WorldWideScience

Sample records for fuel-like thermal simulators

  1. High Fidelity, Fuel-Like Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing: Analysis and Initial Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Kapernick, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power system, providing system characterization data and allowing one to work through various fabrication, assembly and integration issues without the cost and time associated with a full ground nuclear test. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Testing with non-optimized heater elements allows one to assess thermal, heat transfer. and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. High fidelity thermal simulators that match both the static and the dynamic fuel pin performance that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor can vastly increase the value of non-nuclear test results. With optimized simulators, the integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics and assess potential design improvements at relatively small fiscal investment. Initial conceptual thermal simulator designs are determined by simple one-dimensional analysis at a single axial location and at steady state conditions; feasible concepts are then input into a detailed three-dimensional model for comparison to expected fuel pin performance. Static and dynamic fuel pin performance for a proposed reactor design is determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and comparison is made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analyses, a conceptual high fidelity design is developed

  2. Thermal Simulation Facilities Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    as much ultraviolet radiation as possible In the concentrated solar beam. The heliostat automatically tracks the source, the sun or the moon...individually positioned to concentrate the thermal energy at the test object focal plane and are front surfaced the same as the heliostat mirrors. The...energy and redistribute it uniformly over the target area. A beam douser is mounted above the light pipe. The douser, initially positioned to block the

  3. Thermal diffusivity of simulated DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Yang, M. S.; Bae, K. K.; Moon, I. H.; Jung, K. C.; Song, H. S.; Park, C. Y.; Lee, D. J.; Kim, H. S

    2000-06-01

    Thermal diffusivity of simulated DUPIC fuel was measured using Laser Flash Method in the temperautre range from room temperature to 1350 deg C. Density of simulated DUPIC fuel used in the measurement of thermal difusivity was 10.16 g/cm{sup 3} (94.2% of theoretical density) at room temperature and diameter and thickness were 10 mm and 1 mm, respectively. Thermal diffusivity decreased from 0.01857 cm{sup 2}/s at room temperature to 0.00523 cm{sup 2}/s at 1350 deg C. Thermal diffusivity of simulated DUPIC fuel and UO{sub 2} and simulated spent fuel. The difference of thermal diffusivity between simulated DUPIC fule and UO{sub 2} and simulated spent fuel was high and it decreased due to temperature increase.

  4. Thermal diffusivity of simulated DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Yang, M. S.; Bae, K. K.; Moon, I. H.; Jung, K. C.; Song, H. S.; Park, C. Y.; Lee, D. J.; Kim, H. S

    2000-06-01

    Thermal diffusivity of simulated DUPIC fuel was measured using Laser Flash Method in the temperautre range from room temperature to 1350 deg C. Density of simulated DUPIC fuel used in the measurement of thermal difusivity was 10.16 g/cm{sup 3} (94.2% of theoretical density) at room temperature and diameter and thickness were 10 mm and 1 mm, respectively. Thermal diffusivity decreased from 0.01857 cm{sup 2}/s at room temperature to 0.00523 cm{sup 2}/s at 1350 deg C. Thermal diffusivity of simulated DUPIC fuel and UO{sub 2} and simulated spent fuel. The difference of thermal diffusivity between simulated DUPIC fule and UO{sub 2} and simulated spent fuel was high and it decreased due to temperature increase.

  5. Numerical simulation of the LAGEOS thermal behavior and thermal accelerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrés, J.I.; Noomen, R.; Vecellio None, S.

    2006-01-01

    The temperature distribution throughout the LAGEOS satellites is simulated numerically with the objective to determine the resulting thermal force. The different elements and materials comprising the spacecraft, with their energy transfer, have been modeled with unprecedented detail. The radiation i

  6. Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a SNAP derivative reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

  7. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A detailed description of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) is presented. The contents include: 1) Design Requirements; 2) NTREES Layout; 3) Data Acquisition and Control System Schematics; 4) NTREES System Schematic; and 5) NTREES Setup.

  8. Thermal Simulation of AC Electromagnetic Contactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIUChun-ping; CHENDe-gui; ZHANGJing-shu; LIXing-wen

    2005-01-01

    Transient magnetic circuit method is adopted to calculate the power loss in winding and shading coil. Based on the analysis of heat transfer process in AC contactor, a thermal model is proposed and the temperature field distribution is simulated with 3-D FEM of ANSYS.Comparison of simulation results with measurements shows that the proposed method is effective.

  9. Thermal simulation of a dinghy sailor

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a model to simulate a dinghy sailors’ body temperature during a sailing match. This simulation has been developed as part of the master thesis by the author: “Thermal optimization of competitive sailing gear”. A literature study is done to define the human body heat balance and thermal comfort. Next a basic heat balance model was developed and simulated in MatLab Simulink. A field test was used to validate an elaborated model and recommendations are giv...

  10. Battery thermal models for hybrid vehicle simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesaran, Ahmad A.

    This paper summarizes battery thermal modeling capabilities for: (1) an advanced vehicle simulator (ADVISOR); and (2) battery module and pack thermal design. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) ADVISOR is developed in the Matlab/Simulink environment. There are several battery models in ADVISOR for various chemistry types. Each one of these models requires a thermal model to predict the temperature change that could affect battery performance parameters, such as resistance, capacity and state of charges. A lumped capacitance battery thermal model in the Matlab/Simulink environment was developed that included the ADVISOR battery performance models. For thermal evaluation and design of battery modules and packs, NREL has been using various computer aided engineering tools including commercial finite element analysis software. This paper will discuss the thermal ADVISOR battery model and its results, along with the results of finite element modeling that were presented at the workshop on "Development of Advanced Battery Engineering Models" in August 2001.

  11. Residential photovoltaic system simulation: Thermal aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, G. W.; Raghuraman, P.

    1982-04-01

    A TRNSYS simulation was developed to simulate the performance of utility interactive residential photovoltaic energy systems. The PV system is divided into its major functional components, which are individually described with computer models. These models are described in detail. The results of simulation and actual measured data obtained a MIT Lincoln Laboratory's Northeast Residential Station are compared. The thermal influences on the design of such photovoltaic energy systems are given particular attention.

  12. Reservoir Thermal Recover Simulation on Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoyan; Ma, Yuanle

    The rapid development of parallel computers has provided a hardware background for massive refine reservoir simulation. However, the lack of parallel reservoir simulation software has blocked the application of parallel computers on reservoir simulation. Although a variety of parallel methods have been studied and applied to black oil, compositional, and chemical model numerical simulations, there has been limited parallel software available for reservoir simulation. Especially, the parallelization study of reservoir thermal recovery simulation has not been fully carried out, because of the complexity of its models and algorithms. The authors make use of the message passing interface (MPI) standard communication library, the domain decomposition method, the block Jacobi iteration algorithm, and the dynamic memory allocation technique to parallelize their serial thermal recovery simulation software NUMSIP, which is being used in petroleum industry in China. The parallel software PNUMSIP was tested on both IBM SP2 and Dawn 1000A distributed-memory parallel computers. The experiment results show that the parallelization of I/O has great effects on the efficiency of parallel software PNUMSIP; the data communication bandwidth is also an important factor, which has an influence on software efficiency. Keywords: domain decomposition method, block Jacobi iteration algorithm, reservoir thermal recovery simulation, distributed-memory parallel computer

  13. Computer simulation of thermal plant operations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Kelly, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This book describes thermal plant simulation, that is, dynamic simulation of plants which produce, exchange and otherwise utilize heat as their working medium. Directed at chemical, mechanical and control engineers involved with operations, control and optimization and operator training, the book gives the mathematical formulation and use of simulation models of the equipment and systems typically found in these industries. The author has adopted a fundamental approach to the subject. The initial chapters provide an overview of simulation concepts and describe a suitable computer environment.

  14. Numerical simulation of polariton Bose gas thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartsev, P. F.; Kuznetsov, I. O.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present the numerical simulation of the process a Bose gas thermalization and the formation of the condensate. Our approach is based on kinetic equations and “Fermi's golden rule” in the incoherent approximation. Direct summation of terms is performed using GPGPU OpenCL parallel code using AMD Radeon HD 7970.

  15. Quantification of Uncertainty in Thermal Building Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Haghighat, F.; Frier, Christian

    In order to quantify uncertainty in thermal building simulation stochastic modelling is applied on a building model. An application of stochastic differential equations is presented in Part 1 comprising a general heat balance for an arbitrary number of loads and zones in a building to determine...

  16. Simulation of thermo-Elastics Properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simulation of thermo-Elastics Properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings. ... entailing improved lifetime of the coating, but with a higher thermal conductivity. ... elasticity and its evolution with the temperature as well as thermal expansion, aiming at ...

  17. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J.

    2008-01-01

    To support a potential future development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components could be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts.

  18. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    To support the eventual development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts.

  19. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TRANSIENT THERMAL FIELD IN LASER MELTING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚国凤; 陈光南

    2004-01-01

    Numerical simulation of thermal field was studied in laser processing. The 3 -D finite element model of transient thermal calculation is given by thermal conductive equation.The effects of phase transformation latent are considered. Numerical example is given to verify the model. Finally the real example of transient thermal field is given.

  20. 热电池热模拟研究%Study on thermal simulation of thermal battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰伟; 宋学兵; 刘效疆

    2012-01-01

    The use of ANSYS in thermal simulation of thermal battery was introduced, and two thermal batteries were simulated basically. The simulation result accords with the experiment, so the thermal simulation can guide the design of thermal battery.%简要介绍了使用ANSYS对热电池进行热模拟的流程,并针对具体的热电池进行了初步分析.通过对比,模拟结果与实测值基本吻合,说明热模拟对电池热设计具有指导意义.

  1. Thermal Properties of Lunar Regolith Simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Ray, Chandra; Rickman, Doug; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Various high temperature chemical processes have been developed to extract oxygen and metals from lunar regolith. These processes are tested using terrestrial analogues of the regolith. But all practical terrestrial analogs contain H2O and/or OH-, the presence of which has substantial impact on important system behaviors. We have undertaken studies of lunar regolith simulants to determine the limits of the simulants to validate key components for human survivability during sustained presence on the Moon. Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) yields information on phase transitions and melting temperatures. Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis provides information on evolved gas species and their evolution temperature profiles. The DTA and TGA studies included JSC-1A fine (Johnson Space Center Mare Type 1A simulant), NU-LHT-2M (National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-- United States Geological Survey (USGS)--Lunar Highlands Type 2M simulant) and its proposed feedstocks: anorthosite; dunite; high quality (HQ) glass and the norite from which HQ glass is produced. As an example, the DTA and TGA profiles for anorthosite follow. The DTA indicates exothermic transitions at 355 and 490 C and endothermic transitions at 970 and 1235 C. Below the 355 C transition, water is lost accounting for approximately 0.1 percent mass loss. Just above 490 C a second type of water is lost, presumably bound in lattices of secondary minerals along with other volatile oxides. Limited TGA-FTIR data is available at the time of this writing. For JSC-1A fine, the TGA-FTIR indicates at least two kinds of water are evolved in the 100 to 500 and the 700 to 900 C ranges. Evolution of carbon dioxide types occurs in the 250 to 545, 545 to 705, and 705 to 985 C ranges. Geologically, the results are consistent with the evolution of "water" in its several forms, CO2 from break down of secondary carbonates and magmatic, dissolved gas and glass

  2. Thermal transport properties of uranium dioxide by molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Taku; Sinnott, Susan B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tulenko, James S. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Grimes, Robin W. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Schelling, Patrick K. [AMPAC and Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Phillpot, Simon R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)], E-mail: sphil@mse.ufl.edu

    2008-04-30

    The thermal conductivities of single crystal and polycrystalline UO{sub 2} are calculated using molecular dynamics simulations, with interatomic interactions described by two different potential models. For single crystals, the calculated thermal conductivities are found to be strongly dependent on the size of the simulation cell. However, a scaling analysis shows that the two models predict essentially identical values for the thermal conductivity for infinite system sizes. By contrast, simulations with the two potentials for identical fine polycrystalline structures yield estimated thermal conductivities that differ by a factor of two. We analyze the origin of this difference.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal conductivities of superlattice nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨决宽; 陈云飞; 颜景平

    2003-01-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate heat transfer in superlattice nanowires. Results show that for fixed period length superlattice nanowires, the ratio of the total interfacial thermal resistance to the total thermal resistance and the effective thermal conductivities are invariant with the changes in interface numbers. Increasing the period length leads to an increase in the average interfacial thermal resistance, which indicates that the interfacial thermal resistance depends not only on the materials that constitute the alternating segments of superlattice nanowires, but also on the lattice strain throughout the segments. The modification of the lattice structure due to the lattice mismatch should be taken into account in the acoustic mismatch model. Simulation results also demonstrated the size confinement effect on the thermal conductivities for low dimensional structures, i.e. the thermal conductivities and the interfacial thermal resistance increase as the nanowire cross-sectional area increases.

  4. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Simulation in NPSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belair, Michael L.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Four nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) models have been created in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) framework. The models are divided into two categories. One set is based upon the ZrC-graphite composite fuel element and tie tube-style reactor developed during the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) project in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The other reactor set is based upon a W-UO2 ceramic-metallic (CERMET) fuel element. Within each category, a small and a large thrust engine are modeled. The small engine models utilize RL-10 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 33.4 kN (7,500 lbf ). The large engine models utilize scaled RL-60 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 111.2 kN (25,000 lbf ). Power deposition profiles for each reactor were obtained from a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) model of the reactor cores. Performance factors such as thermodynamic state points, thrust, specific impulse, reactor power level, and maximum fuel temperature are analyzed for each engine design.

  5. Modelling and simulation of thermal power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eborn, J.

    1998-02-01

    Mathematical modelling and simulation are important tools when dealing with engineering systems that today are becoming increasingly more complex. Integrated production and recycling of materials are trends that give rise to heterogenous systems, which are difficult to handle within one area of expertise. Model libraries are an excellent way to package engineering knowledge of systems and units to be reused by those who are not experts in modelling. Many commercial packages provide good model libraries, but they are usually domain-specific and closed. Heterogenous, multi-domain systems requires open model libraries written in general purpose modelling languages. This thesis describes a model database for thermal power plants written in the object-oriented modelling language OMOLA. The models are based on first principles. Subunits describe volumes with pressure and enthalpy dynamics and flows of heat or different media. The subunits are used to build basic units such as pumps, valves and heat exchangers which can be used to build system models. Several applications are described; a heat recovery steam generator, equipment for juice blending, steam generation in a sulphuric acid plant and a condensing steam plate heat exchanger. Model libraries for industrial use must be validated against measured data. The thesis describes how parameter estimation methods can be used for model validation. Results from a case-study on parameter optimization of a non-linear drum boiler model show how the technique can be used 32 refs, 21 figs

  6. Real-time simulation of thermal shadows with EMIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Andreas; Oberhofer, Stefan; Schätz, Peter; Nischwitz, Alfred; Obermeier, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Modern missile systems use infrared imaging for tracking or target detection algorithms. The development and validation processes of these missile systems need high fidelity simulations capable of stimulating the sensors in real-time with infrared image sequences from a synthetic 3D environment. The Extensible Multispectral Image Generation Toolset (EMIT) is a modular software library developed at MBDA Germany for the generation of physics-based infrared images in real-time. EMIT is able to render radiance images in full 32-bit floating point precision using state of the art computer graphics cards and advanced shader programs. An important functionality of an infrared image generation toolset is the simulation of thermal shadows as these may cause matching errors in tracking algorithms. However, for real-time simulations, such as hardware in the loop simulations (HWIL) of infrared seekers, thermal shadows are often neglected or precomputed as they require a thermal balance calculation in four-dimensions (3D geometry in one-dimensional time up to several hours in the past). In this paper we will show the novel real-time thermal simulation of EMIT. Our thermal simulation is capable of simulating thermal effects in real-time environments, such as thermal shadows resulting from the occlusion of direct and indirect irradiance. We conclude our paper with the practical use of EMIT in a missile HWIL simulation.

  7. Behavior of nanoporous thermal barrier coatings under cyclic thermal loading. Computer-aided simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseenko, D. D., E-mail: mdd@ispms.tsc.ru; Maksimov, P. V., E-mail: mdd@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Sciences SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Panin, S. V., E-mail: svp@ispms.tsc.ru; Panin, V. E., E-mail: paninve@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Sciences SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Berto, F., E-mail: berto@gest.unipd.it [University of Padua, Vicenza, 36100 Italy (Italy)

    2015-10-27

    The work presents the development of new algorithms for calculating the fraction of thermal energy dissipated during the irradiation on the inner surface of pores. On the basis of these algorithms, the simulation of heat transfer in three-layered systems was carried out taking into account the dissipation of thermal energy in specimens having different porosity. We have performed quantitative estimates of the portion of dissipating thermal energy and its influence on the distribution of thermal stresses in thermal barrier coating systems. It was demonstrated that the presence of pores with a large internal surface area in the intermediate layer material enables two-fold decrease of the internal thermal stresses.

  8. Closed loop simulations of the thermal experiments in LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Gibert, Ferran; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Díaz-Aguiló, Marc; Mateos, Ignacio; Lobo, Alberto; Gesa, Lluís; Martín, Víctor; Lloro, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The thermal experiments to be carried out onboard LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will provide essential information of the dependences of the instrument with respect to temperature variations. These thermal experiments must be modelled and simulated both to be validated for mission operations purposes and also to develop a data analysis tool able to characterise the temperature noise contribution to the instrument performance. Here we will present the models developed and the simulated signals for some of the experiments together with the corresponding interferometer readouts, the latter being computed by combining the thermal models with the global LTP (LISA Technology Package) simulator of the LTP Data Analysis team.

  9. Thermal properties of simulated Hanford waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Carmen P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Canfield, Nathan L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Rönnebro, Ewa C. E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Kruger, Albert A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland Washington

    2017-03-20

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will vitrify the mixed hazardous wastes generated from 45 years of plutonium production. The molten glasses will be poured into stainless steel containers or canisters and subsequently quenched for storage and disposal. Such highly energy-consuming processes require precise thermal properties of materials for appropriate facility design and operations. Key thermal properties (heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity) of representative high-level and low-activity waste glasses were studied as functions of temperature in the range of 200 to 800°C (relevant to the cooling process), implementing simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry-thermal gravimetry (DSC-TGA), Xe-flash diffusivity, pycnometry, and dilatometry. The study showed that simultaneous DSC-TGA would be a reliable method to obtain heat capacity of various glasses at the temperature of interest. Accurate thermal properties from this study were shown to provide a more realistic guideline for capacity and time constraint of heat removal process, in comparison to the design basis conservative engineering estimates. The estimates, though useful for design in the absence measured physical properties, can now be supplanted and the measured thermal properties can be used in design verification activities.

  10. Contact Thermal Analysis and Wear Simulation of a Brake Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nándor Békési

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes an experimental test and a coupled contact-thermal-wear analysis of a railway wheel/brake block system through the braking process. During the test, the friction, the generated heat, and the wear were evaluated. It was found that the contact between the brake block and the wheel occurs in relatively small and slowly moving hot spots, caused by the wear and the thermal effects. A coupled simulation method was developed including numerical frictional contact, transient thermal and incremental wear calculations. In the 3D simulation, the effects of the friction, the thermal expansion, the wear, and the temperature-dependent material properties were also considered. A good agreement was found between the results of the test and the calculations, both for the thermal and wear results. The proposed method is suitable for modelling the slowly oscillating wear caused by the thermal expansions in the contact area.

  11. EXPERIMENTAL THERMAL SIMULATION OF THE HIGH AUDIO SPEAKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Cainiceanu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses a thermal simulation model that can be applied to electromagnetic field and for the sound. Due to the symmetrical structure difuzorlui using AXI-symmetric pattern which significantly reduces computing time.

  12. Thermal Mapping Airborne Simulator for Small Satellite Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A high performance, inexpensive, airborne simulator that will serve as the prototype for a small satellite based imaging system capable of mapping thermal anomalies...

  13. Thermal Modeling and Feedback Requirements for LIFE Neutronic Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifried, J E

    2009-07-15

    An initial study is performed to determine how temperature considerations affect LIFE neutronic simulations. Among other figures of merit, the isotopic mass accumulation, thermal power, tritium breeding, and criticality are analyzed. Possible fidelities of thermal modeling and degrees of coupling are explored. Lessons learned from switching and modifying nuclear datasets is communicated.

  14. APPLICATION OF NUMERICAL SIMULATION TO STUDY ON THERMAL CONDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. Zhu; Z. Xu; D.E. Wu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, using computer simulation and mathematic experiment method to solve the simplified one dimensional thermal conduction equation and to obtain the temperature distribution in a metal bar when its one end was heated. According to principle of hot expansion, a holograph of temperature distribution in the bar by laser holotechnique was taken. The results of numerical simulation and experiments are in good agreement and a new method for study on thermal conduction by laser holo-technique was found.

  15. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  16. Toward Improved Fidelity of Thermal Explosion Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, A L; Becker, R; Howard, W M; Wemhoff, A

    2009-07-17

    We will present results of an effort to improve the thermal/chemical/mechanical modeling of HMX based explosive like LX04 and LX10 for thermal cook-off. The original HMX model and analysis scheme were developed by Yoh et.al. for use in the ALE3D modeling framework. The current results were built to remedy the deficiencies of that original model. We concentrated our efforts in four areas. The first area was addition of porosity to the chemical material model framework in ALE3D that is used to model the HMX explosive formulation. This is needed to handle the roughly 2% porosity in solid explosives. The second area was the improvement of the HMX reaction network, which included the inclusion of a reactive phase change model base on work by Henson et.al. The third area required adding early decomposition gas species to the CHEETAH material database to develop more accurate equations of state for gaseous intermediates and products. Finally, it was necessary to improve the implicit mechanics module in ALE3D to more naturally handle the long time scales associated with thermal cook-off. The application of the resulting framework to the analysis of the Scaled Thermal Explosion (STEX) experiments will be discussed.

  17. Computer Simulation in Problems of Thermal Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga I. Chelyapina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses informative technology of using graphical programming environment LabVIEW 2009 when calculating and predicting the thermal strength of materials with an inhomogeneous structure. Algorithm for processing the experimental data was developed as part of the problem.

  18. Assessment of the thermal environment in a simulated aircraft cabin using thermal manikin exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Zukowska, Daria; Jama, Agnieszka

    2007-01-01

    The thermal environment in a full-scale 21-seat section of an aircraft cabin installed in a climate chamber was investigated. Fourteen heated cylinders and two thermal manikins were used to simulate the heat load, buoyancy flow and flow obstruction from passengers in the cabin. Measurements were...

  19. How to measure thermal effects of personal cooling systems : Human, thermal manikin and human simulator study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, N.; Psikuta, A.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Rossi, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal effects, such as cooling power and thermophysiological responses initiated upon application of a personal cooling system, can be assessed with (i) humans, (ii) a thermal manikin and (iii) a thermophysiological human simulator. In order to compare these methods, a cooling shirt (mild cooling)

  20. Reliability Design and Electro-Thermal-Optical Simulation of Bridge-Style Infrared Thermal Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Designs and simulations of silicon-based micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS infrared (IR thermal emitters for gas sensing application are presented. The IR thermal emitter is designed as a bridge-style hotplate (BSH structure suspended on a silicon frame for realizing a good thermal isolation between hotplate and frame. For investigating the reliability of BSH structure, three kinds of fillet structures were designed in the contact corner between hotplate and frame. A 3-dimensional finite element method (3D-FEM is used to investigate the electro-thermal, thermal-mechanical, and thermal-optical properties of BSH IR emitter using software COMSOLTM (COMSOL 4.3b, COMSOL Inc., Stockholm, Sweden. The simulation results show that the BSH with oval fillet has the lowest stress distribution and smoothest flows of stress streamlines, while the BSH with square fillet has the highest temperature and stress distribution. The thermal-optical and thermal-response simulations further indicate that the BSH with oval fillet is the optimal design for a reliable IR thermal emitter in spite of having slight inadequacies in emission intensity and modulation bandwidth in comparison with other two structures.

  1. Deterministic simulation of thermal neutron radiography and tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal Chowdhury, Rajarshi; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, thermal neutron radiography and tomography have gained much attention as one of the nondestructive testing methods. However, the application of thermal neutron radiography and tomography is hindered by their technical complexity, radiation shielding, and time-consuming data collection processes. Monte Carlo simulations have been developed in the past to improve the neutron imaging facility's ability. In this paper, a new deterministic simulation approach has been proposed and demonstrated to simulate neutron radiographs numerically using a ray tracing algorithm. This approach has made the simulation of neutron radiographs much faster than by previously used stochastic methods (i.e., Monte Carlo methods). The major problem with neutron radiography and tomography simulation is finding a suitable scatter model. In this paper, an analytic scatter model has been proposed that is validated by a Monte Carlo simulation.

  2. Thermal conduction in cosmological SPH simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Jubelgas, M; Dolag, K

    2004-01-01

    Thermal conduction in the intracluster medium has been proposed as a possible heating mechanism for offsetting central cooling losses in rich clusters of galaxies. In this study, we introduce a new formalism to model conduction in a diffuse ionised plasma using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), and we implement it in the parallel TreePM/SPH-code GADGET-2. We consider only isotropic conduction and assume that magnetic suppression can be described in terms of an effective conductivity, taken as a fixed fraction of the temperature-dependent Spitzer rate. We also account for saturation effects in low-density gas. Our formulation manifestly conserves thermal energy even for individual and adaptive timesteps, and is stable in the presence of small-scale temperature noise. This allows us to evolve the thermal diffusion equation with an explicit time integration scheme along with the ordinary hydrodynamics. We use a series of simple test problems to demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of our method. We then ...

  3. Adaptive implicit method for thermal compositional reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, A.; Tchelepi, H.A. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Stanford Univ., Palo Alto (United States)

    2008-10-15

    As the global demand for oil increases, thermal enhanced oil recovery techniques are becoming increasingly important. Numerical reservoir simulation of thermal methods such as steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is complex and requires a solution of nonlinear mass and energy conservation equations on a fine reservoir grid. The most currently used technique for solving these equations is the fully IMplicit (FIM) method which is unconditionally stable, allowing for large timesteps in simulation. However, it is computationally expensive. On the other hand, the method known as IMplicit pressure explicit saturations, temperature and compositions (IMPEST) is computationally inexpensive, but it is only conditionally stable and restricts the timestep size. To improve the balance between the timestep size and computational cost, the thermal adaptive IMplicit (TAIM) method uses stability criteria and a switching algorithm, where some simulation variables such as pressure, saturations, temperature, compositions are treated implicitly while others are treated with explicit schemes. This presentation described ongoing research on TAIM with particular reference to thermal displacement processes such as the stability criteria that dictate the maximum allowed timestep size for simulation based on the von Neumann linear stability analysis method; the switching algorithm that adapts labeling of reservoir variables as implicit or explicit as a function of space and time; and, complex physical behaviors such as heat and fluid convection, thermal conduction and compressibility. Key numerical results obtained by enhancing Stanford's General Purpose Research Simulator (GPRS) were also presented along with a list of research challenges. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs., 1 appendix.

  4. Advanced thermal energy management: A thermal test bed and heat pipe simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barile, Ronald G.

    1986-01-01

    Work initiated on a common-module thermal test simulation was continued, and a second project on heat pipe simulation was begun. The test bed, constructed from surplus Skylab equipment, was modeled and solved for various thermal load and flow conditions. Low thermal load caused the radiator fluid, Coolanol 25, to thicken due to its temperature avoided by using a regenerator-heat-exchanger. Other possible solutions modeled include a radiator heater and shunting heat from the central thermal bus to the radiator. Also, module air temperature can become excessive with high avionics load. A second preoject concerning advanced heat pipe concepts was initiated. A program was written which calculates fluid physical properties, liquid and vapor pressure in the evaporator and condenser, fluid flow rates, and thermal flux. The program is directed to evaluating newer heat pipe wicks and geometries, especially water in an artery surrounded by six vapor channels. Effects of temperature, groove and slot dimensions, and wick properties are reported.

  5. Numerical simulation of thermal behavior during laser metal deposition shaping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Ri-sheng; LIU Wei-jun; XING Fei; WANG Hua-bing

    2008-01-01

    Based on the element life and death theory of finite element analysis (FEA),a three-dimensional multi-track and multi-layer model for laser metal deposition shaping (LMDS) was developed with ANSYS parametric design language (APDL),and detailed numerical simulations of temperature and thermal stress were conducted.Among those simulations,long-edge parallel reciprocating scanning method was introduced.The distribution regularities of temperature,temperature gradient,Von Mise's effective stress,X-directional,Y-directional and Z-directional thermal stresses were studied.LMDS experiments were carried out with nickel-based superalloy using the same process parameters as those in simulation.The measured temperatures of molten pool are in accordance with the simulated results.The crack engendering and developing regularities of samples show good agreement with the simulation results.

  6. Integrated thermal simulation of buildings and regenerative evaporative coolers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, P.G.; Mathews, E.H.; Grobler, L.J. (Pretoria Univ. (South Africa). Centre for Experimental and Numerical Thermoflow)

    1994-01-01

    The thermal environment inside a building, fitted with a regenerative evaporative cooler, is influenced by the performance of the cooler. However, this performance is again influenced by the indoor air conditions. It means that the thermal performance of the building and the performance of the cooler cannot be separated. This paper proposes an innovative model for simulating the integrated thermal performance of buildings and regenerative evaporative coolers. The cooler model employs a standard single equation to characterize the performance of a cooler. Only the coefficients of this equation differs for different coolers. These coefficients are found from empirical performance data available from suppliers. The model was integrated with a comprehensive building thermal analysis program and verified successfully. This model now enables the designer to simulate any regenerative evaporative cooler connected to any building in any climatic region. The control strategy best suited for different off-design conditions can now also be investigated. (Author)

  7. Numerical Simulation for Thermal Shock Resistance of Thermal Protection Materials Considering Different Operating Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the sensitivities of material properties to temperature and the complexity of service environment of thermal protection system on the spacecraft, ultrahigh-temperature ceramics (UHTCs, which are used as thermal protection materials, cannot simply consider thermal shock resistance (TSR of the material its own but need to take the external constraint conditions and the thermal environment into full account. With the thermal shock numerical simulation on hafnium diboride (HfB2, a detailed study of the effects of the different external constraints and thermal environments on the TSR of UHTCs had been made. The influences of different initial temperatures, constraint strengths, and temperature change rates on the TSR of UHTCs are discussed. This study can provide a more intuitively visual understanding of the evolution of the TSR of UHTCs during actual operation conditions.

  8. Thermal simulation and analysis of the STF cryomodule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Qing-Jin; Ohuchi Norihito; Kiyosumi Tsuchiya; Tsai Ming-Hsun; ZONG Zhan-Guo; ZHAI Ji-Yuan; GAO Jie

    2009-01-01

    STF is a superconducting RF test facility constructed at the high energy accelerator research orga-nization of Japan (KEK), as a main part of a R&D project for the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) in Asia. Thermal study of the STF 1.3 GHz 9-cell cavity cryomodule was carried out within a collaboration between China and Japan. Static and dynamic thermal behaviors of the STF cryomodule were simulated and analyzed with the FEM method, and some simulation results were compared with the available experimental data. This paper presents the details.

  9. Electro-Thermal-Mechanical Simulation Capability Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D

    2008-02-06

    This is the Final Report for LDRD 04-ERD-086, 'Electro-Thermal-Mechanical Simulation Capability'. The accomplishments are well documented in five peer-reviewed publications and six conference presentations and hence will not be detailed here. The purpose of this LDRD was to research and develop numerical algorithms for three-dimensional (3D) Electro-Thermal-Mechanical simulations. LLNL has long been a world leader in the area of computational mechanics, and recently several mechanics codes have become 'multiphysics' codes with the addition of fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and chemistry. However, these multiphysics codes do not incorporate the electromagnetics that is required for a coupled Electro-Thermal-Mechanical (ETM) simulation. There are numerous applications for an ETM simulation capability, such as explosively-driven magnetic flux compressors, electromagnetic launchers, inductive heating and mixing of metals, and MEMS. A robust ETM simulation capability will enable LLNL physicists and engineers to better support current DOE programs, and will prepare LLNL for some very exciting long-term DoD opportunities. We define a coupled Electro-Thermal-Mechanical (ETM) simulation as a simulation that solves, in a self-consistent manner, the equations of electromagnetics (primarily statics and diffusion), heat transfer (primarily conduction), and non-linear mechanics (elastic-plastic deformation, and contact with friction). There is no existing parallel 3D code for simulating ETM systems at LLNL or elsewhere. While there are numerous magnetohydrodynamic codes, these codes are designed for astrophysics, magnetic fusion energy, laser-plasma interaction, etc. and do not attempt to accurately model electromagnetically driven solid mechanics. This project responds to the Engineering R&D Focus Areas of Simulation and Energy Manipulation, and addresses the specific problem of Electro-Thermal-Mechanical simulation for design and analysis of energy

  10. Simulation of Thermal Comfort of a Residential House

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masine Md. Tap

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In hot and humid climates thermal comfort can become a problem to the occupants of many residential buildings especially when they are not equipped with air-conditioning system. This paper presents outcomes of an ongoing research work to investigate thermal comfort level in a naturally ventilated residential house in Malaysia using computational fluid dynamics (CFD method. Actual measurements of the temperature distribution, relative humidity and air flow pattern were conducted. CFD simulations on the model of the house allow us to visualize the temperature distribution and air flow pattern and velocity in the house. The thermal comfort in the house was found to be well outside the limits specified by ASHRAE standards. CFD simulation was used to investigate the effects of using a ceiling fan installed in the middle of the hall section and rotating at 150 RPM. It was found that the fan produced swirling flow pattern in the hall section resulting in a more uniform temperature distribution inside the house. However, there is no significant improvement in the thermal comfort level in the house. Results of CFD simulations also show that the use of small extractor fans installed on the front and back walls has no significant effects on the thermal comfort level in the house. Although the mechanical ventilation devices did not help improve the thermal comfort in the house being studied, the CFD simulation results can be used by building designers and engineers to further improved the level of thermal comfort in residential houses in hot and humid climates that are naturally ventilated.

  11. Simulations of thermal conductance across tilt grain boundaries in graphene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Wang; Bo Gong; Qiong Feng; Hong-Tao Wang

    2012-01-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) method was performed to simulate the thermal transportation process in graphene nanoribbons (GNRs).A convenient way was conceived to introduce tilt grain boundaries (GBs) into the graphene lattice by repetitive removing C atom rows along certain directions.Comprehensive MD simulations reveal that larger-angle GBs are effective thermal barriers and substantially reduce the average thermal conductivity of GNRs.The GB thermal conductivity is ~ 10 W.m-1·K-1 for a bicrystal GNR with a misorientation of 21.8°,which is ~97% less than that of a prefect GNR with the same size.The total thermal resistance has a monotonic dependence on the density of the 5-7 defects along the GBs.A theoretical model is proposed to capture this relation and resolve the contributions by both the reduction in the phonon mean free path and the defect-induced thermal resistance.

  12. A New Mathematical Simulation Approach for Thermal Cracking Furnace Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LanXingying; XuChunming; GaoJinsen; ZhangHongmei

    2005-01-01

    Thermal cracking of hydrocarbons for olefin production is normally carried out in long reactor tubes suspended in a large gas fired furnace. In this paper, a coupled furnace-reactor mathematical model based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique is developed to simulate the complex fluid dynamics phenomena in the thermal cracking furnace. The model includes mass transfer, momentum transfer, and heat transfer, as well as thermal cracking reactions, fuel combustion and radiative heat transfer. The rationality and reliability of the mathematical model is confirmed by the approximate agreement of predicted data and industrial data. The coupled furnace-reactor simulation revealed the details of both the transfer and reaction processes taking place in the thermal cracking furnace. The results indicate highly nonuniform distribution of the flue-gas velocity, concentration and temperature in the furnace, which cause nonuniform distribution of tube skin temperature and heat flux of the reactor tubes. Profiles of oil-gas velocity,pressure, temperature and product yields in the lengthwise direction of the reactor tube are obtained. Furthermore, in the radial direction steep velocity and temperature gradients and relatively slight gradients of species concentration are found.In conclusion, the model can provide more information on the fluid dynamics and reaction behavior in the thermal cracking furnace, and guidance for the design and improvement of thermal cracking furnaces.

  13. Optical and thermal simulation chain for LED package

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tapaninen, O.; Myohanen, P.; Majanen, M.; Sitomaniemi, A.; Olkkonen, J.; Hildenbrand, V.; Gielen, A.W.J.; Mackenzie, F.V.; Barink, M.; Smilauer, V.; Patzak, B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a test case for coupling two physical aspects of an LED, optical and thermal, using specific simulation models coupled through an open source platform for distributed multi-physics modelling. The glue code for coupling is written with Python programming language including routine

  14. Weldability investigation steel P 91 by weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates results of hardness and impact energy of thermal cycle simulated specimens of high-alloy steel P 91 and their dependence on cooling time from 800 to 500 °C. Results were obtained by measuring hardness HV 1 and by experimental testing of Charpy notched specimens. Metallographic analysis of samples was performed on scanning electronic microscope.

  15. Combining building thermal simulation methods and LCA methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Frank; Hansen, Klaus; Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    2008-01-01

    Thsi paper describes recent efforts made by the Danish Building Research Institute regarding the integration of a life cycle assessment (LCA) method into a whole building hygro-thermal simulation tool. The motivation for the work is that the increased requirements to the energy performance...

  16. Hybrid simulation of metal oxide surge-arrester thermal behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, L.; Raghuveer, M.R. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1996-01-01

    A finite-difference-based technique for simulating the thermal behaviour of a metal oxide surge arrester (MOSA) was described. The improved hybrid thermal modelling technique was claimed to accurately represent heat-transfer modes. Fin theory was used to represent arrester sheds. The proposed model, which relies on simple measurements at the arrester terminals, yields the temporal variation of temperature in a MOSA in both the axial and radial direction. The thermal behaviour of a MOSA under steady-state and transient conditions can be simulated using such a model under different environmental conditions. The accuracy of the modelling technique was demonstrated experimentally by measurements conducted on an arrester. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Cosmological MHD simulations of cluster formation with anisotropic thermal conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Ruszkowski, M; Bruggen, M; Parrish, I; Oh, S Peng

    2010-01-01

    (abridged) The ICM has been suggested to be buoyantly unstable in the presence of magnetic field and anisotropic thermal conduction. We perform first cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formation that simultaneously include magnetic fields, radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction. In isolated and idealized cluster models, the magnetothermal instability (MTI) tends to reorient the magnetic fields radially. Using cosmological simulations of the Santa Barbara cluster we detect radial bias in the velocity and magnetic fields. Such radial bias is consistent with either the inhomogeneous radial gas flows due to substructures or residual MTI-driven field rearangements that are expected even in the presence of turbulence. Although disentangling the two scenarios is challenging, we do not detect excess bias in the runs that include anisotropic thermal conduction. The anisotropy effect is potentially detectable via radio polarization measurements with LOFAR and SKA and future X-ray spectroscopic stu...

  18. Thermal stability of silicon nanowires:atomistic simulation study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wen-Liang; Zhang Kai-Wang; Zhong Jian-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Using the Stillinger-Weber (SW) potential model, we investigate the thermal stability of pristine silicon nanowires based on classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We explore the structural evolutions and the Lindemann indices of silicon nanowires at different temperatures in order to unveil atomic-level melting behaviour of silicon nanowires.The simulation results show that silicon nanowires with surface reconstructions have higher thermal stability than those without surface reconstructions, and that silicon nanowires with perpendicular dimmer rows on the two (100) surfaces have somewhat higher thermal stability than nanowires with parallel dimmer rows on the two (100) surfaces. Furthermore, the melting temperature of silicon nanowires increases as their diameter increases and reaches a saturation value close to the melting temperature of bulk silicon. The value of the Lindemann index for melting silicon nanowires is 0.037.

  19. Assessment of the thermal environment in a simulated aircraft cabin using thermal manikin exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Zukowska, Daria; Jama, Agnieszka

    2007-01-01

    investigation in which 4 groups of 17 subjects participated, each group being exposed to the same three temperature conditions during simulated 7-hour transatlantic flights. The assessments indicate that an air temperature increase in the middle of a 7-hour flight period followed by a decrease before landing......The thermal environment in a full-scale 21-seat section of an aircraft cabin installed in a climate chamber was investigated. Fourteen heated cylinders and two thermal manikins were used to simulate the heat load, buoyancy flow and flow obstruction from passengers in the cabin. Measurements were...

  20. GOTHIC code simulation of thermal stratification in POOLEX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2009-07-15

    Pressure suppression pool is an important element of BWR containment. It serves as a heat sink and steam condenser to prevent containment pressure buildup during loss of coolant accident or safety relief valve opening during normal operations of a BWR. Insufficient mixing in the pool, in case of low mass flow rate of steam, can cause development of thermal stratification and reduction of pressure suppression pool capacity. For reliable prediction of mixing and stratification phenomena validation of simulation tools has to be performed. Data produced in POOLEX/PPOOLEX facility at Lappeenranta University of Technology about development of thermal stratification in a large scale model of a pressure suppression pool is used for GOTHIC lumped and distributed parameter validation. Sensitivity of GOTHIC solution to different boundary conditions and grid convergence study for 2D simulations of POOLEX STB-20 experiment are performed in the present study. CFD simulation was carried out with FLUENT code in order to get additional insights into physics of stratification phenomena. In order to support development of experimental procedures for new tests in the PPOOLEX facility lumped parameter pre-test GOTHIC simulations were performed. Simulations show that drywell and wetwell pressures can be kept within safety margins during a long transient necessary for development of thermal stratification. (au)

  1. Engineering-Based Thermal CFD Simulations on Massive Parallel Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Frisch

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD codes is a challenging task that entails efficient parallelization concepts and strategies in order to achieve good scalability values when running those codes on modern supercomputers with several thousands to millions of cores. In this paper, we present a hierarchical data structure for massive parallel computations that supports the coupling of a Navier–Stokes-based fluid flow code with the Boussinesq approximation in order to address complex thermal scenarios for energy-related assessments. The newly designed data structure is specifically designed with the idea of interactive data exploration and visualization during runtime of the simulation code; a major shortcoming of traditional high-performance computing (HPC simulation codes. We further show and discuss speed-up values obtained on one of Germany’s top-ranked supercomputers with up to 140,000 processes and present simulation results for different engineering-based thermal problems.

  2. Engineering-Based Thermal CFD Simulations on Massive Parallel Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Frisch, Jérôme

    2015-05-22

    The development of parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is a challenging task that entails efficient parallelization concepts and strategies in order to achieve good scalability values when running those codes on modern supercomputers with several thousands to millions of cores. In this paper, we present a hierarchical data structure for massive parallel computations that supports the coupling of a Navier–Stokes-based fluid flow code with the Boussinesq approximation in order to address complex thermal scenarios for energy-related assessments. The newly designed data structure is specifically designed with the idea of interactive data exploration and visualization during runtime of the simulation code; a major shortcoming of traditional high-performance computing (HPC) simulation codes. We further show and discuss speed-up values obtained on one of Germany’s top-ranked supercomputers with up to 140,000 processes and present simulation results for different engineering-based thermal problems.

  3. SIMULATION OF THERMAL DECOMPOSITION OF MINERAL INSULATING OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. M. Cruz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDissolved gas analysis (DGA has been applied for decades as the main predictive maintenance technique for diagnosing incipient faults in power transformers since the decomposition of the mineral insulating oil (MIO produces gases that remain dissolved in the liquid phase. Nevertheless, the most known diagnostic methods are based on findings of simplified thermodynamic and compositional models for the thermal decomposition of MIO, in addition to empirical data. The simulation results obtained from these models do not satisfactorily reproduce the empirical data. This paper proposes a flexible thermodynamic model enhanced with a kinetic approach and selects, among four compositional models, the one offering the best performance for the simulation of thermal decomposition of MIO. The simulation results obtained from the proposed model showed better adequacy to reported data than the results obtained from the classical models. The proposed models may be applied in the development of a phenomenologically-based diagnostic method.

  4. Thermal Simulation of the Component Rework Profile Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Nurminen, Janne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the possibilities and feasibility of the ther-mal simulation for the modeling of the rework process. The rework process modeling could enable an easy and fast access to the component and PWB level thermally critical effects like over and under heating of the component during the rework process. The modeling could also be used as a help of the real rework profile definition at an early phase of the electrical device development. The work includes a...

  5. Thermal numerical simulator for laboratory evaluation of steamflood oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarathi, P.

    1991-04-01

    A thermal numerical simulator running on an IBM AT compatible personal computer is described. The simulator was designed to assist laboratory design and evaluation of steamflood oil recovery. An overview of the historical evolution of numerical thermal simulation, NIPER's approach to solving these problems with a desk top computer, the derivation of equations and a description of approaches used to solve these equations, and verification of the simulator using published data sets and sensitivity analysis are presented. The developed model is a three-phase, two-dimensional multicomponent simulator capable of being run in one or two dimensions. Mass transfer among the phases and components is dictated by pressure- and temperature-dependent vapor-liquid equilibria. Gravity and capillary pressure phenomena were included. Energy is transferred by conduction, convection, vaporization and condensation. The model employs a block centered grid system with a five-point discretization scheme. Both areal and vertical cross-sectional simulations are possible. A sequential solution technique is employed to solve the finite difference equations. The study clearly indicated the importance of heat loss, injected steam quality, and injection rate to the process. Dependence of overall recovery on oil volatility and viscosity is emphasized. The process is very sensitive to relative permeability values. Time-step sensitivity runs indicted that the current version is time-step sensitive and exhibits conditional stability. 75 refs., 19 figs., 19 tabs.

