsforth, C.V.; King, D.; Parkerton, T.; Paumen, M.L.; Dmytrasz, B.

    2011-12-15

    This report describes the experimental procedures and results obtained in acute ecotoxicity tests on several heavy fuel oil (HFO) samples. Water accommodated fractions (WAFs) of these samples were tested for toxicity to the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), the crustacean zooplankter (Daphnia magna) and green algae (Selenastrum capricornutum). These results assist in determining the environmental hazard from heavy fuel oil.

  16. Diesel fuel oil for increasing mountain pine beetle mortality in felled logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. A. Mata; J. M. Schmid; D. A. Leatherman

    2002-01-01

    Diesel fuel oil was applied to mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) infested bolts of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson) in early June. Just prior to the fuel oil application and 6 weeks later, 0.5 ft2 bark samples were removed from each bolt and the numbers of live beetles counted....

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon body residues and lysosomal membrane destabilization in mussels exposed to the Dubai Star bunker fuel oil (intermediate fuel oil 380) spill in San Francisco Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyun-Min; Stanton, Beckye; McBride, Toby; Anderson, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Following the spill of bunker fuel oil (intermediate fuel oil 380, approximately 1500-3000 L) into San Francisco Bay in October 2009, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in mussels from moderately oiled areas increased up to 87 554 ng/g (dry wt) and, 3 mo later, decreased to concentrations found in mussels collected prior to oiling, with a biological half-life of approximately 16 d. Lysosomal membrane destabilization increased in mussels with higher PAH body burdens.

  18. Structured Analysis and Supervision Applied on Heavy Fuel Oil Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAKHOUA Mohamed Najeh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the need for structured analysis and real time (SA-RT method of controlcommand applications in a thermal power plant (TPP using a supervisory control and data acquisition system (SCADA. Then, the architecture of a SCADA system in a TPP is presented. A significant example of a control-command application is presented. It is about the heavy fuel oil tanks of a TPP. Then an application of a structured analysis method, generally used in industry, on the basis of the SA-RT formalism is presented. In fact, different modules are represented and described: Context Diagram, Data Flows Diagram, Control Flows Diagram, State Transition Diagram, Timing Specifications and Requirements Dictionary. Finally, this functional and operational analysis allows us to assist the different steps of the specification, the programming and the configuration of a new tabular in a SCADA system.

  19. Carcinogenicity of residual fuel oils by nonbiological laboratory methods: annotated bibliography. Part I. Laboratory methods of analysis. Part II. Analysis results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichorz, R. S.

    1976-04-09

    Recent emphases have been directed by Federal government regulatory agencies and other research groups on the carcinogenic effects of certain aromatic hydrocarbon components in naturally occurring petroleum products. These are used in plant operations, and underline the importance of evaluating environments. Since Rocky Flats Plant uses large quantities of fuel oil, the author was prompted to undertake a search of the chemical literature. Articles and accounts of studies were reviewed on nonbiological laboratory methods for determining the carcinogenicity of residual fuel oils and related high-boiling petroleum fractions. The physical and chemical methods involve the separation or measurement (or both) of polynuclear aromatic constituents which generally are responsible for the carcinogenic effects. Thus, the author suggests that the total carcinogenic activity of any petroleum product may not be due to a specific potent carcinogen, but rather to the cumulative effect of several individually weak carcinogens. The literature search is presented as an annotated bibliography, current as of January 1, 1975, and includes significant parts of the studies along with the total number of other references found when the citation was examined in its entirety. Part I deals with laboratory chemical and physical methods of determining carcinogenicity or polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (or both) in residual fuel oils and contains ten entries. Part II includes the results of testing specific fuel oils for carcinogenic constituents and contains eleven entries. An author index and subject categories are included.

  20. Assessing the emission factors of low-pour-fuel-oil and diesel in steam boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohijeagbon, I.O.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the emissions effects resulting from the use of low pour fuel oil (LPFO and diesel fuels in industrial steam boilers operation. The method of ultimate analysis of the products of combustion and emissions of pollutant analysis were used to estimate the annual rate of emissions of boilers. The results shows that the levels of uncontrolled boiler emissions on the environment can lead to increased greenhouse effects, global warming, and pollution and toxilogical impacts on human health. Only carbon monoxide emission was found to vary with the levels of oxygen generation in the products of combustion, while other substances were generally in relation to constituents and rates of consumption of fuel.

  1. Thermo-chemical extraction of fuel oil from waste lubricating grease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilusa, Tsietsi Jefrey; Muzenda, Edison; Shukla, Mukul

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the recovery of oil from waste grease through the process of thermal degradation in an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide (KOH) followed by solvent extraction. Waste high temperature metal bearing grease was dissolved in a 15 w/w% KOH solution at 80°C while being agitated at 2000 rpm using a shear action agitator for a period of 15 min. Two distinct layers were observed after 8 min of settling time. The top layer being of dark brown oil and the bottom layer was a heterogeneous mixture. The two layers were separated by decantation. The bottom layer was cooled down to 45°C followed by slow addition of toluene (C7H8) while agitating at 1200 rpm for 15 min to prevent solids settling and minimise rapid volatilisation of the organic compounds in the mixture. Two distinct layers were also formed, the top homogeneous mixture of light brown oil-toluene mixture and the bottom sludge layer. The solvent was recovered from the oil for re-use by fractional distillation of the homogenous mixture. It was observed that 15 w/w% potassium hydroxide solution can chemically degrade the soap matrix in the grease and extract up to 49 w/w% of the fuel oil when subjected to high shear stress at a temperature of 80°C. The 26 w/w% extraction of oil in the remaining sludge was obtained by solvent extraction process with mass ratios of sludge to solvent of 2:1. Solvent recovery of 88% by mass was obtained via fractional distillation method. The combined extraction processes brought an overall oil yield of 75 w/w% from the waste grease. The fuel oil obtained from this process has similar properties to paraffin oil and can be blended with other oils as an alternative energy source.

  2. Geomorphology's role in the study of weathering of cultural stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Gregory A.; Meierding, Thomas C.; Paradise, Thomas R.

    2002-10-01

    Great monumental places—Petra, Giza, Angkor, Stonehenge, Tikal, Macchu Picchu, Rapa Nui, to name a few—are links to our cultural past. They evoke a sense of wonderment for their aesthetic fascination if not for their seeming permanence over both cultural and physical landscapes. However, as with natural landforms, human constructs are subject to weathering and erosion. Indeed, many of our cultural resources suffer from serious deterioration, some natural, some enhanced by human impact. Groups from the United Nations to local civic and tourism assemblies are deeply interested in maintaining and preserving such cultural resources, from simple rock art to great temples. Geomorphologists trained in interacting systems, process and response to thresholds, rates of change over time, and spatial variation of weathering processes and effects are able to offer insight into how deterioration occurs and what can be done to ameliorate the impact. Review of recent literature and case studies presented here demonstrate methodological and theoretical advances that have resulted from the study of cultural stone weathering. Because the stone was carved at a known date to a "baseline" or zero-datum level, some of the simplest methods (e.g., assessing surface weathering features or measuring surface recession in the field) provide useful data on weathering rates and processes. Such data are difficult or impossible to obtain in "natural" settings. Cultural stone weathering studies demonstrate the importance of biotic and saline weathering agents and the significance of weathering factors such as exposure (microclimate) and human impact. More sophisticated methods confirm these observations, but also reveal discrepancies between field and laboratory studies. This brings up two important caveats for conservators and geomorphologists. For the conservator, are laboratory and natural setting studies really analogous and useful for assessing stone damage? For the geomorphologist, does

  3. Cogeneration with fuel oil at the Nancy district hall; Cogeneration au fuel a l`hotel du Departement de Nancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contelly, P. [CGC Lorraine Sud, 54 (France); Jacquemin, G. [Conseil General de Meurthe et Moselle, 54 (France)

    1996-07-01

    In the framework of the renovation and construction of a block of buildings for the new district hall in Nancy (France), a cogeneration system operating with fuel oil has been studied for space heating and power generation. The cogeneration system is composed of a diesel engine generating plant (1275 kWe) with a combined production of hot water. Electric power is combined to the national grid for optimizing the peak day rate system. Technical characteristics of the generating plant, electric and control equipment, remote control and maintenance systems are presented together with an environmental and economic analysis of the project. Installation and functional diagrams are provided

  4. Aviation Weather Information Communications Study (AWIN). Phase 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J. W.; Herron, R. G.; Nozawa, E. T.; Thomas, E. A.; Witchey, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    This two part study examines the communication requirements to provide weather information in the cockpit as well as public and private communication systems available to address the requirements. Ongoing research projects combined with user needs for weather related information are used to identify and describe potential weather products that address decision support in three time frames: Far-Term Strategic, Near-Term Strategic and Tactical. Data requirements of these future products are identified and quantified. Communications systems and technologies available in the public as well as private sector are analyzed to identify potential solutions. Recommendations for further research identify cost, performance, and safety benefits to justify the investment. The study concludes that not all weather information has the same level of urgency to safety-of-flight and some information is more critical to one category of flight than another. Specific weather products need to be matched with communication systems with appropriate levels of reliability to support the criticality of the information. Available bandwidth for highly critical information should be preserved and dedicated to safety. Meanwhile, systems designed for in-flight-entertainment and other passenger/crew services could be used to support less critical information that is used only for planning and economic decision support.

  5. Differential gene expression induced by exposure of captive mink to fuel oil: A model for the sea otter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, L.; Riva, F.; Mohr, C.; Aldridge, B.; Schwartz, J.; Miles, A.K.; Stott, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Free-ranging sea otters are subject to hydrocarbon exposure from a variety of sources, both natural and anthropogenic. Effects of direct exposure to unrefined crude oil, such as that associated with the Exxon Valdez oil spill, are readily apparent. However, the impact of subtle but pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of crude oil on sea otters is difficult to assess. The present study was directed at developing a model for assessing the impact of low concentrations of fuel oil on sea otters. Quantitative PCR was used to identify differential gene expression in American mink that were exposed to low concentrations of bunker C fuel oil. A total of 23 genes, representing 10 different physiological systems, were analyzed for perturbation. Six genes with immunological relevance were differentially expressed in oil-fed mink. Interleukin-18 (IL-18), IL-10, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and complement cytolysis inhibitor (CLI) were down-regulated while IL-2 was up-regulated. Expression of two additional genes was affected; heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was up-regulated and thyroid hormone receptor (THR) was down-regulated. While the significance of each perturbation is not immediately evident, we identified differential expression of genes that would be consistent with the presence of immune system-modifying and endocrine-disrupting compounds in fuel oil. Application of this approach to identify effects of petroleum contamination on sea otters should be possible following expansion of this mink model to identify a greater number of affected genes in peripheral blood leukocytes. ?? 2007 Ecohealth Journal Consortium.

  6. Assessing fuel spill risks in polar waters: Temporal dynamics and behaviour of hydrocarbons from Antarctic diesel, marine gas oil and residual fuel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathryn E; King, Catherine K; Kotzakoulakis, Konstantinos; George, Simon C; Harrison, Peter L

    2016-09-15

    As part of risk assessment of fuel oil spills in Antarctic and subantarctic waters, this study describes partitioning of hydrocarbons from three fuels (Special Antarctic Blend diesel, SAB; marine gas oil, MGO; and intermediate grade fuel oil, IFO 180) into seawater at 0 and 5°C and subsequent depletion over 7days. Initial total hydrocarbon content (THC) of water accommodated fraction (WAF) in seawater was highest for SAB. Rates of THC loss and proportions in equivalent carbon number fractions differed between fuels and over time. THC was most persistent in IFO 180 WAFs and most rapidly depleted in MGO WAF, with depletion for SAB WAF strongly affected by temperature. Concentration and composition remained proportionate in dilution series over time. This study significantly enhances our understanding of fuel behaviour in Antarctic and subantarctic waters, enabling improved predictions for estimates of sensitivities of marine organisms to toxic contaminants from fuels in the region.

  7. NMR sensor for onboard ship detection of catalytic fines in marine fuel oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Morten K; Vinding, Mads S; Bakharev, Oleg N; Nesgaard, Tomas; Jensen, Ole; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2014-08-01

    A mobile, low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensor for onboard, inline detection of catalytic fines in fuel oil in the shipping industry is presented as an alternative to onshore laboratory measurements. Catalytic fines (called cat fines) are aluminosilicate zeolite catalysts utilized in the oil cracking process at refineries. When present in fuel oil, cat fines cause abrasive wear of engine parts and may ultimately lead to engine breakdown with large economical consequences, thereby motivating methods for inline measurements. Here, we report on a robust, mobile, and low-cost (27)Al NMR sensor for continuous online measurement of the level of catalytic fines in fuel oil onboard ships. The sensor enables accurate measurements of aluminum (catalytic fines) in ppm concentrations in good agreement with commercial laboratory reference measurements.

  8. Aerosol emissions of a ship diesel engine operated with diesel fuel or heavy fuel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streibel, Thorsten; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Czech, Hendryk; Harndorf, Horst; Jakobi, Gert; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Karg, Erwin; Lintelmann, Jutta; Matuschek, Georg; Michalke, Bernhard; Müller, Laarnie; Orasche, Jürgen; Passig, Johannes; Radischat, Christian; Rabe, Rom; Reda, Ahmed; Rüger, Christopher; Schwemer, Theo; Sippula, Olli; Stengel, Benjamin; Sklorz, Martin; Torvela, Tiina; Weggler, Benedikt; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    Gaseous and particulate emissions from a ship diesel research engine were elaborately analysed by a large assembly of measurement techniques. Applied methods comprised of offline and online approaches, yielding averaged chemical and physical data as well as time-resolved trends of combustion by-products. The engine was driven by two different fuels, a commonly used heavy fuel oil (HFO) and a standardised diesel fuel (DF). It was operated in a standardised cycle with a duration of 2 h. Chemical characterisation of organic species and elements revealed higher concentrations as well as a larger number of detected compounds for HFO operation for both gas phase and particulate matter. A noteworthy exception was the concentration of elemental carbon, which was higher in DF exhaust aerosol. This may prove crucial for the assessment and interpretation of biological response and impact via the exposure of human lung cell cultures, which was carried out in parallel to this study. Offline and online data hinted at the fact that most organic species in the aerosol are transferred from the fuel as unburned material. This is especially distinctive at low power operation of HFO, where low volatility structures are converted to the particulate phase. The results of this study give rise to the conclusion that a mere switching to sulphur-free fuel is not sufficient as remediation measure to reduce health and environmental effects of ship emissions.

  9. Thermal Cracking of Jatropha Oil with Hydrogen to Produce Bio-Fuel Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yu Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study used thermal cracking with hydrogen (HTC to produce bio-fuel oil (BFO from jatropha oil (JO and to improve its quality. We conducted HTC with different hydrogen pressures (PH2; 0–2.07 MPa or 0–300 psig, retention times (tr; 40–780 min, and set temperatures (TC; 623–683 K. By applying HTC, the oil molecules can be hydrogenated and broken down into smaller molecules. The acid value (AV, iodine value, kinematic viscosity (KV, density, and heating value (HV of the BFO produced were measured and compared with the prevailing standards for oil to assess its suitability as a substitute for fossil fuels or biofuels. The results indicate that an increase in PH2 tends to increase the AV and KV while decreasing the HV of the BFO. The BFO yield (YBFO increases with PH2 and tr. The above properties decrease with increasing TC. Upon HTC at 0.69 MPa (100 psig H2 pressure, 60 min time, and 683 K temperature, the YBFO was found to be 86 wt%. The resulting BFO possesses simulated distillation characteristics superior to those of boat oil and heavy oil while being similar to those of diesel oil. The BFO contains 15.48% light naphtha, 35.73% heavy naphtha, 21.79% light gas oil, and 27% heavy gas oil and vacuum residue. These constituents can be further refined to produce gasoline, diesel, lubricants, and other fuel products.

  10. Fuel oil and dispersant toxicity to the Antarctic sea urchin (Sterechinus neumayeri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Frances J; King, Catherine K; Reichelt-Brushett, Amanda J; Harrison, Peter L

    2016-11-04

    The risk of a major marine fuel spill in Antarctic waters is increasing, yet there are currently no standard or suitable response methods under extreme Antarctic conditions. Fuel dispersants may present a possible solution; however, little data exist on the toxicity of dispersants or fuels to Antarctic species, thereby preventing informed management decisions. Larval development toxicity tests using 3 life history stages of the Antarctic sea urchin (Sterechinus neumayeri) were completed to assess the toxicity of physically dispersed, chemically dispersed, and dispersant-only water-accommodated fractions (WAFs) of an intermediate fuel oil (IFO 180, BP) and the chemical dispersant Slickgone NS (Dasic International). Despite much lower total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations, physically dispersed fuels contained higher proportions of low-to-intermediate weight carbon compounds and were generally at least an order of magnitude more toxic than chemically dispersed fuels. Based on concentrations that caused 50% abnormality (EC50) values, the embryonic unhatched blastula life stage was the least affected by fuels and dispersants, whereas the larval 4-armed pluteus stage was the most sensitive. The present study is the first to investigate the possible implications of the use of fuel dispersants for fuel spill response in Antarctica. The results indicate that the use of a fuel dispersant did not increase the hydrocarbon toxicity of IFO 180 to the early life stages of Antarctic sea urchins, relative to physical dispersal. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-9. © 2016 SETAC.

  11. Simulation of detonation of ammonium nitrate fuel oil mixture confined by aluminum: edge angles for DSD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quirk, James J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiyanda, Charles B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Briggs, Matthew E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shinas, Micheal A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Non-ideal high explosives are typically porous, low-density materials with a low detonation velocity (3--5 km/s) and long detonation reaction zone ({approx} cms). As a result, the interaction of a non-ideal high explosive with an inert confiner can be markedly different than for a conventional high explosive. Issues arise, for example, with light stiff confiners where the confiner can drive the high explosive (HE) through a Prandtl-Meyer fan at the HE/confiner interface rather than the HE driving the confiner. For a non-ideal high explosive confined by a high sound speed inert such that the detonation velocity is lower than the inert sound speed, the flow is subsonic and thus shockless in the confiner. In such cases, the standard detonation shock dynamics methodology, which requires a positive edge-angle be specified at the HE/confiner interface in order that the detonation shape be divergent, cannot be directly utilized. In order to study how detonation shock dynamics can be utilized in such cases, numerical simulations of the detonation of ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) confined by aluminum 6061 are conducted.

  12. Weatherization Beyond the Numbers: Case Studies of Fifteen High-performing Weatherization Agencies - Conducted May 2011 through July 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rose, Erin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hawkins, Beth A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The report presents fifteen individual case studies of high-performing and unique local weatherization agencies. This research was one component of the retrospective evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s Weatherization Assistance Program. The agencies were chosen to represent a range of contexts and approaches to weatherization. For example, the set of agencies includes a mix of urban and rural agencies, those that mainly use in-house crews to weatherize homes versus those that use contractor crews, and a mix of locations, from very cold climates to moderate to hot humid and dry climates. The case studies were mainly based on site visits to the agencies that encompassed interviews with program directors, weatherization crews, and recipients of weatherization. This information was supplemented by secondary materials. The cases document the diversity of contexts and challenges faced by the agencies and how they operate on a day-by-day basis. The cases also high common themes found throughout the agencies, such as their focus on mission and respect for their clients.

  13. FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS FROM RESIDUAL FUEL OIL COMBUSTION: CHARACTERIZATION AND MECHANISMS OF FORMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of a comparison of the characteristics of particulate matter (PM) emitted from residual fuel oil combustion in two types of combustion equipment. A small commercial 732-kW fire-tube boiler yielded a weakly bi-modal particulate size distribution (PSD) with...

  14. HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF AN EMULSIFIED HEAVY FUEL OIL IN A FIRETUBE BOILER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of measuring emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from the combustion flue gases of a No. 6 fuel oil, both with and without an emulsifying agent, in a 2.5 million Btu/hr (732 kW) firetube boiler with the purpose of determining the impacts of the e...

  15. Emulsions of crude glycerin from biodiesel processing with fuel oil for industrial heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mize, Hannah E; Lucio, Anthony J; Fhaner, Cassie J; Pratama, Fredy S; Robbins, Lanny A; Karpovich, David S

    2013-02-13

    There is considerable interest in using crude glycerin from biodiesel production as a heating fuel. In this work crude glycerin was emulsified into fuel oil to address difficulties with ignition and sustained combustion. Emulsions were prepared with several grades of glycerin and two grades of fuel oil using direct and phase inversion emulsification. Our findings reveal unique surfactant requirements for emulsifying glycerin into oil; these depend on the levels of several contaminants, including water, ash, and components in MONG (matter organic non-glycerin). A higher hydrophile-lipophile balance was required for a stable emulsion of crude glycerin in fuel oil compared to water in fuel oil. The high concentration of salts from biodiesel catalysts generally hindered emulsion stability. Geometric close-packing of micelles was carefully balanced to mechanically stabilize emulsions while also enabling low viscosity for pumping and fuel injection. Phase inversion emulsification produced more stable emulsions than direct emulsification. Emulsions were tested successfully as fuel for a waste oil burner.

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF CARBON BURNOUT ON SUBMICRON PARTICLE FORMATION FROM EMULSIFIED FUEL OIL COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of an examination of particle behavior and particle size distributions from the combustion of different fuel oils and emulsified fuels in three experimental combusators. Results indicate that improved carbon (C) burnout from fule oil combustion, either by...

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF CARBON BURNOUT ON SUBMICRON PARTICLE FORMATION FROM EMULSIFIED FUEL OIL COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of an examination of particle behavior and particle size distributions from the combustion of different fuel oils and emulsified fuels in three experimental combusators. Results indicate that improved carbon (C) burnout from fule oil combustion, either by...

  18. Microbiologically induced corrosion of aluminum alloys in fuel-oil/aqueous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S S; Lin, J Y; Lin, Y T

    1998-09-01

    To investigate the microbiologically induced corrosion of aluminum alloys in fuel-oil/aqueous system, aluminum alloys A356, AA 5052, AA 5083 and AA 6061 were chosen as the test alloys and Cladosporium and several fuel-oil contaminated microbes isolated in Taiwan were used as test organisms. Aluminum alloy AA 5083 in fuel-oil/aqueous system was the most susceptible material for microbial corrosion, then followed by aluminum alloys AA 5052 and A356, and AA 6061 was more resistant to microbial aggression. Mixed culture had high capability of corrosion, then followed by Penicillium sp. AM-F5, Fusarium sp. AM-F1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa AM-B5, Ps. fluorescens AM-B9, C. resinae ATCC 22712, Penicillium sp. AM-F2, Candida sp. AM-Y1 and Ps. aeruginosa AM-B11. From energy dispersive spectrometer analysis, aluminum and magnesium contents decreased in the corrosion area, while chlorine and sulfur contents increased. The major organic acid produced in fuel-oil/aqueous system was acetic acid, and the total organic acids content had a positive correlation with the degree of microbial corrosion.

  19. High-quality weather data for grid integration studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxl, C.

    2016-12-01

    As variable renewable power penetration levels increase in power systems worldwide, renewable integration studies are crucial to ensure continued economic and reliable operation of the power grid. In this talk we will shed light on requirements for grid integration studies as far as wind and solar energy are concerned. Because wind and solar plants are strongly impacted by weather, high-resolution and high-quality weather data are required to drive power system simulations. Future data sets will have to push limits of numerical weather prediction to yield these high-resolution data sets, and wind data will have to be time-synchronized with solar data. Current wind and solar integration data sets will be presented. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit is the largest and most complete grid integration data set publicly available to date. A meteorological data set, wind power production time series, and simulated forecasts created using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model run on a 2-km grid over the continental United States at a 5-min resolution is now publicly available for more than 126,000 land-based and offshore wind power production sites. The Solar Integration National Dataset (SIND) is available as time synchronized with the WIND Toolkit, and will allow for combined wind-solar grid integration studies. The National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) is a similar high temporal- and spatial resolution database of 18 years of solar resource data for North America and India. Grid integration studies are also carried out in various countries, which aim at increasing their wind and solar penetration through combined wind and solar integration data sets. We will present a multi-year effort to directly support India's 24x7 energy access goal through a suite of activities aimed at enabling large-scale deployment of clean energy and energy efficiency. Another current effort is the North-American-Renewable-Integration-Study, with the aim of providing

  20. Weather Features Associated with Aircraft Icing Conditions: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Fernández-González

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of aviation weather hazards, the study of aircraft icing is very important because of several accidents attributed to it over recent decades. On February 1, 2012, an unusual meteorological situation caused severe icing of a C-212-200, an aircraft used during winter 2011-2012 to study winter cloud systems in the Guadarrama Mountains of the central Iberian Peninsula. Observations in this case were from a MP-3000A microwave radiometric profiler, which acquired atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles continuously every 2.5 minutes. A Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS was also used to study cloud hydrometeors. Finally, ice nuclei concentration was measured in an isothermal cloud chamber, with the goal of calculating concentrations in the study area. Synoptic and mesoscale meteorological conditions were analysed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. It was demonstrated that topography influenced generation of a mesolow and gravity waves on the lee side of the orographic barrier, in the region where the aircraft experienced icing. Other factors such as moisture, wind direction, temperature, atmospheric stability, and wind shear were decisive in the appearance of icing. This study indicates that icing conditions may arise locally, even when the synoptic situation does not indicate any risk.

  1. Space Weather and Solar Wind Studies with OWFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Subrahmanya, C. R.; Chengalur, J. N.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we review the results of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations made with the legacy system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) and compare them with the possibilities opened by the upgraded ORT, the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA). The stability and the sensitivity of the legacy system of ORT allowed the regular monitoring of IPS on a grid of large number of radio sources and the results of these studies have been useful to understand the physical processes in the heliosphere and space weather events, such as coronal mass ejections, interaction regions and their propagation effects. In the case of OWFA, its wide bandwidth of 38 MHz, the large field-of-view of 27° and increased sensitivity provide a unique capability for the heliospheric science at 326.5 MHz. IPS observations with the OWFA would allow one to monitor more than 5000 sources per day. This, in turn, will lead to much improved studies of space weather events and solar wind plasma, overcoming the limitations faced with the legacy system. We also highlight some of the specific aspects of the OWFA, potentially relevant for the studies of coronal plasma and its turbulence characteristics.

  2. Space Weather and Solar Wind Studies with OWFA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. K. Manoharan; C. R. Subrahmanya; J. N. Chengalur

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we review the results of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations made with the legacy system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) and compare them with the possibilities opened by the upgraded ORT, the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA). The stability and the sensitivity of the legacy system of ORT allowed the regular monitoring of IPS on a grid of large number of radio sources and the results of these studies have been useful to understand the physical processes in the heliosphere and space weather events, such as coronal mass ejections, interaction regions and their propagation effects. In the case of OWFA, its wide bandwidth of 38 MHz, the large field-of-view of $\\sim$27$^\\circ$ and increased sensitivity provide a unique capability for the heliospheric science at 326.5 MHz. IPS observations with the OWFA would allow one to monitor more than 5000 sources per day. This, in turn, will lead to much improved studies of space weather events and solar wind plasma, overcoming the limitations faced with the legacy system. We also highlight some of the specific aspects of the OWFA, potentially relevant for the studies of coronal plasma and its turbulence characteristics.

  3. Operation of SCINDA Receiver at the University of Calcutta and Space Weather Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-18

    15. SUBJECT TERMS Space weather , Ionospheric Irregularities, scintillation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...using the SCINDA data. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Space weather , Ionospheric Irregularities, scintillation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF... Space Weather Studies Principal Investigator: Dr. Ashik Paul Institute of Radio Physics and Electronics University of Calcutta ashik_paul

  4. Heavy fuel oil pyrolysis and combustion: kinetics and evolved gases investigated by TGA-FTIR

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2017-08-24

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) obtained from crude oil distillation is a widely used fuel in marine engines and power generation technologies. In the present study, the pyrolysis and combustion of a Saudi Arabian HFO in nitrogen and in air, respectively, were investigated using non-isothermal thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. TG and DTG (differential thermo-gravimetry) were used for the kinetic analysis and to study the mass loss characteristics due to the thermal degradation of HFO at temperatures up to 1000°C and at various heating rates of 5, 10 and 20°C/min, in air and N2 atmospheres. FTIR analysis was then performed to study the composition of the evolved gases. The TG/DTG curves during HFO combustion show the presence of three distinct stages: the low temperature oxidation (LTO); fuel decomposition (FD); and high temperature oxidation (HTO) stages. The TG/DTG curves obtained during HFO pyrolysis show the presence of two devolatilization stages similar to that seen in the LTO stage of HFO combustion. Apart from this, the TG/DTG curves obtained during HFO combustion and pyrolysis differ significantly. Kinetic analysis was also performed using the distributed activation energy model, and the kinetic parameter (E) was determined for the different stages of HFO combustion and pyrolysis processes, yielding a good agreement with the measured TG profiles. FTIR analysis showed the signal of CO2 as approximately 50 times more compared to the other pollutant gases under combustion conditions. Under pyrolytic conditions, the signal intensity of alkane functional groups was the highest followed by alkenes. The TGA-FTIR results provide new insights into the overall HFO combustion processes, which can be used to improve combustor designs and control emissions.

  5. The Prestige oil spill. 2. Enhanced biodegradation of a heavy fuel oil under field conditions by the use of an oleophilic fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Núria; Viñas, Marc; Sabaté, Jordi; Díez, Sergi; Bayona, Josep M; Solanas, Anna M; Albaiges, Joan

    2006-04-15

    A field bioremediation assay using the oleophilic fertilizer S200 was carried out 10 months after the Prestige heavy fuel-oil spill on a beach of the Cantabrian coast (North Spain). The field survey showed that S200 significantly enhanced the biodegradation rate, particularly of high molecular weight n-alkanes, alkylcyclohexanes, and benzenes, and alkylated PAHs, paralleling the results previously found in vitro. The most significant molecular bioremediation indicators were the depletion of diasteranes and C-27 sterane components. Enhanced isomeric selectivity was also observed within the C1-phenanthrenes and dibenzothiophenes. Through the analysis of some target aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons a number of chemical indicators for assessing the efficiency of field bioremediation as well as identifying the source of highly weathered samples collected in the area after the spill are defined.

  6. Ex situ bioremediation of a soil contaminated by mazut (heavy residual fuel oil)--a field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beškoski, Vladimir P; Gojgić-Cvijović, Gordana; Milić, Jelena; Ilić, Mila; Miletić, Srdjan; Solević, Tatjana; Vrvić, Miroslav M

    2011-03-01

    Mazut (heavy residual fuel oil)-polluted soil was exposed to bioremediation in an ex situ field-scale (600 m(3)) study. Re-inoculation was performed periodically with biomasses of microbial consortia isolated from the mazut-contaminated soil. Biostimulation was conducted by adding nutritional elements (N, P and K). The biopile (depth 0.4m) was comprised of mechanically mixed polluted soil with softwood sawdust and crude river sand. Aeration was improved by systematic mixing. The biopile was protected from direct external influences by a polyethylene cover. Part (10 m(3)) of the material prepared for bioremediation was set aside uninoculated, and maintained as an untreated control pile (CP). Biostimulation and re-inoculation with zymogenous microorganisms increased the number of hydrocarbon degraders after 50 d by more than 20 times in the treated soil. During the 5 months, the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content of the contaminated soil was reduced to 6% of the initial value, from 5.2 to 0.3 g kg(-1) dry matter, while TPH reduced to only 90% of the initial value in the CP. After 150 d there were 96%, 97% and 83% reductions for the aliphatic, aromatic, and nitrogen-sulphur-oxygen and asphaltene fractions, respectively. The isoprenoids, pristane and phytane, were more than 55% biodegraded, which indicated that they are not suitable biomarkers for following bioremediation. According to the available data, this is the first field-scale study of the bioremediation of mazut and mazut sediment-polluted soil, and the efficiency achieved was far above that described in the literature to date for heavy fuel oil.

  7. Electron beam technology for multipollutant emissions control from heavy fuel oil-fired boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G; Ostapczuk, Anna; Licki, Janusz

    2010-08-01

    The electron beam treatment technology for purification of exhaust gases from the burning of heavy fuel oil (HFO) mazout with sulfur content approximately 3 wt % was tested at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology laboratory plant. The parametric study was conducted to determine the sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) removal efficiency as a function of temperature and humidity of irradiated gases, absorbed irradiation dose, and ammonia stoichiometry process parameters. In the test performed under optimal conditions with an irradiation dose of 12.4 kGy, simultaneous removal efficiencies of approximately 98% for SO2, and 80% for NO(x) were recorded. The simultaneous decrease of PAH and one-ringed aromatic hydrocarbon (benzene, toluene, and xylenes [BTX]) concentrations was observed in the irradiated flue gas. Overall removal efficiencies of approximately 42% for PAHs and 86% for BTXs were achieved with an irradiation dose 5.3 kGy. The decomposition ratio of these compounds increased with an increase of absorbed dose. The decrease of PAH and BTX concentrations was followed by the increase of oxygen-containing aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations. The PAH and BTX decomposition process was initialized through the reaction with hydroxyl radicals that formed in the electron beam irradiated flue gas. Their decomposition process is based on similar principles as the primary reaction concerning SO2 and NO(x) removal; that is, free radicals attack organic compound chains or rings, causing volatile organic compound decomposition. Thus, the electron beam flue gas treatment (EBFGT) technology ensures simultaneous removal of acid (SO2 and NO(x)) and organic (PAH and BTX) pollutants from flue gas emitted from burning of HFO. This technology is a multipollutant emission control technology that can be applied for treatment of flue gas emitted from coal-, lignite-, and HFO-fired boilers. Other thermal processes such

  8. Fuel-oil cogeneration plant for textile Industry. Central de cogeneracion a fueloleo para industria textil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro Larrauri, M.; Diez Hernandez, J.; Villasante Diaz, A. (IDOM, Ingenieria y Consultoria, S.A. (Spain))

    1993-10-01

    Aznar S.A. is a textile factory especially sensitive to electricity distribution failures. They produce the subsequent shut down at the manufacturing process and several hours of maintenance tasks. A cogeneration plant has been installed to provide electricity and thermal energy to the process. Since the location is far from Natural Gas pipelines the system includes fuel-oil as energy source. Annual electricity production will be 23.300 MWh and 6.400 MWh of them will be exported into the grid. Fuel-oil consumption at the heat exchanger is reduced by 47%, but the whole factory consumption increases a 247% due to the high consumption of the engine. This increase is compensated by revenues from selling electricity and electricity savings. These facts, together with maintenance cost saving leads to a pay back time of 3.3. years. (Author)

  9. Microstructural Studies of Space Weathering Effects in Lunar Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.

    2002-01-01

    Space weathering is a term used to include all of the processes which act on material exposed at the surface of a planetary or small body. In the case of the moon, it includes a variety of processes which have formed the lunar regolith, caused the maturation of lunar soils, and formed patina on rock surfaces. The processes include micrometeorite impact and reworking, implantation of solar wind and flare particles, radiation damage and chemical effects from solar particles and cosmic rays, interactions with the lunar atmosphere, and sputtering erosion and deposition. Space weathering effects collectively result in a reddened continuum slope, lowered albedo, and attenuated absorption features in reflectance spectra of lunar soils as compared to finely comminuted rocks from the same Apollo sites. However, the regolith processes that cause these effects are not well known, nor is the petrographic setting of the products of these processes fully understood. An interesting confluence of events occurred in the early 1990s. First, came the discovery of vapor deposited coatings on lunar regolith grains by Keller and McKay, who showed that amorphous coatings from 50-100 nm thick containing fine-grained Fe metal (1-10 nm in diameter) were common in the fine size fraction of several mature lunar soils. The other discovery was the recognition that the optical properties of lunar soils were dominated by fine grain sized material (less than 45 micrometer fraction) by Pieters and coworkers. These discoveries led to coordinated studies that looked at the mineralogy, chemistry, and optical properties of lunar soils as function of composition, maturity, and grain size fraction. One of the major revelations from these studies was the recognition that much of the nanophase Fe metal is surface-correlated especially in the finest size fractions, and that it was this nanophase Fe that dominated the optical properties of the soil.

  10. Hepatic gene transcription profiles in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) experimentally exposed to heavy fuel oil nº 6 and to styrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz de Cerio, Oihane; Bilbao, Eider; Ruiz, Pamela; Pardo, Belén G; Martínez, Paulino; Cajaraville, Miren P; Cancio, Ibon

    2017-02-01

    Oil and chemical spills in the marine environment, although sporadic, are highly dangerous to biota inhabiting coastal and estuarine areas. Effects of spilled compounds in exposed organisms occur at different biological organization levels: from molecular, cellular or tissue levels to the physiological one. The present study aims to determine the specific hepatic gene transcription profiles observed in turbot juveniles under exposure to fuel oil n °6 and styrene vs controls using an immune enriched turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) oligo-microarray containing 2716 specific gene probes. After 3 days of exposure, fuel oil specifically induced aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediated transcriptional response through up-regulation of genes, such as ahrr and cyp1a1. More gene transcripts were regulated after 14 days of exposure involved in ribosomal biosynthesis, immune modulation, and oxidative response among the most significantly regulated functional pathways. On the contrary, gene transcription alterations caused by styrene did not highlight any significantly regulated molecular or metabolic pathway. This was also previously reported at cell and tissue level where no apparent responses were distinguishable. For the fuel oil experiment, obtained specific gene profiles could be related to changes in cell-tissue organization in the same individuals, such as increased hepatocyte vacuolization, decrease in melano-macrophage centers and the regulation of leukocyte numbers. In conclusion, the mode of action reflected by gene transcription profiles analyzed hereby in turbot livers could be linked with the responses previously reported at higher biological organization levels. Molecular alterations described hereby could be preceding observed alterations at cell and tissue levels.

  11. The Economy-wide Impact of Fuel Oil, Gas and Electricity Pricing and Subsidy Policies as well as Their Consumption Improvement Efficiency in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Djoni Hartono; Budy P. Resosudarmo

    2006-01-01

    In Indonesia, the government determines the domestic prices of energy; namely fuel oil, such as gasoline, automotive diesel oil (ADO) and kerosene, gas and electricity. In response to the weakening of rupiah during the 1997/1998 economic crisis and the increasing of the world price of crude oil, the government tends to increase the energy subsidy on domestic prices of fuel oil, gas and electricity, rather than letting these domestic prices follows the world prices of fuel oil, gas and electri...

  12. Mineralogical and geological study of quaternary deposits and weathering profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gi Young; Lee, Bong Ho [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-01-15

    Movement history of a quaternary reverse fault cutting marine terrace deposit and tertiary bentonite in the Yangnammyon, Gyoungju city was studied by the mineralogical and microtextural analysis of the fault clays and weathered terrace deposits. Two types of fault clays were identified as greenish gray before the deposition of the marine terrace deposits and reddish brown after deposition. Greenish gray fault clay is composed mostly of smectite probably powdered from bentonite showing at least two events of movement from microtextures. After the bentonite was covered by quaternary marine gravel deposits, the reverse fault was reactivated cutting marine gravel deposits to form open spaces along the fault plane which allowed the hydrological infiltration of soil particles and deposition of clays in deep subsurface. The reddish brown 'fault' clays enclosed the fragments of dark brown ultrafine varved clay, proving two events of faulting, and slicken sides bisecting reddish brown clays suggest another faulting event in the final stage. Mineralogical and microtextural analysis of the fault clay show total five events of faulting, which had not been recognized even by thorough conventional paleoseismological investigation using trench, highlighting the importance of microtextural and mineralogical analysis in paleoseismology.

  13. Field Studies Delve Into the Intricacies of Mountain Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Harindra J. S.; Pardyjak, Eric R.

    2013-09-01

    Mountain meteorology, in particular weather prediction in complex (rugged) terrain, is emerging as an important topic for science and society. Large urban settlements such as Los Angeles, Hong Kong, and Rio de Janeiro have grown within or in the shadow of complex terrain, and managing the air quality of such cities requires a good understanding of the air flow patterns that spill off of mountains. On a daily time scale, the interconnected engineered and natural systems that sustain urban metabolism and quality of life are affected by weather [Fernando, 2010]. Further, recent military engagements in remote mountainous areas have heightened the need for better weather predictions—alpine warfare is considered to be one of the most dangerous types of combat.

  14. Weather Forecasting for Ka-band Operations: Initial Study Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D.; Wu, L.; Slobin, S.

    2016-08-01

    As lower frequency bands (e.g., 2.3 GHz and 8.4 GHz) have become oversubscribed during the past several decades, NASA has become interested in using higher frequency bands (e.g., 26 GHz and 32 GHz) for telemetry, thus making use of the available wider bandwidth. However, these bands are more susceptible to atmospheric degradation. Currently, flight projects tend to be conservative in preparing their communications links by using worst-case or conservative assumptions. Such assumptions result in nonoptimum data return. We explore the use of weather forecasting for Goldstone and Madrid for different weather condition scenarios to determine more optimal values of atmospheric attenuation and atmospheric noise temperature for use in telecommunication link design. We find that the use of weather forecasting can provide up to 2 dB or more of increased data return when more favorable conditions are forecast. Future plans involve further developing the technique for operational scenarios with interested flight projects.

  15. Preliminary Study on weathering and pedogenesis of carbonate rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王世杰; 季宏兵; 欧阳自远; 周德全; 郑乐平; 黎廷宇

    1999-01-01

    South China is the largest continuous distribution area of carbonate rock in the world. The origin of the soils over the bedrock carbonate rock has long been a controversial topic. Here further exploration is made by taking five soil profiles as examples, which are developed over the bedrock dolomitite and limestone and morphologically located in upland in karst terrain in the central, west and north Guizhou as well as west Hunan, and proved to be the weathering profiles of carbonate rock by the research results of acid-dissolved extraction experiment of bedrock, mineralogy and trace element geochemistry. Field, mineralogical and trace element geochemical characteristics of weathering and pedogenesis for carbonate rock are discussed in detail. It is pointed out that weathering and pedogenesis of carbonate rock are important pedogenetic mechanisms for soil resources in karst area, providing a basis for further researches on the origin of soils widely overlying bedrock carbonate rocks in South China.

  16. Accumulation and retention of No. 2 fuel-oil compounds in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus' rathbun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melzian, B.D.; Lake, J.

    1987-01-01

    In order to determine if Blue Crabs (Callinectes sapidus) can bioaccumulate and retain complex mixtures of petroleum hydrocarbons, adult crabs were exposed for 14 days or 30-35 days in continuous flow-through seawater systems to three sublethal concentrations, nominally 0.00 (control), 0.01, or 1.0 ppm (mg/liter), of the water-accomodated fraction (WAF) of Number (No.) 2 fuel oil. Crabs exposed for 14 days were subsequently exposed to clean running seawater for a 30 day depuration period. Gill, hepatopancreas, and muscle tissue samples were collected from control, WAF exposed, and depurated crabs and analyzed by gas chromatography and/or gas chomatography-mass spectrometry. No. 2 fuel-oil compounds were not detected in any of the tissues of the control crabs. Trace amounts of fuel-oil compounds were detected in gill and hepatopancreas tissues collected from crabs exposed to the 0.01 ppm WAF and no fuel-oil compounds were detected in muscle tissues. All tissues of crabs exposed to the 1.0 ppm WAF accumulated No. 2 fuel-oil compounds and considerable amounts remained in hepatopancreas and gill tissues following depuration for 30 days in clean seawater.

  17. The use of fuel oil by the shipping sector; Zeevaart verbruikt meer stookolie door wereldhandel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-05-15

    The supply of fuel oil for the international shipping sector (bunkering) increased considerably since 1990 (9 million ton). Between 2003 and 2006 bunkering increased to 16 million ton, mainly due to the increased world trade. [Dutch] De levering van stookolie voor de internationale scheepvaart (bunkering) blijft sterk toenemen (1990: 9 miljoen ton; 2000: bijna 12 miljoen ton). Tussen 2003 en 2006 is de bunkering toegenomen naar een recordwaarde van ruim 16 miljoen ton. De stijging hangt nauw samen met de sterke toename van de wereldhandel.

  18. Problems of coal burn in cement ovens, compared with heavy fuel oil and natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucchi, R.; Botti, R.

    1981-10-01

    The article examines the main problems associated with the use of coal or natural gas in place of heavy fuel oil to heat cement ovens. As regards combustion, the heat loss increases with coal and natural gas and consequently the specific primary energy consumption rises. With respect to treatment, the authors examine the effect of the sulphur, alkalis and chlorides present in the three types of fuel in question. The topic of atmospheric pollution by dust and oxides of nitrogen is also dealt with. (45 refs.) (In Italian)

  19. New Procedure to Develop Lumped Kinetic Models for Heavy Fuel Oil Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yunqing

    2016-09-20

    A new procedure to develop accurate lumped kinetic models for complex fuels is proposed, and applied to the experimental data of the heavy fuel oil measured by thermogravimetry. The new procedure is based on the pseudocomponents representing different reaction stages, which are determined by a systematic optimization process to ensure that the separation of different reaction stages with highest accuracy. The procedure is implemented and the model prediction was compared against that from a conventional method, yielding a significantly improved agreement with the experimental data. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  20. Combustion and economics of coal slurry fuels: a look at coal-fuel oil slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, T.; Matsuoka, H.

    1984-01-01

    With the aim of reducing dependence on petroleum, research has been going ahead into the development of various alternative fuels. Of these, coal slurry fuels are regarded as being first in line for commercialization. The authors discuss the combustion of coal-oil fuels. The combustion of fuel oil, pulverized coal and coal-water slurry is also examined. In each case, combustion properties and associated problems are discussed. Finally, the economics of these fuels are examined and trends in research and development surveyed. 23 references.

  1. Visual Programming of Stochastic Weather Generator and Future Applications on Agroecological Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiao-guang; SHEN Zuo-rui; HUANG Shao-ming; LI Zhi-hong; GAO Ling-wang

    2003-01-01

    Based on former studies on weather simulator modules in IPMist laboratory, study on visual programming of stochastic weather generator (VS-WGEN) was continued. In this study, Marlkov Chain,Monte Carlo, Fourier Series, and weak stationary process were used to generate the daily weather data in software Matlab 6.0, with the data input from 40 years' weather data recorded by Beijing Weather Station. The generated data includes daily maximum temperature, minimum temperature, precipitation and solar radiation. It has been verified that the weather data generated by the VS-WGEN were more accurate than that by the old WGEN, when twenty new model parameters were included. VS-WGEN bas wide software applications,such as pest risk analysis, pest forecast and management. It can be implemented in hardware development as well, such as weather control in weather chamber and greenhouse for researches on ecological adaptation of crop varieties to a given location over time and space. Overall, VS-WGEN is a very useful tool for studies on theoretical and applied ecology.

  2. Fuel oil heating installation inspection report 2 July 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corea, R. [NRG Resources Inc., Thornbury, ON (Canada)

    2009-01-06

    A project was launched to inspect oil-burning appliances and supply tanks in Whitehorse and Haines Junction on behalf of the Yukon Housing Corporation. Fifty-one inspections were conducted to determine compliance levels with the B139 Installation Code for Oil-Burning Equipment, as well as to identify efficiency and safety issues and solutions. The study identified a total of 316 infractions of the code, of which 152 were considered to be of significant concern or posed an imminent hazard. The average number of code infractions was 6.2 per site. The average number of significant infractions was 3 per site. The survey demonstrated that a large percentage of oil-burning equipment in the Yukon area has not been properly installed or maintained in accordance with standards. Lack of maintenance was a major cause of problems discovered at sites located outside of Whitehorse. Homeowners in Haines Junction indicated that there were no mechanics available to service or maintain their appliances. Only 4 of the 51 sites were conducted by licensed oil burner technicians. It was concluded that the survey confirmed previous recommendations for improving the safety and efficiency of oil-burning equipment installation and maintenance in the Yukon. 6 tabs.

  3. Component Cost of Fuel Oil of Waste Transportation Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burhamtoro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The success of the transportation system can be measured based on four things, namely the efficiency of time, energy and fuel efficiency, environmental impact, and safety. Efficiency of energy and fuel is often stated as part of vehicle operating costs (VOC. So need to know the amount of the percentage of the fuel cost component of vehicle operating costs. The purpose of this study was to determine the percentage of the fuel cost component of the total cost of transportation. Research object is a dump truck or on the SCS transport system that serves the city of Malang. Stages of research begins with getting the data needed to analyze the cost of transporting waste. Furthermore, the analysis performed to determine the percentage of each component of transport costs. Results of the analysis showed that the greatest percentage of the cost of each component of the cost of transporting waste is a component of the fuel, while the smallest percentage of the cost of the mechanical components. For the percentage of fuel costs by 28.90% of the variable cost per kilometer, while the percentage of fuel costs by 27.45% of the total cost of transporting waste on his m3each.

  4. Microbial Bioremediation of Fuel Oil Hydrocarbons in Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Pavitran

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Pollution in marine environment due to heavier petroleum products such as high-speeddiesel is known to take from days to months for complete natural remediation owing to its lowvolatility. For the survival of marine flora and fauna, it is important to control pollution causedby such recalcitrant and xenobiotic substances. Several petroleum hydrocarbons found in natureare toxic and recalcitrant. Therefore, pollution due to high-speed diesel is a cause of concern.The natural dispersion of high-speed diesel, a slow process, is attributed to an overall combinedeffect of physico-chemical and biological processes which take months for complete dispersion.History of marine oil spill bioremediation indicates limited laboratory studies. But experiencesfrom various oil spill management and field trials indicate important role of bioremediation, where,biodegradation of hydrocarbons through microbial mediators plays a major role in pollutant oildispersion. These microbial mediators such as bioemulsifiers and fimbrae, help in emulsification,dispersion, allowing attachment of bacteria to oil layers, followed by substrate-specific enzymaticbiodegradation in water.

  5. Rock weathering on the eastern mountains of southern Africa: Review and insights from case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, P. D.; Hall, K. J.; van Rooy, J. L.; Meiklejohn, K. I.

    2009-12-01

    The mountains in the eastern region of southern Africa are of significant regional importance, providing for a diverse range of land use including conservation, tourism and subsistence agriculture. The higher regions are comprised of flood basalts and are immediately underlain by predominantly aeolian-origin sandstones. Our understanding of the weathering of these basalts and sandstones is reviewed here, with particular focus on the insights gained from the Lesotho Highlands Water Project and an ongoing study into the deterioration of rock art. While the chemical weathering attributes of the basalts have been substantially investigated, it is evident that the environmental surface conditions of rock moisture and temperature, as affecting weathering processes, remain largely unknown. Within the sandstones, studies pertaining to rock art deterioration present insights into the potential surface weathering processes and highlight the need for detailed field monitoring. Outside of these site-specific studies, however, little is understood of how weathering impacts on landscape development; notably absent, are detail on weathering rates, and potential effects of biological weathering. Some palaeoenvironmental inferences have also been made from weathering products, both within the basalts and the sandstones, but aspects of these remain controversial and further detailed research can still be undertaken.

  6. A weather type method to study surface ocean variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, M.; Camus, P.; Mendez, F. J.; Losada, I. J.

    2012-04-01

    The set of methodologies for obtaining wave climate information at high spatial resolution from relatively coarse resolution is known as downscaling. Dynamic downscaling, based on the use of numerical models, is perhaps the most widely used methodology for surface ocean variables. An alternative approach is the statistical downscaling, that can be conducted by means of regression methods or weather pattern-based approaches. The main advantages of the statistical downscaling based on weather patterns are: the low computational requirements; the ease of implementation; the additional climatology information; and local forecast application. Moreover, this technique allows exploring the synoptic atmospheric climatology and their relationship with surface ocean variables. It is well known nowadays that the seasonal-to-interannual variability of wave climate is linked to the atmosphere circulation patterns. We proposed a statistical approach based on the predictand (eg. local wave characteristics) is associated to a particular synoptic-scale weather type (predictor). The predictor is the n-days-averaged sea level pressure field (SLP) anomalies, which are synthesized using data mining techniques to describe a number of weather types. In particular, we focus in NE Atlantic (NAO region) using as predictor the 3-days-averaged SLP fields calculated by NCEP atmospheric reanalysis (1948-2010). A principal component analysis is applied over SLP fields to reduce the spatial and temporal dimensions. The K-means clustering technique is then applied to the two-dimensional sample of the principal components which explain more than 95% variance of the SLP. The K-means technique divides the data space into a number of clusters, where each of them is characterized by a centroid and formed by the data for which the centroid is the nearest. Finally, we visualize the weather types associated to each centroid in an ordered way similar to self-organizing maps, SOMs. The probability

  7. Space Weather Monitoring for ISS Geomagnetic Storm Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) space environments community utilizes near real time space weather data to support a variety of ISS engineering and science activities. The team has operated the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) suite of plasma instruments (two Langmuir probes, a floating potential probe, and a plasma impedance probe) on ISS since 2006 to obtain in-situ measurements of plasma density and temperature along the ISS orbit and variations in ISS frame potential due to electrostatic current collection from the plasma environment (spacecraft charging) and inductive (vxB) effects from the vehicle motion across the Earth s magnetic field. An ongoing effort is to use FPMU for measuring the ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms at ISS altitudes and investigate auroral charging of the vehicle as it passes through regions of precipitating auroral electrons. This work is challenged by restrictions on FPMU operations that limit observation time to less than about a third of a year. As a result, FPMU campaigns ranging in length from a few days to a few weeks are typically scheduled weeks in advance for ISS engineering and payload science activities. In order to capture geomagnetic storm data under these terms, we monitor near real time space weather data from NASA, NOAA, and ESA sources to determine solar wind disturbance arrival times at Earth likely to be geoeffective (including coronal mass ejections and high speed streams associated with coronal holes) and activate the FPMU ahead of the storm onset. Using this technique we have successfully captured FPMU data during a number of geomagnetic storm periods including periods with ISS auroral charging. This presentation will describe the strategies and challenges in capturing FPMU data during geomagnetic storms, the near real time space weather resources utilized for monitoring the space weather environment, and provide examples of auroral charging data obtained during storm operations.