  6. Meteorological simulation of thermal environment in the Sichuan basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongbinZHANG; KeisukeHANAKI; ToshiyaARAMAKI

    2003-01-01

    A highly versatile numerical code - the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was used into the heat island simulation of an inland mega-city - Chongqing and Sichuan Basin, China. The entire horizontal calculation domain 2000 km×2000 km and the vertical calculation domain was from 50cm under ground to the altitude of 15 000 m. The USGS (U.S.Geological Survey) topography and land use data, the NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction) meteorological data were used as the input data of this simulation. The simulation shows that the temperature of Chongqing''s urban area was higher than that of suburb area corresponding to the topographical condition. It was confirmed that RAMS could be applied for the simulation of thermal environment. It was also demonstrated that the local climate in the smaller scale could be expressed by generating two-way interactive nesting grid.

  7. Numerical simulation for thermal flow filling process of casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ye; ZHAO Yu-hong; HOU Hua

    2006-01-01

    The solution algorithm (SOLA) method was used to solve the velocity and pressure field of the thermal flow filling process, and the volume of fluid (VOF) method for the free surface problem. Since the "donor-acceptor" rule often results in the free interface vague, the explicit difference method was adopted, and a method describing the free surface state at 0<F<1 was proposed to deal with this problem. In order to raise the computation efficiency, such algorithms were investigated and invalidated as: 1) internal and external area separation simplification algorithm; 2) the reducing necessary search area method. With the improved algorithms, the filling processes of the valve cover castings with gravity cast and an up cylinder block casting with low-pressure cast were simulated, the simulation results are believable and the computation efficiency is greatly improved. The SOLA-VOF model and its difference method for thermal fluid flow filling process were introduced.

  8. Simulation of collision cascades and thermal spikes in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.

    2010-10-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to examine defect production by energetic recoils in UO2, Gd2Ti2O7, Gd2Zr2O7 and ZrSiO4. These atomistic simulations provide details of the nature and size distribution of defect clusters produced in collision cascades. The accommodation of recoil damage by lower energy cation exchange and greater occupation of anion structural vacancies is a contributing factor for the greater radiation tolerance of Gd2Zr2O7 relative to Gd2Ti2O7. In addition, electronic energy loss processes in UO2 has been modeled in the form of a thermal spike to study the details of track formation and track structure. For thermal spikes with energy deposition of 4 keV/nm in UO2, a track was not formed and mainly isolated Frenkel pairs are produced.

  9. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S.; Williams, H. R.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system; and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  10. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Williams, H.R. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system, and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  11. Simulation of a steady-state integrated human thermal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, F. T.; Fan, L. T.; Hwang, C. L.

    1972-01-01

    The mathematical model of an integrated human thermal system is formulated. The system consists of an external thermal regulation device on the human body. The purpose of the device (a network of cooling tubes held in contact with the surface of the skin) is to maintain the human body in a state of thermoneutrality. The device is controlled by varying the inlet coolant temperature and coolant mass flow rate. The differential equations of the model are approximated by a set of algebraic equations which result from the application of the explicit forward finite difference method to the differential equations. The integrated human thermal system is simulated for a variety of combinations of the inlet coolant temperature, coolant mass flow rate, and metabolic rates. Two specific cases are considered: (1) the external thermal regulation device is placed only on the head and (2) the devices are placed on the head and the torso. The results of the simulation indicate that when the human body is exposed to hot environment, thermoneutrality can be attained by localized cooling if the operating variables of the external regulation device(s) are properly controlled.

  12. Combining building thermal simulation methods and LCA methods

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Frank; Hansen, Klaus; Wittchen, Kim Bjarne; Sørensen, Karl Grau; Johnsen, Kjeld

    2008-01-01

    Thsi paper describes recent efforts made by the Danish Building Research Institute regarding the integration of a life cycle assessment (LCA) method into a whole building hygro-thermal simulation tool. The motivation for the work is that the increased requirements to the energy performance of buildings (as expressed in EU Directive 2002/91/EC), may in the future be supplemented by requirements to the environmental impact of buildings. This can be seen by the fact that EU recently has given EN...

  13. Thermal Simulation of Four Die-Attach Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    contact between circuit board layers. ..............................................................5 Figure 4. Simulation results with AuSn braze on...being investigated, three were metallic, with good thermal conductivity. These materials were a Au/Sn braze , in an 80%/20% mixture; a CPES nanoscale...silver powder; and Kester R520A solder paste, an alloy which is 96.5% Sn, 3.0% Ag, and 0.5% Cu , commonly called SAC. The fourth die-attach material

  14. Overall Thermal Performance of Flexible Piping Under Simulated Bending Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Demko, J. A.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Flexible, vacuum-insulated transfer lines for low-temperature applications have higher thermal losses than comparable rigid lines. Typical flexible piping construction uses corrugated tubes, inner and outer, with a multilayer insulation (MLI) system in the annular space. Experiments on vacuum insulation systems in a flexible geometry were conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. The effects of bending were simulated by causing the inner tube to be eccentric with the outer tube. The effects of spacers were simulated in a controlled way by inserting spacer tubes for the length of the cylindrical test articles. Two material systems, standard MLI and a layered composite insulation (LCI), were tested under the full range of vacuum levels using a liquid nitrogen boiloff calorimeter to determine the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value). The results indicate that the flexible piping under simulated bending conditions significantly degrades the thermal performance of the insulation system. These data are compared to standard MLI for both straight and flexible piping configurations. The definition of an overall k-value for actual field installations (k(sub oafi)) is described for use in design and analysis of cryogenic piping systems.

  15. Minerve: thermal-hydraulic phenomena simulation and virtual reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laffont, A.; Pentori, B. [EDF R and D, EDF SEPTEN Electricity of France - Research and Development, Department SINETICS, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2003-07-01

    MINERVE is a 3D interactive application representing the thermal-hydraulic phenomena happening in a nuclear plant. Therefore, the 3D geometric model of the French 900 MW PWR installations has been built. The users can interact in real time with this model to see at each step of the simulation what happens in the pipes. The thermal-hydraulic simulation is made by CATHARE-2, which calculates at every time step data on about one thousand meshes (the whole primary circuit, a part of the second circuit, and the Residual Heat Removal System). The simulation covers incidental and accidental cases on these systems. There are two main innovations in MINERVE: In the domain of nuclear plant's visualization, it is to introduce interactive 3D software mechanisms to visualize results of a physical simulation. In the domain of real-time 3D, it is to visualize fluids in a pipe, while they can have several configurations, like bubbles or single liquid phase. These mechanisms enable better comprehension and better visual representation of the possible phenomena. This paper describes the functionalities of MINERVE, and the difficulties to represent fluids with several characteristics like speed, configuration,..., in 3D. On the end, we talk about the future of MINERVE, and more widely of the possible futures of such an application in scientific visualization. (authors)

  16. Thermal energy storage in buildings using PCM. Computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khudhair, A.M.; Farid, M.M.; Chen, J.J.J. [Auckland Univ. (New Zealand). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering; Bansal, P.K. [Auckland Univ. (New Zealand). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents the results of phase changing material, RT20, impregnated up to 26%-wt into the gypsum wallboards to produce a significant thermal storage medium (PCMGW). A full-scale test facility using the PCMGW was monitored for two years, and was modeled using the thermal building simulation package, SUNREL, to evaluate the latent heat storage performance of the PCM treated wallboards. Measured and simulated results showed that the use of PCMGW met two needs: quick absorption of solar heat for use during off-sunshine hours and avoid overheating during sunshine hours. The PCMGWs effectively smoothed out diurnal daily fluctuations of indoor air temperatures on sunny days and, therefore, providing thermal comfort. Although the benefits of PCMGW were clearly demonstrated, it was necessary to optimize the melting point and quantity of the PCM and to highlight the importance of showing how many days the PCM could effectively minimize the indoor temperature fluctuation. In a 90-day period during summer, a PCM of with a melting range of 18 C - 22 C could be fully utilized for 39% and partially utilized for 55.5% of the summer days when there is either partial melting or partial freezing. There is no benefit for only 5.5% of the summer days when the PCM remains either in the solid or liquid state. These percentages show that the decision of using 26%-wt RT20 with the melting range of 18-22 C is a practical and realistic one. (orig.)

  17. Thermal nuclear pulse simulation at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, C.P.; Ralph, M.E. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Ghanbari, C.M. (Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Oeding, R.; Shaw, K. (PDA Engineering, Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico is being used to simulate the thermal pulse from a nuclear weapon on relatively large surfaces. Pulses varying in length from 2 seconds to 7 seconds have been produced. The desired pulse length varies as a function of the yield of the weapon being simulated. The present experiment capability can accommodate samples as large as 1.2 {times} 1.5 meters. Samples can be flat or three-dimensional. Samples exposed have ranged from fabrics (protective clothing) to an aircraft canopy and cockpit system, complete with a mannequin in a flight suit and helmet. In addition, a windowed wind tunnel has been constructed which permits exposure of flight surface materials to thermal transients with air speed of Mach 0.8. The wind tunnel can accommodate samples up to .48 {times} .76 meters or an array of smaller samples. The maximum flux capability of the NSTTF is about 70 calories/cm{sup 2}-sec. A black-body temperature of about 6000 K is produced by the solar beam and is therefore ideal for simulating the nuclear source. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Quality control for thermal building simulations; Keurmerk thermische gebouwsimulaties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijsman, A.J.Th.M.; Plokker, W. [TNO Bouw, Delft (Netherlands)

    1999-07-01

    Within the framework of the IEA (International Energy Agency) Annex 21 (Calculation of Energy and Environmental Performance of Buildings a set of tools has been developed to reduce the - in practice often very broad - differences produced in computerised thermal calculations for buildings and installations. This was followed by the launch of a project aimed at putting the assimilated knowledge and newly developed tools into practice in the Netherlands. The tools (MIS or Model Information System for the documentation of the models and the programmes, BESTEST to test building simulation programmes, and PAM, a Performance Assessment Method with guidelines for the user to translate practical data of the building into input data for the programme) were partly adapted to the Dutch situation and then transferred to four interested Dutch distributors of the computer software used for the thermal calculations. A procedure was also developed for issuing a mark of approval, based on these tools. 2 refs.

  19. Comparisons between different models for thermal simulation of GTAW process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yanli; Wei Yanhong

    2005-01-01

    Two mathematical models are built to study the effects of the fluid flow on thermal distributions of the gas tungsten arc welding(GTAW) process. One model is based on the heat conductivity equation, which doesn' t take the effects of the fluid flow into account, and the other couples the laminar heat transfer and fluid flow in the weld pool, which is called laminar fluid flow model in short. The simulated results of the two models show that the pattern and velocity of the fluid flow play a critical role in determining the thermal distribution and the weld pool shape. For the laminar fluid flow model, its highest temperature is 400 K lower than that calculated with the other model and the depth of its weld pool is shallower too, which is mainly caused by the main vortex of the flow in the weld pool.

  20. Coupled mechanical and thermal simulation of warm compaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuan-yuan; ZHAO Wei-bin; ZHOU Zhao-yao; CHEN Pu-qing

    2006-01-01

    Warm compaction process of pure iron powder was investigated. Due to the existence of elastic, plastic and thermal strains,a coupled mechanical and thermal model was applied. The elasto-plastic constitutive equations for powder material were developed based on ellipsoidal yield criterion and continuum theory. The constitutive equations were integrated into the constitutive integral arithmetic and solved employing incremental iterative solution strategy. The yield strength of iron powder was obtained according to the tensile experiments. When the compaction temperature was raised to 130 ℃, the yield strength of iron powder metal drops to 85% of room temperature value. Modified coulomb friction law is applied and the simulation results show that friction was an important factor resulting in the inhomogeneous relative density and reverse-density distribution phenomena in the regions near the die wall and the symmetrical axis.

  1. Simulation and measurement of thermal comfort; Simulation und Messung der thermischen Behaglichkeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelker, Conrad; Kornadt, Oliver [Bauhaus-Universitaet Weimar, Professur Bauphysik (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    An approach is introduced, which enables the assessment of thermal comfort considering the complex and inhomogeneous climatic conditions in buildings as well as the human physiology. Computational fluid dynamic is linked with a numerical model representing the thermophysiological behavior of the human body (UC Berkeley Comfort Model). By dint of CFD, the climatic conditions in buildings are simulated with a detailed resolution. Basing on the simulations, the thermophysiological model is able to determine the temperature distribution of the human body, the heat flux to the environment as well as thermal comfort. The approach is used for the exemplified investigation of thermal comfort and sensation in a room equipped with a radiant cooling floor. (Copyright copyright 2010 Ernst and Sohn Verlag fuer Architektur und technische Wissenschaften GmbH and Co. KG, Berlin)

  2. Simulating the Mineral Scale by High Pressure Thermal Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y. H.; Liu, H. L.; Chen, H. F.; Song, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    The generating capacity of Chingshui geothermal power plant decreased rapidly after it had operated three years. Chinese Petroleum Corporation (CPC) attributed the main reason was the depletion of reservoir. One reason was that the reservoir did not be recharged. And the other was the mineral scale in reservoir and pipes which caused flow rate decreased. There are abundant geothermal energy in Taiwan. But in Chingshui, the spring has amount content of carbonate. Most scaling are calcium carbonate and silica. These two materials have different solubility in various pH and physical conditions. Because the pressure reduced in the process of upwelling, the hot spring from the reservoir deposited calcium carbonate immediately by large carbon dioxide escape. This result caused the diameter of pipeline reduced. Besides, as the temperature decreased, the silica would scaling in the part of heat exchanger. To avoid the failure experience in Chingshui , how to prevent the mineral scaling is the key point that we need to solve. Our study will use hydrothermal experiments by High Pressure Thermal Vessel to simulate the process of spring water upwelling from reservoir to surface, to understand whether calcium carbonate and silica scaling or not in different temperature and pressure. This study choose the Hongchailin well as objects to simulate, and the target layers of drilling well were set as Szeleng sandstone and Lushan slate. We used pure water and saturated water pressure in our experiments. There were four vessels in High thermal vessel. The first vessel was used to simulate the condition of reservoir. The second and third vessel were simulated the conditions in the well when spring water upwelling to the surface. And the last vessel was simulated the conditions on surface surroundings. We hope to get the temperature and pressure when the scaling occurred, and verified with the computing result, thus we can inhibit the scaling.

  3. Thermal stability of marks gold nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanlin; Li, Siqi; Qi, Weihong; Wang, Mingpu; Li, Zhou; Wang, Zhixing

    2017-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MDs) simulations were used to explore the thermal stability of Au nanoparticles (NPs) with decahedral, cuboctahedral, icosahedral and Marks NPs. According to the calculated cohesive energy and melting temperature, the Marks NPs have a higher cohesive energy and melting temperature compared to these other shapes. The Lindemann index, radial distribution function, deformation parameters, mean square displacement and self-diffusivity have been used to characterize the structure variation during heating. This work may inspire researchers to prepare Marks NPs and apply them in different fields.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of thermal effects in nanometric cutting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the basic action of how material removing in nanoscale is a critical issue of producing well-formed components.In order to clarify thermal effects on material removal at atomic level,molecular dynamics(MD)simulations of nanometric cutting of mono-crystalline copper are performed with Morse,EAM and Tersoff potential.The effects of cutting speed on temperature distribution are investigated.The simulation results demonstrate that the temperature distribution shows a roughly concentric shape around shear zone and a steep temperature gradient lies in diamond tool,a relative high temperature is located in shear zone and machined surface,but the highest temperature is found in chip.At a high cutting speed mode,the atoms in shear zone with high temperature implies a large stress is built up in a local region.

  5. Thermal behavior simulation of Ni/MH battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI DaHe; YANG Kai; CHEN Shi; WU Feng

    2009-01-01

    Thermal behavior of overcharged Ni/MH battery is studied with microcalorimeter. The battery Is in-stalled in a special device in a microcslorimeter with a quartz frequency thermometer. Quantity of heat and heat capacity of the battery charged at different state of charge (SOC) st different rates are meas-ured by the microcalorimeter. Based on a series of aseumputions, heat transfer equation is set up. Ex-pression of heat generation is attained by curve fitting instead of theoretical calculation. Thermal model is used to simulate thermal behavior of the battery in charging period, results of calculation and expe-riment match very well. The temperature distribution is non-uniform because the poor conductivity limits the heat transfer during charging process. It is difficult to greatly improve the heat conductivity of the battery because it is related to materials inside the battery including electrodes, separators and so on. Therefore, high rate charge should be avoided in actual use. It may cause some damage to the battery.

  6. A Guide to Finite Element Simulations of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäker, Martin; Seiler, Philipp

    2017-08-01

    To understand the stress evolution and failure mechanisms of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), finite element simulations are an invaluable tool. Simulations are especially useful to unwrap complex interactions of different phenomena at high temperature, including creep, sintering, diffusion, and oxidation. However, the correct setup and evaluation of a finite element model for this problem are difficult. This article reviews critical issues in modelling TBC systems. Some of the most important aspects are as follows: (a) stresses in 3D simulations may differ considerably from 2D models; (b) the interface shape strongly affects the stresses and using an idealized geometry may underestimate stresses; (c) crack propagation requires simulating sufficiently large regions to correctly capture stress redistribution; (d) a correct description of the material behaviour (visco-plasticity, TGO growth, sintering) is crucial in determining the stress state. The article discusses these and other issues in detail and provides guidelines on the choice of model parameters, boundary conditions, etc. The paper also points out open questions in modelling TBC systems and discusses aspects of verification and validation.

  7. On the precision of aero-thermal simulations for TMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos; Thompson, Hugh

    2016-08-01

    Environmental effects on the Image Quality (IQ) of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) are estimated by aero-thermal numerical simulations. These simulations utilize Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to estimate, among others, thermal (dome and mirror) seeing as well as wind jitter and blur. As the design matures, guidance obtained from these numerical experiments can influence significant cost-performance trade-offs and even component survivability. The stochastic nature of environmental conditions results in the generation of a large computational solution matrix in order to statistically predict Observatory Performance. Moreover, the relative contribution of selected key subcomponents to IQ increases the parameter space and thus computational cost, while dictating a reduced prediction error bar. The current study presents the strategy followed to minimize prediction time and computational resources, the subsequent physical and numerical limitations and finally the approach to mitigate the issues experienced. In particular, the paper describes a mesh-independence study, the effect of interpolation of CFD results on the TMT IQ metric, and an analysis of the sensitivity of IQ to certain important heat sources and geometric features.

  8. Parabolic Trough Photovoltaic/Thermal Collectors: Design and Simulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vanoli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a design procedure and a simulation model of a novel concentrating PVT collector. The layout of the PVT system under investigation was derived from a prototype recently presented in literature and commercially available. The prototype consisted in a parabolic trough concentrator and a linear triangular receiver. In that prototype, the bottom surfaces of the receiver are equipped with mono-crystalline silicon cells whereas the top surface is covered by an absorbing surface. The aperture area of the parabola was covered by a glass in order to improve the thermal efficiency of the system. In the modified version of the collector considered in this paper, two changes are implemented: the cover glass was eliminated and the mono-crystalline silicon cells were replaced by triple-junction cells. In order to analyze PVT performance, a detailed mathematical model was implemented. This model is based on zero-dimensional energy balances. The simulation model calculates the temperatures of the main components of the system and the main energy flows Results showed that the performance of the system is excellent even when the fluid temperature is very high (>100 °C. Conversely, both electrical and thermal efficiencies dramatically decrease when the incident beam radiation decreases.

  9. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup;

    2016-01-01

    A basic challenge in the IGBT transient simulation study is to obtain the realistic junction temperature, which demands not only accurate electrical simulations but also precise thermal impedance. This paper proposed a transient thermal model for IGBT junction temperature simulations during short...... circuits or overloads. The updated Cauer thermal model with varying thermal parameters is obtained by means of FEM thermal simulations with temperature-dependent physical parameters. The proposed method is applied to a case study of a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module. Furthermore, a testing setup is built up...

  10. Uncertainty evaluation of the thermal expansion of simulated fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Je; Kang, Kweon Ho; Song, Kee Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Dukjin-dong, Yuseung-gu, Daejon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    Thermal expansions of simulated fuel (SS1) are measured by using a dilatometer (DIL402C) from room temperature to 1900K. The main procedure of an uncertainty evaluation was followed by the strategy of the UO{sub 2} fuel. There exist uncertainties in the measurement, which should be quantified based on statistics. Referring to the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) guide, the uncertainties of the thermal expansion are quantified in three parts: the initial length, the length variation, and the system calibration factor. Each part is divided into two types. The A type uncertainty is derived from the statistical iterative measurement of an uncertainty and the B type uncertainty comes from a non-statistical uncertainty including a calibration and test reports. For the uncertainty evaluation, the digital calipers had been calibrated by the KOLAS (Korea Laboratory Accreditation Scheme) to obtain not only the calibration values but also the type B uncertainty. The whole system, the dilatometer (DIL402C), is composed of many complex sub-systems and in fact it is difficult to consider all the uncertainties of sub-systems. Thus, a calibration of the system was performed with a standard material (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which is provided by NETZSCH. From the above standard uncertainties, the combined standard uncertainties were calculated by using the law of a propagation of an uncertainty. Finally, the expanded uncertainty was calculated by using the effective degree of freedom and the t-distribution for a given confidence level. The uncertainty of the thermal expansion for a simulated fuel was also compared with those of UO{sub 2} fuel. (author)

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Thermal Conductivity in Si-Ge Nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiao-Peng; HUAI Xiu-Lan

    2008-01-01

    @@ Thermal conductivity of nanocomposites is calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The effect of size on thermal conductivity of nanowire composites and the temperature profiles are studied. The results indicate that the thermal conductivity of nanowire composites could be much lower than alloy value; the thermal conductivity is slightly dependent on temperature except at very low temperature.

  12. Simulation and parametric optimisation of thermal power plant cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ravindra Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to analyse parametric studies and optimum steam extraction pressures of three different (subcritical, supercritical and ultra-supercritical coal fired power plant cycles at a particular main steam temperature of 600 °C by keeping the reheat temperature at 537 °C and condenser pressure at 0.09 bar as constant. In order to maximize the heat rate gain possible with supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions, eight stages of feed water heater arrangement with single reheater is considered. The system is optimized in such a way that the percentage exergetic losses are reduced for the increase of the exergetic efficiency and higher fuel utilization. The plant cycles are simulated and optimized by using Cycle Tempo 5.0 simulation software tool. From the simulation study, it is observed that the thermal efficiency of the three different power plant cycles obtained as 41.40, 42.48 and 43.03%, respectively. The specific coal consumption for three different power plant cycles are 0.56, 0.55 and 0.54 Tonnes/MWh. The improvement in feed water temperatures at the inlet of steam generator of respective cycles are 291, 305 and 316 °C.

  13. A Thermal Simulation Tool for Building and Its Interoperability through the Building Information Modeling (BIM Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Nicolle

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes potential challenges and opportunities for using thermal simulation tools to optimize building performance. After reviewing current trends in thermal simulation, it outlines major criteria for the evaluation of building thermal simulation tools based on specifications and capabilities in interoperability. Details are discussed including workflow of data exchange of multiple thermal analyses such as the BIM-based application. The present analysis focuses on selected thermal simulation tools that provide functionalities to exchange data with other tools in order to obtain a picture of its basic work principles and to identify selection criteria for generic thermal tools in BIM. Significances and barriers to integration design with BIM and building thermal simulation tools are also discussed.

  14. Three-Dimensional Electro-Thermal Verilog-A Model of Power MOSFET for Circuit Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chvála, A.; Donoval, D.; Marek, J.; Príbytný, P.; Molnár, M.; Mikolášek, M.

    2014-04-01

    New original circuit model for the power device based on interactive coupling of electrical and thermal properties is described. The thermal equivalent network for a three-dimensional heat flow is presented. Designed electro-thermal MOSFET model for circuit simulations with distributed properties and three-dimensional thermal equivalent network is used for simulation of multipulse unclamped inductive switching (UIS) test of device robustness. The features and the limitations of the new model are analyzed and presented.

  15. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusion of binary mixtures confined in a nanochannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourali, Meisam; Maghari, Ali

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, direct non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation is developed to investigate thermal conductivity and thermal diffusion factors of confined binary mixtures of methane and some n-alkanes in a nanochannel. We used two thermal walls in different temperatures to impose temperature gradient in the system. The mixtures are confined between two parallel atomic walls, normal to temperature gradient. Simulation results show high inhomogeneity and layering in the mixtures. Thermal conductivity of mixtures increases with decreasing the channel width and increases in mixtures with high concentration of methane. Except for very small channels, confinement has minimal effect on thermal diffusion. In very narrow channels, thermal diffusion is small and it reaches a steady state value with increasing the channel width. Local velocity fields for two different channels also show different behaviors. In relatively large channels some convection patterns are observed in mixtures.

  16. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusion of binary mixtures confined in a nanochannel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourali, Meisam; Maghari, Ali, E-mail: maghari@ut.ac.ir

    2014-11-24

    In this paper, direct non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation is developed to investigate thermal conductivity and thermal diffusion factors of confined binary mixtures of methane and some n-alkanes in a nanochannel. We used two thermal walls in different temperatures to impose temperature gradient in the system. The mixtures are confined between two parallel atomic walls, normal to temperature gradient. Simulation results show high inhomogeneity and layering in the mixtures. Thermal conductivity of mixtures increases with decreasing the channel width and increases in mixtures with high concentration of methane. Except for very small channels, confinement has minimal effect on thermal diffusion. In very narrow channels, thermal diffusion is small and it reaches a steady state value with increasing the channel width. Local velocity fields for two different channels also show different behaviors. In relatively large channels some convection patterns are observed in mixtures.

  17. Initial Operation of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Pearson, J. Boise; Schoenfeld, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The NTREES facility has recently been upgraded such that the power capabilities of the facility have been increased significantly. At its present 1.2 MW power level, more prototypical fuel element temperatures nay now be reached. The new 1.2 MW induction heater consists of three physical units consisting of a transformer, rectifier, and inverter. This multiunit arrangement facilitated increasing the flexibility of the induction heater by more easily allowing variable frequency operation. Frequency ranges between 20 and 60 kHz can accommodated in the new induction heater allowing more representative power distributions to be generated within the test elements. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during testing In this new higher power configuration, NTREES will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials at near-prototypic power densities. As checkout testing progressed and as higher power levels were achieved, several design deficiencies were discovered and fixed. Most of these design deficiencies were related to stray RF energy causing various components to encounter unexpected heating. Copper shielding around these components largely eliminated these problems. Other problems encountered involved unexpected movement in the coil due to electromagnetic forces and electrical arcing between the coil and a dummy test article. The coil movement and arcing which were encountered during the checkout testing effectively destroyed the induction coil in use at

  18. Advanced wellbore thermal simulator GEOTEMP2 user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondy, L.A.; Duda, L.E.

    1984-11-01

    GEOTEMP2 is a wellbore thermal simulator computer code designed for geothermal drilling and production applications. The code treats natural and forced convection and conduction within the wellbore and heat conduction within the surrounding rock matrix. A variety of well operations can be modeled including injection, production, forward, and reverse circulation with gas or liquid, gas or liquid drilling, and two-phase steam injection and production. Well completion with several different casing sizes and cement intervals can be modeled. The code allows variables suchas flow rate to change with time enabling a realistic treatment of well operations. This user manual describes the input required to properly operate the code. Ten sample problems are included which illustrate all the code options. Complete listings of the code and the output of each sample problem are provided.

  19. Towards understanding thermal jet quenching via lattice simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, M

    2013-01-01

    After reviewing how simulations employing classical lattice gauge theory permit to test a conjectured Euclideanization property of a light-cone Wilson loop in a thermal non-Abelian plasma, we show how Euclidean data can in turn be used to estimate the transverse collision kernel, C(k_perp), characterizing the broadening of a high-energy jet. First results, based on data produced recently by Panero et al, suggest that C(k_perp) is enhanced over the known NLO result in a soft regime k_perp < a few T. The shape of k_perp^3 C(k_perp) is consistent with a Gaussian at small k_perp.

  20. Double MRT thermal lattice Boltzmann method for simulating convective flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezrhab, Ahmed, E-mail: mezrhab@fso.ump.m [Laboratoire de Mecanique and Energetique, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mohammed 1er, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Amine Moussaoui, Mohammed; Jami, Mohammed [Laboratoire de Mecanique and Energetique, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mohammed 1er, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Naji, Hassan [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille, and LML UMR CNRS 8107, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Bouzidi, M' hamed [Universite Clermont 2, LaMI EA 3867, IUT de Montlucon, Av. A. Briand, BP 2235, F-03101 Montlucon cedex (France)

    2010-07-26

    A two-dimensional double Multiple Relaxation Time-Thermal Lattice Boltzmann Equation (2-MRT-TLBE) method is developed for predicting convective flows in a square differentially heated cavity filled with air (Pr=0.71). In this Letter, we propose a numerical scheme to solve the flow and the temperature fields using the MRT-D2Q9 model and the MRT-D2Q5 model, respectively. Thus, the main objective of this study is to show the effectiveness of such model to predict thermodynamics for heat transfer. This model is validated by the numerical simulations of the 2-D convective square cavity flow. Excellent agreements are obtained between numerical predictions. These results demonstrate the accuracy and the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  1. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William

    2013-01-01

    A key technology element in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion is the development of fuel materials and components which can withstand extremely high temperatures while being exposed to flowing hydrogen. NTREES provides a cost effective method for rapidly screening of candidate fuel components with regard to their viability for use in NTR systems. The NTREES is designed to mimic the conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel elements and other components would be subjected to during reactor operation. The NTREES consists of a water cooled ASME code stamped pressure vessel and its associated control hardware and instrumentation coupled with inductive heaters to simulate the heat provided by the fission process. The NTREES has been designed to safely allow hydrogen gas to be injected into internal flow passages of an inductively heated test article mounted in the chamber.

  2. Mathematical modeling and simulation of a thermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropoc, Mirela; Gavrila, Camelia; Frunzulica, Rodica; Toma, Petrica D.

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present paper is the conception of a mathematical model and simulation of a system formed by a heatexchanger for domestic hot water preparation, a storage tank for hot water and a radiator, starting from the mathematical equations describing this system and developed using Scilab-Xcos program. The model helps to determine the evolution in time for the hot water temperature, for the return temperature in the primary circuit of the heat exchanger, for the supply temperature in the secondary circuit, the thermal power for heating and for hot water preparation to the consumer respectively. In heating systems, heat-exchangers have an important role and their performances influence the energy efficiency of the systems. In the meantime, it is very important to follow the behavior of such systems in dynamic regimes. Scilab-Xcos program can be utilized to follow the important parameters of the systems in different functioning scenarios.

  3. Computer aided analysis, simulation and optimisation of thermal sterilisation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, C M; Banerjee, Arindam

    2013-04-01

    Although thermal sterilisation is a widely employed industrial process, little work is reported in the available literature including patents on the mathematical analysis and simulation of these processes. In the present work, software packages have been developed for computer aided optimum design of thermal sterilisation processes. Systems involving steam sparging, jacketed heating/cooling, helical coils submerged in agitated vessels and systems that employ external heat exchangers (double pipe, shell and tube and plate exchangers) have been considered. Both batch and continuous operations have been analysed and simulated. The dependence of del factor on system / operating parameters such as mass or volume of substrate to be sterilised per batch, speed of agitation, helix diameter, substrate to steam ratio, rate of substrate circulation through heat exchanger and that through holding tube have been analysed separately for each mode of sterilisation. Axial dispersion in the holding tube has also been adequately accounted for through an appropriately defined axial dispersion coefficient. The effect of exchanger characteristics/specifications on the system performance has also been analysed. The multiparameter computer aided design (CAD) software packages prepared are thus highly versatile in nature and they permit to make the most optimum choice of operating variables for the processes selected. The computed results have been compared with extensive data collected from a number of industries (distilleries, food processing and pharmaceutical industries) and pilot plants and satisfactory agreement has been observed between the two, thereby ascertaining the accuracy of the CAD softwares developed. No simplifying assumptions have been made during the analysis and the design of associated heating / cooling equipment has been performed utilising the most updated design correlations and computer softwares.

  4. Report of NPSAT1 Battery Thermal Contact Resistance Testing, Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    interface through use of the Siemens NX I-DEAS thermal model generator (TMG) software. Once the orbital parameters are defined, the appropriate interface...the NX I-DEAS Thermal Model Generator software was performed to duplicate the test results in simulation. Agreement between the simulations and...vacuum chamber with controlled boundary conditions. Modeling and simulation using the NX I-DEAS Thermal Model Generator software was performed to

  5. Benefits of full scope simulators during solar thermal power plants design and construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, José F.; Gil, Elena; Rey, Pablo

    2017-06-01

    In order to efficiently develop high-precision dynamic simulators for solar thermal power plants, Tecnatom adapted its simulation technology to consider solar thermal models. This effort and the excellent response of the simulation market have allowed Tecnatom to develop simulators with both parabolic trough and solar power tower technologies, including molten salt energy storage. These simulators may pursue different objectives, giving rise to training or engineering simulators. Solar thermal power market combines the need for the training of the operators with the potential benefits associated to the improvement of the design of the plants. This fact along with the simulation capabilities enabled by the current technology and the broad experience of Tecnatom present the development of an engineering+training simulator as a very advantageous option. This paper describes the challenge of the development and integration of a full scope simulator during the design and construction stages of a solar thermal power plant, showing the added value to the different engineering areas.

  6. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Wu,Rui; Wang, Huai; Ma, Ke; Ghimire, Pramod; Iannuzzo, Francesco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    Thermal impedance of IGBT modules may vary with operating conditions due to that the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of materials are temperature dependent. This paper proposes a Cauer thermal model for a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module with temperature-dependent thermal resistances and thermal capacitances. The temperature effect is investigated by Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation based on the geometry and material information of the IGBT module. The developed model is ready for circu...

  7. Thermal nuclear blast simulation at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, C.P.; Ghanbari, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility is operated by Sandia National Laboratories and located on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The facility includes a heliostat field and associated receiver tower, two solar furnaces, and two point-focus parabolic concentrators. All can be used for simulating the thermal portion of nuclear pulses. The heliostat field contains 222 computer-controlled mirrors, which reflect concentrated solar energy to test stations on a 61-m tower. The field produces a peak flux density of 250 W/cm/sup 2/ over a 15-cm diameter with a total beam power of over 5 MW/sub t/. Thermal nuclear blasts have been simulated using a high-speed shutter (opening and closing time of 0.15 sec over a 1-m wide aperture) in combination with heliostat control to produce square or shaped pulses. The shutter can accommodate samples up to 1 /times/ 1 m and it has been used by several US and Canadian agencies. A glass-windowed wind tunnel located behind the shutter can accommodate samples up to 48 /times/ 76 cm with simultaneous exposure to the thermal flux and air flow at velocities up to 120 m/s. Each solar furnace at the facility includes a heliostat, a non-tracking parabolic concentrator, and an attenuator. One solar furnace produces flux levels of 270 W/cm/sup 2/ over a 6-mm diameter and total power of 16 kW/sub t/. A second furnace, currently under construction, will produce flux levels up to 1000 W/cm/sup 2/ over a 4-cm diameter and total power of 65 kW/sub t/. Both furnaces include shutters and attenuators that can provide square or shaped pulses. The two 11-m diameter tracking parabolic point-focusing concentrators at the facility can each produce peak flux levels of 1500 W/cm/sup 2/ over a 2.5-cm diameter and total power of 75 kW/sub t/. High-speed shutters have been used to produce square pulses. 5 figs.

  8. Thermal Simulation of Biogas Plants Using Mat Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen.M.Sain

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The major prerequisite for the optimum production of methane from a biogas plant is the sustenance of digester temperature within the narrow limits (300C-350C. It is experimentally investigated that, the MIT biogas plant is not maintaining optimum temperature, this decreases the efficiency and increases the detention time for charge. To maintain the plant in optimum temperature, it is necessary to find out the heat losses from the biogas plant and the external energy inputs need to operate the plant. Rate of gas yield, and the detention time (time necessary to anaerobically digest organic wastes in a biogas reactor, are favorable functions of the temperature in the digester. A thermal simulation for MIT biogas plant has developed using matlab in order to understand the heat transfer from the slurry and the gas holder to the surrounding earth and air respectively. The computation has been performed when the slurry is maintained at 200C and 300C, optimum temperature of anaerobic fermentation. If the slurry is considered to be at 350C, the optimum temperature of anaerobic fermentation, the total heat loss from the plant is higher than the heat loss when the slurry is maintained at 200C. The heat calculations provide an appraisal for the heat which has to be supplied by external means to compensate for the net heat losses which occur if the slurry is to be maintained at 350C. A solar system with auxiliary electric heater is designed for maintaining the slurry at 350C.In conclusion; the results of thermal analysis are used to define a strategy for operating biogas plant at optimum temperatures. .

  9. Weldability prediction of high strength steel S960QL after weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents weld thermal cycle simulation of high strength steel S960QL, and describes influence of cooling time t8/5 on hardness and impact toughness of weld thermal cycle simulated specimens. Furthermore, it presents analysis of characteristic fractions done by electron scanning microscope which can contribute to determination of welding parameters for S960QL steel.

  10. Thermal simulation of the formation and evolution of coalbed gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yi; WU Baoxiang; ZHENG Chaoyang; WANG Chuanyuan

    2005-01-01

    Thermal simulation experiment of gas generation from the peat and the coals were performed using the high temperature and pressure apparatus, at temperature ranging from 336.8-600℃, a pressure of 50MPa and two heating rates of 20℃/h and 2℃/h, and the evolution and formation of coalbed gas components were studied. Results show that for the coals, the gaseous products are mainly composed of hydrocarbon gases. However, for the peat the content of hydrocarbon gases in gaseous products is lower than that of non-hydrocarbon components. In the generated hydrocarbon gases methane is predominant and heavy hydrocarbon gases (C2-5) are present in small amount.Meanwhile, carbon dioxide (CO2) predominates the generated non-hydrocarbon gases, and hydrogen (H2) and sulfurated hydrogen (H2S) are existent in trace amount. It is also observed that temperature is the main factor controlling the evolution of coalbed gas generation. With increasing vitrinite reflectance, methane rapidly increases, CO2 sightly increases, and C2-5 hydrocarbons first increase and then decrease. The peat and Shanxi formation coal have a higher generative potential of coalbed gases than coals and Taiyuan formation coal, respectively, reflecting the effect of the property of organic matter on the characteristics of coalbed gas component generation. In this study, it is found that low heating rate is favorable for the generation of methane, H2and CO2, and the decomposition of C2-5 hydrocarbons. This shows that heating time plays an important controlling role in the generation and evolution of coalbed gases. The results obtained from the simulation experiment in the study of coalbed gases in natural system are also discussed.

  11. Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Simulation of Lithium-Ion Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Zhang, Chao; Sprague, Michael A.; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Models capture the force response for single-cell and cell-string levels to within 15%-20% accuracy and predict the location for the origin of failure based on the deformation data from the experiments. At the module level, there is some discrepancy due to poor mechanical characterization of the packaging material between the cells. The thermal response (location and value of maximum temperature) agrees qualitatively with experimental data. In general, the X-plane results agree with model predictions to within 20% (pending faulty thermocouples, etc.); the Z-plane results show a bigger variability both between the models and test-results, as well as among multiple repeats of the tests. The models are able to capture the timing and sequence in voltage drop observed in the multi-cell experiments; the shapes of the current and temperature profiles need more work to better characterize propagation. The cells within packaging experience about 60% less force under identical impact test conditions, so the packaging on the test articles is robust. However, under slow-crush simulations, the maximum deformation of the cell strings with packaging is about twice that of cell strings without packaging.

  12. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner.

  13. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) has been undergoing a significant upgrade beyond its initial configuration. The NTREES facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The first phase of the upgrade activities which was completed in 2012 in part consisted of an extensive modification to the hydrogen system to permit computer controlled operations outside the building through the use of pneumatically operated variable position valves. This setup also allows the hydrogen flow rate to be increased to over 200 g/sec and reduced the operation complexity of the system. The second stage of modifications to NTREES which has just been completed expands the capabilities of the facility significantly. In particular, the previous 50 kW induction power supply has been replaced with a 1.2 MW unit which should allow more prototypical fuel element temperatures to be reached. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during. This new setup required that the NTREES vessel be raised onto a platform along with most of its associated gas and vent lines. In this arrangement, the induction heater and water systems are now located underneath the platform. In this new configuration, the 1.2 MW NTREES induction heater will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials in flowing hydrogen at pressures up to 1000 psi at temperatures up to and beyond 3000 K and at near-prototypic reactor channel power densities. NTREES is also capable of testing potential fuel elements with a variety of propellants, including hydrogen with additives to inhibit

  14. Development of thermal simulation system for heavy section ductile iron solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    A new reliable thermal simulation system for studying solidification of heavy section ductile iron has been developed using computer feedback control and artificial intelligent methods. Results of idle test indicate that the temperature in the system responses exactly to the inputted control data and the temperature control error is less than ± 0.5 %. It is convenient to simulate solidification of heavy section ductile iron using this new system. Results of thermal simulation experiments show that the differences in nodularity and number of graphite nodule per unit area in the thermal simulation specimen and the actual heavy section block is less than 5 % and 10 %, respectively.

  15. Correlation between subjective assessments of local thermal discomfort and thermal manikin measurements in a simulated aircraft cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Jama, Agnieszka

    2005-01-01

    The thermal environment in a 21-seat simulated section of an aircraft cabin installed in a climate chamber was investigated. Using two thermal manikins and fourteen heated cylin-ders to represent passengers, measurements were carried out at cabin temperatures of 20.6°C, 23.3°C and 26.1°C (69°F, 74...

  16. Thermal dynamic simulation of wall for building energy efficiency under varied climate environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejin; Zhang, Yujin; Hong, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Aiming at different kind of walls in five cities of different zoning for thermal design, using thermal instantaneous response factors method, the author develops software to calculation air conditioning cooling load temperature, thermal response factors, and periodic response factors. On the basis of the data, the author gives the net work analysis about the influence of dynamic thermal of wall on air-conditioning load and thermal environment in building of different zoning for thermal design regional, and put forward the strategy how to design thermal insulation and heat preservation wall base on dynamic thermal characteristic of wall under different zoning for thermal design regional. And then provide the theory basis and the technical references for the further study on the heat preservation with the insulation are in the service of energy saving wall design. All-year thermal dynamic load simulating and energy consumption analysis for new energy-saving building is very important in building environment. This software will provide the referable scientific foundation for all-year new thermal dynamic load simulation, energy consumption analysis, building environment systems control, carrying through farther research on thermal particularity and general particularity evaluation for new energy -saving walls building. Based on which, we will not only expediently design system of building energy, but also analyze building energy consumption and carry through scientific energy management. The study will provide the referable scientific foundation for carrying through farther research on thermal particularity and general particularity evaluation for new energy saving walls building.

  17. Simulation of Nuclear Thermal Radiation with High Intensity Flashlamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-26

    lators. Thermal test requirements often stress only one aspect of nuclear radiation at a time, i.e., maximum flux, UV exposure, etc. Hardness tests...DoE/STTF* furnace at Sandia/Albuquerque is presently capable of low *Solar Thermal Test Facility, now renamed Central Receiver Test Facil- ity (CRTF...Viewpoint," a paper presented at the annual meeting of the Solar Thermal Test Facilities Users Association, Golden, Colorado, April 11-12, 1978. 2. T

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal conductivity of GaN/AlN quantum dot superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Takahiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    We calculated thermal conductivity of GaN/AlN quantum dot superlattices by molecular dynamics simulation. The results of investigation of the effect of quantum dots on thermal conductivity as a function of superlattice period are presented in this paper. An empirical potential function of Stillinger-Weber potential was used for simulations. Thermal conductivity was obtained by Green-Kubo's equation. The results show that the values of thermal conductivity parallel to the wetting layers decreased due to the effect of quantum dots. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. A Fast Electro-Thermal Co-Simulation Modeling Approach for SiC Power MOSFETs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceccarelli, Lorenzo; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Iannuzzo, Francesco

    The purpose of this work is to propose a novel electro-thermal co-simulation approach for the new generation of SiC MOSFETs, by development of a PSpice-based compact and physical SiC MOSFET model including temperature dependency of several parameters and a Simulink-based thermal network. The PSpice...... electrical model is capable to estimate the switching behavior and the energy losses of the device accurately under a wide range of operational conditions, including high temperature operations, within a relatively fast simulation time (few seconds). The the thermal network elements are extracted from...... the FEM simulation of the DUT’s structure, performed in ANSYS Icepack. A MATLAB script is used to process the simulation data and feed the needed settings and parameters back into the simulation. The parameters for a CREE 1.2 kV/30 A SiC MOSFET have been identified and the electro-thermal model has been...