  8. Iron Mossbauer spectral study of weathered Antarctic and SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, T. C.; Burns, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    Mossbauer spectral measurements were made on suites of finds from Antarctica and falls collected elsewhere in order to distinguish preterrestrial oxidation products formed on parent meteorite bodies from secondary minerals derived from chemical weathering on earth. Ferric iron is shown to be present throughout the interiors of all the specimens, in amounts ranging from less than 1 to greater than 30 percent Fe(3+). The results indicate that achondrites found to date did not originate from the outermost surface of Mars.

  9. The spectral analysis of fuel oils using terahertz radiation and chemometric methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Honglei; Zhao, Kun; Zhao, Hui; Li, Qian; Zhu, Shouming; Xiao, Lizhi

    2016-10-01

    The combustion characteristics of fuel oils are closely related to both engine efficiency and pollutant emissions, and the analysis of oils and their additives is thus important. These oils and additives have been found to generate distinct responses to terahertz (THz) radiation as the result of various molecular vibrational modes. In the present work, THz spectroscopy was employed to identify a number of oils, including lubricants, gasoline and diesel, with different additives. The identities of dozens of these oils could be readily established using statistical models based on principal component analysis. The THz spectra of gasoline, diesel, sulfur and methyl methacrylate (MMA) were acquired and linear fittings were obtained. By using chemometric methods, including back propagation, artificial neural network and support vector machine techniques, typical concentrations of sulfur in gasoline (ppm-grade) could be detected, together with MMA in diesel below 0.5%. The absorption characteristics of the oil additives were also assessed using 2D correlation spectroscopy, and several hidden absorption peaks were discovered. The technique discussed herein should provide a useful new means of analyzing fuel oils with various additives and impurities in a non-destructive manner and therefore will be of benefit to the field of chemical detection and identification.

  10. Evaluating potential benefits of burning lower quality fuel oils using the oil burn optimization model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babilonia, P.

    1995-09-01

    As a result of a 1987 New York State Public Service Commission Audit of Niagara Mohawk`s Fuel Supply operations, Niagara Mohawk (NMPC) became interested in analyzing the plant performance impacts of burning fuels of differing qualities at its various generating stations. Black & Veatch (B&V) had previously developed a computer model for EPRI that analyzed coal quality impacts (i.e., Coal Quality Impact Model). As a result of B&V`s work, NMPC contracted with B&V to first develop custom-designed software for its coal stations (Coal Burn Optimization Model (CBOM)). Subsequently, B&V was retained to develop a similar designed software for its oil stations, Oswego and Albany Steam Stations. The Oil Burn Optimization Model (OBOM) was, therefore, developed. OBOM was designed to be used to evaluate residual fuel oil supply options by predicting their fuel-related plant operating and maintenance costs. Fuel oil-related costs can also be compared to natural gas-related costs. Costs are estimated by predicting performance of various plant equipment. Predictions focus on combustion calculations, material flows, auxiliary power, boiler efficiency, precipitator and fan performance, fuel pumping and preheating requirements, and corrosion considerations. Total costs at the busbar attributed to fuel are calculated from these predictions. OBOM is a PC-based system operating under MS-DOS. The model produces hard copy results for quick comparison of fuels and their potential effects on plant operating and maintenance costs.

  11. Lethal and behavioural impacts of diesel and fuel oil on the Antarctic amphipod Paramoera walkeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathryn E; King, Catherine K; Harrison, Peter L

    2017-03-03

    Toxicity testing with Antarctic species is required for risk assessment of fuel spills in Antarctic coastal waters. The lethal and sub-lethal (movement behaviour) sensitivity of adults and juveniles of the Antarctic amphipod Paramoera walkeri to the water accommodated fractions (WAF) of three fuels were estimated in extended duration tests at -1°C to 21 d. Response of P. walkeri for lethal hydrocarbon concentrations was slow, with LC50s first able to be estimated at 7 d for adults exposed to Special Antarctic Blend diesel (SAB), which had the highest hydrocarbon concentrations of the three fuel WAFs. Juveniles showed greater response to marine gas oil (MGO) and intermediate residual fuel oil (IFO 180) at longer exposure durations and were most sensitive at 21 d to IFO 180 (LC50 = 12 µg/L). Adults were initially more sensitive than juveniles; however, at 21 d juveniles were more than twice as sensitive as adults to SAB (LC50 = 153 µg/L and 377 µg/L respectively). Significant effects on movement behaviour were evident at earlier time points and lower concentrations than was mortality in all three fuel WAFs, and juveniles were highly sensitive to sub-lethal effects of MGO. These first estimates of Antarctic amphipod sensitivity to diesel and fuel oils in seawater contribute to development of ecologically relevant water quality guidelines for management of hydrocarbon contamination in the region. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Degradation of Bunker C Fuel Oil by White-Rot Fungi in Sawdust Cultures Suggests Potential Applications in Bioremediation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy Young

    Full Text Available Fungal lignocellulolytic enzymes are promising agents for oxidizing pollutants. This study investigated degradation of Number 6 "Bunker C" fuel oil compounds by the white-rot fungi Irpex lacteus, Trichaptum biforme, Phlebia radiata, Trametes versicolor, and Pleurotus ostreatus (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes. Averaging across all studied species, 98.1%, 48.6%, and 76.4% of the initial Bunker C C10 alkane, C14 alkane, and phenanthrene, respectively were degraded after 180 days of fungal growth on pine media. This study also investigated whether Bunker C oil induces changes in gene expression in the white-rot fungus Punctularia strigosozonata, for which a complete reference genome is available. After 20 days of growth, a monokaryon P. strigosozonata strain degraded 99% of the initial C10 alkane in both pine and aspen media but did not affect the amounts of the C14 alkane or phenanthrene. Differential gene expression analysis identified 119 genes with ≥ log2(2-fold greater expression in one or more treatment comparisons. Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with potential roles in xenobiotic biotransformation. Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates. The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures suggest that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels.

  13. Degradation of Bunker C Fuel Oil by White-Rot Fungi in Sawdust Cultures Suggests Potential Applications in Bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Darcy; Rice, James; Martin, Rachael; Lindquist, Erika; Lipzen, Anna; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

    2015-01-01

    Fungal lignocellulolytic enzymes are promising agents for oxidizing pollutants. This study investigated degradation of Number 6 "Bunker C" fuel oil compounds by the white-rot fungi Irpex lacteus, Trichaptum biforme, Phlebia radiata, Trametes versicolor, and Pleurotus ostreatus (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes). Averaging across all studied species, 98.1%, 48.6%, and 76.4% of the initial Bunker C C10 alkane, C14 alkane, and phenanthrene, respectively were degraded after 180 days of fungal growth on pine media. This study also investigated whether Bunker C oil induces changes in gene expression in the white-rot fungus Punctularia strigosozonata, for which a complete reference genome is available. After 20 days of growth, a monokaryon P. strigosozonata strain degraded 99% of the initial C10 alkane in both pine and aspen media but did not affect the amounts of the C14 alkane or phenanthrene. Differential gene expression analysis identified 119 genes with ≥ log2(2-fold) greater expression in one or more treatment comparisons. Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with potential roles in xenobiotic biotransformation. Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates. The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures suggest that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels.

  14. The use of blunted Maya crude as alternating fuel to fuel oil; Uso de crudo Maya despuntado como combustiononble alterno al combustoleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas Bravo, Victor M.; Diego Marin, Antonio; Porcayo C; Jesus [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The Mexican fuel oil is characterized by its high viscosity and elevated contents of sulfur and vanadium. This particularity determines a problematic characteristic in the steam generators that use this fuel. Our country produces three types of crude petroleum: Olmeca, Istmo and Maya. The difference between these crudes remains in its density and the sulfur content. The Olmeca crude and the Istmo are classified as super-light and light, respectively; whereas the Maya crude is classified as a heavy crude, with a density of 1.0 to 0.92 g/cm and a minimum sulfur content of 3.3 %. For this reason the processing of the Maya crude is seen as an alternative. A table with the physicochemical analysis and properties of a fuel oil and the blunted Maya crude is given, and another one with the quantitative chemical analysis of some metals in fuel oil and in the blunted Maya crude. The stability tests of the fuel are studied giving a comparison of the effect of the aging time on the viscosity of a fuel oil and of the blunted Maya crude at 60 Celsius degrees. As well as a graph of thermograms obtained of a blunted Maya crude sample and of a typical fuel oil. Finally the corrosion tests are described that allow to know in real time the degradation process by corrosion of the materials. [Spanish] El combustoleo mexicano se caracteriza por su alta viscosidad y elevados contenidos de azufre y vanadio. Esta particularidad determina una problematica caracteristica en los generadores de vapor que utilizan este combustible. Nuestro pais produce tres tipos de petroleo crudo: Olmeca, Istmo y Maya. La diferencia entre estos crudos estriba en su densidad y el contenido de azufre. El crudo Olmeca y el Istmo estan clasificados como superligero y ligero, respectivamente; mientras que el crudo Maya esta clasificado como un crudo pesado, con una densidad de 1.0 a 0.92 g/cm y un contenido minimo de azufre de 3.3 %.Con el proposito se busca la alternativa de procesar el crudo Maya. Se da una tabla

  15. Biodegradation pattern of hydrocarbons from a fuel oil-type complex residue by an emulsifier-producing microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievas, M L; Commendatore, M G; Esteves, J L; Bucalá, V

    2008-06-15

    The biodegradation of a hazardous waste (bilge waste), a fuel oil-type complex residue from normal ship operations, was studied in a batch bioreactor using a microbial consortium in seawater medium. Experiments with initial concentrations of 0.18 and 0.53% (v/v) of bilge waste were carried out. In order to study the biodegradation kinetics, the mass of n-alkanes, resolved hydrocarbons and unresolved complex mixture (UCM) hydrocarbons were assessed by gas chromatography (GC). Emulsification was detected in both experiments, possibly linked to the n-alkanes depletion, with differences in emulsification start times and extents according to the initial hydrocarbon concentration. Both facts influenced the hydrocarbon biodegradation kinetics. A sequential biodegradation of n-alkanes and UMC was found for the higher hydrocarbon content. Being the former growth associated, while UCM biodegradation was a non-growing process showing enzymatic-type biodegradation kinetics. For the lower hydrocarbon concentration, simultaneous biodegradation of n-alkanes and UMC were found before emulsification. Nevertheless, certain UCM biodegradation was observed after the medium emulsification. According to the observed kinetics, three main types of hydrocarbons (n-alkanes, biodegradable UCM and recalcitrant UCM) were found adequate to represent the multicomponent substrate (bilge waste) for future modelling of the biodegradation process.

  16. Optical and chemical characterization of aerosols emitted from coal, heavy and light fuel oil, and small-scale wood combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Anna K; Saarnio, Karri; Lamberg, Heikki; Mylläri, Fanni; Karjalainen, Panu; Teinilä, Kimmo; Carbone, Samara; Tissari, Jarkko; Niemelä, Ville; Häyrinen, Anna; Rautiainen, Jani; Kytömäki, Jorma; Artaxo, Paulo; Virkkula, Aki; Pirjola, Liisa; Rönkkö, Topi; Keskinen, Jorma; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hillamo, Risto

    2014-01-01

    Particle emissions affect radiative forcing in the atmosphere. Therefore, it is essential to know the physical and chemical characteristics of them. This work studied the chemical, physical, and optical characteristics of particle emissions from small-scale wood combustion, coal combustion of a heating and power plant, as well as heavy and light fuel oil combustion at a district heating station. Fine particle (PM1) emissions were the highest in wood combustion with a high fraction of absorbing material. The emissions were lowest from coal combustion mostly because of efficient cleaning techniques used at the power plant. The chemical composition of aerosols from coal and oil combustion included mostly ions and trace elements with a rather low fraction of absorbing material. The single scattering albedo and aerosol forcing efficiency showed that primary particles emitted from wood combustion and some cases of oil combustion would have a clear climate warming effect even over dark earth surfaces. Instead, coal combustion particle emissions had a cooling effect. Secondary processes in the atmosphere will further change the radiative properties of these emissions but are not considered in this study.

  17. Environmental benefits of replacing fuel oil by natural gas in the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, S. [Sao Paulo State Gas Co. and Mackenzie Univ. (Brazil); Assuncao, J.V. de [Mackenzie Univ. and Univ. of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    The Metropolitan Region of Sao Paulo (Brazil) has a population 16.322 million people (1995 estimate) living in an area of 8,051 km2 with most of them concentrated in the city of Sao Paulo with 9.8 million people and 4.6 million cars. Although with an air quality better than some other Latin American megacities such as Mexico and Santiago do Chile, the air quality still exceeds the national air quality standards. In 2/17/1993 Brazilian Petroleum Company (PETROBRAS) and the Bolivian Petroleum Company (Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos -- YPFB) signed an agreement to bring natural gas from Bolivia to the south and southeast of Brazil. The end of the construction of the gas pipeline will be in 1999, and it will deliver 4 million Nm3/day of natural gas to COMGAS Sao Paulo State Gas Company. This amount will increase to 8.1 million Nm3/day by the year 2006, that will be sufficient to supply the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Region market need at that time. In this study an estimate of the influence in the air quality was performed supposing the substitution of fuel oil by natural gas in industry and also in diesel buses. The results showed that there will be benefits in relation to sulfur dioxide, PM10, greenhouse gases and trace elements, and negligible effects in relation to NO{sub x}, NMTOC and carbon monoxide.

  18. Metaevaluation of National Weatherization Assistance Program Based on State Studies, 1993-2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, L

    2003-04-02

    The National Weatherization Assistance Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and implemented by state and local agencies throughout the United States, weatherizes homes for low-income residents in order to increase their energy efficiency and lower utility bills. Research staff members at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have performed two previous metaevaluations of this program (Berry, 1997; Schweitzer and Berry, 1999). Both of these earlier metaevaluations involved synthesizing the results from individual studies of state weatherization efforts completed during a several year period. This report is the third in a series of metaevaluations of state-level studies. It is built on the foundation developed by the previous two metaevaluations. The purpose of this report, like that of the two earlier ORNL metaevaluations, is to provide a current estimate of the average national energy savings per home weatherized for the Weatherization Assistance Program based on the relevant state-level studies. All three of the metaevaluations, including this one, were designed to be updates to the findings of a national evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program, which examined a representative national sample of several thousand structures weatherized in 1989 (Brown, Berry, Balzer, and Faby 1993). Although the first and second metaevaluations used separate sets of state-level studies, completed during different time periods, there was little difference in their findings about the typical national energy savings per weatherized home for homes that heat with natural gas. Our initial analysis efforts for this report involved repeating the same procedures that had been used in the previous two reports. In particular, we collected and examined only the state-level evaluations that had become available between September of 1998 and August of 2002. Once again, we found little difference in the average energy savings estimates per weatherized home that were

  19. Characterization of weathered petroleum hydrocarbons during a landfarming bioremediation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maletić Snežana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Landfarming bioremediation was performed over 2 years on soil heavily polluted with weathered oil and oil derivatives: 23200 mg kg-1 of mineral oil, 35300 mg kg-1 total hydrocarbons, and 8.65 mg kg-1 of total PAHs. During the experiment, mineral oil, total hydrocarbon and PAH concentrations decreased by approximately 53%, 27% and 72%, respectively. A GC/MS-Scan was used to identify the crude oil components that persist after bioremediation treatment of contaminated soil and the metabolites generated during this process. The data shows that in weathered-hydrocarbons contaminated soil, the number of initially detected compounds after the bioremediation process further decreased over a 2 year period, and at the same time several new compounds were observed at the end of experiment. Higher persistence was also shown for heavier n-alkanes and branched alkanes, which could be detected over a longer period of time. The analysis highlights the importance of n-alkanes, their substituted derivatives and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as the most significant pollutants.

  20. Weathering of Dronino Iron Meteorite and Ferric Hydrous Oxides Transfer in Clay Sand Studied Using Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, G. A.; Oshtrakh, M. I.; Semionkin, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    The Dronino meteorite fragments found in clay sand demonstrated heavily weathering. Several concretions formed in this place were also found. These weathering products were subject for the study using Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  1. Reconnaissance of Field Sites for the Study of Chemical Weathering on the Guayana Shield, South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefell, C I

    2003-02-01

    Despite the fact that chemical weathering of silicate rocks plays an important role in the draw-down of CO{sub 2} over geologic time scales (Berner and Berner, 1996), the overall controls on the rate of chemical weathering are still not completely understood. Lacking a mechanistic understanding of these controls, it remains difficult to evaluate a hypothesis such as that presented by Raymo and Ruddiman (1992), who suggested that enhanced weathering and CO{sub 2} draw-down resulting from the uplift of the Himalayas contributed to global cooling during the Cenozoic. At an even more fundamental level, the three to four order of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates is still unresolved (White et al., 1996). There is as yet no comprehensive, mechanistic model for silicate chemical weathering that considers the coupled effects of precipitation, vadose zone flow, and chemical reactions. The absence of robust process models for silicate weathering and the failure to resolve some of these important questions may in fact be related-the controls on the overall rates of weathering cannot be understood without considering the weathering environment as one in which multiple, time-dependent chemical and physical processes are coupled (Malmstrom, 2000). Once chemical weathering is understood at a mechanistic process level, the important controls on chemical weathering (physical erosion, temperature, precipitation) can be folded into larger scale models tracking the global carbon cycle. Our goal in this study was to carry out the preliminary work needed to establish a field research site for chemical weathering om the Cuayana Shield in South America. The Guayana Shield is a Precambrian province greater than 1.5 billion years old covering portions of Venezuela, Guyana (the country), Surinam, French Guiana, and Brazil (Figure 1). More important than the age of the rocks themselves, however, is the age of the erosion surface developed on the Shield, with

  2. Weather effects on mobile social interactions: a case study of mobile phone users in Lisbon, Portugal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi Phithakkitnukoon

    Full Text Available The effect of weather on social interactions has been explored through the analysis of a large mobile phone use dataset. Time spent on phone calls, numbers of connected social ties, and tie strength were used as proxies for social interactions; while weather conditions were characterized in terms of temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, and wind speed. Our results are based on the analysis of a full calendar year of data for 22,696 mobile phone users (53.2 million call logs in Lisbon, Portugal. The results suggest that different weather parameters have correlations to the level and character of social interactions. We found that although weather did not show much influence upon people's average call duration, the likelihood of longer calls was found to increase during periods of colder weather. During periods of weather that were generally considered to be uncomfortable (i.e., very cold/warm, very low/high air pressure, and windy, people were found to be more likely to communicate with fewer social ties. Despite this tendency, we found that people are more likely to maintain their connections with those they have strong ties with much more than those of weak ties. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on social relationships and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on social dynamics.

  3. COMPARISON OF PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS AND ELEMENTAL PARTITIONING FROM THE COMBUSTION OF PULVERIZED COAL AND RESIDUAL FUEL OIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of experimental efforts in which three coals and a residual fuel oil were combusted in three different systems simulating process and utility boilers. Particloe size distributions (PSDs) were determined using atmospheric and low-pressure impaction, electr...

  4. Metaevaluation of National Weatherization Assistance Program Based on State Studies, 1996-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, M.; Berry, L.

    1999-05-01

    The national Weatherization Assistance Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and implemented by state and local agencies throughout the US, weatherizes homes for low-income residents in order to increase their energy efficiency and lower utility bills. Staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed a metaevaluation of this program, which involved synthesizing the results from ten individuals studies of state weatherization efforts completed between April 1996 and September 1998. The states whose studies were used in this metaevaluation, the dates of program operations covered by these studies, and the fuels that were examined are shown in Table ES-1. This effort represents a follow-up to an earlier ORNL metaevaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program that looked at 19 state studies completed between 1990 and early 1996 (Berry 1997). That study, in turn, was done as an update to a national evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program that examined a representative sample of several thousand structures weatherized in 1989 (Brown, Berry, Balzer, and Faby 1993).

  5. Heat transfer in fuel oil storage tank at thermal power plants with local fuel heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsova Svetlana A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of mathematical modeling of the thermal control system in fuel oil storage, in the presence of heat source at the lower boundary of the region, in the framework of models of incompressible viscous fluid are presented. Solved the system of differential equations of non-stationary Navier-Stokes equations, the energy equation and the heat equation with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Takes into account the processes of heat exchange region considered with the environment. A comparative analysis of the dependence of average temperatures of oil in the volume of the tank on the time calculated by the simplified (balanced method and obtained as a result of numerical simulation are performed.

  6. Some aspects of coal utilization in cement ovens as compared with fuel oil and natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucchi, R.; Botti, R.

    1981-01-01

    The technical problems specific to the use of coal in the cement industry of Italy, compared with the use of fuel oil or gas, are reviewed. Considers the heat and energy aspects of the problem - losses due to combustion gas, primary air and the coal's moisture content. Looks at the role of the minor constituents in coal, on the manufacturing process: the roles of S, K/SUB/2O, Na/SUB/2O and some chlorides; and discusses the incidence of heterogeneity of the various coals. Discusses atmospheric pollution (by sulphur dioxides, nitrogen and thallium compounds). In conclusion, it appears that whilst the use of coal leads to a slight increase in primary energy consumption (30 to 60 kcal/kg of clinker) the presence of minor constituents has little effect on the manufacturing process, except in the case of chlorides. (45 refs) (In French)

  7. Study of One Rainstorm Being Affected by Two Weather Systems in Jinzhou Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study one rainstorm process being affected by two weather system. [Method] Influenced by high trough and Mongolia cold front, high latitude trough and subtropical high shear, rainstorm occurred in Jinzhou from October 19 to 22 in 2010. In order to make the analysis clear, there were two precipitation stages. Considering precipitation, weather situation, satellite image and numerical forecast, the rainstorm process was discussed. [Result] There were two raining stages during this p...

  8. Severe Marine Weather Studies using SMOS L-band Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reul, Nicolas; Chapron, Bertrand; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta

    2014-05-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission provides multi-angular L-band (1.4 GHz) brightness temperature images of the Earth. Because upwelling radiation at 1.4 GHz is significantly less affected by rain and atmospheric effects than at higher microwave frequencies, the SMOS measurements offer unique opportunities to complement existing ocean satellite high wind observations that are often erroneous in these extreme conditions. In this talk, we shall provide an overview of the results of an ESA project which aims to exploit the identified capability of SMOS L1 Brightness Temperatures to monitor wind speed and whitecap statistical properties beneath Tropical Cyclones and severe storms. We shall present an overview of these new capabilities and of the potential of the synergy between L-band and C-band sensor data for severe marine weather monitoring. In particular, we will show the results from SMOS for several Hurricanes and Typhoons since 2010 and an analysis of the combined SMOS and AMSR-2 data acquired during the passage of the Typhoon Haiyan, the strongest tropical storms to date and the second-deadliest Philippine typhoon on record.

  9. The effects of synoptic weather on influenza infection incidences: a retrospective study utilizing digital disease surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Naizhuo; Cao, Guofeng; Vanos, Jennifer K.; Vecellio, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    The environmental drivers and mechanisms of influenza dynamics remain unclear. The recent development of influenza surveillance-particularly the emergence of digital epidemiology-provides an opportunity to further understand this puzzle as an area within applied human biometeorology. This paper investigates the short-term weather effects on human influenza activity at a synoptic scale during cold seasons. Using 10 years (2005-2014) of municipal level influenza surveillance data (an adjustment of the Google Flu Trends estimation from the Centers for Disease Control's virologic surveillance data) and daily spatial synoptic classification weather types, we explore and compare the effects of weather exposure on the influenza infection incidences in 79 cities across the USA. We find that during the cold seasons the presence of the polar [i.e., dry polar (DP) and moist polar (MP)] weather types is significantly associated with increasing influenza likelihood in 62 and 68% of the studied cities, respectively, while the presence of tropical [i.e., dry tropical (DT) and moist tropical (MT)] weather types is associated with a significantly decreasing occurrence of influenza in 56 and 43% of the cities, respectively. The MP and the DP weather types exhibit similar close positive correlations with influenza infection incidences, indicating that both cold-dry and cold-moist air provide favorable conditions for the occurrence of influenza in the cold seasons. Additionally, when tropical weather types are present, the humid (MT) and the dry (DT) weather types have similar strong impacts to inhibit the occurrence of influenza. These findings suggest that temperature is a more dominating atmospheric factor than moisture that impacts the occurrences of influenza in cold seasons.

  10. Acute Low Back Pain? Do Not Blame the Weather-A Case-Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilken, Keira; Hancock, Mark J; Maher, Chris G; Li, Qiang; Steffens, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the influence of various weather parameters on the risk of developing a low back pain (LBP) episode. Case-crossover study. Primary care clinics in Sydney, Australia. 981 participants with a new episode of acute LBP. Weather parameters were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were derived comparing two exposure variables in the case window-(1) the average of the weather variable for the day prior to pain onset and (2) the change in the weather variable from 2 days prior to 1 day prior to pain onset-with exposures in two control windows (1 week and 1 month before the case window). The weather parameters of precipitation, humidity, wind speed, wind gust, wind direction, and air pressure were not associated with the onset of acute LBP. For one of the four analyses, higher temperature slightly increased the odds of pain onset. Common weather parameters that had been previously linked to musculoskeletal pain, such as precipitation, humidity, wind speed, wind gust, wind direction, and air pressure, do not increase the risk of onset for LBP.

  11. The atomization and the flame structure in the combustion of residual fuel oils; La atomizacion y estructura de flama en la combustion de combustibles residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolado Estandia, Ramon [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1985-12-31

    In this article a research on the combustion of heavy residual fuel oils is presented. The type of flames studied were obtained by means of the burning of sprays produced by an atomizer designed and calibrated specially for the research purpose. The flame characteristics that were analyzed are its length, its luminosity, the temperature, the distribution of the droplets size and mainly the burning regime of the droplets in the flame. The experimental techniques that were used for these studies were shadow micro-photography, suction pyrometry and of total radiation, laser diffraction, 35 mm photography, and impact push. The analysis of the experimental results, together with the results of the application of a mathematical model, permitted to establish two parameters, that quantitatively related determine the burning regime of the droplets in a flame of sprays of residual heavy fuel oil. [Espanol] En este articulo se presenta una investigacion sobre la combustion de combustibles residuales pesados. El tipo de flamas estudiadas se obtuvieron mediante el quemado de sprays producidos por un atomizador disenado y calibrado especialmente para el proposito de la investigacion. Las caracteristicas de flama que se analizaron son la longitud, la luminosidad, la temperatura, la distribucion de tamano de gotas y, principalmente, el regimen de quemado de gotas en la flama. Las tecnicas experimentales que se usaron para estos estudios fueron microfotografia de sombras, pirometria de succion y de radiacion total, difraccion laser, fotografia de 35 mm y empuje de impacto. El analisis de resultados experimentales, junto con los resultados de la aplicacion de un modelo matematico, permitio establecer dos parametros, que relacionados cuantitativamente, determinan el regimen de quemado de gotas en una flama de sprays de combustible residual pesado.

  12. Fuel oil combustion with low production of nitrogen oxides; Combustion de combustoleo con baja produccion de oxidos de nitrogeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escalera Campoverde, Rogelio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1998-09-01

    This work presents the results of the theoretical-experimental study of the effects of the secondary air jet directed perpendicularly to the flame axis in the fuel oil combustion in a 500 Kw furnace. The main purpose of this study was to obtain low nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions without increasing the CO, which is observed in low NO{sub x} conventional burners. The experimental results showed a significative reduction of the NO{sub x} and of the CO, from 320 to 90 ppm and from 50 ppm to negligible values, respectively. A commercial computational code of fluid dynamics was employed for modeling the combustion in base line conditions, without secondary air and with the injection of secondary air. The experimental results were compared with calculated ones. [Espanol] En este trabajo se presentan los resultados del estudio teorico experimental de los efectos de los chorro de aire secundario dirigidos en forma perpendicular al eje de la flama en la combustion del combustoleo en un horno de 500 kW. El proposito principal del estudio fue obtener bajas emisiones de oxidos de nitrogeno (NO{sub x}) sin incrementar el CO, lo cual se observa en quemadores convencionales de bajo NO{sub x}. Los resultados experimentales demostraron una reduccion significativa del NO{sub x} y del CO: de 320 a 90 ppm y de 50 ppm a valores despreciables, respectivamente. Se empleo un codigo computacional comercial de dinamica de fluidos para modelar la combustion en condiciones de linea base, sin aire secundario, y con la inyeccion del aire secundario. Se comparan resultados experimentales con los calculados.

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of Heavy Fuel Oil Spray and Combustion under Low-Speed Marine Engine-Like Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available On account of their high power, thermal efficiency, good reliability, safety, and durability, low-speed two-stroke marine diesel engines are used as the main drive devices for large fuel and cargo ships. Most marine engines use heavy fuel oil (HFO as the primary fuel, however, the physical and chemical characteristics of HFO are not clear because of its complex thermophysical properties. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of fuel properties on the spray and combustion characteristics under two-stroke marine engine-like conditions via a sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity analysis of fuel properties for non-reacting and reacting simulations are conducted by comparing two fuels having different physical properties, such as fuel density, dynamic viscosity, critical temperature, and surface tension. The performances of the fuels are comprehensively studied under different ambient pressures, ambient temperatures, fuel temperatures, and swirl flow conditions. From the results of non-reacting simulations of HFO and diesel fuel properties in a constant volume combustion chamber, it can be found that the increase of the ambient pressure promotes fuel evaporation, resulting in a reduction in the steady liquid penetration of both diesel and HFO; however, the difference in the vapor penetrations of HFO and diesel reduces. Increasing the swirl flow significantly influences the atomization of both HFO and diesel, especially the liquid distribution of diesel. It is also found that the ambient temperature and fuel temperature have the negative effects on Sauter mean diameter (SMD distribution. For low-speed marine engines, the combustion performance of HFO is not sensitive to activation energy in a certain range of activation energy. At higher engine speed, the difference in the effects of different activation energies on the in-cylinder pressure increases. The swirl flow in the cylinder can significantly promote fuel evaporation and

  14. A spectrocolorimetric and chemical study on color modification of heat-treated wood during artificial weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianai; Kocaefe, Duygu; Kocaefe, Yasar; Boluk, Yaman; Pichette, Andre

    2012-05-01

    Effect of artificial weathering on the wood surface color modifications of three North American species (jack pine, aspen, and birch) heat-treated under different temperatures was studied by spectrocolorimetric colormeter (datacolor, CHECK TM). Data was analyzed using the reflectance spectra (400-700 nm) as well as the CIE-L*a*b* system and ΔE. Kubelka-Munk (K-M) spectra of samples were recorded as a function of artificial weathering time to obtain the absorption maxima of the chromophore woods formed during artificial weathering. The results were compared with those of the respective untreated (Kiln-dried) species. Analysis of chemical components shows that the lignin percent of jack pine, aspen, and birch increased after heat treatment (28.66-35.9%, 20.27-26.41%, and 19.04-22.71% respectively) which might be due to smaller influence of heat treatment on lignin content than hemicelluloses. This improves the resistance of heat-treated wood to photo-degradation. This is also supported by the smaller change observed in K-M spectra and total color parameters in CIE-L*a*b* system of heat-treated wood samples compared to those of untreated wood when weathered for72 h. However, the lignin percent of heat-treated woods reduce to maximum 2.5% after artificial weathering of 1512 h. This suggests that the weathering degrades most lignin matrix; consequently, both the colors of heat-treated woods and untreated woods are lighter and very similar after a long period of artificial weathering.

  15. The refining industry and the future of the fuel oils; L'industrie du raffinage et le devenir des fiouls lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleille, S. [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques, 60 - Verneuil en Halatte (INERIS) (France)

    2004-07-15

    The INERIS established during the year 2003 a report on the problems about the fuel oils which may occurred in the context of the sustainable development of the refining sector. This presentation discusses the report and more precisely two chapters and the conclusion. The two chapters concern the french situation (demand, supply and and exports of fuel oils) and the evaluation of the world situation. They propose some hypothesis on the fuel market evolution. (A.L.B.)

  16. Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patinkin, L.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

  17. Decreased survival of rainbow trout exposed to no. 2 fuel oil caused by sublethal preexposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, B. L.; Stubblefield, W. A.; Lapoint, T. W.; Bergman, H.L.; Kaiser, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed for 21 d to sublethal levels of No. 2 fuel oil (2FO). The four exposure concentrations ranged from 12 to 100 mg/L 2FO dispersed in water and resulted in 0 to 12% mortality. Following this exposure period (preexposure) the ability of preexposed trout to survive exposure to acutely lethal levels of 2FO was observed. Preexposure to either 50 or 100 mg/L 2FO consistently resulted in decreased survival and a lower LC50 for a given observation period. Unfortunately, because the LC50 determinations were not obtained independently, they could not be used to test statistically the effects of preexposure on survival. Therefore, two proportional hazard modeling techniques were applied to the data to test for effects due to preexposure. Both modeling techniques indicated that preexposure results in decreased survival of rainbow trout exposed to acutely toxic levels of 2FO. Thus, in contrast to preexposure to metals, which results in acclimation, preexposure to 2FO results in decreased survival.

  18. Characterization of pitch prepared from pyrolysis fuel oil via electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Gun; Park, Mira; Kim, Hak-Yong; Kwac, Lee Ku; Shin, Hye Kyoung

    2017-06-01

    Pitch samples were obtained from pyrolysis fuel oil by thermal treatment for 2 h at 300 °C after electron beam irradiation (EBI) treatment and by thermal treatment alone for different temperature of 250 °C, 300 °C, and 350 °C. EBI treatment was found to be an effective treatment for preparing pitch compare to the pitch obtained without EBI treatment. These results were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) analyses, which showed the increase in the intensities of peaks corresponding to aromatic compounds. In the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) spectra, the amount of components with medium molecular weights in the pitch was found to increase with the temperature; likewise, in the case of the pitch obtained via EBI treatment, we found that the amount of components with higher molecular weight over 1000 (m/v) similarly increased. Further, the thermal stability and carbon yield at 850 °C of the pitch obtained by EBI were greater than those of samples subjected to thermal treatment at 250 and 300 °C.

  19. Steam and fuel oil supply and purge valve with cooling steam feature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, B.F.; Buchanan, J.R.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes a steam and fuel oil supply and purge valve. It comprises a valve body defining steam and oil inlet ports, at least one discharge port, a steam purge passageway interconnecting the steam inlet and discharge ports, an oil supply passageway interconnecting the oil inlet and discharge ports, a cooling steam passageway interconnecting the steam inlet and discharge ports, a steam valve and actuator member movable between first, second, third, and fourth positions in the valve body and operable to open and close the steam purge and cooling steam passageways, a small metering passageway in the steam valve and actuator member which is so dimensioned and located as to open prior to full opening movement of the valve member and actuator relative to its seat, an oil valve member movable between first and second positions to open and close the oil supply passageway, biasing means urging the oil valve member toward its second and closed positions, the steam valve and actuator member in its first and second positions respectively closing and opening the steam purge passageway.

  20. Mercury's Weather-Beaten Surface: Understanding Mercury in the Context of Lunar and Asteroid Space Weathering Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominque, Deborah L.; Chapman, Clark R.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Schriver, David; hide

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the composition of Mercury's crust is key to comprehending the formation of the planet. The regolith, derived from the crustal bedrock, has been altered via a set of space weathering processes. These processes are the same set of mechanisms that work to form Mercury's exosphere, and are moderated by the local space environment and the presence of an intrinsic planetary magnetic field. The alterations need to be understood in order to determine the initial crustal compositions. The complex interrelationships between Mercury's exospheric processes, the space environment, and surface composition are examined and reviewed. The processes are examined in the context of our understanding of these same processes on the lunar and asteroid regoliths. Keywords: Mercury (planet) Space weathering Surface processes Exosphere Surface composition Space environment 3

  1. Correlating Bacharach opacity in fuel oil exhaust. Prediction of the operating parameters that reduce it; Correlation de l'opacite Bacharach des gaz d'echappement. Prediction des parametres operateurs qui la reduisent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, M.; Coello, J.; Maspoch, S.; Puigdomenech, A. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Dept. de Quimica (Spain); Peralta, X.; Gonzalez, J.M.; Torres, J. [Asfaltos Espanoles SA, Refineria de Tarragona (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    A study was conducted with a view to determining the steps to be taken in order to control the Bacharach opacity of smoke released by different types of engines powered by fuel oil through the same chimney. A statistical model was constructed to relate Bacharach opacity to the operational parameters of the burning equipment on the basis of information recorded during its routine functioning over a period of about one year, with no laboratory experiments nor intentional alteration of such parameters. Different chemo-metric tools were applied to the data recorded over a period long enough to ensure a good model. Owing to the high complexity of the data handled (equipment parameters, fuel oil properties, operating conditions, etc.), the model was constructed by using different tools that were tested in order of increasing complexity. Thus, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was initially conducted on the variables defining the different types of fuel oil used in order to suppress their high correlation. The scores obtained from this analysis were used as the fuel data in the subsequent steps. Owing to the high complexity of the parameters involved, linear regression methods were not functional, so the non-linear regression method Alternating Conditional Expectations (ACE) had to be used instead to determine the influence of these parameters on Bacharach opacity. After the model was constructed, the parameters that govern opacity were determined and the model was experimentally validated by exploring the variables that can be modified at plant level (viz. the combination of conradson coke and asphaltenes in the fuel, the oil viscosity at burner and the proportion of oxygen in the furnace). Changes in these variables were found to alter the properties of the stack; also, the predictions of the ACE model were confirmed. Consequently, the proposed methodology allows the effective control of smoke released by the equipment. (authors)

  2. National impacts of the Weatherization Assistance Program in single-family and small multifamily dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Balzer, R.A.; Faby, E.

    1993-05-01

    Since 1976, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has operated one of the largest energy conservation programs in the nation -- the low-income Weatherization Assistance Program. The program strives to increase the energy efficiency of dwellings occupied by low-income persons in order to reduce their energy consumption, lower their fuel bills, increase the comfort of their homes, and safeguard their health. It targets vulnerable groups including the elderly, people with disabilities, and families with children. The most recent national evaluation of the impacts of the Program was completed in 1984 based on energy consumption data for households weatherized in 1981. DOE Program regulations and operations have changed substantially since then: new funding sources, management principles, diagnostic procedures, and weatherization technologies have been incorporated. Many of these new features have been studied in isolation or at a local level; however, no recent evaluation has assessed their combined, nationwide impacts to date or their potential for the future. In 1990, DOE initiated such an evaluation. This evaluation is comprised of three ``impact`` studies (the Single-Family Study, High-Density Multifamily Study, and Fuel-Oil Study) and two ``policy`` studies. Altogether, these five studies will provide a comprehensive national assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program as it existed in the 1989 Program Year (PY 1989). This report presents the results of the first phase of the Single-Family Study. It evaluates the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the Program as it has been applied to the largest portion of its client base -- low-income households that occupy single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and small (2- to 4-unit) multifamily dwellings. It is based upon a representative national sample that covers the full range of conditions under which the program was implemented in PY 1989.

  3. Natural Weathering Exposure Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corps of Engineers' Treat Island Natural Weathering Exposure Station is a long-term natural weathering facility used to study concrete durability. Located on the...

  4. The effects of weather on pediatric seizure: A single-center retrospective study (2005-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Kim, Joon Soo; Jin, Mi Hyeon; Lee, Jun Hwa

    2017-12-31

    Several studies have reported an association between seizure and the weather. However, reports are conflicting. Thus, we investigated whether emergency department visits due to seizure are affected by weather. We retrospectively analyzed 108,628 emergency department visits to Samsung Changwon Hospital by pediatric patients from January 2005 to December 2015. Among them, there were 3484 (3.2%) visits for any type of seizure. Seizures were categorized as febrile seizure, afebrile seizure, epilepsy, or status epilepticus. We used a distributed lag non-linear model with quasi-Poisson distribution to investigate the association between weather and pediatric seizure. During this 11-year study period, over the half of total pediatric seizure patients were febrile seizure (53.5%) and the proportion for status epilepticus were the lowest (5.9%). Mean of mean temperature and diurnal temperature range were 14.7°C and 8.3°C. Mean humidity was 62.1%, mean of atmospheric pressure was 1015.5hPa and mean of sunshine was 6.3Hr. When considering the overall 0-15days lagged effect of weather, only mean temperature was significantly associated with emergency department visits. At lower temperatures, the number of emergency department visits increases and decreases at higher temperatures. All 4 types of seizure also showed similar patterns. In particular, only visits of febrile seizure were significantly associated with mean temperature. We investigated the association weather and pediatric seizure by considering 0-15day lags. In particular, low mean temperature increase the emergency department visits for pediatric seizure and high mean temperature decrease the pediatric seizure. In addition, only febrile seizure of 4 seizure types was affected by mean average temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Polyphasic approach for assessing changes in an autochthonous marine bacterial community in the presence of Prestige fuel oil and its biodegradation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Núria; Viñas, Marc; Guiu-Aragonés, Cèlia; Bayona, Josep M; Albaigés, Joan; Solanas, Anna M

    2011-08-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to identify key hydrocarbon degraders from a marine oil spill sample (Prestige fuel oil), to ascertain their role in the degradation of different hydrocarbons, and to assess their biodegradation potential for this complex heavy oil. After a 17-month enrichment in weathered fuel, the bacterial community, initially consisting mainly of Methylophaga species, underwent a major selective pressure in favor of obligate hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms, such as Alcanivorax and Marinobacter spp. and other hydrocarbon-degrading taxa (Thalassospira and Alcaligenes), and showed strong biodegradation potential. This ranged from >99% for all low- and medium-molecular-weight alkanes (C(15)-C(27)) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (C(0)- to C(2)- naphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene, dibenzothiophene, and carbazole), to 75-98% for higher molecular-weight alkanes (C(28)-C(40)) and to 55-80% for the C(3) derivatives of tricyclic and tetracyclic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (e.g., C(3)-chrysenes), in 60 days. The numbers of total heterotrophs and of n-alkane-, aliphatic-, and PAH degraders, as well as the structures of these populations, were monitored throughout the biodegradation process. The salinity of the counting medium affects the counts of PAH degraders, while the carbon source (n-hexadecane vs. a mixture of aliphatic hydrocarbons) is a key factor when counting aliphatic degraders. These limitations notwithstanding, some bacterial genera associated with hydrocarbon degradation (mainly belonging to α- and γ-Proteobacteria, including the hydrocarbonoclastic Alcanivorax and Marinobacter) were identified. We conclude that Thalassospira and Roseobacter contribute to the degradation of aliphatic hydrocarbons, whereas Mesorhizobium and Muricauda participate in the degradation of PAHs.

  6. Polyphasic approach for assessing changes in an autochthonous marine bacterial community in the presence of Prestige fuel oil and its biodegradation potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Nuria [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Microbiology; IDAEA-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry; Vinas, Marc [GIRO Technological Centre, Mollet del Valles (Spain); Guiu-Aragones, Celia; Solanas, Anna M. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Microbiology; Bayona, Josep M.; Albaiges, Joan [IDAEA-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry

    2011-08-15

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to identify key hydrocarbon degraders from a marine oil spill sample (Prestige fuel oil), to ascertain their role in the degradation of different hydrocarbons, and to assess their biodegradation potential for this complex heavy oil. After a 17-month enrichment in weathered fuel, the bacterial community, initially consisting mainly of Methylophaga species, underwent a major selective pressure in favor of obligate hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms, such as Alcanivorax and Marinobacter spp. and other hydrocarbon-degrading taxa (Thalassospira and Alcaligenes), and showed strong biodegradation potential. This ranged from >99% for all low- and medium-molecular-weight alkanes (C{sub 15}-C{sub 27}) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (C{sub 0-} to C{sub 2-} naphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene, dibenzothiophene, and carbazole), to 75-98% for higher molecular-weight alkanes (C{sub 28}-C{sub 40}) and to 55-80% for the C{sub 3} derivatives of tricyclic and tetracyclic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (e.g., C{sub 3}-chrysenes), in 60 days. The numbers of total heterotrophs and of n-alkane-, aliphatic-, and PAH degraders, as well as the structures of these populations, were monitored throughout the biodegradation process. The salinity of the counting medium affects the counts of PAH degraders, while the carbon source (n-hexadecane vs. a mixture of aliphatic hydrocarbons) is a key factor when counting aliphatic degraders. These limitations notwithstanding, some bacterial genera associated with hydrocarbon degradation (mainly belonging to {alpha}- and {gamma}-Proteobacteria, including the hydrocarbonoclastic Alcanivorax and Marinobacter) were identified. We conclude that Thalassospira and Roseobacter contribute to the degradation of aliphatic hydrocarbons, whereas Mesorhizobium and Muricauda participate in the degradation of PAHs. (orig.)

  7. Cenosphere formation from heavy fuel oil: a numerical analysis accounting for the balance between porous shells and internal pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Vanteru, Mahendra Reddy

    2016-01-18

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) as a fuel in industrial and power generation plants ensures the availability of energy at economy. Coke and cenosphere emissions from HFO combustion need to be controlled by particulate control equipment such as electrostatic precipitators, and collection effectiveness is impacted by the properties of these particulates. The cenosphere formation is a function of HFO composition, which varies depending on the source of the HFO. Numerical modelling of the cenosphere formation mechanism presented in this paper is an economical method of characterising cenosphere formation potential for HFO in comparison to experimental analysis of individual HFO samples, leading to better control and collection. In the present work, a novel numerical model is developed for understanding the global cenosphere formation mechanism. The critical diameter of the cenosphere is modelled based on the balance between two pressures developed in an HFO droplet. First is the pressure (Prpf) developed at the interface of the liquid surface and the inner surface of the accumulated coke due to the flow restriction of volatile components from the interior of the droplet. Second is the pressure due to the outer shell strength (PrC) gained from van der Walls energy of the coke layers and surface energy. In this present study it is considered that when PrC ≥ Prpf the outer shell starts to harden. The internal motion in the shell layer ceases and the outer diameter (DSOut) of the shell is then fixed. The entire process of cenosphere formation in this study is analysed in three phases: regression, shell formation and hardening, and post shell hardening. Variations in pressures during shell formation are analysed. Shell (cenosphere) dimensions are evaluated at the completion of droplet evaporation. The rate of fuel evaporation, rate of coke formation and coke accumulation are analysed. The model predicts shell outer diameters of 650, 860 and 1040 µm, and inner diameters are 360, 410

  8. Mercury's Weather-Beaten Surface: Understanding Mercury in the Context of Lunar and Asteroidal Space Weathering Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingue, Deborah L.; Chapman, Clark. R.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.; Schriver, David; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Sprague, Ann L.; Blewett, David T.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Feldman, William C.; Lawrence, David J.; Ho, George C.; Ebel, Denton S.; Nittler, Larry R.; Vilas, Faith; Pieters, Carle M.; Solomon, Sean C.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Winslow, Reka M..; Helbert, Jorn; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Weider, Shoshana Z.; Mouawad, Nelly; Izenberg, Noam R.; McClintock, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury's regolith, derived from the crustal bedrock, has been altered by a set of space weathering processes. Before we can interpret crustal composition, it is necessary to understand the nature of these surface alterations. The processes that space weather the surface are the same as those that form Mercury's exosphere (micrometeoroid flux and solar wind interactions) and are moderated by the local space environment and the presence of a global magnetic field. To comprehend how space weathering acts on Mercury's regolith, an understanding is needed of how contributing processes act as an interactive system. As no direct information (e.g., from returned samples) is available about how the system of space weathering affects Mercury's regolith, we use as a basis for comparison the current understanding of these same processes on lunar and asteroidal regoliths as well as laboratory simulations. These comparisons suggest that Mercury's regolith is overturned more frequently (though the characteristic surface time for a grain is unknown even relative to the lunar case), more than an order of magnitude more melt and vapor per unit time and unit area is produced by impact processes than on the Moon (creating a higher glass content via grain coatings and agglutinates), the degree of surface irradiation is comparable to or greater than that on the Moon, and photon irradiation is up to an order of magnitude greater (creating amorphous grain rims, chemically reducing the upper layers of grains to produce nanometer scale particles of metallic iron, and depleting surface grains in volatile elements and alkali metals). The processes that chemically reduce the surface and produce nanometer-scale particles on Mercury are suggested to be more effective than similar processes on the Moon. Estimated abundances of nanometer-scale particles can account for Mercury's dark surface relative to that of the Moon without requiring macroscopic grains of opaque minerals. The presence of

  9. A comparative study of European insurance schemes for extreme weather risks and incentives for risk reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Marleen; Hudson, Paul; de Ruig, Lars; Kuik, Onno; Botzen, Wouter

    2017-04-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the insurance schemes that cover extreme weather events in twelve different EU countries and the risk reduction incentives offered by these schemes. Economic impacts of extreme weather events in many regions in Europe and elsewhere are on the rise due to climate change and increasing exposure as driven by urban development. In an attempt to manage impacts from extreme weather events, natural disaster insurance schemes can provide incentives for taking measures that limit weather-related risks. Insurance companies can influence public risk management policies and risk-reducing behaviour of policyholders by "rewarding behaviour that reduces risks and potential damages" (Botzen and Van den Bergh, 2008, p. 417). Examples of insurance market systems that directly or indirectly aim to incentivize risk reduction with varying degrees of success are: the U.S. National Flood Insurance Programme; the French Catastrophes Naturelles system; and the U.K. Flood Re program which requires certain levels of protection standards for properties to be insurable. In our analysis, we distinguish between four different disaster types (i.e. coastal and fluvial floods, droughts and storms) and three different sectors (i.e. residential, commercial and agriculture). The selected case studies also provide a wide coverage of different insurance market structures, including public, private and public-private insurance provision, and different methods of coping with extreme loss events, such as re-insurance, governmental aid and catastrophe bonds. The analysis of existing mechanisms for risk reduction incentives provides recommendations about incentivizing adaptive behaviour, in order to assist policy makers and other stakeholders in designing more effective insurance schemes for extreme weather risks.

  10. Experimental Space Weathering: A coordinated LIBS, TEM, VIS and NIR/MIR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojic, Aleksandra N.; Pavlov, Sergey; Markus, Kathrin; Morlok, Andreas; Wirth, Richard; Weber, Iris; Schreiber, Anja; Hiesinger, Harald; Sohn, Martin; Huebers, Heinz-Wilhelm

    2016-04-01

    We conducted pulsed infrared laser irradiation experiments, in order to simulate space weathering triggered modifications of planetary surfaces not protected by an enveloping atmosphere [1,2], e.g., Mercury. Our work is embedded in the framework of the BepiColombo space mission to Mercury [3]. The MErcury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS), an onboard spectrometer will deliver surface data in the range of 7 - 14 μm once it reaches orbit in 2024 [4]. Space weathering effects known from other Solar System bodies are likely to be very prominent on Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, the lack of a protective atmosphere and its weak magnetic field [5]. Space weathering effects, e.g., implantation of solar wind in regolith material, sputtering and (micro) meteorite impacts modify the planetary surface and thus, therefrom obtained spectral data in the VIS/NIR range considerably (e.g., reddening and darkening of spectra) [6-9]. We expect modifications induced by space weathering, known from the VIS/NIR range also to show in the mid infrared range, probably by amorphisation or similar still unknown effects [2,10]. Our approach is therefore threefold: a) alter analog material artificially by pulsed laser experiments, b) investigate altered analog material spectrally (VIS/NIR and MIR range) and c) conduct transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies on selected weathered grains to better understand the nanostratigraphy developed by irradiation and its impact on the resulting infrared spectra. Here, we report on results obtained from the first set of experiments. Characteristic upper mantle minerals were taken as analog material, Mg-rich olivine and pyroxene, were ground into a powder (Earth, Planets Sp. 1255-1265. [7] Brucato et al. (2003) Earth, Moon, and Planets. 307-314. [8] Sasaki et al. (2003) Adv Sp Res. 2537-2542. [9] Brunetto et al. (2007) Icarus. 381-393. [10] Morlok et al. (2016) Icarus. 352-368.

  11. The North Carolina Field Test: Field Performance of the Preliminary Version of an Advanced Weatherization Audit for the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    The field performance of weatherizations based on a newly-developed advanced technique for selecting residential energy conservation measures was tested alongside current Retro-Tech-based weatherizations in North Carolina. The new technique is computer-based and determines measures based on the needs of an individual house. In addition, it recommends only those measures that it determines will have a benefit-to-cost ratio greater than 1 for the house being evaluated. The new technique also considers the interaction of measures in computing the benefit-to-cost ratio of each measure. The two weatherization approaches were compared based on implementation ease, measures installed, labor and cost requirements, and both heating and cooling energy savings achieved. One-hundred and twenty houses with the following characteristics participated: the occupants were low-income, eligible for North Carolina's current weatherization program, and responsible for their own fuel and electric bills. Houses were detached single-family dwellings, not mobile homes; were heated by kerosene, fuel oil, natural gas, or propane; and had one or two operating window air conditioners. Houses were divided equally into one control group and two weatherization groups. Weekly space heating and cooling energy use, and hourly indoor and outdoor temperatures were monitored between November 1989 and September 1990 (pre-period) and between December 1990 and August 1991 (post-period). House consumption models were used to normalize for annual weather differences and a 68 F indoor temperature. Control group savings were used to adjust the savings determined for the weatherization groups. The two weatherization approaches involved installing attic and floor insulations in near equivalent quantities, and installing storm windows and wall insulation in drastically different quantities. Substantial differences also were found in average air leakage reductions for the two weatherization groups. Average

  12. Comparative Study of Different Stochastic Weather Generators for Long-Term Climate Data Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant Mehan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate is one of the single most important factors affecting watershed ecosystems and water resources. The effect of climate variability and change has been studied extensively in some places; in many places, however, assessments are hampered by limited availability of long-term continuous climate data. Weather generators provide a means of synthesizing long-term climate data that can then be used in natural resource assessments. Given their potential, there is the need to evaluate the performance of the generators; in this study, three commonly used weather generators—CLImate GENerator (CLIGEN, Long Ashton Research Station Weather Generator (LARS-WG, and Weather Generators (WeaGETS were compared with regard to their ability to capture the essential statistical characteristics of observed data (distribution, occurrence of wet and dry spells, number of snow days, growing season temperatures, and growing degree days. The study was based on observed 1966–2015 weather station data from the Western Lake Erie Basin (WLEB, from which 50 different realizations were generated, each spanning 50 years. Both CLIGEN and LARS-WG performed fairly well with respect to representing the statistical characteristics of observed precipitation and minimum and maximum temperatures, although CLIGEN tended to overestimate values at the extremes. This generator also overestimated dry sequences by 18%–30% and snow-day counts by 12%–19% when considered over the entire WLEB. It (CLIGEN was, however, well able to simulate parameters specific to crop growth such as growing degree days and had an added advantage over the other generators in that it simulates a larger number of weather variables. LARS-WG overestimated wet sequence counts across the basin by 15%–38%. In addition, the optimal growth period simulated by LARS-WG also exceeded that obtained from observed data by 16%–29% basin-wide. Preliminary results with WeaGETS indicated that additional evaluation is

  13. Personal Insights and Anecdotes about the Weatherization Assistance Program Process Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treitler, Inga [Anthropology Imagination, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The present report is based on the research conducted for the Process Field Study between March and September 2011. The Process Field Study documents how Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) services were delivered to clients, and the quality with which those services were delivered. The assessments were conducted by visiting 19 agencies in 19 states around the country interviewing agency managers, staff, and contractors; observing program intake along, with 43 audits, 45 measure installation and 37 final inspections; and conducting debriefing interviews with clients and weatherization staff following the observation of service delivery. In this report, we turn to detailed observations of a few field interactions. The client stories from our observations illustrate some of the ways clients and crew interact to build the success of the program, but shows there will always be unanticipated obstacles to building trust and getting the program to the public. Stories of staff and crew career paths indicate that weatherization technology and techniques are being learned and used by technicians out of the new home construction industry and that their new knowledge provides them with technical tools and methods that many hope to take back into the construction industry if and when they return. This report is organized according to the four stages of weatherization: intake, audit, installation, and inspection. It contributes to our understanding of the area where policy, environment, culture, and individual decisions influence social innovation. The anecdotes reveal the realities of implementing programs for the benefit of the greater good at minimal cost and sacrifice in times of ever restricting budgets. As the authors revisited their field notes and compiled memorable narratives to communicate the essence of the weatherization experience, they identified three key takeaways that summarize the major issues. First, in WAP as in all services there will always be

  14. Study of the engineering geologic feature of weathering zone of bedrock in 810 producing area of Luling Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂和荣; 孙家斌; 李明好; 李伟; 尹正柱; 陈富勇; 宋晓梅

    2002-01-01

    For a safe extracting of the mine resource of the razor-thin capping rock, a study of waterproof, sand prevention, roof-fall prevention must be made. As a result, its necessary to master the engineering feature of weathering zone of bedrock. According to the lithology appraisal and X diffract analyses, the mineral feature of weathering zone of bedrock in 810 producing area has been studied in this article. By testing the physical mechanics index of weathering zone, we have found out some features of physical mechanic quality. Utilizing the determined result of viscosity index and slaking test, we reach a conclusion of the water stability of weathering zone, that is the weathering zone rock belongs to the type that is easily slaked when encountered water and the water stability is weak.

  15. Ethanol pilot project: an energy alternative project for a total or partial substitution of fuel oil in thermoelectric generation plants; Projeto piloto do etanol - PPE: alternativa energetica para substituicao parcial ou total do oleo combustivel em plantas de geracao termoeletrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessoa, Joao Simoes

    2004-07-01

    The actual stage of technological development is strongly dependent on wide use of petroleum combustibles, in which its trade market defines the rules of socio economical and geopolitics interdependencies. The economic growth has been driven by the 'readily available - cheap energy' stimulus, limiting studies on natural sources of energy (geothermal, solar) and development of renewable ones (bio combustibles). However, economical, financial crisis may change this scenario, and new opportunities for a change in the technological matrix and in technological structure might occur. In Brazil, the 'Agenda 21', especially the PPA - Applied Research Program in the Energetic Area, intend to develop case studies and implement 'pilots projects' to research conventional and renewable sources of energy, bringing to present the value of this project, developed between 1979 and 1980, to evaluate the technical feasibility of ethylic alcohol utilization as a complementary combustible or in a total substitute for the fuel oil in boilers of conventional thermoelectric generation plants. This work presents the performance of one of the Piratininga thermal power plant's boiler, as well as the main data acquired from direct experimentation and the characteristics of this plant, from the use of ethylic alcohol as a substitute of fuel oil. (author)

  16. Study of Dronino Iron Meteorite Weathering in Clay Sand Using Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoriy A. Yakovlev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Weathering products of two fragments of Dronino iron ungrouped meteorite found in the wet and drier clay sand were studied using X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. The products of metal oxidation in the internal and external surface layers were different for both fragments. The weathering products in fragment found in the wet clay sand contain magnetite (Fe3O4, maghemite (γ-Fe2O3, goethite (α-FeOOH and probably ferrihydrite (5Fe2O3∙9H2O while those in fragment found in drier clay sand contained ferric hydrous oxides (FeOOH and siderite (FeCO3 mainly. Concretions found near the first fragment contain ferric hydrous oxides (FeOOH mainly. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

  17. Emissions in the exhaust of fishing boats after adding viscous agents into fuel oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Lien-Te; Shih, Shun-I; Lin, Sheng-Lun; Yang, Tsun-Lirng; Wu, Tser-Son; Hung, Chung-Hsien

    2009-12-20

    In order to avoid the illegal use of fishing boat fuel A (FBFA) by traveling diesel vehicles (TDVs) in Taiwan, alternatives that are easily distinguished from premium diesel fuel (PDF) were prepared to evaluate their suitability. Two new ingredients, pyrolysis fuel oil (PFO) and residue of desulfurization unit (RDS), were added into FBFA and formed PFO0.5 and RDS0.5, respectively. Along with FBFA, these three fuels were analyzed for their chemical and physical properties. Furthermore, they were used by three fishing boats with different sizes, output powers, and weights. The engine performances and pollutant emissions were examined and monitored. Experimental results show that there are significant differences in appearance between PDF and the two new blended fuels (PFO0.5 and RDS0.5), and thus misuse or illegal use of FBFA could be substantially reduced. The fuel consumption, which is negatively related to the heating value of fuels, is in order of FBFAfishing boats, using RDS0.5 resulted in a decrease in CO and NO(x) emissions, while the PM emission factors (g bhp(-1) h(-1) and g L(-1)-fuel) were reduced by approximately 36% and 33%, respectively. Owing to the higher total aromatic content in PFO0.5 and RDS0.5, total-PAH concentrations in the exhausts from the three fishing boats using PFO0.5 and RDS0.5 were slightly (1.2 and 1.1 times, respectively) higher than for those using FBFA. Nevertheless, the estimated total BaP(eq) from the three fishing boats using RDS0.5 was 27.5, 19.5, and 8.25% lower than those using FBFA. With using PFO0.5, they were totally different, at 23.5, 2.79, and 2.58% higher. With regard to looking different to PDF, RDS0.5 is superior to PFO0.5, and is thus recommended as a better alternative to FBFA, particularly because it can help lower more emissions of CO, NO(x), PM and BaP(eq).

  18. Weather conditions and Bell's palsy: five-year study and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milionis Haralampos J

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Climatic or meteorological condition changes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Bell's palsy (BP. We evaluate the influence of meteorological parameters, such as temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure, and their variation and covariation on the incidence of BP and present a review of the literature on the effect of meteorological conditions on facial nerve function. Methods A total of 171 cases of BP admitted to our Department over a five-year period were studied. The meteorological database included daily values of 13 distinct parameters recorded at the meteorological station of the University of Ioannina during this period. A relationship between each meteorological variable and the incidence of BP was investigated by applying (Χ2 test on data from 13 contingency tables. In addition, the influence of different weather types on the incidence of BP was also investigated. For this purpose Cluster Analysis was used to create eight clusters (weather types for the Ioannina prefecture and (Χ2 test was applied on the contingency tables consisting of the days of BP cases for each cluster. Results No significant correlation was found either between BP and each distinct meteorological parameter or between BP and any specific weather. Conclusions Meteorological conditions, such as those dominating in the Northwestern Greece, and/or their changes have little effect on the incidence of BP. Multicenter studies taking into account atmospheric pollution, and climatic differences between countries, are necessary to scrutinize the environmental effects on facial nerve function.

  19. Study of arsenopyrite weathering products in mine wastes from abandoned tungsten and tin exploitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murciego, A. [Department of Geology, Plza. de los Caidos s/n. Salamanca University, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Alvarez-Ayuso, E., E-mail: esther.alvarez@irnasa.csic.es [Department of Environmental Geochemistry, IRNASA (CSIC), Apdo. 257, 37071 Salamanca (Spain); Pellitero, E. [Department of Geology, Plza. de los Caidos s/n. Salamanca University, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Rodriguez, M.A. [Faculty of Sciences, Crystallography and Mineralogy Area, Avd. Elvas s/n. Extremadura University, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Garcia-Sanchez, A. [Department of Environmental Geochemistry, IRNASA (CSIC), Apdo. 257, 37071 Salamanca (Spain); Tamayo, A.; Rubio, J.; Rubio, F. [Ceramic and Glass Institute (CSIC), c/Kelsen, 5, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Rubin, J. [Material Science Institute of Aragon, CSIC-Zaragoza University, c/Maria de Luna 3, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    Arsenopyrite-rich wastes from abandoned tungsten and tin exploitations were studied to determine the composition and characteristics of the secondary phases formed under natural weathering conditions so as to assess their potential environmental risk. Representative weathered arsenopyrite-bearing rock wastes collected from the mine dumps were analysed using the following techniques: X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis, polarizing microscopy analysis, electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and microRaman and Moessbauer spectroscopies. Scorodite, pharmacosiderite and amorphous ferric arsenates (AFA) with Fe/As molar ratios in the range 1.2-2.5 were identified as secondary arsenic products. The former showed to be the most abundant and present in the different studied mining areas. Its chemical composition showed to vary in function of the original surrounding rock mineralogy in such a way that phosphoscorodite was found as the mineral variety present in apatite-containing geoenvirons. Other ever-present weathering phases were goethite and hydrous ferric oxides (HFO), displaying, respectively, As retained amounts about 1 and 20% (expressed as As{sub 2}O{sub 5}). The low solubility of scorodite, the relatively low content of AFA and the formation of compounds of variable charge, mostly of amorphous nature, with high capacity to adsorb As attenuate importantly the dispersion of this element into the environment from these arsenopyrite-bearing wastes.

  20. Li isotope geochemical study on weathering of granite in Longnan, Jiangxi Province, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.; Xu, Z.; Zhao, T.; Yu, C.; Zhou, L.

    2015-12-01

    Li isotopes have been demonstrated to be a powerful tool in silicate weathering research from the continental scale to that of catchments and weathering profiles. In this study, we focus on Li isotopic behavior during granite weathering and pedogenic processes. Study profiles are developed on a granite intrusion in Longnan, South China, under a subtropical monsoon climate. Two soil profiles (JLN-S4 on the ridgetop and JLN-S3 on the midslope; both 120cm deep) and one weathering profiles (JLN-S1 on the toe slope; 1100cm deep) along a hill slope were selected to represent the granite weathering process in near surface condition. Bulk samples of these profiles were analyzed for major element and Li content, and δ7Li value. CIA (chemical index of alteration) values were determined. The uppermost soil profile (JLN-S4) samples have CIA values between 97.6 and 98.3, with δ7Li values from -2.50 to -3.90‰; JLN-S3 profile samples have lower CIA values varing from 94.4 to 96.1 and δ7Li values from -0.73‰ to -1.55‰. The weathering profile JLN-S1 at the toe slope has a generally increasing CIA values (in the range of 57.8~92.4) upward in the profile. The δ7Li values variation with CIA in JLN-S1, shows a two staged relationship: δ7Li increasing from -14.92‰ to 0.66‰ when CIA increases from 57.8 to 74.6 as the first stage (from the bottom to 370cm depth), and no obvious relationship between CIA andδ7Li(-4.74~3.62‰) was observed in the second stage (CIA higher than 74.6, 370cm depth above). Li contents in JLN-S4 vary between 3.84 and 15.03 μg/g, in JLN-S3 between 1.43~8.03 μg/g, and in JLN-S1 between 6.95~22.27μg/g. In the first stage defined by δ7Li and CIA relationship, Li contents decrease with increasing CIA. However, in the second stage, Li abundance decreases upward at the beginning and turns into an increacing tendency (at 175cm depth) to the surface. Two granite bedrock samples have δ7Li value of -0.23 and 0.39‰, and Li contents of 38.58 and 34

  1. STUDIES ON NATURAL WEATHERING OF RATTAN POWDER-FILLED NATURAL RUBBER COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komethi Muniandy,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the effect of natural weathering on mechanical and morphological properties of rattan powder-filled natural rubber (NR composites as a function of filler loading and silane coupling agent. The rattan powder samples in the range of 0 to 30 phr were compounded with NR using a laboratory size two-roll mill. The natural weathering test was carried out for six months. The degradation of the samples was evaluated by performing a tensile test, a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and a scanning electron microscopy (SEM test. The results indicated that after natural weathering, an increase in stress at 100% elongation (M100 can be seen for samples without the silane coupling agent, whilst M100 was reduced for samples with silane coupling agent. A drastic reduction in tensile strength and elongation at break were observed for all samples due to the photo-oxidation process that occurred during the degradation of the samples. The extent of degradation on the samples’ surfaces and the presence of oxygenated products were confirmed by SEM and FTIR studies, respectively.

  2. Do Wind Turbines Affect Weather Conditions?: A Case Study in Indiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan F. Henschen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind turbines are becoming increasingly widespread in the United States as the world looks for cleaner sources of energy. Scientists, policymakers, and citizens have strong opinions regarding the positive and negative effects of wind energy projects, and there is a great deal of misinformation about wind energy circulating on the Web and other media sources. The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of how the rotation of hundreds of turbines can influence local weather conditions within a wind farm and in the surrounding areas. This experiment measures temperature, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, wind direction, relative humidity, and evaporation with five weather instruments at Meadow Lake Wind Farm located in White, Jasper, and Benton Counties, Indiana, from November 4 through November 18, 2010. The data show that as wind passes throughout the wind farm, the air warms during the overnight and early morning hours and cools during daytime hours. Observed lower humidity rates and higher evaporation rates downwind also demonstrate that the air dries out as it travels through the wind farm. Further research over multiple seasons is necessary to examine the effects of warmer nighttime temperatures and drier conditions progressively downwind of the installation. Nevertheless, wind turbines did not negatively affect local weather patterns in our small-scale research and may actually prevent frost, which could have important positive implications for farmers by potentially prolonging the growing season.

  3. Assessment of the potential for conversion of TP-108 boilers to firing natural gas and fuel oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugov, A. N.; Supranov, V. M.; Izyumov, M. A.; Vereshchetin, V. A.; Usman, Yu. M.; Natal'in, A. S.

    2017-03-01

    TP-108 boilers were initially designed to burn milled peat. In the 1980s, they were reconstructed for conversion to burning natural gas as well. However, operation of these boilers revealed problems due to low reheat temperature and great air inleakage in the furnace. The initial design of the boiler and its subsequent reconstruction are described in the paper. Measures are presented for further modernization of TP-108 boilers to eliminate the above-mentioned problems and enable natural gas or fuel oil only to be burned in them. Thermal design calculations made using a specially developed adapted model (AM) suggest that replacement of the existing burners with new oil/gas burners, installation of steam-to-steam heat exchangers (SSHE), and sealing of the boiler gas path to make it gas tight will allow the parameters typical of gas-and-oil fired boilers to be attained. It is demonstrated that SSHEs can yield the design secondary steam reheat temperature, although this solution is not typical for natural circulation boilers with steam reheat. The boiler equipped with SSHEs can operate on fuel oil or natural gas with flue gas recirculation or without it. Moreover, operation of the boiler with flue gas recirculation to the air duct in combination with staged combustion enables the required environmental indicators to be attained.

  4. Identification of compounds in heavy fuel oil that are chronically toxic to rainbow trout embryos by effects-driven chemical fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Julie; Bornstein, Jason M; Munno, Keenan; Hollebone, Bruce; King, Thomas; Brown, R Stephen; Hodson, Peter V

    2014-04-01

    The present study isolated and identified compounds in heavy fuel oil 7102 (HFO 7102) that are bioavailable and chronically toxic to rainbow trout embryos (Oncorhynchus mykiss). An effects-driven chemical fractionation combined the chemical separation of oil with toxicity testing and chemical analyses of each fraction to identify the major classes of compounds associated with embryo toxicity. Toxicity was assessed with 2 exposure methods, a high-energy chemical dispersion of oil in water, which included oil droplets in test solutions, and water accommodated fractions which were produced by oiled gravel desorption columns, and which did not contain visible oil droplets. Fractions of HFO with high concentrations of naphthalenes, alkanes, asphaltenes, and resins were nontoxic to embryos over the range of concentrations tested. In contrast, fractions enriched with 3- to 4-ringed alkyl polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were embryotoxic, consistent with published studies of crude oils and individual alkyl PAHs. The rank order of fraction toxicity did not vary between the exposure methods and was consistent with their PAH content; fractions with higher-molecular weight alkyl PAHs were the most toxic. Exposure of juvenile trout to most fractions of HFO induced higher activities of cytochrome P450 enzymes, with a rank order of potency that varied with exposure method and differed somewhat from that of embryotoxicity. Induction reflected the bioavailability of PAHs but did not accurately predict embryotoxicity.

  5. Calculation of average molecular parameters, functional groups, and a surrogate molecule for heavy fuel oils using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2016-04-22

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) is primarily used as fuel in marine engines and in boilers to generate electricity. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful analytical tool for structure elucidation and in this study, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy were used for the structural characterization of 2 HFO samples. The NMR data was combined with elemental analysis and average molecular weight to quantify average molecular parameters (AMPs), such as the number of paraffinic carbons, naphthenic carbons, aromatic hydrogens, olefinic hydrogens, etc. in the HFO samples. Recent formulae published in the literature were used for calculating various derived AMPs like aromaticity factor 〖(f〗_a), C/H ratio, average paraffinic chain length (¯n), naphthenic ring number 〖(R〗_N), aromatic ring number〖 (R〗_A), total ring number〖 (R〗_T), aromatic condensation index (φ) and aromatic condensation degree (Ω). These derived AMPs help in understanding the overall structure of the fuel. A total of 19 functional groups were defined to represent the HFO samples, and their respective concentrations were calculated by formulating balance equations that equate the concentration of the functional groups with the concentration of the AMPs. Heteroatoms like sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen were also included in the functional groups. Surrogate molecules were finally constructed to represent the average structure of the molecules present in the HFO samples. This surrogate molecule can be used for property estimation of the HFO samples and also serve as a surrogate to represent the molecular structure for use in kinetic studies.

  6. Satellite Constellations for Space Weather and Ionospheric Studies: Overview of the COSMIC and COSMIC-2 Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, W. S.; Pedatella, N. M.; Weiss, J.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements from constellations of low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites are proving highly useful for ionospheric science and space weather studies. The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC), a joint US/Taiwan mission launched in April 2006, is a six micro-satellite constellation carrying Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) receivers. COSMIC has collected a large amount of useful data from these scientific payloads and is still currently collecting up to 1,000 RO measurement events per day on average. The GPS RO dual-frequency L-band phase and amplitude measurements can be used to observe absolute Total Electron Content (TEC) and scintillation on lines of sight between the LEO and GPS satellites, and electron density profiles via the RO method. The large number and complete global and local time coverage of COSMIC data are allowing scientists to observe ionospheric and plasmaspheric phenomena that are difficult to see with other instruments. The success of COSMIC has prompted U.S. agencies and Taiwan to execute a COSMIC follow-on mission (called COSMIC-2) that will put twelve satellites with GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) RO payloads into orbit on two launches in the 2017-20 time frame. The first launch in 2017 will place six satellites in a 520-km altitude 24 deg inclination orbit, which is ideal for low latitude ionospheric research and space weather forecasting. The planned second launch (not currently funded) places six additional satellites in a 750 km 72 deg inclination orbit to provide global coverage and increased sampling density. COSMIC-2 will make use of an advanced radio occultation receiver with an innovative beam-forming antenna design, and is expected to produce at least 10,000 high-quality atmospheric and ionospheric profiles per day from GPS and GLONASS signals to support operational weather prediction, climate monitoring, and space weather forecasting. Each COSMIC-2 spacecraft

  7. Tool for evaluating the evolution Space Weather Regional Warning Centers under the innovation point of view: the Case Study of the Embrace Space Weather Program Early Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a tool for measuring the evolutional stage of the space weather regional warning centers using the approach of the innovative evolution starting from the perspective presented by Figueiredo (2009, Innovation Management: Concepts, metrics and experiences of companies in Brazil. Publisher LTC, Rio de Janeiro - RJ). It is based on measuring the stock of technological skills needed to perform a certain task that is (or should) be part of the scope of a space weather center. It also addresses the technological capacity for innovation considering the accumulation of technological and learning capabilities, instead of the usual international indices like number of registered patents. Based on this definition, we have developed a model for measuring the capabilities of the Brazilian Study and Monitoring Program Space Weather (Embrace), a program of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE), which has gone through three national stages of development and an international validation step. This program was created in 2007 encompassing competence from five divisions of INPE in order to carry out the data collection and maintenance of the observing system in space weather; to model processes of the Sun-Earth system; to provide real-time information and to forecast space weather; and provide diagnostic their effects on different technological systems. In the present work, we considered the issues related to the innovation of micro-processes inherent to the nature of the Embrace program, not the macro-economic processes, despite recognizing the importance of these. During the development phase, the model was submitted to five scientists/managers from five different countries member of the International Space Environment Service (ISES) who presented their evaluations, concerns and suggestions. It was applied to the Embrace program through an interview form developed to be answered by professional members of regional warning centers. Based on the returning

  8. How to use The National Gallery as a cross curricular approach to weather and climate studies at primary level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, P. J. K.

    2009-09-01

    How to use The National Gallery as a cross curricular approach to weather and climate studies at primary level. Pål J. Kirkeby Hansen Faculty of Education and International Studies, Oslo University College (PalKirkeby.Hansen@lui.hio.no) Weather and climate are topics in natural science and geography in primary and secondary education in most countries. The pupils are often doing own weather observations and measurements and are presenting the results oral, by posters or with digital aids. They also use the Internet with all its relevant resources in their studies to develop vocabulary, practical and conceptual knowledge. Knowledge about weather and climate is parts of liberal education and could be projected to other topics in science and to topics in other subjects, for instance: history, social geography, literature and arts. This article reports from a case study in grade 3 classes (age 9 year) during their Weather Week. Their science teacher was, quite untypical, also educated in art history. She arranged a visited to The National Gallery with the double agenda: 1. To introduce the pupils to Norwegian canon paintings from the national romantic period, our so-called "golden age”. 2. To look for and discuss weather elements in this paintings. For one hour the museum curator guided the pupils around the water cycle by using the paintings. While the pupils' own observations of weather, clouds and wind and measurements of temperature and precipitation during the Weather Week only are point checks, the guided tour in The National Gallery gave literally "the whole picture” of the Norwegian weather and climate and of the water cycle. During the tour, the curator constantly invited the pupils to tell about and discuss what weather and water elements they were looking at when standing in front of a painting. The pupils were responsive and interested all the time. Back at school, they demonstrated that they had learned much about both weather elements, the water

  9. SEASAT economic assessment. Volume 9: Ports and harbors case study and generalization. [economic benefits of SEASAT satellites to harbors and shipping industries through improved weather forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    This case study and generalization quantify benefits made possible through improved weather forecasting resulting from the integration of SEASAT data into local weather forecasts. The major source of avoidable economic losses to shipping from inadequate weather forecasting data is shown to be dependent on local precipitation forecasting. The ports of Philadelphia and Boston were selected for study.

  10. Study on Rear-end Real-time Data Quality Control Method of Regional Automatic Weather Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the rear-end real-time data quality control method of regional automatic weather station. [Method] The basic content and steps of rear-end real-time data quality control of regional automatic weather station were introduced. Each element was treated with systematic quality control procedure. The existence of rear-end real time data of regional meteorological station in Guangxi was expounded. Combining with relevant elements and linear changes, improvement based on traditiona...

  11. 33 CFR 155.350 - Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of less...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of less than 400 gross tons. 155.350 Section 155... mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of less than 400 gross tons. (a) No person may operate an oceangoing ship of less than 400 gross tons, unless it either:...

  12. First-principles study of cesium adsorption to weathered micaceous clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Masahiko; Nakamura, Hiroki; Machida, Masahiko

    2014-05-01

    A large amount of radioactive nuclides was produced into environment due to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Residents near FDNPP were suffering from radioactive cesium and then evacuated, because which has long half-life and is retained by surface soil for long time. The Japanese government has been decontaminating the cesium by removing the surface soil in order to return them to their home. This decontamination method is very effective, but which produces huge amount of waste soil. This becomes another big problem in Fukushima, because it is not easy to find large storage sites. Then effective and economical methods to reduce the volume of the waste soil are needed. However, it has not been invented yet. One of the reasons is lack of knowledge about microscopic process of adsorption/desorption of cesium to/from soil. It is known that weathered micaceous clay minerals play crucial role on adsorption and retention of cesium. They are expected to have special sorption sites, called frayed edge sites (FESs), which adsorb cesium selectively and irreversibly. Properties of FES have been intensely investigated by experiments. But microscopic details of the adsorption process on FES are still unclear. Because direct observation of the process with current experimental techniques is quite difficult. We investigated the adsorption of cesium to FES in muscovite, which is a typical micaceous clay mineral, via first-principles calculations (density functional theory). We made a minimal model of FES and evaluate the energy difference before and after cesium adsorption to FES. This is the first numerical modeling of FES. It was shown that FES does adsorb cesium if the weathering of muscovite has been weathered. In addition, we revealed the mechanism of cesium adsorption to FES, which is competition between ion radius of cesium and the degree of weathering. I plan to discuss volume reduction of the waste soil based on our result. Reference M. Okumura

  13. Plants remember past weather: a study for atmospheric pollen concentrations of Ambrosia, Poaceae and Populus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyasovszky, István; Makra, László; Csépe, Zoltán; Sümeghy, Zoltán; Deák, Áron József; Pál-Molnár, Elemér; Tusnády, Gábor

    2015-10-01

    After extreme dry (wet) summers or years, pollen production of different taxa may decrease (increase) substantially. Accordingly, studying effects of current and past meteorological conditions on current pollen concentrations for different taxa have of major importance. The purpose of this study is separating the weight of current and past weather conditions influencing current pollen productions of three taxa. Two procedures, namely multiple correlations and factor analysis with special transformation are used. The 11-year (1997-2007) data sets include daily pollen counts of Ambrosia (ragweed), Poaceae (grasses) and Populus (poplar), as well as daily values of four climate variables (temperature, relative humidity, global solar flux and precipitation). Multiple correlations of daily pollen counts with simultaneous values of daily meteorological variables do not show annual course for Ambrosia, but do show definite trends for Populus and Poaceae. Results received using the two methods revealed characteristic similarities. For all the three taxa, the continental rainfall peak and additional local showers in the growing season can strengthen the weight of the current meteorological elements. However, due to the precipitation, big amount of water can be stored in the soil contributing to the effect of the past climate elements during dry periods. Higher climate sensitivity (especially water sensitivity) of the herbaceous taxa ( Ambrosia and Poaceae) can be definitely established compared to the arboreal Populus. Separation of the weight of the current and past weather conditions for different taxa involves practical importance both for health care and agricultural production.

  14. Convective Weather Avoidance with Uncertain Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Sinan; Windhorst, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Convective weather events have a disruptive impact on air traffic both in terminal area and in en-route airspaces. In order to make sure that the national air transportation system is safe and efficient, it is essential to respond to convective weather events effectively. Traffic flow control initiatives in response to convective weather include ground delay, airborne delay, miles-in-trail restrictions as well as tactical and strategic rerouting. The rerouting initiatives can potentially increase traffic density and complexity in regions neighboring the convective weather activity. There is a need to perform rerouting in an intelligent and efficient way such that the disruptive effects of rerouting are minimized. An important area of research is to study the interaction of in-flight rerouting with traffic congestion or complexity and developing methods that quantitatively measure this interaction. Furthermore, it is necessary to find rerouting solutions that account for uncertainties in weather forecasts. These are important steps toward managing complexity during rerouting operations, and the paper is motivated by these research questions. An automated system is developed for rerouting air traffic in order to avoid convective weather regions during the 20- minute - 2-hour time horizon. Such a system is envisioned to work in concert with separation assurance (0 - 20-minute time horizon), and longer term air traffic management (2-hours and beyond) to provide a more comprehensive solution to complexity and safety management. In this study, weather is dynamic and uncertain; it is represented as regions of airspace that pilots are likely to avoid. Algorithms are implemented in an air traffic simulation environment to support the research study. The algorithms used are deterministic but periodically revise reroutes to account for weather forecast updates. In contrast to previous studies, in this study convective weather is represented as regions of airspace that pilots

  15. Numerical studies of the combustion of fuel oil in the boiler furnace at reduced load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivantsov Aleksandr A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Relevance of the work due to the need to assess the effectiveness and reliability of the boiler units on reserve fuel after reconstruction associated with a change in the base fuel and approaches of numerical analysis. Analysis of physical and chemical processes in the furnace volume of boiler BKZ–210–140 operating on reserve fuel and rated load when using the Euler and Euler combined and Lagrangian modeling approaches. Results of the numerical modeling of the processes of aerodynamics, heat exchange, and combustion in the furnace volume.

  16. Bioaccumulation and subacute toxicity of mechanically and chemically dispersed heavy fuel oil in sea urchin (Glyptocidaris crenulari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailin Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil spills have a disastrous ecological impact on ecosystems but few data are available for the effects of dispersed oil on benthic marine organisms. In order to provide information for assessment, we analysed the hydrocarbon compositions of the mechanically dispersed water accommodated fraction (MDWAF and the chemically dispersed water accommodated fraction (CDWAF of No. 120 fuel oil, their bioaccumulation, and DNA damage related to oil exposure, using the sea urchin as a sentinel organism. The results show that the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in the tissues of sea urchin exposed to the CDWAF is higher than that of those exposed to the MDWAF. The single cell gel electrophoresis assay results also indicated higher DNA damage from exposure to the CDWAF of oil. Thus, dispersants should be applied with caution in oil spill accidents.

  17. Weathering and Biodegradation Study on Graft Copolymer Compatibilized Hybrid Bionanocomposites of Poly(Lactic Acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajna, VP; Nayak, Sanjay K.; Mohanty, Smita

    2016-07-01

    This work reports on the influence of moisture absorption and accelerated weathering on the properties of graft copolymer compatibilized bionanocomposites of poly(lactic acid) (PLA). Moisture absorption tests were conducted for 30 days by immersing the samples in a distilled water bath at room temperature, and the amount of moisture absorbed in each time interval was measured. The rate of moisture uptake decreased by incorporation of C30B nanoclay and graft copolymer into fiber-reinforced PLA composites. Changes in the mechanical properties of composites in each time interval of moisture absorption were investigated using tensile and impact tests. Exposure to moisture caused significant drops in the mechanical properties. The morphological characterization of biocomposites during the aforementioned tests has been made using SEM, while bionanocomposites were analyzed by TEM. Further, this paper also reported the effect of accelerated weathering on the mechanical properties and the results are confirmed through SEM analysis. Biodegradation behaviors of PLA biocomposites and bionanocomposites have also been studied.

  18. Study on the Variation Characteristics of Haze Weather in Hubei Province during 1980-2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianxing SU; Mingfang XU; Xiang ZHOU; Zaiqiang YANG; Jijian YUAN; Haiyan ZHANG

    2015-01-01

    This paper, using the method of "the combination of 14 o ’clock relative humidity, visibility and weather phenomena" , selected haze days during 1980-2012 from 13 stations of Hubei Province, and studied years of variation characteristics of haze weather in Hubei Province. The results showed that the average annual haze days showed a fluctuant rising trend in whole from 1980 to 2012, but there were many peak value and val ey value during the whole changing process; haze days of most stations showed an increasing trend, among which the stations with less than 50 d haze days had a more obvious increasing trend, and the spatial distribution of annual mean haze days had distinct inhomogeneity. Haze days of Hubei Province presented the distribution characteristics of more in autumn and winter, and less in spring and summer, in which haze days during December-January were the most, and haze days during July -August were the least. Terrain had a big impact on lo-cal haze days, piedmont leeward zones were prone to haze days, mountainous re-gions were just the opposite. The research suggested that we should combine dif-ferent situations with different stations instead of exclusively from the mean value of multiple stations when we analyze the mean change of haze days in a broader area, to investigate the overal changing trend and the reasons.

  19. Weather Conditions, Weather Information and Car Crashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriaan Perrels

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic safety is the result of a complex interaction of factors, and causes behind road vehicle crashes require different measures to reduce their impacts. This study assesses how strongly the variation in daily winter crash rates associates with weather conditions in Finland. This is done by illustrating trends and spatiotemporal variation in the crash rates, by showing how a GIS application can evidence the association between temporary rises in regional crash rates and the occurrence of bad weather, and with a regression model on crash rate sensitivity to adverse weather conditions. The analysis indicates that a base rate of crashes depending on non-weather factors exists, and some combinations of extreme weather conditions are able to substantially push up crash rates on days with bad weather. Some spatial causation factors, such as variation of geophysical characteristics causing systematic differences in the distributions of weather variables, exist. Yet, even in winter, non-spatial factors are normally more significant. GIS data can support optimal deployment of rescue services and enhance in-depth quantitative analysis by helping to identify the most appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. However, the supportive role of GIS should not be inferred as existence of highly significant spatial causation.

  20. EU-INTACT-case studies: Impact of extreme weather on critical Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Ruiten Kees

    2016-01-01

    One of the case studies is located in the Netherlands and deals with the port of Rotterdam. The situation in Rotterdam is representative for many other main ports in Europe. These ports are all situated in a delta area, near the sea and rivers or canals. Also, these ports are close to urban areas and industrial complexes. Finally, these ports have a multimodal transport infrastructure to and from its hinterland, which is also vulnerable for extreme weather events. The case study is not only significant for the development of methods and tools, but also of direct interest for the region itself. The combination of the National Water safety policy and the best practices from the INTACT cases offer challenges to create better adaptation options and coping capacity to these relatively unforeseen and unexpected impacts based on climate change scenario’s and socio-economic megatrends.

  1. Longitudinal Study of the Market Penetration of Cockpit Weather Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, Harry Paul, III; Sireli, Yesim; Ozan, Erol; Kauffmann, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the longitudinal research of the market penetration of cockpit weather information systems (CWIS) is to contribute to the body of knowledge on modeling advanced technology feasibility in aviation by tracking and analyzing the market adoption of CWIS over a three year period. This research takes advantage of a previous study, conducted by Dr. Paul Kauffmann in 2000, which demonstrated an integrated and cost effective approach to evaluate advanced technology feasibility, examining the feasibility of CWIS in five market segments: transport, commuter, general aviation, business, and rotorcraft. The longitudinal research consists of two consecutive studies and produced two reports. The first report was submitted in August 2003 and included general market analysis about the CWIS products in the market at the time, identified their characteristics and examined developing market dynamics.

  2. A study on weather radar data assimilation for numerical rainfall prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscale NWP model is gaining more attention in providing high-resolution rainfall forecasts at the catchment scale for real-time flood forecasting. The model accuracy is however negatively affected by the "spin-up" effect and errors in the initial and lateral boundary conditions. Synoptic studies in the meteorological area have shown that the assimilation of operational observations especially the weather radar data can improve the reliability of the rainfall forecasts from the NWP models. This study aims at investigating the potential of radar data assimilation in improving the NWP rainfall forecasts that have direct benefits for hydrological applications. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model is adopted to generate 10 km rainfall forecasts for a 24 h storm event in the Brue catchment (135.2 km2 located in Southwest England. Radar reflectivity from the lowest scan elevation of a C-band weather radar is assimilated by using the three dimensional variational (3D-Var data assimilation technique. Considering the unsatisfactory quality of radar data compared to the rain gauges, the radar data is assimilated in both the original form and an improved form based on a real-time correction ratio developed according to the rain gauge observations. Traditional meteorological observations including the surface and upper-air measurements of pressure, temperature, humidity and wind speed are also assimilated as a bench mark to better evaluate and test the potential of radar data assimilation. Four modes of data assimilation are thus carried out on different types or combinations of observations: (1 traditional meteorological data; (2 radar reflectivity; (3 corrected radar reflectivity; (4 a combination of the original reflectivity and meteorological data; and (5 a combination of the corrected reflectivity and meteorological data. The WRF rainfall forecasts before and after different modes of data assimilation is evaluated by examining

  3. Weather as a risk factor for epileptic seizures: A case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakers, Florian; Walther, Mario; Schiffner, Rene; Rupprecht, Sven; Rasche, Marius; Kockler, Michael; Witte, Otto W; Schlattmann, Peter; Schwab, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    Most epileptic seizures occur unexpectedly and independently of known risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of patients' perception that weather is a risk factor for epileptic seizures. Using a hospital-based, bidirectional case-crossover study, 604 adult patients admitted to a large university hospital in Central Germany for an unprovoked epileptic seizure between 2003 and 2010 were recruited. The effect of atmospheric pressure, relative air humidity, and ambient temperature on the onset of epileptic seizures under temperate climate conditions was estimated. We found a close-to-linear negative correlation between atmospheric pressure and seizure risk. For every 10.7 hPa lower atmospheric pressure, seizure risk increased in the entire study population by 14% (odds ratio [OR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.28). In patients with less severe epilepsy treated with one antiepileptic medication, seizure risk increased by 36% (1.36, 1.09-1.67). A high relative air humidity of >80% increased seizure risk in the entire study population by up to 48% (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.11-1.96) 3 days after exposure in a J-shaped association. High ambient temperatures of >20°C decreased seizure risk by 46% in the overall study population (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.32-0.90) and in subgroups, with the greatest effects observed in male patients (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.14-0.74). Low atmospheric pressure and high relative air humidity are associated with an increased risk for epileptic seizures, whereas high ambient temperatures seem to decrease seizure risk. Weather-dependent seizure risk may be accentuated in patients with less severe epilepsy. Our results require further replication across different climate regions and cohorts before reliable clinical recommendations can be made. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  4. Weather effects on the patterns of people's everyday activities: a study using GPS traces of mobile phone users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerayut Horanont

    Full Text Available This study explores the effects that the weather has on people's everyday activity patterns. Temperature, rainfall, and wind speed were used as weather parameters. People's daily activity patterns were inferred, such as place visited, the time this took place, the duration of the visit, based on the GPS location traces of their mobile phones overlaid upon Yellow Pages information. Our analysis of 31,855 mobile phone users allowed us to infer that people were more likely to stay longer at eateries or food outlets, and (to a lesser degree at retail or shopping areas when the weather is very cold or when conditions are calm (non-windy. When compared to people's regular activity patterns, certain weather conditions affected people's movements and activities noticeably at different times of the day. On cold days, people's activities were found to be more diverse especially after 10AM, showing greatest variations between 2PM and 6PM. A similar trend is observed between 10AM and midnight on rainy days, with people's activities found to be most diverse on days with heaviest rainfalls or on days when the wind speed was stronger than 4 km/h, especially between 10AM-1AM. Finally, we observed that different geographical areas of a large metropolis were impacted differently by the weather. Using data of urban infrastructure to characterize areas, we found strong correlations between weather conditions upon people's accessibility to trains. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on human behavior, in particular the choice of daily activities and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on urban dynamics.

  5. Weather effects on the patterns of people's everyday activities: a study using GPS traces of mobile phone users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanont, Teerayut; Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Leong, Tuck W; Sekimoto, Yoshihide; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the effects that the weather has on people's everyday activity patterns. Temperature, rainfall, and wind speed were used as weather parameters. People's daily activity patterns were inferred, such as place visited, the time this took place, the duration of the visit, based on the GPS location traces of their mobile phones overlaid upon Yellow Pages information. Our analysis of 31,855 mobile phone users allowed us to infer that people were more likely to stay longer at eateries or food outlets, and (to a lesser degree) at retail or shopping areas when the weather is very cold or when conditions are calm (non-windy). When compared to people's regular activity patterns, certain weather conditions affected people's movements and activities noticeably at different times of the day. On cold days, people's activities were found to be more diverse especially after 10AM, showing greatest variations between 2PM and 6PM. A similar trend is observed between 10AM and midnight on rainy days, with people's activities found to be most diverse on days with heaviest rainfalls or on days when the wind speed was stronger than 4 km/h, especially between 10AM-1AM. Finally, we observed that different geographical areas of a large metropolis were impacted differently by the weather. Using data of urban infrastructure to characterize areas, we found strong correlations between weather conditions upon people's accessibility to trains. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on human behavior, in particular the choice of daily activities and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on urban dynamics.

  6. Comparison of three weather generators for crop modeling: a case study for subtropical environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartkamp, A.D.; White, J.W.; Hoogenboom, G.

    2003-01-01

    The use and application of decision support systems (DDS) that consider variation in climate and soil conditions has expanded in recent years. Most of these DSS are based on crop simulation models that require daily weather data, so access to weather data, at single sites as well as large amount of

  7. Fuel oil made of high temperature tar hydrogenation and its feasibility analysis%高温煤焦油加氢制燃料油与可行性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆奎; 王生军

    2013-01-01

    介绍了煤焦油加氢反应机理,结合目前国内煤焦油加氢技术和酒钢自产煤焦油性质,对焦油加氢制燃料油的工艺路线、工艺条件、催化剂类型等进行研究,并对酒钢煤焦油加氢制燃料油可行性进行了分析。%The reaction mechanism of tar-hydrogenation is introduced . Combining with current domestic tar-hydrogenation technology as well as the nature of tar self-produced by Jiu Steel Group , researches on the process routing ,conditions ,among other types of catalysts are studied and feasibility on the process of fuel oil made by Jiu Steel tar hydrogenation is analyzed .

  8. Wacky Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarre, Amy; Gulino, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    What do a leaf blower, water hose, fan, and ice cubes have in common? Ask the students who participated in an integrative science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (I-STEM) education unit, "Wacky Weather," and they will tell say "fun and severe weather"--words one might not have expected! The purpose of the unit…

  9. Wacky Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarre, Amy; Gulino, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    What do a leaf blower, water hose, fan, and ice cubes have in common? Ask the students who participated in an integrative science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (I-STEM) education unit, "Wacky Weather," and they will tell say "fun and severe weather"--words one might not have expected! The purpose of the unit…

  10. AMS Online Weather Studies: The National Dissemination of a Distance Learning Course for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbeck, R. S.; Geer, I. W.; Mills, E. W.; Porter, W. A.; Moran, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    Our nation faces a serious challenge in attracting young people to science and science-related careers (including teaching). This is particularly true for members of groups underrepresented in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology and is especially acute in the number of minority college students majoring in the geosciences. A formidable obstacle in attracting undergraduates to the geosciences is lack of access, that is, no opportunity to enroll in geoscience courses simply because none is offered at their college or university. Often college-level introductory courses are a student's first exposure to the geosciences. To help alleviate this problem of access, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) has developed and implemented nationally an introductory weather and climate course, Online Weather Studies, which can be added to an institution's menu of general education course offerings. This highly successful course has been licensed by over 230 colleges and universities nationwide, among them 72 minority-serving institutions which have joined via the AMS Online Weather Studies Geosciences Diversity Program since 2002. This program designed to reach institutions serving large numbers of minority students has been made possible through support from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences (OEDG) and Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement-National Dissemination (CCLI-ND) programs. Online Weather Studies is an innovative, 12- to 15-week introductory college-level, online distance-learning course on the fundamentals of atmospheric science. Learner-formatted current weather data are delivered via the Internet and coordinated with investigations keyed to the day's weather. The principal innovation of Online Weather Studies is that students learn about weather as it happens in near real-time - a highly motivational learning experience. The AMS Education Program designed and services this course

  11. Natural weathering studies of oil palm trunk lumber (OPTL) green polymer composites enhanced with oil palm shell (OPS) nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Nazrul; Dungani, Rudi; Abdul Khalil, Hps; Alwani, M Siti; Nadirah, Wo Wan; Fizree, H Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a green composite was produced from Oil Palm Trunk Lumber (OPTL) by impregnating oil palm shell (OPS) nanoparticles with formaldehyde resin. The changes of physical, mechanical and morphological properties of the OPS nanoparticles impregnated OPTL as a result of natural weathering was investigated. The OPS fibres were ground with a ball-mill for producing nanoparticles before being mixed with the phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin at a concentration of 1, 3, 5 and 10% w/w basis and impregnated into the OPTL by vacuum-pressure method. The treated OPTL samples were exposed to natural weathering for the period of 6 and 12 months in West Java, Indonesia according to ASTM D1435-99 standard. Physical and mechanical tests were done for analyzing the changes in phenol formaldehyde-nanoparticles impregnated (PF-NPI) OPTL. FT-IR and SEM studies were done to analyze the morphological changes. The results showed that both exposure time of weathering and concentration of PF-NPI had significant impact on physical and mechanical properties of OPTL. The longer exposure of samples to weathering condition reduced the wave numbers during FT-IR test. However, all these physical, mechanical and morphological changes were significant when compared with the untreated samples or only PF impregnated samples. Thus, it can be concluded that PF-NP impregnation into OPTL improved the resistance against natural weathering and would pave the ground for improved products from OPTL for outdoor conditions.

  12. X-ray photoelectron studies of the mechanism of iron silicate dissolution during weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Jacques; Berner, Robert A.

    1983-12-01

    Iron silicate minerals (bronzite, fayalite), exposed to aqueous dissolution in the laboratory for up to 60 days at room temperature and pH 1, 1.5, and 6, have been studied for evidence of changes in surface composition, using XPS, and these results compared with those obtained from solution chemical analysis. In the absence of dissolved O 2 or at low pH (1-1.5) dissolution proceeds congruently after the initial formation of a thin (occupation by Fe +2 of more weakly bonded M 2 sites. The behavior of the layer is similar to that found earlier on iron-free pyroxene ( SCHOTTet al., 1981); in other words, because of its thinness and instability it is not diffusion-inhibiting or protective toward dissolution. In the presence of dissolved O 2, as would be the case in most weathering solutions, dissolution of bronzite and fayalite results in the formation of two surface layers whose compositions were deduced by measurements of XPS binding energies. The outer layer, consisting of hydrous ferric oxide, is readily removed by ultrasonic cleaning and, most likely, is not protective toward dissolution. The inner layer consists of Fe +3 in a protonated or hydroxylated silicate (Mg-silicate in the case of bronzite) matrix. This layer appears to impede dissolution over the time scale of the experiment as attested to by parabolic dissolution rates. However, the layer does not continue to grow on the time scale of weathering because ultrasonically cleaned soil grains ( BERNER and SCHOTT, 1982) exhibit surface compositions similar to those found in the present month-long laboratory experiments. In other words, a thick, highly altered, diffusion-inhibiting, protective surface layer does not form at the acidic pH of most soils.

  13. Bird migration flight altitudes studied by a network of operational weather radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokter, Adriaan M.; Liechti, Felix; Stark, Herbert; Delobbe, Laurent; Tabary, Pierre; Holleman, Iwan

    2011-01-01

    A fully automated method for the detection and quantification of bird migration was developed for operational C-band weather radar, measuring bird density, speed and direction as a function of altitude. These weather radar bird observations have been validated with data from a high-accuracy dedicated bird radar, which was stationed in the measurement volume of weather radar sites in The Netherlands, Belgium and France for a full migration season during autumn 2007 and spring 2008. We show that weather radar can extract near real-time bird density altitude profiles that closely correspond to the density profiles measured by dedicated bird radar. Doppler weather radar can thus be used as a reliable sensor for quantifying bird densities aloft in an operational setting, which—when extended to multiple radars—enables the mapping and continuous monitoring of bird migration flyways. By applying the automated method to a network of weather radars, we observed how mesoscale variability in weather conditions structured the timing and altitude profile of bird migration within single nights. Bird density altitude profiles were observed that consisted of multiple layers, which could be explained from the distinct wind conditions at different take-off sites. Consistently lower bird densities are recorded in The Netherlands compared with sites in France and eastern Belgium, which reveals some of the spatial extent of the dominant Scandinavian flyway over continental Europe. PMID:20519212

  14. Weather derivative design in agriculture – a case study of barley in the Southern Moravia Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Špička

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to point out some problems of index estimation for the purposes of weather derivative valuation considering the particularities of agriculture. The assessment of the sensitivity of barley to weather over 40 years has been the basis for the design and valuation of weather derivative in the Czech Republic (The Southern Moravia Region. The analysis is based on regression modeling using temperature index and barley yield. The burn analysis based on parametric bootstrap is used as the method for the valuation of weather derivative contract. With the effective bootstrap tool, the burn analysis may easily be processed and the uncertainty about the pay-off, option price and statistics of probability distribution of revenues can be effectively determined. Nevertheless, the results of the analysis reveal a significant adverse impact of basis risk on the quality of agricultural weather derivative in the Czech growing conditions. The article outlines the scope for use of weather derivative as the reinsurance tool in regions with frequent occurrence of systematic weather risk.

  15. Integrated non-food concept of rape seed, reed canary grass and flax processing for fiber, fuel oil and solid fuel; Energiarypsi - peltojen non-food vaihtoehtoja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1995-12-31

    The target of this project is to investigate if rape seed based fuel oil and diesel fuel component, agrofiber and solid fuel from other annual crops could be produced effectively as an alternative to existing non economical biodiesel-RME and ethanol production. Without heavy tax incentives the biodiesel and grain ethanol can not compete with conventional liquid fuels, the present EU fuel tax legislation will not permit any permanent tax incentives for commercial scale operations. Based on several studies by VTT the rape seed oil will be 30 % cheaper than RME and the utilization as a component 10-30 % blended to heating oil or diesel fuel might the most flexible solution. Neste Oy has carried out the combustion tests with 20 kW boiler and VTT the diesel engine tests with 20 % unprocessed rape seed oil mixtures, the oil was delivered by Mildola Oy. For the co-utilization of annual crops and straw, several laboratory scale combustion and flash pyrolysis tests have been carried out by VTT with straw, reed canary grass etc. In a flash pyrolysis process, the alkalies will remain in the char and a low alkali level bio oils can be produced. As a final step in order to reach the zero subsidy target, an extensive laboratory work is carried out to produce agrofibre from flax, reed canary grass and wheat straw. During the next months an overall economic calculations will be carried out in Finnish, Danish and Italian conditions as an EU-Apas project in order to see the competitiveness of such integrated concepts to conventional RME and reed canary grass combustion

  16. Does weather affect daily pain intensity levels in patients with acute low back pain? A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Vicky; Maher, Chris G; Steffens, Daniel; Li, Qiang; Hancock, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of various weather parameters on pain intensity levels in patients with acute low back pain (LBP). We performed a secondary analysis using data from the PACE trial that evaluated paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the treatment of acute LBP. Data on 1604 patients with LBP were included in the analysis. Weather parameters (precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and air pressure) were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Pain intensity was assessed daily on a 0-10 numerical pain rating scale over a 2-week period. A generalised estimating equation analysis was used to examine the relationship between daily pain intensity levels and weather in three different time epochs (current day, previous day, and change between previous and current days). A second model was adjusted for important back pain prognostic factors. The analysis did not show any association between weather and pain intensity levels in patients with acute LBP in each of the time epochs. There was no change in strength of association after the model was adjusted for prognostic factors. Contrary to common belief, the results demonstrated that the weather parameters of precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and air pressure did not influence the intensity of pain reported by patients during an episode of acute LBP.

  17. Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences through National Dissemination of the AMS Online Weather Studies Distance Learning Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbeck, R. S.; Geer, I. W.; Mills, E. W.; Porter, W. A.; Moran, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    Our nation faces a serious challenge in attracting young people to science and science-related careers (including teaching). This is particularly true for members of groups underrepresented in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology and is especially acute in the number of minority college students majoring in the geosciences. A formidable obstacle in attracting undergraduates to the geosciences is lack of access, that is, no opportunity to enroll in an introductory geoscience course simply because none is offered at their college or university. Often introductory or survey courses are a student's first exposure to the geosciences. To help alleviate this problem, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) through its Education Program developed and implemented nationally an introductory weather and climate course, Online Weather Studies, which can be added to an institution's menu of general education course offerings. This highly successful course will be offered at 130 colleges and universities nationwide, including 30 minority-serving institutions, 20 of which have joined the AMS Online Weather Studies Diversity Program during 2002. The AMS encourages course adoption by more institutions serving large numbers of minority students through support from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences (OEDG) and Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement-National Dissemination (CCLI-ND) programs. Online Weather Studies is an innovative, 12- to 15-week introductory college-level, online distance-learning course on the fundamentals of atmospheric science. Learner-formatted current weather data are delivered via the Internet and coordinated with investigations keyed to the day's weather. The principal innovation of Online Weather Studies is that students learn about weather as it happens in near real-time-a highly motivational learning experience. The AMS Education Program designed and services this course and

  18. New insight into Earth's weather through studies of Sun's magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Solar Vector Magnetograph is used to predict solar flares, and other activities associated with sun spots. This research provides new understanding about weather on the Earth, and solar-related conditions in orbit.

  19. Mirador - Weather

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. Our weather system includes the dynamics of the atmosphere and its interaction with the oceans and land. The improvement of...

  20. Study of Natural and Accelerated Weathering on Mechanical Properties of Antioxidants Modified Low Density Polyethylene Films for Greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Al Othman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural and accelerated weatherings were studied to inspect the effect of antioxidants to protect low-density polyethylene (LDPE films for commercial application as greenhouse covering materials in Saudi Arabia. In this investigation, six different formulations of LDPE film with incorporation of antioxidants were prepared and compared with neat LDPE. The samples were extruded and blown into a film using twin-screw extruder and film blowing machine. The LDPE films were exposed for outdoor weathering in Riyadh during the period of 90 days (mid of June to mid of September while the accelerated tests were performed by Weather-Ometer. The film having 0.2 wt% Alkanox-240 (AN-0.2 stabilizers showed the highest tensile strength among all samples during natural and 100-hour accelerated weathering (10.9 MPa and 21.8 MPa, resp.. The best elongation at break was witnessed in 0.2% Good-rite antioxidants which were 64% in natural weathering; however, 0.5% Good-rite antioxidants showed 232% in accelerated weathering. The film having 0.5 wt% Good-rite 3114 (GR-0.5 antioxidant could withstand 70 days during natural exposure before the tensile strength values were reduced to 2/3rd of the initial. The present study suggested that the addition of antioxidants Good-rite, Anox, and Alkanox can improve the mechanical strength, film’s life, effectiveness, and stability and they are suitable to be incorporated in LDPE for commercial greenhouse films.