  20. Micromechanical Simulation of Thermal Cyclic Behavior of ZrO2/Ti Functionally Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Tsukamoto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study numerically investigates cyclic thermal shock behavior of ZrO2/Ti functionally graded thermal barrier coatings (FG TBCs based on a nonlinear mean-field micromechanical approach, which takes into account the time-independent and dependent inelastic deformation, such as plasticity of metals, creep of metals and ceramics, and diffusional mass flow at the ceramic/metal interface. The fabrication processes for the FG TBCs have been also considered in the simulation. The effect of creep and compositional gradation patterns on micro-stress states in the FG TBCs during thermal cycling has been examined in terms of the amplitudes, ratios, maximum and mean values of thermal stresses. The compositional gradation patterns highly affect thermal stress states in case of high creep rates of ZrO2. In comparison with experimental data, maximum thermal stresses, amplitudes and ratios of thermal stresses can be effective parameters for design of such FG TBCs subject to cyclic thermal shock loadings.

  1. Simulation of Thermal-Mechanical Strength for Marine Engine Piston Using FEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Guo He

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of Thermal-Mechanical Strength for Marine Engine Piston Using FEA Abstract: This paper involves simulation of a 2-stroke 6S35ME marine diesel engine piston to determine its temperature field, thermal, mechanical and coupled thermal-mechanical stress. The distribution and magnitudes of the afore-mentioned strength parameters are useful in design, failure analysis and optimization of the engine piston. The piston model was developed in solid-works and imported into ANSYS for preprocessing, loading and post processing. Material model chosen was 10-node tetrahedral thermal solid 87. The simulation parameters used in this paper were piston material, combustion pressure, inertial effects and temperature. The highest calculated stress was the thermal-mechanical coupled stress and was below the yield stress of the piston material (580Mpa at elevated temperatures hence the piston would withstand the induced stresses during work cycles.

  2. Coupled Aeroheating and Ablative Thermal Response Simulation Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A predictive tool with tight coupling of the fluid and thermal physics will give insights into the conservatism of the uncoupled design process and could lead to...

  3. A Thermal Runaway Simulation on a Lithium Titanate Battery and the Battery Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the electrochemical and thermal model, a coupled electro-thermal runaway model was developed and implemented using finite element methods. The thermal decomposition reactions when the battery temperature exceeds the material decomposition temperature were embedded into the model. The temperature variations of a lithium titanate battery during a series of charge-discharge cycles under different current rates were simulated. The results of temperature and heat generation rate demonstrate that the greater the current, the faster the battery temperature is rising. Furthermore, the thermal influence of the overheated cell on surrounding batteries in the module was simulated, and the variation of temperature and heat generation during thermal runaway was obtained. It was found that the overheated cell can induce thermal runaway in other adjacent cells within 3 mm distance in the battery module if the accumulated heat is not dissipated rapidly.

  4. Experimental simulation of latent heat thermal energy storage and heat pipe thermal transport for dish concentrator solar receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, R.; Zimmerman, W. F.; Poon, P. T. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Test results on a modular simulation of the thermal transport and heat storage characteristics of a heat pipe solar receiver (HPSR) with thermal energy storage (TES) are presented. The HPSR features a 15-25 kWe Stirling engine power conversion system at the focal point of a parabolic dish concentrator operating at 827 C. The system collects and retrieves solar heat with sodium pipes and stores the heat in NaF-MgF2 latent heat storage material. The trials were run with a single full scale heat pipe, three full scale TES containers, and an air-cooled heat extraction coil to replace the Stirling engine heat exchanger. Charging and discharging, constant temperature operation, mixed mode operation, thermal inertial, etc. were studied. The heat pipe performance was verified, as were the thermal energy storage and discharge rates and isothermal discharges.

  5. Simulation on Thermal Integrity of the Fin/Tube Brazed Joint of Heat Exchangers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiyu QIAN; Feng GAO; Fengjiang WANG; Hui ZHAO

    2003-01-01

    In the applications of heat exchangers, the fin efficiency of heat transfer is the key issue. Thermal distribution withinthe brazed joints in heat exchanger under loading conditions is investigated in this paper. Simulated results showedthat the therma

  6. The Modeling and Simulation of Thermal Analysis at Hydro Generator Stator Winding Insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Raduca

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modelling and simulation of thermal analysis at hydro generator stator winding. The winding stator is supplied at high voltage of 11 kV for high power hydro generator. To present the thermal analysis for stator winding is presented at supply of coil by 11 kV, when coil is heat and thermal transfer in insulation at ambient temperature.

  7. Numerical simulation of the effects of nanofluid on a heat pipe thermal performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavtash, Barzin; Hussain, Khalid; Layeghi, Mohammad;

    2014-01-01

    This research aims at modeling and simulating the effects of nanofluids on cylindrical heat pipes thermal performance using the ANSYS-FLUENT CFD commercial software. The heat pipe outer wall temperature distribution, thermal resistance, liquid pressure and axial velocity in presence of suspended ...

  8. Monte Carlo analysis: error of extrapolated thermal conductivity from molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersson, Anders David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-07

    In this short report, we give an analysis of the extrapolated thermal conductivity of UO2 from earlier molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [1]. Because almost all material properties are functions of temperature, e.g. fission gas release, the fuel thermal conductivity is the most important parameter from a model sensitivity perspective [2]. Thus, it is useful to perform such analysis.

  9. Impact of geometry of a sedentary occupant simulator on the generated thermal plume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska-Tejsen, Daria; Melikov, Arsen; Popiolek, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of the thermal plume generated by a sitting person were experimentally studied using four human body simulators with different complexities of geometry but equal surface area and heat generation: a vertical cylinder, a rectangular box, a dummy, and a thermal manikin. The exper...

  10. Thermal Simulation of Switching Pulses in an Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) Power Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Thermal Simulation of Switching Pulses in an Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) Power Module by Gregory K Ovrebo ARL-TR-7210...ARL-TR-7210 February 2015 Thermal Simulation of Switching Pulses in an Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) Power Module Gregory K... Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) Power Module 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Gregory K Ovrebo 5d

  11. Micromagnetic simulations with thermal noise: Physical and numerical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, E. [Dept. de Ingenieria Electromecanica, Universidad de Burgos, Plaza Misael Banuelos, s/n, E-09001, Burgos (Spain)]. E-mail: emvecino@ubu.es; Lopez-Diaz, L. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, Salamanca E-37008 (Spain); Torres, L. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, Salamanca E-37008 (Spain); Garcia-Cervera, C.J. [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Langevin dynamics treats finite temperature effects in micromagnetics framework by adding a thermal fluctuation field to the local effective field. Several works have addressed that the numerical results depend on the cell size used to split the ferromagnetic samples on the nanoscale regime. In this short paper, we analyze a thermally perturbed micromagnetic problem by using an implicit unconditionally stable numerical scheme to integrate the Langevin equation at room temperature. The obtained micromagnetic results for several cell sizes inside the validity range of the micromagnetic formalism, indicate that the addressed cell size dependence could be associated to numerical limitations of the commonly used numerical schemes.

  12. Thermal Forming of Glass — Experiment vs. Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Švéda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal forming is a technique for forming glass foils precisely into a desired shape. It is widely used in the automotive industry. It can also be used for shaping X-ray mirror substrates for space missions, as in our case. This paper presents the initial results of methods used for automatic data processing of in-situ measurements of the thermal shaping process and a comparison of measured and simulatated values. It also briefly describes improvements of the overall experimental setup currently being made in order to obtain better and more precise results.

  13. Effect of Simulant Type on the Absorptance and Emittance of Dusted Thermal Control Surfaces in a Simulated Lunar Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo program the effects of lunar dust on thermal control surfaces was found to be more significant than anticipated, with several systems overheating due to deposition of dust on them. In an effort to reduce risk to future missions, a series of tests has been initiated to characterize the effects of dust on these surfaces, and then to develop technologies to mitigate that risk. Given the variations in albedo across the lunar surface, one variable that may be important is the darkness of the lunar dust, and this study was undertaken to address that concern. Three thermal control surfaces, AZ-93 white paint and AgFEP and AlFEP second surface mirrors were dusted with three different lunar dust simulants in a simulated lunar environment, and their integrated solar absorptance ( ) and thermal emittance ( ) values determined experimentally. The three simulants included JSC-1AF, a darker mare simulant, NU-LHT-1D, a light highlands simulant, and 1:1 mixture of the two. The response of AZ-93 was found to be slightly more pronounced than that of AgFEP. The increased with fractional dust coverage in both types of samples by a factor of 1.7 to 3.3, depending on the type of thermal control surface and the type of dust. The of the AZ-93 decreased by about 10 percent when fully covered by dust, while that of AgFEP increased by about 10 percent. It was found that / varied by more than a factor of two depending on the thermal control surface and the darkness of the dust. Given that the darkest simulant used in this study may be lighter than the darkest dust that could be encountered on the lunar surface, it becomes apparent that the performance degradation of thermal control surfaces due to dust on the Moon will be strongly dependent on the and of the dust in the specific locality

  14. Dynamic characterization for tumor- and deformation-induced thermal contrasts on breast surface: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray H.

    2009-02-01

    Understanding the complex relationship between the thermal contrasts on the breast surface and the underlying physiological and pathological factors is important for thermogram-based breast cancer detection. Our previous work introduced a combined thermal-elastic modeling method with improved ability to simultaneously characterize both elastic-deformation-induced and tumor-induced thermal contrasts on the breast. In this paper, the technique is further extended to investigate the dynamic behaviors of the breast thermal contrasts during cold stress and thermal recovery procedures in the practice of dynamic thermal imaging. A finite-element method (FEM) has been developed for dynamic thermal and elastic modeling. It is combined with a technique to address the nonlinear elasticity of breast tissues, as would arise in the large deformations caused by gravity. Our simulation results indicate that different sources of the thermal contrasts, such as the presence of a tumor, and elastic deformation, have different transient time courses in dynamic thermal imaging with cold-stress and thermal-recovery. Using appropriate quantifications of the thermal contrasts, we find that the tumor- and deformation-induced thermal contrasts show opposite changes in the initial period of the dynamic courses, whereas the global maxima of the contrast curves are reached at different time points during a cold-stress or thermal-recovery procedure. Moreover, deeper tumors generally lead to smaller peaks but have larger lags in the thermal contrast time course. These findings suggest that dynamic thermal imaging could be useful to differentiate the sources of the thermal contrast on breast surface and hence to enhance tumor detectability.

  15. Numerical Simulation of a Thermal-Protection Element of a Promising Reusable Capsule-Type Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosuntsov, P. V.; Shulyakovskii, A. V.; Taraskin, N. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    An indestructible multilayer thermal-barrier coating is proposed for a promising reusable capsule-type lander. This coating is based on a porous carbon-ceramic material. The thermal state of the coating proposed was simulated mathematically for different types of its reinforcement and different values of the porosity and the heat-conductivity coefficient of the carbon-ceramic material. Results of a numerical simulation of the temperature state of an element of the multilayer thermal-barrier coating are presented. On the basis of these data, the thickness and the weight efficiency of the coating were estimated.

  16. Experiments and Simulation of Thermal Behaviors of the Dual-drive Servo Feed System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jun; MEI Xuesong; FENG Bin; ZHAO Liang; MA Chi; SHI Hu

    2015-01-01

    The machine tool equipped with the dual-drive servo feed system could realize high feed speed as well as sharp precision. Currently, there is no report about the thermal behaviors of the dual-drive machine, and the current research of the thermal characteristics of machines mainly focuses on steady simulation. To explore the influence of thermal characterizations on the precision of a jib boring machine assembled dual-drive feed system, the thermal equilibrium tests and the research on thermal-mechanical transient behaviors are carried out. A laser interferometer, infrared thermography and a temperature-displacement acquisition system are applied to measure the temperature distribution and thermal deformation at different feed speeds. Subsequently, the finite element method (FEM) is used to analyze the transient thermal behaviors of the boring machine. The complex boundary conditions, such as heat sources and convective heat transfer coefficient, are calculated. Finally, transient variances in temperatures and deformations are compared with the measured values, and the errors between the measurement and the simulation of the temperature and the thermal error are 2 ℃ and 2.5 μm, respectively. The researching results demonstrate that the FEM model can predict the thermal error and temperature distribution very well under specified operating condition. Moreover, the uneven temperature gradient is due to the asynchronous dual-drive structure that results in thermal deformation. Additionally, the positioning accuracy decreases as the measured point became further away from the motor, and the thermal error and equilibrium period both increase with feed speeds. The research proposes a systematical method to measure and simulate the boring machine transient thermal behaviors.

  17. Thermal plume above a simulated sitting person with different complexity of body geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Popiolek, Zbigniew J.

    2007-01-01

    Occupants are one of the main heat sources in rooms. They generate thermal plumes with characteristics, which depend on geometry, surface temperature and area of the human body in contact with the surrounding air as well as temperature, velocity and turbulence intensity distribution in the room....... The characteristics of the thermal plume generated by a sitting person were studied using four human body simulators with different complexity of geometry but equal surface area: a vertical cylinder, a rectangular box, a dummy, and a thermal manikin. The results show that the dummy and the thermal manikin generate...

  18. Modelling and simulation of thermal behaviour of vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yitao; Li, Yifeng; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria; Bao, Jie

    2016-08-01

    This paper extends previous thermal models of the vanadium redox flow battery to predict temperature profiles within multi-cell stacks. This involves modelling the thermal characteristics of the stack as a whole to modelling each individual cell. The study investigates the thermal behaviour for two different scenarios: during standby periods when the pumps are turned off, and in a residential power arbitrage scenario for two types of membranes. It was found that the temperature gradient across the cells is most significant during the standby case, with the simulation results showing completely different thermal behaviours between the two systems.

  19. Optimization for operating modes based on simulation of seasonal underground thermal energy storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun ZHAO; Yan CHEN; Xinguo LI

    2008-01-01

    A simulation was performed, which concerned the feasibility of seasonal underground thermal energy storage (UTES) in Tianjin, China. The investigated sys-tem consisted of 8 boreholes. In summer, residual solar thermal energy was emitted into the soil surrounding the borehole heat exchangers through which the stored energy was extracted in winter with a ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) to provide a proper heating temperature. A simulation study was performed to study the influence of system operation modes on thermal recovery based on the experimental data of a GCHP system, local met-eorological conditions and soil properties in Tianjin. The results indicate a thermal recovery ratio of less than 67% and different temperature distributions under three modes. Finally, an operation mode was suggested based on both lower loss and better thermal recovery in the UTES.

  20. A Method for more specific Simulation of Operative Temperature in Thermal Analysis Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Erik

    2008-01-01

    Simulation of energy consumption of buildings on hourly basis is closely connected to the thermal indoor climate. The operative temperature can be used as a simple measure for thermal environment. The operative temperature is a function of the air temperature, the mean radiant temperature and the...... for calculating the angular factor and shows how a matrix solution for the angular factor can easily be implemented in programs for dynamic building thermal analysis.......Simulation of energy consumption of buildings on hourly basis is closely connected to the thermal indoor climate. The operative temperature can be used as a simple measure for thermal environment. The operative temperature is a function of the air temperature, the mean radiant temperature...

  1. Simulation of global warming effect on outdoor thermal comfort conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshan, G.R.; Ranjbar, F. [Univ. of Tehran (IR). Dept. of Physical Geography; Orosa, J.A. [Univ. of A Coruna (Spain). Dept. of Energy

    2010-07-01

    In the coming decades, global warming and increase in temperature, in different regions of the world, may change indoor and outdoor thermal comfort conditions and human health. The aim of this research was to study the effects of global warming on thermal comfort conditions in indoor ambiences in Iran. To study the increase in temperature, model for assessment of greenhouse-gas induced climate change scenario generator compound model has been used together with four scenarios and to estimate thermal comfort conditions, adaptive model of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers has been used. In this study, Iran was divided into 30 zones, outdoor conditions were obtained using meteorological data of 80 climatological stations and changes in neutral comfort conditions in 2025, 2050, 2075 and 2100 were predicted. In accordance with each scenario, findings from this study showed that temperature in the 30 zones will increase by 2100 to between 3.4 C and 5.6 C. In the coming decades and in the 30 studied zones, neutral comfort temperature will increase and be higher and more intense in the central and desert zones of Iran. The low increase in this temperature will be connected to the coastal areas of the Caspian and Oman Sea in southeast Iran. This increase in temperature will be followed by a change in thermal comfort and indoor energy consumption from 8.6 % to 13.1 % in air conditioning systems. As a result, passive methods as thermal inertia are proposed as a possible solution.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Transient Thermal Stress Field for Laser Metal Deposition Shaping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Risheng; LIU Weijun

    2006-01-01

    To decrease thermal stress during laser metal deposition shaping (LMDS) process, it is of great importance to learn the transient thermal stress distribution regularities. Based on the "element life and death" technique of finite element analysis (FEA), a three-dimensional multi-track and multi-layer numerical simulation model for LMDS is developed with ANSYS parametric design language (APDL) for the first time, in which long-edge parallel reciprocating scanning paths is introduced. Through the model, detailed simulations of thermal stress during whole metal cladding process are conducted, the generation and distribution regularities of thermal stress are also discussed in detail. Using the same process parameters, the simulation results show good agreement with the features of samples which fabricated by LMDS.

  3. Monte Carlo simulations to advance characterisation of landmines by pulsed fast/thermal neutron analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M.; Rigollet, C.

    2004-01-01

    The performance of a detection system based on the pulsed fast/thermal neutron analysis technique was assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. The aim was to develop and implement simulation methods, to support and advance the data analysis techniques of the characteristic gamma-ray spectra, potentia

  4. Large-eddy simulation of thermal mixing flows for thermal fatigue analysis; Large-eddy Simulation von thermischer Vermischung zur Analyse thermischer Ermuedung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeren, D. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE); EnBW Kernkraft GmbH, Kernkraftwerk Neckarwestheim (Germany); Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE)

    2012-11-01

    For the safety evaluation of nuclear facilities the lifetime estimation of piping component in the cooling circuits are required. Besides system transients temperature fluctuations due to flow instabilities in case of mixing processes contribute to thermal fatigue of the pipe material. The material failure corresponds to the damage mechanism cause by high-cycle fatigue (HCF). Through-wall cracks attributed to HCF were found in the mixing flow region of a T-joint in the decay-heat removal system of a French reactor. Detailed temperature measurements for HCF analysis are not possible in nuclear facilities. It is therefore of interest to have a reliable problem specific database using numerical flow simulation (CFD) for HCF analyses. The contribution is focused on the validation of numerical methods concerning the fluid-structures interaction in thermal mixing and stratified flows. The experimental data were gained with new measuring equipment using optical measuring methods for thermal information. The calculations were performed using large eddy simulation of thermal mixing flows for the assessment of their effect on thermal fatigue for a T-shaped piping segment with circumferential weld.

  5. Electromagnetic and Thermal Simulations of Human Neurons for SAR Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Felipe; Millholland, Gilbert; Peddinti, Seshasai Vamsi Krishna; Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher; Morisaki, Jorge; Rizkalla, Maher E.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the electromagnetic waves (EM) on human neurons (HN) has been under investigation for decades, in efforts to understand the impact of cell phones (radiation) on human health, or radiation absorption by HN for medical diagnosis and treatment. Research issues including the wave frequency, power intensity, reflections and scattering, and penetration depths are of important considerations to be incorporated into the research study. In this study, computer simulation for the EM exposure to HN was studied for the purpose of determining the upper limits of the electric and magnetic field intensities, power consumption, reflections and transmissions, and the change in temperature resulting from the power absorption by human neurons. Both high frequency structural simulators (HFSS) from ANSYS software, and COMSOL multi-physics were used for the simulation of the EM transmissions and reflections, and the temperature profile within the cells, respectively. For the temperature profile estimation, the study considers an electrical source of 0.5 watt input power, 64 MHz. The EM simulation was looking into the uniformity of the fields within the sample cells. The size of the waveguide was set to be appropriate for a small animal model to be conducted in the future. The incident power was fully transmitted throughout the waveguide, and less than 1% reflections were observed from the simulation. The minimum reflected power near the sample under investigation was found to be with negligible reflected field strengths. The temperature profile resulting from the COMSOL simulation was found to be near 0.25 m°K, indicating no change in temperature on the neuro cells under the EM exposure. The paper details the simulation results for the EM response determined by HFSS, and temperature profile simulated by COMSOL. PMID:27617054

  6. Simulation of a thermal battery using Phoenics {sup registered}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Giancarlo C.S.; Vianna, Ardson S. Jr. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Secao de Ensino de Engenharia Quimica, Praca General Tiburcio, 80, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Peixoto, Fernando C. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Escola de Engenharia, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica e de Petroleo, Rua Passo da Patria, 156 - Bloco D - Sala 307, 24210-240 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-04-15

    Thermal batteries are primary disposable systems specially designed to develop a high energy density in a short period. In the present work, the modeling of heat generation and propagation within three Ca/CaCrO{sub 4} thermal batteries has been carried out, using a transient model. The commercial CFD software Phoenics {sup registered} has been used and, through a typical finite volume approach, the related 2D transport equations have been solved, giving the time-dependent temperature profiles. To check the quality of the model, the temperature of pseudo-equilibrium state (a typical thermodynamic parameter), has been analyzed. The temperatures related in the literature were close to those calculated. The results also indicate that the fusion of electrolytes is virtually an instantaneous process when compared to the time to reach the pseudo-equilibrium state, which indicates that the generation of electrical current occurs immediately after the thermite burning. (author)

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal stability of nanocrystalline vanadium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI; Mingzhi; XIAO; Shifang; YUAN; Xiaojian; HU; Wangyu

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure and thermal stability of nanocrystalline vanadium with an average grain size ranging from 2.86 to 7.50 nm are calculated by means of the analytic embedded-atom method and molecular dynamics. The grain boundary and nanocrystalline grain atoms are differentiated by the common neighbor analysis method. The results indicate that the fraction of grain boundary increases with the grain size decreasing, and the mean energy of atoms is higher than that of coarse crystals. The thermal-stable temperatures of nanocrystalline vanadium are determined from the evolution of atomic energy, fraction of grain boundary and radial distribution function. It is shown that the stable temperature decreases obviously with the grain size decreasing. In addition the reasons which cause the grain growth of nanocrystalline vanadium are discussed.

  8. Correlation between subjective assessments of local thermal discomfort and thermal manikin measurements in a simulated aircraft cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Jama, Agnieszka

    2005-01-01

    participated, each being exposed to the same three temperature conditions during simulated 7-hour transatlantic flights. The assessments indicate that an air temperature increase in the middle of a 7-hour flight period followed by a decrease before landing might be preferred. A comparison be-tween manikin......The thermal environment in a 21-seat simulated section of an aircraft cabin installed in a climate chamber was investigated. Using two thermal manikins and fourteen heated cylin-ders to represent passengers, measurements were carried out at cabin temperatures of 20.6°C, 23.3°C and 26.1°C (69°F, 74...

  9. Cellular and Porous Materials Thermal Properties Simulation and Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Öchsner, Andreas; de Lemos, Marcelo J S

    2008-01-01

    Providing the reader with a solid understanding of the fundamentals as well as an awareness of recent advances in properties and applications of cellular and porous materials, this handbook and ready reference covers all important analytical and numerical methods for characterizing and predicting thermal properties. In so doing it directly addresses the special characteristics of foam-like and hole-riddled materials, combining theoretical and experimental aspects for characterization purposes.

  10. Thermal simulation for geometric optimization of metallized polypropylene film capacitors

    OpenAIRE

    El-Husseini, M.,; Venet, Pascal; Rojat, Gérard; Joubert, Charles

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we use an analytic model to calculate the losses in the metallized polypropylene film capacitors. The model is validated experimentally for capacitors having the same capacitance but different geometry. For each group of capacitors a temperature distribution in the roll is assumed with the aim of optimizing its thermal performance. It appears that the heating of a long capacitor is higher than that of an equivalent flat capacitor subjected to the same electric stresses.

  11. Thermal tracer tomography: from numerical simulation to field implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Brauchler, Ralf; Bayer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Choosing heat for subsurface investigations is attractive because changes in temperature can be easily measured, and natural variations are typically slower than the timescale of the experiments. The tomographical setup expands the applicability of such tests to reconstruct the spatial distribution of hydraulic aquifer properties. A new inversion methodology is presented for thermal tracer tomography, using tracer travel times to invert the hydraulic conductivity distribution of the aquifer. If we can assume that heat transport is driven by advection, the travel time of the thermal tracer can be related to the hydraulic parameters of the aquifer. With this assumption other thermal effects such as thermal diffusion or density driven flow appear as noise in the results. To reduce these effects the early time diagnostics of the recorded breakthrough curves are used, focusing on the fastest transport routes between the sources and receivers. The inverse problem of the experiment thus can be formulated as a classical travel time problem, and it can be solved using standard eikonal solver algorithms known from seismic or hydraulic tomography. The method is demonstrated with a high resolution 3-D aquifer analog dataset. The generated 3-D reconstruction reveals the potential of the method, especially in finding the preferential flow paths within the aquifer. Aside from this, the developed method is computationally efficient and can provide results in a fragment of the time required for full-physics model calibration. The method is also tested under field conditions. Four heat tracer injections were performed during a three day field campaign at the Widen field site in northeast Switzerland. Pulse signals were used and the temperature evolution was measured downstream using a distributed measurement system. The preliminary results of the tomographic inversion correspond well with the findings of earlier studies from the field site imaging the same geological features as

  12. High Fidelity Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing: Analysis and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David

    2007-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power system, providing system characterization data and allowing one to work through various fabrication, assembly and integration issues without the cost and time associated with a full ground nuclear test. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Testing with non-optimized heater elements allows one to assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. High fidelity thermal simulators that match both the static and the dynamic fuel pin performance that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor can vastly increase the value of non-nuclear test results. With optimized simulators, the integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronie response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing, providing a better assessment of system integration issues, characterization of integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assessment of potential design improvements' at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial conceptual thermal simulator designs are determined by simple one-dimensional analysis at a single axial location and at steady state conditions; feasible concepts are then input into a detailed three-dimensional model for comparison to expected fuel pin performance. Static and dynamic fuel pin performance for a proposed reactor design is determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and comparison is made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analyses, a conceptual high fidelity design can developed. Test results presented in this paper correspond to a "first cut" simulator design for a potential

  13. Coupled Simulation of Flow and Thermal Field of Twin-Roll Strip Casting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The first micro-segregation under conditions of twin roll strip casting was simulated. The relationship between the temperature and solid fraction in the mushy zone was given. The temperatures such as ZDT, LIT were got from this simulation. Then using the turbulent model, the flow field and thermal field in the pool of twin-roll strip caster was simulated. The speed and temperature at different casting speed was given, and the results were also explained. By these two simulations, the appropriate casting speed can be found. These simulations can provide effective data for controlling the twin-roll strip casting process.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Thermal Striping Phenomena in a T-Junction Piping System Using Large Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masa-Aki; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Monji, Hideaki

    At the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the simulation code “MUGTHES (MUlti Geometry simulation code for THErmal-hydraulic and Structure heat conduction analysis in boundary fitted coordinate)” has been developed to evaluate thermal striping phenomena that are caused by the turbulence mixing of fluids at different temperatures. In this paper, numerical schemes for thermal-hydraulic simulation employed in MUGTHES are described, including the LES model. A simple method to limit numerical oscillation is adopted in energy equation solutions. A new iterative method to solve the Poisson equation in the BFC system is developed for effective transient calculations. This method is based on the BiCGSTAB method and the SOR technique. As the code validation of MUGTHES, a numerical simulation in a T-junction piping system with the LES approach was conducted. Numerical results related to velocity and fluid temperature distributions were compared with existing water experimental data and the applicability of numerical schemes with the LES model in MUGTHES to the thermal striping phenomenon was confirmed.

  15. Experimental measurements of thermal properties for Mexican building materials to simulate thermal behavior to save energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez-Galan, Jesus; Almanza, Rafael; Rodriguez, Neftali [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico). Inst. de Ingenieria

    2008-07-01

    One of the main factors that determine the reliability of building's thermal design is the values of thermal and heat transfer properties used during this process. In order to optimizing such thermal design process, there is little information available of the most utilized building materials in Mexico; hence, some measurements were carried out. We present thermal conductivity experimental results for: red brick, tepetate, adobe and concrete. Furthermore, experimental data of convective heat transfer coefficients are reported on: red brick, tepetate, adobe and concrete walls. Kondratyev methodology was used for thermal conductivity estimations. Kondratyev methodology is based on the cooling off of bodies in regular state analysis. Thermal conductivity values were: red brick k{sub L} = 0.906 W/mC, tepetate k{sub T} = 0.648 W/mC, adobe k{sub A} = 0.570 W/mC, and concrete k{sub C} = 1.918 W/mC. Red brick, tepetate, adobe and concrete test walls of 0.46 x 0.56 and 0.06 m thick, were manufactured, as well as a prototype of testing for mounting the walls, in order to evaluate their convective heat transfer coefficients. Measurements were carried out at the Institute of Engineering-UNAM Wind-Tunnel, for an air velocities interval of 2-10 m/s. Reported values for convective coefficients fluctuate on 16-134 W/m{sup 2}2 C, depending on material and position wall, as well as air velocity. (orig.)

  16. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-09-01

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material composed of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. The purpose of this work is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Therefore, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flash analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. The ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al3Hf, radiation damage, and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.

  17. Evolving non-thermal electrons in simulations of black hole accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chael, Andrew A.; Narayan, Ramesh; Sa¸dowski, Aleksander

    2017-09-01

    Current simulations of hot accretion flows around black holes assume either a single-temperature gas or, at best, a two-temperature gas with thermal ions and electrons. However, processes like magnetic reconnection and shocks can accelerate electrons into a non-thermal distribution, which will not quickly thermalize at the very low densities found in many systems. Such non-thermal electrons have been invoked to explain the infrared and X-ray spectra and strong variability of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the black hole at the Galactic Center. We present a method for self-consistent evolution of a non-thermal electron population in the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code koral. The electron distribution is tracked across Lorentz factor space and is evolved in space and time, in parallel with thermal electrons, thermal ions and radiation. In this study, for simplicity, energy injection into the non-thermal distribution is taken as a fixed fraction of the local electron viscous heating rate. Numerical results are presented for a model with a low mass accretion rate similar to that of Sgr A*. We find that the presence of a non-thermal population of electrons has negligible effect on the overall dynamics of the system. Due to our simple uniform particle injection prescription, the radiative power in the non-thermal simulation is enhanced at large radii. The energy distribution of the non-thermal electrons shows a synchrotron cooling break, with the break Lorentz factor varying with location and time, reflecting the complex interplay between the local viscous heating rate, magnetic field strength and fluid velocity.

  18. Shock initiated thermal and chemical responses of HMX crystal from ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tingting; Song, Huajie; Liu, Yi; Huang, Fenglei

    2014-07-21

    To gain an atomistic-level understanding of the thermal and chemical responses of condensed energetic materials under thermal shock, we developed a thermal shock reactive dynamics (TS-RD) computational protocol using molecular dynamics simulation coupled with ReaxFF force field. β-Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX) was selected as a a target explosive due to its wide usage in the military and industry. The results show that a thermal shock initiated by a large temperature gradient between the "hot" region and the "cold" region results in thermal expansion of the particles and induces a thermal-mechanical wave propagating back and forth in the system with an averaged velocity of 3.32 km s(-1). Heat propagating along the direction of thermal shock leads to a temperature increment of the system and thus chemical reaction initiation. Applying a continuum reactive heat conduction model combined with the temperature distribution obtained from the RD simulation, a heat conduction coefficient is derived as 0.80 W m(-1) K(-1). The chemical reaction mechanisms during thermal shock were analyzed, showing that the reaction is triggered by N-NO2 bond breaking followed by HONO elimination and ring fission. The propagation rates of the reaction front and reaction center are obtained to be 0.069 and 0.038 km s(-1), based on the time and spatial distribution of NO2. The pressure effect on the thermal shock was also investigated by employing uniaxial compression before the thermal shock. We find that compression significantly accelerates thermal-mechanical wave propagation and heat conduction, resulting in higher temperature and more excited molecules and thus earlier initiation and faster propagation of chemical reactions.

  19. Thermal conductivity predictions of herringbone graphite nanofibers using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, Masoud H; Wemhoff, Aaron P

    2013-02-28

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are used to investigate the thermal conductivity of herringbone graphite nanofibers (GNFs) at room temperature by breaking down the axial and transverse conductivity values into intralayer and interlayer components. The optimized Tersoff potential is used to account for intralayer carbon-carbon interactions while the Lennard-Jones potential is used to model the interlayer carbon-carbon interactions. The intralayer thermal conductivity of the graphene layers near room temperature is calculated for different crease angles and number of layers using NEMD with a constant applied heat flux. The edge effect on a layer's thermal conductivity is investigated by computing the thermal conductivity values in both zigzag and armchair directions of the heat flow. The interlayer thermal conductivity is also predicted by imposing hot and cold Nosé-Hoover thermostats on two layers. The limiting case of a 90° crease angle is used to compare the results with those of single-layer graphene and few-layer graphene. The axial and transverse thermal conductivities are then calculated using standard trigonometric conversions of the calculated intralayer and interlayer thermal conductivities, along with calculations of few-layer graphene without a crease. The results show a large influence of the crease angle on the intralayer thermal conductivity, and the saturation of thermal conductivity occurs when number of layers is more than three. The axial thermal conductivity, transverse thermal conductivity in the crease direction, and transverse thermal conductivity normal to the crease for the case of a five-layer herringbone GNF with a 45° crease angle are calculated to be 27 W∕m K, 263 W∕m K, and 1500 W∕m K, respectively, where the axial thermal conductivity is in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  20. Optimization Design of Thermal Conduction Enhanced PCM Plates for Simulating the Infrared Signature of Steel Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Hong; JIANG Li-feng

    2008-01-01

    Phase change material (PCM) can be used to prepare the infrared false targets for realizing all-weather passive infrared decoy, but its low thermal conductivity is a great blockage to the simulation of the infrared signature of thick metal plates. For that reason, a method of simulating the infrared signature of thick steel plates by thermal conduction enhanced PCM, including the aluminum fins, is proposed. A physical and mathematic model is set up, and the infrared signature simulation of thick steel plate is investigated numerically. The effects of the distribution density and thickness of fins and the thickness of PCM plate on the simulation results are discussed, and the reasonable construction parameters of PCM plates used to simulate the steel plates of different thickness are obtained.

  1. Effects of anisotropic thermal conductivity in magnetohydrodynamics simulations of a reversed-field pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofri, M; Malara, F; Veltri, P

    2010-11-19

    A compressible magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the reversed-field pinch is performed including anisotropic thermal conductivity. When the thermal conductivity is much larger in the direction parallel to the magnetic field than in the perpendicular direction, magnetic field lines become isothermal. As a consequence, as long as magnetic surfaces exist, a temperature distribution is observed displaying a hotter confined region, while an almost uniform temperature is produced when the magnetic field lines become chaotic. To include this effect in the numerical simulation, we use a multiple-time-scale analysis, which allows us to reproduce the effect of a large parallel thermal conductivity. The resulting temperature distribution is related to the existence of closed magnetic surfaces, as observed in experiments. The magnetic field is also affected by the presence of an anisotropic thermal conductivity.

  2. The use of the diffusion approximation for simulating radiation and thermal processes in the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtanyuk, A. E.; Grenkin, G. V.; Chebotarev, A. Yu.

    2017-08-01

    Radiation and thermal processes in skin exposed to solar radiation are simulated based on the diffusion model of radiative-conductive heat exchange. Using the model proposed for the parameters corresponding to radiation with a wavelength of 800 nm, the contributions of thermal radiation induced by the skin and the reflection and refraction effects are estimated, and the photoprotective properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2) when introduced into the stratum corneum are studied.

  3. Analysis of thermal response of phenolic foam specimens in a simulated JP-4 fuel fire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laswell, J.E.

    1973-12-11

    NAD Crane has investigated various phenolic foam compositions which have excellent insulative thermal properties. Two contracts were let with Avco Systems Division to conduct thermal response tests with their simulated JP-4 fuel fire facility. Specimen densities ranged from 4.24 to 25.8 pounds per cubic foot. Time and temperature measurements were recorded until backface temperatures reached 500-1000. Aircraft fuel.

  4. Thermal Diffusion in Liquid Mixtures and Polymer Solutions by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is focused on simulating the transport processes of heat and matter under a sufficiently weak temperature gradient where the system linearly responds. The systems we are interested in are binary isotropic liquids with no convection and no viscous flows. Four related transport coefficients of the systems, the thermal conductivity of heat conduction, the diffusion coefficient of matter transfer, the Soret coefficient and the thermal diffusion coefficient of the cross effect between ...

  5. The gyro-radius scaling of ion thermal transport from global numerical simulations of ITG turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottaviani, M. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Manfredi, G. [Dublin Inst. for Advanced Studies (Ireland). School of CosmicPhysics

    1998-12-01

    A three-dimensional, fluid code is used to study the scaling of ion thermal transport caused by Ion-Temperature-Gradient-Driven (ITG) turbulence. The code includes toroidal effects and is capable of simulating the whole torus. It is found that both close to the ITG threshold and well above threshold, the thermal transport and the turbulence structures exhibit a gyro-Bohm scaling, at least for plasmas with moderate poloidal flow. (author) 19 refs.

  6. Experimental Preparation and Numerical Simulation of High Thermal Conductive Cu/CNTs Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhsan Ali Samer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid growth of high performance electronics devices accompanied by overheating problem, heat dissipater nanocomposites material having ultra-high thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion was proposed. In this work, a nanocomposite material made of copper (Cu reinforced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs up to 10 vol. % was prepared and their thermal behaviour was measured experimentally and evaluated using numerical simulation. In order to numerically predict the thermal behaviour of Cu/CNTs composites, three different prediction methods were performed. The results showed that rules of mixture method records the highest thermal conductivity for all predicted composites. In contrast, the prediction model which takes into account the influence of the interface thermal resistance between CNTs and copper particles, has shown the lowest thermal conductivity which considered as the closest results to the experimental measurement. The experimentally measured thermal conductivities showed remarkable increase after adding 5 vol.% CNTs and higher than the thermal conductivities predicted via Nan models, indicating that the improved fabrication technique of powder injection molding that has been used to produced Cu/CNTs nanocomposites has overcome the challenges assumed in the mathematical models.

  7. Optimization simulation of thermal plasma reactor for acetylene production from coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Yang, Y.; Bao, W.; Zhang, Y.; Kie, K. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China)

    2007-07-01

    A heat-flow field mathematical model based on the computational; fluid dynamics (CFD) technique was developed for a thermal plasma reactor in order to optimize the reactor structure and operation conditions for the direct production of acetylene from coal. The simulation of the thermal plasma reactor with single inlet, double inlet and double inlet with protective gas was given; simulations of the heat-flow coupling field were carried out by using the method of Incomplete Cholesky Conjugate Gradient (ICCG). The optimization simulation results show that the load of the thermal plasma reactor with double inlet is increased, and the reactor wall surface coke is depressed. The anticoking effect is best under the gas flow rate of 50 m/s. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Coupled large-eddy simulation of thermal mixing in a T-junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeren, D., E-mail: david.kloeren@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Univ. of Stuttgart, Inst. for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE) (Germany); EnBW Kernkraft GmbH, Kernkraftwerk Neckarwestheim, Neckarwestheim (Germany); Laurien, E., E-mail: eckart.laurien@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Univ. of Stuttgart, Inst. for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE) (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Analyzing thermal fatigue due to thermal mixing in T-junctions is part of the safety assessment of nuclear power plants. Results of two large-eddy simulations of mixing flow in a T-junction with coupled and adiabatic boundary condition are presented and compared. The temperature difference is set to 100 K, which leads to strong stratification of the flow. The main and the branch pipe intersect horizontally in this simulation. The flow is characterized by steady wavy pattern of stratification and temperature distribution. The coupled solution approach shows highly reduced temperature fluctuations in the near wall region due to thermal inertia of the wall. A conjugate heat transfer approach is necessary in order to simulate unsteady heat transfer accurately for large inlet temperature differences. (author)

  9. Minimizing cell size dependence in micromagnetics simulations with thermal noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez, E [Departamento de Ingenieria Electromecanica, Universidad de Burgos, Plaza Misael Banuelos, s/n, E-09001, Burgos (Spain); Lopez-DIaz, L [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada. Universidad Salamanca. Plaza de la Merced s/n. Salamanca E-37008 (Spain); Torres, L [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada. Universidad Salamanca. Plaza de la Merced s/n. Salamanca E-37008 (Spain); GarcIa-Cervera, C J [Department of Mathematics. University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2007-02-21

    Langevin dynamics treats finite temperature effects in a micromagnetics framework by adding a thermal fluctuation field to the effective field. Several works have addressed the dependence of numerical results on the cell size used to split the ferromagnetic samples on the nanoscale regime. In this paper, some former problems dealing with the dependence on the spatial discretization at finite temperature have been revised. We have focused our attention on the stability of the numerical schemes used to integrate the Langevin equation. In particular, a detailed analysis of results was carried out as a function of the time step. It was confirmed that the mentioned dependence can be minimized if an unconditional stable integration method is used to numerically solve the Langevin equation.

  10. Accurately simulating anisotropic thermal conduction on a moving mesh

    CERN Document Server

    Kannan, Rahul; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel implementation of an extremum preserving anisotropic diffusion solver for thermal conduction on the unstructured moving Voronoi mesh of the AREPO code. The method relies on splitting the one-sided facet fluxes into normal and oblique components, with the oblique fluxes being limited such that the total flux is both locally conservative and extremum preserving. The approach makes use of harmonic averaging points and a simple, robust interpolation scheme that works well for strong heterogeneous and anisotropic diffusion problems. Moreover, the required discretisation stencil is small. Efficient fully implicit and semi-implicit time integration schemes are also implemented. We perform several numerical tests that evaluate the stability and accuracy of the scheme, including applications such as point explosions with heat conduction and calculations of convective instabilities in conducting plasmas. The new implementation is suitable for studying important astrophysical phenomena, such as the co...

  11. Compact model of power MOSFET with temperature dependent Cauer RC network for more accurate thermal simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Juraj; Chvála, Aleš; Donoval, Daniel; Príbytný, Patrik; Molnár, Marián; Mikolášek, Miroslav

    2014-04-01

    A new, more accurate SPICE-like model of a power MOSFET containing a temperature dependent thermal network is described. The designed electro-thermal MOSFET model consists of several parts which represent different transistor behavior under different conditions such as reverse bias, avalanche breakdown and others. The designed model is able to simulate destruction of the device as thermal runaway and/or overcurrent destruction during the switching process of a wide variety of inductive loads. Modified thermal equivalent circuit diagrams were designed taking into account temperature dependence of thermal resistivity. The potential and limitations of the new models are presented and analyzed. The new model is compared with the standard and empirical models and brings a higher accuracy for rapid heating pulses. An unclamped inductive switching (UIS) test as a stressful condition was used to verify the proper behavior of the designed MOSFET model.

  12. Quantitative Estimations of Thermal Damage in Skin Tissue Using Monte Carlo Simulation of Polarized Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G. W.; Kim, T. H.; Youn, J. I.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal treatment has been used for collagen tightening and tissue contour enhancement. It is important to monitor the condition of collagenous tissue during and immediately after thermal treatment. Collagen denaturation changes the optical properties such as scattering coefficient and anisotropy. In this study, Monte Carlo simulation of polarized light was used to calculate the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) of backscattered light from thermally damaged porcine skin, and the Mueller matrix was calculated to verify the result of DOLP. We observed a decrease in the DOLP and a significant change in the radial distribution of the Mueller matrix elements at temperatures ranging from 55 to 65°C. This could be attributed to the increase in scattering coefficient and decrease in anisotropy caused by thermal denaturation in the tissue. The DOLP method has a potential implementation as a real-time closed-loop feedback system for use in various thermal treatment methods through measuring changes in optical properties of target tissues.

  13. Synchronized molecular-dynamics simulation for the thermal lubrication of a polymeric liquid between parallel plates

    CERN Document Server

    Yasuda, Shugo

    2015-01-01

    The Synchronized Molecular-Dynamics simulation which was recently proposed by authors [Phys. Rev. X {\\bf 4}, 041011 (2014)] is applied to the analysis of polymer lubrication between parallel plates. The rheological properties, conformational change of polymer chains, and temperature rise due to the viscous heating are investigated with changing the values of thermal conductivity of the polymeric liquid. It is found that at a small applied shear stress on the plate, the temperature of polymeric liquid only slightly increases in inverse proportion to the thermal conductivity and the apparent viscosity of polymeric liquid is not much affected by changing the thermal conductivity. However, at a large shear stress, the transitional behaviors of the polymeric liquid occur due to the interplay of the shear deformation and viscous heating by changing the thermal conductivity. This transition is characterized by the Nahme-Griffith number $Na$ which is defined as the ratio of the viscous heating to the thermal conducti...

  14. Evaluation of thermal bioclimate based on observational data and numerical simulations: an application to Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaros, Theodore M.; Melas, Dimitrios; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    The evaluation of thermal bioclimate can be conducted employing either observational or modeling techniques. The advantage of the numerical modeling approach lies in that it can be applied in areas where there is lack of observational data, providing a detailed insight on the prevailing thermal bioclimatic conditions. However, this approach should be exploited carefully since model simulations can be frequently biased. The aim of this paper is to examine the suitability of a mesoscale atmospheric model in terms of evaluating thermal bioclimate. For this, the numerical weather prediction Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the radiation RayMan model are employed for simulating thermal bioclimatic conditions in Greece during a 1-year time period. The physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) is selected as an index for evaluating thermal bioclimate, while synoptic weather station data are exploited for verifying model performance. The results of the present study shed light on the strengths and weaknesses of the numerical modeling approach. Overall, it is shown that model simulations can provide a useful alternative tool for studying thermal bioclimate. Specifically for Greece, the WRF/RayMan modeling system was found to perform adequately well in reproducing the spatial and temporal variations of PET.

  15. Groundwater cooling of a supercomputer in Perth, Western Australia: hydrogeological simulations and thermal sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Heather A.; Schaubs, Peter M.; Rachakonda, Praveen K.; Trefry, Michael G.; Reid, Lynn B.; Lester, Daniel R.; Metcalfe, Guy; Poulet, Thomas; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater cooling (GWC) is a sustainable alternative to conventional cooling technologies for supercomputers. A GWC system has been implemented for the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre in Perth, Western Australia. Groundwater is extracted from the Mullaloo Aquifer at 20.8 °C and passes through a heat exchanger before returning to the same aquifer. Hydrogeological simulations of the GWC system were used to assess its performance and sustainability. Simulations were run with cooling capacities of 0.5 or 2.5 Mega Watts thermal (MWth), with scenarios representing various combinations of pumping rate, injection temperature and hydrogeological parameter values. The simulated system generates a thermal plume in the Mullaloo Aquifer and overlying Superficial Aquifer. Thermal breakthrough (transfer of heat from injection to production wells) occurred in 2.7-4.3 years for a 2.5 MWth system. Shielding (reinjection of cool groundwater between the injection and production wells) resulted in earlier thermal breakthrough but reduced the rate of temperature increase after breakthrough, such that shielding was beneficial after approximately 5 years pumping. Increasing injection temperature was preferable to increasing flow rate for maintaining cooling capacity after thermal breakthrough. Thermal impacts on existing wells were small, with up to 10 wells experiencing a temperature increase ≥ 0.1 °C (largest increase 6 °C).

  16. Computer Simulation Study of Thermal Conduction in 1D Chains of Anharmonic Oscillators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tejal N.Shah; P.N.Gajjar

    2013-01-01

    In this work thermal conduction in one-dimensional (1D) chains of anharmonic oscillators are studied using computer simulation.The temperature profile,heat flux and thermal conductivity are investigated for chain length N =100,200,400,800 and 1600.In the computer simulation anharmonicity is introduced due to Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-β (FPU-β) model For substrate interaction,an onsite potential due to Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model has been used.Numerical simulations demonstrate that temperature gradient scales behave as N-1 linearly with the relation J =0.1765/N.For the thermal conductivity K,KN to N obey the linear relation of the type KN =0.8805N.It is shown that thermal transport is dependent on phonon-phonon interaction as well as phonon-lattice interaction.The thermal conductivity increaseslinearly with increase inanharmonicity and predicts relation κ =0.133 + 0.804β.It is also concluded that for higher value of the strength of the onsite potential system tends to a thermal insulator.

  17. Design of a Resistively Heated Thermal Hydraulic Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Reactor Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Wang, Ten-See; Anghaie, Samim

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary design study is presented for a non-nuclear test facility which uses ohmic heating to replicate the thermal hydraulic characteristics of solid core nuclear reactor fuel element passages. The basis for this testing capability is a recently commissioned nuclear thermal rocket environments simulator, which uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects. Initially, the baseline test fixture for this non-nuclear environments simulator was configured for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of small cylindrical material specimens as a low cost means of evaluating material compatibility. It became evident, however, that additional functionality enhancements were needed to permit a critical examination of thermal hydraulic effects in fuel element passages. Thus, a design configuration was conceived whereby a short tubular material specimen, representing a fuel element passage segment, is surrounded by a backside resistive tungsten heater element and mounted within a self-contained module that inserts directly into the baseline test fixture assembly. With this configuration, it becomes possible to create an inward directed radial thermal gradient within the tubular material specimen such that the wall-to-gas heat flux characteristics of a typical fuel element passage are effectively simulated. The results of a preliminary engineering study for this innovative concept are fully summarized, including high-fidelity multi-physics thermal hydraulic simulations and detailed design features.

  18. Thermal response simulation for tuning PID controllers in a 1016 mm guarded hot plate apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William C; Zarr, Robert R

    2011-07-01

    A mathematical model has been developed and used to simulate the controlled thermal performance of a large guarded hot-plate apparatus. This highly specialized apparatus comprises three interdependent components whose temperatures are closely controlled in order to measure the thermal conductivity of insulation materials. The simulation model was used to investigate control strategies and derive controller gain parameters that are directly transferable to the actual instrument. The simulations take orders-of-magnitude less time to carry out when compared to traditional tuning methods based on operating the actual apparatus. The control system consists primarily of a PC-based PID control algorithm that regulates the output voltage of programmable power amplifiers. Feedback parameters in the form of controller gains are required for the three heating circuits. An objective is to determine an improved set of gains that meet temperature control criteria for testing insulation materials of interest. The analytical model is based on aggregated thermal capacity representations of the primary components and includes the same control algorithm as used in the actual hot-plate apparatus. The model, accounting for both thermal characteristics and temperature control, was validated by comparisons with test data. The tuning methodology used with the simulation model is described and results are presented. The resulting control algorithm and gain parameters have been used in the actual apparatus without modification during several years of testing materials over wide ranges of thermal conductivity, thickness, and insulation resistance values.

  19. The effects of pen partitions and thermal pig simulators on airflow in a livestock test room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, B.; Svidt, Kjeld; Zhang, G.

    2000-01-01

    partitions which divided the room into four equal-sized pens. The guiding plates beneath the ceiling were efficient in creating two-dimensional how in the occupied zone, but they increased the differences between measured and simulated air velocity close to the ceiling and close to the floor. Both...... measurements and CFD simulations showed that the introduction of pen partitions and thermal pig simulators reduced the air velocities in the occupied zone of the test room. Detailed geometric modelling of the animals might often be unnecessary for simulation of airflow in livestock rooms. This will especially...

  20. Detection of the phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion in numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Haugen, N E L; Rogachevskii, I; Brandenburg, A

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion causing a non-diffusive turbulent flux of particles in the direction of the turbulent heat flux, is found using direct numerical simulations (DNS) in temperature-stratified turbulence. In simulations with and without gravity, a peak in the particle number density is found around the minimum of the mean fluid temperature for small Stokes numbers due to the phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion. This implies that this phenomenon causes formation of large-scale inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of particles. For Stokes numbers larger than unity, this effect decreases with increasing Stokes number.

  1. Fatigue crack growth simulations of 3-D linear elastic cracks under thermal load by XFEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Himanshu PATHAK[1; Akhilendra SINGH[2; I.V. SINGH[3; S. K. YADAV[3

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the fatigue crack growth simulations of three-dimensional linear elastic cracks by XFEM under cyclic thermal load. Both temperature and displacement approximations are extrinsically enriched by Heaviside and crack front enrichment functions. Crack growth is modelled by successive linear extensions, and the end points of these linear extensions are joined by cubic spline segments to obtain a modified crack front. Different crack geometries such as planer, non-planer and arbitrary spline shape cracks are simulated under thermal shock, adiabatic and isothermal loads to reveal the sturdiness and versatility of the XFEM approach.

  2. Thermal simulation of a cooling system of hybrid commercial vehicles; Thermalsimulation eine Hybrid-LKW-Kuehlsystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroh, Christoph; Schnoerch, Stefan; Rathberger, Christian [Magna Powertrain Engineering Center Steyr GmbH und Co. KG, St. Valentin (Austria)

    2012-11-01

    In the past few years hybrid vehicles have been in the center of automotive engineering efforts, in particular in the field of passenger cars. But hybrid powertrains will also be important for commercial trucks. This focus on hybrid vehicles leads to high demands on thermal management since the additional components in a hybrid vehicle need appropriate cooling or even heating. In the given paper the simulation of a complete cooling system of a hybrid commercial vehicle will be explained. For this virtual examination the commercial 1D thermal management software KULI will be used, a co-simulation with several programs will not be done deliberately. Yet all aspects which are relevant for a global assessment of the thermal management are considered. The main focus is put on the investigation of appropriate concepts for the fluid circuits, including low and high temperature circuits, electric water pumps, etc. Moreover, also a refrigerant circuit with a chiller for active battery cooling will be used, the appropriate control strategy is implemented as well. For simulating transient profiles a simple driving simulation model is included, using road profile, ambient conditions, and various vehicle parameters as input. In addition an engine model is included which enables the investigation of fuel consumption potentials. This simulation model shows how the thermal management of a hybrid vehicle can be investigated with a single program and with reasonable effort. (orig.)

  3. Simulating muscular thin films using thermal contraction capabilities in finite element analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Victoria A; Nieto, Santiago G; Grosberg, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Chiel, Hillel J; Quinn, Roger D

    2016-10-01

    In this study, new techniques for approximating the contractile properties of cells in biohybrid devices using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) have been investigated. Many current techniques for modeling biohybrid devices use individual cell forces to simulate the cellular contraction. However, such techniques result in long simulation runtimes. In this study we investigated the effect of the use of thermal contraction on simulation runtime. The thermal contraction model was significantly faster than models using individual cell forces, making it beneficial for rapidly designing or optimizing devices. Three techniques, Stoney׳s Approximation, a Modified Stoney׳s Approximation, and a Thermostat Model, were explored for calibrating thermal expansion/contraction parameters (TECPs) needed to simulate cellular contraction using thermal contraction. The TECP values were calibrated by using published data on the deflections of muscular thin films (MTFs). Using these techniques, TECP values that suitably approximate experimental deflections can be determined by using experimental data obtained from cardiomyocyte MTFs. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis was performed in order to investigate the contribution of individual variables, such as elastic modulus and layer thickness, to the final calibrated TECP for each calibration technique. Additionally, the TECP values are applicable to other types of biohybrid devices. Two non-MTF models were simulated based on devices reported in the existing literature.

  4. Computational simulations of thermally activated magnetisation dynamics at high frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Hannay, J D

    2001-01-01

    short time scale breakdown of the Arrhenius-Neel law for a single magnetic moment is demonstrated and explained in terms of the dynamics of the precessional motion. The variation in response as a function of the damping parameter is found to be an important factor determining the remanent magnetisation for a given pulse width. The effects of interactions between moments are described, including the apparent increase in effective damping. It is shown that interactions between grains can be described in terms of thermally excited spin waves. The most important device for today's large scale information storage is the magnetic hard disk drive. This is because it can store vast amounts of data and also provides the fastest way of accessing this valuable information. A current state of the art commercially available hard disk has data rates in excess of 1 GHz which means the magnetic bits are required to reverse in less than one nanosecond. The areal density is greater than 10 Gbits/in sup 2 which requires extreme...

  5. In-flight thermal experiments for LISA Pathfinder: Simulating temperature noise at the Inertial Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, F.; Nofrarias, M.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, Ll; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Maghami, P.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal Diagnostics experiments to be carried out on board LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will yield a detailed characterisation of how temperature fluctuations affect the LTP (LISA Technology Package) instrument performance, a crucial information for future space based gravitational wave detectors as the proposed eLISA. Amongst them, the study of temperature gradient fluctuations around the test masses of the Inertial Sensors will provide as well information regarding the contribution of the Brownian noise, which is expected to limit the LTP sensitivity at frequencies close to 1 mHz during some LTP experiments. In this paper we report on how these kind of Thermal Diagnostics experiments were simulated in the last LPF Simulation Campaign (November, 2013) involving all the LPF Data Analysis team and using an end-to-end simulator of the whole spacecraft. Such simulation campaign was conducted under the framework of the preparation for LPF operations.

  6. Thermal Properties of Simulated and High-Level Waste Solutions Used for the Solvent Extraction Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2001-06-27

    Researchers measured the heat capacity and thermal conductivity of supernate from a blend of Tank 37H and 44F, of a simulant of this blend, and of a simulant specifically designed for solvent extraction experiments. The measured heat capacity of the blend from the Tanks 37H and 44F equaled 0.871 cal/(g degrees C). The simulant of this blend produced an identical result. The heat capacity of the simulant designed for solvent extraction testing equaled 0.859 cal/(g degrees C). All three solutions have thermal conductivities in the range of 0.54 to 0.6 Watts/(m degrees C). The slight variation in the thermophysical properties of these solutions successfully explains the different flowmeter readings observed during the real waste demonstration of the solvent extraction technology.

  7. Image-based multi-scale simulation and experimental validation of thermal conductivity of lanthanum zirconate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xingye; Hu, Bin; Wei, Changdong; Sun, Jiangang; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Li, Li; Knapp, James; Zhang, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) is a promising candidate material for thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications due to its low thermal conductivity and high-temperature phase stability. In this work, a novel image-based multi-scale simulation framework combining molecular dynamics (MD) and finite element (FE) calculations is proposed to study the thermal conductivity of La2Zr2O7 coatings. Since there is no experimental data of single crystal La2Zr2O7 thermal conductivity, a reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (reverse NEMD) approach is first employed to compute the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of single crystal La2Zr2O7. The single crystal data is then passed to a FE model which takes into account of realistic thermal barrier coating microstructures. The predicted thermal conductivities from the FE model are in good agreement with experimental validations using both flash laser technique and pulsed thermal imaging-multilayer analysis. The framework proposed in this work provides a powerful tool for future design of advanced coating systems. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The simulation of mechanical and thermal behaviour of CANDU fuel channel in thermal transient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Mihalache; Vasile Radu; Margarit Pavelescu [INR-Pitesti (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In certain LOCA conditions in a CANDU-6 NPP (high temperature and high pressure), the pressure tube of fuel channel may balloon by creep into contact with the calandria tube. After the contact moment, a radial heat transfer to the moderator through the contact area is occurring. When the temperature of calandria tube walls increases, the contact area is drying and the heat transfer becomes inefficiently. Thus, the fuel channel could lose its integrity. This paper presents a computer code, DELOCA, developed in INR-Pitesti, which simulate the transient thermo-mechanical behaviour of CANDU fuel channel before and after contact. The code contains few models: alloy creep, heat transfer by conduction through the cylindrical walls, channel failure criteria and calculus of heat transfer at the calandria tube - moderator interface. This code evaluates the contact, dry-out and channel failure moments. In this paper, the simulation results calculated at different temperature increasing rates are presented. Also, the contact moments in different axial-circumferential segments for the postulated accident Rupture of Inlet Header of 5% (RIH5%) were presented. The simulations predict the strain and stress state in the circumferential-axial elements. The input data was furnished by the Cathena thermo-hydraulic code. Also, the results of RIH5% accident are presented in comparison with the results of same simulation with Cathena Code. (authors)

  9. Thermal imaging on simulated faults during frictional sliding

    CERN Document Server

    Mair, Karen; Gundersen, Olav

    2008-01-01

    Heating during frictional sliding is a major component of the energy budget of earthquakes and represents a potential weakening mechanism. It is therefore important to investigate how heat dissipates during sliding on simulated faults. We present results from laboratory friction experiments where a halite (NaCl) slider held under constant load is dragged across a coarse substrate. Surface evolution and frictional resistance are recorded. Heat emission at the sliding surface is monitored using an infra-red camera. We demonstrate a link between plastic deformations of halite and enhanced heating characterized by transient localized heat spots. When sand 'gouge' is added to the interface, heating is more diffuse. Importantly, when strong asperities concentrate deformation, significantly more heat is produced locally. In natural faults such regions could be nucleation patches for melt production and hence potentially initiate weakening during earthquakes at much smaller sliding velocities or shear stress than pre...

  10. SIMULATION IN THERMAL DESIGN FOR ELECTRONIC CONTROL UNIT OF ELECTRONIC UNIT PUMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Quankui; ZHU Keqing; ZHUO Bin; MAO Xiaojian; WANG Junxi

    2008-01-01

    The high working junction temperature of power component is the most common reason of its failure. So the thermal design is of vital importance in electronic control unit (ECU) design. By means of circuit simulation, the thermal design of ECU for electronic unit pump (EUP) fuel system is applied. The power dissipation model of each power component in the ECU is created and simulated. According to the analyses of simulation results, the factors which affect the power dissipation of components are analyzed. Then the ways for reducing the power dissipation of power components are carried out. The power dissipation of power components at different engine state is calculated and analyzed. The maximal power dissipation of each power component in all possible engine state is also carried out based on these simulations. A cooling system is designed based on these studies. The tests show that the maximum total power dissipation of ECU drops from 43.2 W to 33.84 W after these simulations and optimizations. These applications of simulations in thermal design of ECU can greatly increase the quality of the design, save the design cost and shorten design time

  11. Thermal Field Analysis and Simulation of an Infrared Belt Furnace Used for Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During solar cell firing, volatile organic compounds (VOC and a small number of metal particles were removed using the gas flow. When the gas flow was disturbed by the thermal field of infrared belt furnace and structure, the metal particles in the discharging gas flow randomly adhered to the surface of solar cell, possibly causing contamination. Meanwhile, the gas flow also affected the thermal uniformity of the solar cell. In this paper, the heating mechanism of the solar cell caused by radiation, convection, and conduction during firing was analyzed. Afterward, four 2-dimensional (2D models of the furnace were proposed. The transient thermal fields with different gas inlets, outlets, and internal structures were simulated. The thermal fields and the temperature of the solar cell could remain stable and uniform when the gas outlets were installed at the ends and in the middle of the furnace, with the gas inlets being distributed evenly. To verify the results, we produced four types of furnaces according to the four simulated results. The experimental results indicated that the thermal distribution of the furnace and the characteristics of the solar cells were consistent with the simulation. These experiments improved the efficiency of the solar cells while optimizing the solar cell manufacturing equipment.

  12. Thermalization of Na+ Pickup Ions in Mercury's Magnetosheath and Magnetosphere via Hybrid Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardsen, S. A.; Omidi, N.; Slavin, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    In previous studies it has been suggested that the incorporation of Na+ pickup ions into Mercury's magnetosphere could have a significant impact on various magnetospheric processes. Test particle simulations indicate that freshly created Na+ ions are rapidly energized and lost from the system. In order to incorporate these ions into the bulk magnetospheric plasma they must be thermalized. A recent study that used linear theory suggests that the wavelengths of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves may be to large and may not grow to sufficient amplitudes to thermalize these ions and concluded that global thermalization of these ions is not possible. However, under certain solar wind and IMF conditions such thermalization might take place in limited regions of Mercury's magnetosphere, primarily in the sub-solar magnetosheath. Due the small scale size of Mercury's magnetosphere compared to the gyro-radii of these heavy ions and their associated wave modes, hybrid simulation with a kinetic treatment for the ions and a fluid treatment for the electrons may be the only way to study if thermalization of Na+ can occur. Preliminary results of a hybrid simulation that incorporates the Na+ pickup ions in its kinetic treatment will be presented.

  13. Three-dimensional, global, radiative GRMHD simulations of a thermally unstable disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, B.; Fragile, P. C.; Johnson, L. C.; Kluźniak, W.

    2016-12-01

    We present results of a set of three-dimensional, general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamics simulations of thin accretion discs around a non-rotating black hole to test their thermal stability. We consider two cases, one that is initially radiation-pressure-dominated and expected to be thermally unstable and another that is initially gas-pressure dominated and expected to remain stable. Indeed, we find that cooling dominates over heating in the radiation-pressure-dominated model, causing the disc to collapse vertically on roughly the local cooling time-scale. We also find that heating and cooling within the disc have a different dependence on the mid-plane pressure - a prerequisite of thermal instability. Comparison of our data with the relevant thin-disc thermal equilibrium curve suggests that our disc may be headed for the thermally stable, gas-pressure-dominated branch. However, because the disc collapses to the point that we are no longer able to resolve it, we had to terminate the simulation. On the other hand, the gas-pressure-dominated model, which was run for twice as long as the radiation-pressure-dominated one, remains stable, with heating and cooling roughly in balance. Finally, the radiation-pressure-dominated simulation shows some evidence of viscous instability. The strongest evidence is in plots of surface density, which show the disc breaking up into rings.

  14. Thermal Characterization of the Air Force Institute of Technology Solar Simulation Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Decrease KI Decrease Increase Increase Eliminate KD Small Change Decrease Decrease No Change A general process for manually tuning a PID ...solar simulator if restrictions were required. PID Coefficient Tuning Again, due to lack of previous testing of the chamber, the PID coefficients set...prescribed < 0.1°C bound. PID coefficient tuning was done throughout the process of testing in order to get as close to desired performance, with small

  15. Comparison of fabric skins for the simulation of sweating on thermal manikins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelblen, Barbara; Psikuta, Agnes; Bogdan, Anna; Annaheim, Simon; Rossi, René M.

    2017-03-01

    Sweating is an important thermoregulatory process helping to dissipate heat and, thus, to prevent overheating of the human body. Simulations of human thermo-physiological responses in hot conditions or during exercising are helpful for assessing heat stress; however, realistic sweating simulation and evaporative cooling is needed. To this end, thermal manikins dressed with a tight fabric skin can be used, and the properties of this skin should help human-like sweat evaporation simulation. Four fabrics, i.e., cotton with elastane, polyester, polyamide with elastane, and a skin provided by a manikin manufacturer (Thermetrics) were compared in this study. The moisture management properties of the fabrics have been investigated in basic tests with regard to all phases of sweating relevant for simulating human thermo-physiological responses, namely, onset of sweating, fully developed sweating, and drying. The suitability of the fabrics for standard tests, such as clothing evaporative resistance measurements, was evaluated based on tests corresponding to the middle phase of sweating. Simulations with a head manikin coupled to a thermo-physiological model were performed to evaluate the overall performance of the skins. The results of the study showed that three out of four evaluated fabrics have adequate moisture management properties with regard to the simulation of sweating, which was confirmed in the coupled simulation with the head manikin. The presented tests are helpful for comparing the efficiency of different fabrics to simulate sweat-induced evaporative cooling on thermal manikins.

  16. Development of the NSSS thermal-hydraulic program for YGN unit 1 simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Doo; Jeong, Jae Jun; Lee, Won Jae; Chung, Bub Dong; Ha, Kwi Seok; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2000-09-01

    The NSSS thermal-hydraulic programs installed in the domestic full-scope power plant simulators were provided in early 1980s by foreign vendors. Because of limited computational capability at that time, they usually adopt very simplified physical models for a real-time simulation of NSSS thermal-hydraulic phenomena, which entails inaccurate results and the possibility of so-called 'negative training', especially for complicated two-phase flows in the reactor coolant system. To resolve the problem, we developed a realistic NSSS T/H program (named 'ARTS' code) for use in YongGwang Nuclear Unit 1 full-scope simulator. The best-estimate code RETRAN03, developed by EPRI and approved by USNRC, was selected as a reference code of ARTS. For the development of ARTS, the followings have been performed: -Improvement of the robustness of RETRAN - Improvement of the real-time simulation capability of RETRAN - Optimum input data generation for the NSSS simulation - New model development that cannot be efficiently modeled by RETRAN - Assessment of the ARTS code. The systematic assessment of ARTS has been conducted in both personal computers (Windows 98, Visual fortran) and the simulator development environment (Windows NT, GSE simulator development tool). The results were resonable in terms of accuracy, real-time simulation and robustness.

  17. Ventilated buildings optimisation by using a coupled thermal-airflow simulation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Remmen, Arne

    2011-01-01

    This work shows the optimization of natural ventilation within buildings at the stage of design and behaviour of the occupants. An evaluation is done by coupled multizone air modelling and thermal building simulation by using a deterministic set of input factors comprising among others climate...

  18. Advances in thermal hydraulic and neutronic simulation for reactor analysis and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tentner, A.M.; Blomquist, R.N.; Canfield, T.R.; Ewing, T.F.; Garner, P.L.; Gelbard, E.M.; Gross, K.C.; Minkoff, M.; Valentin, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    This paper describes several large-scale computational models developed at Argonne National Laboratory for the simulation and analysis of thermal-hydraulic and neutronic events in nuclear reactors and nuclear power plants. The impact of advanced parallel computing technologies on these computational models is emphasized.

  19. Integrated surface/subsurface permafrost thermal hydrology: Model formulation and proof-of-concept simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Scott L.; Coon, Ethan T.; Atchley, Adam L.; Berndt, Markus; Garimella, Rao; Moulton, J. David; Svyatskiy, Daniil; Wilson, Cathy J.

    2016-08-01

    The need to understand potential climate impacts and feedbacks in Arctic regions has prompted recent interest in modeling of permafrost dynamics in a warming climate. A new fine-scale integrated surface/subsurface thermal hydrology modeling capability is described and demonstrated in proof-of-concept simulations. The new modeling capability combines a surface energy balance model with recently developed three-dimensional subsurface thermal hydrology models and new models for nonisothermal surface water flows and snow distribution in the microtopography. Surface water flows are modeled using the diffusion wave equation extended to include energy transport and phase change of ponded water. Variation of snow depth in the microtopography, physically the result of wind scour, is modeled phenomenologically with a diffusion wave equation. The multiple surface and subsurface processes are implemented by leveraging highly parallel community software. Fully integrated thermal hydrology simulations on the tilted open book catchment, an important test case for integrated surface/subsurface flow modeling, are presented. Fine-scale 100 year projections of the integrated permafrost thermal hydrological system on an ice wedge polygon at Barrow Alaska in a warming climate are also presented. These simulations demonstrate the feasibility of microtopography-resolving, process-rich simulations as a tool to help understand possible future evolution of the carbon-rich Arctic tundra in a warming climate.

  20. Impact energy analysis of HSLA specimens after simulated welding thermal cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarždić, I.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents impact energy results of specimens made from high strength fine grained steel TStE 420 after thermal cycle simulation. These results are obtained by examining Charpy specimens. Metallographic analysis is performed, hardness is measured and total impact energy is divided into ductile and brittle components.

  1. Investigation on reduced thermal models for simulating infrared images in fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardin, J.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Firdaouss, M.; Gardarein, J.-L.; Rigollet, F.

    2016-09-01

    In fusion facilities, the in-vessel wall receives high heat flux density up to 20 MW/m2. The monitoring of in-vessel components is usually ensured by infra-red (IR) thermography but with all-metallic walls, disturbance phenomenon as reflections may lead to inaccurate temperature estimates, potentially endangering machine safety. A full predictive photonic simulation is then used to assess accurately the IR measurements. This paper investigates some reduced thermal models (semi-infinite wall, thermal quadrupole) to predict the surface temperature from the particle loads on components for a given plasma scenario. The results are compared with a reference 3D Finite Element Method (Ansys Mechanical) and used as input for simulating IR images. The performances of reduced thermal models are analysed by comparing the resulting IR images.

  2. Helioseismic holography of simulated sunspots: magnetic and thermal contributions to travel times

    CERN Document Server

    Felipe, T; Crouch, A D; Birch, A C

    2016-01-01

    Wave propagation through sunspots involves conversion between waves of acoustic and magnetic character. In addition, the thermal structure of sunspots is very different than that of the quiet Sun. As a consequence, the interpretation of local helioseismic measurements of sunspots has long been a challenge. With the aim of understanding these measurements, we carry out numerical simulations of wave propagation through sunspots. Helioseismic holography measurements made from the resulting simulated wavefields show qualitative agreement with observations of real sunspots. We use additional numerical experiments to determine, separately, the influence of the thermal structure of the sunspot and the direct effect of the sunspot magnetic field. We use the ray approximation to show that the travel-time shifts in the thermal (non-magnetic) sunspot model are primarily produced by changes in the wave path due to the Wilson depression rather than variations in the wave speed. This shows that inversions for the subsurfac...

  3. Numerical simulation of thermal disposition with induction heating used for oncological hyperthermic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dughiero, F; Corazza, S

    2005-01-01

    Hyperthermia plays an important role in oncological therapies, most often being used in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy. The success of this therapy is strongly dependent on the precision and control of thermal deposition. Hyperthermia based on induction heating, with thermally self-regulating thermoseeds inserted into the tumorous mass, is used for interstitial treatment. The technique was the subject of the numerical study presented in the paper. The analysis was carried out using coupled electromagnetic heating and thermo-fluid dynamic FEM simulations. During thermal deposition by induction heating of inserted seeds, the simulations estimated the thermal field inside and outside the tumour, as well as the sensitivity of the thermal field to variations regarding seed temperature, configuration and proximity to vessels. The method, for which accurate anatomical patient's information is essential, is suitable for providing useful qualitative and quantitative information about thermal transients and power density distribution for hyperthermic treatment. Several grid steps were analysed and compared. A 1 cm seed grid was resulted in good homogeneity and effectiveness of the thermal deposition. The cold spot effect caused by large vessels was demonstrated and quantified. Simulations of the heating of a tumorous mass in the liver showed that an indcutor generator operating at 200 kHz frequency and 500 A current, producing a pulsating magnetic field of H = 60 A cm(-1), was adequate for the treatment. The seeds that perform best among those tested (Nicu (28% Cu), PdNi (27.2% Ni), PdCo (6.15% Co) and ferrite core) were the PdNi (1 mm radius, 10 mm length), as they have a low Curie temperature (52 degrees C), which is the closest to the desired treatment temperature and thus reduces the risk of hot spots.

  4. Fast thermal simulations and temperature optimization for hyperthermia treatment planning, including realistic 3D vessel networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, H P; van den Berg, C A T; Bel, A; Crezee, J

    2013-10-01

    Accurate thermal simulations in hyperthermia treatment planning require discrete modeling of large blood vessels. The very long computation time of the finite difference based DIscrete VAsculature model (DIVA) developed for this purpose is impractical for clinical applications. In this work, a fast steady-state thermal solver was developed for simulations with realistic 3D vessel networks. Additionally, an efficient temperature-based optimization method including the thermal effect of discrete vasculature was developed. The steady-state energy balance for vasculature and tissue was described by a linear system, which was solved with an iterative method on the graphical processing unit. Temperature calculations during optimization were performed by superposition of several precomputed temperature distributions, calculated with the developed thermal solver. The thermal solver and optimization were applied to a human anatomy, with the prostate being the target region, heated with the eight waveguide 70 MHz AMC-8 system. Realistic 3D pelvic vasculature was obtained from angiography. Both the arterial and venous vessel networks consisted of 174 segments and 93 endpoints with a diameter of 1.2 mm. Calculation of the steady-state temperature distribution lasted about 3.3 h with the original DIVA model, while the newly developed method took only ≈ 1-1.5 min. Temperature-based optimization with and without taking the vasculature into account showed differences in optimized waveguide power of more than a factor 2 and optimized tumor T90 differed up to ≈ 0.5°C. This shows the necessity to take discrete vasculature into account during optimization. A very fast method was developed for thermal simulations with realistic 3D vessel networks. The short simulation time allows online calculations and makes temperature optimization with realistic vasculature feasible, which is an important step forward in hyperthermia treatment planning.

  5. HPC simulations of grain-scale spallation to improve thermal spallation drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, S. D.; Lomov, I.; Wideman, T. W.; Potter, J.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal spallation drilling and related hard-rock hole opening techniques are transformative technologies with the potential to dramatically reduce the costs associated with EGS well drilling and improve the productivity of new and existing wells. In contrast to conventional drilling methods that employ mechanical means to penetrate rock, thermal spallation methods fragment rock into small pieces ("spalls") without contact via the rapid transmission of heat to the rock surface. State-of-the-art constitutive models of thermal spallation employ Weibull statistical failure theory to represent the relationship between rock heterogeneity and its propensity to produce spalls when heat is applied to the rock surface. These models have been successfully used to predict such factors as penetration rate, spall-size distribution and borehole radius from drilling jet velocity and applied heat flux. A properly calibrated Weibull model would permit design optimization of thermal spallation drilling under geothermal field conditions. However, although useful for predicting system response in a given context, Weibull models are by their nature empirically derived. In the past, the parameters used in these models were carefully determined from laboratory tests, and thus model applicability was limited by experimental scope. This becomes problematic, for example, if simulating spall production at depths relevant for geothermal energy production, or modeling thermal spallation drilling in new rock types. Nevertheless, with sufficient computational resources, Weibull models could be validated in the absence of experimental data by explicit small-scale simulations that fully resolve rock grains. This presentation will discuss how high-fidelity simulations can be used to inform Weibull models of thermal spallation, and what these simulations reveal about the processes driving spallation at the grain-scale - in particular, the role that inter-grain boundaries and micro-pores play in the

  6. Application of Thermal Analysis Tests Results in the Numerical Simulations of Continuous Casting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kargul T.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of thermophysical properties of steel is possible by using different thermal analysis techniques. In the field of metallurgy the most relevant methods are Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. The paper presents the results of thermophysical properties which are necessary to carry out numerical simulation of continuous casting of steel. The study was performed for two steel grades S320GD and S235JR. The main aim of the research was to determine the dependence of specific heat on temperature. On the basis of obtained results the thermal effects of phase transformations and characteristic transition temperatures were also identified. Both the specific heat of steel and thermal effects of phase transformations are included in the Fourier-Kirchhoff equation, as the material properties necessary to obtain the numerical solution. The paper presents the research methodology, analysis of results and method of determining the specific heat of steel based on the results of DSC analysis.

  7. Phase-field simulation of dendritic sidebranching induced by thermal noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱昌盛; 王智平; 荆涛; 柳百成

    2004-01-01

    The influence of undercooling and noise magnitude on dendritic sidebranching during crystal growth was investigated by simulation of a phase-field model which incorporates thermal noise. It is shown that, the sidebranching is not influenced with inclusion of the nonconserved noise, therefore, in order to save the computational costs it is often neglected; while conserved noise drives the morphological instability and is dominant origin of sidebranching. The dependence of temperature field on magnitude of thermal noise is apparent, when Fu gets an appropriate value, noise can induce sidebranching but not influence the dendritic tip operating state. In the small undercooled melt, the thermal diffusion layer collected around the dendrite is thick, which suppresses the growth of its sidebranching and makes the dendrite take on the morphology of no sidebranching, but when the undercooling is great,the thermal diffusion layer is thin, which is advantageous to the growth of the sidebranching and the dendrite presents the morphology of the developed sidebranching.

  8. Effect of point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2: molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel is an important materials property that affects fuel performance since it is a key parameter determining the temperature distribution in the fuel, thus governing, e.g., dimensional changes due to thermal expansion, fission gas release rates, etc. [1] The thermal conductivity of UO2 nuclear fuel is also affected by fission gas, fission products, defects, and microstructural features such as grain boundaries. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to determine quantitatively, the effect of irradiation induced point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2, as a function of defect concentrations, for a range of temperatures, 300 – 1500 K. The results will be used to develop enhanced continuum thermal conductivity models for MARMOT and BISON by INL. These models express the thermal conductivity as a function of microstructure state-variables, thus enabling thermal conductivity models with closer connection to the physical state of the fuel [2].

  9. Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

    2012-11-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

  10. Progress in the Integrated Simulation of Thermal-Hydraulic Operation of the ITER Magnet System

    CERN Document Server

    Bagnasco, M; Bessette, D; Marinucci, C

    2010-01-01

    A new integrated computer code is being developed for the simulations of the overall behavior of the ITER magnet cryo-system. The existing THEA, FLOWER and POWER codes, assembled as modules of a computational environment (Super-Magnet) have been upgraded to perform global simulations of the cooling circuit for the ITER magnet system. The thermal coupling resulting from the generic geometric configurations has been implemented to realize quasi-three-dimensional simulations of the winding pack. In this paper we present details on the model.

  11. interThermalPhaseChangeFoam—A framework for two-phase flow simulations with thermally driven phase change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The volume-of-fluid (VOF approach is a mature technique for simulating two-phase flows. However, VOF simulation of phase-change heat transfer is still in its infancy. Multiple closure formulations have been proposed in the literature, each suited to different applications. While these have enabled significant research advances, few implementations are publicly available, actively maintained, or inter-operable. Here, a VOF solver is presented (interThermalPhaseChangeFoam, which incorporates an extensible framework for phase-change heat transfer modeling, enabling simulation of diverse phenomena in a single environment. The solver employs object oriented OpenFOAM library features, including Run-Time-Type-Identification to enable rapid implementation and run-time selection of phase change and surface tension force models. The solver is packaged with multiple phase change and surface tension closure models, adapted and refined from earlier studies. This code has previously been applied to study wavy film condensation, Taylor flow evaporation, nucleate boiling, and dropwise condensation. Tutorial cases are provided for simulation of horizontal film condensation, smooth and wavy falling film condensation, nucleate boiling, and bubble condensation. Validation and grid sensitivity studies, interfacial transport models, effects of spurious currents from surface tension models, effects of artificial heat transfer due to numerical factors, and parallel scaling performance are described in detail in the Supplemental Material (see Appendix A. By incorporating the framework and demonstration cases into a single environment, users can rapidly apply the solver to study phase-change processes of interest.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Pillar Structured Solid State Thermal Neutron Detector Efficiency and Gamma Discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, A; Wang, T; Deo, N; Cheung, C; Nikolic, R

    2008-06-24

    This work reports numerical simulations of a novel three-dimensionally integrated, {sup 10}boron ({sup 10}B) and silicon p+, intrinsic, n+ (PIN) diode micropillar array for thermal neutron detection. The inter-digitated device structure has a high probability of interaction between the Si PIN pillars and the charged particles (alpha and {sup 7}Li) created from the neutron - {sup 10}B reaction. In this work, the effect of both the 3-D geometry (including pillar diameter, separation and height) and energy loss mechanisms are investigated via simulations to predict the neutron detection efficiency and gamma discrimination of this structure. The simulation results are demonstrated to compare well with the measurement results. This indicates that upon scaling the pillar height, a high efficiency thermal neutron detector is possible.

  13. Initial Operation and Shakedown of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Prototypical fuel elements mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission in addition to being exposed to flowing hydrogen. Recent upgrades to NTREES now allow power levels 24 times greater than those achievable in the previous facility configuration. This higher power operation will allow near prototypical power densities and flows to finally be achieved in most prototypical fuel elements.

  14. Design and validation of a thermal simulator for solar system performance testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotas, J. F.; Wood, B. D.; McNeill, B. W.; Evans, D. L.

    1981-08-01

    A liquid thermal simulator which processes heat up to a maximum heat rate of 10.5 kW is discussed. Four in-line water heaters of varying power levels provide energy in discrete steps. Each heater is interfaced by a series of relays to a minicomputer, which also monitors fluid stream temperatures. Time constants and steady state power levels for each heater for six different flowrates were found. Two modes of heating element control were devised. It is shown that dynamic heater control minimized the difference between the desired heat rate and the simulator heat rate much better than the steady state control algorithm. Mathematical models of a flat plate collector and residential cooling load were developed. Simulator thermal output deviated a maximum of 3% from the actual collector output under the identical operating conditions.

  15. Thermal striping in nuclear reactors: POD analysis of LES simulations and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzari, Elia; Alvarez, Andres; Marin, Oana; Obabko, Aleksandr; Lomperski, Steve; Aithal, Shashi

    2015-11-01

    Thermal fatigue caused due to thermal striping impacts design and analyses of a wide-range of industrial apparatus. This phenomena is of particular significance in nuclear reactor applications, primarily in sodium cooled fast reactors. In order to conduct systematic analyses of the thermal striping phenomena a simplified experimental set-up was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory. In this set-up two turbulent jets with a temperature difference of about 20K were mixed in a rectangular tank. The jets entered the tank via 2 hexagonal inlets. Two different inlet geometries were studied, both experimentally and via high-fidelity LES simulations. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) was performed on the turbulent velocity field in the tank to identify the most dominant energetic modes. The POD analyses of the experimental data in both inlet geometrical configurations were compared with LES simulations. Detailed POD analyses are presented to highlight the impact of geometry on the velocity and thermal fields. These can be correlated with experimental and numerical data to assess the impact of thermal striping on the design of the upper plenum of sodium-cooled nuclear reactors. ALCF.

  16. Standard Practice for Solar Simulation for Thermal Balance Testing of Spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1973-01-01

    1.1 Purpose: 1.1.1 The primary purpose of this practice is to provide guidance for making adequate thermal balance tests of spacecraft and components where solar simulation has been determined to be the applicable method. Careful adherence to this practice should ensure the adequate simulation of the radiation environment of space for thermal tests of space vehicles. 1.1.2 A corollary purpose is to provide the proper test environment for systems-integration tests of space vehicles. An accurate space-simulation test for thermal balance generally will provide a good environment for operating all electrical and mechanical systems in their various mission modes to determine interferences within the complete system. Although adherence to this practice will provide the correct thermal environment for this type of test, there is no discussion of the extensive electronic equipment and procedures required to support systems-integration testing. 1.2 Nonapplicability—This practice does not apply to or provide inco...

  17. Heat transfer simulation and thermal measurements of microfabricated x-ray transparent heater stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldasseroni, C; Queen, D R; Cooke, David W; Maize, K; Shakouri, A; Hellman, F

    2011-09-01

    A microfabricated amorphous silicon nitride membrane-based nanocalorimeter is proposed to be suitable for an x-ray transparent sample platform with low power heating and built-in temperature sensing. In this work, thermal characterization in both air and vacuum are analyzed experimentally and via simulation. Infrared microscopy and thermoreflectance microscopy are used for thermal imaging of the sample area in air. While a reasonably large isothermal area is found on the sample area, the temperature homogeneity of the entire sample area is low, limiting use of the device as a heater stage in air or other gases. A simulation model that includes conduction, as well as radiation and convection heat loss, is presented with radiation and convection parameters determined experimentally. Simulated temperature distributions show that the homogeneity can be improved by using a thicker thermal conduction layer or reducing the pressure of the gas in the environment but neither are good solutions for the proposed use. A new simple design that has improved temperature homogeneity and a larger isothermal area while maintaining a thin thermal conduction layer is proposed and fabricated. This new design enables applications in transmission x-ray microscopes and spectroscopy setups at atmospheric pressure. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  18. Helioseismic Holography of Simulated Sunspots: Magnetic and Thermal Contributions to Travel Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe, T.; Braun, D. C.; Crouch, A. D.; Birch, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    Wave propagation through sunspots involves conversion between waves of acoustic and magnetic character. In addition, the thermal structure of sunspots is very different than that of the quiet Sun. As a consequence, the interpretation of local helioseismic measurements of sunspots has long been a challenge. With the aim of understanding these measurements, we carry out numerical simulations of wave propagation through sunspots. Helioseismic holography measurements made from the resulting simulated wavefields show qualitative agreement with observations of real sunspots. We use additional numerical experiments to determine, separately, the influence of the thermal structure of the sunspot and the direct effect of the sunspot magnetic field. We use the ray approximation to show that the travel-time shifts in the thermal (non-magnetic) sunspot model are primarily produced by changes in the wave path due to the Wilson depression rather than variations in the wave speed. This shows that inversions for the subsurface structure of sunspots must account for local changes in the density. In some ranges of horizontal phase speed and frequency there is agreement (within the noise level in the simulations) between the travel times measured in the full magnetic sunspot model and the thermal model. If this conclusion proves to be robust for a wide range of models, it would suggest a path toward inversions for sunspot structure.

  19. The thermal regime of the Campi Flegrei magmatic system reconstructed through 3D numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, Valeria; Wohletz, Kenneth; Civetta, Lucia; Moretti, Roberto; Orsi, Giovanni; Gasparini, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    We illustrate a quantitative conductive/convective thermal model incorporating a wide range of geophysical, petrological, geological, geochemical and isotopical observations that constrain the thermal evolution and present state of the Campi Flegrei caldera (CFc) magmatic system. The proposed model has been computed on the basis of the current knowledge of: (1) the volcanic and magmatic history of the volcano over the last 44 ka, (2) its underlying crustal structure, and (3) the physical properties of the erupted magmas. 3D numerical simulations of heat conduction and convection within heterogeneous rock/magma materials with evolving heat sources and boundary conditions that simulate magma rise from a deep (≥ 8 km depth) to shallow (2-6 km) reservoirs, magma chamber formation, magma extrusion, caldera collapse, and intra-caldera hydrothermal convection, have been carried out. The evolution of the CFc magmatic system through time has been simulated through different steps related to its changes in terms of depth, location and size of magma reservoirs and their replenishment. The thermal modeling results show that both heat conduction and convection have played an important role in the CFc thermal evolution, although with different timing. The simulated present heat distribution is in agreement with the measured geothermal profiles (Agip, 1987), reproduces the thermal gradient peaks at the CFc margins in correspondence to the anomalies in surface gradients (Corrado et al., 1998), and suggests temperatures of 700 °C at depth of 4 km in the central portion of the caldera, in agreement with the estimated temperature for the brittle-ductile transition (Hill, 1992).