  1. Corrosion behavior of Fe-Si metallic coatings added with NiCrAlY in an environment of fuel oil ashes at 700 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas-Bravo, V.M.; Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Romero-Castanon, T. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Procesos Termicos., Av. Reforma 113, C.P. 62490 Col. Palmira. Temixco. Morelos (Mexico); Dominguez-Patino, G.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G. [U.A.E.M. Centro de Investigaciones en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas., Av. Universidad 1001, C.P. 62210, Col. Chamilpa. Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curves and immersion tests for 300 h at 700 C in a furnace have been used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of Fe-Si metallic coatings added with up to 50 wt.% of NiCrAIY. The corrosive environment was fuel oil ashes from a steam generator. The composition of fuel oil ashes includes high content of vanadium, sodium and sulfur. The results obtained show that only the addition of 20 wt.% NiCrAlY to the Fe-Si coating improves its corrosion resistance. The behavior of all tested coatings is explained by the results obtained from the analysis of every coating using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. 原子吸收法快速测定燃油中的铝%Rapid Determination of Aluminium in Fuel Oil by Atomic-absorption Spectrophotometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The determination of aluminium in fuel oil by means of the technique of direct dilution using a mixed-solvent system, inorganic aluminiun standard and atomic absorption spectrophotometry is researched. Good recoveries of aluminium added to fuel oil were demonstrated. Relative standard deviation of 3.6% was reached.%采用无机铝标准物和混合溶剂系统直接稀释-原子吸收法测定燃油中铝,回收率达92.4%,相对标准偏差为3.6%,特征质量浓度为0.85μg/mL.

  3. Adapting rail and road networks to weather extremes: case studies for southern Germany and Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Doll, Claus; Trinks, Christian; Sedlacek, Norbert; Pelikan, Verena; Comes, Tina; Schultmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of the current impacts of extreme weather conditions on transport systems reveals high costs in specific locations. Prominent examples for Europe are the economic consequences of the harsh winter periods 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 and the floods in Austria, Eastern Europe, Germany and the United Kingdom in 2005 and 2007. Departing from the EC-funded project WEATHER, this paper delves into the subject of adaptation strategies by revisiting the project’s general findings on adaptati...

  4. Insights into Regolith Evolution from TEM Studies of Space Weathering of Itokawa Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to solar wind irradiation and micrometeorite impacts alter the properties of regolith materials exposed on airless bodies. However, estimates of space weathering rates for asteroid regoliths span many orders of magnitude. Timescales for space weathering processes on airless bodies can be anchored by analyzing surface samples returned by JAXA's Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa. Constraints on timescales of solar flare particle track accumulation and formation of solar wind produced ion-damaged rims yield information on regolith dynamics.

  5. A study on the integrity and authentication of weather observation data using Identity Based Encryption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jung Woo; Lee, Sang Jin

    2016-01-01

    Weather information provides a safe working environment by contributing to the economic activity of the nation, and plays role of the prevention of natural disasters, which can cause large scaled casualties and damage of property. Especially during times of war, weather information plays a more important role than strategy, tactics and information about trends of the enemy. Also, it plays an essential role for the taking off and landing of fighter jet and the sailing of warships. If weather information, which plays a major role in national security and economy, gets misused for cyber terrorism resulting false weather information, it could be a huge threat for national security and the economy. We propose a plan to safely transmit the measured value from meteorological sensors through a meteorological telecommunication network in order to guarantee the confidentiality and integrity of the data despite cyber-attacks. Also, such a plan allows one to produce reliable weather forecasts by performing mutual authentication through authentication devices. To make sure of this, one can apply an Identity Based Signature to ensure the integrity of measured data, and transmit the encrypted weather information with mutual authentication about the authentication devices. There are merits of this research: It is not necessary to manage authentication certificates unlike the Public Key Infrastructure methodology, and it provides a powerful security measure with the capability to be realized in a small scale computing environment, such as the meteorological observation system due to the low burden on managing keys.

  6. Pilot Inter-Laboratory Studies for Evaluating Weathering-Induced Release of Carbon Nanotubes from Solid Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanomaterials are increasingly being used in polymer composites to enhance the properties of these materials. Here we present results of a pilot inter-laboratory study to simulate the effects of weathering on the potential release of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) from thei...

  7. Pilot Inter-Laboratory Studies for Evaluating Weathering-Induced Release of Carbon Nanotubes from Solid Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanomaterials are increasingly being used in polymer composites to enhance the properties of these materials. Here we present results of a pilot inter-laboratory study to simulate the effects of weathering on the potential release of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) from thei...

  8. Social Experiments in Tokyo Metropolitan Area Convection Study for Extreme Weather Resilient Cities(TOMACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyoshi, Nakatani; Nakamura, Isao; MIsumi, Ryohei; Shoji, Yoshinori

    2015-04-01

    Introduction TOMACS research project has been started since 2010 July in order to develop the elementary technologies which are required for the adaptation of societies to future global warming impacts that cannot be avoided by the reduction of greenhouse gases. In collaboration with related government institutions, local governments, private companies, and residents, more than 25 organizations and over 100 people are participated. TOMACS consists of the following three research themes: Theme 1: Studies on extreme weather with dense meteorological observations Theme 2: Development of the extreme weather early detection and prediction system Theme 3: Social experiments on extreme weather resilient cities Theme 1 aims to understand the initiation, development, and dissipation processes of convective precipitation in order to clarify the mechanism of localized heavy rainfall which are potential causes of flooding and landslides. Theme 2 aims to establish the monitoring and prediction system of extreme phenomena which can process real-time data from dense meteorological observation networks, advanced X-band radar network systems and predict localized heavy rainfalls and strong winds. Through social experiments, theme 3 aims to establish a method to use information obtained by the monitoring system of extreme phenomena to disaster prevention operations in order to prevent disasters and reduce damage. Social Experiments Toyo University is the core university for the social experiments accomplishment. And following organizations are participating in this research theme: NIED, the Tokyo Metropolitan Research Institute for Environmental Protection (TMRIEP), University of Tokyo, Tokyo Fire Department (TFD), Edogawa Ward in Tokyo, Yokohama City, Fujisawa City and Minamiashigara City in Kanagawa, East Japan Railway Company, Central Japan Railway Company, Obayashi Corporation, and Certified and Accredited Meteorologists of Japan(CAMJ). The social experiments have carried out

  9. Comparison of the fuel oil biodegradation potential of hydrocarbon-assimilating microorganisms isolated from a temperate agricultural soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaineau, C.H.; Dupont, J.; Bury, E.; Oudot, J. [Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, Laboratoire de Cryptogamie, 12 rue Buffon, 75005 Paris (France); Morel, J. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d' Agronomie et des Industries Alimentaires de Nancy, Laboratoire Sols et Environnement, INRA, 2 avenue de la Foret de Haye, B.P. 172, F-54505 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1999-03-09

    Strains of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) were isolated from an agricultural soil in France. In a field, a portion was treated with oily cuttings resulting from the drilling of an onshore well. The cuttings which were spread at the rate of 600 g HC m{sup -2} contained 10% of fuel oil hydrocarbons (HC). Another part of the field was left untreated. Three months after HC spreading, HC adapted bacteria and fungi were isolated at different soil depths in the two plots and identified. The biodegradation potential of the isolated strains was monitored by measuring the degradation rate of total HC, saturated hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and resins of the fuel. Bacteria of the genera Pseudomonas, Brevundimonas, Sphingomonas, Acinetobacter, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium and fungi belonging to Aspergillus, Penicillium, Beauveria, Acremonium, Cladosporium, Fusarium, and Trichoderma were identified. The most active strains in the assimilation of saturates and aromatics were Arthrobacter sp., Sphingomonas spiritivorum, Acinetobacter baumanii, Beauveria alba and Penicillum simplicissimum. The biodegradation potential of the hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms isolated from polluted or unpolluted soils were similar. In laboratory pure cultures, saturated HC were more degraded than aromatic HC, whereas resins were resistant to microbial attack. On an average, individual bacterial strains were more active than fungi in HC biodegradation. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. Comparison of the fuel oil biodegradation potential of hydrocarbon-assimilating microorganisms isolated from a temperate agricultural soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaineau, C.H.; Dupont, J.; Bury, E.; Oudot, J. [Museum National d`Histoire Naturelle, Laboratoire de Cryptogamie, 12 rue Buffon, 75005 Paris (France); Morel, J. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d`Agronomie et des Industries Alimentaires de Nancy, Laboratoire Sols et Environnement, INRA, 2 avenue de la Foret de Haye, B.P. 172, F-54505 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1999-03-09

    Strains of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) were isolated from an agricultural soil in France. In a field, a portion was treated with oily cuttings resulting from the drilling of an onshore well. The cuttings which were spread at the rate of 600 g HC m{sup -2} contained 10% of fuel oil hydrocarbons (HC). Another part of the field was left untreated. Three months after HC spreading, HC adapted bacteria and fungi were isolated at different soil depths in the two plots and identified. The biodegradation potential of the isolated strains was monitored by measuring the degradation rate of total HC, saturated hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and resins of the fuel. Bacteria of the genera Pseudomonas, Brevundimonas, Sphingomonas, Acinetobacter, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium and fungi belonging to Aspergillus, Penicillium, Beauveria, Acremonium, Cladosporium, Fusarium, and Trichoderma were identified. The most active strains in the assimilation of saturates and aromatics were Arthrobacter sp., Sphingomonas spiritivorum, Acinetobacter baumanii, Beauveria alba and Penicillum simplicissimum. The biodegradation potential of the hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms isolated from polluted or unpolluted soils were similar. In laboratory pure cultures, saturated HC were more degraded than aromatic HC, whereas resins were resistant to microbial attack. On an average, individual bacterial strains were more active than fungi in HC biodegradation

  11. Impact of Circulation Weather Types in the study of Landslides in the Northern Lisbon region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvação, Nadia; Trigo, Ricardo; Câmara, Carlos; Zêzere, José Luis

    2010-05-01

    Landslides in the region north of Lisbon during the last 60 years have been induced almost entirely by rainfall, and landslide activity has been confined to very wet periods. Previous results obtained using empirical relationships between rainfall intensity and slope instability show that critical rainfall conditions for failure are not the same for different types of landslides (Zêzere et al, 2008). Shallow translational soil slips have been related to intense rainfall periods ranging from 1 to 15 days, while deep slope movements (translational slides, rotational slides and complex and composite slope movements) have been occurred in relation to longer periods of less intense rain, lasting from 30 to 90 days. The different time span is consistent with the distinct hydrological triggering conditions related to different types of landslides. Intense rainfall is responsible by the rapid growth of pore pressure and by the loss of the apparent cohesion of thin soils, resulting in failure within the soil material or at the contact with the underlying impermeable bedrock. Long lasting precipitation periods allows the steady rising of the groundwater table, thus resulting in deep failures in soils and rocks by the reduction of shear strength. Rainfall information regarding 19 important landslide events occurred between 1958 and 2001, and the knowledge of the circulation weather types (CWTs) affecting those days, allow us to study the relationship between the CWTs frequency and the occurrence of landslide episodes. We have identified 10 basic CWTs (Cyclonic, Anticyclonic and 8 directional types) following the methodology previously adopted (Trigo and DaCamara, 2000). The composites and anomalies of several meteorological fields associated to landslide events show a large precipitation anomaly in the central region of Portugal and an anomalous low-pressure system located northwest of Iberia. This pattern is similar for both shallow and deep landslides events. However, for

  12. Assessing preferences of beach users for certain aspects of weather and ocean conditions: case studies from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Wang, Xiao Hua

    2013-05-01

    Three well-known Australian beaches, Surfers Paradise Beach (Gold Coast), Narrowneck Beach (Gold Coast) and Bondi Beach (Sydney), were selected for analysis of beach user preferences for certain weather and ocean conditions. Regression methods were used to determine how the numbers of visitors to these beaches are affected by these conditions. Actual visitor numbers were counted at three times during the day over several months at each beach with the aid of web cameras. The corresponding weather and ocean conditions were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and local government agencies. Weekly and seasonal factors were also considered. The conditions preferred by beach users, as found in this study, are: no precipitation, higher temperatures, light-to-moderate wind speed (less than 30 km/h) and low wave height (up to 1.25 m). This study, the first to provide an analysis of beach user preferences for both weather and ocean conditions, shows that ocean conditions play a significant role in explaining the demand for beach recreation in Australia. It is therefore necessary for tourism management authorities or local governments to provide accurate and timely weather and ocean information to local, domestic and international beach users.

  13. Assessing preferences of beach users for certain aspects of weather and ocean conditions: case studies from Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Wang, Xiao Hua

    2013-05-01

    Three well-known Australian beaches, Surfers Paradise Beach (Gold Coast), Narrowneck Beach (Gold Coast) and Bondi Beach (Sydney), were selected for analysis of beach user preferences for certain weather and ocean conditions. Regression methods were used to determine how the numbers of visitors to these beaches are affected by these conditions. Actual visitor numbers were counted at three times during the day over several months at each beach with the aid of web cameras. The corresponding weather and ocean conditions were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and local government agencies. Weekly and seasonal factors were also considered. The conditions preferred by beach users, as found in this study, are: no precipitation, higher temperatures, light-to-moderate wind speed (less than 30 km/h) and low wave height (up to 1.25 m). This study, the first to provide an analysis of beach user preferences for both weather and ocean conditions, shows that ocean conditions play a significant role in explaining the demand for beach recreation in Australia. It is therefore necessary for tourism management authorities or local governments to provide accurate and timely weather and ocean information to local, domestic and international beach users.

  14. Bioremediation of weathered petroleum hydrocarbon soil contamination in the Canadian High Arctic: laboratory and field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanscartier, David; Laing, Tamsin; Reimer, Ken; Zeeb, Barbara

    2009-11-01

    The bioremediation of weathered medium- to high-molecular weight petroleum hydrocarbons (HCs) in the High Arctic was investigated. The polar desert climate, contaminant characteristics, and logistical constraints can make bioremediation of persistent HCs in the High Arctic challenging. Landfarming (0.3 m(3) plots) was tested in the field for three consecutive years with plots receiving very little maintenance. Application of surfactant and fertilizers, and passive warming using a greenhouse were investigated. The field study was complemented by a laboratory experiment to better understand HC removal mechanisms and limiting factors affecting bioremediation on site. Significant reduction of total petroleum HCs (TPH) was observed in both experiments. Preferential removal of compounds nC16 occurred, whereas in the field, TPH reduction was mainly limited to removal of compounds nC16 was observed in the fertilized field plots only. The greenhouse increased average soil temperatures and extended the treatment season but did not enhance bioremediation. Findings suggest that temperature and low moisture content affected biodegradation of HCs in the field. Little volatilization was measured in the laboratory, but this process may have been predominant in the field. Low-maintenance landfarming may be best suited for remediation of HCs compounds

  15. A Study of Aerosols Transportation around City Boundary in the Fog Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J.; Li, J. H.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, B. L.; Wang, Q. T.

    2011-09-01

    The structure of city surface seriously affects transport and diffusion of pollutant aerosol particles in the fog weather. So dynamic model population balance model (PBM) of aerosol particles and multiphase-coupled flow model were established to describe the fluid-particle system of fog. Based on the Eulerian-Lagrangian method and Multi-Monte Carlo method, a study of aerosols transportation around city boundary was conducted. The computed results show a part of aerosols change into droplets during the formation of fog, and the average sizes of aerosols, droplets are about 0.032 7 μm and 28.7 μm with time evolution to 60 min. For the development of fog, with time of 60 min and wind of 2 m/s, the number of aerosol is down to 84.5% of initial value, and the average particle size is down to 22.1 μm accordingly. During the dissipation of fog, the numbers of aerosol and fog droplet are decreased to the 1.65% and 0.016 5% of initial value. As wind speed rising, the turbulent motion strength of particles is increased. Eventually, the droplets have almost disappeared, and a small number of aerosols are still suspended in the atmosphere. The computed results reflect the transport and dynamic characteristics for respirable aerosols around city boundary during three stages of fog.

  16. Performance of Chaos Theory in Weather Forecasts (Case Study: Tehran-Temperate Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SohrabHajjam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate weather forecast is of great importance for providing the suitable substrates for water resources management and crisis management. Therefore, the use of methods with high accuracy and updating the forecast models seem to be necessary in this regard. In evaluation of hydrological and climate data, the investigation of precipitation parameter is in non-linear time series method. The present research aimed to compare the performance of intelligent systems based on nonlinear methods, chaos theory, and neural network system in estimating monthly precipitation in temperate climate of Tehran. The results of neural network system, local model methods, and the nearest neighbor showed that chaos-based methods not only are sensitive to the range of data but also influenced by the length of data and attitude towards data review process based on conditions. Evaluation of results indicated that chaos-based have an acceptable and high precision and accuracy and chaos theory produces better results than neural network system in temperate climates. Considering the nature of data, the studied climate, and the procedures required in forecast of meteorological parameters, chaos theory can bring very good results. Due to the sensitivity of meteorological forecasts, the use of this theory can be helpful and beneficial.

  17. All weather IASI single field-of-view retrievals: case study – validation with JAIVEx data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Zhou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric thermodynamic parameters, such as atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles, cloud optical/microphysical properties, and surface properties are basic meteorological variables for weather forecasting. In addition, they are critical parameters in tropospheric chemistry studies. A physical, geophysical parameter retrieval scheme dealing with cloudy and cloud-free radiances observed with satellite ultraspectral infrared sounders has been developed to determine simultaneously surface, atmospheric thermodynamic, and cloud microphysical parameters. A one-dimensional variational (1-D Var. multivariable inverse solution of the radiative transfer equation is used to iteratively improve a background state defined by eigenvector regression. This algorithm has been applied to data from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI on the EUMETSAT Metop-A satellite. The IASI retrieved parameters presented herein are from radiance data gathered during the Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx. JAIVEx provided intensive aircraft observations obtained from airborne Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS systems, such as the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed – Interferometer (NAST-I, in-situ measurements, and dedicated dropsonde and radiosonde measurements for the validation of the IASI products. Here, IASI atmospheric profile retrievals are compared with those obtained from dedicated dropsondes, radiosondes, and the airborne FTS system. The IASI examples presented here demonstrate the ability to retrieve fine-scale horizontal features with high vertical resolution from satellite ultraspectral sounder radiance spectra.

  18. Applications of Conditional Nonlinear Optimal Perturbation in Predictability Study and Sensitivity Analysis of Weather and Climate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Considering the limitation of the linear theory of singular vector (SV), the authors and their collaborators proposed conditional nonlinear optimal perturbation (CNOP) and then applied it in the predictability study and the sensitivity analysis of weather and climate system. To celebrate the 20th anniversary of Chinese National Committee for World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), this paper is devoted to reviewing the main results of these studies. First, CNOP represents the initial perturbation that has largest nonlinear evolution at prediction time, which is different from linear singular vector (LSV) for the large magnitude of initial perturbation or/and the long optimization time interval. Second, CNOP,rather than linear singular vector (LSV), represents the initial anomaly that evolves into ENSO events most probably. It is also the CNOP that induces the most prominent seasonal variation of error growth for ENSO predictability; furthermore, CNOP was applied to investigate the decadal variability of ENSO asymmetry. It is demonstrated that the changing nonlinearity causes the change of ENSO asymmetry.Third, in the studies of the sensitivity and stability of ocean's thermohaline circulation (THC), the non-linear asymmetric response of THC to finite amplitude of initial perturbations was revealed by CNOP.Through this approach the passive mechanism of decadal variation of THC was demonstrated; Also the authors studies the instability and sensitivity analysis of grassland ecosystem by using CNOP and show the mechanism of the transitions between the grassland and desert states. Finally, a detailed discussion on the results obtained by CNOP suggests the applicability of CNOP in predictability studies and sensitivity analysis.

  19. Use of a Data-Linked Weather Information Display and Effects on Pilot Navigation Decision Making in a Piloted Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuchnovicz, Daniel E.; Novacek, Paul F.; Burgess, Malcolm A.; Heck, Michael L.; Stokes, Alan F.

    2001-01-01

    This study provides recommendations to the FAA and to prospective manufacturers based on an exploration of the effects of data link weather displays upon pilot decision performance. An experiment was conducted with twenty-four current instrument rated pilots who were divided into two equal groups and presented with a challenging but realistic flight scenario involving weather containing significant embedded convective activity. All flights were flown in a full-mission simulation facility within instrument meteorological conditions. The inflight weather display depicted NexRad images, graphical METARs and textual METARs. The objective was to investigate the potential for misuse of a weather display, and incorporate recommendations for the design and use of these displays. The primary conclusion of the study found that the inflight weather display did not improve weather avoidance decision making. Some of the reasons to support this finding include: the pilot's inability to easily perceive their proximity to the storms, increased workload and difficulty in deciphering METAR textual data. The compelling nature of a graphical weather display caused many pilots to reduce their reliance on corroborating weather information from other sources. Minor changes to the weather display could improve the ability of a pilot to make better decisions on hazard avoidance.

  20. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy Studies of Meteorites: Implications for Weathering Rates, Meteorite Flux, and Early Solar System Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, P. A. [Open University, Planetary Science Research Institute (United Kingdom); Berry, F. J. [Open University, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Jull, A. J. T. [University of Arizona, NSF Accelerator Facility for Radioisotope Analyses (United States); Smith, T. B. [Open University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Bevan, A. W. R. [Western Australian Museum, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences (Australia); Cadogan, J. M. [University of New South Wales, School of Physics (Australia); Sexton, A. S.; Franchi, L. A.; Pillinger, C. T. [Open University, Planetary Science Research Institute (United Kingdom)

    2002-09-15

    Ordinary chondrite finds, terrestrial age dated using {sup 14}C analyses, from different meteorite accumulation sites, have been examined by Moessbauer spectroscopy to quantitatively determine terrestrial oxidation. We observe differences in weathering rates between sites, and also between different chondrite groups. A comparison of weathering over time, and its effect in 'eroding' meteorites, together with the number and mass distribution of meteorites in each region, enables us to derive estimates of the number of meteorite falls over a given mass per year. Studies of how the oxygen isotopic composition of samples varies with weathering indicate that incipient alteration may occur without a pronounced isotopic effect, possibly due to weathering of silicates to topotactically oriented smectite confined spaces where the water volume is limited. This finding has profound implications for the use of oxygen isotopes as a tool in understanding water-rock interaction. It also may reconcile previously contradictory data regarding the nebular or asteroidal location of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration. Finally, Moessbauer spectroscopy is also found to be a useful tool in determining mineral abundance in carbonaceous chondrites, where a fine-grained matrix makes traditional approaches inapplicable. Again, the results have implications for the modification of chondritic materials in the early solar system.

  1. Weather Monitoring Station: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Dipak V. Sose

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Weather monitoring plays a very important role in human life hence study of weather system is necessary. Currently there are two types of the weather monitoring stations available i.e. wired and wireless. Wireless system has some advantages over the wired one hence popular now a days. The parameters are include in weather monitoring usually temperature, humidity atmospheric pressure, light intensity, rainfall etc. There are many techniques existed using different processor such as PIC, AVR, ARM etc. Analog to digital channel are used to fetch the analog output of the sensors. The wireless techniques used in the weather monitoring having GSM, FM channel, Zigbee, RF etc Protocols

  2. A radiation belt disturbance study from the space weather point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochel, S.; Boscher, D.; Benacquista, R.; Roussel, J. F.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation belts are a key region located close to the Earth, where the satellites travel. They are located in the centre of the magnetosphere and constitute a region sensitive to the variations of magnetosphere activity. The magnetosphere is in equilibrium in the solar wind. If the solar wind parameters change, then, the magnetospheric balance is upset. Using several processes, particles and energy from the solar wind can enter it, disturbing the magnetosphere and the radiation belts. In this paper, the am index has been used to define a new parameter named Cm, which is indicative of the energy level in the magnetosphere. The impact of CIRs (Corotating Interaction region) and of CMEs (Coronal Mass Ejection) on the magnetosphere has been studied from the Cm point of view, as well as the reaction of the radiation belts to a solar wind disturbance. The results show that the Cm parameter provides a new perspective in space weather studies as it clearly shows that the energy level can be higher for a CIR than for a CME. It also demonstrates that the events with several solar wind structures are much more effective to increase the energy level in the magnetosphere than single ones. Finally, Cm correlates better with the radiation belts fluxes, showing again that Cm is a good indicator of the inner magnetosphere activity. Nevertheless, the energy level in the radiation belts is maximised and the energy level in this population cannot go above a given value which depends on the altitude. The particles coming from the plasmasheet also push the particles from the highest altitudes to the lower ones, allowing the slot filling for Cm> .

  3. ULF Waves Observed at MAGDAS Stations as Probes for Litho-Space Weather Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    K.Yumoto, Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University started the MAGDAS Project effectively in May of 2005, with the installation of the first unit in Hualien, Taiwan (Yumoto et al., 2006, 2007). Since then, over 50 units have been deployed around the world. They are concentrated along three chains: (1) North and South of Japan (the so-called "210o Magnetic Meridian Chain"), (2) Dip Equator Chain, and (3) Africa Chain (the so-called "96o Magnetic Meridian Chain"). The main goals of MAGDAS project are: (1) study magnetospheric pro-cesses by distinguishing between temporal changes and spatial variations in the phenomena, (2) clarify global structures and propagation characteristics of magnetospheric variations from higher to equatorial latitudes, and (3) understand global generation mechanisms of the Solar-Terrestrial phenomena (see Yumoto, 2004). From MAGDAS observations, ULF waves are found to be used as good probes for litho-space weather study in developing and developed countries. In the present paper, we will introduce the following examples: Pc 5 magnetic amplitudes at lower-latitude MAGDAS station show a linear relation with the solar wind velocity, thus we can use the Pc 5 amplitudes as a monitoring probe of the solar wind velocity. Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations have skin depth comparable with the depth of epicentre of earthquakes in the lithosphere. Therefore, we can use Pc 3-4 as a probe for detecting ULF anomaly and precursors associated with great earthquakes. Pi 2 magnetic pulsations are observed globally at MAGDAS stations located at high, middle, low, and equatorial latitudes in night-and day-time. We can use the Pi 2s as a good indicator of onsets of magnetospheric substorms. Sudden commencements (sc), sudden impulse (si), and solar flare effects (sfe) create magnetic variations at MAGDAS stations. Therefore, MAGDAS data can be used as a probe of interplanetary shocks and interplanetary discontinuities in the solar wind, and solar flare

  4. The application of heliospheric imaging to space weather operations: Lessons learned from published studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Richard A.; Davies, Jackie A.; Biesecker, Doug; Gibbs, Mark

    2017-08-01

    The field of heliospheric imaging has matured significantly over the last 10 years—corresponding, in particular, to the launch of NASA's STEREO mission and the successful operation of the heliospheric imager (HI) instruments thereon. In parallel, this decade has borne witness to a marked increase in concern over the potentially damaging effects of space weather on space and ground-based technological assets, and the corresponding potential threat to human health, such that it is now under serious consideration at governmental level in many countries worldwide. Hence, in a political climate that recognizes the pressing need for enhanced operational space weather monitoring capabilities most appropriately stationed, it is widely accepted, at the Lagrangian L1 and L5 points, it is timely to assess the value of heliospheric imaging observations in the context of space weather operations. To this end, we review a cross section of the scientific analyses that have exploited heliospheric imagery—particularly from STEREO/HI—and discuss their relevance to operational predictions of, in particular, coronal mass ejection (CME) arrival at Earth and elsewhere. We believe that the potential benefit of heliospheric images to the provision of accurate CME arrival predictions on an operational basis, although as yet not fully realized, is significant and we assert that heliospheric imagery is central to any credible space weather mission, particularly one located at a vantage point off the Sun-Earth line.

  5. Thermodynamic Study on the Effects of Minor Constituents on Cold Weather Performance of Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel made from vegetable oils, animal fats and other lipid feedstocks. Fuel properties and performance of biodiesel during cold weather are influenced by factors related to its feedstock, namely fatty acid composition and trace concentrations of monoacylglycerols,...

  6. Progress in the study of nonlinear atmospheric dynamics and predictability of weather and climate in China (2007-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feifan; Ding, Ruiqiang; Feng, Guolin; Fu, Zuntao; Duan, Wansuo

    2012-09-01

    Recent progress in the study of nonlinear atmospheric dynamics and related predictability of weather and climate in China (2007-2011) are briefly introduced in this article. Major achievements in the study of nonlinear atmospheric dynamics have been classified into two types: (1) progress based on the analysis of solutions of simplified control equations, such as the dynamics of NAO, the optimal precursors for blocking onset, and the behavior of nonlinear waves, and (2) progress based on data analyses, such as the nonlinear analyses of fluctuations and recording-breaking temperature events, the long-range correlation of extreme events, and new methods of detecting abrupt dynamical change. Major achievements in the study of predictability include the following: (1) the application of nonlinear local Lyapunov exponents (NLLE) to weather and climate predictability; (2) the application of condition nonlinear optimal perturbation (CNOP) to the studies of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) predictions, ensemble forecasting, targeted observation, and sensitivity analysis of the ecosystem; and (3) new strategies proposed for predictability studies. The results of these studies have provided greater understanding of the dynamics and nonlinear mechanisms of atmospheric motion, and they represent new ideas for developing numerical models and improving the forecast skill of weather and climate events.

  7. Progress in the Study of Nonlinear Atmospheric Dynamics and Predictability of Weather and Climate in China (2007-2011)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Feifan; DING Ruiqiang; FENG Guolin; FU Zuntao; DUAN Wansuo

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in the study of nonlinear atmospheric dynamics and related predictability of weather and climate in China (2007-2011) are briefly introduced in this article.Major achievements in the study of nonlinear atmospheric dynamics have been classified into two types:(1) progress based on the analysis of solutions of simplified control equations,such as the dynamics of NAO,the optimal precursors for blocking onset,and the behavior of nonlinear waves,and (2) progress based on data analyses,such as the nonlinear analyses of fluctuations and recording-breaking temperature events,the long-range correlation of extreme events,and new methods of detecting abrupt dynamical change.Major achievements in the study of predictability include the following:(1) the application of nonlinear local Lyapunov exponents (NLLE) to weather and climate predictability; (2) the application of condition nonlinear optimal perturbation (CNOP) to the studies of El Ni(n)o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) predictions,ensemble forecasting,targeted observation,and sensitivity analysis of the ecosystem; and (3) new strategies proposed for predictability studies.The results of these studies have provided greater understanding of the dynamics and nonlinear mechanisms of atmospheric motion,and they represent new ideas for developing numerical models and improving the forecast skill of weather and climate events.

  8. Prioritization Scheme for Proposed Road Weather Information System Sites: Montana Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Kaisy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A model for prioritization of new proposed environmental sensor station (ESS sites is developed and presented in this paper. The model assesses the overall merit (OM of a proposed ESS site as part of a Road Weather Information System (RWIS using weather, traffic, and safety data among other variables. The purpose of the proposed model is to help in selecting optimum sites for new ESS locations, which is important in guiding RWIS system expansion. Inputs to the OM model include weather index (WI, traffic index (TI, crash index, geographic coverage, and opportunistic factors. The WI at a proposed site is determined using multiple indicators of weather severity and variability. The crash index, another major input to the OM model, incorporates crash rate along the route and the percentage of weather-related crashes over the analysis period. The TI, in turn, reflects the amount of travel on the highway network in the area surrounding the proposed ESS site. The fourth input to the merit model accounts for the ESS existing coverage in the area where the proposed site is located, while the fifth and last input is concerned with the availability and ease of access to power and communications. Model coefficients are represented by weights that reflect the contribution of each input (variable to the OM of the ESS site. Those weights are user-specified and should be selected to reflect the agency preferences and priorities. The application of the proposed merit model on sample sites in Montana demonstrated the utility of the model in ranking candidate sites using data readily available to highway agencies.

  9. Degradability of n-alkanes during ex situ natural bioremediation of soil contaminated by heavy residual fuel oil (mazut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ramadan Mohamed Muftah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that during biodegradation of oil in natural geological conditions, or oil pollutants in the environment, a degradation of hydrocarbons occurs according to the well defined sequence. For example, the major changes during the degradation process of n-alkanes occur in the second, slight and third, moderate level (on the biodegradation scale from 1 to 10. According to previous research, in the fourth, heavy level, when intensive changes of phenanthrene and its methyl isomers begin, n-alkanes have already been completely removed. In this paper, the ex situ natural bioremediation (unstimulated bioremediation, without addition of biomass, nutrient substances and biosurfactant of soil contaminated with heavy residual fuel oil (mazut was conducted during the period of 6 months. Low abundance of n-alkanes in the fraction of total saturated hydrocarbons in the initial sample (identification was possible only after concentration by urea adduction technique showed that the investigated oil pollutant was at the boundary between the third and the fourth biodegradation level. During the experiment, an intense degradation of phenanthrene and its methyl-, dimethyl-and trimethyl-isomers was not followed by the removal of the remaining n-alkanes. The abundance of n-alkanes remained at the initial low level, even at end of the experiment when the pollutant reached one of the highest biodegradation levels. These results showed that the unstimulated biodegradation of some hydrocarbons, despite of their high biodegradability, do not proceed completely to the end, even at final degradation stages. In the condition of the reduced availability of some hydrocarbons, microorganisms tend to opt for less biodegradable but more accessible hydrocarbons.

  10. Trophic structure of amoeba communities near roots of Medicago sativa after contamination with fuel oil no. 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Pérez, Sandra; Rodríguez-Zaragoza, Salvador; Mendoza-López, Ma Remedios

    2014-02-01

    Root exudation increases microbial activity, selecting bacterial and fungal communities that metabolize organic matter such as hydrocarbons. However, a strong contamination pulse of hydrocarbons around plant roots may reorganize the soil's microbial trophic structure toward amoebae feeding on bacteria. We conducted a microcosm experiment to elucidate the effect of Medicago sativa on the trophic structure of naked amoebae after a strong pulse of pollution (50,000 ppm of fuel oil no. 6, which is a mixture of long chains ranging from C10 to C28). Plants were seeded 24 h after contamination and species of amoebae in the microcosms were identified at 1, 30, and 60 days after pollution. Several species from three trophic groups of naked amoeba were still alive 24 h after the hydrocarbon pulse. Non-planted microcosms harbored three trophic groups after 60 days, while planted ones nourished four groups. The bacterivore group was the most diverse in all microcosms, followed by protist-eaters and omnivores. The quantity of amoebae was significantly higher (3.4×10(3) organisms/g soil) in the planted pots than in the non-planted ones (1.3×10(3) organisms/g soil after 30 days of pollution (P ≤ 0.01). The shortest hydrocarbon chains (C10-C14) disappeared or diminished in all microcosms, and the longest ones increased in the planted ones. M. sativa thus exerted a positive effect on species richness, quantity, and the composition of amoebae trophic groups in contaminated soil. This indirect effect on bacterial predators is another key factor underlying hydrocarbon assimilation by living organisms during phytoremediation.

  11. Space Weather Services of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, K.; Hong, S.; Jangsuk, C.; Dong Kyu, K.; Jinyee, C.; Yeongoh, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Korean Space Weather Center (KSWC) of the National Radio Research Agency (RRA) is a government agency which is the official source of space weather information for Korean Government and the primary action agency of emergency measure to severe space weather condition. KSWC's main role is providing alerts, watches, and forecasts in order to minimize the space weather impacts on both of public and commercial sectors of satellites, aviation, communications, navigations, power grids, and etc. KSWC is also in charge of monitoring the space weather condition and conducting research and development for its main role of space weather operation in Korea. In this study, we will present KSWC's recent efforts on development of application-oriented space weather research products and services on user needs, and introduce new international collaborative projects, such as IPS-Driven Enlil model, DREAM model estimating electron in satellite orbit, global network of DSCOVR and STEREO satellites tracking, and ARMAS (Automated Radiation Measurement for Aviation Safety).

  12. Space Weather Services of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, KiChang; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Young Yun; Kwon, Yongki; Wi, Gwan-sik

    2016-07-01

    The Korean Space Weather Center (KSWC) of the National Radio Research Agency (RRA) is a government agency which is the official source of space weather information for Korean Government and the primary action agency of emergency measure to severe space weather condition. KSWC's main role is providing alerts, watches, and forecasts in order to minimize the space weather impacts on both of public and commercial sectors of satellites, aviation, communications, navigations, power grids, and etc. KSWC is also in charge of monitoring the space weather condition and conducting research and development for its main role of space weather operation in Korea. In this study, we will present KSWC's recent efforts on development of application-oriented space weather research products and services on user needs, and introduce new international collaborative projects, such as IPS-Driven Enlil model, DREAM model estimating electron in satellite orbit, global network of DSCOVR and STEREO satellites tracking, and ARMAS (Automated Radiation Measurement for Aviation Safety).

  13. Coupled hydro-meteorological modelling on a HPC platform for high-resolution extreme weather impact study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dehua; Echendu, Shirley; Xuan, Yunqing; Webster, Mike; Cluckie, Ian

    2016-11-01

    Impact-focused studies of extreme weather require coupling of accurate simulations of weather and climate systems and impact-measuring hydrological models which themselves demand larger computer resources. In this paper, we present a preliminary analysis of a high-performance computing (HPC)-based hydrological modelling approach, which is aimed at utilizing and maximizing HPC power resources, to support the study on extreme weather impact due to climate change. Here, four case studies are presented through implementation on the HPC Wales platform of the UK mesoscale meteorological Unified Model (UM) with high-resolution simulation suite UKV, alongside a Linux-based hydrological model, Hydrological Predictions for the Environment (HYPE). The results of this study suggest that the coupled hydro-meteorological model was still able to capture the major flood peaks, compared with the conventional gauge- or radar-driving forecast, but with the added value of much extended forecast lead time. The high-resolution rainfall estimation produced by the UKV performs similarly to that of radar rainfall products in the first 2-3 days of tested flood events, but the uncertainties particularly increased as the forecast horizon goes beyond 3 days. This study takes a step forward to identify how the online mode approach can be used, where both numerical weather prediction and the hydrological model are executed, either simultaneously or on the same hardware infrastructures, so that more effective interaction and communication can be achieved and maintained between the models. But the concluding comments are that running the entire system on a reasonably powerful HPC platform does not yet allow for real-time simulations, even without the most complex and demanding data simulation part.

  14. Municipalities' Preparedness for Weather Hazards and Response to Weather Warnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehiriz, Kaddour; Gosselin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The study of the management of weather-related disaster risks by municipalities has attracted little attention even though these organizations play a key role in protecting the population from extreme meteorological conditions. This article contributes to filling this gap with new evidence on the level and determinants of Quebec municipalities’ preparedness for weather hazards and response to related weather warnings. Using survey data from municipal emergency management coordinators and secondary data on the financial and demographic characteristics of municipalities, the study shows that most Quebec municipalities are sufficiently prepared for weather hazards and undertake measures to protect the population when informed of imminent extreme weather events. Significant differences between municipalities were noted though. Specifically, the level of preparedness was positively correlated with the municipalities’ capacity and population support for weather-related disaster management policies. In addition, the risk of weather-related disasters increases the preparedness level through its effect on population support. We also found that the response to weather warnings depended on the risk of weather-related disasters, the preparedness level and the quality of weather warnings. These results highlight areas for improvement in the context of increasing frequency and/or severity of such events with current climate change. PMID:27649547

  15. Iron-57 Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of the weathering of L-chondrite meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, F.J. [Open Univ., Milton Keynes (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chem.; Bland, P.A. [Open Univ., Milton Keynes (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Oates, G. [Open Univ., Milton Keynes (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chem.; Pillinger, C.T. [Open Univ., Milton Keynes (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    1994-11-01

    Some L-chondrite meteorites found in the arid desert region of Roosevelt County in New Mexico, USA, and {sup 14}C dated to determine the terrestrial age have been examined by {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The preliminary results reported here suggest that the initial weathering processes involve oxidation of iron in the iron-nickel alloy. After prolonged exposure to terrestrial weathering for approximately 36 000 years, the iron(II)-sulphide and -silicate phases are also oxidised. The corrosion products are complex and include paramagnetic Fe{sup 3+} species and macroscopic iron(III) oxide and/or oxyhydroxide phases. A meteorite which fell approximately 16 500 years ago at the end of the last glaciation showed extensive corrosion despite its relatively short terrestrial age. The result is associated with climatic changes which occurred at that time. (orig.)

  16. Crop Production Risk in the Pampas: A Bayesian Weather Generator for Climate Change and Land Use Impact Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdin, A.; Rajagopalan, B.; Kleiber, W.; Podesta, G. P.; Bert, F.

    2015-12-01

    We present a space-time stochastic weather generator for daily precipitation and temperature, developed within a Bayesian hierarchical framework (hereafter BayGEN). This framework offers a unique advantage: it provides robust estimation of uncertainty that is typically under-represented in traditional weather generators. Realistic estimates of uncertainty are of utmost importance for studying climate variability and change, impacts on land use, and crop production. BayGEN is applied to a network of weather stations in the Salado basin of the Argentine Pampas, a region that saw immense agricultural expansion towards climatically marginal (i.e., semi-arid) regions, in part due to significant trends in annual precipitation from 1970-2000. Since the turn of the century, observed conditions suggest a decrease in precipitation, which begs the question: "Are the existing agricultural production systems viable in a drier future?" The use of process based (i.e., hydrologic, crop simulation) models in conjunction with BayGEN will allow for complete analysis of the system's response to an ensemble of plausible future scenarios. Precipitation occurrence at each site is modeled at the first level of hierarchy using probit regression with covariates for seasonality, where the latent process is Gaussian -- positivity in the latent process implies occurrence. The precipitation amounts are modeled using a transformed gamma regression (i.e., gamma generalized linear model), similarly with seasonality covariates. Minimum and maximum temperatures are conditional on precipitation occurrence and are decomposed into two processes: (i) climate -- linear regressions on seasonality covariates, and (ii) weather -- realizations from mean-zero Gaussian random fields. The use of seasonality covariates allows the generation of daily weather sequences conditioned on seasonal forecasts or projected multi-annual trends, an increasingly important practice for risk assessment in climatically marginal

  17. Study on Microbes and Their Effects on Rare Earth Extraction in Weathering Crust of Granite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈炳辉; 毋福海; 刘琥琥

    2001-01-01

    Microbes were cultured from the samples at various depths in a weathering profile of RE-bearing granite in Gonghe RE mine, Guangdong Province. The cultured microbes, existing at a depth of 0.2~12 m and being more plentiful within 3 m in the profile,include bacteria (Bacillus,Enterobacter, Escherichia, Alkaligenes, Neisseria, Staphylococcus and anaerobic bacteria such as Clostridium), fungi (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium, Mucor and Saccharomycete) and actinomyces. Experiments were made under room temperature by using solutions of the cultured microbes and their metabolites, compared with distilled water and the culture solution without microbes, to leach RE from the sample of the weathering crust. The results are shown by the experiments: (1) The mixed microbes cultured from the profile and their metabolites increase the quantity of RE leached from the sample and reduce the pH of the solutions. (2) The ability to leach RE from the sample varies with various microbes, decreasing in a sequence of fungi (Mucor, saccharomycete, Aspegillus and Penicillium), zymotic bacilli (Enterobacter, Escherichia etc.), Staphylococcus, zymotic Bacillus, actinomyces and Alkaligenes. (3) The RE leached with bacteria is mainly related to the pH value of the solutions influenced by the metabolites of the bacteria; whereas that leached with fungi is mainly related to the adsorption and imbibition of RE by the fungi and the complexing of RE with their metabolites. (4) Compared with that leached with ammonium sulfate, the fractionation of the RE leached with microbes is characterized by higher δCe, lower δEu and lower ratios of NLa/Sm and NGd/Yb. The result of the fractionation of RE accords with the distribution of RE in the various layers of a profile of weathering crust of granite in South China. The experimental results indicate that microbes and their metabolites should play a positive role in the mobilization, migration and fractionation of RE in the

  18. River water quality in weathered limestone: A case study in upper Mahanadi basin, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Panigrahy; B C Raymahashay

    2005-10-01

    Stromatolitic limestone and calcareous shale belonging to Chattisgarh Supergroup of Proterozoic age dominate the upper part of the Mahanadi river basin.X-ray diffractogram (XRD)of limestone rocks show presence of a significant amount of calcite,dolomite and ankerite.Shales of various colours contain calcite and dolomite.It is observed that congruent dissolution of carbonate minerals in the Charmuria pure limestone has given rise to a typical karst topography.On the other hand, limestones are also seen to support red and black soil pro files.This indicates that the limestone bedrock undergoes a parallel incongruent weathering,which leaves a residue of decomposed rock. The XRD analyses reveal that the limestone soils thus formed contain an assemblage of quartz,clays and Fe-oxides.It is likely that the silicate component trapped during deposition of the stromatolitic limestone weathers incongruently resulting in diverse soil profiles.Carbonate and silicate mineral weathering schemes have been worked out to explain the soil formation,fixation of Al in clay minerals, and Fe in goethite.The water quality parameters such as Ca, Mg and HCO3 in the river water suggest under saturation with respect to calcite and dolomite.The mineral stability diagrams indicate that kaolinite and Ca-smectite are stable in the river water environment,hence they occur in suspended sediments and soils.The dominant influence of carbonate weathering on the water quality is observed even in the downstream part of the river outside the limestone terrain.

  19. Stormy Weather

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by the deep abyss of the unknown; a constant source for investigation and discovery, heating and destruction, all simultaneously. Beneath the deep darkness, millions of species vibrantly thrive in another universe wholly untouched by human hands, though affected by their choices. The weathered pieces and people associated with seaside villages, the deep wrinkles that tell a story of one's life and experiences like

  20. Quantitative Chemical Indices of Weathered Igneous Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of different weathering indices for characterising weathered igneous rocks of Hong Kong. Among eight chemical indices evaluated in this study, the Parker index has been found most suitable for a quantitative description of state of weathering. Based on geochemical results of 174 samples, the index decreases almost linearly with an increasing extent of weathering. The results enable a better understanding of the modification of geotechnical properties of igneous rocks associated with weathering processes.

  1. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Leela R.; Bauman, William H., III

    2008-01-01

    NASA prefers to land the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). When weather conditions violate Flight Rules at KSC, NASA will usually divert the shuttle landing to Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in Southern California. But forecasting surface winds at EAFB is a challenge for the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) forecasters due to the complex terrain that surrounds EAFB, One particular phenomena identified by SMG is that makes it difficult to forecast the EAFB surface winds is called "wind cycling". This occurs when wind speeds and directions oscillate among towers near the EAFB runway leading to a challenging deorbit bum forecast for shuttle landings. The large-scale numerical weather prediction models cannot properly resolve the wind field due to their coarse horizontal resolutions, so a properly tuned high-resolution mesoscale model is needed. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model meets this requirement. The AMU assessed the different WRF model options to determine which configuration best predicted surface wind speed and direction at EAFB, To do so, the AMU compared the WRF model performance using two hot start initializations with the Advanced Research WRF and Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model dynamical cores and compared model performance while varying the physics options.

  2. Influences of weather on Ixodes scapularis nymphal densities at long-term study sites in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Laura E; Scott, Jennifer A; Stafford, Kirby C

    2015-04-01

    Tick species worldwide are implicated in transmission of pathogens that cause mild to severe diseases in humans and livestock. Although tick population densities are often highly correlated with tick-borne disease rates, we currently know little about which factors underlie annual changes in those tick population densities. We used a 25-year dataset of Ixodes scapularis drag-sampling surveys at two locations in CT, USA, to investigate the relationship between average nymphal density from mid-May to mid-August and monthly, lagged regional weather variables. The dataset was randomly split into two data subsets, one for hypothesis development and one for hypothesis testing. Nymphal density showed the strongest association with the Standardized Precipitation Index for January of the same year that density data were collected in the analysis based on the hypothesis development data subset. This association was positive; nymphal tick density increased with regional winter precipitation. Nymphal density was positively associated with this same weather variable in the hypothesis testing data subset. Weather conditions during the coldest months of the year may serve as a bottleneck to tick populations, thereby functioning as an important correlate of not only annual blacklegged tick nymphal densities the following summer, but also entomological risk associated with tick-borne pathogens transmitted by this species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. 费谢尔判别法鉴别原油/燃料油%Properties Identiifcation of Crude Oil and Fuel Oil by Fisher Discrimination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈楠; 林雨霏; 姬泓巍; 孙健; 李开天; 梁旭锋

    2014-01-01

    以多环芳烃作为变量,建立了原油、燃料油属性鉴别的费谢尔判别法。分别测定了来自不同国家和地区的26个原油样品和25个燃料油样品中8种多环芳烃的含量,并将它们作为判别变量。借助SPSS 16.0进行费谢尔判别分析,建立费谢尔判别函数。将未知样品的判别变量值代入后,可以快速地得知样品的类别。结果表明,以多环芳烃作为判别变量进行原油、燃料油费谢尔判别快速而准确。%Fisher discrimination of crude oil and fuel oil with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(PAHs)as variables was built.8 kinds of PAHs in 26 crude oil samples and 25 fuel oil samples from different countries and regions were detected, which were used as discriminant variables. By running the SPSS 16.0 software, classification function coefficients were gotten and the Fisher discrimination function was built. The discrimination variables value of unknown species of oil was plugged into the function to quickly identify which class the sample belonging to.As a result, Fisher species identification of crude oil and fuel oil with PAHs as discriminant variables is quick and accurate.

  4. Fuel oil-water emulsions to reduce unburned particle emissions from boilers; Emulsiones agua en combustoleo para reducir las emisiones de particulas inquemadas en calderas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diego Marin, Antonio; Ocampo Barrera, Rene; Martinez Flores, Marco Antonio; Tamayo Flores, Gustavo Adolfo; Alarcon Quiroz, Ernesto [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    To diminish the problems caused by fuels in boilers such as abnormal soiling of heat interchange surfaces, decrease of thermal and combustion efficiencies and increment of pollutants it is proposed the utilization of fuel oil water emulsions. This technology process is described, its development and application in other countries is shown and mention is made of the experiences in this regard at the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), as well as the perspectives this technology has in Mexico. In conclusion, the fuel oil water emulsion is an alternative that can help burning efficiently the fuel oil and so to contribute to fulfill with the limits established by the environmental regulations on pollutant emissions. The development of this technology is economical and of simple application, compared with others, such as the installation of new burners, the utilization of a commercial technology for flue gas conditioning, etcetera [Espanol] Para disminuir los problemas ocacionados por el combustoleo en las calderas como: ensuciamientos anormales de las superficies de intercambio de calor, disminucion de eficiencias termicas y de combustion e incremento de las emisiones, se propone la utilizacion de la emulsion de agua en combustoleo. Se describe el proceso de esta tecnologia, se muestra su desarrollo y aplicacion en otros paises y se mencionan las experiencias a este respecto en el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), asi como las perspectivas que tiene esta tecnologia en Mexico. En conclusion, la emulsion de agua en combustoleo es una alternativa que puede ayudar a quemar eficientemente al combustoleo y asi contribuir a cumplir con los limites de emisiones que establecen normas ambientales. El desarrollo de esta tecnologia es economica y de aplicacion sencilla, comparada con otras como: la instalacion de nuevos quemadores, la utilizacion de una tecnologia comercial para acondicionar los gases de combustion, etcetera

  5. Geochemical study of boron isotopes in the process of loess weathering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Zhiqi; (

    2003-01-01

    ., Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations over the past 60 million years, Nature, 2000, 406: 695-699.[25]Liu Tungsheng, Loess and Environment (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 1985, 191-302.[26]Gu Zhaoyan, Lal, D., Guo Zhengtang et al., 10Be geochemical characteristics of loess and redclay on the Loess Plateau, Quaternary Research (in Chinese), 2000, 20(5): 409-423.[27]Liu Tungsheng, Loess and Environment (in Chinese), Bejing: Science Pres, 1985, 1-481.[28]Zhao Zhiqi, Liu Congqiang, Xiao Yinkai, Separation of boron in acid-soluble phases in loess and paleosol deposits and its isotopic determination, Geochimica (in Chinese), 2000, 29(4): 351-357.[29]Xiao, Y. K., Beary, E. S., Fassett, J. D., An improved method for the high-precision isotopic measurement of boron by thermal ionization masses spectrometry, Int'l. J. Mass Spect. and Ion Proc., 1988, 85: 203-213.[30]Spivack, A. J., Edmond, J. M., Determination of boron isotope ratios by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of the dicesium metaborate cation, Anal. Chem., 1986, 58: 31-35.[31]Kiss, E., Ion-exchange separation and spectrophotometric determination of boron in geological materials, Anal. Chem. Acta, 1988, 211: 243-256.[32]Liu Tungsheng, Loess and Environment (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 1985, 44-106.[33]Liu Congqiang, Zhao Zhiqi, Xiao Yinkai, Boron isotopic composition of loess and its implication for climatic tracing, Quaternary Research (in Chinese), 2000, 20(4): 394.[34]Taylor, S. R., Mclennan, S. M., Mcculloch, M. T., Geochemistry of loess, continental crustal composition and crustal model age, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1983, 47: 1897-1905.[35]Liu, C. Q., Masuda, A., Okada, A. et al., A geochemical study of loess and desert sand in northern China: Implications for continental crust weathering and composition, Chemical Geology, 1996, 106: 359-374.[36]Ishikawa, T., Nakamura, E., Boron isotope systematics of marine sediment, Earth Planet Sci. Lett., 1993, 117

  6. A statistical study of weather-related disasters. Past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, H.; Bouwman, A.; Petersen, A.; Ligtvoet, W.