  20. Computer simulation of thermal conductivity in vulcanized polyisoprene at variable strain and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Sven; Meyer, Jan; Hentschke, Reinhard

    2017-08-01

    We study the thermal conductivity tensor in an atomistic model of vulcanized cis-1,4-polyisoprene (PI) rubber via molecular dynamics simulations. Our polymer force field is based on V. A. Harmandaris et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 436 (2002), 10.1063/1.1416872], whereas the polymerization algorithm follows the description in J. Hager et al. [Macromolecules 48, 9039 (2015), 10.1021/acs.macromol.5b01864]. The polymer chains are chemically cross linked via sulfur bridges of adjustable cross-link density. A volume-conserving uniaxial strain of up to 200% is applied to the systems. The widely used GROMACS simulation package is adapted to allow using the Green-Kubo approach to calculate the thermal conductivity tensor components. Our analysis of the heat flux autocorrelation functions leads to the conclusion that the thermal conductivity in PI is governed by short-lived phonon modes at low wave numbers due to deformation of the monomers along the polymer backbone. Applying uniaxial strain causes increased orientation of monomers along the strain direction, which enhances the attendant thermal conductivity component. We find an exponential increase of the conductivity in stretch direction in terms of an attendant orientation order parameter. This is accompanied by a simultaneous decline of thermal conductivity in the orthogonal directions. Increase of the cross-link density only has a weak effect on thermal conductivity in the unstrained system, even at high cross-link density. In the strained system we do observed a rising thermal conductivity in the limit of high stress. This increase is attributed to enhanced coupling between chains rather than to their orientation.

  1. Simulating thermal explosion of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine-based explosives: Model comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoh, Jack J.; McClelland, Matthew A.; Maienschein, Jon L.; Wardell, Jeffrey F.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2005-04-01

    We compare two-dimensional model results with measurements for the thermal, chemical, and mechanical behavior in a thermal explosion experiment. Confined high explosives (HEs) are heated at a rate of 1°C/h until an explosion is observed. The heating, ignition, and deflagration phases are modeled using an Arbitrarily Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D) that can handle a wide range of time scales that vary from a structural to a dynamic hydrotime scale. During the preignition phase, quasistatic mechanics and diffusive thermal transfer from a heat source to the HE are coupled with the finite chemical reactions that include both endothermic and exothermic processes. Once the HE ignites, a hydrodynamic calculation is performed as a burn front propagates through the HE. Two cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine-based explosives, C-4 and PBXN-109, are considered, whose chemical-thermal-mechanical models are constructed based on measurements of thermal and mechanical properties along with small scale thermal explosion measurements. The simulated dynamic response of HE confinement during the explosive phase is compared to measurements in larger scale thermal explosion tests. The explosion temperatures for both HEs are predicted to within 5°C. Calculated and measured wall strains provide an indication of vessel pressurization during the heating phase and violence during the explosive phase. During the heating phase, simulated wall strains provide only an approximate representation of measured values indicating a better numerical treatment is needed to provide accurate results. The results also show that more numerical accuracy is needed for vessels with lesser confinement strength. For PBXN-109, the measured wall strains during the explosion are well represented by the ALE3D calculations.

  2. Simulating thermal explosion of RDX-based explosives: Model comparison with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoh, J J; McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Wardell, J F; Tarver, C M

    2004-10-11

    We compare two-dimensional model results with measurements for the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior in a thermal explosion experiment. Confined high explosives are heated at a rate of 1 C per hour until an explosion is observed. The heating, ignition, and deflagration phases are modeled using an Arbitrarily Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D) that can handle a wide range of time scales that vary from a structural to a dynamic hydro time scale. During the pre-ignition phase, quasi-static mechanics and diffusive thermal transfer from a heat source to the HE are coupled with the finite chemical reactions that include both endothermic and exothermic processes. Once the HE ignites, a hydro dynamic calculation is performed as a burn front propagates through the HE. Two RDX-based explosives, C-4 and PBXN-109, are considered, whose chemical-thermal-mechanical models are constructed based on measurements of thermal and mechanical properties along with small scale thermal explosion measurements. The simulated dynamic response of HE confinement during the explosive phase is compared to measurements in large scale thermal explosion tests. The explosion temperatures for both HE's are predicted to within 5 C. Calculated and measured wall strains provide an indication of vessel pressurization during the heating phase and violence during the explosive phase. During the heating phase, simulated wall strains provide only an approximate representation of measured values indicating a better numerical treatment is needed to provide accurate results. The results also show that more numerical accuracy is needed for vessels with lesser confinement strength. For PBXN-109, the measured wall strains during the explosion are well represented by the ALE3D calculations.

  3. Mathematical model for the thermal process of controlled cooling of wires and its numerical simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongxiang Zhu; Xiaohong Hao; Zhi Wen; Yaogen Zhang; Huqiu Chen

    2004-01-01

    The mathematical model for the thermal process of billets rolling has been established, including transporting in air and temperature-holding cover, descaling with high-pressure water, and the process of rolling and cooling in water box. The calculated data by the model have been compared with the measured data and the results show that the model is right and creditable. Based on the model, the main thermal characters of rolling line have been simulated and the influence of all the parameters on the temperature of rolling has been analyzed.

  4. Simulation and Test for the Thermal Behaviour of a Prototype Synchronous Generator with HTS Armature Windings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X.-Y.; Qu, T.-M.; Song, P.; Li, L.-N.; Chen, D.-X.; Han, Z.

    A synchronous generator prototype with HTS armature windings and a permanent magnet rotor (HTS-PM) was developed. The temperature evolution during cooling and operation processes of the HTS coils was analyzed by finite element method (FEM). The simulated results coincided well with the temperature measurement data acquired by PT-100 sensors. Cooling time, terminal temperature, contact thermal conductivity, during cooling, as well as the proportion between real and calculated iron loss, contact thermal conductivity, at various rotating speeds during operation, were worked out using the FEM model.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Vacuum Heat Treatment Thermal Hysteresis Time of GH4169 Superalloy Workpiece

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGMing-wei; ZHANGLi-wen; JIANGGuo-dong; ZHANGFan-yun; LiChen-hui; ZHANGLi-sheng; ZHANGZun-li

    2004-01-01

    A nonlinear finite element model of vacuum heat treatment process was developed. In this model, influence of many factors, such as nonlinear heat radiation, temperature-dependent thermal physical properties of material are considered. The temperature field of GH4169 alloy workpiece during vacuum heat treatment process was calculated using finite element software MSC.Marc, and the thermal hysteresis time of the workpiece was predicted. An experiment of vacuum heat treatment of GH4169 superalloy workpiece was carried out to verify the calculation. The experimental results of temperature profile agree well with the simulated results. This work lays a theoretical foundation for optimizing technical parameter of vacuum heat treatment process.

  6. Optimal simulations of ultrasonic fields produced by large thermal therapy arrays using the angular spectrum approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaozheng; McGough, Robert J

    2009-05-01

    The angular spectrum approach is evaluated for the simulation of focused ultrasound fields produced by large thermal therapy arrays. For an input pressure or normal particle velocity distribution in a plane, the angular spectrum approach rapidly computes the output pressure field in a three dimensional volume. To determine the optimal combination of simulation parameters for angular spectrum calculations, the effect of the size, location, and the numerical accuracy of the input plane on the computed output pressure is evaluated. Simulation results demonstrate that angular spectrum calculations performed with an input pressure plane are more accurate than calculations with an input velocity plane. Results also indicate that when the input pressure plane is slightly larger than the array aperture and is located approximately one wavelength from the array, angular spectrum simulations have very small numerical errors for two dimensional planar arrays. Furthermore, the root mean squared error from angular spectrum simulations asymptotically approaches a nonzero lower limit as the error in the input plane decreases. Overall, the angular spectrum approach is an accurate and robust method for thermal therapy simulations of large ultrasound phased arrays when the input pressure plane is computed with the fast nearfield method and an optimal combination of input parameters.

  7. Using Coupled Mesoscale Experiments and Simulations to Investigate High Burn-Up Oxide Fuel Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, Melissa C.; Fromm, Bradley S.; Tonks, Michael R.; Field, David P.

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear energy is a mature technology with a small carbon footprint. However, work is needed to make current reactor technology more accident tolerant and to allow reactor fuel to be burned in a reactor for longer periods of time. Optimizing the reactor fuel performance is essentially a materials science problem. The current understanding of fuel microstructure have been limited by the difficulty in studying the structure and chemistry of irradiated fuel samples at the mesoscale. Here, we take advantage of recent advances in experimental capabilities to characterize the microstructure in 3D of irradiated mixed oxide (MOX) fuel taken from two radial positions in the fuel pellet. We also reconstruct these microstructures using Idaho National Laboratory's MARMOT code and calculate the impact of microstructure heterogeneities on the effective thermal conductivity using mesoscale heat conduction simulations. The thermal conductivities of both samples are higher than the bulk MOX thermal conductivity because of the formation of metallic precipitates and because we do not currently consider phonon scattering due to defects smaller than the experimental resolution. We also used the results to investigate the accuracy of simple thermal conductivity approximations and equations to convert 2D thermal conductivities to 3D. It was found that these approximations struggle to predict the complex thermal transport interactions between metal precipitates and voids.

  8. Thermal conductivity of tungsten: Effects of plasma-related structural defects from molecular-dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lin; Wirth, Brian D.; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2017-08-01

    We report results on the lattice thermal conductivities of tungsten single crystals containing nanoscale-sized pores or voids and helium (He) nanobubbles as a function of void/bubble size and gas pressure in the He bubbles based on molecular-dynamics simulations. For reference, we calculated lattice thermal conductivities of perfect tungsten single crystals along different crystallographic directions at room temperature and found them to be about 10% of the overall thermal conductivity of tungsten with a weak dependence on the heat flux direction. The presence of nanoscale voids in the crystal causes a significant reduction in its lattice thermal conductivity, which decreases with increasing void size. Filling the voids with He to form He nanobubbles and increasing the bubble pressure leads to further significant reduction of the tungsten lattice thermal conductivity, down to ˜20% of that of the perfect crystal. The anisotropy in heat conduction remains weak for tungsten single crystals containing nanoscale-sized voids and He nanobubbles throughout the pressure range examined. Analysis of the pressure and atomic displacement fields in the crystalline region that surrounds the He nanobubbles reveals that the significant reduction of tungsten lattice thermal conductivity in this region is due to phonon scattering from the nanobubbles, as well as lattice deformation around the nanobubbles and formation of lattice imperfections at higher bubble pressure.

  9. Simulating Thermal Cycling and Isothermal Deformation Response of Polycrystalline NiTi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Sivom; Gaydosh, Darrell J.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Anderson, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    A microstructure-based FEM model that couples crystal plasticity, crystallographic descriptions of the B2-B19' martensitic phase transformation, and anisotropic elasticity is used to simulate thermal cycling and isothermal deformation in polycrystalline NiTi (49.9at% Ni). The model inputs include anisotropic elastic properties, polycrystalline texture, DSC data, and a subset of isothermal deformation and load-biased thermal cycling data. A key experimental trend is captured.namely, the transformation strain during thermal cycling is predicted to reach a peak with increasing bias stress, due to the onset of plasticity at larger bias stress. Plasticity induces internal stress that affects both thermal cycling and isothermal deformation responses. Affected thermal cycling features include hysteretic width, two-way shape memory effect, and evolution of texture with increasing bias stress. Affected isothermal deformation features include increased hardening during loading and retained martensite after unloading. These trends are not captured by microstructural models that lack plasticity, nor are they all captured in a robust manner by phenomenological approaches. Despite this advance in microstructural modeling, quantitative differences exist, such as underprediction of open loop strain during thermal cycling.

  10. Simulation of thermal indoor climate in buildings by using human Projected Area Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Erik

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays many new and old buildings in Denmark have large glass surfaces. This is a consequence of the technical development of windows with low U-values that has made it possible to build houses with windows from floor to ceiling in northern climates. On the other hand if one is sitting close to...... for dynamic building thermal analysis. The method is demonstrated in a newer apartment with windows from floor to ceiling and shows how impotent it is to include the radiant effect from the glass sur-faces and how it influences the indoor thermal climate significantly....... to these large windows on a cold winter day it is recognized that this can cause thermal discomfort. The calculation of this discomfort needs to be taken properly into account in the simulation of the thermal indoor climate and energy consumption of the rooms. The operative temperature can be used as a simple...... measure for thermal environ-ment. The operative temperature is a function of the air temperature, the mean radiant temperature and the relative air velocity. However, in many programs for calculation of energy consumption and thermal indoor climate the model for calculating the mean radiant temperature...

  11. Evaluation of the litcit software for thermal simulation of superficial lasers such as hair removal lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirkavand A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : In this study, we evaluate LITCIT software for its application as a thermal simulation software for superficial hair removal laser systems. Materials and Methods: Two articles were used as our references. Complete information regarding the tissues, such as optical/thermal properties and geometrical modeling and also the laser systems such as wavelength, spot size, pulse duration and fluence were extracted from these texts. Then, this information regarding the tissues and systems was entered into the LITCIT simulation software. Further, we ran the program and saved the results. Finally, we compared our results with the results in references and evaluated the. Results : Output results of the LITCIT show that they are consistent with the results of references that were calculated with a different thermal modeling. Such a small average error shows the accuracy of the software for simulation and calculating the temperature. Conclusions : This simulating software has a good ability to be used as a treatment planning software for superficial lasers. Thus, it can be used for the optimization of treatment parameters and protocols.

  12. Simulation and experimental results of optical and thermal modeling of gold nanoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazanfari, Lida; Khosroshahi, Mohammad E., E-mail: khosrom@mie.utoronto.ca

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a generalized method for optical and thermal modeling of synthesized magneto-optical nanoshells (MNSs) for biomedical applications. Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles with diameter of 9.5 ± 1.4 nm are fabricated using co-precipitation method and subsequently covered by a thin layer of gold to obtain 15.8 ± 3.5 nm MNSs. In this paper, simulations and detailed analysis are carried out for different nanoshell geometry to achieve a maximum heat power. Structural, magnetic and optical properties of MNSs are assessed using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–VIS spectrophotometer, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Magnetic saturation of synthesized magnetite nanoparticles are reduced from 46.94 to 11.98 emu/g after coating with gold. The performance of the proposed optical–thermal modeling technique is verified by simulation and experimental results. - Highlights: • Proposing a generalized method for optical and thermal modeling of nanoshells • Verification of the proposed modeling technique by simulation and experimental results • Simulations for different nanoshell geometry to achieve a maximum heat power • Synthesis and characterization of magneto-optical nanoshells.

  13. Coupling lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of thermal flows on standard lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Luo, K H; He, Y L; Gao, Y J; Tao, W Q

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for simulating thermal flows on the standard two-dimensional nine-velocity (D2Q9) lattice is developed in the framework of the double-distribution-function (DDF) approach in which the viscous heat dissipation and compression work are considered. In the model, a density distribution function is used to simulate the flow field, while a total energy distribution function is employed to simulate the temperature field. The discrete equilibrium density and total energy distribution functions are obtained from the Hermite expansions of the corresponding continuous equilibrium distribution functions. The pressure given by the equation of state of perfect gases is recovered in the macroscopic momentum and energy equations. The coupling between the momentum and energy transports makes the model applicable for general thermal flows such as non-Boussinesq flows, while the existing DDF LB models on standard lattices are usually limited to Boussinesq flows in which the temperature variation is small. Meanwhile, the simple structure and general features of the DDF LB approach are retained. The model is tested by numerical simulations of thermal Couette flow, attenuation-driven acoustic streaming, and natural convection in a square cavity with small and large temperature differences. The numerical results are found to be in good agreement with the analytical solutions and/or other numerical results reported in the literature.

  14. Effects of deformability and thermal motion of lipid membrane on electroporation: By molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Sheng; Yin, Guangyao [Bioengineering Graduate Program, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Lee, Yi-Kuen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Wong, Joseph T.Y. [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Zhang, Tong-Yi, E-mail: mezhangt@ust.hk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} MD simulations show that deformability and thermal motion of membrane affect electroporation. {yields} Stiffer membrane inhibits electroporation and makes water penetrate from both sides. {yields} Higher temperature accelerates electroporation. -- Abstract: Effects of mechanical properties and thermal motion of POPE lipid membrane on electroporation were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Among simulations in which specific atoms of lipids were artificially constrained at their equilibrium positions using a spring with force constant of 2.0 kcal/(mol A{sup 2}) in the external electric field of 1.4 kcal/(mol A e), only constraint on lateral motions of lipid tails prohibited electroporation while non-tail parts had little effects. When force constant decreased to 0.2 kcal/(mol A{sup 2}) in the position constraints on lipid tails in the external electric field of 2.0 kcal/(mol A e), water molecules began to enter the membrane. Position constraints of lipid tails allow water to penetrate from both sides of membrane. Thermal motion of lipids can induce initial defects in the hydrophobic core of membrane, which are favorable nucleation sites for electroporation. Simulations at different temperatures revealed that as the temperature increases, the time taken to the initial pore formation will decrease.

  15. Numerical simulations of the phase separation properties for the thermal aged CDSS with Phase Field Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Fei [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou 215004 (China); Wang Zhaoxi, E-mail: wangzx03@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou 215004 (China); Applied Mechanics Laboratory, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang Guodong [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou 215004 (China); School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Qu Baoping; Shi Huiji [Applied Mechanics Laboratory, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shu Guogang [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou 215004 (China); Liu Wei [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Thermal aging causes the Cr-rich phase precipitate and form clusters. > Phase field dynamic model is used for simulating the phase separation coarsening. > Damage initiated more easily in the ferrite matrix for the Cr clusters. - Abstract: Experiments and numerical simulations with Phase Field Model and Finite Element Analysis were carried out to investigate the phase separation dynamic properties and the corresponding thermal aging degradation mechanism. Experimental results from transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy show that thermal aging causes the Cr-rich phase precipitate and form clusters. A phase field dynamic model was developed with constitutive relations and empirical potential functions to investigate the phase separation dynamics in the ferrite phase. Numerical results integrated with cell dynamical system method show clearly the micro structure morphology and the phase separation coarsening with aging time. The evolution process of the phase separation was quantitatively illustrated and reproduced macroscopically. The scattering pattern becomes clearer and the corresponding radius becomes smaller along with the increasing aging time. The average characteristic length increases firstly then decreases and enters a more stable stage. With the increment of the local Cr concentration, the evolution of the phase morphology was quite different. Finite Element Analysis simulation results with the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman void model show that the damage initiated more easily in the ferrite matrix for the Cr atoms forming clusters with increasing aging time. The phenomenological simulations with Phase Field Model and Finite Element Analysis were in remarkably good agreement with experimental results and analytical considerations.

  16. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Phase II Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Bose

    2013-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, Simulator

  17. Peculiar features of modeling of thermal processes of the cutting area in the SOLIDWORKS SIMULATION system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepchin Ya.A.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Management of thermo-physical process of cutting zone by changing certain parameters of the cutting regime, tool geometry or coolant using allows to achieve a higher level of handling performance. The forecasting of thermal processes during metal cutting is characterized by the multifactor of the model and the nonlinearity of the connection between the temperature field of the cutting zone and the processing parameters. Therefore realistic modeling of these processes with regard to the maximum number of influencing factors which will minimize the time and cost of experimental studies is very important. The research investigates the use of computer-aided design SolidWorks Simulation system to analyze the thermal processes occurring in the cutting zone during finishing turning of hardened circular steel cutting blade of superhard material. While modeling, the distribution of heat generated in cut (in the zone of plastic deformation of the workpiece and on the surfaces of friction of the cutting blade with chips and the treated surface is observed by four flows: to the tool, chips, workpiece and the environment. The limiting conditions for the existence of the developed model-geometric, physical and temporal limits are defined. Simulation is performed in steady and transient modes. Control of adequacy of simulation results is made. The conclusions of the analysis of opportunities of CAD SolidWorks Simulation System for research of thermal processes the cutting zone are drawn.

  18. Modeling and Simulation of Phonon Transport at the Nanoscale for Optimum Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Rui

    Recent progress in nanostructured materials synthesis and device fabrication technology has brought the need for thermal analysis and power management to the forefront. In this thesis, we investigate the phonon transport in the nanoscale through theoretical modeling and simulation for the optimum thermal management. Due to the superior electrical and thermal properties of graphene, the thermal transport of graphene/dielectric contact is first studied to provide better a understanding of phonon interactions and heat dissipation at nanoscale graphene interfaces. Using calculations from first principles and the Landauer approach for phonon transport, we calculated the Kapitza resistance in selected multilayer graphene/dielectric heterojunctions (hexagonal BN and wurtzite SiC) and demonstrate (i) the resistance variability (˜50--700x10 -10 m2K/W) induced by vertical coupling, dimensionality, and atomistic structure of the system and (ii) the ability of understanding the intensity of the thermal transmittance in terms of the phonon distribution at the interface. As a natural extension, thermal properties in the metal/graphene (Gr) systems are analyzed by using an atomistic phonon transport model based on Landauer formalism and first-principles calculations. The specific structures under investigation include chemisorbed Ni(111)/Gr, physisorbed Cu(111)/Gr and Au(111)/Gr, as well as Pd(111)/Gr with intermediate characteristics. Calculated results illustrate a strong dependence of thermal transfer on the details of interfacial microstructures. In particular, it is shown that the chemisorbed case provides a generally smaller interfacial thermal resistance than the physisorbed one due to the stronger bonding. However, our calculation also indicates that the weakly chemisorbed interface of Pd/Gr may be an exception, with the largest thermal resistance among the considered. Further examination of the electrostatic potential and interatomic force constants reveals that the

  19. Degradation of thermal control materials under a simulated radiative space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. K.; Sridhara, N.

    2012-11-01

    A spacecraft with a passive thermal control system utilizes various thermal control materials to maintain temperatures within safe operating limits. Materials used for spacecraft applications are exposed to harsh space environments such as ultraviolet (UV) and particle (electron, proton) irradiation and atomic oxygen (AO), undergo physical damage and thermal degradation, which must be considered for spacecraft thermal design optimization and cost effectiveness. This paper describes the effect of synergistic radiation on some of the important thermal control materials to verify the assumptions of beginning-of-life (BOL) and end-of-life (EOL) properties. Studies on the degradation in the optical properties (solar absorptance and infrared emittance) of some important thermal control materials exposed to simulated radiative geostationary space environment are discussed. The current studies are purely related to the influence of radiation on the degradation of the materials; other environmental aspects (e.g., thermal cycling) are not discussed. The thermal control materials investigated herein include different kind of second-surface mirrors, white anodizing, white paints, black paints, multilayer insulation materials, varnish coated aluminized polyimide, germanium coated polyimide, polyether ether ketone (PEEK) and poly tetra fluoro ethylene (PTFE). For this purpose, a test in the constant vacuum was performed reproducing a three year radiative space environment exposure, including ultraviolet and charged particle effects on North/South panels of a geostationary three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Reflectance spectra were measured in situ in the solar range (250-2500 nm) and the corresponding solar absorptance values were calculated. The test methodology and the degradations of the materials are discussed. The most important degradations among the low solar absorptance materials were found in the white paints whereas the rigid optical solar reflectors remained quite

  20. 电子系统的热仿真及热测试研究%A Study on Thermal Simulation and Thermal Test in Electronic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾林卫

    2011-01-01

    Through introduction of thermal control technology in electronic system , analyzing the relation between reliability of electronic system and thermal simulation. The way and measures of thermal test through introducing research process of cooling module for a project are decribed in details, the function of thermal test in high heat-flux thermal control technology is highlighted. Then,the impro tance of collaborative operation for thermal simulation and thermal test by comparing results of thermal simulation and data of thennal test is explained further with an example.%通过对电子系统热控制技术的介绍,分析了电子系统的可靠性与热仿真之间的关系,阐述了热仿真的优点.详细介绍了热测试的方法和手段,突出了热测试在高热流密度热控技术中的作用,并以实际应用中的热仿真结果与热测试数据进行了比较,进一步说明了热仿真与热测试协同工作,相互验证的重要性.

  1. Simulating Physiological Response with a Passive Sensor Manikin and an Adaptive Thermal Manikin to Predict Thermal Sensation and Comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugh, John P [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chaney, Larry [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hepokoski, Mark [ThermoAnalytics Inc.; Curran, Allen [ThermoAnalytics Inc.; Burke, Richard [Measurement Technology NW; Maranville, Clay [Ford Motor Company

    2015-04-14

    Reliable assessment of occupant thermal comfort can be difficult to obtain within automotive environments, especially under transient and asymmetric heating and cooling scenarios. Evaluation of HVAC system performance in terms of comfort commonly requires human subject testing, which may involve multiple repetitions, as well as multiple test subjects. Instrumentation (typically comprised of an array of temperature sensors) is usually only sparsely applied across the human body, significantly reducing the spatial resolution of available test data. Further, since comfort is highly subjective in nature, a single test protocol can yield a wide variation in results which can only be overcome by increasing the number of test replications and subjects. In light of these difficulties, various types of manikins are finding use in automotive testing scenarios. These manikins can act as human surrogates from which local skin and core temperatures can be obtained, which are necessary for accurately predicting local and whole body thermal sensation and comfort using a physiology-based comfort model (e.g., the Berkeley Comfort Model). This paper evaluates two different types of manikins, i) an adaptive sweating thermal manikin, which is coupled with a human thermoregulation model, running in real-time, to obtain realistic skin temperatures; and, ii) a passive sensor manikin, which is used to measure boundary conditions as they would act on a human, from which skin and core temperatures can be predicted using a thermophysiological model. The simulated physiological responses and comfort obtained from both of these manikin-model coupling schemes are compared to those of a human subject within a vehicle cabin compartment transient heat-up scenario.

  2. Simulating the Thermal Response of High Explosives on Time Scales of Days to Microseconds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoh, J J; McClelland, M A

    2003-07-16

    We present an overview of computational techniques for simulating the thermal cookoff of high explosives using a multi-physics hydrodynamics code, ALE3D. Recent improvements to the code have aided our computational capability in modeling the response of energetic materials systems exposed to extreme thermal environments, such as fires. We consider an idealized model process for a confined explosive involving the transition from slow heating to rapid deflagration in which the time scale changes from days to hundreds of microseconds. The heating stage involves thermal expansion and decomposition according to an Arrhenius kinetics model while a pressure-dependent burn model is employed during the explosive phase. We describe and demonstrate the numerical strategies employed to make the transition from slow to fast dynamics.

  3. Benchmark of SIMULATE5 thermal hydraulics against the Frigg and NUPEC full bundle test experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandi, G. [Studsvik Scandpower, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States); Lindahl, S.-O. [Studsvik Scandpower AB, Vasteras (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    SIMULATE5 is Studsvik Scandpower's next generation nodal code. The core portion of the thermal hydraulic models of PWR and BWRs are treated as essentially identical, with each assembly having an active channel and a number of parallel water channels. In addition, the BWR assembly may be divided into four radial sub-assemblies. For natural circulation reactors, the BWR thermal hydraulic model is capable of modeling an entire vessel loop: core, chimney, upper plenum, standpipes, steam separators, downcomer, recirculation pumps, and lower plenum. This paper presents results of the validation of the BWR thermal hydraulic model against: (1) pressure drop data measured in the Frigg and NUPEC test facilities; (2) void fraction distribution measured in the Frigg and NUPEC loops; (3) quarter-assembly void fraction measured in the NUPEC experiments and (4) natural and forced circulation flow measurements in the Frigg loop. (author)

  4. Numerical simulations of thermal-chemical instabilities at the core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ulrich; Yuen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical simulations of thermal-chemical instabilities in the D-double-prime layer at the core-mantle boundary are presented which show that strong lateral heterogeneities in the composition and density fields can be initiated and maintained dynamically if there is continuous replenishment of material from subduced slabs coming from the upper mantle. These chemical instabilities have a tendency to migrate laterally and may help to support core-mantle boundary topography with short and long wavelengths. The thermal-chemical flows produce a relatively stagnant D-double-prime layer with strong lateral and temporal variations in basal heat flux, which gives rise to thermal core-mantle interactions influencing the geodynamo.

  5. Thermal comfort in residential buildings: Comfort values and scales for building energy simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeters, Leen; D' haeseleer, William [Division of Applied Mechanics and Energy Conversion, University of Leuven (K.U.Leuven), Celestijnenlaan 300 A, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Dear, Richard de [Division of Environmental and Life Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney (Australia); Hensen, Jan [Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Vertigo 6.18, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15

    Building Energy Simulation (BES) programmes often use conventional thermal comfort theories to make decisions, whilst recent research in the field of thermal comfort clearly shows that important effects are not incorporated. The conventional theories of thermal comfort were set up based on steady state laboratory experiments. This, however, is not representing the real situation in buildings, especially not when focusing on residential buildings. Therefore, in present analysis, recent reviews and adaptations are considered to extract acceptable temperature ranges and comfort scales. They will be defined in an algorithm, easily implementable in any BES code. The focus is on comfortable temperature levels in the room, more than on the detailed temperature distribution within that room. (author)

  6. Large eddy simulation on thermal fluid mixing in a T-junction piping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvam, P. Karthick; Kulenovic, R.; Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst fuer Kernenergie und Energiesysteme (IKE)

    2014-11-15

    High cycle thermal fatigue damage caused in piping systems is an important problem encountered in the context of nuclear safety and lifetime management of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The T-junction piping system present in the Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) is more vulnerable to thermal fatigue cracking. In this numerical study, thermal mixing of fluids at temperature difference (?T) of 117 K between the mixing fluids is analyzed. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed with conjugate heat transfer between the fluid and structure. LES is performed based on the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) test facility at University of Stuttgart. The results show an intense turbulent mixing of fluids downstream of T-junction. Amplitude of temperature fluctuations near the wall region and its corresponding frequency distribution is analyzed. LES is performed using commercial CFD software ANSYS CFX 14.0.

  7. Thermal environment in a simulated double office room with convective and radiant cooling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Rezgals, Lauris

    2017-01-01

    The thermal environment in a double office room obtained with chilled beam (CB), chilled beam with radiant panel (CBR), chilled ceiling with ceiling installed mixing ventilation (CCMV) and overhead mixing total volume ventilation (MTVV) under summer (cooling) condition was compared. Design (peak......) and usual (average) heat load from solar radiation, office equipment, lighting and occupants was simulated, respectively at 62 W/m2 and 38 W/m2 under four different workstation layouts. Air temperature, globe (operative) temperature, radiant asymmetry, air velocity and turbulent intensity were measured...... CCMV especially in the design heat load cases. With CBR, the thermal environment was found to be between CB and CCMV. MTVV generated high draught level under the tested design heat load cases. All cooling systems generated similar thermal environment in the usual heat load cases. It would...

  8. A real-time lattice simulation of the thermalization of a gluon plasma: first results

    CERN Document Server

    Attems, Maximilian; Schäfer, Christian; Wagenbach, Björn; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-01-01

    To achieve an understanding of the thermalization of a quark-gluon plasma, starting from QCD without using model assumptions, is a formidable task. We study the early stage dynamics of a relativistic heavy ion collision in the framework of real time simulations of classical Yang-Mills theory in a static box with the color glass condensate as initial condition. Our study generalizes a previous one by Fukushima and Gelis from SU(2) to the realistic case of SU(3). We calculate the chromo-electric and chromo-magnetic energy densities as well as the ratio of longitudinal and transverse pressure as a function of time as probes for thermalization. Our preliminary results on coarse lattices show the occurrence of Weibel instabilities prior to thermalization.

  9. Thermal Lattice Boltzmann Simulations for Vapor-Liquid Two-Phase Flows in Two Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yikun; Qian, Yuehong

    2011-11-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with double distribution functions is developed to simulate thermal vapor-liquid two-phase flows. In this model, the so-called mesoscopic inter-particle pseudo-potential for the single component multi-phase lattice Boltzmann model is used to simulate the fluid dynamics and the internal energy field is simulated by using a energy distribution function. Theoretical results for large-scale dynamics including the internal energy equation can be derived and numerical results for the coexistence curve of vapor-liquid systems are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. It is shown from numerical simulations that the model has the ability to mimic phase transitions, bubbly flows and slugging flows. This research is support in part by the grant of Education Ministry of China IRT0844 and the grant of Shanghai CST 11XD1402300.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations for the motion of evaporative droplets driven by thermal gradients along nanochannels

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Congmin

    2013-04-04

    For a one-component fluid on a solid substrate, a thermal singularity may occur at the contact line where the liquid-vapor interface intersects the solid surface. Physically, the liquid-vapor interface is almost isothermal at the liquid-vapor coexistence temperature in one-component fluids while the solid surface is almost isothermal for solids of high thermal conductivity. Therefore, a temperature discontinuity is formed if the two isothermal interfaces are of different temperatures and intersect at the contact line. This leads to the so-called thermal singularity. The localized hydrodynamics involving evaporation/condensation near the contact line leads to a contact angle depending on the underlying substrate temperature. This dependence has been shown to lead to the motion of liquid droplets on solid substrates with thermal gradients (Xu and Qian 2012 Phys. Rev. E 85 061603). In the present work, we carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as numerical experiments to further confirm the predictions made from our previous continuum hydrodynamic modeling and simulations, which are actually semi-quantitatively accurate down to the small length scales in the problem. Using MD simulations, we investigate the motion of evaporative droplets in one-component Lennard-Jones fluids confined in nanochannels with thermal gradients. The droplet is found to migrate in the direction of decreasing temperature of solid walls, with a migration velocity linearly proportional to the temperature gradient. This agrees with the prediction of our continuum model. We then measure the effect of droplet size on the droplet motion. It is found that the droplet mobility is inversely proportional to a dimensionless coefficient associated with the total rate of dissipation due to droplet movement. Our results show that this coefficient is of order unity and increases with the droplet size for the small droplets (∼10 nm) simulated in the present work. These findings are in semi

  11. Simulation and experimental results of optical and thermal modeling of gold nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfari, Lida; Khosroshahi, Mohammad E

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a generalized method for optical and thermal modeling of synthesized magneto-optical nanoshells (MNSs) for biomedical applications. Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles with diameter of 9.5 ± 1.4 nm are fabricated using co-precipitation method and subsequently covered by a thin layer of gold to obtain 15.8 ± 3.5 nm MNSs. In this paper, simulations and detailed analysis are carried out for different nanoshell geometry to achieve a maximum heat power. Structural, magnetic and optical properties of MNSs are assessed using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-VIS spectrophotometer, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Magnetic saturation of synthesized magnetite nanoparticles are reduced from 46.94 to 11.98 emu/g after coating with gold. The performance of the proposed optical-thermal modeling technique is verified by simulation and experimental results.

  12. The analysis of thermal comfort requirements through the simulation of an occupied building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thellier, F; Cordier, A; Monchoux, F

    1994-05-01

    Building simulation usually focuses on the study of physical indoor parameters, but we must not forget the main aim of a house: to provide comfort to the occupants. This study was undertaken in order to build a complete tool to model thermal behaviour that will enable the prediction of thermal sensations of humans in a real environment. A human thermoregulation model was added to TRNSYS, a building simulation program. For our purposes, improvements had to be made to the original physiological model, by refining the calculation of all heat exchanges with the environment and adding a representation of clothes. This paper briefly describes the program, its modifications, and compares its results with experimental ones. An example of potential use is given, which points out the usefulness of such models in seeking the best solutions to reach optimal environmental conditions for global, and specially local comfort, of building occupants.

  13. Cold gas in cluster cores: Global stability analysis and non-linear simulations of thermal instability

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, Prakriti Pal

    2015-01-01

    We perform global linear stability analysis and idealized numerical simulations in global thermal balance to understand the condensation of cold gas from hot/virial atmospheres (coronae), in particular the intracluster medium (ICM). We pay particular attention to geometry (e.g., spherical versus plane-parallel) and the nature of the gravitational potential. Global linear analysis gives a similar value for the fastest growing thermal instability modes in spherical and Cartesian geometries. Simulations and observations suggest that cooling in halos critically depends on the ratio of the cooling time to the free-fall time ($t_{cool}/t_{ff}$). Extended cold gas condenses out of the ICM only if this ratio is smaller than a threshold value close to 10. Previous works highlighted the difference between the nature of cold gas condensation in spherical and plane-parallel atmospheres; namely, cold gas condensation appeared easier in spherical atmospheres. This apparent difference due to geometry arises because the prev...

  14. Crack prediction in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings based on the simulation of residual stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. W.; Zhao, Y.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Z. Z.; Ma, J.

    2016-07-01

    Thermal barrier coatings systems (TBCs) are widely used in the field of aerospace. The durability and insulating ability of TBCs are highly dependent on the residual stresses of top coatings, thus the investigation of the residual stresses is helpful to understand the failure mechanisms of TBCs. The simulation of residual stresses evolution in electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) TBCs is described in this work. The interface morphology of TBCs subjected to cyclic heating and cooling is observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). An interface model of TBCs is established based on thermal elastic-plastic finite method. Residual stress distributions in TBCs are obtained to reflect the influence of interfacial roughness. Both experimental and simulation results show that it is feasible to predict the crack location by stress analysis, which is crucial to failure prediction.

  15. Thermodynamic Analysis, Simulation and Optimization on Energy Savings of Ideal Internal Thermally Coupled Distillation Columns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘兴高; 马龙华; 钱积新

    2000-01-01

    Internal thermally coupled distillation columns (ITCDIC) are the frontier of distillation energy saving research. In this paper, a novel energy saving model of ideal ITCDIC and a simulation algorithm are presented,upon which a series of comparative studies on energy savings with conventional distillation columns are carried out. Furthermore, we present an optimization model of ideal ITCDIC, which can be used to achieve the maximum energy saving and find the optimal design parameters directly. The binary system of benzene-toluene is adopted for the illustrative example of simulation and optimization. The results show that the maximum energy saving of ITCDIC is 52.25% (compared with energy consumption of conventional distillation under the minimum reflux ratio operation); the optimal design parameters are obtained, where the rectifying section pressure and the feed thermal condition are Pr=0.3006 MPa and q=0.5107 respectively.

  16. Study of silicon+6LiF thermal neutron detectors: GEANT4 simulations versus real data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, S. Lo; Cosentino, L.; Mazzone, A.; Bartolomei, P.; Finocchiaro, P.

    2017-09-01

    Research and development on alternative thermal neutron detection technologies and methods are nowadays needed as a possible replacement of 3He-based ones. Commercial solid state silicon detectors, coupled with neutron converter layers containing 6Li, have been proved to represent a viable solution for several applications as present in the literature. In order to better understand the detailed operation and the response and efficiency of such detectors, a series of dedicated GEANT4 simulations were performed and compared with real data collected in a few different configurations. The results show an excellent agreement between data and simulations, indicating that the behavior of the detector is fully understood.

  17. Stress induced conditioning and thermal relaxation in the simulation of quasi-static compression experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Scalerandi, M; Johnson, P A

    2003-01-01

    Local interaction simulation approach simulations of the ultrasonic wave propagation in multi-grained materials have succeeded in reproducing most of the recently observed nonclassical nonlinear effects, such as stress-strain hysteresis and discrete memory in quasi-static experiments and a downwards shift of the resonance frequency and the generation of odd harmonics at specific amplitude rates in dynamics experiments. By including a simple mechanism of thermally activated random transitions, we can predict the occurrence of experimentally observed effects, such as the conditioning and relaxation of the specimen. Experiments are also suggested for a quantitative assessment of the validity of the model.

  18. Magnetic and Thermal Contributions to Helioseismic Travel times in Simulated Sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Douglas; Felipe, Tobias; Birch, Aaron; Crouch, Ashley D.

    2016-05-01

    The interpretation of local helioseismic measurements of sunspots has long been a challenge, since waves propagating through sunspots are potentially affected by both mode conversion and changes in the thermal structure of the spots. We carry out numerical simulations of wave propagation through a variety of models which alternately isolate either the thermal or magnetic structure of the sunspot or include both of these. We find that helioseismic holography measurements made from the resulting simulated wavefields show qualitative agreement with observations of real sunspots. Using insight from ray theory, we find that travel-time shifts in the thermal (non-magnetic) sunspot model are primarily produced by changes in the wave path due to the Wilson depression rather than variations in the wave speed. This shows that inversions for the subsurface structure of sunspots must account for local changes in the density. In some ranges of horizontal phase speed and frequency there is agreement (within the noise level of the measurements) between the travel times measured in the full magnetic sunspot model and the thermal model. If this conclusion proves to be robust for a wide range of models, it suggests a path towards inversions for sunspot structure. This research has been funded by the Spanish MINECO through grant AYA2014-55078-P, by the NASA Heliophysics Division through NNX14AD42G and NNH12CF23C, and the NSF Solar Terrestrial program through AGS-1127327.

  19. Simulation and Optimization for Thermally Coupled Distillation Using Artificial Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王延敏; 姚平经

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a new approach using artificial neural network and genetic algorithm for the optimization of the thermally coupled distillation is presented. Mathematical model can be constructed with artificial neural network based on the simulation results with ASPEN PLUS. Modified genetic algorithm was used to optimize the model. With the proposed model and optimization arithmetic, mathematical model can be calculated, decision variables and target value can be reached automatically and quickly. A practical example is used to demonstrate the algorithm.

  20. Characteristics and applications of isotopes in products from organic matter in sedimentary rocksby simulated thermal experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈安定; 张文正; 徐永昌

    1995-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of carbon in the products obtained respectively from 25 sedimentary rocks at an early stage of maturation by the simulated thermogenetic hydrocarbons experiments have been determined. The fractional effect of methane carbon isotope during the thermal maturation of organic matter is observed. Based on the experimental data, the relative equations between δ13C and R0 were established and have been used for differentiation of origins of various kinds of natural gases in the Shan-Gan-Ning Basin.

  1. Studies of the Suitability of Fowlpox as Decontamination and Thermal Stability Simulant for Variola Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    a decontamination simulant. Inactivation kinetics studies showed that fowlpox behaved similarly to variola major when treated with 0.1% iodine and 5.7...benzalkonium chloride, but differed in its response to 0.05% iodine and 0.3% polyethyleneglycol nonylphenyl ether and 40% ethanol. Thermal inactivation...Another gene shows similar homology to a protein found in yeast, human, tomato and fruit fly. Secondly, the fowlpox genome contains host range genes

  2. Atomistic simulation of the thermal conductivity in amorphous SiO2 matrix/Ge nanocrystal composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuryliuk, Vasyl V.; Korotchenkov, Oleg A.

    2017-04-01

    We use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics computer simulations with the Tersoff potential aiming to provide a comprehensive picture of the thermal conductivity of amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2) matrix with embedded Ge nanocrystals (nc-Ge). The modelling predicts the a-SiO2 matrix thermal conductivity in a temperature range of 50 molecular dynamics simulations with the Tersoff potential are promising for computing the thermal conductivity of nanocomposites based on amorphous SiO2 and can be readily scaled to more complex composite structures with embedded nanoparticles, which thus help design nanocomposites with desired thermal properties.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of the structural, elastic, and thermal properties of pyrochlores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Liyuan; Li, Yuhong; Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei

    2016-04-28

    We present a comprehensive simulation study of the effect of composition on the structural, elastic and thermal properties of 25 different compounds from the pyrochlore family. We joined a repulsive potential to an existing interatomic potential to enable molecular dynamics simulations of conditions away from equilibrium. We systematically varied the chemistry of the pyrochlore by substituting different cations in the A and B sites of the A2B2O7 formula unit. The A cations varied from Lu3+ to La3+, and the B cations from Ti4+ to Ce4+. The lattice parameter increased steadily with increasing the radius of A or B cations, but the bulk modulus showed a decreasing trend with increasing cation radius. However, the specific heat capacity and thermal expansion coefficient remained almost unchanged with increasing the radii of A and B cations. It is of interest to note that Ce on the B site significantly reduces the specific heat capacity and thermal expansion coefficient, which could have implications for annealing of radiation damage in cerate pyrochlores. The present results are consistent with the experimental measurements, which validates these potentials for simulation of dynamical processes, such as radiation damage, in pyrochlores.

  4. Studies of the Suitability of Fowlpox as a Decontamination and Thermal Stability Simulant for Variola Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E. Chambers

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Variola major, the causative agent of smallpox, has been eradicated from nature. However, stocks still exist; thus, there is a need for relevant decontamination studies, preferably with nonpathogenic simulants. Previous studies have shown a similarity in response of vaccinia virus and variola major to various decontaminants and thermal inactivation. This study compared vaccinia and fowlpox viruses under similar conditions, using disinfectants and temperatures for which variola major data already existed. Most disinfectants showed similar efficacy against vaccinia and fowlpox, suggesting the utility of fowlpox as a decontamination simulant. Inactivation kinetics studies showed that fowlpox behaved similarly to variola major when treated with 0.1% iodine and 5.7% polyethyleneglycol nonylphenyl ether, 0.025% sodium hypochlorite, 0.05% sodium hypochlorite, and 0.1% cetyltrimethylammonium chloride and 0.05% benzalkonium chloride, but differed in its response to 0.05% iodine and 0.3% polyethyleneglycol nonylphenyl ether and 40% ethanol. Thermal inactivation studies demonstrated that fowlpox is a suitable thermal simulant for variola major between 40∘C and 55∘C.

  5. Direct numerical simulation methods of hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer in thermally perfect gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, WenLi; Cao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    High-temperature effects alter the physical and transport properties of air such as vibrational excitation in a thermally perfect gas, and this factor should be considered in order to compute the flow field correctly. Herein, for the thermally perfect gas, a simple method of direct numerical simulation on flat-plat boundary layer is put forward, using the equivalent specific heat ratio instead of constant specific heat ratio in the N-S equations and flux splitting form of a calorically perfect gas. The results calculated by the new method are consistent with that by solving the N-S equations of a thermally perfect gas directly. The mean flow has the similarity, and consistent to the corresponding Blasius solution, which confirms that satisfactory results can be obtained basing on the Blasius solution as the mean flow directly in stability analysis. The amplitude growth curve of small disturbance is introduced at the inlet by using direct numerical simulation, which is consistent with that obtained by linear stability theory. It verified that the equation established and the simulation method is correct.

  6. Building dynamic thermal simulation of low-order multi-dimensional heat transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高岩; 范蕊; 张群力

    2014-01-01

    Multi-dimensional heat transfers modeling is crucial for building simulations of insulated buildings, which are widely used and have multi-dimensional heat transfers characteristics. For this work, state-model-reduction techniques were used to develop a reduced low-order model of multi-dimensional heat transfers. With hot box experiment of hollow block wall, heat flow relative errors between experiment and low-order model predication were less than 8%and the largest errors were less than 3%. Also, frequency responses of five typical walls, each with different thermal masses or insulation modes, the low-order model and the complete model showed that the low-order model results agree very well in the lower excitation frequency band with deviations appearing only at high frequency. Furthermore, low-order model was used on intersection thermal bridge of a floor slab and exterior wall. Results show that errors between the two models are very small. This low-order model could be coupled with most existing simulation software for different thermal mass envelope analyses to make up for differences between the multi-dimensional and one-dimensional models, simultaneously simplifying simulation calculations.

  7. Thermal-Hydrology Simulations of Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste in a Single Deep Borehole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stein, Emily [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Freeze, Geoffrey A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of thermal-hydrology were carried out for the emplacement of spent nuclear fuel canisters and cesium and strontium capsules using the PFLOTRAN simulator. For the cesium and strontium capsules the analysis looked at disposal options such as different disposal configurations and surface aging of waste to reduce thermal effects. The simulations studied temperature and fluid flux in the vicinity of the borehole. Simulation results include temperature and vertical flux profiles around the borehole at selected depths. Of particular importance are peak temperature increases, and fluxes at the top of the disposal zone. Simulations of cesium and strontium capsule disposal predict that surface aging and/or emplacement of the waste at the top of the disposal zone reduces thermal effects and vertical fluid fluxes. Smaller waste canisters emplaced over a longer disposal zone create the smallest thermal effect and vertical fluid fluxes no matter the age of the waste or depth of emplacement.

  8. Three dimensional neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled simulation of MSR in steady state condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianjun; Wang, Chenglong [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); An, Hongzhen [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People' s Republic of China, Beijing 100082 (China); Zhang, Daling, E-mail: dlzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui; Tian, Wenxi; Wu, Yingwei [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Developed a three dimensional coupled code for MSR. • Investigated the neutron distribution and thermal-hydraulic characters of the core under steady state condition. • Analyzed the influence of inlet temperature and inlet velocity to thermal-hydraulics characteristics of the reactor. - Abstract: MSR (molten salt reactor) uses liquid molten salt as the coolant and fuel solvent, making it the only liquid reactor among the six generation IV reactor types. As a liquid reactor the physical properties of the reactor are significantly influenced by the fuel salt flow therefore conventional analysis methods applied in solid fuel reactors are not applicable for this type of reactors. The present work developed a three dimensional neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled code and applied it to investigate the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the core in steady state condition based on neutron diffusion theory and numerical heat transfer. The code consists of two group neutron diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluxes and six group balance equations for delayed neutron precursors. The temperature distribution, neutron fluxes and delayed neutron precursors distribution of the core in steady state conditions was studied, and the result analyzed when inlet temperature and velocity were changed. From simulation it was found that the inlet temperature has little influence to neutron distribution however inlet velocity affects the delayed neutron distribution in steady state condition. The results provide some valuable information in design and research of this kind of reactor.

  9. Hydraulic performance of compacted clay liners under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaeef, A A; Rayhani, M T

    2015-10-01

    Compacted clay liners (CCLs) are commonly used as hydraulic barriers in several landfill applications to isolate contaminants from the surrounding environment and minimize the escape of leachate from the landfill. Prior to waste placement in landfills, CCLs are often exposed to temperature fluctuations which can affect the hydraulic performance of the liner. Experimental research was carried out to evaluate the effects of daily thermal cycles on the hydraulic performance of CCLs under simulated landfill conditions. Hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted on different soil specimens after being exposed to various thermal and dehydration cycles. An increase in the CCL hydraulic conductivity of up to one order of magnitude was recorded after 30 thermal cycles for soils with low plasticity index (PI = 9.5%). However, medium (PI = 25%) and high (PI = 37.2%) plasticity soils did not show significant hydraulic deviation due to their self-healing potential. Overlaying the CCL with a cover layer minimized the effects of daily thermal cycles, and maintained stable hydraulic performance in the CCLs even after exposure to 60 thermal cycles. Wet-dry cycles had a significant impact on the hydraulic aspect of low plasticity CCLs. However, medium and high plasticity CCLs maintained constant hydraulic performance throughout the test intervals. The study underscores the importance of protecting the CCL from exposure to atmosphere through covering it by a layer of geomembrane or an interim soil layer.

  10. Thermal Property Simulation of Zr{sub O}2-based Nanocomposites for Inert Matrix Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, Vivek Raj [Indian Institute of Technology-Kanpur, Kalyanpur (India); Mistarihi, Qusai M.; Ryu, Ho Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Inert matrix fuel (IMF) is a promising concept to incinerate TRU without further producing plutonium from U-238 which is a main host material for current nuclear fuels containing fissile isotopes such as U-235 or Pu-239. ZrO{sub 2} is one of the suitable materials for a matrix of IMF because it has an excellent chemical stability and an irradiation resistance. However, ZrO{sub 2} has a very low thermal conductivity around 3 W/mK at 1000 .deg. C which is not beneficial for the in-reactor fuel performances, and the low thermal conductivity might result in a high fission gas release and high fuel swelling. Therefore, enhancing the thermal conductivity of ZrO{sub 2} might be very effective in improving the fuel performance of ZrO{sub 2} based IMF. Metallic wires with a high thermal conductivity can be used as reinforcement for ZrO{sub 2}. In this study, Mo wire has been selected for the modeling and characterization of ZrO{sub 2}-based nanocomposites because Mo has a high thermal conductivity approximately 138 W/mK and a relatively low neutron absorption cross section. The experimental results and computational simulations presented a good agreement in estimating the effects of the reinforcement on the thermal conductivities of Mo reinforced ZrO{sub 2} nanocomposites. It is found that one of the most contributing factors to the enhancement of the thermal conductivity of ZrO{sub 2}-based nanocomposites is the interconnection of Mo wire.

  11. Numerical Simulation Procedure for Modeling TGO Crack Propagation and TGO Growth in Thermal Barrier Coatings upon Thermal-Mechanical Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Jun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a numerical simulation procedure to model crack propagation in TGO layer and TGO growth near a surface groove in metal substrate upon multiple thermal-mechanical cycles. The material property change method is employed to model TGO formation cycle by cycle, and the creep properties for constituent materials are also incorporated. Two columns of repeated nodes are placed along the interface of the potential crack, and these nodes are bonded together as one node at a geometrical location. In terms of critical crack opening displacement criterion, onset of crack propagation in TGO layer has been determined by finite element analyses in comparison with that without predefined crack. Then, according to the results from the previous analyses, the input values for the critical failure parameters for the subsequent analyses can be decided. The robust capabilities of restart analysis in ABAQUS help to implement the overall simulation for TGO crack propagation. The comparison of the TGO final deformation profile between numerical and experimental observation shows a good agreement indicating the correctness and effectiveness of the present procedure, which can guide the prediction of the failure in TGO for the future design and optimization for TBC system.

  12. Hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) solar systems simulation with Simulink/Matlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    da Silva, R.M.; Fernandes, J.L.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this work consists in thermodynamic modeling of hybrid photovoltaic-thermal (PV/T) solar systems, pursuing a modular strategy approach provided by Simulink/Matlab. PV/T solar systems are a recently emerging solar technology that allows for the simultaneous conversion of solar energy into both electricity and heat. This type of technology present some interesting advantages over the conventional ''side-by-side'' thermal and PV solar systems, such as higher combined electrical/thermal energy outputs per unit area, and a more uniform and aesthetical pleasant roof area. Despite the fact that early research on PV/T systems can be traced back to the seventies, only recently it has gained a renewed impetus. In this work, parametric studies and annual transient simulations of PV/T systems are undertaken in Simulink/Matlab. The obtained results show an average annual solar fraction of 67%, and a global overall efficiency of 24% (i.e. 15% thermal and 9% electrical), for a typical four-person single-family residence in Lisbon, with p-Si cells, and a collector area of 6 m{sup 2}. A sensitivity analysis performed on the PV/T collector suggests that the most important variable that should be addressed to improve thermal performance is the photovoltaic (PV) module emittance. Based on those results, some additional improvements are proposed, such as the use of vacuum, or a noble gas at low-pressure, to allow for the removal of PV cells encapsulation without air oxidation and degradation, and thus reducing the PV module emittance. Preliminary results show that this option allows for an 8% increase on optical thermal efficiency, and a substantial reduction of thermal losses, suggesting the possibility of working at higher fluid temperatures. The higher working temperatures negative effect in electrical efficiency was negligible, due to compensation by improved optical properties. The simulation results are compared with experimental data obtained

  13. Atomistic simulations, mesoscopic modeling, and theoretical analysis of thermal conductivity of bundles composed of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexey N.; Salaway, Richard N.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2013-09-01

    The propensity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to self-organize into continuous networks of bundles has direct implications for thermal transport properties of CNT network materials and defines the importance of clear understanding of the mechanisms and scaling laws governing the heat transfer within the primary building blocks of the network structures—close-packed bundles of CNTs. A comprehensive study of the thermal conductivity of CNT bundles is performed with a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of heat transfer between adjacent CNTs and the intrinsic conductivity of CNTs in a bundle with a theoretical analysis that reveals the connections between the structure and thermal transport properties of CNT bundles. The results of MD simulations of heat transfer in CNT bundles consisting of up to 7 CNTs suggest that, contrary to the widespread notion of strongly reduced conductivity of CNTs in bundles, van der Waals interactions between defect-free well-aligned CNTs in a bundle have negligible effect on the intrinsic conductivity of the CNTs. The simulations of inter-tube heat conduction performed for partially overlapping parallel CNTs indicate that the conductance through the overlap region is proportional to the length of the overlap for CNTs and CNT-CNT overlaps longer than several tens of nm. Based on the predictions of the MD simulations, a mesoscopic-level model is developed and applied for theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of heat transfer in bundles consisting of CNTs with infinitely large and finite intrinsic thermal conductivities. The general scaling laws predicting the quadratic dependence of the bundle conductivity on the length of individual CNTs in the case when the thermal transport is controlled by the inter-tube conductance and the independence of the CNT length in another limiting case when the intrinsic conductivity of CNTs plays the dominant role are derived. An application of the scaling laws to bundles of

  14. Multiscale simulation of thermal disruption in resistance switching process in amorphous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, A. M.; Shumkin, G. N.; Nikishin, N. G.

    2015-09-01

    The switching of material atomic structure and electric conductivity is used in novel technologies of making memory on the base of phase change. The possibility of making memory on the base of amorphous carbon is shown in experiment [1]. Present work is directed to simulation of experimentally observed effects. Ab initio quantum calculations were used for simulation of atomic structure changes in amorphous carbon [2]. These simulations showed that the resistance change is connected with thermally induced effects. The temperature was supposed to be the function of time. In present paper we propose a new multiscale, self-consistent model which combines three levels of simulation scales and takes into account the space and time dependencies of the temperature. On the first level of quantum molecular dynamic we provide the calculations of phase change in atomic structure with space and time dependence of the temperature. Nose-Hover thermostats are used for MD simulations to reproduce space dependency of the temperature. It is shown that atomic structure is localized near graphitic layers in conducting dot. Structure parameter is used then on the next levels of the modeling. Modified Ehrenfest Molecular Dynamics is used on the second level. Switching evolution of electronic subsystem is obtained. In macroscopic scale level the heat conductivity equation for continuous media is used for calculation space-time dependence of the temperature. Joule heat source depends on structure parameter and electric conductivity profiles obtained on previous levels of modeling. Iterative procedure is self-consistently repeated combining three levels of simulation. Space localization of Joule heat source leads to the thermal disruption. Obtained results allow us to explain S-form of the Volt-Ampere characteristic observed in experiment. Simulations were performed on IBM Blue Gene/P supercomputer at Moscow State University.

  15. Study on impact properties of creep-resistant steel thermally simulated heat affected zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Radivoje M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The steam pipe line (SPL and steam line material, along with its welded joints, subject to damage that accumulates during operation in coal power plants. As a result of thermal fatigue, dilatation of SPL at an operating temperature may lead to cracks initiation at the critical zones within heat affected zone (HAZ of steam pipe line welded joints. By registration of thermal cycle during welding and subsequent HAZ simulation is possible to obtain target microstructure. For the simulation is chosen heat resisting steel, 12H1MF (designation 13CrMo44 according to DIN standard. From the viewpoint of mechanical properties, special attention is on impact toughness mostly because very small number of available references. After simulation of single run and multi run welding test on instrumented Charpy pendulum. Metallographic and fractographic analysis is also performed, on simulated 12H1MF steel from service and new, unused steel. The results and correlation between microstructure and impact toughness is discussed, too.

  16. Numerical simulation of a sheet metal extrusion process by using thermal-mechanical coupling EAS FEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The thermal-mechanical coupling finite element method (FEM) was used to simulate a non-isothermal sheet metal extrusion process. On the basis of the finite plasticity consistent with multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient, the enhanced assumed strain (EAS) FEM was applied to carry out the numerical simulation. In order to make the computation reliable and avoid hourglass mode in the EAS element under large compressive strains, an alterative form of the original enhanced deformation gradient was employed. In addition, reduced factors were used in the computation of the element local internal parameters and the enhanced part of elemental stiffness. Numerical resultsshow that the hourglass can be avoided in compression region. In the thermal phase, the boundary energy dissipation due to heat convection was taken into account. As an example, a circular steel plate protruded by cylindrical punch was simulated. The step-wise decoupled strategyis adopted to handle coupling between mechanical deformation and the temperature variation. By comparing with the experimental results, thenumerical simulation was verified.

  17. Simulating galaxy clusters -- I. Thermal and chemical properties of the intra-cluster medium

    CERN Document Server

    Romeo, A D; Portinari, L; Antonuccio-Delogu, V

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a series of N-body/hydrodynamical (TreeSPH) simulations of clusters and groups of galaxies, selected from cosmological N-body simulations within a $\\Lambda$CDM framework: these objects have been re-simulated at higher resolution to $z$=0, in order to follow also the dynamical, thermal and chemical input on to the ICM from stellar populations within galaxies. The simulations include metal dependent radiative cooling, star formation according to different IMFs, energy feedback as strong starburst-driven galactic super-winds, chemical evolution with non-instantaneous recycling of gas and heavy elements, effects of a meta-galactic UV field and thermal conduction in the ICM. In this Paper I of a series of three, we derive results, mainly at $z=0$, on the temperature and entropy profiles of the ICM, its X-ray luminosity, the cluster cold components (cold fraction as well as mass--to--light ratio) and the metal distribution between ICM and stars. In general, models with efficient super-winds, along...

  18. Thermal-hydraulic simulation of mercury target concepts for a pulsed spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.; Haines, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) is a high-power, accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The ORSNS is projected to have a 1 MW proton beam upgradable to 5 MW. About 60% of the beam power (1-5 MW, 17-83 kJ/pulse in 0.5 microsec at 60 cps) is deposited in the liquid metal (mercury) target having the dimensions of 65x30x10 cm (about 19.5 liter). Peak steady state power density is about 150 and 785 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW and 5 MW beam respectively, whereas peak pulsed power density is as high as 5.2 and 26.1 GW/m{sup 3}, respectively. The peak pulse temperature rise rate is 14 million C/s (for 5 MW beam) whereas the total pulse temperature rise is only 7 C. In addition to thermal shock and materials compatibility, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. This includes proper flow distribution, flow reversals, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles throughout the mercury volume or other concepts. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFDS-FLOW3D was used to simulate the thermal and flow distribution in three preliminary concepts of the mercury target. Very initial CFD simulation of He bubbles injection demonstrates some potential for simulating behavior of He bubbles in flowing mercury. Much study and development will be required to be able to `predict`, even in a crude way, such a complex phenomena. Future direction in both design and R&D is outlined.

  19. Simulation study on thermal effect of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; Jin, Guangyong; Yuan, Boshi

    2016-10-01

    Laser machining is one of most widely used technologies nowadays and becoming a hot industry as well. At the same time, many kinds of carbon fiber material have been used in different area, such as sports products, transportation, microelectronic industry and so on. Moreover, there is lack of the combination research on the laser interaction with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) material with simulation method. In this paper, the temperature status of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP will be simulated and discussed. Firstly, a laser thermal damage model has been built considering the heat conduction theory and thermal-elasto-plastic theory. Then using COMSOL Multiphysics software to build the geometric model and to simulate the mathematic results. Secondly, the functions of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP has been introduced. Material surface temperature increased by time during the laser irradiating time and the increasing speed is faster when the laser fluence is higher. Furthermore, the peak temperature of the center of material surface is increasing by enhanced the laser fluence when the pulse length is a constant value. In this condition, both the ablation depth and the Heat Affected Zone(HAZ) is larger when increased laser fluence. When keep the laser fluence as a constant value, the laser with shorter pulse length is more easier to make the CFRP to the vaporization material. Meanwhile, the HAZ is becoming larger when the pulse length is longer, and the thermal effect depth is as the same trend as the HAZ. As a result, when long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material, the thermal effect is the significant value to analysis the process, which is mostly effect by laser fluence and pulse length. For laser machining in different industries, the laser parameter choose should be different. The shorter pulse length laser is suitable for the laser machining which requires high accuracy, and the longer one is better for the deeper or larger

  20. Laser treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: optical, thermal, and tissue damage simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Chang, Chun-Hung; Myers, Erinn M.; Kennelly, Michael J.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) by laser thermal remodeling of subsurface tissues is studied. Light transport, heat transfer, and thermal damage simulations were performed for transvaginal and transurethral methods. Monte Carlo (MC) provided absorbed photon distributions in tissue layers (vaginal wall, endopelvic fascia, urethral wall). Optical properties (n,μa,μs,g) were assigned to each tissue at λ=1064 nm. A 5-mm-diameter laser beam and power of 5 W for 15 s was used, based on previous experiments. MC output was converted into absorbed energy, serving as input for ANSYS finite element heat transfer simulations of tissue temperatures over time. Convective heat transfer was simulated with contact cooling probe set at 0 °C. Thermal properties (κ,c,ρ) were assigned to each tissue layer. MATLAB code was used for Arrhenius integral thermal damage calculations. A temperature matrix was constructed from ANSYS output, and finite sum was incorporated to approximate Arrhenius integral calculations. Tissue damage properties (Ea,A) were used to compute Arrhenius sums. For the transvaginal approach, 37% of energy was absorbed in endopelvic fascia layer with 0.8% deposited beyond it. Peak temperature was 71°C, treatment zone was 0.8-mm-diameter, and almost all of 2.7-mm-thick vaginal wall was preserved. For transurethral approach, 18% energy was absorbed in endopelvic fascia with 0.3% deposited beyond it. Peak temperature was 80°C, treatment zone was 2.0-mm-diameter, and only 0.6 mm of 2.4-mm-thick urethral wall was preserved. A transvaginal approach is more feasible than transurethral approach for laser treatment of SUI.

  1. Integrated thermal simulation of buildings and installations; Integreret termisk simulering af bygninger og installasjoner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittchen, Kim B.; Grau, Karl; Johnsen, Kjeld

    2003-07-01

    Danish Building and Urban Research (Statens Byggeforskningsinstitut) has developed one of the world's most advanced program packages for simulation of energy- and indoor climate issues in buildings, the BSim2002. This package also includes modules for the calculation of daylight, moisture transport in constructions, contribution from integrated solar cells, visual presentation of sun and shadows and the possibility of importing CAD drawings for geometric model building. All the program modules are based on the same data model and are presented in an easily accessible Windows user interface.

  2. Thermal expansion coefficient of graphene using molecular dynamics simulation: A comparative study on potential functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Hamid; Rajabpour, Ali

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of pristine graphene sheets (GSs) using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. We validated our model with previous studies employing AIREBO potential function and repeated the same simulation with the optimized Tersoff potential function. We also discussed the differences of the results and the corresponding reasons: evaluating the negative TEC of graphene by measuring the C-C bond length and out-of-plane vibrations of the GS. We finally showed that the ripples and wrinkles are more represented over the GS during the simulation with the AIREBO potential function rather than the optimized Tersoff. Comparing the results of both potential functions; it is seen that the results obtained by AIREBO potential function are in better agreement with those reported by previous scholars.

  3. Membrane Material-Based Rigid Solar Array Design and Thermal Simulation for Stratospheric Airships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangwen Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve effective utilization of rigid solar array used in stratospheric airships here, the flexible connection design and light laminated design were introduced to rigid solar array. Based on the analysis of the design scheme, firstly, the equivalent coefficient of thermal conductivity was calculated by the theoretical formula. Subsequently, the temperature variation characteristics of the solar cell module were accurately modeled and simulated by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software. Compared to the results of test samples, the solar cell module described here guaranteed effective output as well as good heat insulating ability, effectively improving the feasibility of the stratospheric airship design. In addition, the simulation model can effectively simulate the temperature variation characteristics of the solar cell, which, therefore, provides technical support for the engineering application.

  4. The application of simulation modeling to the cost and performance ranking of solar thermal power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, L. S.; Revere, W. R.; Selcuk, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    A computer simulation code was employed to evaluate several generic types of solar power systems (up to 10 MWe). Details of the simulation methodology, and the solar plant concepts are given along with cost and performance results. The Solar Energy Simulation computer code (SESII) was used, which optimizes the size of the collector field and energy storage subsystem for given engine-generator and energy-transport characteristics. Nine plant types were examined which employed combinations of different technology options, such as: distributed or central receivers with one- or two-axis tracking or no tracking; point- or line-focusing concentrator; central or distributed power conversion; Rankin, Brayton, or Stirling thermodynamic cycles; and thermal or electrical storage. Optimal cost curves were plotted as a function of levelized busbar energy cost and annualized plant capacity. Point-focusing distributed receiver systems were found to be most efficient (17-26 percent).

  5. Impact of substrate and thermal boundary resistance on the performance of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs analyzed by means of electro-thermal Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, S.; Íñiguez-de-la-Torre, I.; Mateos, J.; González, T.; Pérez, S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present results from the simulations of a submicrometer AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) by using an in-house electro-thermal Monte Carlo simulator. We study the temperature distribution and the influence of heating on the transfer characteristics and the transconductance when the device is grown on different substrates (sapphire, silicon, silicon carbide and diamond). The effect of the inclusion of a thermal boundary resistance (TBR) is also investigated. It is found that, as expected, HEMTs fabricated on substrates with high thermal conductivities (diamond) exhibit lower temperatures, but the difference between hot-spot and average temperatures is higher. In addition, devices fabricated on substrates with higher thermal conductivities are more sensitive to the value of the TBR because the temperature discontinuity is greater in the TBR layer.

  6. Thermal stabilization of dihydrofolate reductase using monte carlo unfolding simulations and its functional consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Tian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Design of proteins with desired thermal properties is important for scientific and biotechnological applications. Here we developed a theoretical approach to predict the effect of mutations on protein stability from non-equilibrium unfolding simulations. We establish a relative measure based on apparent simulated melting temperatures that is independent of simulation length and, under certain assumptions, proportional to equilibrium stability, and we justify this theoretical development with extensive simulations and experimental data. Using our new method based on all-atom Monte-Carlo unfolding simulations, we carried out a saturating mutagenesis of Dihydrofolate Reductase (DHFR, a key target of antibiotics and chemotherapeutic drugs. The method predicted more than 500 stabilizing mutations, several of which were selected for detailed computational and experimental analysis. We find a highly significant correlation of r=0.65-0.68 between predicted and experimentally determined melting temperatures and unfolding denaturant concentrations for WT DHFR and 42 mutants. The correlation between energy of the native state and experimental denaturation temperature was much weaker, indicating the important role of entropy in protein stability. The most stabilizing point mutation was D27F, which is located in the active site of the protein, rendering it inactive. However for the rest of mutations outside of the active site we observed a weak yet statistically significant positive correlation between thermal stability and catalytic activity indicating the lack of a stability-activity tradeoff for DHFR. By combining stabilizing mutations predicted by our method, we created a highly stable catalytically active E. coli DHFR mutant with measured denaturation temperature 7.2°C higher than WT. Prediction results for DHFR and several other proteins indicate that computational approaches based on unfolding simulations are useful as a general technique to discover

  7. Cubic Spline Collocation Method for the Simulation of Turbulent Thermal Convection in Compressible Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Victor Manuel [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A collocation method using cubic splines is developed and applied to simulate steady and time-dependent, including turbulent, thermally convecting flows for two-dimensional compressible fluids. The state variables and the fluxes of the conserved quantities are approximated by cubic splines in both space direction. This method is shown to be numerically conservative and to have a local truncation error proportional to the fourth power of the grid spacing. A ''dual-staggered'' Cartesian grid, where energy and momentum are updated on one grid and mass density on the other, is used to discretize the flux form of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Each grid-line is staggered so that the fluxes, in each direction, are calculated at the grid midpoints. This numerical method is validated by simulating thermally convecting flows, from steady to turbulent, reproducing known results. Once validated, the method is used to investigate many aspects of thermal convection with high numerical accuracy. Simulations demonstrate that multiple steady solutions can coexist at the same Rayleigh number for compressible convection. As a system is driven further from equilibrium, a drop in the time-averaged dimensionless heat flux (and the dimensionless internal entropy production rate) occurs at the transition from laminar-periodic to chaotic flow. This observation is consistent with experiments of real convecting fluids. Near this transition, both harmonic and chaotic solutions may exist for the same Rayleigh number. The chaotic flow loses phase-space information at a greater rate, while the periodic flow transports heat (produces entropy) more effectively. A linear sum of the dimensionless forms of these rates connects the two flow morphologies over the entire range for which they coexist. For simulations of systems with higher Rayleigh numbers, a scaling relation exists relating the dimensionless heat flux to the two-seventh's power of the Rayleigh number

  8. Cubic Spline Collocation Method for the Simulation of Turbulent Thermal Convection in Compressible Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, V M

    2005-01-12

    A collocation method using cubic splines is developed and applied to simulate steady and time-dependent, including turbulent, thermally convecting flows for two-dimensional compressible fluids. The state variables and the fluxes of the conserved quantities are approximated by cubic splines in both space direction. This method is shown to be numerically conservative and to have a local truncation error proportional to the fourth power of the grid spacing. A ''dual-staggered'' Cartesian grid, where energy and momentum are updated on one grid and mass density on the other, is used to discretize the flux form of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Each grid-line is staggered so that the fluxes, in each direction, are calculated at the grid midpoints. This numerical method is validated by simulating thermally convecting flows, from steady to turbulent, reproducing known results. Once validated, the method is used to investigate many aspects of thermal convection with high numerical accuracy. Simulations demonstrate that multiple steady solutions can coexist at the same Rayleigh number for compressible convection. As a system is driven further from equilibrium, a drop in the time-averaged dimensionless heat flux (and the dimensionless internal entropy production rate) occurs at the transition from laminar-periodic to chaotic flow. This observation is consistent with experiments of real convecting fluids. Near this transition, both harmonic and chaotic solutions may exist for the same Rayleigh number. The chaotic flow loses phase-space information at a greater rate, while the periodic flow transports heat (produces entropy) more effectively. A linear sum of the dimensionless forms of these rates connects the two flow morphologies over the entire range for which they coexist. For simulations of systems with higher Rayleigh numbers, a scaling relation exists relating the dimensionless heat flux to the two-seventh's power of the Rayleigh number

  9. Atomistic Simulations of Mass and Thermal Transport in Oxide Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du, Shiyu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nerikar, Pankaj [IBM; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory; Millet, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory; Biner, Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory

    2012-06-04

    In this talk we discuss simulations of the mass and thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. Redistribution of fission gases such as Xe is closely coupled to nuclear fuel performance. Most fission gases have low solubility in the fuel matrix, specifically the insolubility is most pronounced for large fission gas atoms such as Xe, and as a result there is a significant driving force for segregation of gas atoms to grain boundaries or dislocations and subsequently for nucleation of gas bubbles at these sinks. The first step of the fission gas redistribution is diffusion of individual gas atoms through the fuel matrix to existing sinks, which is governed by the activation energy for bulk diffusion. Fission gas bubbles are then formed by either separate nucleation events or by filling voids that were nucleated at a prior stage; in both cases their formation and latter growth is coupled to vacancy dynamics and thus linked to the production of vacancies via irradiation or thermal events. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior (diffusion mechanisms) in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using density functional theory (DFT) techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism, though other alternatives may exist in high irradiation fields. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next a continuum transport model for Xe and U is formulated based on the diffusion mechanisms established from DFT. After combining this model with descriptions of the interaction between Xe and grain

  10. Thermal Hydraulic Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations and Experimental Investigation of Deformed Fuel Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mays, Brian [AREVA Federal Services, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Jackson, R. Brian [TerraPower, Bellevue, WA (United States)

    2017-03-08

    The project, Toward a Longer Life Core: Thermal Hydraulic CFD Simulations and Experimental Investigation of Deformed Fuel Assemblies, DOE Project code DE-NE0008321, was a verification and validation project for flow and heat transfer through wire wrapped simulated liquid metal fuel assemblies that included both experiments and computational fluid dynamics simulations of those experiments. This project was a two year collaboration between AREVA, TerraPower, Argonne National Laboratory and Texas A&M University. Experiments were performed by AREVA and Texas A&M University. Numerical simulations of these experiments were performed by TerraPower and Argonne National Lab. Project management was performed by AREVA Federal Services. The first of a kind project resulted in the production of both local point temperature measurements and local flow mixing experiment data paired with numerical simulation benchmarking of the experiments. The project experiments included the largest wire-wrapped pin assembly Mass Index of Refraction (MIR) experiment in the world, the first known wire-wrapped assembly experiment with deformed duct geometries and the largest numerical simulations ever produced for wire-wrapped bundles.

  11. A Thermal Simulation Method for Solidification Process of Steel Slab in Continuous Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Honggang; Chen, Xiangru; Han, Qingyou; Han, Ke; Zhai, Qijie

    2016-10-01

    Eighty years after the invention of continuous cast of steels, reproducibility from few mm3 samples in the laboratory to m3 product in plants is still a challenge. We have engineered a thermal simulation method to simulate the continuous casting process. The temperature gradient ( G L ) and dendritic growth rate ( v) of the slab were reproduced by controlling temperature and cooling intensity at hot and chill end, respectively, in our simulation samples. To verify that our samples can simulate the cast slab in continuous casting process, the heat transfer, solidification structure, and macrosegregation of the simulating sample were compared to those of a much larger continuous casting slab. The morphology of solid/liquid interface, solidified shell thickness, and dendritic growth rate were also investigated by in situ quenching the solidifying sample. Shell thickness ( δ) determined by our quenching experiment was related to solidification time ( τ) by equation: δ = 4.27 × τ 0.38. The results indicated that our method closely simulated the solidification process of continuous casting.

  12. Numerical simulation of CTE mismatch and thermal-structural stresses in the design of interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Geoffrey John M.

    With the ever-increasing chip complexity, interconnects have to be designed to meet the new challenges. Advances in optical lithography have made chip feature sizes available today at 70 nm dimensions. With advances in Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography, X-ray Lithography, and Ion Projection Lithography it is expected that the line width will further decrease to 20 nm or less. With the decrease in feature size, the number of active devices on the chip increases. With higher levels of circuit integration, the challenge is to dissipate the increased heat flux from the chip surface area. Thermal management considerations include coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) matching to prevent failure between the chip and the board. This in turn calls for improved system performance and reliability of the electronic structural systems. Experience has shown that in most electronic systems, failures are mostly due to CTE mismatch between the chip, board, and the solder joint (solder interconnect). The resulting high thermal-structural stress and strain due to CTE mismatch produces cracks in the solder joints with eventual failure of the electronic component. In order to reduce the thermal stress between the chip, board, and the solder joint, this dissertation examines the effect of inserting wire bundle (wire interconnect) between the chip and the board. The flexibility of the wires or fibers would reduce the stress at the rigid joints. Numerical simulations of two, and three-dimensional models of the solder and wire interconnects are examined. The numerical simulation is linear in nature and is based on linear isotropic material properties. The effect of different wire material properties is examined. The effect of varying the wire diameter is studied by changing the wire diameter. A major cause of electronic equipment failure is due to fatigue failure caused by thermal cycling, and vibrations. A two-dimensional modal and harmonic analysis was simulated for the wire interconnect

  13. MHD simulation of the formation of clumps and filaments in quiescent diffuse clouds by thermal instability

    CERN Document Server

    Wareing, C J; Falle, S A E G; Van Loo, S

    2016-01-01

    We have used the AMR hydrodynamic code, MG, to perform 3D MHD simulations of the formation of clumpy and filamentary structure in a thermally unstable medium. A stationary thermally unstable spherical diffuse cloud with uniform density in pressure equilibrium with low density surroundings was seeded with random density variations and allowed to evolve. A range of magnetic field strengths threading the cloud have been explored, from beta=0.1 to beta=1.0 to the zero magnetic field case (beta=infinity), where beta is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. Once the density inhomogeneities had developed to the point where gravity started to become important, self-gravity was introduced to the simulation. With no magnetic field, clumps form within the cloud with aspect ratios of around unity, whereas in the presence of a relatively strong field (beta=0.1) these become filaments, then evolve into interconnected corrugated sheets that are predominantly perpendicular to the magnetic field. With magnetic a...

  14. Thermal shock effect on aluminum leaching in a forest burnt soil: a laboratory simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancelo-González, Javier; Prieto, Diego M.; Díaz-Fierros, Francisco; Barral, María Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The main of this study is to analyze the influence of fire severity on soil aluminum (Al) leaching. For this purpose, unaltered blocks of forest soils were subjected to thermal shock and subsequently to rain simulations. The thermal shock was performed in topsoil (1cm) by the action of infrared lamps, which allowed to reproduce similar temperatures to those reached in moderate and high severity fires (220 and 430°C, respectively). The rain simulations were carried out in two different stages with duration of two hours and intensity of 150 mm/h. This high rain intensity was employed to obtain the maximum leaching. The results showed that the Al leaching was increased with increasing fire severity. Visual Minteq analysis (Gustafsson, 2000) let to determine that Al was primarily mobilized bound to dissolved organic matter, so in complexed form as joined by weak electrostatic bonds. The most intensive thermal shock, in which the highest alkaline conditions occurred, exhibited an appreciable Al mobilization in inorganic form.

  15. Design, simulation and optimization of a solar dish collector with spiral-coil thermal absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Saša R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficient conversion of solar radiation into heat at high temperature levels requires the use of concentrating solar collectors. The goal of this paper is to present the optical and the thermal analysis of a parabolic dish concentrator with a spiral coil receiver. The parabolic dish reflector consists of 11 curvilinear trapezoidal reflective petals constructed by PMMA with silvered mirror layer and has a diameter of 3.8 m, while its focal distance is 2.26m. This collector is designed with commercial software SolidWorks and simulated, optically and thermally in its Flow Simulation Studio. The optical analysis proved that the ideal position of the absorber is at 2.1m from the reflector in order to maximize the optical efficiency and to create a relative uniform heat flux over the absorber. In thermal part of the analysis, the energetic efficiency was calculated approximately 65%, while the exergetic efficiency is varied from 4% to 15% according to the water inlet temperature. Moreover, other important parameters as the heat flux and temperature distribution over the absorber are presented. The pressure drop of the absorber coil is calculated at 0.07bar, an acceptable value.

  16. The effect of ligands on the thermal stability of sulfotransferases: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pu-pu; Zhao, Li; Long, Shi-yang; Tian, Pu

    2015-04-01

    Human cytosolic sulfotransferases (hSULTs) are important phase II metabolic enzymes. They catalyze transfer of the sulfuryl-group (-SO3) from 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) to the hydroxyl or primary amine moieties of a large number of endogenous and xenobiotic substrates. Broad selectivity and specificity of binding and activity within the sulfortransferases family could be detected by thermal denaturation assays, which have been made more and more suitable for high throughput screening based on recent technical advances. Here molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the effect of the cofactor (PAPS) and substrate (LCA) on the thermal stability of the enzyme. It was found that the apo-enzyme unfolded fastest upon heating. The holo-enzyme with bound substrate LCA unfolded slowest. This thermo-denaturation order is consistent with that observed in experiments. Further it was found that the cofactor and substrate will pronouncedly increase the thermal stability of the active pocket regions that interact directly with the ligands. In addition, cofactor and substrate show noticeable synergy effect on the thermal stability of the enzyme.

  17. Design of a new IRSN thermal neutron field facility using Monte-Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, V

    2007-01-01

    The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety owns a graphite-moderated AmBe neutron field facility, SIGMA, that has to be reconstructed. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to study the design of a new thermal facility based on IRSN existing facilities. Studies related to an update version of SIGMA concerned the enhancement of the thermal neutrons contribution to the dose equivalent. Calculations were mainly performed for a (252)Cf neutron source distribution located at the centre of a graphite moderator block. A quasi-pure thermal neutron field was obtained with a 2.4 x 2.4 x 2.4-m(3) block of graphite. A second acceptable neutron field was obtained with 3.3-MeV mono-energetic neutrons created by a 400-kV accelerator coupled to a graphite assembly of 1.5 x 1.5 x 1.5 m(3). The characteristics of the studied thermal fields with the requirement for a reference calibration field are compared, and the advantages and drawbacks of the different producing methods are discussed.

  18. A new experimental setup for making thermal emission measurements in a simulated lunar environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, I. R.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Bowles, N. E.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Temple, J.; Calcutt, S. B.

    2012-12-01

    One of the key problems in determining lunar surface composition for thermal-infrared measurements is the lack of comparable laboratory-measured spectra. As the surface is typically composed of fine-grained particulates, the lunar environment induces a thermal gradient within the near sub-surface, altering the emission spectra: this environment must therefore be simulated in the laboratory, considerably increasing the complexity of the measurement. Previous measurements have created this thermal gradient by either heating the cup in which the sample sits or by illuminating the sample using a solar-like source. This is the first setup able to measure in both configurations, allowing direct comparisons to be made between the two. Also, measurements across a wider spectral range and at a much higher spectral resolution can be acquired using this new setup. These are required to support new measurements made by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer, the first multi-spectral thermal-infrared instrument to orbit the Moon. Results from the two different heating methods are presented, with measurements of a fine-grained quartz sample compared to previous similar measurements, plus measurements of a common lunar highland material, anorthite. The results show that quartz gives the same results for both methods of heating, as predicted by previous studies, though the anorthite spectra are different. The new calibration pipeline required to convert the raw data into emissivity spectra is described also.

  19. Modeling and simulation of 3D thermal stresses of large-sized castings in solidification processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    When heavy machines and large scaled receiver system of communication equipment are manufactured, it always needs to produce large- sized steel castings, aluminum castings and etc. Some defects of hot cracking by thermal stress often appear during solidification process as these castings are produced, which results in failure of castings.Therefore predicting the effects of technological parameters for production of castings on the thermal stress during solidification process becomes an important means. In this paper, the mathematical models have been established and numerical calculation of temperature fields by using finite difference method (FDM) and then thermal stress fields by using finite element method (FEM) during solidification process of castings have been carried out. The technological parameters of production have been optimized by the results of calculation and the defects of hot cracking have been eliminated. Modeling and simulation of 3D thermal stress during solidification processes of large-sized castings provided a scientific basis, which promoted further development of advanced manufacturing technique.

  20. Prediction of thermal behavior and trajectory of stratospheric airships during ascent based on simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xixiang

    2016-06-01

    For designers, operators and users, the ability to accurately predict thermal behavior and trajectory of stratospheric airships is very important. Thermal models and dynamic models of stratospheric airships during ascent are developed, including solar radiation, infrared radiation, convection heat transfer and gas expulsion equation. Based on the model, performance parameters of a stratospheric airship during ascent are obtained, including film temperature, helium gas temperature, air temperature, pressure differential, altitude and ascent velocity, changing regulation for these parameters are discussed, and influence of initial helium gas volume and film radiation properties on thermal behavior is analyzed. Simulation results show that, (1) stratospheric airships experience supercooling during ascent, the maximum value is about 30 K, supercooling causes loss of net buoyancy, and affects ascent velocity and trajectory in the end, (2) stratospheric airships experience superheating at the floating altitude, and the maximum value is about 51 K, (3) initial volume ratio of helium gas and the solar radiation absorptivity of film have important effect on thermal behavior and trajectory during ascent, the larger the initial volume ratio is, the faster the ascent velocity will be, and the bigger the solar radiation absorptivity of film is, the smaller the temperature differential between helium gas and outside atmosphere will be.

  1. Numerical simulation study on thermal response of PBX 9501 to low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jianfeng; Zhou, Tingting; Zhang, Yangeng; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    Impact sensitivity of solid high explosives, an important index in evaluating the safety and performance of explosives, is an important concern in handling, storage, and shipping procedures. It is a great threat for either bare dynamite or shell charge when subjected to low velocity impact involved in traffic accidents or charge piece drops. The Steven test is an effective tool to study the relative sensitivity of various explosives. In this paper, we built the numerical simulation method involving mechanical, thermo and chemical properties of Steven test based on the thermo-mechanical coupled material model. In the model, the stress-strain relationship is described by dynamic plasticity model, the thermal effect of the explosive induced by impact is depicted by isotropic thermal material model, the chemical reaction of explosives is described by Arrhenius reaction rate law, and the effects of heating and melting on mechanical properties and thermal properties of materials are also taken into account. Specific to the standard Steven test, the thermal and mechanical response rules of PBX 9501 at various impact velocities were numerically analyzed, and the threshold velocity of explosive initiation was obtained, which is in good agreement with experimental results. In addition, the effect of confine condition of test device to the threshold velocity was explored.

  2. Steady Thermal Field Simulation of Forced Air-cooled Column-type Air-core Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Qiu; LI Zhenbiao; YIN Xiaogen; YUAN Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Modeling the steady thermal field of the column-type air-core reactor,and further analyzing its distribution regularity,will help optimizing reactor design as well as improving its quality.The operation mechanism and inner insulation structure of a novel current limiting column-type air-core reactor is introduced in this paper.The finite element model of five encapsulation forced air-cooled column type air-core reactor is constructed using Fluent.Most importantly,this paper present a new method that,the steady thermal field of reactor working under forced air-cooled condition is simulated without arbitrarily defining the convection heat transfer coefficient for the initial condition; The result of the thermal field distribution shows that,the maximum steady temperature rise of forced air-cooled columntype air-core reactor happens approximately 5% to its top.The law of temperature distribution indicates:In the 1/3part of the reactor to its bottom,the temperature will rise rapidly to the increasing of height,yet the gradient rate is gradually decreasing; In the 5 % part of the reactor to its top,the temperature will drop rapidly to the increasing of height; In the part between,the temperature will rise slowly to the increasing of height.The conclusion draws that more thermal withstand capacity should be considered at the 5 % part of the reactor to its top to achieve optimal design solution.

  3. Simulation and optimisation of a position sensitive scintillation detector with wavelength shifting fibers for thermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzkamp, Matthias; Engels, Ralf; Kemmerling, Guenter [ZEA-2, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Brueckel, Thomas [JCNS, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Stahl, Achim [III. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Waasen, Stefan van [ZEA-2, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Faculty of Engineering, University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In neutron scattering experiments it is important to have position sensitive large scale detectors for thermal neutrons. A detector based on a neutron scintillator with wave length shifting fibers is a new kind of such a detector. We present the simulation of the detector based on the microscopic structure of the scintillation material of the mentioned detector. It consists of a converter and a scintillation powder bound in a matrix. The converter in our case is lithium fluoride with enriched lithium 6, to convert thermal neutrons into high energetic alpha and triton particles. The scintillation material is silver doped zinc sulfide. We show that pulse height spectra obtained by these scintillators can be be explained by the simple model of randomly distributed spheres of zinc sulfide and lithium fluoride. With this model, it is possible to optimise the mass ratio of zinc sulfide to lithium fluoride with respect to detection efficiency and/or energy deposition in zinc sulfide.