    2012-07-15

    Disasters such as floods, storms, heatwaves and droughts may have serious implications for human health and the economic development of countries. One of the main findings of this report is that disaster burdens are dominated by economic and demographic developments, rather than climate change. Furthermore, disaster burden appears to be spread unequally over rich and poor countries. In Chapter 2 the background of the three regions used throughout this report is described: OECD, BRIICS (Brazil, Russia, India, Indonesia, China and South Africa and remaining countries. Furthermore, an overview of the disaster databases is given, along with definitions of disaster terminology. The statistical treatment of trends in disaster data is shortly exemplified. Chapter 3 gives on overview of the results for disaster burden and trends therein on a global scale. Results are split-up as for different disaster types. In Chapters 4 and 5 the same analysis is performed, but now split-up for three regions. In Chapter 4, disaster burdens are quantified, while analyses of trends in disaster burdens are given in Chapter 5. Here, the analyses are confined to weather-related disaster events only. In Chapter 6 the trend patterns found in Chapter 5, are explained as far as possible. Here, changes in wealth, changes in population, the role of climate change and changes due to adaptation are treated in separate sections. Chapter 7 shortly deals with communicational aspects of disasters: the attribution of individual disasters to climate change and results in the literature which are contradictory to results presented here. Chapters 3 through 7 deal with historical data on disaster burden. In the subsequent Chapters 8 and 9 the future of disaster burden will be dealt with. Chapter 8 gives a short overview of the future of disasters as presented in the literature. In Chapter 9 a PBL case study for flooding on a global scale is given, with predictions for people at risk and economic losses at

  7. Comparación ambiental de la generación de energía eléctrica a partir del bagazo y fuel oil

    OpenAIRE

    Berlan Rodríguez-Pérez; Ana Margarita Contreras-Moya; Elena Rosa-Domínguez

    2014-01-01

    La presente investigación, tiene como objetivo realizar una comparación sobre la base del impacto ambiental en la generación de electricidad, entre la generación a partir de la industria azucarera, y correspondiente a partir de fuel oil en centrales termoeléctricas. En el desarrollo del trabajo se utilizan técnicas de recopilación de información como: entrevistas personales, revisión bibliográfica, tormenta de ideas y el trabajo en equipo, que sirven de apoyo para la utilización de mapas de p...

  8. Comparación ambiental de la generación de energía eléctrica a partir del bagazo y fuel oil

    OpenAIRE

    Berlan Rodríguez-Pérez; Ana Margarita Contreras-Moya; Elena Rosa-Domínguez

    2014-01-01

    La presente investigación, tiene como objetivo realizar una comparación sobre la base del impacto ambiental en la generación de electricidad, entre la generación a partir de la industria azucarera, y correspondiente a partir de fuel oil en centrales termoeléctricas. En el desarrollo del trabajo se utilizan técnicas de recopilación de información como: entrevistas personales, revisión bibliográfica, tormenta de ideas y el trabajo en equipo, que sirven de apoyo para la utilización de mapas de p...

  9. Physicochemical Properties of Diacetylenic Light Fuel Oil from Congolese Oleaginous Plant Ongokea gore (Hua Pierre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Ntumba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oil-based fuels are promising alternative fuels for diesel and light fuel engines because of their environmental and economic strategic advantages. In this study, Ongokea gore oil (OGO and its fully hydrogenated oil were transesterified by means of ethanol in the presence of sodium ethoxide. Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE products were confirmed by 1H NMR and characterized by physical-chemical methods in accordance with the ASTM D 6751 and AFNOR M 15-009 specifications for biodiesels and light biofuels. These methods concern determination of color, density, viscosity, flash and pour points, ash, water and sulfur contents, and corrosion on copper. It was found that pure fatty acid ethyl esters of Ongokea gore oil (B100 and its hydrogenated oil (B100-H meet standard requirements for most of the biodiesel characteristics studied. Only the kinematic viscosity and density values were outside recommended biodiesel standard limits which makes them unsuitable for use in diesel engines. In accordance with the AFNOR M 15-009 specifications of light fuels, they can be used in light fuel engines. Physical-chemical properties of B20, a FAEE blend in petrodiesel, are within the limits prescribed for petrodiesel standards. In brief, Ongokea gore seeds, a nonedible and high-oil-producing feedstock, are suitable starting material for production of light biofuel. The latter blends in petrodiesel can be used as fuel in diesel engines.

  10. The combustion of fuel oil and the factors influencing pollutant formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedighi, Kurosh.

    1990-03-01

    This study presents in-flame and flue gas emission data with particular emphasis on the emission of NO{sub x} compounds arising from oil spray combustion. Experimental studies were carried out in a cylindrical ceramic-lined tunnel furnace using a pressure jet swirl oil burner. This burner was characterized in terms of the droplet size and spray pattern it produced in order to investigate the effect of these parameters on system performance with regard to NO formation. Six operating conditions were used and the NO and NO{sub x} emissions in the flame and post flame regions were reported. The majority of NO in the system was formed via the oxidation of nitrogenous species produced close to the burner. The effect of mean droplet size on the NO formation was investigated and the results showed that any factor which tended to produce smaller fuel droplets promoted an increase in the NO emission. In-flame radial and axial profiles were used to elucidate the mechanism of NO formation with regard to burner operation conditions. The burning rate of the fuel droplets was also modelled theoretically for the experimental conditions investigated. Predictions of NO formation chemistry were undertaken using a kinetic package. A post-processing NO model using the FLUENT computer code was also used. (Author).

  11. Slope stability assessment of weathered clay by using field data and computer modelling: a case study from Budapest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Görög

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A future development site of a housing estate, an abandoned-brick yard with clayey slopes was studied in details to assess slope stability and to calculate the factor of safety. The Oligocene clay, the former raw material, is divided into two different geotechnical units in the clay pit. The lower one consists of grey impermeable clays while the upper unit is characterised by yellowish weathered clay having a limited permeability. At some localities the topmost weathered clay layers are covered by loess, and slope debris. Parts of the former pit were also used as a landfill site. The slope stability analyses were performed based on borehole information and laboratory analyses in order to provide necessary engineering geological data for further site development and urban planning. Two geotechnical codes Plaxis and Geo4 were used to model the slope failures and assess the slope stability. The aim of using two different approaches was to compare them since Plaxis uses finite elements modelling while Geo4 uses conventional calculation methods to obtain circular and polygonal slip surfaces. According to model calculations and field data, the main trigger mechanisms of landslides seem to be high pore pressure due to rainwater and small slope debris covered springs. The slip surface is located at the boundary zone of yellow weathered and grey unaltered clay. Two computer models gave very similar results; although Plaxis provides combined safety factor which is slightly more pessimistic when compared to the safety factor obtained by using Geo4.

  12. The Spanish Space Weather Service SeNMEs. A Case Study on the Sun-Earth Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J.; Cid, C.; Guerrero, A.; Saiz, E.; Cerrato, Y.; Rodríguez-Bouza, M.; Rodríguez-Bilbao, I.; Herraiz, M.; Rodríguez-Caderot, G.

    2016-04-01

    The Spanish Space Weather Service SeNMEs, www.senmes.es, is a portal created by the SRG-SW of the Universidad de Alcalá, Spain, to meet societal needs of near real-time space weather services. This webpage-portal is divided in different sections to fulfill users needs about space weather effects: radio blackouts, solar energetic particle events, geomagnetic storms and presence of geomagnetically induced currents. In less than one year of activity, this service has released a daily report concerning the solar current status and interplanetary medium, informing about the chances of a solar perturbation to hit the Earth's environment. There are also two different forecasting tools for geomagnetic storms, and a daily ionospheric map. These tools allow us to nowcast a variety of solar eruptive events and forecast geomagnetic storms and their recovery, including a new local geomagnetic index, LDiñ, along with some specific new scaling. In this paper we also include a case study analysed by SeNMEs. Using different high resolution and cadence data from space-borne solar telescopes SDO, SOHO and GOES, along with ionospheric and geomagnetic data, we describe the Sun-Earth feature chain for the event.

  13. Severe Weather Forecast Decision Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III; Wheeler, Mark M.; Short, David A.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a 15-year climatological study of severe weather events and related severe weather atmospheric parameters. Data sources included local forecast rules, archived sounding data, Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) data, surface and upper air maps, and two severe weather event databases covering east-central Florida. The local forecast rules were used to set threat assessment thresholds for stability parameters that were derived from the sounding data. The severe weather events databases were used to identify days with reported severe weather and the CGLSS data was used to differentiate between lightning and non-lightning days. These data sets provided the foundation for analyzing the stability parameters and synoptic patterns that were used to develop an objective tool to aid in forecasting severe weather events. The period of record for the analysis was May - September, 1989 - 2003. The results indicate that there are certain synoptic patterns more prevalent on days with severe weather and some of the stability parameters are better predictors of severe weather days based on locally tuned threat values. The results also revealed the stability parameters that did not display any skill related to severe weather days. An interactive web-based Severe Weather Decision Aid was developed to assist the duty forecaster by providing a level of objective guidance based on the analysis of the stability parameters, CGLSS data, and synoptic-scale dynamics. The tool will be tested and evaluated during the 2005 warm season.

  14. Damaging events along roads during bad weather periods: a case study in Calabria (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucci, O.; Pasqua, A. A.

    2012-02-01

    The study focuses on circumstances that affect people during periods of bad weather conditions characterised by winds, rainfall, landslides, flooding, and storm surges. A methodological approach and its application to a study area in southern Italy are presented here. A 10-yr database was generated by mining data from a newspaper. Damaging agents were sorted into five types: flood, urban flooding, landslide, wind, and storm surge. Damage to people occurred in 126 cases, causing 13 victims, 129 injured and about 782 people involved but not injured. For cases of floods, urban flooding and landslides, the analysis does not highlight straightforward relationships between rainfall and damage to people, even if the events showed different features according to the months of occurrence. The events occurring between May and October were characterised by concentrated and intense rainfall, and between May and July, the highest values of hourly (103 mm on the average) and monthly rainfall (114 mm on the average) were recorded. Urban flooding and flash floods were the most common damaging agents: injured, involved people and more rarely, cases with victims were reported. Between November and April, the highest number of events was recorded. Rainfall presented longer durations and hourly and sub-hourly rainfall were lower than those recorded between May and October. Landslides were the most frequent damaging agents but the highest number of cases with victims, which occurred between November and January, were mainly related to floods and urban flooding. Motorists represent the totality of the victims; 84% of the people were injured and the whole of people involved. All victims were men, and the average age was 43 yr. The primary cause of death was drowning caused by floods, and the second was trauma suffered in car accidents caused by urban flooding. The high number of motorists rescued in submerged cars reveals an underestimation of danger in the case of floods, often

  15. Solar-induced weathering of rocks: integrating instrumental and numerical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallet, B.; Eppes, M. C.; Mackenzie-Helnwein, P.; Warren, K.; McFadden, L.; Gillespie, A.; Putkonen, J.; Swami, S.; Shi, J.

    2011-12-01

    The contribution of solar-driven thermal cycling to the progressive breakdown of surface rocks on the Earth and other planets is controversial. We introduce a current study of the physical state in boulders that integrates modern instrumental and numerical approaches to quantify the surface temperature, stresses, strains, and microfracture activity in exposed boulders, and to shed light on the processes underlying this form of mechanical weathering. We are monitoring the surface and environmental conditions of two ~30 cm dia. granite boulders (one in North Carolina, one in New Mexico) in the field for ~1 yr each. Each rock is instrumented with 8 thermocouples, 8 strain gauges, a surface moisture sensor and 6 Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors to monitor microfracture activity continuously. These sensors and a full meteorological station, including soil-moisture probes, are combined into a single, remotely accessible system. AE events can be located to within 2.5 cm. We are able 1) to spatially and temporally correlate microcrack growth (AE events) with the rock surface and environmental conditions experienced by the rock, and 2) to validate modeling results. The modeling work addresses two coupled problems: 1) the time-varying thermal regime of rocks exposed to diurnal variations in solar radiation as dictated by latitude, and time of the year, as well as the surface emissivity and thermal properties of the rock and soil, and size and shape of the rock, and 2) the corresponding time-varying stress and strain fields in the rocks using representative elastic properties and realistic rock shape and orientation. AE events tend to occur shortly after sunset (6-9 pm) in the upper portion of the boulder. Most of the events occur in summer and winter months for the NC boulder. The majority occur in bursts of tens to hundreds over periods of a few minutes, and are often associated with environmental factors other than simple diurnal warming and cooling, such as wind gusts, that

  16. Damaging events along roads during bad weather periods: a case study in Calabria (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Petrucci

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on circumstances that affect people during periods of bad weather conditions characterised by winds, rainfall, landslides, flooding, and storm surges. A methodological approach and its application to a study area in southern Italy are presented here. A 10-yr database was generated by mining data from a newspaper. Damaging agents were sorted into five types: flood, urban flooding, landslide, wind, and storm surge. Damage to people occurred in 126 cases, causing 13 victims, 129 injured and about 782 people involved but not injured.

    For cases of floods, urban flooding and landslides, the analysis does not highlight straightforward relationships between rainfall and damage to people, even if the events showed different features according to the months of occurrence. The events occurring between May and October were characterised by concentrated and intense rainfall, and between May and July, the highest values of hourly (103 mm on the average and monthly rainfall (114 mm on the average were recorded. Urban flooding and flash floods were the most common damaging agents: injured, involved people and more rarely, cases with victims were reported.

    Between November and April, the highest number of events was recorded. Rainfall presented longer durations and hourly and sub-hourly rainfall were lower than those recorded between May and October. Landslides were the most frequent damaging agents but the highest number of cases with victims, which occurred between November and January, were mainly related to floods and urban flooding.

    Motorists represent the totality of the victims; 84% of the people were injured and the whole of people involved. All victims were men, and the average age was 43 yr. The primary cause of death was drowning caused by floods, and the second was trauma suffered in car accidents caused by urban flooding. The high number of motorists rescued in submerged cars reveals an underestimation of

  17. Geochemical study of boron isotopes in the process of loess weathering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵志琦; 刘丛强; 肖应凯; 郎赟超

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the boron contents and boron isotopic composition of acid-soluble phases in loess and paleosol samples are determined for the first time. The boron contents of acid-soluble phases in the Luochuan loess section (S0 -S2) vary within the range of (0.8-2.7)×10-6 and theirδ11B values vary from -1.8‰ to +18.6‰, mostly within the range of 0-+10‰. The boron contents andδ11B values of paleosol layers are higher than those of loess layers, especially in the loess layer S1. Varying chemical weathering intensity and loess adsorption capability are the main factors leading to the variations of boron contents and δ11B values of acid-soluble phases in the loess section. The variation of chemical weathering intensity in response to the variation of climatic conditions seems to be the main factor leading to the variations of boron contents andδ11B values of acid-soluble phases in the loess section.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE ROLE OF INITIAL AND BOUNDARY CONDITIONS IN MESOSCALE NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jing-hua(闫敬华); Detlev Majewski

    2003-01-01

    Based on the real case of a frontal precipitation process affecting South China, 27 controlled numerical experiments was made for the effects of hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic effects, different driving models, combinations of initial/boundary conditions, updates of lateral values and initial time levels of forecast, on model predictions. Features about the impact of initial/boundary conditions on mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) model are analyzed and discussed in detail. Some theoretically and practically valuable conclusions aredrawn. It is found that the overall tendency of mesoscale NWP models is governed by its driving model, with the initial conditions showing remarkable impacts on mesoscale models for the first 10 hours of the predictions while leaving lateral boundary conditions to take care the period beyond; the latter affect the inner area of mesoscale predictions mainly through the propagation and movement of weather signals (waves) of different time scales; initial values of external model parameters such as soil moisture content may affect predictions of more longer time validity, while fast signals may be filtered away and only information with time scale 4 times as large as or more than the updated period of boundary values may be introduced, through lateral boundary, to mesoscale models, etc. Someresults may be taken as important guidance on mesoscale model and its data assimilation developments of the future.

  19. 国内燃料油供需现状分析与思考%The Analysis of Domestic Fuel Oil Supply-Demand Status and Some Considerations about It

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海波

    2015-01-01

    Fuel oil is a petroleum product variety with relatively high market-oriented degree in China at present. China formally opened fuel oil price at 2001 for the first time, then published the adjustment of import-export quota and excise rate as well as other policy measures several times. Domestic fuel oil market basically integrates with international market, the internationalization of products have been further enhanced. Following the development of local refining enterprises, the application of fuel oil extends from traditional power generation, heating and transportation to processing use. The article analyzes the supply-demand status of domestic fuel oil as well as the situation facing it and puts forward some considerations about domestic fuel oil market development.%燃料油是目前我国市场化程度较高的石油产品品种。我国最早于2001年正式放开了燃料油的价格,之后又数次发布进出口配额、消费税率调整等政策措施,国内燃料油市场与国际市场基本接轨,产品的国际化程度进一步提高。随着地方炼油企业的发展,燃料油的用途从传统的发电、供热、运输等领域又扩展到了加工使用。本文分析了国内燃料油供需现状及其面临的形势,提出了关于国内燃料油市场开发的若干思考。

  20. Dual-fuel production from restaurant grease trap waste: bio-fuel oil extraction and anaerobic methane production from the post-extracted residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takuro; Kuramochi, Hidetoshi; Maeda, Kouji; Tsuji, Tomoya; Xu, Kaiqin

    2014-10-01

    An effective way for restaurant grease trap waste (GTW) treatment to generate fuel oil and methane by the combination of physiological and biological processes was investigated. The heat-driven extraction could provide a high purity oil equivalent to an A-grade fuel oil of Japanese industrial standard with 81-93 wt% of extraction efficiency. A post-extracted residue was treated as an anaerobic digestion feedstock, and however, an inhibitory effect of long chain fatty acid (LCFA) was still a barrier for high-rate digestion. From the semi-continuous experiment fed with the residual sludge as a single substrate, it can be concluded that the continuous addition of calcium into the reactor contributed to reducing LCFA inhibition, resulting in the long-term stable operation over one year. Furthermore, the anaerobic reactor performed well with 70-80% of COD reduction and methane productivity under an organic loading rate up to 5.3g-COD/L/d. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimization Design of Ship's Fuel Oil Tank Heating System%船舶燃油舱加热系统优化设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周志贤; 杨令康; 吴海荣

    2013-01-01

    Due to the traditional using steam coil to heat fuel oil storage tanks exists heat loss , repair damaged coil difficultly and coil surface carbon deposition and other shortcomings , a fuel transfer heating system was proposed .By transferring back hot oil to mix some cold oil in the heating tank , so as to achieve the purpose of heating fuel oil .The calculation results showed that using the fuel transfer heating system can reduce energy consumption and cost savings .%针对由于传统蒸汽盘管加热燃油舱存在散热损失大、盘管破损修复困难且表面易积炭等缺点,设计一种燃油转驳加热系统,即通过被驳回的热油来混合加热油舱中适量的冷油,从而达到加热燃油的目的。计算结果表明使用燃油转驳加热系统可以降低能源消耗和节约成本。

  2. FIELD ASSESSMENT OF BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS SEROTYPE H - 14 (BACTIMOS W.P. , ABATE AND FUEL OIL AGAINST ANOPHELES AND CULEX IN SOUTH OF IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Kasir

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The Optimum dosage for field application bactimos (W.P. was determined as 0.04g/m , when efficacy of four concentration of 0.01 , 0.02 , 0.04 and 0.08 gim2 were compared in 1 x I m2 artificial breeding sites. This dosage caused 69.8%, 55.6% and 43.6% anopheline and 83%, 47.8% and 29.7% culicine larval mortality, in 24.48% and 72 hrs post treatment, respectively. Abate and fuel oil were significantly more effective than hactimos (W.P as they caused 100% , 99.7% and 87.2% anopheline and 100% , 93.5% and 87% culicine lavrval mortality , in 24 hr post treatment , respectivelly. In natural breeding sites Abate, fuel oil and Bactimos (W.P. caused 100%, 98% and 69% anopheline and 99.9%, 99% and 79.3% culicine larval mortality, in 24 hr post treatment, respectively. The wettable powder formulation of Bactimos was not regarded as a suitable formulation for anopheline control in Southern Iran.

  3. The influence of weather on the risk of pain exacerbation in patients with knee osteoarthritis - a case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, M L; Zhang, Y; Metcalf, B; Makovey, J; Bennell, K L; March, L; Hunter, D J

    2016-12-01

    To quantify the risk of knee pain exacerbation associated with temperature, relative humidity, air pressure and precipitation in persons with knee osteoarthritis. A web-based case-crossover study was conducted. Participants with a diagnosis of symptomatic, radiographic knee osteoarthritis were measured at baseline and followed for 3 months. Participants were instructed to log on to the study website if they perceived experiencing knee pain exacerbation (hazard period). Pain exacerbation was defined as an increase of ≥2 on a 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS) from the participant's mildest pain reported at baseline. A time-stratified case-crossover study was conducted to anchor the corresponding hazard date to four control periods within a particular 35-day interval. Data on maximum and minimum temperature (°C), relative humidity (%), barometric pressure (hPa) and precipitation (mm) were obtained for the hazard and control periods from the publicly available meteorological database of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. The associations were assessed using conditional logistic regression. Of the 345 participants recruited, 171 participants (women: 64%, mean age: 62 years, mean BMI: 30.2 kg/m(2)) experienced at least one episode of pain exacerbation, yielding 1,425 observations included in the analyses. There was no apparent association between temperature, relative humidity, air pressure or precipitation and risk of knee pain exacerbation. Despite anecdotal reports from patients, change in weather factors does not appear to influence the risk of pain exacerbation in persons with knee osteoarthritis. Additional studies should quantify the association of weather and risk of pain exacerbation in regions with more extreme weather conditions. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. OpenWeather: a peer-to-peer weather data transmission protocol

    CERN Document Server

    Yanes, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    The study of the weather is performed using instruments termed weather stations. These weather stations are distributed around the world, collecting the data from the different phenomena. Several weather organizations have been deploying thousands of these instruments, creating big networks to collect weather data. These instruments are collecting the weather data and delivering it for later processing in the collections points. Nevertheless, all the methodologies used to transmit the weather data are based in protocols non adapted for this purpose. Thus, the weather stations are limited by the data formats and protocols used in them, not taking advantage of the real-time data available on them. We research the weather instruments, their technology and their network capabilities, in order to provide a solution for the mentioned problem. OpenWeather is the protocol proposed to provide a more optimum and reliable way to transmit the weather data. We evaluate the environmental factors, such as location or bandwi...

  5. Decrease of noxious emissions in the residual fuel oil combustion; Disminucion de emisiones nocivas en la combustion de aceite combustible residual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandoki W, Jorge [Econergia S. de R. L. de C. V. Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    The residual fuel oil combustion emits noxious substances such as carbonaceous particulate, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur trioxide at unacceptable levels. Water emulsified in the fuel substantially reduces such emissions, achieving besides, in most of the cases, a net saving in the fuel consumption. The beneficial effects are shown in burning the residual fuel oil as a water emulsion, as well as the method to produce an adequate emulsion. The emulsified fuel technology offers a low cost option to reduce air pollution. The fuel oil quality has been declining during the last decades due to: 1. Increase in the production of crude heavy oils, generally with higher content of asphaltens and sulfur. 2. Less availability of vacuum distillation residues due to its conversion into greater value products. 3. More intensive conversion processes such as catalytic cracking, visbreaking, etc. that increase the asphaltenes concentration in the bottoms, causing instability problems. 4. The increase in the vanadium and other metals content as the concentration of asphaltenes increases. The use of emulsified fuel oil provides an efficient and economical method to substantially reduce the noxious emissions to the atmosphere. The emulsion contains water particles in a diameter between 2 and 20 microns, uniformly distributed in the fuel oil, generally in a proportion generally of 5 to 10%; besides, it contains a tensioactive agent to assure a stable emulsion capable of withstanding the shearing forces of the pumping and distribution systems. When the atomized oil drops get into the combustion chamber, the emulsified water flashes into high pressure steam, originating a violent secondary atomization. The effect of this secondary atomization is the rupture of the oil drops of various hundred microns, producing drops of 5 to 15 microns in diameter. Since the necessary time for combustion is an exponential function of the drop diameter, a very substantial improvement in the combustion is

  6. Decrease of noxious emissions in the residual fuel oil combustion; Disminucion de emisiones nocivas en la combustion de aceite combustible residual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandoki W, Jorge [Econergia S. de R. L. de C. V. Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    The residual fuel oil combustion emits noxious substances such as carbonaceous particulate, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur trioxide at unacceptable levels. Water emulsified in the fuel substantially reduces such emissions, achieving besides, in most of the cases, a net saving in the fuel consumption. The beneficial effects are shown in burning the residual fuel oil as a water emulsion, as well as the method to produce an adequate emulsion. The emulsified fuel technology offers a low cost option to reduce air pollution. The fuel oil quality has been declining during the last decades due to: 1. Increase in the production of crude heavy oils, generally with higher content of asphaltens and sulfur. 2. Less availability of vacuum distillation residues due to its conversion into greater value products. 3. More intensive conversion processes such as catalytic cracking, visbreaking, etc. that increase the asphaltenes concentration in the bottoms, causing instability problems. 4. The increase in the vanadium and other metals content as the concentration of asphaltenes increases. The use of emulsified fuel oil provides an efficient and economical method to substantially reduce the noxious emissions to the atmosphere. The emulsion contains water particles in a diameter between 2 and 20 microns, uniformly distributed in the fuel oil, generally in a proportion generally of 5 to 10%; besides, it contains a tensioactive agent to assure a stable emulsion capable of withstanding the shearing forces of the pumping and distribution systems. When the atomized oil drops get into the combustion chamber, the emulsified water flashes into high pressure steam, originating a violent secondary atomization. The effect of this secondary atomization is the rupture of the oil drops of various hundred microns, producing drops of 5 to 15 microns in diameter. Since the necessary time for combustion is an exponential function of the drop diameter, a very substantial improvement in the combustion is

  7. Caught in the Solar Wind: A Study of Space Weather and its Influence on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R.; Chuckran, A.; Erickson, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    Space weather is a phenomenon that is becoming more familiar to the general public. As people are increasingly reliant on 21st century technology, the potential for disruption to their daily lives also rises. As the sun approaches its next solar maximum in 2011 or 2012, the peak of Cycle 24 is expected to be the highest of the satellite age, perhaps surpassing that of Cycle 19 in 1957-58. In this teaching unit, we have attempted to create a series of lessons that sheds light on the concept of space weather and the sun's influences on earth's magnetic field and upper atmosphere. Within this unit, we have provided ample opportunities for students to access and interpret real scientific data from a variety of sources. The main location is the web site www.spaceweather.com , which has near real time data from satellites such as SOHO, STEREO, ACE and POES. This data is easily viewed and explained within the site, and with appropriate instruction, students can regularly gather data, make predictions, and draw conclusions based on the current behavior of the sun. Examples include sunspot number and development, speed and density of solar wind, orientation and strength of the interplanetary magnetic field, location of coronal holes, planetary K index and X-ray solar flares. Depending on the level of the students, some or all of this data can be compiled over a period of time to better understand the behavior of the sun as well as its influence on Earth. The goal of this unit is to provide a vehicle for students to understand how data is used by scientists. Once they have the base knowledge, students may be able to construct their own questions and follow through with research. An inquiry-based approach is incorporated whenever possible. With the onset of a potentially active solar cycle in the near future, teachers have the opportunity to make a dramatic connection between the natural world and their daily lives. Solar storms can cause disruption to telephone communication

  8. The Use of Remotely Sensed Rainfall for Managing Drought Risk: A Case Study of Weather Index Insurance in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Black

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Remotely sensed rainfall is increasingly being used to manage climate-related risk in gauge sparse regions. Applications based on such data must make maximal use of the skill of the methodology in order to avoid doing harm by providing misleading information. This is especially challenging in regions, such as Africa, which lack gauge data for validation. In this study, we show how calibrated ensembles of equally likely rainfall can be used to infer uncertainty in remotely sensed rainfall estimates, and subsequently in assessment of drought. We illustrate the methodology through a case study of weather index insurance (WII in Zambia. Unlike traditional insurance, which compensates proven agricultural losses, WII pays out in the event that a weather index is breached. As remotely sensed rainfall is used to extend WII schemes to large numbers of farmers, it is crucial to ensure that the indices being insured are skillful representations of local environmental conditions. In our study we drive a land surface model with rainfall ensembles, in order to demonstrate how aggregation of rainfall estimates in space and time results in a clearer link with soil moisture, and hence a truer representation of agricultural drought. Although our study focuses on agricultural insurance, the methodological principles for application design are widely applicable in Africa and elsewhere.

  9. The North Carolina Field Test: Field performance of the preliminary version of an advanced weatherization audit for the Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, T.R.

    1994-06-01

    The field performance of weatherizations based on a newly-developed advanced technique for selecting residential energy conservation measures was tested alongside current Retro-Tech-based weatherizations in North Carolina. The new technique is computer-based and determines measures based on the needs of an individual house. In addition, it recommends only those measures that it determines will have a benefit-to-cost ratio greater than 1 for the house being evaluated. The new technique also considers the interaction of measures in computing the benefit-to-cost ratio of each measure. The two weatherization approaches were compared based on implementation ease, measures installed, labor and cost requirements, and both heating and cooling energy savings achieved. One-hundred and twenty houses with the following characteristics participated: the occupants were low-income, eligible for North Carolina`s current weatherization program, and responsible for their own fuel and electric bills. Houses were detached single-family dwellings, not mobile homes; were heated by kerosene, fuel oil, natural gas, or propane; and had one or two operating window air conditioners. Houses were divided equally into one control group and two weatherization groups. Weekly space heating and cooling energy use, and hourly indoor and outdoor temperatures were monitored between November 1989 and September 1990 (pre-period) and between December 1990 and August 1991 (post-period). House consumption models were used to normalize for annual weather differences and a 68{degrees}F indoor temperature. Control group savings were used to adjust the savings determined for the weatherization groups. The two weatherization approaches involved installing attic and floor insulations in near equivalent quantities, and installing storm windows and wall insulation in drastically different quantities. Substantial differences also were found in average air leakage reductions for the two weatherization groups.

  10. 'Is it the weather?'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Jacobsen (Ben); W.A. Marquering (Wessel)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWe show that results in the recent strand of the literature that tries to explain stock returns by weather induced mood shifts of investors might be data-driven inference. More specifically, we consider two recent studies (Kamstra, Kramer and Levi, 2003a and Cao and Wei, 2004) that claim

  11. Influence de la nature des fuels lourds sur la qualité de leur combustion Influence of Heavy Fuel Oil Composition on Particulate Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feugier A.

    2006-11-01

    heavy fuel oils in a 1 MW boiler and an 0. 1 MW furnace, the conclusion was reached that Conradson carbon residue (CCR of fuel oils is a good indicator of their combustibility, but that it is not sufficient in all cases, i. e. for the same CCR, different values of particulate emissions can be measured. Several possible interpretations were proposed and checked:(a Conradson carbon residue is the result of slow pyrolysis, but it is a procedure that is not sufficiently representative of actual conditions. Yet, by subjecting various fuel oils to flash pyrolysis (heated-grid technique, a good correlation is found between the amount of residue resulting and the CCR. Therefore the CCR remains a good combustibility indicator. (b For fuel oils ex atmospheric residue, ex vacuum residue and ex deasphalting, satisfactory correlations have been observed between CCR and various physicochemical properties of the heavy fractions of fuel oils (cut point of 450°C chosen, i. e. polyaromaticity (measured by carbon 13 NMR, C/H and molecular weight. However, visbreaking fuel oils meet other correlations, as do steam-cracking residues. Hence for these classes of fuel oils, anomalies can be predicted between the particulate emissions and CCR, which is effectively observed with some equipments. (c For the same CCR value, the relative proportion between light and heavy fractions of fuels can sometimes be seen to vary quite appreciably, thus causing changes in the richness and temperature maps of the resulting flames, and hence variations in particulate emissions. The extent of such variations will depend on the types of burners and combustion chambers in which the flame develops.

  12. A study of the relationship between cloud-to-ground lightning and precipitation in the convective weather system in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhou

    Full Text Available In this paper, the correlation between cloud-to-ground (CG lightning and precipitation has been studied by making use of the data from weather radar, meteorological soundings, and a lightning location system that includes three direction finders about 40 km apart from each other in the Pingliang area of east Gansu province in P. R. China. We have studied the convective systems that developed during two cold front processes passing over the observation area, and found that the CG lightning can be an important factor in the precipitation estimation. The regression equation between the average precipitation intensity (R and the number of CG lightning flashes (L in the main precipitation period is R = 1.69 ln (L - 0.27, and the correlation coefficient r is 0.86. The CG lightning flash rate can be used as an indicator of the formation and development of the convective weather system. Another more exhaustive precipitation estimation method has been developed by analyzing the temporal and spatial distributions of the precipitation relative to the location of the CG lightning flashes. Precipitation calculated from the CG lightning flashes is very useful, especially in regions with inadequate radar cover.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (atmospheric electricity; lightning; precipitation

  13. The erosion of the beaches on the coast of Alicante: Study of the mechanisms of weathering by accelerated laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, I; López, M; Aragonés, L; García-Barba, J; López, M P; Sánchez, I

    2016-10-01

    One of the main problems that coasts around the world present, is the regression and erosion of beaches. However, the factors involved in these processes are unclear. In this study, the influence of sediment erosion on beach regression has been analysed. In order to do that, a three-step investigation has been carried out. Firstly, coastline variations of four Spanish beaches have been analysed. Secondly, a study on sediment position along the beach profile has been developed. Finally, the process that beach sediments undergo along the surf zone when they are hit by the incident waves has been simulated by an accelerated particle weathering test. Samples of sand and shells were subjected to this accelerated particle weathering test. Results were supplemented with those from carbonate content test, XRD, SEM and granulometric analysis. Results shows a cross-shore classification of sediments along the beach profile in which finer particles move beyond offshore limit. Besides, it was observed that sediment erosion process is divided into three sages: i) particles wear due to crashes ii) dissolution of the carbonate fraction, and iii) breakage and separation of mineral and carbonate parts of particles. All these processes lead to a reduction of particle size. The mechanism responsible of beach erosion would consist of multiples and continuous particle location exchanges along the beach profile as a consequence of grain-size decrease due to erosion.

  14. Case studies of NOAA 6/TIROS N data impact on numerical weather forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druyan, L. M.; Alperson, Z.; Ben-Amram, T.

    1984-01-01

    The impact of satellite temperatures from systems which predate the launching of the third generation of vertical sounding instruments aboard TIROS N (13 Oct 1978) and NOAA 6 (27 June 1979) is reported. The first evaluation of soundings from TIROS N found that oceanic, cloudy retrievals over NH mid latitudes show a cold bias in winter. It is confirmed for both satellite systems using a larger data base. It is shown that RMS differences between retrievals and colocated radiosonde observations within the swath 30-60N during the 1979-80 winter were generally 2-3K in clear air and higher for cloudy columns. A positive impact of TIROS N temperatures on the analysis of synoptic weather systems is shown. Analyses prepared from only satellite temperatures seemed to give a better definition to weather systems' thermal structure than that provided by corresponding NMC analyses without satellite data. The results of a set of 14 numerical forecast experiments performed with the PE model of the Israel Meteorological Service (IMS) are summarized; these were designed to test the impact of TIROS N and NOAA 6 temperatures within the IMS analysis and forecast cycle. The satellite data coverage over the NH, the mean area/period S1 and RMS verification scores and the spatial distribution of SAT versus NO SAT forecast differences are discussed and it is concluded that positive forecast impact occurs over ocean areas where the extra data improve the specification which is otherwise available from conventional observations. The forecast impact for three cases from the same set of experiments was examined and it is found that satellite temperatures, observed over the Atlantic Ocean contribute to better forecasts over Iceland and central Europe although a worse result was verified over Spain. It is also shown that the better scores of a forecast based also on satellite data and verified over North America actually represent a mixed impact on the forecast synoptic patterns. A superior 48 hr

  15. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Leela R.; Bauman, William H., III; Hoeth, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This abstract describes work that will be done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in assessing the success of different model configurations in predicting "wind cycling" cases at Edwards Air Force Base, CA (EAFB), in which the wind speeds and directions oscillate among towers near the EAFB runway. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model allows users to choose among two dynamical cores - the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) and the Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM). There are also data assimilation analysis packages available for the initialization of the WRF model - the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) and the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS). Having a series of initialization options and WRF cores, as well as many options within each core, creates challenges for local forecasters, such as determining which configuration options are best to address specific forecast concerns. The goal of this project is to assess the different configurations available and determine which configuration will best predict surface wind speed and direction at EAFB.

  16. Using stochastic activity networks to study the energy feasibility of automatic weather stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassano, Luca [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informatica e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Cesarini, Daniel [Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa (Italy); Avvenuti, Marco [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, University of Pisa (Italy)

    2015-03-10

    Automatic Weather Stations (AWSs) are systems equipped with a number of environmental sensors and communication interfaces used to monitor harsh environments, such as glaciers and deserts. Designing such systems is challenging, since designers have to maximize the amount of sampled and transmitted data while considering the energy needs of the system that, in most cases, is powered by rechargeable batteries and exploits energy harvesting, e.g., solar cells and wind turbines. To support designers of AWSs in the definition of the software tasks and of the hardware configuration of the AWS we designed and implemented an energy-aware simulator of such systems. The simulator relies on the Stochastic Activity Networks (SANs) formalism and has been developed using the Möbius tool. In this paper we first show how we used the SAN formalism to model the various components of an AWS, we then report results from an experiment carried out to validate the simulator against a real-world AWS and we finally show some examples of usage of the proposed simulator.

  17. Arsenic release from arsenopyrite weathering: insights from sequential extraction and microscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ankan; Schreiber, Madeline E

    2013-11-15

    At a former As mine site, arsenopyrite oxidation has resulted in formation of scorodite and As-bearing iron hydroxide, both in host rock and mine tailings. Electron microprobe analysis documents that arsenopyrite weathers along two pathways: one that involves formation of sulfur, and one that does not. In both pathways, arsenopyrite oxidizes to form scorodite, which dissolves incongruently to form As-bearing iron hydroxides. From a mass balance perspective, arsenopyrite oxidation to scorodite conserves As, but as scorodite dissolves incongruently to iron hydroxides, As is released to solution, resulting in elevated As concentrations in the headwater stream adjacent to the site. The As-bearing iron hydroxide is the dominant solid phase reservoir of As in mine tailings and stream sediment, as suggested by sequential extraction. This As-bearing iron hydroxide is stable under the aerobic and pH 4-6 conditions at the site; however, changes in biogeochemical conditions resulting from sediment burial or future remedial efforts, which could promote As release from this reservoir due to reductive dissolution, should be avoided.

  18. Experimental study on the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff: Salt weathering and consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Russa, Mauro Francesco; Ruffolo, Silvestro Antonio; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Ricca, Michela; Belfiore, Cristina Maria; Pezzino, Antonino; Mirocle Crisci, Gino

    2016-04-01

    Salt crystallization is one of the major weathering agents in porous building materials due to the crystallization pressure exerted by salt crystals growing in confined pores. The consolidation of such degraded stone materials is a crucial issue in the field of Cultural Heritage restoration.
 This contribution deals with laboratory experimentation carried out on the Neapolitan Tuff, a pyroclastic rock largely used in the Campanian architecture. Several specimens, collected from a historical quarry nearby the city of Naples, were treated with two different consolidating products: a suspension of nanosilica in water (Syton X30®) and ethyl silicate (Estel 1000®) dispersed in organic solvent (TEOS). Then, in order to assess the effectiveness of consolidation treatments, both treated and untreated samples underwent accelerated degradation through salt crystallization tests. A multi-analytical approach, including mercury intrusion porosimetry, peeling tests and point load test, was employed to evaluate the correlation between the salt crystallization and the micro-structural features of the examined tuff specimens. In addition, the calculation of the crystallization pressures was also performed in order to make a correlation between the porous structure of the tuff and its susceptivity to salt crystallization. Obtained results show that both the tested products increase the resistance of tuff to salt crystallization, although inducing an increase of crystallization pressure. Ethyl silicate, however, shows a better behaviour in terms of superficial cohesion, even after several degradation cycles.

  19. Monthly Weather Review

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Supplements to the Monthly Weather Review publication. The Weather Bureau published the Monthly weather review Supplement irregularly from 1914 to 1949. The...

  20. Weather Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacmeister, Julio T.

    Awareness of weather and concern about weather in the proximate future certainly must have accompanied the emergence of human self-consciousness. Although weather is a basic idea in human existence, it is difficult to define precisely.

  1. Sensitivity of high-temperature weather to initial soil moisture: a case study using the WRF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X.-M.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Song, S.; Huang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Chen, C.; Wang, G.

    2014-09-01

    Using a succession of 24 h Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) simulations, we investigate the sensitivity to initial soil moisture of a short-range high-temperature weather event that occurred in late July 2003 in East China. The initial soil moisture (SMOIS) in the Noah land surface scheme is adjusted (relative to the control run, CTL) for four groups of simulations: DRY25 (-25%), DRY50 (-50%), WET25 (+25%) and WET50 (+50%). Ten 24 h integrations are performed in each group. We focus on 2 m surface air temperature (SAT) greater than 35 °C (the threshold of "high-temperature" events in China) at 06:00 UTC (roughly 14:00 LT in the study domain) to analyse the occurrence of the high-temperature event. The 10-day mean results show that the 06:00 UTC SAT (SAT06) is sensitive to the SMOIS change; specifically, SAT06 exhibits an apparent increase with the SMOIS decrease (e.g. compared with CTL, DRY25 generally results in a 1 °C SAT06 increase over the land surface of East China), areas with 35 °C or higher SAT06 are the most affected, and the simulations are more sensitive to the SMOIS decrease than to the SMOIS increase, which suggests that hot weather can be amplified under low soil moisture conditions. Regarding the mechanism underlying the extremely high SAT06, sensible heat flux has been shown to directly heat the lower atmosphere, and latent heat flux has been found to be more sensitive to the SMOIS change, resulting in an overall increase in surface net radiation due to the increased greenhouse effect (e.g. with the SMOIS increase from DRY25 to CTL, the 10-day mean net radiation increases by 5 W m-2). Additionally, due to the unique and dynamic nature of the western Pacific subtropical high, negative feedback occurs between the regional atmospheric circulation and the air temperature in the lower atmosphere while positive feedback occurs in the mid-troposphere. Using a method based on an analogous temperature relationship, a detailed analysis of the

  2. Sensitivity of high-temperature weather to initial soil moisture: a case study with the WRF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X.-M.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Song, S.; Huang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Chen, C.; Wang, G.

    2014-05-01

    Using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), we investigate the sensitivity of simulated short-range high-temperature weather to initial soil moisture for the East China extremely hot event in late July 2003 via a succession of 24 h simulations. The initial soil moisture (SMOIS) in the Noah land surface scheme is prescribed for five groups of designed simulations, i.e., relative to the control run (CTL), SMOIS is changed by -25, -50, +25 and +50% in the DRY25, DRY50, WET25 and WET50 groups, respectively, with ten 24 h-long integrations performed in each group. We focus on above-35 °C (standard of so-called "high-temperature" event in China) 2 m surface air temperature (SAT) at 06:00 UTC (roughly 12:00 LT in the study domain) to analyze the occurrence of the high-temperature event. Ten-day mean results show that the 06:00 UTC SAT (SAT06) is sensitive to the SMOIS change, i.e., SAT06 exhibits an apparent rising with the SMOIS decrease (e.g., compared with CTL, DRY25 results in a 1 °C SAT06 rising in general over land surface of East China), areas with above-35 °C SAT06 are most affected, and the simulations are found to be more sensitive to the SMOIS decrease than to the SMOIS increase, suggesting that hot weather can be amplified under low soil moisture conditions. With regard to the mechanism of influencing the extreme high SAT06, sensible heat flux shows to directly heat the lower atmosphere, latent heat flux is found to be more sensitive to the SMOIS change and results in the overall increase of surface net radiation due to the increased greenhouse effect (e.g., with the SMOIS increase of 25% from DRY25 to CTL, the ten-day mean net radiation is increased by 5 W m-2), and a negative (positive) feedback is found between regional atmospheric circulation and air temperature in the lower atmosphere (mid-troposphere) due to the unique dynamic nature of the western Pacific subtropical high. Using a method based on an analogous temperature relationship, a

  3. a Study of Risk Preferences and Perceptions of Weather Variability of Smallholder Subsistence Farmers in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S.; Michelson, H. C.

    2013-12-01

    called parametric Dynamic Experiments for Estimating Preferences developed at Columbia University to measure three prospect theory parameters using an adaptive survey tool installed on a tablet PC. Our work is the first to use an adaptive survey tool to measure risk preferences and to combine these measures with both panel data on agricultural investments and beliefs about climate change using scenarios. Despite the need for better understanding of how farmer preferences over time and risk might influence technology adoption and production decisions made by farmers in sub-Saharan Africa, there is a critical gap in research about this topic. Whether and how vulnerability to climate change has entered the mind frame of farmers is explored with a scenario setup, in which farmers are asked to provide advice to a hypothetical farmer facing low yields due to a prolonged drought. Farmer responses to the scenarios give us information about both the channel through which farmers receive information about agriculture and adaptation and primary factors mentioned to be important agricultural strategies in the face of increasingly unpredictable weather patterns. This research offers insights to understand decision-making process of smallholder farmers, who face adverse effects of weather variability and the present problem of low soil fertility.

  4. The Transfer Function Model as a Tool to Study and Describe Space Weather Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Hayden S.; Mayr, Hans G.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Transfer Function Model (TFM) is a semi-analytical, linear model that is designed especially to describe thermospheric perturbations associated with magnetic storms and substorm. activity. It is a multi-constituent model (N2, O, He H, Ar) that accounts for wind induced diffusion, which significantly affects not only the composition and mass density but also the temperature and wind fields. Because the TFM adopts a semianalytic approach in which the geometry and temporal dependencies of the driving sources are removed through the use of height-integrated Green's functions, it provides physical insight into the essential properties of processes being considered, which are uncluttered by the accidental complexities that arise from particular source geometrie and time dependences. Extending from the ground to 700 km, the TFM eliminates spurious effects due to arbitrarily chosen boundary conditions. A database of transfer functions, computed only once, can be used to synthesize a wide range of spatial and temporal sources dependencies. The response synthesis can be performed quickly in real-time using only limited computing capabilities. These features make the TFM unique among global dynamical models. Given these desirable properties, a version of the TFM has been developed for personal computers (PC) using advanced platform-independent 3D visualization capabilities. We demonstrate the model capabilities with simulations for different auroral sources, including the response of ducted gravity waves modes that propagate around the globe. The thermospheric response is found to depend strongly on the spatial and temporal frequency spectra of the storm. Such varied behavior is difficult to describe in statistical empirical models. To improve the capability of space weather prediction, the TFM thus could be grafted naturally onto existing statistical models using data assimilation.

  5. Facile Route to Generate Fuel Oil via Catalytic Pyrolysis of Waste Polypropylene Bags: Towards Waste Management of >20 μm Plastic Bags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel strategy of waste recycling of polypropylene plastics (PP bags for generation of commercially viable byproducts using nanoforms of nickel as catalyst is presented in this work. After pyrolysis of waste PP bags (>20 μm under continuous argon flow, 90% conversion efficiency to high petroleum oil was observed at 550°C. To assess the physicochemical attributes of formed oil, flash point, pour point, viscosity, specific gravity, heating value, and density were also measured and found to be very close to ideal values of commercial fuel oil. Moreover, GC-MS was used to resolve the range of trace mass hydrocarbon present in the liquefied hydrocarbon. Our robust recycling system can be exploited as economical technique to solve the nuisance of waste plastic hazardous to ecosystem.

  6. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-D-9 Boiler Fuel Oil Tank Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-08-10

    The 100-D-9 site is the former location of an underground storage tank used for holding fuel for the 184-DA Boiler House. Results of soil-gas samples taken from six soil-gas probes in a rectangle around the site the tank had been removed from concluded that there were no volatile organic compounds at detectable levels in the area. The 100-D-9 Boiler Fuel Oil Tank Site meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  7. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in ashes from a fuel-oil power plant in Cienfuegos, Cuba, and the associated radiation hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Hernández, C M; Bernal-Castillo, J; Morera-Gómez, Y; Guillen-Arruebarrena, A; Cartas-Aguila, H A; Acosta-Milián, R

    2014-03-01

    The radioactivity of NORM was measured in ashes collected from a fuel-oil power plant in Cienfuegos, Cuba, using an HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer. The (226)Ra, (210)Pb, (40)K, (232)Th and (238)U activity concentrations reached 240, 77, 59, 70 and 15 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The potential radiological hazard of these residuals was assessed. The radium equivalent activities of the samples varied from 54 to 345 Bq kg(-1). The gamma index was calculated to be lower than that of the reference values, and the gamma absorbed dose rate was higher than the average reported for the earth's crust; however, the assessed annual effective dose was slightly lower than the annual effective dose limit for public, i.e. 1 mSv. Therefore, these bottom ashes were not dramatically enriched with radionuclides and may be used as an additive for building materials without restrictions from a radiological protection point of view.

  8. Epilepsy and weather: A significant correlation between the onset of epileptic seizures and specific atmospherics — a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhenstroth-Bauer, G.; Baumer, H.; Kugler, J.; Spatz, R.; Sönning, W.; Filipiak, B.

    1984-12-01

    The possibility of connections between weather and the onset of epileptic seizures has long been suggested (see, for example, the Hammurabi Codex 1600 BC). Work in the 20th Century points to a probability that the onset of both local and generalised epilepsy is significantly influenced by an interaction between genetic and extrinsic factors. In an attempt to clarify the situation a detailed study of the history of 315 attacks from 1 Jan. to 31 July 1981 suffered by a small number of patients in Munich has been undertaken. Although linkages between “classical” meteorological parameters and the onset of seizures are very weak, links with more generalised indexes (e.g. passage of fronts and disturbances) are more promising. However, the correlation between onsets and “atmospherics” of 28 KHz (positive) and 10 KHz (negative) impulses, are significant and call for urgent study.

  9. 汽车燃油加热器数据自动采集系统%Automatic Data Acquisition System for Automotive Fuel Oil Heater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张铁壁; 孙士尉; 夏国明; 马晓辉; 张学军

    2013-01-01

    为了解决目前汽车燃油加热器采集系统存在的问题,研制了一种基于RS-485总线的汽车燃油加热器数据采集系统.该系统采用触摸屏输入员工的信息、产品编号以及进行各项参数的设定;随后,采集模块将加热器的各项数据输入到PLC,并采用最小二乘法对温度测量数据进行修正.运行效果表明,系统操作简单、数据准确、适用性强,具有较高的推广价值.%In order to solve the problem that existing in current data acquisition system for automotive fuel oil heater,the data acquisition system based on RS-485 for automotive fuel oil heater has been researched and developed.In this system,the personnel information,product serial number and various parameters are input and setup by using touch screen ; all the data of the heater are input to PLC through acquisition module later; and the measurement data of temperature are corrected with the least squares method.The operation results prove that the system offers easy operation,accurate data and good applicability; it possesses higher promoting value.

  10. Rainmakers: why bad weather means good productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jooa Julia; Gino, Francesca; Staats, Bradley R

    2014-05-01

    People believe that weather conditions influence their everyday work life, but to date, little is known about how weather affects individual productivity. Contrary to conventional wisdom, we predict and find that bad weather increases individual productivity and that it does so by eliminating potential cognitive distractions resulting from good weather. When the weather is bad, individuals appear to focus more on their work than on alternate outdoor activities. We investigate the proposed relationship between worse weather and higher productivity through 4 studies: (a) field data on employees' productivity from a bank in Japan, (b) 2 studies from an online labor market in the United States, and (c) a laboratory experiment. Our findings suggest that worker productivity is higher on bad-, rather than good-, weather days and that cognitive distractions associated with good weather may explain the relationship. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of our research.

  11. Glacial and Periglacial Chemical Weathering on Mars: New Results and New Questions from Field Analog Studies and Mars Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, B.; Scudder, N.; Rutledge, A.; Ackiss, S.

    2016-09-01

    Ice has been a powerful physical weather agent on Mars through geologic time, however, it is less well understood how much chemical weathering ice has caused on Mars, and how the mode of alteration has changed with the climate over time.

  12. Decision Making Models Using Weather Forecast Information

    OpenAIRE

    Hiramatsu, Akio; Huynh, Van-Nam; Nakamori, Yoshiteru

    2007-01-01

    The quality of weather forecast has gradually improved, but weather information such as precipitation forecast is still uncertainty. Meteorologists have studied the use and economic value of weather information, and users have to translate weather information into their most desirable action. To maximize the economic value of users, the decision maker should select the optimum course of action for his company or project, based on an appropriate decision strategy under uncertain situations. In...

  13. Chemical, mineralogical and morphological changes in weathered coal fly ash: a case study of a brine impacted wet ash dump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Chuks P; Nyale, Sammy M; Akinyeye, Richard O; Gitari, Wilson M; Akinyemi, Segun A; Fatoba, Olanrewaju O; Petrik, Leslie F

    2013-11-15

    The mobility of species in coal fly ash (FA), co-disposed with brine using a wet ash handling system, from a coal fired power generating utility has been investigated. The study was conducted in order to establish if the wet ash dump could act as a salt sink. The ash was dumped as a slurry with 5:1 brine/ash ratio and the dam was in operation for 20 years. Weathered FA samples were collected along three cores at a South African power station's wet ash dump by drilling and sampling the ash at 1.5 m depth intervals. A fresh FA sample was collected from the hoppers in the ash collection system at the power station. Characterization of both fresh FA and weathered FA obtained from the drilled cores S1, S2 and S3 was done using X-ray diffraction (XRD) for mineralogy, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) for chemical composition and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology. Analysis of extracted pore water and moisture content determination of the fresh FA and the weathered FA obtained from the drilled cores S1, S2 and S3 was done in order to evaluate the physico-chemical properties of the FA. The XRD analysis revealed changes in mineralogy along cores S1, S2 and S3 in comparison with the fresh FA. The SEM analysis revealed spherical particles with smooth outer surfaces for the fresh FA while the weathered ash samples obtained from cores S1, S2 and S3 consisted of agglomerated, irregular particles appearing to be encrusted, etched and corroded showing that weathering and leaching had occurred in the ash dump. The moisture content (MC) analysis carried out on the fresh FA (1.8%) and the weathered FA obtained from the drilled cores S1 (41.4-73.2%), S2 (30.3-94%) and S3 (21.7-76.2%)indicated that the ash dump was water logged hence creating favourable conditions for leaching of species. The fresh fly ash (n = 3) had a pH of 12.38 ± 0.15, EC value of 4.98 ± 0.03 mS/cm and TDS value of 2.68 ± 0.03 g/L, the pH of the drilled core S1 (n = 45) was 10.04 ± 0

  14. Weather in Your Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannegieter, Sandy; Wirkler, Linda

    Facts and activities related to weather and meteorology are presented in this unit. Separate sections cover the following topics: (1) the water cycle; (2) clouds; (3) the Beaufort Scale for rating the speed and force of wind; (4) the barometer; (5) weather prediction; (6) fall weather in Iowa (sleet, frost, and fog); (7) winter weather in Iowa…

  15. Practical Weathering for Geology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, A. Peter

    1990-01-01

    The design and data management of an activity to study weathering by increasing the rate of mineral dissolution in a microwave oven is described. Data analysis in terms of parabolic and first-order kinetics is discussed. (CW)

  16. Weather Effect on the Solar Adsorption Air-conditioning System using Activated Carbon Fiber/Ethanol as Pair of Refrigeration: A Case Study of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhair M. Abdul Majeed

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study indicates the simulation analysis of the solar adsorption cycle using the activated carbon fiber/ethanol as the pair of refrigeration in Malaysia. The heat source used was evacuated tube collectors. The cycle is used for the purpose of air-conditioning for two temperature levels, where the cooling load can be 7°C. TRNSYS simulation software was used to model the system with the weather data of Malaysia. The results showed that the weather has a high effect on the performance of the cycle. Both the cooling capacity and the COP were calculated in this study.