  4. Solar Simulation for the CREST Preflight Thermal-Vacuum Test at B-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemke, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    In June 2011, the multi-university sponsored Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope (CREST) has undergone thermal-vacuum qualification testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, Sandusky, Ohio. The testing was performed in the B- 2 Space Propulsion Facility vacuum chamber. The CREST was later flown over the Antarctic region as the payload of a stratospheric balloon. Solar simulation was provided by a system of planar infrared lamp arrays specifically designed for CREST. The lamp arrays, in conjunction with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled cryoshroud, achieved the required thermal conditions for the qualification tests. This report focuses on the design and analysis of the planar arrays based on first principles. Computational spreadsheets are included in the report.

  5. 3D modeling and simulation of the thermal performance of solid cyclotron targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M.A.; Sader, J.A.; McQuarrie, S.A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, AB (Canada); McQuarrie, S.A. [Alberta Univ., Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Div. of Oncologic Imaging, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    COMSOL Multiphysics was used to model and simulate the thermal performance of solid targets irradiated with charged particles. Parametric solutions for beam power densities in the range from 1.5 10{sup 5} to 1.5 10{sup 6} W/m{sup 2} and cooling water flow velocities from 0.2 to 4.0 m/s were obtained for different plate materials. Results showed that materials with a high thermal conductivity to heat capacity ratio behave better in cooling dynamic systems requiring fast dissipation of heat. Results also showed that water flow rates greater than 2.6 L/min do not noticeably improve the heat dissipation of solid targets irradiated with charged particles. (authors)

  6. Double MRT Thermal Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulating Natural Convection of Low Prandtl Number Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zheng; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this paper are testing an efficiency algorithm based on LBM and using it to analyze two-dimensional natural convection with low Prandtl number. Steady state or oscillatory results are obtained using double multiple-relaxation-time thermal lattice Boltzmann method. The velocity and temperature fields are solved using D2Q9 and D2Q5 models, respectively. With different Rayleigh number, the tested natural convection can either achieve to steady state or oscillatory. With fixed Rayleigh number, lower Prandtl number leads to a weaker convection effect, longer oscillation period and higher oscillation amplitude for the cases reaching oscillatory solutions. At fixed Prandtl number, higher Rayleigh number leads to a more notable convection effect and longer oscillation period. Double multiple-relaxation-time thermal lattice Boltzmann method is applied to simulate the low Prandtl number fluid natural convection. Rayleigh number and Prandtl number effects are also investigated when the natural convection...

  7. Thermal hydraulic simulations, error estimation and parameter sensitivity studies in Drekar::CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Thomas Michael; Shadid, John N; Pawlowski, Roger P; Cyr, Eric C; Wildey, Timothy Michael

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work directed towards completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) CFD Level 3 Milestone THM.CFD.P7.05 for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Nuclear Hub effort. The focus of this milestone was to demonstrate the thermal hydraulics and adjoint based error estimation and parameter sensitivity capabilities in the CFD code called Drekar::CFD. This milestone builds upon the capabilities demonstrated in three earlier milestones; THM.CFD.P4.02 [12], completed March, 31, 2012, THM.CFD.P5.01 [15] completed June 30, 2012 and THM.CFD.P5.01 [11] completed on October 31, 2012.

  8. Thermal Comfort in Simulated Office Environment with Four Convective and Radiant Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Mustakallio, Panu; Kolencíková, Sona

    2013-01-01

    with overhead mixing ventilation (MVRC). Whole body thermal sensation (TS) and whole body TS acceptability under the four systems in a simulated office room for one hour exposure were collected. The simulated two-man office (4.12 x 4.20 x 2.89 m, L x W x H) was kept at 26 oC room air temperature. Moderate heat...... load of 64 W/m2 was generated by simulated solar heat load, 2 laptops and 2 occupants, giving in total 1104 W. The supplied outdoor air temperature was kept at 16 oC. The supply air flow rate for CB, CBR and CCMV was set to 26 L/s (category II low-polluting building, EN 15251-2007). For MVRC supply...... to “neutral” compared to male, whose votes were closer to the “slightly warm” thermal sensation. The whole body TS acceptability was rated close to ''clearly acceptable'' (EN 15251-2007) and was independent of subject's gender for all tested systems....

  9. Effects of deformability and thermal motion of lipid membrane on electroporation: By molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Effects of mechanical properties and thermal motion of POPE lipid membrane on electroporation were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Among simulations in which specific atoms of lipids were artificially constrained at their equilibrium positions using a spring with force constant of 2.0kcal/(molÅ2) in the external electric field of 1.4kcal/(molÅe), only constraint on lateral motions of lipid tails prohibited electroporation while non-tail parts had little effects. When force constant decreased to 0.2kcal/(molÅ2) in the position constraints on lipid tails in the external electric field of 2.0kcal/(molÅe), water molecules began to enter the membrane. Position constraints of lipid tails allow water to penetrate from both sides of membrane. Thermal motion of lipids can induce initial defects in the hydrophobic core of membrane, which are favorable nucleation sites for electroporation. Simulations at different temperatures revealed that as the temperature increases, the time taken to the initial pore formation will decrease. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  10. CFD SIMULATION FOR DEMILITARIZATION OF RDX IN A ROTARY KILN BY THERMAL DECOMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SI H. LEE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Demilitarization requires the recovery and disposal of obsolete ammunition and explosives. Since open burning/detonation of hazardous waste has caused serious environmental and safety problems, thermal decomposition has emerged as one of the most feasible methods. RDX is widely used as a military explosive due to its high melting temperature and detonation power. In this work, the feasible conditions under which explosives can be safely incinerated have been investigated via a rotary kiln simulation. To solve this problem, phase change along with the reactions of RDX has been incisively analyzed. A global reaction mechanism consisting of condensed phase and gas phase reactions are used in Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation. User Defined Functions in FLUENT is utilized in this study to inculcate the reactions and phase change into the simulation. The results divulge the effect of temperature and the varying amounts of gas produced in the rotary kiln during the thermal decomposition of RDX. The result leads to the prospect of demilitarizing waste explosives to avoid the possibility of detonation.

  11. Development of the Real-time Core and Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Kori-1 Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Hyuk; Lee, Myeong Soo; Hwang, Do Hyun; Byon, Soo Jin [KEPRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The operation of the Kori-Unit 1 (1723.5MWt) is expanded to additional 10 years with upgrades of the Main Control Room (MCR). Therefore, the revision of the procedures, performance tests and works related with the exchange of the Main Control Board (MCB) are currently carried out. And as a part of it, the fullscope simulator for the Kori-1 is being developed for the purpose of the pre-operation and emergence response capability for the operators. The purpose of this paper is to report on the performance of the developed neutronics and thermal-hydraulic (TH) models of Kori Unit 1 simulator. The neutronics model is based on the NESTLE code and TH model based on the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulics analysis code which was funded as FY-93 LDRD Project 7201 and is running on the commercial simulator environment tool (the 3KeyMaster{sup TM} of the WSC). As some examples for the verification of the developed neutronics and TH models, some figures are provided. The outputs of the developed neutronics and TH models are in accord with the Nuclear Design Report (NDR) and Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) of the reference plant

  12. Advanced Coupled Simulation of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage Systems and Above Ground Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Bastian; Rühaak, Wolfram; Schulte, Daniel O.; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storage in borehole heat exchanger arrays is a promising technology to reduce primary energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. These systems usually consist of several subsystems like the heat source (e.g. solarthermics or a combined heat and power plant), the heat consumer (e.g. a heating system), diurnal storages (i.e. water tanks), the borehole thermal energy storage, additional heat sources for peak load coverage (e.g. a heat pump or a gas boiler) and the distribution network. For the design of an integrated system, numerical simulations of all subsystems are imperative. A separate simulation of the borehole energy storage is well-established but represents a simplification. In reality, the subsystems interact with each other. The fluid temperatures of the heat generation system, the heating system and the underground storage are interdependent and affect the performance of each subsystem. To take into account these interdependencies, we coupled a software for the simulation of the above ground facilities with a finite element software for the modeling of the heat flow in the subsurface and the borehole heat exchangers. This allows for a more realistic view on the entire system. Consequently, a finer adjustment of the system components and a more precise prognosis of the system's performance can be ensured.

  13. The relevance of thermal hydraulics pipeline simulation as a regulatory support tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Patricia Mannarino; Santos, Almir Beserra dos [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The capacity definition of a pipeline, along with its allocation, is very relevant to assure market transparency, nondiscriminatory access, security of supply, and also to give consistent signs for expansion needs. Nevertheless, the capacity definition is a controversial issue, and may widely vary depending on the technical and commercial assumptions made. To calculate a pipeline's nominal capacity, there are a variety of simulation tools, which include steady state, transient and on-line computer programs. It is desirable that the simulation tool is robust enough to predict the pipeline's capacity under different conditions. There are many variables that impact the flow through a pipeline, like gas characteristics, pipe and environmental variables. Designing a thermal model is a time-consuming task that requests understanding the level of detail need, in order to achieve success in its application. This article discusses the capacity definition, its role and calculation guidelines, describes ANP's experience with capacity calculation and further challenges according to the new regulation, and debates the role of thermal hydraulic simulation as a regulatory tool. (author)

  14. Design Considerations for the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, Bill; Kirk, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Rockets or NTR's have been suggested as a propulsion system option for vehicles traveling to the moon or Mars. These engines are capable of providing high thrust at specific impulses at least twice that of today s best chemical engines. The performance constraints on these engines are mainly the result of temperature limitations on the fuel coupled with a limited ability to withstand chemical attack by the hot hydrogen propellant. To operate at maximum efficiency, fuel forms are desired which can withstand the extremely hot, hostile environment characteristic of NTR operation for at least several hours. The simulation of such an environment would require an experimental device which could simultaneously approximate the power, flow, and temperature conditions which a nuclear fuel element (or partial element) would encounter during NTR operation. Such a simulation would allow detailed studies of the fuel behavior and hydrogen flow characteristics under reactor like conditions to be performed. The goal of these simulations would be directed toward expanding the performance envelope of NTR engines over that which was demonstrated during the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs of the 1970's. Currently, such a simulator is nearing completion at the Marshall Space Flight Center, and will shortly be used in the future to evaluate a wide variety of he1 element designs and the materials of which they are constructed. This present work addresses the initial experimental objectives of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator or NTREES and some of the design considerations which were considered prior to and during its construction.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamical simulation of the formation of clumps and filaments in quiescent diffuse medium by thermal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareing, C. J.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Van Loo, S.

    2016-06-01

    We have used the adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic code, MG, to perform idealized 3D magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the formation of clumpy and filamentary structure in a thermally unstable medium without turbulence. A stationary thermally unstable spherical diffuse atomic cloud with uniform density in pressure equilibrium with low density surroundings was seeded with random density variations and allowed to evolve. A range of magnetic field strengths threading the cloud have been explored, from β = 0.1 to 1.0 to the zero magnetic field case (β = ∞), where β is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. Once the density inhomogeneities had developed to the point where gravity started to become important, self-gravity was introduced to the simulation. With no magnetic field, clouds and clumps form within the cloud with aspect ratios of around unity, whereas in the presence of a relatively strong field (β = 0.1) these become filaments, then evolve into interconnected corrugated sheets that are predominantly perpendicular to the magnetic field. With magnetic and thermal pressure equality (β = 1.0), filaments, clouds and clumps are formed. At any particular instant, the projection of the 3D structure on to a plane parallel to the magnetic field, i.e. a line of sight perpendicular to the magnetic field, resembles the appearance of filamentary molecular clouds. The filament densities, widths, velocity dispersions and temperatures resemble those observed in molecular clouds. In contrast, in the strong field case β = 0.1, projection of the 3D structure along a line of sight parallel to the magnetic field reveals a remarkably uniform structure.

  16. PIC Simulations of the Effect of Velocity Space Instabilities on Electron Viscosity and Thermal Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    In low-collisionality plasmas, velocity-space instabilities are a key mechanism providing an effective collisionality for the plasma. We use particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to study the interplay between electron- and ion-scale velocity-space instabilities and their effect on electron pressure anisotropy, viscous heating, and thermal conduction. The adiabatic invariance of the magnetic moment in low-collisionality plasmas leads to pressure anisotropy, {{Δ }}{p}j\\equiv {p}\\perp ,j-{p}\\parallel ,j\\gt 0, if the magnetic field {\\boldsymbol{B}} is amplified ({p}\\perp ,j and {p}\\parallel ,j denote the pressure of species j (electron, ion) perpendicular and parallel to {\\boldsymbol{B}}). If the resulting anisotropy is large enough, it can in turn trigger small-scale plasma instabilities. Our PIC simulations explore the nonlinear regime of the mirror, IC, and electron whistler instabilities, through continuous amplification of the magnetic field | {\\boldsymbol{B}}| by an imposed shear in the plasma. In the regime 1≲ {β }j≲ 20 ({β }j\\equiv 8π {p}j/| {\\boldsymbol{B}}{| }2), the saturated electron pressure anisotropy, {{Δ }}{p}{{e}}/{p}\\parallel ,{{e}}, is determined mainly by the (electron-lengthscale) whistler marginal stability condition, with a modest factor of ˜1.5-2 decrease due to the trapping of electrons into ion-lengthscale mirrors. We explicitly calculate the mean free path of the electrons and ions along the mean magnetic field and provide a simple physical prescription for the mean free path and thermal conductivity in low-collisionality β j ≳ 1 plasmas. Our results imply that velocity-space instabilities likely decrease the thermal conductivity of plasma in the outer parts of massive, hot, galaxy clusters. We also discuss the implications of our results for electron heating and thermal conduction in low-collisionality accretion flows onto black holes, including Sgr A* in the Galactic Center.

  17. 3D COMSOL Simulations for Thermal Deflection of HFIR Fuel Plate in the "Cheverton-Kelley" Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    Three dimensional simulation capabilities are currently being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using COMSOL Multiphysics, a finite element modeling software, to investigate thermal expansion of High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) s low enriched uranium fuel plates. To validate simulations, 3D models have also been developed for the experimental setup used by Cheverton and Kelley in 1968 to investigate the buckling and thermal deflections of HFIR s highly enriched uranium fuel plates. Results for several simulations are presented in this report, and comparisons with the experimental data are provided when data are available. A close agreement between the simulation results and experimental findings demonstrates that the COMSOL simulations are able to capture the thermal expansion physics accurately and that COMSOL could be deployed as a predictive tool for more advanced computations at realistic HFIR conditions to study temperature-induced fuel plate deflection behavior.

  18. Thermal conductance of carbon nanotube contacts: Molecular dynamics simulations and general description of the contact conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaway, Richard N.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2016-07-01

    The contact conductance of carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions is the key factor that controls the collective heat transfer through CNT networks or CNT-based materials. An improved understanding of the dependence of the intertube conductance on the contact structure and local environment is needed for predictive computational modeling or theoretical description of the effective thermal conductivity of CNT materials. To investigate the effect of local structure on the thermal conductance across CNT-CNT contact regions, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed for different intertube contact configurations (parallel fully or partially overlapping CNTs and CNTs crossing each other at different angles) and local structural environments characteristic of CNT network materials. The results of MD simulations predict a stronger CNT length dependence present over a broader range of lengths than has been previously reported and suggest that the effect of neighboring junctions on the conductance of CNT-CNT junctions is weak and only present when the CNTs that make up the junctions are within the range of direct van der Waals interaction with each other. A detailed analysis of the results obtained for a diverse range of intertube contact configurations reveals a nonlinear dependence of the conductance on the contact area (or number of interatomic intertube interactions) and suggests larger contributions to the conductance from areas of the contact where the density of interatomic intertube interactions is smaller. An empirical relation accounting for these observations and expressing the conductance of an arbitrary contact configuration through the total number of interatomic intertube interactions and the average number of interatomic intertube interactions per atom in the contact region is proposed. The empirical relation is found to provide a good quantitative description of the contact conductance for various CNT configurations investigated in the MD

  19. 3D thermal modeling of TRISO fuel coupled with neutronic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jianwei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uddin, Rizwan [UNIV OF ILLINIOS

    2010-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Gas Reactor (VHTR) is widely considered as one of the top candidates identified in the Next Generation Nuclear Power-plant (NGNP) Technology Roadmap under the U.S . Depanment of Energy's Generation IV program. TRlSO particle is a common element among different VHTR designs and its performance is critical to the safety and reliability of the whole reactor. A TRISO particle experiences complex thermo-mechanical changes during reactor operation in high temperature and high burnup conditions. TRISO fuel performance analysis requires evaluation of these changes on micro scale. Since most of these changes are temperature dependent, 3D thermal modeling of TRISO fuel is a crucial step of the whole analysis package. In this paper, a 3D numerical thermal model was developed to calculate temperature distribution inside TRISO and pebble under different scenarios. 3D simulation is required because pebbles or TRISOs are always subjected to asymmetric thermal conditions since they are randomly packed together. The numerical model was developed using finite difference method and it was benchmarked against ID analytical results and also results reported from literature. Monte-Carlo models were set up to calculate radial power density profile. Complex convective boundary condition was applied on the pebble outer surface. Three reactors were simulated using this model to calculate temperature distribution under different power levels. Two asymmetric boundary conditions were applied to the pebble to test the 3D capabilities. A gas bubble was hypothesized inside the TRISO kernel and 3D simulation was also carried out under this scenario. Intuition-coherent results were obtained and reported in this paper.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of highly cross-linked polymer networks: prediction of thermal and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenogina, Natalia; Tsige, Mesfin; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila; Patnaik, Soumya

    2012-02-01

    We use all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to predict the mechanical and thermal properties of thermosetting polymers. Atomistic simulation is a promising tool which can provide detailed structure-property relationships of densely cross-linked polymer networks. In this work we study the thermo-mechanical properties of thermosetting polymers based on amine curing agents and epoxy resins and have focused on the DGEBA/DETDA epoxy system. At first we describe the modeling approach to construction of realistic all-atom models of densely cross-linked polymer matrices. Subsequently, a series of atomistic simulations was carried out to examine the simulation cell size effect as well as the role of cross-linking density and chain length of the resin strands on thermo-mechanical properties at different temperatures. Two different methods were used to deform the polymer networks. Both static and dynamic approaches to calculating the mechanical properties were considered and the thermo-mechanical properties obtained from our simulations were found in reasonable agreement with experimental values.

  1. Rotating Solar Jets in Simulations of Flux Emergence with Thermal Conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Fang; McIntosh, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    We study the formation of coronal jets through numerical simulation of the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux rope into a pre-existing open magnetic field. Reconnection inside the emerging flux rope in addition to that between the emerging and pre-existing fields give rise to the violent eruption studied. The simulated event closely resembles the coronal jets ubiquitously observed by Hinode/XRT and demonstrates that heated plasma is driven into the extended atmosphere above. Thermal conduction implemented in the model allows us to qualitatively compare simulated and observed emission from such events. We find that untwisting field lines after the reconnection drive spinning outflows of plasma in the jet column. The Poynting flux in the simulated jet is dominated by the untwisting motions of the magnetic fields loaded with high-density plasma. The simulated jet is comprised of spires of untwisting field that are loaded with a mixture of cold and hot plasma and exhibit rotational motion of order 20 km/s and m...

  2. Thermal resistance of attic loose-fill insulations decreases under simulated winter conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, R.S.; Wilkes, K.E.; McElroy, D.L.

    1994-05-01

    Two absolute techniques were used to measure the thermal resistance of attic loose-fill insulations: the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) and the Unguarded Thin-Heater Apparatus (UTHA). Two types of attic loose-fill insulations (unbonded and bonded/cubed) were tested under simulated winter conditions. To simulate winter conditions for an attic insulation, the specimens were tested with heat flow up, large temperature differences, and an air gap. The specimens were tested either with a constant mean temperature (30 or 21{degrees}C) and an increasing temperature difference or with a constant base temperature (21{degrees}C) and an increasing temperature difference (i.e., a decreasing mean temperature). The UTHA test specimens had a nominal thickness of 0.2 m of loose-fill insulation. The LSCS test specimens had a nominal thickness of 0.3 m of loose-fill insulation contained in a 4.2 by 5 m attic test module with a gypsum board base. The module had a gabled attic with a 5 in 12 slope roof. The tests yielded the surface-to-surface thermal resistance, R, which includes the thermal resistance due to gypsum, insulation, and any wood joists. Tests with and without an air gap were conducted in the UTHA. Surface-to-surface thermal resistance results from the LSCS and the UTHA show similar trends for these two types of loose-fill insulation when tested under simulated winter conditions. Tests with no air gap gave values of R that agreed with the bag label R-value for the insulations; R increased with lower mean temperatures. These no-gap values of R were 2 to 5% greater than the values of R obtained with an air gap for temperature differences of less than 22{degrees}C. For larger temperature differences R decreased, and at temperature differences of over 40{degrees}C, the R values were 50% less than those at small temperature differences.

  3. Numerical simulation of thermal process and energy saving of lime furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Zheng-ming; ZHOU Jie-min; CHEN Hong-rong

    2005-01-01

    Based on the principle of thermal balance and material balance of lime furnace, the reaction and heat transfer process mathematical-physical model and the on-line monitoring model of the decomposition rate of limestone were set up. With this model, numerical simulation is used to analyze the effects of operational parameters on the process of lime calcining and to optimize it. By using visual basic program to communicate and program, the centralized management and automatic control of the lime furnace are realized. The software is put into practical production, which makes the lime furnace operate steadily and efficiently, and causes the increase in output and decrease in energy consumption.

  4. Occupant evaluation of 7-hour exposures in a simulated aircraft cabin - Part 2: Thermal effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Wyon, David Peter; Zukowska, Daria

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a simulated section of an aircraft cabin with 21 seats installed in a climate chamber, to determine the extent to which passengers’ perception of cabin air quality is affected by air temperature. The temperature inside the cabin was set at three differ-ent levels, 20...... of air quality, cabin environment, intensity of symptoms commonly experienced during flight, and thermal comfort. The investigation showed that cabin air temperature did not change symptoms typical of the aircraft cabin environment whereas it did significantly affect air quality, freshness of air...

  5. Finger temperature as a predictor of thermal comfort for sedentary passengers in a simulated aircraft cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Wyon, David Peter; Zukowska, Daria

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a simulated aircraft cabin with 21 seats installed in a climate chamber, to determine the extent to which passengers’ perception of cabin air quality is affected by air temperature. The temperature inside the cabin was set at three different levels, 20.6, 23.3 and 26.......1°C. A total of 68 subjects were exposed to each of the three conditions. The subjects completed questionnaires to provide subjective assessments of air quality, cabin environment, intensity of symptoms commonly experienced during flight, and thermal comfort. Objective physiological measurements...

  6. Model of natural ventilation by using a coupled thermal-airflow simulation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Remmen, Arne

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a model of natural ventilation of buildings at the stage of design and a consequence of the behaviour of the occupants. An evaluation is made by coupling multizone air modelling and thermal building simulation using a deterministic set of input factors comprising among others...... climate, local environment, building characteristics, building systems, behaviour of occupants and heat loads. Selected deterministic input factors are varied to generate additional information applied in an optimization loop. With that, it is found that the optimal solution depends to a great extent...

  7. Occupant evaluation of 7-hour exposures in a simulated aircraft cabin - Part 2: Thermal effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Wyon, David Peter; Zukowska, Daria;

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a simulated section of an aircraft cabin with 21 seats installed in a climate chamber, to determine the extent to which passengers’ perception of cabin air quality is affected by air temperature. The temperature inside the cabin was set at three differ-ent levels, 20...... of air quality, cabin environment, intensity of symptoms commonly experienced during flight, and thermal comfort. The investigation showed that cabin air temperature did not change symptoms typical of the aircraft cabin environment whereas it did significantly affect air quality, freshness of air...

  8. Simulation of electrical and thermal fields in a multimode microwave oven using software written in C++

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrudean, C.

    2017-05-01

    Due to multiple reflexions on walls, the electromagnetic field in a multimode microwave oven is difficult to estimate analytically. This paper presents a C++ program that calculates the electromagnetic field in a resonating cavity with an absorbing payload, uses the result to calculate heating in the payload taking its properties into account and then repeats. This results in a simulation of microwave heating, including phenomena like thermal runaway. The program is multithreaded to make use of today’s common multiprocessor/multicore computers.

  9. Computer simulation of nonstationary thermal fields in design and operation of northern oil and gas fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaganova, N. A., E-mail: vna@imm.uran.ru [Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Filimonov, M. Yu., E-mail: fmy@imm.uran.ru [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, Russia and Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    A mathematical model, numerical algorithm and program code for simulation and long-term forecasting of changes in permafrost as a result of operation of a multiple well pad of northern oil and gas field are presented. In the model the most significant climatic and physical factors are taken into account such as solar radiation, determined by specific geographical location, heterogeneous structure of frozen soil, thermal stabilization of soil, possible insulation of the objects, seasonal fluctuations in air temperature, and freezing and thawing of the upper soil layer. Results of computing are presented.

  10. Development of a hot water tank simulation program with improved prediction of thermal stratification in the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon; Yue, Hongqiang

    2015-01-01

    A simulation program SpiralSol was developed in previous investigations to calculate thermal performance of a solar domestic hot water (SDHW) system with a hot water tank with a built-in heat exchanger spiral [1]. The simulation program is improved in the paper in term of prediction of thermal...... stratification in the tank. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the hot water tank during cooling caused by standby heat loss are investigated by validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. Detailed CFD investigations are carried out to determine the influence of thickness and material...... property of the tank wall on thermal stratification in the tank. It is elucidated how thermal stratification in the tank is influenced by the natural convection and how the heat loss from the tank sides will be distributed at different levels of the tank at different thermal conditions. The existing...

  11. Numerical simulation of thermal fracture in functionally graded materials using element-free Galerkin method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SAHIL GARG; MOHIT PANT

    2017-03-01

    In the present work, element-free Galerkin method (EFGM) has been extended and implemented to simulate thermal fracture in functionally graded materials. The thermo-elastic fracture problem is decoupled into two separate parts. Initially, the temperature distribution over the domain is obtained by solving the heat transfer problem. The temperature field so obtained is then employed as input for the mechanical problem to determine the displacement and stress fields. The crack surfaces are modelled as non-insulated boundaries; hence the temperature field remains undisturbed by the presence of crack. A modified conservative M-integral technique has been used in order to extract the stress intensity factors for the simulated problems. The present analysisshows that the results obtained by EFGM are in good agreement with those available in the literature.

  12. Numerical simulation of porous latent heat thermal energy storage for thermoelectric cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trelles, J.P.; Dufly, J.J. [University of Massachusettes Lowell, MA (United States). Dept. of Energy Engineering

    2003-09-01

    Porous latent heat thermal energy storage for thermoelectric cooling is simulated via a matrix-based enthalpy formulation, having the temperature as unknown, in a three-dimensional domain. The system is made up of two aluminum containers; the inner one contains the cooling objective in water suspension and the outer one the phase change material (PCM) in a porous aluminum matrix. The system's charging and discharging processes are simulated for constant thermoelectric module cold side temperature under different porosities of the aluminum matrix. The mathematical modeling approach simplifies the analysis while the metal matrix in the PCM greatly improves performance. A direct application of the studied system is vaccine conservation in solar powered thermoelectric cooling systems. (Author)

  13. Simulating thermal boundary conditions of spin-lattice models with weighted averages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenlong

    2016-07-01

    Thermal boundary conditions have played an increasingly important role in revealing the nature of short-range spin glasses and is likely to be relevant also for other disordered systems. Diffusion method initializing each replica with a random boundary condition at the infinite temperature using population annealing has been used in recent large-scale simulations. However, the efficiency of this method can be greatly suppressed because of temperature chaos. For example, most samples have some boundary conditions that are completely eliminated from the population in the process of annealing at low temperatures. In this work, I study a weighted average method to solve this problem by simulating each boundary conditions separately and collect data using weighted averages. The efficiency of the two methods is studied using both population annealing and parallel tempering, showing that the weighted average method is more efficient and accurate.

  14. Theoretical Simulation of 87Rb Absorption Spectrum in a Thermal Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Hong; Xin, Pei-Pei; Yuan, Cheng; Liu, Hong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical simulation of 87Rb absorption spectrum in a thermal cm-cell which is adaptive to the experimental observation. In experiment, the coupling and probe beams are configured to copropagate but perpendicular polarized, making up to five velocity selective optical pumping (VSOP) absorption dips able to be identified. A $\\Lambda$-type electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is also observed for each group of velocity-selected atoms. The spectrum by only sweeping the probe beam can be decomposed into a combination of Doppler-broadened background and three VSOP dips for each group of velocity-selected atoms, companied by an EIT peak. This proposed theoretical model can be used to simulate the spectrum adaptive to the experimental observation by non-linear least-square fit method. The fit for high quality of experimental observation can determine valuable transition parameters such as decaying rates and coupling beam power accurately.

  15. Monte Carlo Simulation of Linear Polymer Thermal Depolymerization under Isothermal and Dynamic Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Bystritskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics of linear polymer thermal depolymerization under isothermal and dynamic TGA modes was simulated by the Monte Carlo method. The simulation was carried out on model arrays having the same initial degree of polymerization =100 and different width (polydispersity index, PDI=/=1∼3 at three constant temperatures and five heating rates. Kinetics of the process in both modes is described by the Avrami equation, the exponent in which decreasing as the distribution width increases. Treatment of the model kinetic curves of degradation using the nonlinear regression method by the Avrami equation, under both isothermal and dynamic modes, gives correct activation energy and pre-exponential factor values independently of the initial PDI. Data obtained in the dynamic mode were also treated by two isoconversion methods, widely applied to kinetic analysis of TGA curves (Flynn-Wall-Ozawa method and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS method.

  16. Simulations of Kikuchi patterns due to thermal diffuse scattering on MgO crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoto, Kazuya; Tsuda, Kenji; Tanaka, Michiyoshi

    2002-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of fast transmission electrons from a perfect crystal is investigated using the Bloch wave theory. A comprehensive expression for the scattering of electrons is given, which includes both elastic and inelastic multiple scatterings. This expression is an extended form of Fujimoto's expression for elastic scattering (J. Phys. Soc. Japan 14:1558 (1959)). For the approximation of single inelastic scattering, the expression becomes equivalent to the formula of Rez et al. (Phil. Mag. 35: 81 (1977)). When thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) is considered using the Einstein model or the scattering factor for TDS given by Hall and Hirsch (Proc. R. Soc. A 286: 158 (1965)), Rossouw and Bursill's expression (Acta Cryst. A 41: 320 (1985)) is derived. This expression has been used in computer simulations of TDS intensity distribution (Kikuchi pattern). It is shown that the simulations for magnesium oxide (MgO) using 357 beams agree quite well with the experimental ones.

  17. Modification of a very large thermal-vacuum test chamber for ionosphere and plasmasphere simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, O. L.

    1978-01-01

    No large-volume chamber existed which could simulate the ion and electron environment of near-earth space. A very large thermal-vacuum chamber was modified to provide for the manipulation of the test volume magnetic field and for the generation and monitoring of plasma. Plasma densities of 1 million particles per cu cm were generated in the chamber where a variable magnetic flux density of up to 0.00015 T (1.5 gauss) was produced. Plasma temperature, density, composition, and visual effects were monitored, and plasma containment and control were investigated. Initial operation of the modified chamber demonstrated a capability satisfactory for a wide variety of experiments and hardware tests which require an interaction with the plasma environment. Potential for improving the quality of the simulation exists.

  18. Experimental analysis of simulated reinforcement learning control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, S. [Architectural Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, PKI 243, Omaha, NE (United States); Henze, G. P. [Architectural Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, PKI 203D, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This paper is the first part of a two-part investigation of a novel approach to optimally control commercial building passive and active thermal storage inventory. The proposed building control approach is based on simulated reinforcement learning, which is a hybrid control scheme that combines features of model-based optimal control and model-free learning control. An experimental study was carried out to analyze the performance of a hybrid controller installed in a full-scale laboratory facility. The first part presents an overview of the project with an emphasis on the theoretical foundation. The motivation of the research will be introduced first, followed by a review of past work. A brief introduction of the theory is provided including classic reinforcement learning and its variation, so-called simulated reinforcement learning, which constitutes the basic architecture of the hybrid learning controller. A detailed discussion of the experimental results will be presented in the companion paper. (author)

  19. PIC simulation of a thermal anisotropy-driven Weibel instability in a circular rarefaction wave

    CERN Document Server

    Dieckmann, M E; Murphy, G C; Bret, A; Romagnani, L; Kourakis, I; Borghesi, M; Ynnerman, A; Drury, L O'C; 10.1088/1367-2630/14/2/023007

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of an initially unmagnetized planar rarefaction wave has recently been shown to trigger a thermal anisotropy-driven Weibel instability (TAWI), which can generate magnetic fields from noise levels. It is examined here if the TAWI can also grow in a curved rarefaction wave. The expansion of an initially unmagnetized circular plasma cloud, which consists of protons and hot electrons, into a vacuum is modelled for this purpose with a two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is shown that the momentum transfer from the electrons to the radially accelerating protons can indeed trigger a TAWI. Radial current channels form and the aperiodic growth of a magnetowave is observed, which has a magnetic field that is oriented orthogonal to the simulation plane. The induced electric field implies that the electron density gradient is no longer parallel to the electric field. Evidence is presented here for that this electric field modification triggers a second magnetic instability, which results i...

  20. Finite Element Simulation of Residual Stress Development in Thermally Sprayed Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhoriny, Mohamed; Wenzelburger, Martin; Killinger, Andreas; Gadow, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    The coating buildup process of Al2O3/TiO2 ceramic powder deposited on stainless-steel substrate by atmospheric plasma spraying has been simulated by creating thermomechanical finite element models that utilize element death and birth techniques in ANSYS commercial software and self-developed codes. The simulation process starts with side-by-side deposition of coarse subparts of the ceramic layer until the entire coating is created. Simultaneously, the heat flow into the material, thermal deformation, and initial quenching stress are computed. The aim is to be able to predict—for the considered spray powder and substrate material—the development of residual stresses and to assess the risk of coating failure. The model allows the prediction of the heat flow, temperature profile, and residual stress development over time and position in the coating and substrate. The proposed models were successfully run and the results compared with actual residual stresses measured by the hole drilling method.

  1. Simulation of thermal ageing and radiation damage in Fe-Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallenius, Janne [Department of Reactor Physics, KTH, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: janne@neutron.kth.se; Olsson, Paer [Department Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Electricite de France, EDF-R and D, Les Renardieres, F-77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Malerba, Lorenzo [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Terentyev, Dmitry [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2007-02-15

    In recent years substantial progress has been made in the field of multi-scale modelling of radiation damage Fe-Cr alloy. Ab initio calculations have provided a description of point-defect properties for a large number of defect configurations. Empirical potentials for the alloy of EAM and 2nd moment tight binding type have been constructed that reproduce these formation energies, as well as the anomalous shift in sign of mixing enthalpy at a Cr concentration of about 10%. Applying the potentials in simulation of interstitial cluster transport, it has been found that cluster diffusion coefficients have shallow minima corresponding to experimentally measured minima in swelling rates of Fe-Cr alloys. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of thermal ageing further show that these potentials correctly reproduce the formation modes of the alpha-prime phase for Cr concentrations above 9%. The present paper is a review of methods used and results achieved within the last couple of years.

  2. Empirical Validation of Heat Transfer Performance Simulation of Graphite/PCM Concrete Materials for Thermally Activated Building System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hee Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To increase the heat capacity in lightweight construction materials, a phase change material (PCM can be introduced to building elements. A thermally activated building system (TABS with graphite/PCM concrete hollow core slab is suggested as an energy-efficient technology to shift and reduce the peak thermal load in buildings. An evaluation of heat storage and dissipation characteristics of TABS in graphite/PCM concrete has been conducted using dynamic simulations, but empirical validation is necessary to acceptably predict the thermal behavior of graphite/PCM concrete. This study aimed to validate the thermal behavior of graphite/PCM concrete through a three-dimensional transient heat transfer simulation. The simulation results were compared to experimental results from previous studies of concrete and graphite/PCM concrete. The overall thermal behavior for both materials was found to be similar to experiment results. Limitations in the simulation modeling, which included determination of the indoor heat transfer coefficient, assumption of constant thermal conductivity with temperature, and assumption of specimen homogeneity, led to slight differences between the measured and simulated results.

  3. Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (MD Simulation Study of Thermal Conductivity of Graphene Nanoribbon: A Comparative Study on MD Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asir Intisar Khan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs has been investigated using equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD simulation based on Green-Kubo (GK method to compare two interatomic potentials namely optimized Tersoff and 2nd generation Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO. Our comparative study includes the estimation of thermal conductivity as a function of temperature, length and width of GNR for both the potentials. The thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbon decreases with the increase of temperature. Quantum correction has been introduced for thermal conductivity as a function of temperature to include quantum effect below Debye temperature. Our results show that for temperatures up to Debye temperature, thermal conductivity increases, attains its peak and then falls off monotonically. Thermal conductivity is found to decrease with the increasing length for optimized Tersoff potential. However, thermal conductivity has been reported to increase with length using 2nd generation REBO potential for the GNRs of same size. Thermal conductivity, for the specified range of width, demonstrates an increasing trend with the increase of width for both the concerned potentials. In comparison with 2nd generation REBO potential, optimized Tersoff potential demonstrates a better modeling of thermal conductivity as well as provides a more appropriate description of phonon thermal transport in graphene nanoribbon. Such comparative study would provide a good insight for the optimization of the thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons under diverse conditions.

  4. Optical and thermal simulations of noninvasive laser coagulation of the human vas deferens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Cilip, Christopher M.; Trammell, Susan R.; Cherukuri, Harish; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Successful noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, in vivo, has been previously reported. However, there is a significant difference between the optical properties of canine and human skin. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of light transport through tissue and heat transfer simulations are performed to determine the feasibility of noninvasive laser vasectomy in humans. A laser wavelength of 1064 nm was chosen for deep optical penetration in tissue. Monte Carlo simulations determined the spatial distribution of absorbed photons inside the tissue layers (epidermis, dermis, and vas). The results were convolved with a 3-mm-diameter laser beam, and then used as the spatial heat source for the heat transfer model. A laser pulse duration of 500 ms and pulse rate of 1 Hz, and cryogen spray cooling were incident on the tissue for 60 s. Average laser power (5-9 W), cryogen pulse duration (60-100 ms), cryogen cooling rate (0.5-1.0 Hz), and increase in optical transmission due to optical clearing (0-50 %), were studied. After application of an optical clearing agent to increase skin transmission by 50%, an average laser power of 6 W, cryogen pulse duration of 60 ms, and cryogen cooling rate of 1 Hz resulted in vas temperatures of ~ 60°C, sufficient for thermal coagulation, while 1 mm of the skin surface (epidermis and dermis) remained at a safe temperature of ~ 45 °C. Monte Carlo and heat transfer simulations indicate that it is possible to noninvasively thermally coagulate the human vas without adverse effects (e.g. scrotal skin burns), if an optical clearing agent is applied to the skin prior to the procedure.

  5. Mathematical modelling and simulation of the thermal performance of a solar heated indoor swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mančić Marko V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Buildings with indoor swimming pools have a large energy footprint. The source of major energy loss is the swimming pool hall where air humidity is increased by evaporation from the pool water surface. This increases energy consumption for heating and ventilation of the pool hall, fresh water supply loss and heat demand for pool water heating. In this paper, a mathematical model of the swimming pool was made to assess energy demands of an indoor swimming pool building. The mathematical model of the swimming pool is used with the created multi-zone building model in TRNSYS software to determine pool hall energy demand and pool losses. Energy loss for pool water and pool hall heating and ventilation are analyzed for different target pool water and air temperatures. The simulation showed that pool water heating accounts for around 22%, whereas heating and ventilation of the pool hall for around 60% of the total pool hall heat demand. With a change of preset controller air and water temperatures in simulations, evaporation loss was in the range 46-54% of the total pool losses. A solar thermal sanitary hot water system was modelled and simulated to analyze it's potential for energy savings of the presented demand side model. The simulation showed that up to 87% of water heating demands could be met by the solar thermal system, while avoiding stagnation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 42006: Research and development of energy and environmentally highly effective polygeneration systems based on using renewable energy sources

  6. Comparison of cryotherapy and thermal therapy for breast cancer treatment simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas P.

    2001-05-01

    Breast cancer presents an ongoing challenge in regard to treatment efficacy and successful clinical outcomes. There has been a challenge to increase the survival rate over the past 50 years and only recently have clinical outcomes improved, although slightly. Thermal treatment regimes have been evolving and most recently, have been applied in situ. A standalone treatment for malignancies is challenging due to the rigor in achieving homogeneity in the distribution of therapeutic temperatures in the tumor and the lack of therapy in the adjacent normal tissue. Although initial work used lasers, contemporary work utilizes radiofrequency (RF) or cryotherapy as a treatment modality. Both monopolar and bipolar RF devices were modeled for the RF treatments in the breast. Using finite element techniques, these two modalities were simulated in breast tissue and the results of the bioheat equation compared for similar sized devices. The model incorporated changing electrical and thermal properties of tissue with temperature, as well as blood flow changes. For thermal treatment, the isotherm of +55 degree(s)C was considered the margin of coagulation necrosis, while for cryotreatment, the -40 degree(s)C isotherm was used. The comparison aids in the selection of the best method to improve clinical outcomes, while paying attention to the size of the applicator and time length of treatment.

  7. Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings:Field Tests, Simulation and Audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

    2005-09-01

    The principle of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads and reducing or shedding related electrical demand during the peak periods. Cost savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies (Braun 1990, Ruud et al. 1990, Conniff 1991, Andresen and Brandemuehl 1992, Mahajan et al. 1993, Morris et al. 1994, Keeney and Braun 1997, Becker and Paciuk 2002, Xu et al. 2003). This technology appears to have significant potential for demand reduction if applied within an overall demand response program. The primary goal associated with this research is to develop information and tools necessary to assess the viability of and, where appropriate, implement demand response programs involving building thermal mass in buildings throughout California. The project involves evaluating the technology readiness, overall demand reduction potential, and customer acceptance for different classes of buildings. This information can be used along with estimates of the impact of the strategies on energy use to design appropriate incentives for customers.

  8. Three-dimensional finite-element code for electrosurgery and thermal ablation simulations (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Stanley; Johnson, Kristin; Rick, Kyle; Liu, Zheng-jun; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2005-04-01

    ETherm3 is a finite-element software suite for simulations of electrosurgery and RF thermal ablation processes. Program components cover the complete calculation process from mesh generation to solution analysis. The solutions employ three-dimensional conformal meshes to handle cluster probes and other asymmetric assemblies. The conformal-mesh approach is essential for high-accuracy surface integrals of net electrode currents. ETherm3 performs coupled calculations of RF electric fields in conductive dielectrics and thermal transport via dynamic solutions of the bioheat equation. The boundary-value RF field solution is updated periodically to reflect changes in material properties. ETherm3 features advanced material models with the option for arbitrary temperature variations of thermal and electrical conductivity, perfusion rate, and other quantities. The code handles irreversible changes by switching the material reference of individual elements at specified transition temperatures. ETherm3 is controlled through a versatile interpreter language to enable complex run sequences. The code can automatically maintain constant current or power, switch to different states in response to temperature or impedance information, and adjust parameters on the basis of user-supplied control functions. In this paper, we discuss the physical basis and novel features of the code suite and review application examples.

  9. Thermal transport in nanocrystalline Si and SiGe by ab initio based Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lina; Minnich, Austin J

    2017-03-14

    Nanocrystalline thermoelectric materials based on Si have long been of interest because Si is earth-abundant, inexpensive, and non-toxic. However, a poor understanding of phonon grain boundary scattering and its effect on thermal conductivity has impeded efforts to improve the thermoelectric figure of merit. Here, we report an ab-initio based computational study of thermal transport in nanocrystalline Si-based materials using a variance-reduced Monte Carlo method with the full phonon dispersion and intrinsic lifetimes from first-principles as input. By fitting the transmission profile of grain boundaries, we obtain excellent agreement with experimental thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline Si [Wang et al. Nano Letters 11, 2206 (2011)]. Based on these calculations, we examine phonon transport in nanocrystalline SiGe alloys with ab-initio electron-phonon scattering rates. Our calculations show that low energy phonons still transport substantial amounts of heat in these materials, despite scattering by electron-phonon interactions, due to the high transmission of phonons at grain boundaries, and thus improvements in ZT are still possible by disrupting these modes. This work demonstrates the important insights into phonon transport that can be obtained using ab-initio based Monte Carlo simulations in complex nanostructured materials.

  10. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONALMETHODS FOR COMPLEX SIMULATION OF THERMAL PROCESSES IN POWER ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risto V. Filkoski

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The overall frame and principal steps of complex numerical modelling of thermal processes in power boiler furnaces on pulverised coal with tangential disposition of the burners are presented in the paper. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD technique is used as a tool to perform comprehensive thermal analysis in two test cases. The methodology for creation of three-dimensional models of boiler furnaces is briefly described. Standard steady k- model is employed for description of the turbulent flow. The coupling of continuity and momentum is achieved by the SIMPLEC method. Coal combustion is modelled by the mixture fraction/probability density function approach for the reaction chemistry, with equilibrium assumption applied for description of the system chemistry. Thermal radiation is computed by means of the simplified P-N model, based on expansion of the radiation intensity into an orthogonal series of spherical harmonics.Comparison between the simulation predictions and available site measurements leads to a conclusion that the model produces realistic insight into the furnace processes. Qualitative agreement of the results indicates reasonability of the calculations and validates the employed sub-models. The described test cases and other experiences with CFD modelling stress the advantages over a purely field data study, such as the ability to quickly and cheaply analyse a variety of design options without actually modifying the object and the availability of significantly more data to interpret the results.