  17. Metabolic Profiling as Well as Stable Isotope Assisted Metabolic and Proteomic Analysis of RAW 264.7 Macrophages Exposed to Ship Engine Aerosol Emissions: Different Effects of Heavy Fuel Oil and Refined Diesel Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapcariu, Sean C.; Kanashova, Tamara; Dilger, Marco; Diabaté, Silvia; Oeder, Sebastian; Passig, Johannes; Radischat, Christian; Buters, Jeroen; Sippula, Olli; Streibel, Thorsten; Paur, Hanns-Rudolf; Schlager, Christoph; Mülhopt, Sonja; Stengel, Benjamin; Rabe, Rom; Harndorf, Horst; Krebs, Tobias; Karg, Erwin; Gröger, Thomas; Weiss, Carsten; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hiller, Karsten; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution resulting from fossil fuel combustion has been linked to multiple short-term and long term health effects. In a previous study, exposure of lung epithelial cells to engine exhaust from heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF), two of the main fuels used in marine engines, led to an increased regulation of several pathways associated with adverse cellular effects, including pro-inflammatory pathways. In addition, DF exhaust exposure was shown to have a wider response on multiple cellular regulatory levels compared to HFO emissions, suggesting a potentially higher toxicity of DF emissions over HFO. In order to further understand these effects, as well as to validate these findings in another cell line, we investigated macrophages under the same conditions as a more inflammation-relevant model. An air-liquid interface aerosol exposure system was used to provide a more biologically relevant exposure system compared to submerged experiments, with cells exposed to either the complete aerosol (particle and gas phase), or the gas phase only (with particles filtered out). Data from cytotoxicity assays were integrated with metabolomics and proteomics analyses, including stable isotope-assisted metabolomics, in order to uncover pathways affected by combustion aerosol exposure in macrophages. Through this approach, we determined differing phenotypic effects associated with the different components of aerosol. The particle phase of diluted combustion aerosols was found to induce increased cell death in macrophages, while the gas phase was found more to affect the metabolic profile. In particular, a higher cytotoxicity of DF aerosol emission was observed in relation to the HFO aerosol. Furthermore, macrophage exposure to the gas phase of HFO leads to an induction of a pro-inflammatory metabolic and proteomic phenotype. These results validate the effects found in lung epithelial cells, confirming the role of inflammation and cellular stress in the

  18. Metabolic Profiling as Well as Stable Isotope Assisted Metabolic and Proteomic Analysis of RAW 264.7 Macrophages Exposed to Ship Engine Aerosol Emissions: Different Effects of Heavy Fuel Oil and Refined Diesel Fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapcariu, Sean C; Kanashova, Tamara; Dilger, Marco; Diabaté, Silvia; Oeder, Sebastian; Passig, Johannes; Radischat, Christian; Buters, Jeroen; Sippula, Olli; Streibel, Thorsten; Paur, Hanns-Rudolf; Schlager, Christoph; Mülhopt, Sonja; Stengel, Benjamin; Rabe, Rom; Harndorf, Horst; Krebs, Tobias; Karg, Erwin; Gröger, Thomas; Weiss, Carsten; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hiller, Karsten; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution resulting from fossil fuel combustion has been linked to multiple short-term and long term health effects. In a previous study, exposure of lung epithelial cells to engine exhaust from heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF), two of the main fuels used in marine engines, led to an increased regulation of several pathways associated with adverse cellular effects, including pro-inflammatory pathways. In addition, DF exhaust exposure was shown to have a wider response on multiple cellular regulatory levels compared to HFO emissions, suggesting a potentially higher toxicity of DF emissions over HFO. In order to further understand these effects, as well as to validate these findings in another cell line, we investigated macrophages under the same conditions as a more inflammation-relevant model. An air-liquid interface aerosol exposure system was used to provide a more biologically relevant exposure system compared to submerged experiments, with cells exposed to either the complete aerosol (particle and gas phase), or the gas phase only (with particles filtered out). Data from cytotoxicity assays were integrated with metabolomics and proteomics analyses, including stable isotope-assisted metabolomics, in order to uncover pathways affected by combustion aerosol exposure in macrophages. Through this approach, we determined differing phenotypic effects associated with the different components of aerosol. The particle phase of diluted combustion aerosols was found to induce increased cell death in macrophages, while the gas phase was found more to affect the metabolic profile. In particular, a higher cytotoxicity of DF aerosol emission was observed in relation to the HFO aerosol. Furthermore, macrophage exposure to the gas phase of HFO leads to an induction of a pro-inflammatory metabolic and proteomic phenotype. These results validate the effects found in lung epithelial cells, confirming the role of inflammation and cellular stress in the

  19. Metabolic Profiling as Well as Stable Isotope Assisted Metabolic and Proteomic Analysis of RAW 264.7 Macrophages Exposed to Ship Engine Aerosol Emissions: Different Effects of Heavy Fuel Oil and Refined Diesel Fuel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Sapcariu

    Full Text Available Exposure to air pollution resulting from fossil fuel combustion has been linked to multiple short-term and long term health effects. In a previous study, exposure of lung epithelial cells to engine exhaust from heavy fuel oil (HFO and diesel fuel (DF, two of the main fuels used in marine engines, led to an increased regulation of several pathways associated with adverse cellular effects, including pro-inflammatory pathways. In addition, DF exhaust exposure was shown to have a wider response on multiple cellular regulatory levels compared to HFO emissions, suggesting a potentially higher toxicity of DF emissions over HFO. In order to further understand these effects, as well as to validate these findings in another cell line, we investigated macrophages under the same conditions as a more inflammation-relevant model. An air-liquid interface aerosol exposure system was used to provide a more biologically relevant exposure system compared to submerged experiments, with cells exposed to either the complete aerosol (particle and gas phase, or the gas phase only (with particles filtered out. Data from cytotoxicity assays were integrated with metabolomics and proteomics analyses, including stable isotope-assisted metabolomics, in order to uncover pathways affected by combustion aerosol exposure in macrophages. Through this approach, we determined differing phenotypic effects associated with the different components of aerosol. The particle phase of diluted combustion aerosols was found to induce increased cell death in macrophages, while the gas phase was found more to affect the metabolic profile. In particular, a higher cytotoxicity of DF aerosol emission was observed in relation to the HFO aerosol. Furthermore, macrophage exposure to the gas phase of HFO leads to an induction of a pro-inflammatory metabolic and proteomic phenotype. These results validate the effects found in lung epithelial cells, confirming the role of inflammation and cellular

  20. The impact of weather conditions on Culex pipiens and Culex restuans (Diptera: Culicidae) abundance: a case study in Peel Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiafeng; Ogden, Nick H; Zhu, Huaiping

    2011-03-01

    Mosquito populations are sensitive to long-term variations in climate and short-term variations in weather. Mosquito abundance is a key determinant of outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases, such as West Nile virus (WNV). In this work, the short-term impact of weather conditions (temperature and precipitation) on Culex pipiens L.-Culex restuans Theobald mosquito abundance in Peel Region, Ontario, Canada, was investigated using the 2002-2009 mosquito data collected from the WNV surveillance program managed by Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and a gamma-generalized linear model. There was a clear association between weather conditions (temperature and precipitation) and mosquito abundance, which allowed the definition of threshold criteria for temperature and precipitation conditions for mosquito population growth. A predictive statistical model for mosquito population based on weather conditions was calibrated using real weather and mosquito surveillance data, and validated using a subset of surveillance data. Results showed that WNV vector abundance on any one day could be predicted with reasonable accuracy from relationships with mean degree-days >9 degrees C over the 11 preceding days, and precipitation 35 d previously. This finding provides optimism for the development of weather-generated forecasting for WNV risk that could be used in decision support systems for interventions such as mosquito control.

  1. Areosynchronous weather imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschell, Jeffery J.; Lock, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Mars is characterized by rapidly changing, poorly understood weather that is a concern for future human missions. Future Areosynchronous Mars Orbit (AMO) communication satellites offer possible platforms for Mars weather imagers similar to the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) weather imagers that have been observing Earth since 1966. This paper describes an AReosynchronous Environmental Suite (ARES) that includes two imagers: one with two emissive infrared bands (10.8 μm and 12.0 μm) at 4 km resolution and the other with three VNIR bands (500 nm, 700 nm, 900 nm) at 1 km resolution. ARES stares at Mars and provides full disk coverage as fast as every 40 sec in the VNIR bands and every 2 min in the emissive bands with good sensitivity (SNR 200 in the VNIR for typical radiances and NEDT 0.2K at 180 K scene temperature in the emissive infrared). ARES size, mass, power and data rate characteristics are compatible with expectations for hosted payloads onboard future AMO communication satellites. Nevertheless, more work is needed to optimize ARES for future missions, especially in terms of trades between data rate, full disk coverage rate, sensitivity, number of spectral bands and spatial resolution and in study of approaches for maintaining accurate line of sight knowledge during data collection.

  2. Developments in the technology for the combustion of water emulsions in Mexican fuel oil; Desarrollos en la tecnologia para la combustion de emulsiones agua en combustoleo mexicano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diego, Antonio Marin; Martinez Flores, Marco A.; Tamayo Flores, Gustavo; Alarcon Quiroz, Ernesto; Melendez Cervantes, Carlos [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The residual petroleum oil (fuel oil) is the most used fuel in boilers of electrical and industrial power stations. Nevertheless, the use of this fuel can generate diverse problems such as the elevated particle emissions, that affect the boiler efficiency, darken the visibility by the smoke that leaves the chimneys and is emitted to the Environment. In addition, sulfur trioxide is produced, which reacts with the water present in the combustion gases, forming sulfuric acid that, when emitted, also affects the visibility of the plume and can be condensed, originating corrosion and increased accumulation of deposits in the boilers. The experimental research was made in a comparative base, between combustion tests of fuel oil, with emulsions where the water concentration and the size of the drops of this one was varied. A diagram of the supply of fuel and preparation of emulsions in a pilot furnace is shown. The article contains graphs of the effect of the water concentration of the emulsions in the particulate emission. The article contains figures of the cenospheres produced by the fuel oil combustion (500 x) and the ones produced by the combustion with 5% of water (500 x). Also shows graphs of the effect of the water drop size of emulsions in the particulate emission, of the reduction of the sulfur trioxide with soluble magnesium products in the water of emulsions, and of the free particle acidity with neutralizers of water emulsions of soluble magnesium. [Spanish] El aceite residual de petroleo (combustoleo) es el combustible mas utilizado en calderas de centrales electricas e industriales. Sin embargo, el uso de este combustible puede generar diverso problemas como las emisiones elevadas de particulas, que afectan la eficiencia de una caldera, obscurecen la visibilidad pero el humo que sale de las chimeneas y se emiten al medio ambiente. Ademas se produce trioxido de azufre, el cual reacciona con el vapor de agua presente en los gases de combustion, formado acido

  3. Effects of Weathering at Waste Rock Dump on Water Quality Inside the Mine Wastes; A Case Study in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, G.; Cheong, Y.; Park, H.; Ji, S.; Lee, H.

    2008-05-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the route of acid rock drainage production and some of the important factors at the abandoned Geo-pung copper mine in Okcheon, Korea. In this research area, planting and remediation have been carried out to prevent environmental pollution, but these effects turned out to be a failure and that acid rock drainage is observed around waste rock dump and planted vegetation is dying. Currently, the slope of mine waste rock dump in the study site is about 40°. It is composed of particles with a variety of shapes, with the surface exposure to atmosphere being transformed to oxide minerals due to weathering. Since groundwater level underneath the mine wastes is directly related to rainfall, a comparative evaluation of weather records and groundwater level data obtained using on-site measuring device (CTD diver) would allow estimation of locational media-specific pattern of rainfall effect in term of infiltration flux and time of threshold impact on groundwater. Sampling and analysis of there borehole water were conducted in July and September, 2007. It was found that all of the borehole water had highly variable levels of Fe (0.4-588 mg/l), Al (8.2-41.9 mg/l), Cu (6.0-32.2 mg/l), Zn (22.2-226.7 mg/l) and other elements. Also, in general, pH of the borehole waters decreased while electric conducivity measured. Such a high variance in the water quality among different borehole water suggests that geochemical environment inside the mine wastes is largely dependent on the local variation in rainfall infiltration of waste rock dump and underneath groundwater level. Vadose zone which has vertical variation of 2-4 m is directly impacted by amount of rainfall and maintains oxidizing condition due to diffusion of oxygen carred by rainfall. Therefore, sulfide minerals within in the zone continued to be oxidized, producing acid rock drainage. To prevent production of acid rock drainage of mine waste, it is necessary to control infiltration of

  4. Great Historical Events That Were Significantly Affected by the Weather: Part 8, Germany's War on the Soviet Union, 1941-45. I. Long-range Weather Forecasts for 1941-42 and Climatological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, J.; Flohn, H.

    1987-06-01

    A brief account is given of Baur's long-range weather forecast prepared in the autumn of 1941 for the 1941-42 winter in Eastern Europe. Baur's forecast called for a normal' or mild winter but the winter turned out to be one of the most severe winters on record. The cold, the icy winds and blizzards gravely hit the German armies and coincided with the first major Soviet counteroffensive of the war. A Soviet weather forecast for January 1942, also called for a mild month.A review of the climatological studies prepared for the war indicates that the occurrence of mud periods of considerable intensity in autumn was not considered. The autumn 1941 mud period immobilized most of the German armies for a month and caused the attempted final German assault on Moscow to take place in an early and severe winter.Hitter would not tolerate the mention of winter and still less the mention of the retreat of Napoleon's Grande Armée from Russia.The support given by Soviet meteorologists and hydrologists to the Red Army is sketched. For the 1941-42 winter the more-important short- to medium-range forecasts included a forecast for 7 November (anniversary of the October Revolution) at Moscow and a forecast for the start of Zhukov's counteroffensive in the Battle of Moscow in December 1941.

  5. Enhancing the Awareness of the Interaction of the Space Weather and Public: Some Case Studies in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulunay, Y.; Tulunay, E.; Kocabas, Z.; Altuntas, E.; Yapici, T.; Senalp, E. T.; Hippler, R.

    2009-04-01

    Space Weather has important effects on many systems and peripherals that human interacts with. However, most of the people are not aware of those interactions. During the FP6 SWEETS, COST 724 and the ‘I love my Sun' activities it was aimed to create basis to bring together academicians from universities, experts from industry, scientific institutes, and the public, especially the school children of age 7-11, in order to enhance the awareness of space weather effects and to discuss appropriate countermeasures by different education and promotion methods including non-technical ones. This work mentions the activities performed in Turkey within the framework. Since 1990, a small group at METU has been developing data driven models in order to forecast some critical system parameters related with the near-Earth space processes. With the background on the subject the group feels responsible to organise activities in Turkey to inform public on enhancing the awareness of space weather effects. In order to inform and educate public on their interaction with the Space Weather, distinct social activities which take quick and strong attention were organised. Those include art shows and workshops, quizes, movies and entertainments, special programs for school children of age 7-11 under the ‘I love my Sun' activities, press releases, audio-visual media including webpages [Tulunay, 2007]. The impact of the activities can be evaluated considering the before and after activity record materials of the participants. For instance, under the ‘I love my Sun' activities, the school children drew pictures related with Sun before and after the informative programs. The performance of reaching the school children on the subject is very promising. Sub-activities conducted under the action are: 1. Space Weather Dance Show "Sonnensturm" 2. Web Quiz all over Europe: In Türkiye 3. Space Weather / Sun / Heliospheric Public Science Festivals in 27 Countries: In Türkiye 4. Space Weather on

  6. 国内航运企业燃油成本管控现状及对策分析%The Managing Status Quo and Countermeasures of Fuel Oil Cost about Domestic Shipping Companies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁帅

    2012-01-01

    The essay starts with the basic theories of logistic project management. By means of evidence-based research and analysis combined with the trend of domestic and foreign marine fuel oil market situation and the properties of shipping and logistics industries, research and investigation are made on the status quo of marine fuel oil management of one large-scale container liner so as to decide on the appropriate marine filel oil cost management strategy for domestic shipping companies.%从物流工程管理的基本理论出发,结合国内外燃油市场的形势和航运业的特点,时国内某大型集装箱航运公司燃油成本管控现状进行分析,并提出了适合国内航运企业的燃油成本管控策略。

  7. Reducing the prediction uncertainties of high-impact weather and climate events: An overview of studies at LASG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wansuo; Feng, Rong

    2017-02-01

    This paper summarizes recent progress at the State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in studies on targeted observations, data assimilation, and ensemble prediction, which are three effective strategies to reduce the prediction uncertainties and improve the forecast skill of weather and climate events. Considering the limitations of traditional targeted observation approaches, LASG researchers have developed a conditional nonlinear optimal perturbation-based targeted observation strategy to optimize the design of the observing network. This strategy has been employed to identify sensitive areas for targeted observations of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, Indian Ocean dipole, and tropical cyclones, and has been demonstrated to be effective in improving the forecast skill of these events. To assimilate the targeted observations into the initial state of a numerical model, a dimension-reducedprojection- based four-dimensional variational data assimilation (DRP-4DVar) approach has been proposed and is used operationally to supply accurate initial conditions in numerical forecasts. The performance of DRP-4DVar is good, and its computational cost is much lower than the standard 4DVar approach. Besides, ensemble prediction, which is a practical approach to generate probabilistic forecasts of the future state of a particular system, can be used to reduce the prediction uncertainties of single forecasts by taking the ensemble mean of forecast members. In this field, LASG researchers have proposed an ensemble forecast method that uses nonlinear local Lyapunov vectors (NLLVs) to yield ensemble initial perturbations. Its application in simple models has shown that NLLVs are more useful than bred vectors and singular vectors in improving the skill of the ensemble forecast. Therefore, NLLVs represent a candidate for possible development as an

  8. Study in the Area of Satellite Meteorology. Volume 1. Mesoscale Weather Analysis and Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-01

    and E. J. Wiegman , "Study of Time-Lapse Processing for Dynamic Hydrologie Conditions," Final Report, NASA Contract NAS5-21841...J. Wiegman , R. G. Hadfield, and W. E. Evans, "Electronic System for Utilization of Satellite Cloud Pictures, " Bull. Amer...Photographs," S~mp Research Paper 71, University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill., 25 pp. (1968). 21. S. M. Serebreny, E. J. Wiegman , R. G. Hadfield, and W. E

  9. Land Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  10. Project Weather and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Pal J. Kirkeby

    2000-01-01

    Introduces Project Weather and Water with the goal of developing and testing ideas of how to implement weather topics and water physics in an integrated way. Discusses teacher preparation, implementation, and evaluation of this project. (ASK)

  11. Pilot Weather Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviation weather reports relayed from pilots to FAA air traffic controllers or National Weather Service personnel. Elements include sky cover, turbulence, wind...

  12. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  13. Surface Weather Observing Manuals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Manuals and instructions for taking weather observations. Includes the annual Weather Bureau 'Instructions for Preparing Meteorological Forms...' and early airways...

  14. Daily Weather Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These daily weather records were compiled from a subset of stations in the Global Historical Climatological Network (GHCN)-Daily dataset. A weather record is...

  15. Winter Weather Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severe winter weather can lead to health and safety challenges. You may have to cope with Cold related health problems, including ... there are no guarantees of safety during winter weather emergencies, you can take actions to protect yourself. ...

  16. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  17. Internet Weather Source

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Weather Service (NWS) National Telecommunications Gateway provides weather, hydrologic, and climate forecasts and warnings for the United States, its...

  18. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  19. PARTICLE CONCENTRATIONS IN A CHURCH DURING DIFFERENT WEATHER CONDITIONS – A CASE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard Polednik; Aleksandra Polednik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report particle number (PN) and particle mass (PM) concentration changes in the church during three 60-minute Masses held on a cloudy, sunny and rainy day. At each Mass with a similar number of participants the same number of candles was lit and incense was burned. The highest average PN1 and PM1 concentrations of submicrometer particles which respectively amounted to 23.9 pt/cm3 and 241.1 µg/m3 were obtained for the Mass held on a rainy day. During that Mass t...

  20. A Study on Snowstorm Weather in Coastal Area of Western Antarctic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Yaorong; Xue Zhenhe; Xu Cong

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, based on the observational data of 1995 in the Chinese Antarctic Great Wall Station the snowstorm is studied synoptically. It is found that there are two kinds of snowstorms with different physical characteristics and that the happening of snowstorm is always accompanied by a near-ground level inversion layer. The function of the inversion layer is analyzed, too. It is indicated that the strong ESE-wind type snowstorm is mainly caused by katabatic wind and gradient wind together. This idea is new and different from the general concept that there is no katabatic wind in the western Antarctic area.

  1. Classification of weather patterns to study the influence of meteorological characteristics on PM2.5 concentrations in Yunlin County, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia-Hua; Cheng, Fang-Yi

    2016-11-01

    Yunlin County is located in the central part of western Taiwan with major emissions from the Mailiao industrial park, the Taichung Power Plants and heavy traffic. In order to understand the influence of meteorological conditions on PM2.5 concentrations in Yunlin County, we applied a two-stage cluster analysis method using the daily averaged surface winds from four air quality monitoring stations in Yunlin County to classify the weather pattern. The study period includes 1095 days from Jan 2013 to December 2015. The classification results show that the low PM2.5 concentration occurs when the synoptic weather in Taiwan is affected by the strong southwesterly monsoonal flow. The high PM2.5 concentration occurs when Taiwan is under the influence of weak synoptic weather conditions and continental high-pressure peripheral circulation. A high PM2.5 event was studied and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) meteorological model was performed. The result indicated that due to being blocked by the Central Mountain Range, Yunlin County, which is situated on the leeside of the mountains, exhibits low wind speed and strong subsidence behavior that favors PM2.5 accumulation.

  2. The power of weather

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Huurman; Francesco Ravazzolo; Chen Zhou

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the predictive power of weather for electricity prices in day ahead markets in real time. We find that next-day weather forecasts improve the forecast accuracy of Scandinavian day-ahead electricity prices substantially in terms of point forecasts, suggesting that weather forecasts can price the weather premium. This improvement strengthens the confidence in the forecasting model, which results in high center-mass predictive densities. In density forecast, such a predictive...

  3. A Study of the Relationship between Weather Variables and Electric Power Demand inside a Smart Grid/Smart World Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chinarro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges of today’s society is the need to fulfill at the same time the two sides of the dichotomy between the growing energy demand and the need to look after the environment. Smart Grids are one of the answers: intelligent energy grids which retrieve data about the environment through extensive sensor networks and react accordingly to optimize resource consumption. In order to do this, the Smart Grids need to understand the existing relationship between energy demand and a set of relevant climatic variables. All smart “systems” (buildings, cities, homes, consumers, etc. have the potential to employ their intelligence for self-adaptation to climate conditions. After introducing the Smart World, a global framework for the collaboration of these smart systems, this paper presents the relationship found at experimental level between a range of relevant weather variables and electric power demand patterns, presenting a case study using an agent-based system, and emphasizing the need to consider this relationship in certain Smart World (and specifically Smart Grid and microgrid applications.

  4. Surficial phase-identification and structural profiles from weathered natural pyrites: A grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Yuanfeng [State Key Laboratory of Mineral Deposits Research, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Earth Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)], E-mail: caiyf@nju.edu.cn; Pan, Yuguan [State Key Laboratory of Mineral Deposits Research, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xue Jiyue; Su Guizhen [Department of Earth Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2009-01-15

    Five pyrites with original crystal face (1 0 0) with different tarnish colours were selected from one pyrite-bearing ore sample from Tongling multi-metal deposit, Anhui, China. They are henna mottled with dark violet, yellow mottled with red, yellow, blue mottled with violet and reddish brown in surface colour. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffractometry (GIXRD) was used to study the phases formed or precipitated on the surface of pyrite (1 0 0) face during chemical weathering. By changing the incident angle, GIXRD can provide information on the changes in the mineral phases from the surface as a function of depth. Products formed or precipitated on the surface of pyrite (1 0 0) face are one or several sulfur or iron-bearing hydrated oxides and include gypsum, jalpaite, goethite, goldichite. The sulfur-bearing minerals present on the surface imply the oxidation of sulfur to sulfate, or the reduction of sulfur to sulfide. By analyzing a series of GIXRD patterns obtained at different angles of incidence for a single pyrite, the mineral assemblage differs from the surface into the body of the crystal. Taking the reddish brown sample as an example, four diffraction profiles at 2.575, 2.2105, 1.9118 and 1.613 A are present in the pattern of a 2{sup o} incident angle experiment whereas they cannot be found at a GIXRD angle smaller than 0.6{sup o}.

  5. A Study of the Relationship between Weather Variables and Electric Power Demand inside a Smart Grid/Smart World Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Luis; Baladrón, Carlos; Aguiar, Javier M.; Calavia, Lorena; Carro, Belén; Sánchez-Esguevillas, Antonio; Cook, Diane J.; Chinarro, David; Gómez, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    One of the main challenges of today's society is the need to fulfill at the same time the two sides of the dichotomy between the growing energy demand and the need to look after the environment. Smart Grids are one of the answers: intelligent energy grids which retrieve data about the environment through extensive sensor networks and react accordingly to optimize resource consumption. In order to do this, the Smart Grids need to understand the existing relationship between energy demand and a set of relevant climatic variables. All smart “systems” (buildings, cities, homes, consumers, etc.) have the potential to employ their intelligence for self-adaptation to climate conditions. After introducing the Smart World, a global framework for the collaboration of these smart systems, this paper presents the relationship found at experimental level between a range of relevant weather variables and electric power demand patterns, presenting a case study using an agent-based system, and emphasizing the need to consider this relationship in certain Smart World (and specifically Smart Grid and microgrid) applications.

  6. Respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis, weather conditions and air pollution in an Italian urban area: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenna, Raffaella; Evangelisti, Melania; Frassanito, Antonella; Scagnolari, Carolina; Pierangeli, Alessandra; Antonelli, Guido; Nicolai, Ambra; Arima, Serena; Moretti, Corrado; Papoff, Paola; Villa, Maria Pia; Midulla, Fabio

    2017-10-01

    In this study we sought to evaluate the association between viral bronchiolitis, weather conditions, and air pollution in an urban area in Italy. We included infants hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis from 2004 to 2014. All infants underwent a nasal washing for virus detection. A regional agency network collected meteorological data (mean temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity) and the following air pollutants: sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, benzene and suspended particulate matter measuring less than 10µm (PM10) and less than 2.5µm (PM2.5) in aerodynamic diameter. We obtained mean weekly concentration data for the day of admission, from the urban background monitoring sites nearest to each child's home address. Overdispersed Poisson regression model was fitted and adjusted for seasonality of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, to evaluate the impact of individual characteristics and environmental factors on the probability of a being positive RSV. Of the 723 nasal washings from the infants enrolled, 266 (68%) contained RSV, 63 (16.1%) rhinovirus, 26 (6.6%) human bocavirus, 20 (5.1%) human metapneumovirus, and 16 (2.2%) other viruses. The number of RSV-positive infants correlated negatively with temperature (p bronchiolitis epidemics in an Italian urban area. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Hessian forest ecosystem study. Forest report 2005. Weather, oaks; Waldoekosystemstudie Hessen. Waldzustandsbericht 2005. Witterung, Eiche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paar, U.; Gawehn, P.; Scheler, B.; Schmidt, M.; Schoenfelder, E.; Eichhorn, J. (comps.) [Hessen-Forst FIV - Forsteinrichtung, Information, Versuchswesen, Hannoversch Muenden (Germany). Fachgebiet fuer Waldoekosystemstudie Hessen/Forsthydrologie

    2005-07-01

    The Hessian Forest Ecosystem Study aims to document and explore changes of forest ecosystems as a result of emissions and climatic influences. Thus, it contributes importantly to a multifunctional and sustainable forest management. Crown condition assessment results show only slight differences compared to the previous year (over all defoliation 2004: 25%, 2005: 26%). Vitality of oak proved a significant increase of defoliation, closely correlated to insect damage in 2005. Crown condition of oak is worse in the Hessian Rhein-Main area compared to the whole country. In contradiction to other species beech shows some regeneration in 2005. Deposition of sulfur and acid components has been on a low level. A high deposition of nitrogen compounds needs further reduction. Long term monitoring of forest ecosystems allows interpretation of climate based effects on forests. (orig.)

  8. Influence of the environment on weathering of limestone: study through mercury porosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez Rojas, M. I.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The physic-chemical processes of decay in building materials and, particularly those affecting petreum materials, obey to different causes as composition, morphology, texture, the orientation of the material in the building and, mainly, its interaction with the environment. Because of their chemical composition, limestone materials may undergo alterations when they are in contact with aggressive media. Rain water or fog contain gases that may dissolve the stone provoking crusts due to salts precipitation. This work is based in the study of the decay processes of a limestone material from a building placed at Madrid. Mercury porosimetry technique (among others is used in this study.

    Los procesos físico-químicos de degradación de los materiales de construcción en general, y de los materiales pétreos en particular, obedecen a distintas causas, como son: composición, morfología, textura, orientación en el edificio, y principalmente de la interacción con el medioambiente. Los materiales calizos, por su composición química, pueden sufrir alteraciones al entrar en contacto con un medio agresivo, como puede ser el agua de lluvia o niebla contaminada con gases, que actúan disolviendo la roca y provocando costras por precipitación de sales. Este trabajo tiene como base el estudio de un material calizo, procedente de un edificio situado en una zona céntrica de Madrid, utilizando porosimetría de mercurio, entre otras técnicas instrumentales.

  9. Weather Fundamentals: Meteorology. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) looks at how meteorologists gather and interpret current weather data collected from sources…

  10. Cold-Weather Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cold-Weather Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold-Weather Sports A A A What's in this article? ... Equipment Ahh, winter! Shorter days. Frigid temperatures. Foul weather. What better time to be outdoors? Winter sports ...

  11. PARTICLE CONCENTRATIONS IN A CHURCH DURING DIFFERENT WEATHER CONDITIONS – A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Polednik

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to report particle number (PN and particle mass (PM concentration changes in the church during three 60-minute Masses held on a cloudy, sunny and rainy day. At each Mass with a similar number of participants the same number of candles was lit and incense was burned. The highest average PN1 and PM1 concentrations of submicrometer particles which respectively amounted to 23.9 pt/cm3 and 241.1 µg/m3 were obtained for the Mass held on a rainy day. During that Mass the maximum PN1 and PM1 concentrations (amounting to 59.4×103 pt/cm3 and 632 µg/m3 were respectively about 15 and 39 times higher than the church background levels. The greatest number of submicrometer particles (about 18.5×109 was inhaled by an average participant of the Mass held on a sunny day and it was approximately 7 times higher than the number that would have been inhaled at the same time outdoors. The greatest mass of such particles (about 195.4 µg was inhaled by an average participant of the Mass held on a rainy day and it was approximately 8 times higher than the mass of particles that would have been inhaled outdoors during the same time.

  12. Improving the health forecasting alert system for cold weather and heat-waves in England: a case-study approach using temperature-mortality relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masato, Giacomo; Cavany, Sean; Charlton-Perez, Andrew; Dacre, Helen; Bone, Angie; Carmicheal, Katie; Murray, Virginia; Danker, Rutger; Neal, Rob; Sarran, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    The health forecasting alert system for cold weather and heatwaves currently in use in the Cold Weather and Heatwave plans for England is based on 5 alert levels, with levels 2 and 3 dependent on a forecast or actual single temperature action trigger. Epidemiological evidence indicates that for both heat and cold, the impact on human health is gradual, with worsening impact for more extreme temperatures. The 60% risk of heat and cold forecasts used by the alerts is a rather crude probabilistic measure, which could be substantially improved thanks to the state-of-the-art forecast techniques. In this study a prototype of a new health forecasting alert system is developed, which is aligned to the approach used in the Met Office's (MO) National Severe Weather Warning Service (NSWWS). This is in order to improve information available to responders in the health and social care system by linking temperatures more directly to risks of mortality, and developing a system more coherent with other weather alerts. The prototype is compared to the current system in the Cold Weather and Heatwave plans via a case-study approach to verify its potential advantages and shortcomings. The prototype health forecasting alert system introduces an "impact vs likelihood matrix" for the health impacts of hot and cold temperatures which is similar to those used operationally for other weather hazards as part of the NSWWS. The impact axis of this matrix is based on existing epidemiological evidence, which shows an increasing relative risk of death at extremes of outdoor temperature beyond a threshold which can be identified epidemiologically. The likelihood axis is based on a probability measure associated with the temperature forecast. The new method is tested for two case studies (one during summer 2013, one during winter 2013), and compared to the performance of the current alert system. The prototype shows some clear improvements over the current alert system. It allows for a much greater

  13. The use of weather radars to estimate hail damage to automobiles: an exploratory study in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Roman; Schiesser, Hans-Heinrich; Knepper, Ingeborg

    As the first of its kind, this study presents damage functions between two damage variables of hail-damaged automobiles and radar-derived hail kinetic energy for a total of 12 severe hailstorms that have occurred over the Swiss Mittelland (1992-1998). Hail kinetic energy is calculated from C-band Doppler radar CAPPIs at low storm level (1.5 km MSL) and is integrated per radar element ( EKINPIX) for entire hail cells. Hail damage claim data were available per Swiss community on a daily basis and transformed (Delaunay triangulation) along with EKINPIX to a regular 3×3 km grid, thereafter allowing cross-correlation between the variables. The results show nonlinear relationships between EKINPIX and both loss ratios and mean damages per hail-damaged car, differing between high hail season storms (15 June-15 August) and storms that occurred during the low season (before and after). A weighted logistic function provides correlation coefficients between EKINPIX and loss ratios of 0.71 (0.79) for high (low) season storms and 0.76 (0.40) for mean damages of high (low) season hailstorms. Maximally possible loss ratios reach 60% (40%) in high (low) season storms with maximum mean damages of CHF 6000 (CHF 3000) and average values around CHF 3100 (CHF 2100). Seasonal differences in hailfall intensities are discussed in terms of atmospheric conditions favoring convective activity and the likelihood of higher numbers of large hailstones (>20 mm in diameter) that induce more severe damage to cars during the high storm season. The results suggest that radar-derived hail kinetic energy could be used by insurance companies in the future to (1) assess hail damage to cars immediately after a storm has passed over a radar observation area and (2) to estimate potential maximal hail losses to car portfolios for parts of central Europe.

  14. Investigating SO3 Formation from the Combustion of Heavy Fuel Oil in a Four-Stroke Medium Speed Test Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Lage; Schramm, Jesper; Rabe, Rom

    2013-01-01

    The validation of detailed models, in terms of SO3 formation in large marine engines operating on sulfur-containing heavy fuel oils (HFOs), relies on experimental work. The requisite is addressed in the present work, where SO3 is measured in the exhaust gas of an 80 kW medium-speed single......-cylinder HFO-fuelled test engine. SO3 formation is triggered by running the engine at altered operational conditions and speeds within 1050−1500 rpm. The test engine does not represent a large low-speed marine engine; however, the nature of high-temperature SO3 formation may well be explored with the current...... conversion and indirect detection via light absorption in a photometer. Present results show that SO3 formation is favored by elevated pressure histories, premixed combustion, and reduced speeds. The fraction of fuel sulfur converted to SO3 is measured to be on the order of 0.5%−2.4%, corresponding to 4...

  15. Comparación ambiental de la generación de energía eléctrica a partir del bagazo y fuel oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlan Rodríguez-Pérez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La presente investigación, tiene como objetivo realizar una comparación sobre la base del impacto ambiental en la generación de electricidad, entre la generación a partir de la industria azucarera, y correspondiente a partir de fuel oil en centrales termoeléctricas. En el desarrollo del trabajo se utilizan técnicas de recopilación de información como: entrevistas personales, revisión bibliográfica, tormenta de ideas y el trabajo en equipo, que sirven de apoyo para la utilización de mapas de proceso y diagrama de flujo, para complementar la aplicación del Análisis del Ciclo de Vida. Se toma como referencia la metodología de Análisis de Ciclo de Vida (ACV que aparece en la serie de normas NC ISO 14040. A partir del desarrollo de las fases del procedimiento aplicado: definición de alcances y objetivos, análisis de inventario, evaluación de impacto ambiental y análisis de mejora; se logran identificar y cuantificar los principales impactos que se generan en la producción de electricidad a partir de bagazo y fuel, demostrando la factibilidad ambiental de la generación a partir de biomasa.

  16. La pulvérisation du fuel oïl lourd par des combustibles gazeux Using Gaseous Fuels to Spray Heavy Fuel Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladurelli A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Pour faciliter l'inflammation du fuel lourd on procède à sa pulvérisation au droit du brûleur. Deux méthodes sont généralement employées à cet effet : - La pulvérisation mécanique qui consiste à faire passer le liquide sous forte pression au travers d'orifices calibrés de petit diamètre. - La pulvérisation pneumatique qui consiste à utiliser la détente d'un fluide auxiliaire préalablement comprimé. Les fluides couramment utilisés pour cela sont l'air comprimé et la vapeur d'eau ; toutefois tous les combustibles gazeux, notamment le gaz naturel et les gaz de raffinerie, peuvent également servir de fluide de pulvérisation quand ils sont disponibles sous pression. The igniting of heavy fuel oil is facilitated by spraying it at the burner. Two methods are used as a rule: - Pressure atomization, consisting in causing the liquid to pass at high pressure through calibrated small-diameter orifices. - Twin-fluid atomization, which consists in using the expansion of a previously compressed auxiliary fluid. The fluids commonly used for the purpose are compressed air and steam. However, any gaseous fuel, particularly natural gas and the refinery gases, can be used as the spraying fluid provided it is available under pressure.

  17. 基于GIS的汽车燃油油量监测系统设计%Design of Vehicle Fuel Oil Monitoring System Based on GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈娣丽; 李新华; 陆程; 郭侠; 明五一

    2012-01-01

    采用GIS、GPRS、嵌入式、数据库等技术,设计了基于GIS的汽车燃油油量监测系统.该系统以嵌入式单片机为基础,可以对车辆的位置、油箱油量、瞬时油耗等进行实时监测、显示和上传到监控中心.此外系统采用模块化设计方法,实现了各个车载设备与监控中心的松散耦合,既具有高度集成性又可灵活搭配.该系统设计简单,可靠性好,易于安装,经济实用.%Using GIS (Geography Information System), GPS (Global Position System), embedded, database technology, GIS-based vehicle fuel oil monitoring system was designed. The system was based on the embedded microcontroller, with which the location of the vehicle, fuel tank, instantaneous fuel consumption and others could be monitored, displayed and uploaded to the monitoring center in real-time. In addition the system was designed modular in methods, this enabled that each vehicle terminal and monitoring center could be loosely coupled, highly integrated and flexibly mixed. The system is designed to be simple, reliable, easy to install, economical and practical.

  18. Stochastic Optimization of Supply Chain Risk Measures –a Methodology for Improving Supply Security of Subsidized Fuel Oil in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adinda Yuanita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo simulation-based methods for stochastic optimization of risk measures is required to solve complex problems in supply security of subsidized fuel oil in Indonesia. In order to overcome constraints in distribution of subsidized fuel in Indonesia, which has the fourth largest population in the world—more than 250,000,000 people with 66.5% of productive population, and has more than 17,000 islands with its population centered around the nation's capital only—it is necessary to have a measurable and integrated risk analysis with monitoring system for the purpose of supply security of subsidized fuel. In consideration of this complex issue, uncertainty and probability heavily affected this research. Therefore, this research did the Monte Carlo sampling-based stochastic simulation optimization with the state-of-the-art "FIRST" parameter combined with the Sensitivity Analysis to determine the priority of integrated risk mitigation handling so that the implication of the new model design from this research may give faster risk mitigation time. The results of the research identified innovative ideas of risk based audit on supply chain risk management and new FIRST (Fairness, Independence, Reliable, Sustainable, Transparent parameters on risk measures. In addition to that, the integration of risk analysis confirmed the innovative level of priority on sensitivity analysis. Moreover, the findings showed that the new risk mitigation time was 60% faster than the original risk mitigation time.

  19. Wavelet Study of Meteorological Data Collected by Arduino-Weather Station: Impact on Solar Energy Collection Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Caccamo Maria Teresa; Calabró Emanuele; Cannuli Antonio; Magazù Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Meteorological data collected by an automated LSI Lastem weather station connected with an Arduino device for remote acquisition are reported and discussed. Weather station, located at 38° 15’ 35.10’’ N latitude and 15° 35’ 58.86’’ E longitude, registered data which were analysed by wavelet transform to obtain time-frequency characterization of the signals. Such an approach allowed to highlight the correlation existing among the registered meteorological data. The results show a positive corr...

  20. The importance of terrestrial weathering for climate system modelling on extended timescales: a study with the UVic ESCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Marc-Olivier; Matthews, Damon; Mysak, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    The chemical erosion of carbonate and silicate rocks is a key process in the global carbon cycle and, through its coupling with calcium carbonate deposition in the ocean, is the primary sink of carbon on geologic timescales. The dynamic interdependence of terrestrial weathering rates with atmospheric temperature and carbon dioxide concentrations is crucial to the regulation of Earth's climate over multi-millennial timescales. However any attempts to develop a modeling context for terrestrial weathering as part of a dynamic climate system are limited, mostly because of the difficulty in adapting the multi-millennial timescales of the implied negative feedback mechanism with those of the atmosphere and ocean. Much of the earlier work on this topic is therefore based on box-model approaches, abandoning spatial variability for the sake of computational efficiency and the possibility to investigate the impact of weathering on climate change over time frames much longer than those allowed by traditional climate system models. As a result we still have but a rudimentary understanding of the chemical weathering feedback mechanism and its effects on ocean biogeochemistry and atmospheric CO2. Here, we introduce a spatially-explicit, rock weathering model into the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM). We use a land map which takes into account a number of different rock lithologies, changes in sea level, as well as an empirical model of the temperature and NPP dependency of weathering rates for the different rock types. We apply this new model to the last deglacial period (c. 21000BP to 13000BP) as well as a future climate change scenario (c. 1800AD to 6000AD+), comparing the results of our 2-D version of the weathering feedback mechanism to simulations using only the box-model parameterizations of Meissner et al. [2012]. These simulations reveal the importance of two-dimensional factors (i.e., changes in sea level and rock type distribution) in the

  1. Weather Radar Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    with heavy plastic covering the opening in the top. We also decided to leave all the station hardware including solar panels and batteries in the field...pictures, and dusted for fingerprints. The wind sensors, rain gauge, and antenna were destroyed but the DCP, solar panel , and other site components...DEVELOPMENT 3 A. Radome 3 B. Antenna 4 C. Antenna Mount 4 D. Transmitter/Receiver 5 E. Signal Processor: 5 F. Data Acquisition and Analysis (DAA) Processor 7 G

  2. Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program reduces energy costs for low-income households by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes, while ensuring their health and safety.

  3. Building the ensemble flood prediction system by using numerical weather prediction data: Case study in Kinu river basin, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitsuka, Y.; Yoshimura, K.

    2016-12-01

    Floods have a potential to be a major source of economic or human damage caused by natural disasters. Flood prediction systems were developed all over the world and to treat the uncertainty of the prediction ensemble simulation is commonly adopted. In this study, ensemble flood prediction system using global scale land surface and hydrodynamic model was developed. The system requests surface atmospheric forcing and Land Surface Model, MATSIRO, calculates runoff. Those generated runoff is inputted to hydrodynamic model CaMa-Flood to calculate discharge and flood inundation. CaMa-Flood can simulate flood area and its fraction by introducing floodplain connected to river channel. Forecast leadtime was set 39hours according to forcing data. For the case study, the flood occurred at Kinu river basin, Japan in 2015 was hindcasted. In a 1761 km² Kinu river basin, 3-days accumulated average rainfall was 384mm and over 4000 people was left in the inundated area. Available ensemble numerical weather prediction data at that time was inputted to the system in a resolution of 0.05 degrees and 1hour time step. As a result, the system predicted the flood occurrence by 45% and 84% at 23 and 11 hours before the water level exceeded the evacuation threshold, respectively. Those prediction lead time may provide the chance for early preparation for the floods such as levee reinforcement or evacuation. Adding to the discharge, flood area predictability was also analyzed. Although those models were applied for Japan region, this system can be applied easily to other region or even global scale. The areal flood prediction in meso to global scale would be useful for detecting hot zones or vulnerable areas over each region.

  4. Urban Heat Island and Boundary Layer Structures under Hot Weather Synoptic Conditions: A Case Study of Suzhou City, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ning; ZHU Lianfang; ZHU Yan

    2011-01-01

    A strong urban heat island (UHI) appeared in a hot weather episode in Suzhou City during the period from 25 July to 1 August 2007. This paper analyzes the urban heat island characteristics of Suzhou City under this hot weather episode. Both meteorological station observations and MODIS satellite observations show a strong urban heat island in this area. The maximum UHI intensity in this hot weather episode is 2.2℃, which is much greater than the summer average of 1.0℃ in this year and the 37-year (from 1970 to 2006) average of 0.35℃. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulation results demonstrate that the rapid urbanization processes in this area will enhance the UHI in intensity, horizontal distribution, and vertical extension. The UHI spatial distribution expands as the urban size increases. The vertical extension of UHI in the afternoon increases about 50 m higher under the year 2006 urban land cover than that under the 1986 urban land cover. The conversion from rural land use to urban land type also strengthens the local lake-land breeze circulations in this area and modifies the vertical wind speed field.

  5. Space Weather - the Economic Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, M. M.; Gibbs, M.

    2015-12-01

    Following on from the UK Government's placement of space weather on it's National Risk Register, in 2011, and the Royal Academy of Engineering's study into the impacts of a severe space weather event, the next piece of key evidence, to underpin future investment decisions, is understanding the socio-economic impact of space weather This poster outlines a study, funded by the UK Space Agency, which will assess the socio-economic cost of space weather, both severe events, such as 1989 & a modern day repeat of the Carrington storm and also the cost of day-to-day impacts. The study will go on to estimate the cost benefit of forecasting and also investigate options for an operational L5 spacecraft mission and knowledge exchange activities with the South African Space Agency. The findings from the initial space weather socio-economic literature review will be presented along with other findings to date and sets out the tasks for the remainder of this programme of work.

  6. Model analysis of urbanization impacts on boundary layer meteorology under hot weather conditions: a case study of Nanjing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Meigen; Wang, Yongwei

    2016-08-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, configured with a single-layer urban canopy model, was employed to investigate the influence of urbanization on boundary layer meteorological parameters during a long-lasting heat wave. This study was conducted over Nanjing city, East China, from 26 July to 4 August 2010. The impacts of urban expansion and anthropogenic heat (AH) release were simulated to quantify their effects on 2-m temperature, 2-m water vapor mixing ratio, and 10-m wind speed and heat stress index. Urban sprawl increased the daily 2-m temperature in urbanized areas by around 1.6 °C and decreased the urban diurnal temperature range (DTR) by 1.24 °C. The contribution of AH release to the atmospheric warming was nearly 22 %, but AH had little influence on the DTR. The urban regional mean surface wind speed decreased by about 0.4 m s-1, and this decrease was successfully simulated from the surface to 300 m. The influence of urbanization on 2-m water vapor mixing ratio was significant over highly urbanized areas with a decrease of 1.1-1.8 g kg-1. With increased urbanization ratio, the duration of the inversion layer was about 4 h shorter, and the lower atmospheric layer was less stable. Urban heat island (UHI) intensity was significantly enhanced when synthesizing both urban sprawl and AH release and the daily mean UHI intensity increased by 0.74 °C. Urbanization increased the time under extreme heat stress (about 40 %) and worsened the living environment in urban areas.

  7. Variability of extreme weather events over the equatorial East Africa, a case study of rainfall in Kenya and Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongoma, Victor; Chen, Haishan; Omony, George William

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the variability of extreme rainfall events over East Africa (EA), using indices from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI). The analysis was based on observed daily rainfall from 23 weather stations, with length varying within 1961 and 2010. The indices considered are: wet days (R ≥1 mm), annual total precipitation in wet days (PRCPTOT), simple daily intensity index (SDII), heavy precipitation days (R ≥ 10 mm), very heavy precipitation days (R ≥ 20 mm), and severe precipitation (R ≥ 50 mm). The non-parametric Mann-Kendall statistical analysis was carried out to identify trends in the data. Temporal precipitation distribution was different from station to station. Almost all indices considered are decreasing with time. The analysis shows that the PRCPTOT, very heavy precipitation, and severe precipitation are generally declining insignificantly at 5 % significant level. The PRCPTOT is evidently decreasing over Arid and Semi-Arid Land (ASAL) as compared to other parts of EA. The number of days that recorded heavy rainfall is generally decreasing but starts to rise in the last decade although the changes are insignificant. Both PRCPTOT and heavy precipitation show a recovery in trend starting in the 1990s. The SDII shows a reduction in most areas, especially the in ASAL. The changes give a possible indication of the ongoing climate variability and change which modify the rainfall regime of EA. The results form a basis for further research, utilizing longer datasets over the entire region to reduce the generalizations made herein. Continuous monitoring of extreme events in EA is critical, given that rainfall is projected to increase in the twenty-first century.

  8. Study of recent changes of weathering dynamic in soils based on Sr and U isotope ratios in soil solutions (Strengbach catchment- Vosges, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunier, Jonathan; Chabaux, François; Stille, Peter; Pierret, Marie-Claire; Viville, Daniel; Gangloff, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Major and trace element concentrations along with U and Sr isotopic ratios of the main components of the water-soil-plant system of two experimental plots in a forested silicate catchment were determined to characterize the day-present weathering processes within the surface soil levels and to identify the nature of minerals which control the lithogenic flux of the soil solutions. This study allows recognition of a lithogenic origin of the dissolved U in the surface soil solutions, even in the most superficial ones, implying that the colloidal U is a U secondarily associated with organic matter or organo-metallic complexes. This flux significantly varies in the upper meter of the soil and between the two sites, due to their slightly different bedrock lithologies and likely also to their different vegetation covers. A long-time monitoring during the past 15 years was achieved to evaluate the response of this ecosystem to recent environmental changes. A clear decrease of the Ca and K fluxes exported by the soil solutions between 1992 and 2006 at the spruce site was observed, while this decrease is much smaller for the beech plot. In addition, the Sr isotope ratios of soil solutions vary significantly between 1998 and 2004, with once again a much more important change for the spruce site than for the beech site. It demonstrates that the source of elements in soil solutions has changed over this time period due to a modification of the weathering reactions occurring within the weathering profile. The origin of the weathering modification could be the consequence of the acid rains on weathering granitic bedrock or a consequence of forest exploitation incompatible with the nutriment reserve of soils with recent plantations of conifer, which impoverish soils. All together, these data suggest that the forest ecosystem at the spruce plot is in a transient state of functioning marked by a possible recent modification of weathering reactions. This study shows the potential of

  9. Weathering of rock 'Ginger'

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    One of the more unusual rocks at the site is Ginger, located southeast of the lander. Parts of it have the reddest color of any material in view, whereas its rounded lobes are gray and relatively unweathered. These color differences are brought out in the inset, enhanced at the upper right. In the false color image at the lower right, the shape of the visible-wavelength spectrum (related to the abundance of weathered ferric iron minerals) is indicated by the hue of the rocks. Blue indicates relatively unweathered rocks. Typical soils and drift, which are heavily weathered, are shown in green and flesh tones. The very red color in the creases in the rock surface correspond to a crust of ferric minerals. The origin of the rock is uncertain; the ferric crust may have grown underneath the rock, or it may cement pebbles together into a conglomerate. Ginger will be a target of future super-resolution studies to better constrain its origin.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  10. Benign Weather Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    operational interest in modifying weather to support combat operations increased, ultimately leading to a multi-service effort called PROJECT POPEYE . The goal...This, coupled with the revelations concerning weather modification use in the Vietnam War (PROJECT POPEYE ), was a double blow to weather modification...AWS-TR-74-247, June 1984. Cobb, James T., Jr., et. al. Project Popeye : Final Report. China Lake, CA: Naval Weapons Center, 1967. Langmuir, Irving

  11. Is Weather Chaotic?

    CERN Document Server

    Raidl, A

    1998-01-01

    The correlation dimension and K2-entropy are estimated from meteorological time- series. The results lead us to claim that seasonal variability of weather is under influence of low dimensional dynamics, whereas changes of weather from day to day are governed by high dimensional system(s). Error-doubling time of this system is less than 3 days. We suggest that the outstanding feature of the weather dynamics is deterministic chaos.

  12. Análisis de criticidad de grupos electrógenos de la tecnología fuel oil en Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Bárbara Hourné Calzada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available En el 2004, Cuba pone en marcha un nuevo programa que consiste en un esquema de generación eléctrica distribuida que emplea la instalación de emplazamientos compuestos por grupos electrógenos, que operan con diesel o fuel-oil, constituyendo uno de los más profundos cambios conceptuales en esta esfera. El presente trabajo tiene como objetivo la obtención del modelo matemático para el Análisis de Criticidad que permita la clasificación jerarquizada de los sistemas en este proceso de generación de electricidad. Para cumplir este objetivo resultó necesario: el estudio de diferentes modelos de criticidad y la posible factibilidad de su uso en el campo de investigación. La identificación de los sistemas y subsistemas que componen los grupos electrógenos. La realización de un análisis documental de las fallas más frecuentes en que incurren los sistemas y equipos de los grupos electrógenos. La validación del modelo y finalmente la clasificación de los activos de acuerdo al índice de criticidad contra índice de complejidad. Se desarrolla un instrumento a partir del criterio de expertos para determinar las variables a considerar en el modelo de criticidad y complejidad, realizándose para los modelos un estudio de su confiabilidad. El modelo obtenido fue aplicado, proporcionando resultados satisfactorios.

  13. Fuel oil heating process and viscosity control system based on PI controllers; Proceso de calentamiento de combustoleo y sistema de control de viscosidad en base a controladores PI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgadillo Valencia, Miguel Angel; Dominguez Molina, Beatriz Adriana [Gerencia de Control e Instrumentacionn Instituto de Investigaciones Eletricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: madv@iie.org.mx; ingbty@hotmail.com

    2010-11-15

    This job presents a mathematical development for evaluating the fuel oil viscosity from direct pressure drop measurement data in a piece of tube, the density of the oil and the oil flow at the main heater input of a conventional power plant. A group of curves obtained from different type of oils are presented in equation form which are used to interpolate the actual oil and to extend it to evaluate the corresponding temperature for the goal viscosity. This temperature is used as temperature setpoint for the proposed viscosity control system. A conventional plant main heater model is developed in order to carry out simulation tests for the viscosity control. Simulation tests are done in the Simulink of Matlab platform and graphs of runs are presented. [Spanish] Este trabajo presenta un desarrollo matematico para la evaluacion de la viscosidad del combustoleo a partir de datos de medicion directa de caida de presion en un tramo de tuberia, de la densidad y del flujo de combustible a la entrada del calentador principal de una central termoelectrica convencional. A traves de datos de diferentes tipos de combustible se presentaron un conjunto de curvas, representadas por ecuaciones, mediante las cuales se interpola la curva correspondiente al combustible actual y se proyecta para evaluar la temperatura correspondiente a la viscosidad objetivo; esta temperatura objetivo se utiliza despues como senal de punto de ajuste para el control de la viscosidad del combustible en un sistema de control propuesto. Para la realizacion de pruebas del control de viscosidad, se plantea el desarrollo del modelo del calentador principal de la central termoelectrica. Las corridas de simulacion se realizan en la plataforma de Simulink de Matlab y se presentan las graficas de dichas corridas.

  14. Particulate matter from both heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel shipping emissions show strong biological effects on human lung cells at realistic and comparable in vitro exposure conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Oeder

    Full Text Available Ship engine emissions are important with regard to lung and cardiovascular diseases especially in coastal regions worldwide. Known cellular responses to combustion particles include oxidative stress and inflammatory signalling.To provide a molecular link between the chemical and physical characteristics of ship emission particles and the cellular responses they elicit and to identify potentially harmful fractions in shipping emission aerosols.Through an air-liquid interface exposure system, we exposed human lung cells under realistic in vitro conditions to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on either common heavy fuel oil (HFO or cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF. Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling including isotope labelling methods to characterise the lung cell responses.The HFO emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds such as metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and were higher in particle mass. These compounds were lower in DF emissions, which in turn had higher concentrations of elemental carbon ("soot". Common cellular reactions included cellular stress responses and endocytosis. Reactions to HFO emissions were dominated by oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, whereas DF emissions induced generally a broader biological response than HFO emissions and affected essential cellular pathways such as energy metabolism, protein synthesis, and chromatin modification.Despite a lower content of known toxic compounds, combustion particles from the clean shipping fuel DF influenced several essential pathways of lung cell metabolism more strongly than particles from the unrefined fuel HFO. This might be attributable to a higher soot content in DF. Thus the role of diesel soot, which is a known carcinogen in acute air pollution-induced health effects should be further investigated. For the use of HFO and DF we recommend a

  15. Experimental observations of detonation in ammonium-nitrate-fuel-oil (ANFO) surrounded by a high-sound speed, shockless, aluminum confiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klyanda, Charles B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Short, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Detonations in explosive mixtures of ammonium-nitrate-fuel-oil (ANFO) confined by aluminum allow for transport of detonation energy ahead of the detonation front due to the aluminum sound speed exceeding the detonation velocity. The net effect of this energy transport on the detonation is unclear. It could enhance the detonation by precompressing the explosive near the wall. Alternatively, it could desensitize the explosive by crushing porosity required for shock initiation or destroying confinement ahead of the detonation. As these phenomena are not well understood, most numerical explosive models are unable to account for them. But with slowly detonating, non-ideal high explosive (NIHE) systems becoming increasing prevalent, proper understanding and prediction of the performance of these metal-confined NIHE systems is desirable. Experiments are discussed that measured the effect of this ANFO detonation energy transported upstream of the front by an aluminum confining tube. Detonation velocity, detonation front curvature, and aluminum response are recorded as a function of confiner wall thickness and length. Front curvature profiles display detonation acceleration near the confining surface, which is attributed to energy transported upstream modifying the flow. Average detonation velocities were seen to increase with increasing confiner thickness due to the additional inertial confinement of the reaction zone flow. Significant radial sidewall tube motion was observed immediately ahead of the detonation. Axial motion was also detected which interfered with the front curvature measurements in some cases. It was concluded that the confiner was able to transport energy ahead of the detonation and that this transport has a definite effect on the detonation.

  16. Wavelet Study of Meteorological Data Collected by Arduino-Weather Station: Impact on Solar Energy Collection Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caccamo Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meteorological data collected by an automated LSI Lastem weather station connected with an Arduino device for remote acquisition are reported and discussed. Weather station, located at 38° 15’ 35.10’’ N latitude and 15° 35’ 58.86’’ E longitude, registered data which were analysed by wavelet transform to obtain time-frequency characterization of the signals. Such an approach allowed to highlight the correlation existing among the registered meteorological data. The results show a positive correlation between the minimum temperature and the maximum temperature values whereas a negative correlation emerges between daily rainfall and minimum temperature values as well as for daily rainfall and maximum temperature values. These results suggest the possibility to estimate the global and diffuse solar radiation using more reliable climatologic parameters for optimizing solar energy collected by solar panels.

  17. Numerical simulation for regional ozone concentrations: A case study by weather research and forecasting/chemistry (WRF/Chem) model

    OpenAIRE

    Khandakar Md Habib Al Razi, Moritomi Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research is to better understand and predict the atmospheric concentration distribution of ozone and its precursor (in particular, within the Planetary Boundary Layer (Within 110 km to 12 km) over Kasaki City and the Greater Tokyo Area using fully coupled online WRF/Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry) model. In this research, a serious and continuous high ozone episode in the Greater Tokyo Area (GTA) during the summer of 14–18 August 2010 was investigated u...

  18. ROMANIAN TERMINOLOGY IN THE METEOROLOGY OF SEVERE WEATHER – CASE STUDY OF THE SUPERCELL FROM ARAD COUNTRY ON THE 14TH OF JUNE 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. SCRIDONESI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Romanian terminology in the meteorology of severe weather – Case study of the supercell from the 14th of June 2010. Using the ingredients-based methodology, the low precipitation supercell storm from the 14th of June 2010 in the Arad county is analyzed in terms of conditions of development, evolution and structure. To address such a topic an important issue is the lack of meteorological terms in the Romanian language to enable the completion of such analysis of supercell storms or other severe weather phenomena. Finding terms that correspond to the best of the English language during the analysis is performed either by direct translation into romanian, either by replacing the terms that best fit the context and the use of each term is motivated.

  19. Space Weather Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Weather Computational Laboratory is a Unix and PC based modeling and simulation facility devoted to research analysis of naturally occurring electrically...

  20. Space Weather Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Space Weather Analysis archives are model output of ionospheric, thermospheric and magnetospheric particle populations, energies and electrodynamics

  1. Accelerated weathering-induced degradation of poly(lactic acid) fiber studied by near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzawa, Hideyuki; Nishida, Masakazu; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Kanematsu, Wataru

    2012-04-01

    Hydrolysis degradation of a set of drawn poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fibers was induced by an accelerated weathering test, radiating ultraviolet (UV) light under a certain temperature and humidity. The fine features of the transient behavior of the PLA fibers were captured by near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging. The PLA fibers showed a gradual decrease in mechanical property (e.g., tensile strength), indicating hydrolysis degradation. Thus, the detailed analysis of the spectral variation, in turn, offers useful information on the molecular-level degradation behavior of the drawn PLA fibers. The variation of the spectral intensity as well as band position shift of the crystalline band of PLA was analyzed. The spectral intensity of the crystalline band of PLA showed gradual decrease, suggesting the decrease in molecular weight induced by the hydrolysis degradation. In addition, the crystalline band also exhibited a coinciding shift to the lower wavenumber direction with the weathering test, revealing cleavage-induced crystallization of the PLA samples. Consequently, the hydrolysis degradation induced by the weathering test substantially accelerates predominant degradation of the amorphous structure of the PLA and such variation of the molecular structure, in turn, brings less ductility to the PLA fiber.

  2. Element geochemistry of weathering profile of dolomitite and its implications for the average chemical composition of the upper-continental crust--Case studies from the Xinpu profile,northern Guizhou Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Geochemical behavior of chemical elements is studied in a dolomitite weathering profile in upland of karst terrain in northern Guizhou.Two stages can be recognized during the process of in situ weathering of dolomitite:the stage of sedentary accumulation of leaching residue of dolomitite and the stage of chemical weathering evolution of sedentary soil.Ni,Cr,Mo,W and Ti are the least mobile elements with reference to Al.The geochemical behavior of REE is similar to that observed in weathering of other types of rocks.Fractionation of REE is noticed during weathering,and the two layers of REE enrichments are thought to result from downward movement of the weathering front in response to changes in the environment.It is considered that the chemistry of the upper part of the profile,which was more intensively weathered,is representative of the mobile components of the upper curst at the time the dolomitite was formed,while the less weathered lower profile is chemically representative of the immobile constitution.Like glacial till and loess,the "insoluble" materials in carbonate rocks originating from chemical sedimentation may also provide valuable information about the average chemical composition of the upper continental crust.

  3. Element geochemistry of weathering profile of dolomitite and its implications for the average chemical composition of the upper-continental crust——Case studies from the Xinpu profile, northern Guizhou Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季宏兵; 欧阳自远; 王世杰; 周德全

    2000-01-01

    Geochemical behavior of chemical elements is studied in a dolomitite weathering profile in upland of karst terrain in northern Guizhou. Two stages can be recognized during the process of in situ weathering of dolomitite: the stage of sedentary accumulation of leaching residue of dolomitite and the stage of chemical weathering evolution of sedentary soil. Ni, Cr, Mo, W and Ti are the least mobile elements with reference to Al. The geochemical behavior of REE is similar to that observed in weathering of other types of rocks. Fractionation of REE is noticed during weathering, and the two layers of REE enrichments are thought to result from downward movement of the weathering front in response to changes in the environment. It is considered that the chemistry of the upper part of the profile, which was more intensively weathered, is representative of the mobile components of the upper curst at the time the dolomitite was formed, while the less weathered lower profile is chemically representative of the immo

  4. Weather and emotional state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasova, Z.

    2010-09-01

    Introduction Given the proven effects of weather on the human organism, an attempt to examine its effects on a psychic and emotional level has been made. Emotions affect the bio-tonus, working ability and concentration, hence their significance in various domains of economic life, such as health care, education, transportation, tourism, etc. Data and methods The research has been made in Sofia City within a period of 8 months, using 5 psychological methods (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Test for Self-assessment of the emotional state (developed by Wessman and Ricks), Test for evaluation of moods and Test "Self-confidence - Activity - Mood" (developed by the specialists from the Military Academy in Saint Petersburg). The Fiodorov-Chubukov's complex-climatic method was used to characterize meteorological conditions because of the purpose to include in the analysis a maximal number of meteorological elements. 16 weather types are defined in dependence of the meteorological elements values according to this method. Abrupt weather changes from one day to another, defined by the same method, were considered as well. Results and discussions The results obtained by t-test show that the different categories of weather lead to changes in the emotional status, which indicates a character either positive or negative for the organism. The abrupt weather changes, according to expectations, have negative effect on human emotions but only when a transition to the cloudy weather or weather type, classified as "unfavourable" has been realized. The relationship between weather and human emotions is rather complicated since it depends on individual characteristics of people. One of these individual psychological characteristics, marked by the dimension "neuroticism", has a strong effect on emotional reactions in different weather conditions. Emotionally stable individuals are more "protected" to the weather influence on their emotions

  5. Evaporation and weather

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, H.A.R. de; Feddes, R.A.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Lablans, W.N.; Schuurmans, C.J.E.; Shuttleworth, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Data on evaporation to be used in agriculture, hydrology, forestry, etc. are usually supplied by meteorologists. Meteorologists themselves also use evaporation data. Air mass properties determining weather are strongly dependent on the input of water vapour from the surface. So for weather

  6. Designing a Weather Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The collection and analysis of weather data is crucial to the location of alternate energy systems like solar and wind. This article presents a design challenge that gives students a chance to design a weather station to collect data in advance of a large wind turbine installation. Data analysis is a crucial part of any science or engineering…

  7. Evaporation and weather

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, H.A.R. de; Feddes, R.A.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Lablans, W.N.; Schuurmans, C.J.E.; Shuttleworth, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Data on evaporation to be used in agriculture, hydrology, forestry, etc. are usually supplied by meteorologists. Meteorologists themselves also use evaporation data. Air mass properties determining weather are strongly dependent on the input of water vapour from the surface. So for weather predictio

  8. Weather and road capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Christian

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents estimations of the effect of bad weather on the observed speed on a Danish highway section; Køge Bugt Motorvejen. The paper concludes that weather, primarily precipitation and snow, has a clear negative effect on speed when the road is not in hypercongestion mode. Furthermore......, the capacity of the highway seems to be reduced in bad weather and there are indications that travel time variability is also increased, at least in free-flow conditions. Heavy precipitation reduces speed and capacity by around 5-8%, whereas snow primarily reduces capacity. Other weather variables......-parametrically against traffic density and in step 2 the residuals from step 1 are regressed linearly against the weather variables. The choice of a non-parametric method is made to avoid constricting ties from a parametric specification and because the focus here is not on the relationship between traffic flow...

  9. Weather in Mountainous Terrain (Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Weather in Mountainous Terrain (Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support) Fiesta Resort & Conference Center Tempe, AZ February 1...Meteorology Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support Fiesta Resort & Conference Center Tempe, AZ February 1 & 2, 2010 Hosted by University

  10. Approach to Integrate Global-Sun Models of Magnetic Flux Emergence and Transport for Space Weather Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Nagi N.; Wray, Alan A.; Mehrotra, Piyush; Henney, Carl; Arge, Nick; Godinez, H.; Manchester, Ward; Koller, J.; Kosovichev, A.; Scherrer, P.; Zhao, J.; Stein, R.; Duvall, T.; Fan, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The Sun lies at the center of space weather and is the source of its variability. The primary input to coronal and solar wind models is the activity of the magnetic field in the solar photosphere. Recent advancements in solar observations and numerical simulations provide a basis for developing physics-based models for the dynamics of the magnetic field from the deep convection zone of the Sun to the corona with the goal of providing robust near real-time boundary conditions at the base of space weather forecast models. The goal is to develop new strategic capabilities that enable characterization and prediction of the magnetic field structure and flow dynamics of the Sun by assimilating data from helioseismology and magnetic field observations into physics-based realistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations. The integration of first-principle modeling of solar magnetism and flow dynamics with real-time observational data via advanced data assimilation methods is a new, transformative step in space weather research and prediction. This approach will substantially enhance an existing model of magnetic flux distribution and transport developed by the Air Force Research Lab. The development plan is to use the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) to develop Coupled Models for Emerging flux Simulations (CMES) that couples three existing models: (1) an MHD formulation with the anelastic approximation to simulate the deep convection zone (FSAM code), (2) an MHD formulation with full compressible Navier-Stokes equations and a detailed description of radiative transfer and thermodynamics to simulate near-surface convection and the photosphere (Stagger code), and (3) an MHD formulation with full, compressible Navier-Stokes equations and an approximate description of radiative transfer and heating to simulate the corona (Module in BATS-R-US). CMES will enable simulations of the emergence of magnetic structures from the deep convection zone to the corona. Finally, a plan

  11. Development and Evaluation of a City-Wide Wireless Weather Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ben; Wang, Hsue-Yie; Peng, Tian-Yin; Hsu, Ying-Shao

    2010-01-01

    This project analyzed the effectiveness of a city-wide wireless weather sensor network, the Taipei Weather Science Learning Network (TWIN), in facilitating elementary and junior high students' study of weather science. The network, composed of sixty school-based weather sensor nodes and a centralized weather data archive server, provides students…

  12. Learning to become a member of a community of scientists: An ethnographic study of student participation in weather research in two middle school classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Candice Michelle

    2000-11-01

    This research project involves the investigation of the opportunities to learn science and about science through an extended year-long weather project in two middle school science classrooms. The theoretical framework draws together two compatible but as yet unconnected bodies of literature. From studies of scientific practices, the importance of the ways science is learned through practice in authentic settings are considered. Studies of situated cognition are examined as well to discern how students learn in context-specific ways. This empirical research is unique in three important ways. First, the research took place in two different middle school classrooms and utilized extensive participant observation over the course of the entire academic year and focus group interviews with students. One of the classes was mostly Hispanic students of lower socioeconomic status. The other class was primarily Caucasian students of middle socioeconomic status. Second, the teachers in the study participated in a multi-year service program coordinated by the local university. The teachers worked with their students to complete a year-long weather project that involves data collection, representation, analysis, and interpretation. Third, the project involves long-term study of weather data. As a result, students participating in the research over the year began to challenge the claims of their peers. Few classroom studies of earth science have been conducted and published and even fewer involved student managed school science research projects. The findings from this study can be used as a model for how long-term research projects in science can be incorporated into middle school science classes. This project is thus very important in the field of science education for understanding ways to make science accessible and appealing to a variety of students.

  13. Induction of CYP1A1 in rat liver after ingestion of mussels contaminated by Erika fuel oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaty, Sylvie; Rodius, Francois; Vasseur, Paule [Universite de Metz: CNRS UMR 7146, Lab., Interactions Ecotoxicite, Biodiversite, Ecosystemes, Metz (France); Lanhers, Marie-Claire; Burnel, Daniel [Universite de Nancy I, Faculte de Medecine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2008-02-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are known to be specific inducers of CYP1A1 expression in vertebrates. CYP1A1 induction has been widely studied in mammal cell cultures or in vivo, in conditions of exposure to single PAH chemicals. Here, we studied the possible transfer of PAH to rats via the food chain in environmentally-relevant conditions. Rats were fed for 2 days with PAH-contaminated mussels sampled on coasts polluted by the Erika oil-tanker wreck. CYP1A1 expression was investigated by measuring mRNA levels and EROD enzymatic activity over the 84 h following the last ingestion. CYP1A1 expression in treated rats was compared to controls fed with mussels free from PAH contamination. The results showed that ingestion of PAH-contaminated mussels induced CYP1A1 mRNA and EROD activity. Increase of transcriptional level and of EROD activity was transient with a peak within 12 h and a return to basal levels within 36 h. (orig.)

  14. Weather pattern climatology of the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barchet, W.R.; Davis, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    In this study the geographic domain covered the 48 conterminous states of the United States. The daily synoptic weather pattern was classified into nine types for the 10-year period January 1, 1969 to December 31, 1978. Weather pattern types were defined relative to the classical polar front model of a mid-latitude cyclonic storm system and its associated air masses. Guidelines for classifying weather patterns on an operational basis were developed. These were applied to 3652 daily surface weather maps to produce a time series of weather pattern type at 120 grid points of a 160 point, 3/sup 0/ latitude by 4/sup 0/ longitude array over the United States. Statistics on the frequency of occurrence, persistence and alternation of weather patterns were calculated for each grid point. Summary statistics for the entire grid and for six regions were also presented. Frequency of occurrence and persistence were found to depend on the size and speed of movement of the weather pattern. Large, slow moving air masses had higher frequency of occurrence and longer persistence than small (fronts) or rapidly moving (or changing) features (fronts, storm centers). Some types showed distinct regional preferences. The subtropical maritime high occurred mainly in the south central and southeast. An indeterminate weather pattern type accounted for those weather patterns that did not fit the polar front model or were too disorganized to be classified. The intermountain thermal low of the desert southwest was one such feature that dominated both frequency of occurrence and persistence in this region. Alternation from one weather pattern to another followed the polar front model of a moving cyclonic storm. The tendency for anticyclonic weather patterns to become disorganized as they weakened was seen in the high percentage of these patterns that changed to an indeterminate pattern as they aged.

  15. Influence of local calibration on the quality of online wet weather discharge monitoring: feedback from five international case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caradot, Nicolas; Sonnenberg, Hauke; Rouault, Pascale; Gruber, Günter; Hofer, Thomas; Torres, Andres; Pesci, Maria; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports about experiences gathered from five online monitoring campaigns in the sewer systems of Berlin (Germany), Graz (Austria), Lyon (France) and Bogota (Colombia) using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectrometers and turbidimeters. Online probes are useful for the measurement of highly dynamic processes, e.g. combined sewer overflows (CSO), storm events, and river impacts. The influence of local calibration on the quality of online chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements of wet weather discharges has been assessed. Results underline the need to establish local calibration functions for both UV-VIS spectrometers and turbidimeters. It is suggested that practitioners calibrate locally their probes using at least 15-20 samples. However, these samples should be collected over several events and cover most of the natural variability of the measured concentration. For this reason, the use of automatic peristaltic samplers in parallel to online monitoring is recommended with short representative sampling campaigns during wet weather discharges. Using reliable calibration functions, COD loads of CSO and storm events can be estimated with a relative uncertainty of approximately 20%. If no local calibration is established, concentrations and loads are estimated with a high error rate, questioning the reliability and meaning of the online measurement. Similar results have been obtained for total suspended solids measurements.

  16. Experimental Study on the Effects of Organic Acids on the Dissolution of REE in the Weathering Crust of Granite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈炳辉; 毋福海; 刘琥琥

    2001-01-01

    The results of REE leached by some organic acids with various concentrations and water/rock ratios for different durations from a mixed sample of the weathering crust of a granite in Gonghe, Guangdong, China, showed that: 1 ) the contents of REE leached increase with increasing concentrations of the organic acids; 2) the contents of REE leached by 0.01 mol/L organic acids increase with increasing water/rock ratio; 3) the interaction between the organic acids and the samples enhances the pH value of the medium and the contents of REE leached tend to increase with decreasing pH value; and 4) compared with those leached by ammonia sulfate, the REE leached by the organic acids are characterized by a weaker negative Ce anomaly, a stronger negative Eu anomaly, and lower (La/Sm)N and (Gd/Yb)N ratios, indicating that the organic acids have made contributions to the fractionation of REE in the weathering crust.

  17. Experimental Study on the Effects of Organic Acids on the Dissolution of REE in the Weathering Crust of Granite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈炳辉; 毋福海; 等

    2001-01-01

    The results of REE leached by some organic acids with various concentrations and water/rock ratios for different durations from a mixed samples of the weathering crust of a granite in Gonghe,Guangdong,China,showed that:1)the contents of REE leached increase with increasing concentrations of the organic acids;2) the contents of REE leached by 0.01mol/L organic acids increase with increasing water/rock ration;3) the interaction between the organic acids and the samples enhances the pH value of the medium and the contents of REE leached tend to increase with decreasing pH value;and 4) compared with those leached by ammonia sulfate,the REE leached by the organic acids are characterized by a weaker negative C e anomaly,a stronger negative Eu anomaly,and lower(La/Sm)N and (Gd/Yb)N ratios,indicating that the organic acids have made contributions to the fractionation of REE in the weathering crust.

  18. Changes in the As solid speciation during weathering of volcanic ashes: A XAS study on Patagonian ashes and Chacopampean loess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bia, G.; García, M. G.; Borgnino, L.

    2017-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to determine the oxidation state of As, local chemical coordination and the relative proportion of different As species in recent and ancient Andean volcanic ashes, as well as in Chaco Pampean loess. As K edge XANES analysis indicates that in loess sediments the dominant species is As(V) (i.e., >91%). Conversely, As(III) is dominant in all ash samples. In the Puyehue sample, only As(III) species were determined, while in both, the Chaitén and the ancient tephra samples, As(III) species accounts for 66% of the total As. The remaining 34% corresponds to As(-1) in the Chaitén sample and to As(V) in the weathered tephra. The proposed EXAFS models fit well with the experimental data, suggesting that in ancient and recent volcanic ashes, As(III) is likely related to As atoms present as impurities within the glass structure, forming hydroxide species bound to the Al-Si network. In addition, the identified As(-1) species is related to arsenian pyrite, while in the ancient volcanic ash, As(V) was likely a product of incipient weathering. In loess sediments, the identified As(V) species represents arsenate ions adsorbed onto Fe oxy(hydr)oxides, forming inner-sphere surface complexes, in a bidentate binuclear configuration.

  19. Integrating weather and climate predictions for seamless hydrologic ensemble forecasting: A case study in the Yalong River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Aizhong; Deng, Xiaoxue; Ma, Feng; Duan, Qingyun; Zhou, Zheng; Du, Chao

    2017-04-01

    Despite the tremendous improvement made in numerical weather and climate models over the recent years, the forecasts generated by those models still cannot be used directly for hydrological forecasting. A post-processor like the Ensemble Pre-Processor (EPP) developed by U.S. National Weather Service must be used to remove various biases and to extract useful predictive information from those forecasts. In this paper, we investigate how different designs of canonical events in the EPP can help post-process precipitation forecasts from the Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS) and Climate Forecast System Version 2 (CFSv2). The use of canonical events allow those products to be linked seamlessly and then the post-processed ensemble precipitation forecasts can be generated using the Schaake Shuffle procedure. We used the post-processed ensemble precipitation forecasts to drive a distributed hydrological model to obtain ensemble streamflow forecasts and evaluated those forecasts against the observed streamflow. We found that the careful design of canonical events can help extract more useful information, especially when up-to-date observed precipitation is used to setup the canonical events. We also found that streamflow forecasts using post-processed precipitation forecasts have longer lead times and higher accuracy than streamflow forecasts made by traditional Extend Streamflow Prediction (ESP) and the forecasts based on original GEFS and CFSv2 precipitation forecasts.

  20. Phytoremediation of fuel oil and lead co-contaminated soil by Chromolaena odorata in association with Micrococcus luteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jampasri, Kongkeat; Pokethitiyook, Prayad; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Ounjai, Puey; Kumsopa, Acharaporn

    2016-10-01

    Phytoremediation is widely promoted as a cost-effective technology for treating heavy metal and total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) co-contaminated soil. This study investigated the concurrent removal of TPHs and Pb in co-contaminated soil (27,000 mg kg(-1) TPHs, 780 mg kg(-1) Pb) by growing Siam weed (Chromolaena odorata) in a pot experiment for 90 days. There were four treatments: co-contaminated soil; co-contaminated soil with C. odorata only; co-contaminated soil with C. odorata and Micrococcus luteus inoculum; and co-contaminated soil with M. luteus only. C. odorata survived and grew well in the co-contaminated soil. C. odorata with M. luteus showed the highest Pb accumulation (513.7 mg kg(-1)) and uptake (7.7 mg plant(-1)), and the highest reduction percentage of TPHs (52.2%). The higher TPH degradation in vegetated soils indicated the interaction between the rhizosphere microorganisms and plants. The results suggested that C. odorata together with M. luteus and other rhizosphere microorganisms is a promising candidate for the removal of Pb and TPHs in co-contaminated soils.

  1. Applicability of Doppler weather radar based rainfall data for runoff estimation in Indian watersheds – A case study of Chennai basin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Josephine; B V Mudgal; S B Thampi

    2014-08-01

    Traditionally, India has been vulnerable to various hazards such as floods, droughts and cyclones. About 8% of the total Indian landmass is prone to cyclones. A number of Doppler weather radars are installed in India and their products are utilized for weather predictions and detection of cyclones approaching the Indian coast. Radar-based hydrological studies in various countries have proven that computation of runoff using radar rainfall data could outperform rain gauge network measurements. There are no reported studies on their utilization for hydrological modelling and/or flood-related studies in Indian river basins. A comparison study between Doppler weather radar (DWR) derived rainfall data and the conventional rain gauge data was carried out with hourly inputs at one of the watersheds of Chennai basin, Tamil Nadu, India using HEC-HMS model. The model calibration and validation were performed by comparing the simulated outflow with the observed daily outflow data. The calibrated model was used to predict runoff from two post-monsoon cyclonic storm events with hourly inputs. It was noticed that the discrepancy in the runoff volume was small, but the difference in the peak flow was substantial. Additionally, there was a variation at the time to peak flow using daily and hourly inputs. The results show that the use of radar data may be optional for runoff volume estimation for the watersheds with sufficient rain gauge density, but highly desirable for peak flow and time to peak estimation. Therefore, the DWR derived rainfall data is a promising input for runoff estimation, especially in urban flood modelling.

  2. Laboratory Hydrothermal Alteration of Basaltic Tephra by Acid Sulfate Solutions: An Analog Process for Martian Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to conduct simulated Mars-like weathering experiments in the laboratory to determine the weathering products that might form during oxidative, acidic weathering of Mars analog materials.

  3. Modélisation de la combustion de fuels lourds prenant en compte la dispersion des asphaltènes Modeling Heavy Fuel-Oil Combustion (While Considering Or Including Asphaltene Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audibert F.

    2006-11-01

    difficultés relevant du mode d'exploration et de la non adéquation entre les structures asphalténiques et fractales. On a finalement opté pour une détermination visuelle s'appuyant sur les clichés sur lesquels les agglomérats d'asphaltènes sont clairement visualisés tels qu'ils sont dans le fuel. Ce mode d'exploration laborieux a cependant permis de déterminer un modèle construit sur une série de 25 fuels dont 10 ont été brûlés sur une chaudière de 2 MW, et 15 sur un four de 100 kW. Ce modèle fait intervenir les teneurs en carbone Conradson et en métaux, ainsi que le taux de dispersion des asphaltènes. Le perfectionnement des moyens d'exploration aidant, on peut s'attendre à ce que soient disponibles des techniques d'évaluation de la dispersion sur les clichés. Ce paramètre pourra alors être pris en considération pour une meilleure prédiction de résultats de combustion insuffisamment expliqués avec les paramètres classiques. Various models aiming to predict the amount of unburned particles (solids during heavy fuel-oil combustion have been developed. The parameters taken into consideration are generally asphaltenes precipitated by normal heptane or pentane and Conradson carbon as well as the metals content having a known catalytic effect on cenosphere combustion in the combustion chamber. The Exxon and Shell models can be mentioned, which were developed respectively in 1979 and 1981 (Chapter II. Other models also give consideration to the fuel-oil composition, the way it is atomized and diffused in the chamber and the combustion kinetics (research done by the MIT Energy Laboratory published in 1986. However, the above parameters are not the only ones involved. For some fuel oils, experience has shown that the state of dispersion of asphaltenes may also play an important role particularly for combustion installations with mechanical injection for which the dispersion of fuel-oil droplets is not very great and does not affect the structures built

  4. Mexican Space Weather Service (SCIESMEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; De la Luz, V.; Mejia-Ambriz, J. C.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Corona-Romero, P.; Gonzalez, L. X.

    2015-12-01

    Recent modifications of the Civil Protection Law in Mexico include now specific mentions to space hazards and space weather phenomena. During the last few years, the UN has promoted international cooperation on Space Weather awareness, studies and monitoring. Internal and external conditions motivated the creation of a Space Weather Service in Mexico (SCIESMEX). The SCIESMEX (www.sciesmex.unam.mx) is operated by the Geophysics Institute at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The UNAM has the experience of operating several critical national services, including the National Seismological Service (SSN); besides that has a well established scientific group with expertise in space physics and solar- terrestrial phenomena. The SCIESMEX is also related with the recent creation of the Mexican Space Agency (AEM). The project combines a network of different ground instruments covering solar, interplanetary, geomagnetic, and ionospheric observations. The SCIESMEX has already in operation computing infrastructure running the web application, a virtual observatory and a high performance computing server to run numerical models. SCIESMEX participates in the International Space Environment Services (ISES) and in the Inter-progamme Coordination Team on Space Weather (ICTSW) of the Word Meteorological Organization (WMO).

  5. Space weather: European Space Agency perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, E. J.; Hilgers, A.

    Spacecraft and payloads have become steadily more sophisticated and therefore more susceptible to space weather effects. ESA has long been active in applying models and tools to the problems associated with such effects on its spacecraft. In parallel, ESA and European agencies have built a highly successful solar-terrestrial physics capability. ESA is now investigating the marriage of these technological and scientific capabilities to address perceived user needs for space weather products and services. Two major ESA-sponsored studies are laying the groundwork for a possible operational European space weather service. The wide-ranging activities of ESA in the Space Weather/Space Environment domain are summarized and recent important examples of space weather concerns given.

  6. Microbial desulfurization of fuel oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Culture conditions of desulfurization microbes were investigated with a bioreactor controlled by computer.Factors such as pH, choice of carbon source, optimal concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur sources were determined. The addition of carbon in a culture with a constant pH greatly improved the growth of Rhodococcus. Cells and cell debris from microbes rested using a sulfur- specific pathway were used to desulfurize diesel oil treated by hydrodesulfurization (acquired from the Research Institute of Fushun Petroleum with total sulfur level at 205 μg/mL).Strains 1awq, IG, X7B, ZT, ZCR, and a mixture of No. 5 and No. 6, were used in the biodesulfurization process. The reduction of total sulfur was between 10.6% and 90.3%.

  7. Topographic imprint on chemical weathering in deeply weathered soil-mantled landscapes (southern Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, Veerle; Schoonejans, Jerome; Ameijeiras-Marino, Yolanda; Opfergelt, Sophie; Minella, Jean

    2017-04-01

    The regolith mantle is defined as the thin layer of unconsolidated material overlaying bedrock that contributes to shape the Earth's surface. The development of the regolith mantle in a landscape is the result of in-situ weathering, atmospheric input and downhill transport of weathering products. Bedrock weathering - the physical and chemical transformations of rock to soil - contributes to the vertical development of the regolith layer through downward propagation of the weathering front. Lateral transport of soil particles, aggregates and solutes by diffusive and concentrated particle and solute fluxes result in lateral redistribution of weathering products over the hillslope. In this study, we aim to expand the empirical basis on long-term soil evolution at the landscape scale through a detailed study of soil weathering in subtropical soils. Spatial variability in chemical mass fluxes and weathering intensity were studied along two toposequences with similar climate, lithology and vegetation but different slope morphology. This allowed us to isolate the topographic imprint on chemical weathering and soil development. The toposequences have convexo-concave slope morphology, and eight regolith profiles were analysed involving the flat upslope, steep midslope and flat toeslope part. Our data show a clear topographic imprint on soil development. Along hillslope, the chemical weathering intensity of the regolith profiles increases with distance from the crest. In contrast to the upslope positions, the soils in the basal concavities develop on in-situ and transported regolith. While the chemical weathering extent on the slope convexities (the upslope profiles) is similar for the steep and gentle toposequence, there is a clear difference in the rate of increase of the chemical weathering extent with distance from the crest. The increase of chemical weathering extent along hillslope is highest for the steep toposequence, suggesting that topography enhances soil particle

  8. Oil Rig Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather observations taken at offshore platforms along the United States coastlines. The majority are located in oil-rich areas of the Gulf of Mexico, Gulf of...

  9. Uruguay - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface weather observation forms for 26 stations in Uruguay. Period of record 1896-2005, with two to eight observations per day. Files created through a...

  10. Cape Kennedy Weather Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitized data taken from original weather observations taken at Cape Kennedy Air Force Station, Florida. Elements recorded are wind speed and direction,...

  11. Monthly Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms is a set of historical manuscript records for the period 1893-1948. The collection includes two very similar form types: Form...

  12. Daily Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Several different government offices have published the Daily weather maps over its history. The publication has also gone by different names over time. The U.S....

  13. Weather Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Science Communications International (SCI), formerly General Science Corporation, has developed several commercial products based upon experience acquired as a NASA Contractor. Among them are METPRO, a meteorological data acquisition and processing system, which has been widely used, RISKPRO, an environmental assessment system, and MAPPRO, a geographic information system. METPRO software is used to collect weather data from satellites, ground-based observation systems and radio weather broadcasts to generate weather maps, enabling potential disaster areas to receive advance warning. GSC's initial work for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center resulted in METPAK, a weather satellite data analysis system. METPAK led to the commercial METPRO system. The company also provides data to other government agencies, U.S. embassies and foreign countries.

  14. Space Weather Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of space weather datasets from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and from the World Data Service for Geophysics,...

  15. Numerical simulation for regional ozone concentrations: A case study by weather research and forecasting/chemistry (WRF/Chem) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib Al Razi, Khandakar Md; Hiroshi, Moritomi [Environmental and Renewable Energy System, Graduate School of Engineering, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu City, 501-1193 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this research is to better understand and predict the atmospheric concentration distribution of ozone and its precursor (in particular, within the Planetary Boundary Layer (Within 110 km to 12 km) over Kasaki City and the Greater Tokyo Area using fully coupled online WRF/Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry) model. In this research, a serious and continuous high ozone episode in the Greater Tokyo Area (GTA) during the summer of 14–18 August 2010 was investigated using the observation data. We analyzed the ozone and other trace gas concentrations, as well as the corresponding weather conditions in this high ozone episode by WRF/Chem model. The simulation results revealed that the analyzed episode was mainly caused by the impact of accumulation of pollution rich in ozone over the Greater Tokyo Area. WRF/Chem has shown relatively good performance in modeling of this continuous high ozone episode, the simulated and the observed concentrations of ozone, NOx and NO2 are basically in agreement at Kawasaki City, with best correlation coefficients of 0.87, 0.70 and 0.72 respectively. Moreover, the simulations of WRF/Chem with WRF preprocessing software (WPS) show a better agreement with meteorological observations such as surface winds and temperature profiles in the ground level of this area. As a result the surface ozone simulation performances have been enhanced in terms of the peak ozone and spatial patterns, whereas WRF/Chem has been succeeded to generate meteorological fields as well as ozone, NOx, NO2 and NO.

  16. Numerical simulation for regional ozone concentrations: A case study by weather research and forecasting/chemistry (WRF/Chem model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandakar Md Habib Al Razi, Moritomi Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to better understand and predict the atmospheric concentration distribution of ozone and its precursor (in particular, within the Planetary Boundary Layer (Within 110 km to 12 km over Kasaki City and the Greater Tokyo Area using fully coupled online WRF/Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry model. In this research, a serious and continuous high ozone episode in the Greater Tokyo Area (GTA during the summer of 14–18 August 2010 was investigated using the observation data. We analyzed the ozone and other trace gas concentrations, as well as the corresponding weather conditions in this high ozone episode by WRF/Chem model. The simulation results revealed that the analyzed episode was mainly caused by the impact of accumulation of pollution rich in ozone over the Greater Tokyo Area. WRF/Chem has shown relatively good performance in modeling of this continuous high ozone episode, the simulated and the observed concentrations of ozone, NOx and NO2 are basically in agreement at Kawasaki City, with best correlation coefficients of 0.87, 0.70 and 0.72 respectively. Moreover, the simulations of WRF/Chem with WRF preprocessing software (WPS show a better agreement with meteorological observations such as surface winds and temperature profiles in the ground level of this area. As a result the surface ozone simulation performances have been enhanced in terms of the peak ozone and spatial patterns, whereas WRF/Chem has been succeeded to generate meteorological fields as well as ozone, NOx, NO2 and NO.

  17. A Feasibility Study of a Field-specific Weather Service for Small-scale Farms in a Topographically Complex Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. O.; Shim, K. M.; Shin, Y. S.; Yun, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    Adequate downscaling of synoptic forecasts is a prerequisite for improved agrometeorological service to rural areas in South Korea where complex terrain and small farms are common. Geospatial schemes based on topoclimatology were used to scale down the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) temperature forecasts to the local scale (~30 m) across a rural catchment. Local temperatures were estimated at 14 validation sites at 0600 and 1500 LST in 2013/2014 using these schemes and were compared with observations. A substantial reduction in the estimation error was found for both 0600 and 1500 temperatures compared with uncorrected KMA products. Improvement was most remarkable at low lying locations for the 0600 temperature and at the locations on west- and south-facing slopes for the 1500 temperature. Using the downscaled real-time temperature data, a pilot service has started to provide field-specific weather information tailored to meet the requirements of small-scale farms. For example, the service system makes a daily outlook on the phenology of crop species grown in a given field using the field-specific temperature data. When the temperature forecast is given for tomorrow morning, a frost risk index is calculated according to a known phenology-frost injury relationship. If the calculated index is higher than a pre-defined threshold, a warning is issued and delivered to the grower's cellular phone with relevant countermeasures to help protect crops against frost damage. The system was implemented for a topographically complex catchment of 350km2with diverse agricultural activities, and more than 400 volunteer farmers are participating in this pilot service to access user-specific weather information.

  18. Experimental plan for the Single-Family Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, L.G.; Brown, M.A.; Wright, T.; White, D.L.

    1991-09-01

    The national evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) consists of five separate studies. The Single-Family Study is one of three studies that will estimate program energy savings and cost effectiveness in principal WAP submarkets. This report presents the experimental plan for the Single-Family Study, which will be implemented over the next three years (1991--1993). The Single-Family Study will directly estimate energy savings for a nationally representative sample of single-family and small multifamily homes weatherized in the 1989 program year. Savings will be estimated from gas and electric utility billing records using the Princeton Scorekeeping Method (PRISM). The study will also assess nonenergy impacts (e.g., health, comfort, safety, and housing affordability), estimate cost effectiveness, and analyze factors influencing these outcomes. For homes using fuels such as wood, coal, fuel oil, kerosene, and propane as the primary source of space conditioning, energy savings will be studied indirectly. The study will assemble a large nationally representative data base. A cluster sampling approach will be used, in which about 400 subgrantees are selected in a first stage and weatherized homes are selected in a second range. To ensure that the Single-Family Study is able to identify promising opportunities for future program development, two purposively selected groups of subgrantees will be included: (1) subgrantees that install cooling measures (such as more efficient air conditioning equipment or radiant barriers), and (2) exemplary subgrantees that use state-of-the-art technologies and service delivery procedures (such as advanced audit techniques, blower door tests, infrared scanners, extensive client education, etc.). These two groups of subgrantees will be analyzed to identify the most effective program elements in specific circumstances. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Impacts of fuel oil substitution by natural gas in a pipeline network scheduling; Impactos da substituicao do oleo combustivel por gas natural na programacao de uma rede de dutos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Filho, Erito M.; Bahiense, Laura; Ferreira Filho, Virgilio J.M. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    In recent decades, due to the advancement and computational methods for solving optimization problems, the number of articles addressing the scheduling of products has grown. The mathematical models developed have proved useful to schedule from a single pipeline with multiple products to complex networks of multiple pipelines. Moreover, the planning of these activities is of even greater importance when considering the existence of new environmental requirements to be applied to production and marketing of petroleum products. An example of this paradigm shift is the reduction in fuel oil consumption due to increased share of natural gas in the Brazilian energy matrix. In this context, this paper proposes a mathematical model to obtain feasible solutions for problems of scheduling a network of pipelines considering replacing all or part of the demand for fuel oil to natural gas. We tested the model on three real instances of a multi commodity network consists of 4 terminals, 4 refineries and 8 unidirectional pipelines, considering a planning horizon of one week. (author)

  20. Genetically optimizing weather predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S. B.; Staats, Kai; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni

    2016-07-01

    humidity, air pressure, wind speed and wind direction) into a database. Built upon this database, we have developed a remarkably simple approach to derive a functional weather predictor. The aim is provide up to the minute local weather predictions in order to e.g. prepare dome environment conditions ready for night time operations or plan, prioritize and update weather dependent observing queues. In order to predict the weather for the next 24 hours, we take the current live weather readings and search the entire archive for similar conditions. Predictions are made against an averaged, subsequent 24 hours of the closest matches for the current readings. We use an Evolutionary Algorithm to optimize our formula through weighted parameters. The accuracy of the predictor is routinely tested and tuned against the full, updated archive to account for seasonal trends and total, climate shifts. The live (updated every 5 minutes) SALT weather predictor can be viewed here: http://www.saao.ac.za/ sbp/suthweather_predict.html

  1. Cockpit weather information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jeffrey Chen-Yu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Weather information, periodically collected from throughout a global region, is periodically assimilated and compiled at a central source and sent via a high speed data link to a satellite communication service, such as COMSAT. That communication service converts the compiled weather information to GSDB format, and transmits the GSDB encoded information to an orbiting broadcast satellite, INMARSAT, transmitting the information at a data rate of no less than 10.5 kilobits per second. The INMARSAT satellite receives that data over its P-channel and rebroadcasts the GDSB encoded weather information, in the microwave L-band, throughout the global region at a rate of no less than 10.5 KB/S. The transmission is received aboard an aircraft by means of an onboard SATCOM receiver and the output is furnished to a weather information processor. A touch sensitive liquid crystal panel display allows the pilot to select the weather function by touching a predefined icon overlain on the display's surface and in response a color graphic display of the weather is displayed for the pilot.

  2. The scope of the Weatherization Assistance Program: The weatherized population and the resource base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, M.; Eisenberg, J.F.; Michels, E. [Economic Opportunity Research Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Witherspoon, M.J. [National Association for State Community Service Programs, Washington, DC (United States); Brown, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-05-01

    This study is one of five parts of the US Department of Energy`s national evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). It has three major goals: (1) to enumerate the size and sources of investment in low-income weatherization; (2) to provide a count of the number of low-income units weatherized by all weatherization programs and characterized the type and tenure of those homes; and (3) to document the extent to which the DOE/WAP funding has been expanded though use of external resources.

  3. The scope of the Weatherization Assistance Program: The weatherized population and the resource base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, M.; Eisenberg, J.F.; Michels, E. (Economic Opportunity Research Inst., Washington, DC (United States)); Witherspoon, M.J. (National Association for State Community Service Programs, Washington, DC (United States)); Brown, M.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-05-01

    This study is one of five parts of the US Department of Energy's national evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). It has three major goals: (1) to enumerate the size and sources of investment in low-income weatherization; (2) to provide a count of the number of low-income units weatherized by all weatherization programs and characterized the type and tenure of those homes; and (3) to document the extent to which the DOE/WAP funding has been expanded though use of external resources.

  4. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigg, Scott [Energy Center of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Cautley, Dan [Energy Center of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Francisco, Paul [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Hawkins, Beth A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brennan, Terry M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  5. Assessment Impacts of Weather and Land Use/Land Cover (LULC Change on Urban Vegetation Net Primary Productivity (NPP: A Case Study in Guangzhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiantie Zeng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Net primary productivity (NPP can indicate vegetation ecosystem services ability and reflect variation response to climate change and human activities. This study applied MODIS-1 km NPP products to investigate the NPP variation from 2001 to 2006, a fast urban expansion and adjustment period in Guangzhou, China, and quantify the impacts of weather and land use/land cover (LULC changes, respectively. The results showed that the NPP mean value increased at a rate of 11.6 g∙C∙m−2∙yr−1 during the initial three years and decreased at an accelerated rate of 31.0 g∙C∙m−2∙yr−1 during the final three years, resulting in a total NPP loss of approximately 167 × 106 g∙C. The spatiotemporal of NPP varied obviously in the central area, suburb and exurb of Guangzhou driven by three patterns of weather and LULC changes. By the interactive effects and the weather variation dominated effects, NPP of most areas changed slightly with dynamic index less than 5% of NPP mean value in the central area and the suburb. The LULC change dominated effects caused obvious NPP reduction, by more than 15% of the NPP mean value, which occurred in some areas of the suburb and extended to the exurb with the outward urban sprawl. Importantly, conversion from wood grassland, shrublands and even forests to croplands occupied by urban landscapes proved to be a main process in the conversion from high-NPP coverage to low-NPP coverage, thereby leading to the rapid degradation of urban carbon stock capacity in urban fringe areas. It is helpful for government to monitor urban ecological health and safety and make relevant policies.

  6. Using Music to Communicate Weather and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P.; Aplin, K. L.; Brown, S.; Jenkins, K.; Mander, S.; Walsh, C.

    2016-12-01

    Depictions of weather and other atmospheric phenomena are common throughout the arts. Unlike in the visual arts, however, there has been little study of meteorological inspiration in music. This presentation will discuss the frequencies with which different weather types have been depicted in music over time, covering the period from the seventeenth century to the present day. Beginning with classical orchestral music, we find that composers were generally influenced by their own country's climate in the type of weather they chose to represent. Depictions of weather vary from explicit mimicry using traditional and specialized orchestral instruments, through to subtle suggestions. Pieces depicting stormy weather tend to be in minor keys, whereas pieces depicting fair weather tend to be in major keys. As befits the national stereotype, British composers seem disproportionately keen to depict the UK's variable weather patterns and stormy coastline. Moving onto modern popular music, we have identified and analyzed over 750 songs referring to different weather types. We find that lyrical references to bad weather peaked in songs written during the stormy 1950s and 60s, when there were many hurricanes, before declining in the relatively calm 1970s and 80s. This finding again suggests a causal link between song-writers' meteorological environments and compositional outputs. Composers and song-writers have a unique ability to emotionally connect their listeners to the environment. This ability could be exploited to communicate environmental science to a broader audience. Our work provides a catalogue of cultural responses to weather before (and during the early stages of) climate change. The effects of global warming may influence musical expression in future, in which case our work will provide a baseline for comparison.

  7. Weather, transport mode choices and emotional travel experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böcker, L.; Dijst, M.J.; Faber, J.

    2016-01-01

    With climate change high on the political agenda, weather has emerged as an important issue in travel behavioral research and urban planning. While various studies demonstrate profound effects of weather on travel behaviors, limited attention has been paid to subjective weather experiences and the

  8. The weathering of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash evaluated by some weathering indices for natural rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Fumitake; Shimaoka, Takayuki

    2012-12-01

    The weathering of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues consists of complicated phenomena. This makes it difficult to describe leaching behaviors of major and trace elements in fresh/weathered MSWI bottom ash, which was relevant interactively to pH neutralization and formation of secondary minerals. In this study, mineralogical weathering indices for natural rock profiles were applied to fresh/landfilled MSWI bottom ash to investigate the relation of these weathering indices to landfill time and leaching concentrations of component elements. Tested mineralogical weathering indices were Weathering Potential Index (WPI), Ruxton ratio (R), Weathering Index of Parker (WIP), Vogt's Residual Index (V), Chemical Index of Alternation (CIA), Chemical Index of Weathering (CIW), Plagioclase Index of Alternation (PIA), Silica-Titania Index (STI), Weathering Index of Miura (Wm), and Weatherability index of Hodder (Ks). Welch's t-test accepted at 0.2% of significance level that all weathering indices could distinguish fresh and landfilled MSWI bottom ash. However, R and STI showed contrasted results for landfilled bottom ash to theoretical expectation. WPI, WIP, Wm, and Ks had good linearity with reclamation time of landfilled MSWI bottom ash. Therefore, these four indices might be applicable as an indicator to identify fresh/weathered MSWI bottom ash and to estimate weathering time. Although WPI had weak correlation with leachate pH, other weathering indices had no significant correlation. In addition, all weathering indices could not explain leaching concentration of Al, Ca, Cu, and Zn quantitatively. Large difficulty to modify weathering indices correctly suggests that geochemical simulation including surface sorption, complexation with DOM, and other mechanisms seems to be the only way to describe leaching behaviors of major and trace elements in fresh/weathered MSWI bottom ash. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Improving Local Weather Forecasts for Agricultural Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, T.G.; Keesman, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    For controlling agricultural systems, weather forecasts can be of substantial importance. Studies have shown that forecast errors can be reduced in terms of bias and standard deviation using forecasts and meteorological measurements from one specific meteorological station. For agricultural systems

  10. Improving Local Weather Forecasts for Agricultural Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, T.G.; Keesman, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    For controlling agricultural systems, weather forecasts can be of substantial importance. Studies have shown that forecast errors can be reduced in terms of bias and standard deviation using forecasts and meteorological measurements from one specific meteorological station. For agricultural systems

  11. Urban pluvial flood prediction: a case study evaluating radar rainfall nowcasts and numerical weather prediction models as model inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Jensen, David Getreuer

    2016-12-01

    Flooding produced by high-intensive local rainfall and drainage system capacity exceedance can have severe impacts in cities. In order to prepare cities for these types of flood events - especially in the future climate - it is valuable to be able to simulate these events numerically, both historically and in real-time. There is a rather untested potential in real-time prediction of urban floods. In this paper, radar data observations with different spatial and temporal resolution, radar nowcasts of 0-2 h leadtime, and numerical weather models with leadtimes up to 24 h are used as inputs to an integrated flood and drainage systems model in order to investigate the relative difference between different inputs in predicting future floods. The system is tested on the small town of Lystrup in Denmark, which was flooded in 2012 and 2014. Results show it is possible to generate detailed flood maps in real-time with high resolution radar rainfall data, but rather limited forecast performance in predicting floods with leadtimes more than half an hour.

  12. Comparative study of the reliability of MPPT algorithms for the crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules in variable weather conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Dandoussou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules are widely used as power supply sources in the tropical areas where the weather conditions change abruptly. Fortunately, many MPPT algorithms are implemented to improve their performance. In the other hand, it is well known that these power supply sources are nonlinear dipoles and so, their intrinsic parameters may vary with the irradiance and the temperature. In this paper, the MPPT algorithms widely used, i.e. Perturb and Observe (P&O, Incremental Conductance (INC, Hill-Climbing (HC, are implemented using Matlab®/Simulink® model of a crystalline silicon photovoltaic module whose intrinsic parameters were extracted by fitting the I(V characteristic to experimental points. Comparing the simulation results, it is obvious that the variable step size INC algorithm has the best reliability than both HC and P&O algorithms for the near to real Simulink® model of photovoltaic modules. With a 60 Wp photovoltaic module, the daily maximum power reaches 50.76 W against 34.40 W when the photovoltaic parameters are fixed. Meanwhile, the daily average energy is 263 Wh/day against 195 Wh/day.

  13. An Experimental Study on the Effects of Microbes on the Migration and Accumulation of REE in the Weathering Crust of Granite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈炳辉; 王智美; 等

    2000-01-01

    Microbes were cultured and identified from the saples collected at various depths in 4 weathering profiles of REE-bearing granites in Gonghe,Guangdong,The microbes were found existing at the depth of 0-5m in all the profiles.The main microbes include coccus (Staphylococcus,Streptococcus),bacillus(Bacillus,Clostridium and Escherichia Coli),actinmyces and fungi(Saccharomycete,Penicillium,Fusarium,Aspergillus Aiger and Mucor),The number of colonies decreases downwards in the profiles.Experimental studies show that all the microbes used in the experiment can accelerate downward migation of REE in the experimental tubes.,The ability to accelerate the migration of REE decreases in a sequence of fungi→actinomyces→acillus→coccus.The microbes can change the modes of occurrence of REE in the weathering crust.The coccus,bacillus and actinomyces can increase the amounts of REE in ion state,whereas the fungi have a stronger ability to from organic compounding REE and accumulate REE than the bacteria do.

  14. Developing a Traffic Management Framework for Coastal Expressway Bridges under Adverse Weather Conditions: Case Study of Rain Day in Shenzhen, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenming Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse weather can reduce visibility and road surface friction, lower vehicle maneuverability, and increase crash frequency and injury severity. The impacts of adverse weather and its interactions with drivers and roadway on the operation and management of expressway or expressway bridges have drawn the researchers’ and managers’ attention to develop traffic management frameworks to mitigate the negative influence. Considering the peculiar geographical location and meteorological conditions, the Guangshen Coast Expressway-Shenzhen Segment (GSCE-SS was selected as a case in this study to illustrate the proposed traffic management framework on rain days. Conditions categorized by rainfall intensity and traffic flow were the main precondition to make the management decisions. CORSIM simulator was used to develop the alternate routes choice schemes, providing reference for other systems in the proposed traffic management framework. Maps of (a entrance ramp control (ERC strategies; (b mainline control strategies; (c alternate routes choice; (d information release schemes, under scenarios of different volume and rainstorm warning grades (BLUE to RED, were drawn to present a reference or demonstration for managers of long-span expressway bridges not only in China, but even in the world.

  15. Measuring ignitability for in situ burning of oil spills weathered under Arctic conditions: From laboratory studies to large-scale field experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Brandvik, Per Johan

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares the ignitability of Troll B crude oil weathered under simulated Arctic conditions (0%, 50% and 90% ice cover). The experiments were performed in different scales at SINTEF’s laboratories in Trondheim, field research station on Svalbard and in broken ice (70–90% ice cover......) in the Barents Sea. Samples from the weathering experiments were tested for ignitability using the same laboratory burning cell. The measured ignitability from the experiments in these different scales showed a good agreement for samples with similar weathering. The ice conditions clearly affected the weathering...... process, and 70% ice or more reduces the weathering and allows a longer time window for in situ burning. The results from the Barents Sea revealed that weathering and ignitability can vary within an oil slick. This field use of the burning cell demonstrated that it can be used as an operational tool...

  16. The influence of ship movements on the energy expenditure of fishermen. A study during a North Sea Voyage in calm weather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breidahl, Tomas; Christensen, Michael; Johansen, Jens Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Former studies of professional fishing activities has indicated that movements of a ship, in itself, may increase the energy expenditure in addition to the traditional work carried out by fishermen. We have studied the effects of expo- sure to the ship’s movement during calm weather...... by examining the crude relation between the ship’s movement and the energy expenditure of the fishermen, thus ignoring the various tasks undertaken on board. Methods: Four fishermen on two contemporary steel trawlers were recruited and participated during the whole study. Activities and health conditions were...... recorded once an hour in four days. Estimation of energy expenditure were done with a body monitoring system (SenseWear Pro 3) carried as an armband placed on the right upper arm. Measurements of sea movements were obtained by a gyroscope placed in the vessels wheelhouse during fishing expeditions...

  17. 重质燃料油中主要芳烃在自然条件下的风化规律%Weathering of Main Aromatic Hydrocarbon in Heavy Fuel Oil under Natural Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪张林; 马启敏; 程海鸥

    2007-01-01

    文章在自然环境条件下对重质燃料油进行了风化模拟实验,采用气质(GC/MS)联用仪分析了重质燃料油中主要芳烃组分及其变化.结果表明:该重质燃料油中主要芳烃为苯类(CnB)、萘(CnN)类、菲(CnP)类、二苯并噻吩(CnD)类;在自然条件下,经过1周的风化,CnB和C0N完全损失;经过6周风化,C1N完全损失;经过12周的风化,C2N完全损失,3环的PAHs无明显变化.同时指出C2D/C2P和C3D/C,P的比值以及烷基化二苯并噻吩的同分异构体分布可用于区别其它油品,并且风化后变化不大,仍可较好地用于油品的鉴定.

  18. A grid-based distributed flood forecasting model for use with weather radar data: Part 2. Case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, V. A.; Moore, R. J.

    A simple distributed rainfall-runoff model, configured on a square grid to make best use of weather radar data, was developed in Part 1 (Bell and Moore, 1998). The simple form of the basic model, referred to as the Simple Grid Model or SGM, allows a number of model variants to be introduced, including probability-distributed storage and topographic index representations of runoff production and formulations which use soil survey and land use data. These models are evaluated here on three catchments in the UK: the Rhondda in south Wales, the Wyre in north-west England and the Mole in the Thames Basin near London. Assessment is initially carried out in simulation mode to focus on the conversion of rainfall to runoff as influenced by (i) use of radar or raingauge input, (ii) choice of model variant, and (iii) use of a lumped or distributed model formulation. Weather radar data, in grid square and catchment average form, and raingauge data are used as alternative estimates of rainfall input to the model. Results show that when radar data are of good quality, significant model improvement may be obtained by replacing data from a single raingauge by 2 km grid square radar data. The performance of the Simple Grid Model with optimised isochrones is only marginally improved through the use of different model variants and is generally preferred on account of its simplicity. A more traditional lumped rainfall-runoff model, the Probability-Distributed Moisture model or PDM, is used as a benchmark against which to assess the performance of the distributed models. This proves hard to better, although the distributed formulation of the Grid model proves more reliable for some storm and catchment combinations where spatial effects on runoff response are evident. Assessment is then carried out in updating mode to emulate a real-time forecasting environment. First, a state updating form of the Grid Model is developed and then assessed against an ARMA error-prediction technique. Both

  19. Performance assessment of the COAMPS numerical weather prediction model in precise GPS positioning: EUPOS network case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgosz, Pawel; Paziewski, Jacek; Krankowski, Andrzej; Kroszczynski, Krzyszfof; Figurski, Mariusz

    2010-05-01

    The Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS®) represents a complete three-dimensional data assimilation system comprised of data quality control, analysis, initialization, and forecast model components. COAMPS has been developed by the Marine Meteorology Division (MMD) of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The U.S. Navy uses the system for short-term numerical weather predictions for various regions of the world. Currently COAMPS ver.3.1 is also operated and tested at the Department of Civil Engineering and Geodesy of the Military University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland (MUT). It is primarily used for military applications, but also a new module has been developed to provide tropospheric zenith total delays (ZTD) for stations of the Polish part of the European Position Determination System (EUPOS). ZTDs can be obtained in both near-real time and several hours ahead. In the highest-precision GPS applications tropospheric delays are usually estimated from satellite observables. When processing long baselines the common practice is to derive the hydrostatic component from any troposphere model and use it as a priori information. The non-hydrostatic part is estimated in the adjustment along with station coordinates. The change of satellite geometry during the observational session allows overcome high correlation between the tropospheric delays and the station height components. However, when processing very short sessions and medium baselines, this change is too small and does not allow estimating reliable ZTDs. Hence, ZTD are derived from troposphere models and used for correction of GPS data in the processing. This contribution presents the application of COAMPS-derived ZTDs in precise GPS positioning when using short data spans (1-5 minutes) and processing medium baselines (50-80 km). The presented tests were performed in two areas: Wielkopolska Lowland (all stations located at similar heights), and Carpathian Mountains (where station

  20. Space weather & telecommunications

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, John M

    2006-01-01

    This book is both a survey of practical concepts for forecasting the performance of various telecommunication systems as well as a balanced treatment of space-weather phenomena that give rise to telecommunication impairment episodes. It bridges the gap in the relationship that exists between the following two disciplines: space weather and telecommunication system performance. There are a number of books that address one of the two disciplines in some detail, but only merely mention the other as an afterthought. In this book the author has married the two disciplines so that the readership can

  1. Effects of glacial/post-glacial weathering compared with hydrothermal alteration - implications for matrix diffusion. Results from drillcore studies in porphyritic quartz monzodiorite from Aespoe SE Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landstroem, Ove [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden); Eriksson, Gunda; Sandell, Yvonne [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2001-08-01

    The effects of hydrothermal + subsequent low temperature alteration and glacial/post-glacial weathering have been studied in two cores of quartz monzodiorite. One core (YA 1192) was drilled into the hydrothermally altered wall rock of a water-conducting fracture exposed at 170 m depth in the access tunnel to the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The other one (Bas 1) was drilled from an outcrop with a glacially polished surface, 1 km north of the YA 1192 site. Both drill cores were sectioned into mm-thick slices perpendicular to the core axis. The fracture filling of the YA 1192 core, the weathered surface of the BAS 1 core and the different slices were analysed for major and trace elements and isotopes of U and Th. The altered zone of the YA 1192 core extends to approx. 2.5 cm from the fracture surface. The alteration (mainly plagioclase {yields} albite + sericite + epidote) has resulted in a higher porosity and formation of sorbing secondary minerals (e.g. sericite), favouring matrix diffusion. Increased Br concentrations in the altered zone are indicative of saline water in pores and micro fractures i.e. the presence of a diffusion medium. 234U/238U activity ratios > 1 and increased Cs in the altered zone are then interpreted as diffusion of U and Cs from fracture groundwater and subsequent sorption. The U migration is geologically recent (< 1 Ma). The 2.5 cm altered zone (corresponding to the zone of active matrix diffusion) significantly exceeds the visible red staining zone (0.5 cm) caused by hematite/FeOOH micrograins, emphasizing the need of microscopy to identify zones of alteration. The conspicuous weathering at the BAS 1 site is confined to a narrow rim of the bedrock surface (approx. 0.2-0.5 cm thick). Mass balance calculations for this rim (based on immobility of K) indicate that mechanical erosion has dominated over chemical dissolution processes (is roughly 10 times greater). The chemical weathering has affected mainly plagioclase and chlorite resulting

  2. Differences in the importance of weather and weather-based decisions among campers in Ontario parks (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewer, Micah J.; Scott, Daniel J.; Gough, William A.

    2017-05-01

    Parks and protected areas represent an important resource for tourism in Canada, in which camping is a common recreational activity. The important relationship between weather and climate with recreation and tourism has been widely acknowledged within the academic literature. Howbeit, the need for activity-specific assessments has been identified as an on-going need for future research in the field of tourism climatology. Furthermore, very little is known about the interrelationships between personal characteristics and socio-demographics with weather preferences and behavioural thresholds. This study uses a stated climate preferences approach (survey responses) to explore differences in the importance of weather and related weather-based decisions among summer campers in Ontario parks. Statistically significant differences were found among campers for each of the four dependent variables tested in this study. Physically active campers placed greater importance on weather but were still more tolerant of adverse weather conditions. Older campers placed greater importance on weather. Campers travelling shorter distances placed greater importance on weather and were more likely to leave the park early due to adverse weather. Campers staying for longer periods of time were less likely to leave early due to weather and were willing to endure longer durations of adverse weather conditions. Beginner campers placed greater importance on weather, were more likely to leave early due to weather and recorded lower temporal weather thresholds. The results of this study contribute to the study of tourism climatology by furthering understanding of how personal characteristics such as gender, age, activity selection, trip duration, distance travelled, travel experience and life cycles affect weather preferences and decisions, focusing this time on recreational camping in a park tourism context.

  3. Effects of Weather on Tourism and its Moderation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. H.; Kim, S.; Lee, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Tourism is weather sensitive industry (Gómez Martín, 2005). As climate change has been intensifying, the concerns about negative effects of weather on tourism also have been increasing. This study attempted to find ways that mitigate the negative effects from weather on tourism, by analyzing a path of the effects of weather on intention to revisit and its moderation. The data of the study were collected by a self-recording online questionnaire survey of South Korean domestic tourists during August 2015, and 2,412 samples were gathered. A path model of effects of weather on intention to revisit that including moderating effects from physical attraction satisfaction and service satisfaction was ran. Season was controlled in the path model. The model fit was adequate (CMIN/DF=2.372(p=.000), CFI=.974, RMSEA=.024, SRMR=0.040), and the Model Comparison, which assumes that the base model to be correct with season constrained model, showed that there was a seasonal differences in the model ( DF=24, CMIN=32.430, P=.117). By the analysis, it was figured out that weather and weather expectation affected weather satisfaction, and the weather satisfaction affected intention to revisit (spring/fall: .167**, summer: .104**, and winter: .114**). Meanwhile physical attraction satisfaction (.200**), and service satisfaction (.210**) of tourism positively moderated weather satisfaction in summer, and weather satisfaction positively moderated physical attraction (.238**) satisfaction and service satisfaction (.339**). In other words, in summer, dissatisfaction from hot weather was moderated by satisfaction from physical attractions and services, and in spring/fall, comfort weather conditions promoted tourists to accept tourism experience and be satisfied from attractions and services positively. Based on the result, it was expected that if industries focus on offering the good attractions and services based on weather conditions, there would be positive effects to alleviate tourists

  4. Variation of radiological consequences under various weather conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xinhe; Homma, Toshimitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    Stratified sampling method of determining weather sequences is widely used in Probabilistic Safety Assessment Level-3 calculations with an intention to predict the complete spectrum of the accident consequences. Intensive calculations were performed for every weather bin in order to get a general view of consequence variation in response to the indices used in the weather bin categorization procedures. The results of this case study demonstrated that there must be important factors, such as time-integrals of meteorological parameters other than initial weather conditions, which might influence the consequences for a given accident. Further improvement is needed for the choice of criteria for grouping weather sequences in the stratified sampling scheme. (author)

  5. Investigating Space Weather Events Impacting the Spitzer Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Leo Y.; Hunt, Joseph C. Jr.; Stowers, Kennis; Lowrance, Patrick; Stewart, Andrzej; Travis, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the dynamical process in the space environment has increased dramatically. A relatively new field of study called "Space Weather" has emerged in the last few decades. Fundamental to the study of space weather is an understanding of how space weather events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections impact spacecraft in varying orbits and distances around the Sun. Specialized space weather satellite monitoring systems operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) allow scientists to predict space weather events affecting critical systems on and orbiting the Earth. However, the Spitzer Space Telescope is in an orbit far outside the areas covered by those space weather monitoring systems. This poses a challenge for the Spitzer's Mission Operations Team in determining whether space weather events affect Spitzer.

  6. Biogenic isoprene emissions driven by regional weather predictions using different initialization methods: case studies during the SEAC4RS and DISCOVER-AQ airborne campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Land and atmospheric initial conditions of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model are often interpolated from a different model output. We perform case studies during NASA's SEAC4RS and DISCOVER-AQ Houston airborne campaigns, demonstrating that using land initial conditions directly downscaled from a coarser resolution dataset led to significant positive biases in the coupled NASA-Unified WRF (NUWRF, version 7 surface and near-surface air temperature and planetary boundary layer height (PBLH around the Missouri Ozarks and Houston, Texas, as well as poorly partitioned latent and sensible heat fluxes. Replacing land initial conditions with the output from a long-term offline Land Information System (LIS simulation can effectively reduce the positive biases in NUWRF surface air temperature by ∼ 2 °C. We also show that the LIS land initialization can modify surface air temperature errors almost 10 times as effectively as applying a different atmospheric initialization method. The LIS-NUWRF-based isoprene emission calculations by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN, version 2.1 are at least 20 % lower than those computed using the coarser resolution data-initialized NUWRF run, and are closer to aircraft-observation-derived emissions. Higher resolution MEGAN calculations are prone to amplified discrepancies with aircraft-observation-derived emissions on small scales. This is possibly a result of some limitations of MEGAN's parameterization and uncertainty in its inputs on small scales, as well as the representation error and the neglect of horizontal transport in deriving emissions from aircraft data. This study emphasizes the importance of proper land initialization to the coupled atmospheric weather modeling and the follow-on emission modeling. We anticipate it to also be critical to accurately representing other processes included in air quality modeling and chemical data assimilation. Having more

  7. Dress for the Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, Nicole J.; Smetana, Lara K.

    2010-01-01

    "If someone were traveling to our area for the first time during this time of year, what would you tell them to bring to wear? Why?" This question was used to engage students in a guided-inquiry unit about how climate differs from weather. In this lesson, students explored local and national data sets to give "travelers" advice…

  8. Microbial Weathering of Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D. S.; Longazo, T. G.; Wentworth, S. J.; Southam, G.

    2002-01-01

    Controlled microbial weathering of olivine experiments displays a unique style of nanoetching caused by biofilm attachment to mineral surfaces. We are investigating whether the morphology of biotic nanoetching can be used as a biosignature. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Winter Weather: Indoor Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Part 3 of 3) Hot Weather Tips Heat Stress in Older Adults FAQs Extreme Heat PSAs Related Links MMWR Bibliography CDC's Program Floods Flood Readiness Personal Hygiene After a Disaster Cleanup of Flood Water After a Flood Worker Safety Educational Materials Floods ...

  10. Winter Weather: Frostbite

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Part 3 of 3) Hot Weather Tips Heat Stress in Older Adults FAQs Extreme Heat PSAs Related Links MMWR Bibliography CDC's Program Floods Flood Readiness Personal Hygiene After a Disaster Cleanup of Flood Water After a Flood Worker Safety Educational Materials Floods ...

  11. Winter Weather Checklists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Part 3 of 3) Hot Weather Tips Heat Stress in Older Adults FAQs Extreme Heat PSAs Related Links MMWR Bibliography CDC's Program Floods Flood Readiness Personal Hygiene After a Disaster Cleanup of Flood Water After a Flood Worker Safety Educational Materials Floods ...

  12. Weather at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, David Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-19

    This report gives general information about how to become a meteorologist and what kinds of jobs exist in that field. Then it goes into detail about why weather is monitored at LANL, how it is done, and where the data can be accessed online.

  13. Cold Weather Pet Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they can be knocked over, potentially starting a fire. Check your furnace before the cold weather sets in to make ... avoided because of the risk of burns or fire. Heated pet mats should also be used ... to burrow, get them back inside quickly because they are showing signs of ...

  14. Dress for the Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, Nicole J.; Smetana, Lara K.

    2010-01-01

    "If someone were traveling to our area for the first time during this time of year, what would you tell them to bring to wear? Why?" This question was used to engage students in a guided-inquiry unit about how climate differs from weather. In this lesson, students explored local and national data sets to give "travelers" advice…

  15. On the mechanisms of the corrosion of weathering steel by SO{sub 2} in laboratory studies: influence of the environmental parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco, J. F., E-mail: jfmarco@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química Física “Rocasolano”, CSIC (Spain)

    2017-11-15

    We report here on the mechanisms underlying the corrosion of weathering steel in accelerated laboratory tests using artificially polluted SO{sub 2}-atmospheres. The role of corrosion parameters such as the SO{sub 2} concentration, the exposure time, the relative humidity and temperature of the environment are discussed in detail. Through the extensive use of Mössbauer spectroscopy in both its transmission and electron detection modes, as well as with the help of other analysis techniques, the characterization of the different corrosion products at the various stages of the corrosion process has been carried out. The results complement the data obtained in field studies and help to understand the mechanisms involved in this complex phenomenon.

  16. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    . The negatively fractionated δ53Cr values measured in the weathering profile relative to the unaltered tonalitic bedrock characterized by a high temperature magmatic inventory Cr isotope signature are consistent with loss of a positively fractionated Cr(VI) pool formed during weathering. The predicted existence......We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al...... of the soil profile relative to stage one altered saprolite. This gain in Cr is accompanied by decreasing δ53Cr values and can be explained by partial immobilization (possibly by adsorption/coprecipitation on/with Fe-oxy-hydroxides) of mobile Cr(III) during upward transport in the weathering profile...

  17. Weatherization Works: An interim report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The National Weatherization Evaluation is the first comprehensive evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program since 1984. The evaluation was designed to accomplish the following goals: Estimate energy savings and cost effectiveness; Assess nonenergy impacts; Describe the weatherization network; Characterize the eligible population and resources; and Identify factors influencing outcomes and opportunities for the future. As a national program, weatherization incorporates considerable diversity due to regional differences. Therefore, evaluation results are presented both in aggregate and for three climate regions: cold, moderate and hot.

  18. Weatherization Works: An interim report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The National Weatherization Evaluation is the first comprehensive evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program since 1984. The evaluation was designed to accomplish the following goals: Estimate energy savings and cost effectiveness; Assess nonenergy impacts; Describe the weatherization network; Characterize the eligible population and resources; and Identify factors influencing outcomes and opportunities for the future. As a national program, weatherization incorporates considerable diversity due to regional differences. Therefore, evaluation results are presented both in aggregate and for three climate regions: cold, moderate and hot.

  19. Research Progress in Municipal Solid Waste Pyrolysis Technology for Fuel Oil Production%城市生活垃圾处理现状及热解制备燃料油技术的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向达

    2012-01-01

    在简要阐述了国内外城市生活垃圾处理现状的基础上,分析了城市生活垃圾热解制备燃料油技术的技术背景、技术原理、工艺流程,并分析了该技术的优势和经济效益。%The statas of the processing of the municipal solid waste at home and abroad were introduced. The background and the technological process of municipal solid waste pyrolysis technology for fuel oil production were introduced, too. Finally the advan- tages and the economic benefits of the technology were analysed.

  20. Risk Evaluation in Fuel Oil Futures Market Based on VaR-GARCH Dynamic Model%基于VaR-GARCH族动态模型的燃料油期货市场风险测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴毓; 周德群

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,we build a dynamic VaR-GARCHs evaluation model of the single futures contract in Shanghai fuel oil futures market was given.Based on VaR,the dynamic VaR-GARCH evaluation model can effectively forecast the range of volatility in the future well and truly.Furthermore,it is workable in forewarning and monitoring market risks.Considering actual futures margin rate in Shanghai fuel oil futures market,a new rate setting model(RCM)was obtained with corrected futures margin rate.RCM absorbs the advantages of margin rate setting techniques used at home and aborad.As a result,it can effectively control and avoid market risks,thus increasing the efficiency of fund utilization.%针对上海燃料油期货市场,基于VaR方法,建立了单个期货合约的VaR-GARCH族动态测量模型.实证结果表明,该模型可以较准确地预测未来价格波动范围,并具有较好的风险预警、风险监控作用.针对燃料油期货的现行保证金比例,本文给出修正后的保证金比例井提出了一种新型的保证金设定模型,该模型结合了国内、外确定期货保证金方法的优点,在有效地控制和规避市场风险的基础上提高了资金使用效率.

  1. North America Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Maps contains a surface analysis comprised of plotted weather station observations, isobars indicating low and high-pressure...

  2. Severe Weather Data Inventory (SWDI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Severe Weather Data Inventory (SWDI) is an integrated database of severe weather records for the United States. SWDI enables a user to search through a variety...

  3. Study on Climate Changes and Dlsastrous Weather in Tianjin%天津气候变化及灾害性天气研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵聪颖; 李云波; 王菲

    2011-01-01

    选取1980~2009年30 a天津4个具有代表性的气象站点的观测资料,研究了蓟县、宝坻、天津市区和大港地区温度、降水等气象因子的变化,分析了该地区的气候变化,以及沙尘、冰雹、雷暴和烟霾等灾害性天气出现频次.结果表明.1980~2009年在全球气候变暖、华北地区气温趋向暖干化的背景下,天津地区温度呈上升趋势,降水量变化不同,雷暴和烟霾是该地区频繁出现的灾害性天气,尤其是烟霾出现的频率增长很快,值得进一步关注.%Meteorological observation datd in 4 representative meteorological stations in Tianjin during 30 a(1980-2009)were selected,and the variation of meteorological factors,such as temperature,rainfall,etc.in Ji County,Tianjin Urban District and Dagang regions were studied In addition,the climate variation and the occurrence frequency of disadtrous weather,such as,dust,hailstone,thunderstorm and smaze,etc.in those were summarized and analyzed.The results indicated that under the background of global warming and climate warming and drying in North China during 1980-2009,the temperature in Tianjin showed increasing trend,and rainfall variation was not uniform,thunderstorm and smaze were desastrous weather which occurred frequengly in this area,especially the frequency if smaze increased quickly and deserved further attention.

  4. What characterizes planetary space weather?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Space weather has become a mature discipline for the Earth space environment. With increasing efforts in space exploration, it is becoming more and more necessary to understand the space environments of bodies other than Earth. This is the background for an emerging aspect of the space weather discipline: planetary space weather. In this article, we explore what characterizes planetary space weather, using some examples throughout the solar system. We consider energy s...

  5. Resources for Teaching about Energy in the Social Studies Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Robin; Stone, Kim

    1992-01-01

    Lists instructional resources for use by social studies teachers in teaching about energy. Includes curriculum materials, videotapes, organizations, government agencies, and industry trade associations that can provide information. Suggests items on energy conservation, global warming, ecology, nuclear power, fossil fuels, oil spills, and…

  6. Characterization of the Weatherization Assistance Program network. Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihlmester, P.E.; Koehler, W.C. Jr.; Beyer, M.A. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Applied Management Sciences Div.; Brown, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Beschen, D.A. Jr. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Weatherization Assistance Programs

    1992-02-01

    The Characterization of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) Network was designed to describe the national network of State and local agencies that provide WAP services to qualifying low-income households. The objective of this study was to profile the current WAP network. To achieve the objective, two national surveys were conducted: one survey collected data from 49 State WAP agencies (including the coterminous 48 States and the District of Columbia), and the second survey collected data from 920 (or 81 percent) of the local WAP agencies.

  7. Severe Weather Planning for Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Barbara McNaught; Strong, Christopher; Bunting, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Flash floods, severe thunderstorms, and tornadoes occur with rapid onset and often no warning. Decisions must be made quickly and actions taken immediately. This paper provides tips for schools on: (1) Preparing for Severe Weather Emergencies; (2) Activating a Severe Weather Plan; (3) Severe Weather Plan Checklist; and (4) Periodic Drills and…

  8. Whether weather affects music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, Karen L.; Williams, Paul D.

    2012-09-01

    The creative output of composers, writers, and artists is often influenced by their surroundings. To give a literary example, it has been claimed recently that some of the characters in Oliver Twist and A Christmas Carol were based on real-life people who lived near Charles Dickens in London [Richardson, 2012]. Of course, an important part of what we see and hear is not only the people with whom we interact but also our geophysical surroundings. Of all the geophysical phenomena to influence us, the weather is arguably the most significant because we are exposed to it directly and daily. The weather was a great source of inspiration for artists Claude Monet, John Constable, and William Turner, who are known for their scientifically accurate paintings of the skies [e.g., Baker and Thornes, 2006].

  9. The Weather Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋涵毅

    2009-01-01

    Secondly. the weather man一定会告诉我们每天的最高和最低温度(the highest and the lowest temperature)。我们用℃来表示摄氏度,有的地方则用°F,那是华氏温度。°F=9/5×℃+32

  10. Tactical Weather Expert System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of developing an expert system for tactical weather prediction. Using WILLARD, an expert ...indicate that intelligent interpretations of cloud formations can be made. These inferences can then be automatically passed to the expert system for...processing as another piece of information. It is anticipated that this technology will significantly reduce the dependence of the expert system on a

  11. Space Weather Ballooning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tony; Johnson, Sam; Koske-Phillips, Amelia; White, Michael; Yarborough, Amelia; Lamb, Aaron; Herbst, Anna; Molina, Ferris; Gilpin, Justin; Grah, Olivia; Perez, Ginger; Reid, Carson; Harvey, Joey; Schultz, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a "Space Weather Buoy" for measuring upper atmospheric radiation from cosmic rays and solar storms. The Buoy, which is carried to the stratosphere by helium balloons, is relatively inexpensive and uses off-the-shelf technology accessible to small colleges and high schools. Using this device, we have measured two Forbush Decreases and a small surge in atmospheric radiation during the St. Patrick's Day geomagnetic storm of March 2015.

  12. Weathering the financial storm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsson, Tjörvi; Pétursson, Thórarinn G.

    2011-01-01

    to explain a significant share of the cross-country variation in the depth and duration of the crisis and provide quite sharp predictions of the incidence of banking and currency crises. This suggests that country-specific initial conditions played an important role in determining the economic impact...... of the crisis and, in particular, that countries with sound fundamentals and flexible economic frameworks were better able to weather the financial storm....

  13. Characterizing and modelling 'ghost-rock' weathered limestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Caroline; Goderniaux, Pascal; Deceuster, John; Poulain, Angélique; Kaufmann, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    'Ghost-rock' karst aquifer has recently been highlighted. In this particular type of aquifer, the karst is not expressed as open conduits but consists in zones where the limestone is weathered. The in-situ weathering of limestone leaves a soft porous material called 'alterite'. The hydro-mechanical properties of this material differs significantly from those of the host rock: the weathering enhances the storage capacity and the conductivity of the rock. This type of weathered karst aquifer has never been studied from a hydrogeological point of view. In this study, we present the hydraulic characterization of such weathered zones. We also present a modelling approach derived from the common Equivalent Porous Medium (EPM) approach, but including the spatial distribution of hydrogeological properties through the weathered features, from the hard rock to the alterite, according to a weathering index. Unlike the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) approaches, which enable to take into account a limited number of fractures, this new approach allows creating models including thousands of weathered features. As the properties of the alterite have to be considered at a centimeter scale, it is necessary to upscale these properties to carry out simulations over large areas. Therefore, an upscaling method was developed, taking into account the anisotropy of the weathered features. Synthetic models are built, upscaled and different hydrogeological simulations are run to validate the method. This methodology is finally tested on a real case study: the modelling of the dewatering drainage flow of an exploited quarry in a weathered karst aquifer in Belgium.

  14. Daily Weather and Children's Physical Activity Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmers, Teun; Thijs, Carel; Timperio, Anna; Salmon, J O; Veitch, Jenny; Kremers, Stef P J; Ridgers, Nicola D

    2017-05-01

    Understanding how the weather affects physical activity (PA) may help in the design, analysis, and interpretation of future studies, especially when investigating PA across diverse meteorological settings and with long follow-up periods. The present longitudinal study first aims to examine the influence of daily weather elements on intraindividual PA patterns among primary school children across four seasons, reflecting day-to-day variation within each season. Second, we investigate whether the influence of weather elements differs by day of the week (weekdays vs weekends), gender, age, and body mass index. PA data were collected by ActiGraph accelerometers for 1 wk in each of four school terms that reflect each season in southeast Australia. PA data from 307 children (age range 8.7-12.8 yr) were matched to daily meteorological variables obtained from the Australian Government's Bureau of Meteorology (maximum temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, day length, and rainfall). Daily PA patterns and their association with weather elements were analyzed using multilevel linear mixed models. Temperature was the strongest predictor of moderate and vigorous PA, followed by solar radiation and humidity. The relation with temperature was curvilinear, showing optimum PA levels at temperatures between 20°C and 22°C. Associations between weather elements on PA did not differ by gender, child's age, or body mass index. This novel study focused on the influence of weather elements on intraindividual PA patterns in children. As weather influences cannot be controlled, knowledge of its effect on individual PA patterns may help in the design of future studies, interpretation of their results, and translation into PA promotion.

  15. Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Year-Old Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? KidsHealth > For Parents > Can the Weather Affect My ... empeorar el asma de mi hijo? Weather and Asthma The effect of weather on asthma symptoms isn' ...

  16. Geochemical investigation of weathering processes in a forested headwater catchment: Mass-balance weathering fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.F.; Herman, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Geochemical research on natural weathering has often been directed towards explanations of the chemical composition of surface water and ground water resulting from subsurface water-rock interactions. These interactions are often defined as the incongruent dissolution of primary silicates, such as feldspar, producing secondary weathering products, such as clay minerals and oxyhydroxides, and solute fluxes (Meunier and Velde, 1979). The chemical composition of the clay-mineral product is often ignored. However, in earlier investigations, the saprolitic weathering profile at the South Fork Brokenback Run (SFBR) watershed, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, was characterized extensively in terms of its mineralogical and chemical composition (Piccoli, 1987; Pochatila et al., 2006; Jones et al., 2007) and its basic hydrology. O'Brien et al. (1997) attempted to determine the contribution of primary mineral weathering to observed stream chemistry at SFBR. Mass-balance model results, however, could provide only a rough estimate of the weathering reactions because idealized mineral compositions were utilized in the calculations. Making use of detailed information on the mineral occurrence in the regolith, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of compositional variation on mineral-solute mass-balance modelling and to generate plausible quantitative weathering reactions that support both the chemical evolution of the surface water and ground water in the catchment, as well as the mineralogical evolution of the weathering profile. ?? 2008 The Mineralogical Society.

  17. Development of Contingency Plans and Scientific Background Studies for Applying Weather Modification During Drought Periods in Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Bowles, David S.; Frantz, Marjorie; Glover, Terry; Richardson, E. Arlo; Sutherland, Joe L.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-disciplinary study of drought in utah was conducted as a part of the Bureau of Reclamation's Southwest Drought Research Program. The study was administered by the Utah Division of Water Resources. Utah drought was investigated from a variety of viewpoints, including drought climatology, drought meteorology, hydrologic effects of drought, and economic effects of drought. A stand-by wintertime cloud seeding ...

  18. Study On The Coal Tar Pitch Emulsify As Fuel Oil%煤焦油沥青乳化用作燃料油的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何军

    2003-01-01

    用软化点为38.5℃的软沥青作原料,在合适的工艺条件下,制成含沥青60%~70%的沥青乳液(乳液的沥青含量为沥青量与洗油加入量之和).该乳液具有流动性好、储存稳定等优点.本研究结果表明,沥青乳液可以用作燃料,对解决煤沥青的利用具有重大意义.

  19. Study of the dielectric properties of weathered granite, basalt and quartzite by means of broadband dielectric spectroscopy over a wide range of frequency and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Steven; Delbreilh, Laurent; Antoine, Raphael; Dargent, Eric; Fauchard, Cyrille

    2016-04-01

    Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS) allows the measurement of the complex impedance of various materials over a wide range of frequency (0.1 Hz to 2 MHz) and temperature (-150 to 400°C). Other properties can be assessed from this measurement such as permittivity and conductivity. In this study, the BDS is presented to figure out the complex behaviour of several rock parameters as a function of the temperature and frequency. Indeed, multiple processes might occur such as interfacial polarization, AC and DC conductivity. The measurements of a weathered granite, basalt and quartzite were performed. The activation energy associated to each process involved during the measurement can be calculated by following the relaxation time as a function of the temperature, taking into account the Havriliak-Négami model. The principle of the technique and the whole study is presented here and several hypothesis are advanced to explain the dielectric behaviour of rocks. Finally, as the range of frequency and temperature of the BDS method is common to several electromagnetic and electrical techniques applied in subsurface geophysics, some perspectives are proposed to better understand geophysical measurements in hydrothermal systems.

  20. The Weather in Richmond

    OpenAIRE

    Harless, William Edwin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The Weather in Richmond is a short documentary about the Oilers, the football team at Richmond High School in downtown Richmond, California, as they struggle in 2012 with the legacy of winning no games, with the exception of a forfeit, in two years. The video documents the city of Richmond’s poverty and violence, but it also is an account of the city’s cultural diversity, of the city’s industrial history and of the hopes of some of the people who grow up there. The...

  1. Combating bad weather

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta

    2015-01-01

    Every year lives and properties are lost in road accidents. About one-fourth of these accidents are due to low vision in foggy weather. At present, there is no algorithm that is specifically designed for the removal of fog from videos. Application of a single-image fog removal algorithm over each video frame is a time-consuming and costly affair. It is demonstrated that with the intelligent use of temporal redundancy, fog removal algorithms designed for a single image can be extended to the real-time video application. Results confirm that the presented framework used for the extension of the

  2. Microscopic study of weathering of white Flemish stone from the monumental Church of Our Lady in Breda, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larbi, J.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Naldini, S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the use of an integrated microscopic method to assist in the investigation of the causes and the extent of decay of the stones and ornaments in the gothic Clurch of Out Lady in Breda, The Netherlands. The purpose of the study was to determine whether conservation measures were

  3. NASA Space Weather Center Services: Potential for Space Weather Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua; Kuznetsova, Masha; Pulkkinen, Antti; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Lee, H.; Hesse, M.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Space Weather Center's primary objective is to provide the latest space weather information and forecasting for NASA's robotic missions and its partners and to bring space weather knowledge to the public. At the same time, the tools and services it possesses can be invaluable for research purposes. Here we show how our archive and real-time modeling of space weather events can aid research in a variety of ways, with different classification criteria. We will list and discuss major CME events, major geomagnetic storms, and major SEP events that occurred during the years 2010 - 2012. Highlights of major tools/resources will be provided.

  4. Interdisciplinary challenges in the study of power grid resilience and stability and their relation to extreme weather events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzig, J.; Fujiwara, N.; Aihara, K.; Kurths, J.

    2014-10-01

    This topical issue collects contributions to the interdisciplinary study of power grid stability in face of increasing volatility of energy production and consumption due to increasing renewable energy infeed and changing climatic conditions. The individual papers focus on different aspects of this field and bring together modern achievements from various disciplines, in particular complex systems science, nonlinear data analysis, control theory, electrical engineering, and climatology. Main topics considered here are prediction and volatility of renewable infeed, modelling and theoretical analysis of power grid topology, dynamics and stability, relationships between stability and complex network topology, and improvements via topological changes or control. Impacts for the design of smart power grids are discussed in detail.

  5. Road Weather and Connected Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, P.; Boyce, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    On average, there are over 5.8 M vehicle crashes each year of which 23% are weather-related. Weather-related crashes are defined as those crashes that occur in adverse weather or on slick pavement. The vast majority of weather-related crashes happen on wet pavement (74%) and during rainfall (46%). Connected vehicle technologies hold the promise to transform road-weather management by providing improved road weather data in real time with greater temporal and geographic accuracy. This will dramatically expand the amount of data that can be used to assess, forecast, and address the impacts that weather has on roads, vehicles, and travelers. The use of vehicle-based measurements of the road and surrounding atmosphere with other, more traditional weather data sources, and create road and atmospheric hazard products for a variety of users. The broad availability of road weather data from mobile sources will vastly improve the ability to detect and forecast weather and road conditions, and will provide the capability to manage road-weather response on specific roadway links. The RWMP is currently demonstrating how weather, road conditions, and related vehicle data can be used for decision making through an innovative Integrated Mobile Observations project. FHWA is partnering with 3 DOTs (MN, MI, & NV) to pilot these applications. One is a mobile alerts application called the Motorists Advisories and Warnings (MAW) and a maintenance decision support application. These applications blend traditional weather information (e.g., radar, surface stations) with mobile vehicle data (e.g., temperature, brake status, wiper status) to determine current weather conditions. These weather conditions, and other road-travel-relevant information, are provided to users via web and phone applications. The MAW provides nowcasts and short-term forecasts out to 24 hours while the EMDSS application can provide forecasts up to 72 hours in advance. The three DOTs have placed readers and external

  6. Simulations of Clouds and Sensitivity Study by Weather Research and Forecast Model for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Case 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.; Zhang, M.

    2005-03-18

    One of the large errors in general circulation models (GCMs) cloud simulations is from the mid-latitude, synoptic-scale frontal cloud systems. Now, with the availability of the cloud observations from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) 2000 cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) and other observational datasets, the community is able to document the model biases in comparison with the observations and make progress in development of better cloud schemes in models. Xie et al. (2004) documented the errors in midlatitude frontal cloud simulations for ARM Case 4 by single-column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs). According to them, the errors in the model simulated cloud field might be caused by following reasons: (1) lacking of sub-grid scale variability; (2) lacking of organized mesoscale cyclonic advection of hydrometeors behind a moving cyclone which may play important role to generate the clouds there. Mesoscale model, however, can be used to better under stand these controls on the subgrid variability of clouds. Few studies have focused on applying mesoscale models to the forecasting of cloud properties. Weaver et al. (2004) used a mesoscale model RAMS to study the frontal clouds for ARM Case 4 and documented the dynamical controls on the sub-GCM-grid-scale cloud variability.

  7. Rough weather rescue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This report, which was commissioned by the Offshore Division of the Health and Safety Executive, reviews the type of equipment and techniques used to rescue people from the water around offshore platforms in rough weather. It also examines the limitations of the equipment in extreme conditions and reports the views of the various industry sectors (as determined by a questionnaire survey). The type of incidents covered by the report include: man overboard; helicopter ditching; and evacuation from totally enclosed motor propelled survival craft (TEMPSC) and life rafts. The report considers: the approach taken by other oil-producing countries; current escape, evacuation and rescue (EER) practices for the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS); environmental limits; methods for rescue and recovery from the water and TEMPSC; launch and recovery systems; fast rescue craft (FSC) and daughter craft; emergency response and rescue vessels; helicopters; casualty personal protection equipment; claimed versus actual equipment performance; training and practice procedures; attitudes to environmental limits; lessons learnt from incidents; mechanical recovery devices; equipment design and use in rough weather; and recommendations for improvements.

  8. Weatherization Apprenticeship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Eric J

    2012-12-18

    Weatherization improvement services will be provided to Native people by Native people. The proposed project will recruit, train and hire two full-time weatherization technicians who will improve the energy efficiency of homes of Alaska Natives/American Indians residing in the Indian areas, within the Cook Inlet Region of Alaska. The Region includes Anchorage as well as 8 small tribal villages: The Native Villages of Eklutna, Knik, Chickaloon, Seldovia, Ninilchik, Kenaitze, Salamatof, and Tyonek. This project will be a partnership between three entities, with Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) as the lead agency: CITCA's Employment and Training Services Department, Cook Inlet Housing Authority and Alaska Works Partnership. Additionally, six of the eight tribal villages within the Cook Inlet Region of Alaska have agreed to work with the project in order to improve the energy efficiency of their tribally owned buildings and homes. The remaining three villages will be invited to participate in the establishment of an intertribal consortium through this project. Tribal homes and buildings within Anchorage fall under Cook Inlet Region, Inc. (CIRI) tribal authority.

  9. Schmidt Hammer studies in the maritime Antarctic: Application to dating Holocene deglaciation and estimating the effects of macrolichens on rock weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmin, M.; Worland, M. R.; Convey, P.; Cannone, N.

    2012-06-01

    In order to contribute to the reconstruction of the deglaciation history of the Marguerite Bay area (~ 68°S, Maritime Antarctic) and to estimate the rock weathering rate in this Antarctic sector, 28 sites (7 on Rothera Point and 21 on Anchorage Island) were characterised using Schmidt Hammer values. The weathering effect of two of the most widespread species of macrolichens in this area (Usnea sphacelata and Umbilicaria decussata) was tested at 5 different sites on Rothera Point. Schmidt Hammer data, in conjunction with recent 14C age, suggest a deglaciation age for the Marguerite Bay area of around 12 ka, and an average uplift rate of 5.4 mm year- 1 on Anchorage Island for the period between 3.3 and 5.2 ka. The weathering rates are extremely slow (e.g. three times slower than reported in Norway). Our data confirm that lichens exert a strong impact on weathering, decreasing the Schmidt Hammer R-values on lichenised surfaces by a factor of 3-4 compared to bare rock surfaces. The effect of lichens on weathering is mainly due to edaphic conditions and the type of the lichen involved rather the period of exposure.

  10. Space Weather- Physics and Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bothmer, Volker

    2007-01-01

    This book is a state-of-the-art review on the physics of space weather and on space weather impacts on human technology, including manned spaceflight. With contributions from a team of international experts, this comprehensive work covers all aspects of space weather physical processes, and all known aspects of space hazards from humans, both in space and on Earth. Space Weather - Physics and Effects provides the first comprehensive, scientific background of space storms caused by the sun and its impact on geospace focuses on weather issues that have become vital for the development of nationwide technological infrastructures explains magnetic storms on Earth, including the effects of EUV radiation on the atmosphere is an invaluable aid in establishing real-time weather forecasts details the threat that solar effects might have on modern telecommunication systems, including national power grid systems, aircraft and manned spaceflight.

  11. Weather Forecasting Systems and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecikalski, John (Inventor); MacKenzie, Wayne M., Jr. (Inventor); Walker, John Robert (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A weather forecasting system has weather forecasting logic that receives raw image data from a satellite. The raw image data has values indicative of light and radiance data from the Earth as measured by the satellite, and the weather forecasting logic processes such data to identify cumulus clouds within the satellite images. For each identified cumulus cloud, the weather forecasting logic applies interest field tests to determine a score indicating the likelihood of the cumulus cloud forming precipitation and/or lightning in the future within a certain time period. Based on such scores, the weather forecasting logic predicts in which geographic regions the identified cumulus clouds will produce precipitation and/or lighting within during the time period. Such predictions may then be used to provide a weather map thereby providing users with a graphical illustration of the areas predicted to be affected by precipitation within the time period.

  12. Weather data analysis based on typical weather sequence analysis. Application: energy building simulation

    CERN Document Server

    David, Mathieu; Garde, Francois; Boyer, Harry

    2014-01-01

    In building studies dealing about energy efficiency and comfort, simulation software need relevant weather files with optimal time steps. Few tools generate extreme and mean values of simultaneous hourly data including correlation between the climatic parameters. This paper presents the C++ Runeole software based on typical weather sequences analysis. It runs an analysis process of a stochastic continuous multivariable phenomenon with frequencies properties applied to a climatic database. The database analysis associates basic statistics, PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and automatic classifications. Different ways of applying these methods will be presented. All the results are stored in the Runeole internal database that allows an easy selection of weather sequences. The extreme sequences are used for system and building sizing and the mean sequences are used for the determination of the annual cooling loads as proposed by Audrier-Cros (Audrier-Cros, 1984). This weather analysis was tested with the datab...

  13. ESA situational awareness of space weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luntama, Juha-Pekka; Glover, Alexi; Keil, Ralf; Kraft, Stefan; Lupi, Adriano

    2016-07-01

    ESA SSA Period 2 started at the beginning of 2013 and will last until the end of 2016. For the Space Weather Segment, transition to Period 2 introduced an increasing amount of development of new space weather service capability in addition to networking existing European assets. This transition was started already towards the end of SSA Period 1 with the initiation of the SSA Space Weather Segment architecture definition studies and activities enhancing existing space weather assets. The objective of Period 2 has been to initiate SWE space segment developments in the form of hosted payload missions and further expand the federated service network. A strong focus has been placed on demonstration and testing of European capabilities in the range of SWE service domains with a view to establishing core products which can form the basis of SWE service provision during SSA Period 3. This focus has been particularly addressed in the SSA Expert Service Centre (ESC) Definition and Development activity that was started in September 2015. This presentation will cover the current status of the SSA SWE Segment and the achievements during SSA Programme Periods 1 and 2. Particular attention is given to the federated approach that allow building the end user services on the best European expertise. The presentation will also outline the plans for the Space Weather capability development in the framework of the ESA SSA Programme in 2017-2020.

  14. Visually Comparing Weather Features in Forecasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinan, P Samuel; Meyer, Miriah

    2016-01-01

    Meteorologists process and analyze weather forecasts using visualization in order to examine the behaviors of and relationships among weather features. In this design study conducted with meteorologists in decision support roles, we identified and attempted to address two significant common challenges in weather visualization: the employment of inconsistent and often ineffective visual encoding practices across a wide range of visualizations, and a lack of support for directly visualizing how different weather features relate across an ensemble of possible forecast outcomes. In this work, we present a characterization of the problems and data associated with meteorological forecasting, we propose a set of informed default encoding choices that integrate existing meteorological conventions with effective visualization practice, and we extend a set of techniques as an initial step toward directly visualizing the interactions of multiple features over an ensemble forecast. We discuss the integration of these contributions into a functional prototype tool, and also reflect on the many practical challenges that arise when working with weather data.

  15. An evaluation study of WRF-ARW model with observations during a usual low pressure system over eastern Mediterranean area (Greece) and comparison of the results with an extreme weather event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanouil, George; Vlachogiannis, Diamanto; Sfetsos, Athanasios; Karozis, Stelios; Tasopoulou, Antonia

    2016-04-01

    The accurate simulation of weather conditions is becoming more and more an issue of increased research interest and public demand. Because of the uncertainty in forecasting such phenomena, the investigation of the choice of a proper model configuration to simulate in a satisfactory way usual weather conditions, as well as extreme events is of crucial importance. In the framework of providing reliable weather forecasting, the WRF atmospheric model was employed to simulate the weather conditions during a usual for the area low pressure system that passed over the Greek peninsula during 2015 (September, 18-24). NCEP FNL analysis data were used for model input. The model configuration was setup to include three nested domains with increasing horizontal resolution inwards (11km, 2km and 0.5km respectively), centered in Attica area. The model parameterization was concluded following a number of sensitivity tests, previously carried out for other weather events including extremes in the same area, such as the Cleopatra cyclone. The main meteorological variables were analyzed and evaluation of the results was performed against in-situ measurements by the network of the Hellenic National Meteorological Service stations. The comparison of the September low-pressure event and the Cleopatra case study model results in temperature showed good agreement with the observations in both cases. Study of the precipitation fields yielded significant improvement compared to the analysis data of the NCEP FNL and the comparison between the model results and observed values was found to be good locally at some stations. The overall conclusion was that the model parameterization and applied methodology proved to be an efficient and useful tool for studying and forecasting such events.

  16. Small Sensors for Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory is actively pursuing enhancing the nation's space weather sensing capability. One aspect of this plan is the concept of flying Space Weather sensor suites on host spacecraft as secondary payloads. The emergence and advancement of the CubeSat spacecraft architecture has produced a viable platform for scientifically and operationally relevant Space Weather sensing. This talk will provide an overview of NRL's low size weight and power sensor technologies targeting Space Weather measurements. A summary of on-orbit results of past and current missions will be presented, as well as an overview of future flights that are manifested and potential constellation missions.

  17. Bishop Paiute Weatherization Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Hernandez

    2010-01-28

    The DOE Weatherization Training Grant assisted Native American trainees in developing weatherization competencies, creating employment opportunities for Bishop Paiute tribal members in a growing field. The trainees completed all the necessary training and certification requirements and delivered high-quality weatherization services on the Bishop Paiute Reservation. Six tribal members received all three certifications for weatherization; four of the trainees are currently employed. The public benefit includes (1) development of marketable skills by low-income Native individuals, (2) employment for low-income Native individuals in a growing industry, and (3) economic development opportunities that were previously not available to these individuals or the Tribe.

  18. Age and weathering rate of sediments in small catchments: the role of hillslope erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosseto, A.; Buss, H. L.; Chabaux, F.

    2014-12-01

    Erosion is intimately linked to chemical weathering, however we lack quantitative constraints on how erosion processes impact mineral weathering rates. Here we use the uranium-series isotope composition of river-borne material in small catchments of Puerto Rico and southeastern Australia to study the effect of contrasting erosion regimes on weathering. The U-series isotope composition of stream sediments was modelled to infer a weathering age, i.e. the average time elapsed since the sediment's minerals have started weathering. In southeastern Australia, the weathering age of stream sediments ranges between 346 ± 12 kyr and 1.78 ± 0.16 Myr, similar to values inferred from weathering profiles in the same catchment. Old weathering ages likely reflect the shallow origin of sediments mobilised via near-surface soil transport, the main mechanism of erosion in this catchment. Contrastingly, in Puerto Rico weathering ages are much younger, ranging from 5.1 ± 0.1 to 19.4 ± 0.4 kyr, reflecting that sediments are derived from less weathered, deeper saprolite, mobilised by landslides. Weathering ages of stream sediments are used to infer catchment-wide, mineral-specific weathering rates that are one to two orders of magnitude faster for Puerto Rico than for southeastern Australia. Thus, the type of erosion (near-surface soil transport vs. landslide) also affects the weathering rate of river sediments, because their weathering ages determine the potential for further weathering during sediment transport and storage in alluvial plains.

  19. Weathering a Perfect Storm from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Extreme space-weather events — intense solar and geomagnetic storms — have occurred in the past: most recently in 1859, 1921 and 1989. So scientists expect that, sooner or later, another extremely intense spaceweather event will strike Earth again. Such storms have the potential to cause widespread interference with and damage to technological systems. A National Academy of Sciences study projects that an extreme space-weather event could end up costing the American economy more than $1 trillion. The question now is whether or not we will take the actions needed to avoid such expensive consequences. Let’s assume that we do. Below is an imagined scenario of how, sometime in the future, an extreme space-weather event might play out.

  20. Space Weather Effects of Coronal Mass Ejection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. N. Iyer; R. M. Jadav; A. K. Jadeja; P. K. Manoharan; Som Sharma; Hari Om Vats

    2006-06-01

    This paper describes the space weather effects of a major CME which was accompanied by extremely violent events on the Sun. The signatures of the event in the interplanetary medium (IPM) sensed by Ooty Radio Telescope, the solar observations by LASCO coronagraph onboard SOHO, GOES X-ray measurements, satellite measurements of the interplanetary parameters, GPS based ionospheric measurements, the geomagnetic storm parameter Dst and ground based ionosonde data are used in the study to understand the space weather effects in the different regions of the solar-terrestrial environment. The effects of this event are compared and possible explanations attempted.