  11. Numerical simulation of diurnally varying thermal environment in a street canyon under haze-fog conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zijing; Dong, Jingliang; Xiao, Yimin; Tu, Jiyuan

    2015-10-01

    The impact of haze-fog on surface temperature, flow pattern, pollutant dispersion and pedestrian thermal comfort are investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach based on a three-dimensional street canyon model under different haze-fog conditions. In this study, light extinction coefficient (Kex) is adopted to represent haze-fog pollution level. Numerical simulations are performed for different Kex values at four representative time events (1000 LST, 1300 LST, 1600 LST and 2000 LST). The numerical results suggest that the surface temperature is strongly affected by the haze-fog condition. Surface heating induced by the solar radiation is enhanced by haze-fog, as higher surface temperature is observed under thicker haze-fog condition. Moreover, the temperature difference between sunlit and shadow surfaces is reduced, while that for the two shadow surfaces is slightly increased. Therefore, the surface temperature among street canyon facets becomes more evenly distributed under heavy haze-fog conditions. In addition, flow patterns are considerably altered by different haze-fog conditions, especially for the afternoon (1600 LST) case, in which thermal-driven flow has opposite direction as that of the wind-driven flow direction. Consequently, pollutants such as vehicular emissions will accumulate at pedestrian level, and pedestrian thermal comfort may lower under thicker haze-fog condition.

  12. Numerical simulations of subcritical reactor kinetics in thermal hydraulic transient phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J.; Park, W. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A subcritical reactor driven by a linear proton accelerator has been considered as a nuclear waste incinerator at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Since the multiplication factor of a subcritical reactor is less than unity, to compensate exponentially decreasing fission neutrons, external neutrons form spallation reactions are essentially required for operating the reactor in its steady state. Furthermore, the profile of accelerator beam currents is very important in controlling a subcritical reactor, because the reactor power varies in accordance to the profile of external neutrons. We have developed a code system to find numerical solutions of reactor kinetics equations, which are the simplest dynamic model for controlling reactors. In a due course of our previous numerical study of point kinetics equations for critical reactors, however, we learned that the same code system can be used in studying dynamic behavior of the subcritical reactor. Our major motivation of this paper is to investigate responses of subcritical reactors for small changes in thermal hydraulic parameters. Building a thermal hydraulic model for the subcritical reactor dynamics, we performed numerical simulations for dynamic responses of the reactor based on point kinetics equations with a source term. Linearizing a set of coupled differential equations for reactor responses, we focus our research interest on dynamic responses of the reactor to variations of the thermal hydraulic parameters in transient phases. 5 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  13. A PIC Simulation Study of Electron Viscosity and Thermal Conduction in Collisionless Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Mario; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    We use particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to study the interplay between electron- and ion-scale velocity-space instabilities and their effect on electron pressure anisotropy, viscous heating, and thermal conduction. The adiabatic invariance of the magnetic moment in low-collisionality plasmas gives rise to pressure anisotropy, with p⊥ , j -p∥ , j > 0 ( | grows (decreases), where p⊥ , j and p∥ , j denote the pressure of species j [electron or ion] perpendicular and parallel to B-> . If the resulting anisotropy is large enough, it can trigger small-scale plasma instabilities. By imposing a shear in the plasma we either amplify or decrease the magnetic field | B-> | . When | B-> | is amplified, we explored the nonlinear regime of the mirror, ion-cyclotron, and electron whistler instabilities. When | B-> | is decreased, we studied the nonlinear regime of the ion- and electron-firehose instabilities. We discuss the implications of our results for electron heating and thermal conduction in low-collisionality accretion flows onto black holes, like Sgr A*. We also discuss the possible implications for the thermal conductivity of plasma in the outer parts of massive, hot, galaxy clusters.

  14. Optimization of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage System Design Using Comprehensive Coupled Simulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Bastian; Rühaak, Wolfram; Schulte, Daniel O.; Formhals, Julian; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Large-scale borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) is a promising technology in the development of sustainable, renewable and low-emission district heating concepts. Such systems consist of several components and assemblies like the borehole heat exchangers (BHE), other heat sources (e.g. solarthermics, combined heat and power plants, peak load boilers, heat pumps), distribution networks and heating installations. The complexity of these systems necessitates numerical simulations in the design and planning phase. Generally, the subsurface components are simulated separately from the above ground components of the district heating system. However, as fluid and heat are exchanged, the subsystems interact with each other and thereby mutually affect their performances. For a proper design of the overall system, it is therefore imperative to take into account the interdependencies of the subsystems. Based on a TCP/IP communication we have developed an interface for the coupling of a simulation package for heating installations with a finite element software for the modeling of the heat flow in the subsurface and the underground installations. This allows for a co-simulation of all system components, whereby the interaction of the different subsystems is considered. Furthermore, the concept allows for a mathematical optimization of the components and the operational parameters. Consequently, a finer adjustment of the system can be ensured and a more precise prognosis of the system's performance can be realized.

  15. Lattice Thermal Conductivity from Atomistic Simulations: ZrB2 and HfB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) including ZrB2 and HfB2 have a number of properties that make them attractive for applications in extreme environments. One such property is their high thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of these materials will facilitate understanding of fundamental mechanisms, elucidate structure-property relationships, and ultimately accelerate the materials design cycle. Progress in computational modeling of UHTCs however has been limited in part due to the absence of suitable interatomic potentials. Recently, we developed Tersoff style parameterizations of such potentials for both ZrB2 and HfB2 appropriate for atomistic simulations. As an application, Green-Kubo molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of ZrB2 and HfB2. The atomic mass difference in these binary compounds leads to oscillations in the time correlation function of the heat current, in contrast to the more typical monotonic decay seen in monoatomic materials such as Silicon, for example. Results at room temperature and at elevated temperatures will be reported.

  16. Simulating galaxy formation with black hole driven thermal and kinetic feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Rainer; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars; Pillepich, Annalisa; Marinacci, Federico; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Naiman, Jill; Torrey, Paul

    2017-03-01

    The inefficiency of star formation in massive elliptical galaxies is widely believed to be caused by the interactions of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with the surrounding gas. Achieving a sufficiently rapid reddening of moderately massive galaxies without expelling too many baryons has however proven difficult for hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation, prompting us to explore a new model for the accretion and feedback effects of supermassive black holes. For high-accretion rates relative to the Eddington limit, we assume that a fraction of the accreted rest mass energy heats the surrounding gas thermally, similar to the 'quasar mode' in previous work. For low-accretion rates, we invoke a new, pure kinetic feedback model that imparts momentum to the surrounding gas in a stochastic manner. These two modes of feedback are motivated both by theoretical conjectures for the existence of different types of accretion flows as well as recent observational evidence for the importance of kinetic AGN winds in quenching galaxies. We find that a large fraction of the injected kinetic energy in this mode thermalizes via shocks in the surrounding gas, thereby providing a distributed heating channel. In cosmological simulations, the resulting model produces red, non-star-forming massive elliptical galaxies, and achieves realistic gas fractions, black hole growth histories and thermodynamic profiles in large haloes.

  17. CFD Simulation of Melting and Solidification of PCM in Thermal Energy Storage Systems of Different Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, S.; Cau, G.; Palomba, C.

    2015-11-01

    At the Department of Mechanical, Chemical and Materials Engineering of the University of Cagliari an experimental and numerical research project has begun with the aim of developing highly efficient thermal energy storage (TES) systems using phase change materials (PCM) of particular interest in concentrating small-medium scale solar power (CSP) applications. The present work aims to simulate the melting and solidification processes in containing boxes and heat transfer devices of different geometrical features which may constitute the elementary cell of a more complex TES system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical models, developed with COMSOL Multiphysics are considered and used to simulate TES, heat conduction and natural convection. The models are used to determine the temperature profile inside the PCM to identify which configurations are capable of enhancing thermal response between a solid wall and a PCM. The results obtained will be used for comparison with experimental data acquired from a pilot plant under construction in the DIMCM laboratories. At the current stage the laboratory is being brought to completion.

  18. Thermal instability (or not?) in three-dimensional, global, radiative GRMHD simulations of geometrically thin discs

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, B; Johnson, L C; Kluźniak, W

    2016-01-01

    We present results of a set of three-dimensional, general relativistic radiation magnetohydro- dynamics simulations of thin accretion discs to test their thermal stability. We consider two cases, one that is initially radiation-pressure dominated and expected to be thermally unstable and another that is initially gas-pressure dominated and expected to remain stable. Indeed, we find that cooling dominates over heating in the radiation-pressure-dominated case, causing the disc to collapse vertically on the local cooling timescale. On the other hand, the gas-pressure- dominated case, which was run for twice as long as the radiation-pressure-dominated case, remains stable, with heating and cooling roughly in balance. Because the radiation-pressure- dominated disc collapses to the point that we are no longer able to resolve it, we had to terminate the simulation. Thus, we do not know for sure whether it might find a much thinner, stable solution or if it will make a transition to unstable expansion and exhibit lim...

  19. Prediction of blind frequency in lock-in thermography using electro-thermal model based numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Tuli, Suneet

    2013-11-01

    Lock-in thermography is increasingly becoming popular as a non-destructive testing technique for defect detection in composite materials for its low heating excitation. The experimental data is processed with Fourier transformation to produce phase and amplitude images. Phase images, though immune to surface emissivity variation, suffer from blind frequency effect, where a defect becomes invisible at a certain excitation frequency. There exists no analytical model to predict this 3-dimensional heat flow phenomenon. This paper presents a study of blind frequency using electro-thermal model based numerical simulation on a piece of thermally anisotropic carbon fibre composite. The performance of the simulator is optimized for spatial mesh size. Further the effect of paint layer, which is often applied to the sample surface for better thermal imaging, has been incorporated in the simulation. Finally, both experimental and simulation results are presented side-by-side for easy comparison.

  20. Determination of the strain rate dependent thermal softening behavior of thermoplastic materials for crash simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmann, Christian; Klein, Jan; Schöngart, Maximilian

    2016-03-01

    Thermoplastic materials are increasingly used as a light weight replacement for metal, especially in automotive applications. Typical examples are frontends and bumpers. The loads on these structures are very often impulsive, for example in a crash situation. A high rate of loading causes a high strain rate in the material which has a major impact on the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials. The stiffness as well as the rigidity of polymers increases to higher strain rates. The increase of the mechanical properties is superimposed at higher rates of loading by another effect which works reducing on stiffness and rigidity, the increase of temperature caused by plastic deformation. The mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials is influenced by temperature opposing to strain rate. The stiffness and rigidity are decreased to higher values of temperature. The effect of thermal softening on thermoplastic materials is investigated at IKV. For this purpose high-speed tensile tests are performed on a blend, consisting of Polybutylenterephthalate (PBT) and Polycarbonate (PC). In preliminary investigations the effects of strain rate on the thermomechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials was studied by different authors. Tensile impact as well as split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests were conducted in combination with high-speed temperature measurement, though, the authors struggled especially with temperature measurement. This paper presents an approach which uses high-speed strain measurement to transpire the link between strain, strain rate and thermal softening as well as the interdependency between strain hardening and thermal softening. The results show a superimposition of strain hardening and thermal softening, which is consistent to preliminary investigations. The advantage of the presented research is that the results can be used to calibrate damage and material models to perform mechanical simulations using Finite Element Analysis.

  1. New Laboratory Technique to Determine Thermal Conductivity of Complex Regolith Simulants Under High Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, A. J.; Christensen, P. R.

    2016-12-01

    Laboratory measurements have been necessary to interpret thermal data of planetary surfaces for decades. We present a novel radiometric laboratory method to determine temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of complex regolith simulants under high vacuum and across a wide range of temperatures. Here, we present our laboratory method, strategy, and initial results. This method relies on radiometric temperature measurements instead of contact measurements, eliminating the need to disturb the sample with thermal probes. We intend to determine the conductivity of grains that are up to 2 cm in diameter and to parameterize the effects of angularity, sorting, layering, composition, and cementation. These results will support the efforts of the OSIRIS-REx team in selecting a site on asteroid Bennu that is safe and meets grain size requirements for sampling. Our system consists of a cryostat vacuum chamber with an internal liquid nitrogen dewar. A granular sample is contained in a cylindrical cup that is 4 cm in diameter and 1 to 6 cm deep. The surface of the sample is exposed to vacuum and is surrounded by a black liquid nitrogen cold shroud. Once the system has equilibrated at 80 K, the base of the sample cup is rapidly heated to 450 K. An infrared camera observes the sample from above to monitor its temperature change over time. We have built a time-dependent finite element model of the experiment in COMSOL Multiphysics. Boundary temperature conditions and all known material properties (including surface emissivities) are included to replicate the experiment as closely as possible. The Optimization module in COMSOL is specifically designed for parameter estimation. Sample thermal conductivity is assumed to be a quadratic or cubic polynomial function of temperature. We thus use gradient-based optimization methods in COMSOL to vary the polynomial coefficients in an effort to reduce the least squares error between the measured and modeled sample surface temperature.

  2. Cellular Automata Simulations of Thermal and Electrical Transport Properties of Thin-Film Polymer/CNTs Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Alex; Iannacchione, Germano; Georgiev, Georgi; Cebe, Peggy

    2014-03-01

    A computational algorithm has been developed to simulate the transport properties of oriented and un-oriented thin film nanocomposites of isotactic Polypropylene (iPP) and carbon nanotubes (CNT) with increasing CNT concentration. Our goal is to be able to design materials with optimal properties using simulations. We use cellular automata approach in Matlab simulation environment. The percolation threshold is reproduced in the simulations, matching experimental data. Upon percolation, the thermal transport in the films increases sharply, more so for the electrical than for the thermal conductivity, due to the larger difference in the electric conductivities of the CNTs and the polymer. To verify the simulation, the thin-film samples were sheared in the melt at 200 C at 1 Hz in a Linkan microscope shearing hot stage. The thermal and electrical conductivity measurements were performed on the same cell arrangement with the transport perpendicular to the thin-film plane using a DC method. The thermal and electrical conductivity are higher for the un-sheared as compared to the sheared samples with stronger temperature dependence for the latter as compared to the former. Our cellular automata simulations provide information about the microstructure-macroscopic property relation in the thin film nanocomposites and can be extended to simulations of other important materials.

  3. JPL Thermal Design Modeling Philosophy and NASA-STD-7009 Standard for Models and Simulations - A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    The Standard JPL thermal engineering practice prescribes worst-case methodologies for design. In this process, environmental and key uncertain thermal parameters (e.g., thermal blanket performance, interface conductance, optical properties) are stacked in a worst case fashion to yield the most hot- or cold-biased temperature. Thus, these simulations would represent the upper and lower bounds. This, effectively, represents JPL thermal design margin philosophy. Uncertainty in the margins and the absolute temperatures is usually estimated by sensitivity analyses and/or by comparing the worst-case results with "expected" results. Applicability of the analytical model for specific design purposes along with any temperature requirement violations are documented in peer and project design review material. In 2008, NASA released NASA-STD-7009, Standard for Models and Simulations. The scope of this standard covers the development and maintenance of models, the operation of simulations, the analysis of the results, training, recommended practices, the assessment of the Modeling and Simulation (M&S) credibility, and the reporting of the M&S results. The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) project thermal control system M&S activity was chosen as a case study determining whether JPL practice is in line with the standard and to identify areas of non-compliance. This paper summarizes the results and makes recommendations regarding the application of this standard to JPL thermal M&S practices.

  4. A 3-D wellbore simulator (WELLTHER-SIM) to determine the thermal diffusivity of rock-formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Loya, J. A.; Santoyo, E.; Andaverde, J.

    2017-06-01

    Acquiring thermophysical properties of rock-formations in geothermal systems is an essential task required for the well drilling and completion. Wellbore thermal simulators require such properties for predicting the thermal behavior of a wellbore and the formation under drilling and shut-in conditions. The estimation of static formation temperatures also needs the use of these properties for the wellbore and formation materials (drilling fluids and pipes, cements, casings, and rocks). A numerical simulator (WELLTHER-SIM) has been developed for modeling the drilling fluid circulation and shut-in processes of geothermal wellbores, and for the in-situ determination of thermal diffusivities of rocks. Bottomhole temperatures logged under shut-in conditions (BHTm), and thermophysical and transport properties of drilling fluids were used as main input data. To model the thermal disturbance and recovery processes in the wellbore and rock-formation, initial drilling fluid and static formation temperatures were used as initial and boundary conditions. WELLTHER-SIM uses these temperatures together with an initial thermal diffusivity for the rock-formation to solve the governing equations of the heat transfer model. WELLTHER-SIM was programmed using the finite volume technique to solve the heat conduction equations under 3-D and transient conditions. Thermal diffusivities of rock-formations were inversely computed by using an iterative and efficient numerical simulation, where simulated thermal recovery data sets (BHTs) were statistically compared with those temperature measurements (BHTm) logged in some geothermal wellbores. The simulator was validated using a well-documented case reported in the literature, where the thermophysical properties of the rock-formation are known with accuracy. The new numerical simulator has been successfully applied to two wellbores drilled in geothermal fields of Japan and Mexico. Details of the physical conceptual model, the numerical

  5. Simulating the thermal operating conditions in the thermal wells of ground-source heat-pump heat supply systems. Part I: Porous moisture freezing processes in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, G. P.; Peskov, N. V.; Lichman, V. A.; Gornov, V. F.; Kolesova, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    The mathematical models laid down in the new blocks of the INSOLAR.GSHP.12 software system simulating unsteady operating conditions of ground-source heat-pump (GSHP) heat supply systems are presented. The new model blocks take into account the effect the freezing of porous moisture in soil has on the GSHP system performance efficiency. Illustration is given to the need of taking into account the porous moisture freezing/thawing processes in soil, and the results from investigations devoted to the opening possibilities of constructing adaptive GSHP systems with controlled intensity of heat transfer in the soil-thermal well system are presented. The development of software simulating the porous moisture phase state variation processes in soil was preceded by development of mathematical equations representing the thermal conditions of soil body involving porous moisture freezing/thawing processes. A description of these equations is also given in the article. In constructing the mathematical model, the notion "effective thermal conductivity" of soil was introduced for taking into account the latent heat of phase transition that releases during the freezing of moisture. The above-mentioned effective thermal conductivity of soil involves two components: the soil thermal conductivity coefficient itself and an additional term modifying the thermal conductivity value for taking into account the influence of phase transition. For quantitatively evaluating the soil effective thermal conductivity component that takes into account the influence of phase transition, the soil freezing zone radius around the thermal well was determined. The obtained analytic solutions have been implemented in the form of computer program blocks, after which a "numerical experiment" was carried out for estimating the effect the porous moisture freezing/thawing processes have on the soil thermal conditions. It was demonstrated during that experiment that the soil thermal conductivities determined

  6. Thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis coupled with chromatography as a thermal simulation experimental method and its application to gaseous hydrocarbons from different source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Ji'an; ZHAO Xin; WANG Qi; LIU Quanyou

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis method coupled with chromatography (TG-DTA-GC) has been adopted to simulate the generation of gaseous hydrocarbons from different hydrocarbon source rocks such as coals, mudstones, and carbonate rocks with different maturities. The temperature programming for thermal simulation experiment is 20℃/min from ambient temperature to 700℃. As viewed from the quantities and composition of generated gaseous hydrocarbons at different temperatures, it is shown that low-mature coal has experienced the strongest exothermic reaction and the highest loss of weight in which the first exothermic peak is relatively low. Low-mature coal samples have stronger capability of generating gaseous hydrocarbons than high-mature samples. The amounts and composition of gaseous hydrocarbons generated are closely related not only to the abundance of organic carbon in source rocks, but also to the type of kerogen in the source rocks, and their thermal maturity. In the present highly mature and over-mature rock samples organic carbon, probably, has already been exhausted, so the production of gaseous hydrocarbons in large amounts is impossible. The contents of heavy components in gaseous hydrocarbons from the source rocks containing type-Ⅰand -Ⅱ kerogens are generally high; those of light components such as methane and ethane in gaseous hydrocarbons from the source rocks with Ⅲ-type kerogens are high as well. In the course of thermal simulation of carbonate rock samples, large amounts of gaseous hydrocarbons were produced in a high temperature range.

  7. A Coupled MHD and Thermal Model Including Electrostatic Sheath for Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Akira; Kubota, Kenichi; Funaki, Ikkoh; Okuno, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-01

    Steady-state and self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster, which utilizes high-intensity direct-current (DC) discharge, is one of the prospective candidates of future high-power electric propulsion devices. In order to accurately assess the thrust performance and the electrode temperature, input electric power and wall heat flux must correctly be evaluated where electrostatic sheaths formed in close proximity of the electrodes affect these quantities. Conventional model simulates only plasma flows occurring in MPD thrusters with the absence of electrostatic sheath consideration. Therefore, this study extends the conventional model to a coupled magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and thermal model by incorporating the phenomena relevant to the electrostatic sheaths. The sheaths are implemented as boundary condition of the MHD model on the walls. This model simulated the operation of the 100-kW-class thruster at discharge current ranging from 6 to 10 kA with argon propellant. The extended model reproduced the discharge voltages and wall heat load which are consistent with past experimental results. In addition, the simulation results indicated that cathode sheath voltages account for approximately 5-7 V subject to approximately 20 V of discharge voltages applied between the electrodes. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 26289328 and 15J10821.

  8. Simulating thermal behavior of AECL's spent fuel dry storage system with CATHENA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabourin, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    This paper documents the comparisons between CATHENA predictions and temperature measurements taken at the Gentilly-2 NPP spent fuel dry storage facility and in a mock--up of a storage basket placed inside a storage cylinder. It also presents CATHENA temperature predictions related to the storage of spent fuel in MACSTOR modules as planned for Ignalina NPP, Lithuania. CATHENA has been chosen because it can simulate many noncondensable gases including air and helium, and because of its great flexibility in the representation of the MACSTOR module geometry. The results of the simulations show good agreement with the experimental measurements. The two comparisons indicate that CATHENA can be used to simulate heat transfer from the fuel to the external air circuit of the spent fuel dry storage system. For the Ignalina MACSTOR module, containing RBMK fuel having higher heat release than typical CANDU fuel, CATHENA predicts that the maximum fuel temperature is expected to be around 240 deg C, giving an acceptable margin below the maximum allowed temperature of 300 deg C. In conclusion, this paper shows that the thermalhydraulic code CATHENA can accurately predict the thermal behavior AECL's air cooled spent fuel dry storage system. (author)

  9. Thermal transport in UO2 with defects and fission products by molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lashley, Jason Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Byler, Darrin David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-14

    The importance of the thermal transport in nuclear fuel has motivated a wide range of experimental and modelling studies. In this report, the reduction of thermal transport in UO2 due to defects and fission products has been investigated using non-equilibrium MD simulations, with two sets of empirical potentials for studying the degregation of UO2 thermal conductivity including a Buckingham type interatomic potential and a recently developed EAM type interatomic potential. Additional parameters for U5+ and Zr4+ in UO2 have been developed for the EAM potential. The thermal conductivity results from MD simulations are then corrected for the spin-phonon scattering through Callaway model formulations. To validate the modelling results, comparison was made with experimental measurements on single crystal hyper-stoichiometric UO2+x samples.

  10. Atomistic Simulations of Chemical Reactivity of TATB Under Thermal and Shock Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manaa, M R; Reed, E J; Fried, L E

    2009-09-23

    The study of chemical transformations that occur at the reactive shock front of energetic materials provides important information for the development of predictive models at the grain-and continuum scales. A major shortcoming of current high explosives models is the lack of chemical kinetics data of the reacting explosive in the high pressure and temperature regimes. In the absence of experimental data, long-time scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations with reactive chemistry become a viable recourse to provide an insight into the decomposition mechanism of explosives, and to obtain effective reaction rate laws. These rates can then be incorporated into thermo-chemical-hydro codes (such as Cheetah linked to ALE3D) for accurate description of the grain and macro scales dynamics of reacting explosives. In this talk, I will present quantum simulations of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) crystals under thermal decomposition (high density and temperature) and shock compression conditions. This is the first time that condensed phase quantum methods have been used to study the chemistry of insensitive high explosives. We used the quantum-based, self-consistent charge density functional tight binding method (SCC{_}DFTB) to calculate the interatomic forces for reliable predictions of chemical reactions, and to examine electronic properties at detonation conditions for a relatively long time-scale on the order of several hundreds of picoseconds. For thermal decomposition of TATB, we conducted constant volume-temperature simulations, ranging from 0.35 to 2 nanoseconds, at {rho} = 2.87 g/cm{sup 3} at T = 3500, 3000, 2500, and 1500 K, and {rho} = 2.9 g/cm{sup 3} and 2.72 g/cm{sup 3}, at T = 3000 K. We also simulated crystal TATB's reactivity under steady overdriven shock compression using the multi-scale shock technique. We conducted shock simulations with specified shock speeds of 8, 9, and 10 km/s for up to 0.43 ns duration, enabling us to track the

  11. Development of numerical simulation system for thermal-hydraulic analysis in fuel assembly of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Akihiko; Imai, Yasutomo; Ito, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    A numerical simulation system, which consists of a deformation analysis program and three kinds of thermal-hydraulics analysis programs, is being developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency in order to offer methodologies to clarify thermal-hydraulic phenomena in fuel assemblies of sodium-cooled fast reactors under various operating conditions. This paper gives the outline of the system and its applications to fuel assembly analyses as a validation study.

  12. Development of numerical simulation system for thermal-hydraulic analysis in fuel assembly of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Uwaba, Tomoyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (4002 Narita, O-arai, Ibaraki 311-1393, Japan) (Japan); Hashimoto, Akihiko; Imai, Yasutomo [NDD Corporation (1-1-6 Jounan, Mito, Ibaraki 310-0803, Japan) (Japan); Ito, Masahiro [NESI Inc. (4002 Narita, O-arai, Ibaraki 311-1393, Japan) (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    A numerical simulation system, which consists of a deformation analysis program and three kinds of thermal-hydraulics analysis programs, is being developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency in order to offer methodologies to clarify thermal-hydraulic phenomena in fuel assemblies of sodium-cooled fast reactors under various operating conditions. This paper gives the outline of the system and its applications to fuel assembly analyses as a validation study.

  13. Indoor test for thermal performance evaluation of Libbey-Owens-Ford solar collector. [using a solar simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, K.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal performance of a flat plate solar collector that uses liquid as the heat transfer medium was investigated under simulated conditions. The test conditions and thermal performance data obtained during the tests are presented in tabular form, as well as in graphs. Data obtained from a time constant test and incident angle modifier test, conducted to determine transient effect and the incident angle effect on the collector, are included.

  14. Simulation of thermal effects during high and low frequency gas storage operations in porous formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmann Pfeiffer, Wolf; Wang, Bo; Bauer, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    Increasing the share of energy production from renewable sources will result in shortages in power supply on various timescales and magnitudes. Besides other options, porous media storage of chemical energy in the form of gases such as hydrogen (H2) or synthetic methane (CH4) as well as mechanical energy, i.e. in the form of a compressed air energy storage (CAES) could be employed to mitigate such shortages. A key difference between these storage options are the potential storage operation schemes in which they are used as a result of the different effective energy density in the subsurface. While CAES would most likely be employed in a high flow rate, high frequency storage scheme with daily cycles, H2 and CH4 storage sites are also suitable for longer, up to seasonal, withdrawal cycles with a lower periodicity. The aim of this work is to compare different thermal effects as a result of H2, CH4, and compressed air energy storage operations. Besides advective-conductive heat transport in the fluid and solid phases, also the Joule-Thomson effect as a result of gas flow through the porous formation is analysed for the different storage options. For this the Joule-Thomson effect is implemented in the open source simulation software OpenGeoSys and numerical simulations of the different storage options are performed. For the simulations, synthetic but realistically parameterized storage sites are used. Besides using OpenGeoSys, the simulations are also compared to results obtained with the ECLIPSE reservoir simulator (© Schlumberger). The simulations show that the heat introduced into the system by the gas injections is transported away from the injection wells mainly through heat conduction. Thus, the thermal perturbation is also present in the caprocks above and below the storage formation. Because of the low heat capacity of the injected gas, thermal effects are confined to the near well region. Temperature changes of more than 1 K are thus found within the first

  15. Validation methodology for the evaluation of thermal-hydraulic sub-channel codes devoted to LOCA simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, N.; Ruyer, P.; Biton, B., E-mail: nathalie.seiler@irsn.fr, E-mail: pierre.ruyer@irsn.fr [IRSN/DPAM/SEMCA/LEMAR, CE Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2011-07-01

    This study focuses on thermal-hydraulic simulations, at sub-channel scale, of a damaged PWR reactor core during a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The aim of this study is to accurately simulate the thermal-hydraulics to provide the thermal-mechanical code DRACCAR with an accurate wall heat transfer law. This latter code is developed by the French Safety Institute “Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire” (IRSN) to evaluate the thermics and deformations of fuel assemblies within the core. The present paper first describes the methodology considered to evaluate the capabilities of existing codes CATHARE-3 and CESAR to simulate dispersed droplet flows at a sub-channel scale and then provides some first evaluations of them. (author)

  16. Thermal-Hydraulic Simulations of Single Pin and Assembly Sector for IVG- 1M Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Garner, P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hanan, N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Thermal-hydraulic simulations have been performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the highly-enriched uranium (HEU) design of the IVG.1M reactor at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) at the National Nuclear Center (NNC) in the Republic of Kazakhstan. Steady-state simulations were performed for both types of fuel assembly (FA), i.e. the FA in rows 1 & 2 and the FA in row 3, as well as for single pins in those FA (600 mm and 800 mm pins). Both single pin calculations and bundle sectors have been simulated for the most conservative operating conditions corresponding to the 10 MW output power, which corresponds to a pin unit cell Reynolds number of only about 7500. Simulations were performed using the commercial code STAR-CCM+ for the actual twisted pin geometry as well as a straight-pin approximation. Various Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models gave different results, and so some validation runs with a higher-fidelity Large Eddy Simulation (LES) code were performed given the lack of experimental data. These singled out the Realizable Two-Layer k-ε as the most accurate turbulence model for estimating surface temperature. Single-pin results for the twisted case, based on the average flow rate per pin and peak pin power, were conservative for peak clad surface temperature compared to the bundle results. Also the straight-pin calculations were conservative as compared to the twisted pin simulations, as expected, but the single-pin straight case was not always conservative with regard to the straight-pin bundle. This was due to the straight-pin temperature distribution being strongly influenced by the pin orientation, particularly near the outer boundary. The straight-pin case also predicted the peak temperature to be in a different location than the twisted-pin case. This is a limitation of the straight-pin approach. The peak temperature pin was in a different location from the peak power pin in every case simulated, and occurred at an

  17. Simulating galaxy formation with black hole driven thermal and kinetic feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberger, Rainer; Hernquist, Lars; Pillepich, Annalisa; Marinacci, Federico; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Naiman, Jill; Torrey, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The inefficiency of star formation in massive elliptical galaxies is widely believed to be caused by the interactions of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with the surrounding gas. Achieving a sufficiently rapid reddening of moderately massive galaxies without expelling too many baryons has however proven difficult for hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation, prompting us to explore a new model for the accretion and feedback effects of supermassive black holes. For high accretion rates relative to the Eddington limit, we assume that a fraction of the accreted rest mass energy heats the surrounding gas thermally, similar to the `quasar mode' in previous work. For low accretion rates, we invoke a new, pure kinetic feedback model which imparts momentum into the surrounding gas in a stochastic manner. These two modes of feedback are motivated both by theoretical conjectures for the existence of different types of accretion flows as well as recent observational evidence for the importance of kinetic AGN wind...

  18. Numerical simulation of Neumann boundary condition in the thermal lattice Boltzmann model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, J. F.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a bilinear interpolation finite-difference scheme is proposed to handle the Neumann boundary condition with nonequilibrium extrapolation method in the thermal lattice Boltzmann model. The temperature value at the boundary point is obtained by the finite-difference approximation, and then used to determine the wall temperature via an extrapolation. Our method can deal with the boundaries with complex geometries, motions and gradient boundary conditions. Several simulations are performed to examine the capacity of this proposed boundary method. The numerical results agree well with the analytical solutions. When compared with a representative boundary method, an improved performance is observed. The results also show that the proposed scheme together with nonequilibrium extrapolation method has second-order accuracy.

  19. Prototypic Thermal-Hydraulic Experiment in NRU to Simulate Loss-of-Coolant Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, C. L.; Hesson, G. M.; Russcher, G. E.; Marsh, R. K.; King, L. L.; Wildung, N. J.; Rausch, W. N.; Bennett, W. D.

    1981-04-01

    Quick-look test results are reported for the initial test series of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation in the National Research Universal {NRU) test program, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This test was devoted to evaluating the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a full-length light water reactor (LWR) fuel bundle during the heatup, reflood, and quench phases of a LOCA. Experimental results from 28 tests cover reflood rates of 0.74 in./sec to 11 in./sec and delay times to initiate reflood of 3 sec to 66 sec. The results indicate that current analysis methods can predict peak temperatures within 10% and measured quench times for the bundle were significantly less than predicted. For reflood rates of 1 in./sec where long quench times were predicted (>2000 sec}, measured quench times of 200 sec were found.

  20. Characterisation and efficient simulation of thermal phenomena in SIMOX thermo-optic phase modulators

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, S A

    2001-01-01

    device has been designed to minimize power requirements, 3dB bandwidths in excess of 1kHz have been achieved for less than 10mW of drive power. A basic set of design parameters is developed which allow estimation of bandwidth and power requirements based on an initial knowledge of the material system and the intended modulator architecture. Silicon can be very effectively exploited in integrated optics due to its well-defined process chemistry and the availability of techniques developed primarily for the semiconductor industry which allow control over dimensions and the creation of arbitrary two dimensional structures with great precision and repeatability. In this thesis the complete design and simulation of thermo-optic phase modulators, realised in silicon-on-insulator (SOI), is presented. Since material thermal and optical parameters vary with temperature, anomalous departure between first-order theory and experimentation can exist when operating under conditions whereby material parameters are markedly ...

  1. Thermal imaginary part of a real-time static potential from classical lattice gauge theory simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, M; Tassler, M

    2007-01-01

    Recently, a finite-temperature real-time static potential has been introduced via a Schr\\"odinger-type equation satisfied by a certain heavy quarkonium Green's function. Furthermore, it has been pointed out that it possesses an imaginary part, which induces a finite width for the tip of the quarkonium peak in the thermal dilepton production rate. The imaginary part originates from Landau-damping of low-frequency gauge fields, which are essentially classical due to their high occupation number. Here we show how the imaginary part can be measured with classical lattice gauge theory simulations, accounting non-perturbatively for the infrared sector of finite-temperature field theory. We demonstrate that a non-vanishing imaginary part indeed exists non-perturbatively; and that its value agrees semi-quantitatively with that predicted by Hard Loop resummed perturbation theory.

  2. Prototypic Thermal-Hydraulic Experiment in NRU to Simulate Loss-of-Coolant Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, C. L.; Hesson, G. M.; Russcher, G. E.; Marsh, R. K.; King, L. L.; Wildung, N. J.; Rausch, W. N.; Bennett, W. D.

    1981-04-01

    Quick-look test results are reported for the initial test series of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation in the National Research Universal {NRU) test program, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This test was devoted to evaluating the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a full-length light water reactor (LWR) fuel bundle during the heatup, reflood, and quench phases of a LOCA. Experimental results from 28 tests cover reflood rates of 0.74 in./sec to 11 in./sec and delay times to initiate reflood of 3 sec to 66 sec. The results indicate that current analysis methods can predict peak temperatures within 10% and measured quench times for the bundle were significantly less than predicted. For reflood rates of 1 in./sec where long quench times were predicted (>2000 sec}, measured quench times of 200 sec were found.

  3. Numerical Simulation on Supersonic Flow in High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi KATANODA; Hideki YAMAMOTO; Kazuyasu MATSUO

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the behaviour of coating particles as well as the gas flow both inside and outside of the High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun by using a quasi-one-dimensional analysis and a numerical simulation. The HVOF gun in the present analysis is an axially symmetric convergent-divergent nozzle with the design Mach number of 2.0. From the present analysis, the distributions of velocity and temperature of the coating particles flying inside and outside of the HVOF gun are predicted. The velocity and temperature of the coating particles at the exit of the gun calculated by the present method agree well with the previous experimental results. Therefore, the present method of calculation is considered to be useful for predicting the HVOF gas and particle flows.

  4. Finite Element Simulation Code for Computing Thermal Radiation from a Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C. N.; Rappaport, H. L.

    2004-11-01

    A finite element code, ``THERMRAD,'' for computing thermal radiation from a plasma is under development. Radiation from plasma test particles is found in cylindrical geometry. Although the plasma equilibrium is assumed axisymmetric individual test particle excitation produces a non-axisymmetric electromagnetic response. Specially designed Whitney class basis functions are to be used to allow the solution to be solved on a two-dimensional grid. The basis functions enforce both a vanishing of the divergence of the electric field within grid elements where the complex index of refraction is assumed constant and continuity of tangential electric field across grid elements while allowing the normal component of the electric field to be discontinuous. An appropriate variational principle which incorporates the Sommerfeld radiation condition on the simulation boundary, as well as its discretization by the Rayleigh-Ritz technique is given. 1. ``Finte Element Method for Electromagnetics Problems,'' Volakis et al., Wiley, 1998.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers

    CERN Document Server

    Yushou, Song; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-01-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1\\,$\\mu$m, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optic...

  6. Verification of a thermal simulation tool for moving objects on the lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Philipp; Reiss, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    The thermal environment of the Moon is a challenge for the design and successful operation of rovers and scientific instruments, especially for dynamic, mobile situations. Examples range from transport and stability of volatile samples in transport devices at the lunar poles to an analysis instrument, to astronauts exploring varied terrain. A dynamic thermal simulation tool for moving objects on the lunar surface was created and its verification for several test cases against Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter DIVINER brightness temperature data is presented here. The Thermal Moon Simulator (TherMoS) allows the prediction of incoming heat fluxes on a mobile object on the lunar surface and subsequent object temperatures. A model for regolith temperatures based on the models presented in [1,2] was set in a MATLAB simulation context. A time-marching numerical finite-difference approach was used to calculate the temperatures for log-distributed regolith depth nodes to a depth of 2m. The lunar interior heat flux was set to 0.033 [W ? m-2], based on the early publications of [3]. The incoming heat fluxes are calculated with a ray tracing algorithm. Parallel solar rays and their diffuse reflected components lead to the solar heat flux for each surface element. Additionally each surface element emits hemispherical, diffuse infrared rays that are absorbed by the object as well as other lunar surface elements. The lunar topography is represented in a triangular mesh. The topography is either derived from Kaguya LALT data or generated artificially. In the latter case craters and boulders are placed manually or randomly in a level terrain. This approach is restricted to bowl shaped primary craters with a boulder size and spatial distribution that takes into account the region (mare or highland) and the parent crater diameter [4,5,6]. A thermal boulder model is integrated, based on work performed by [7]. This model also uses a finite-difference numerical approach to compute boulder

  7. Importance of thermal reactivity for hexamethylenetetramine formation from simulated interstellar ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Duvernay, F.; Briani, G.; Danger, G.; Cottin, H.; Theulé, P.; Chiavassa, T.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Complex organic molecules are observed in a broad variety of astrophysical objects, but little is known about their formation mechanism. Laboratory simulations on interstellar ice analogues are therefore crucial for understanding the origin of these complex organic molecules. In this context, we focus on the thermal reactivity for the formation of the organic residue obtained after photolysis at 25 K of the interstellar ice analogue (H2O:CH3OH:NH3) warmed to 300 K. Aims: We determine the formation mechanism of one major product detected in the organic residue: hexamethylenetetramine (HMT). We compare the warming of the photolysed interstellar ice analogue with the warming of the two non-photolysed specific ice mixtures H2CO:NH3:HCOOH and CH2NH:HCOOH, which are used as references. Using both general and specific approaches, we show the precise role of the UV photons and the thermal processing in the HMT formation. Methods: We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to monitor the chemical changes induced by the heating of the photolysed ice analogue and characterize some important species that will subsequently evolve in the formation of HMT in the residue. Results: We show that the thermal processes play a key role in the HMT formation in photolysed ice analogues heated at 300 K. We identify the stable intermediates in the HMT formation that are formed during the warming: the aminomethanol (NH2CH2OH) and the protonated ion trimethyletriamine (TMTH+, C3H10N3+). We also identify for the first time a new product in the organic residue, the polymethylenimine PMI (-(CH2 -NH)n). Results from this study will be interesting for the analysis of the forthcoming Rosetta mission.

  8. An improved electrical and thermal model of a microbolometer for electronic circuit simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würfel, D.; Vogt, H.

    2012-09-01

    The need for uncooled infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA) for imaging systems has increased since the beginning of the nineties. Examples for the application of IRFPAs are thermography, pedestrian detection for automotives, fire fighting, and infrared spectroscopy. It is very important to have a correct electro-optical model for the simulation of the microbolometer during the development of the readout integrated circuit (ROIC) used for IRFPAs. The microbolometer as the sensing element absorbs infrared radiation which leads to a change of its temperature due to a very good thermal insulation. In conjunction with a high temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of the sensing material (typical vanadium oxide or amorphous silicon) this temperature change results in a change of the electrical resistance. During readout, electrical power is dissipated in the microbolometer, which increases the temperature continuously. The standard model for the electro-optical simulation of a microbolometer includes the radiation emitted by an observed blackbody, radiation emitted by the substrate, radiation emitted by the microbolometer itself to the surrounding, a heat loss through the legs which connect the microbolometer electrically and mechanically to the substrate, and the electrical power dissipation during readout of the microbolometer (Wood, 1997). The improved model presented in this paper takes a closer look on additional radiation effects in a real IR camera system, for example the radiation emitted by the casing and the lens. The proposed model will consider that some parts of the radiation that is reflected from the casing and the substrate is also absorbed by the microbolometer. Finally, the proposed model will include that some fraction of the radiation is transmitted through the microbolometer at first and then absorbed after the reflection at the surface of the substrate. Compared to the standard model temperature and resistance of the microbolometer can be

  9. ENHANCED THERMAL VACUUM TEST CAPABILITY FOR RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BETTER SIMULATES ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS OF SPACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. C. Giglio; A. A. Jackson

    2012-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is preparing to fuel and test the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), the next generation space power generator. The INL identified the thermal vacuum test chamber used to test past generators as inadequate. A second vacuum chamber was upgraded with a thermal shroud to process the unique needs and to test the full power capability of the new generator. The thermal vacuum test chamber is the first of its kind capable of testing a fueled power system to temperature that accurately simulate space. This paper outlines the new test and set up capabilities at the INL.

  10. ENHANCED THERMAL VACUUM TEST CAPABILITY FOR RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BETTER SIMULATES ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS OF SPACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. C. Giglio; A. A. Jackson

    2012-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is preparing to fuel and test the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), the next generation space power generator. The INL identified the thermal vacuum test chamber used to test past generators as inadequate. A second vacuum chamber was upgraded with a thermal shroud to process the unique needs and to test the full power capability of the new generator. The thermal vacuum test chamber is the first of its kind capable of testing a fueled power system to temperature that accurately simulate space. This paper outlines the new test and set up capabilities at the INL.

  11. Determination of thermal properties pure ThO2 using classical molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Partha S.; Kaur, Karamvir; Ali, K.; Arya, A.; Dey, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper calculates lattice thermal expansion (LTE), thermal conductivity (TC) and melting temperature (MT) of ThO2 using classical molecular dynamic simulations. In this study we consider two set of interatomic potential consisting of Coulomb-Buckingham (Buck) and Coulomb-Buckingham-Morse-Many body (BMM) potential form. The MD calculated LTE of 10.29 × 10-6 and 10.61 × 10-6 K-1 using BMM and Buck potential, respectively, is slightly higher than the experimentally determined values (9.54 - 9.86 × 10-6 K-1). The MD calculated TC values in the high temperature range (600 to 1200 K) accords very well with the experimental measurements and at the low temperature range (300-500 K) our results are slightly different from experimental results as our presumption that the dominant mechanism for phonon scattering is the Umklapp process. The MD calculated MT of ThO2 using Buck and BMM potential model is 3662.5±12.5 K and 3812.5±12.5 K, respectively, and these values are in reasonable agreement with previous experimental values.

  12. Impact of modified soil thermal characteristic on the simulated monsoon climate over south Asia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pankaj Kumar; Ralf Podzun; Stefan Hagemann; Daniela Jacob

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, the influence of soil thermal characteristics (STC) on the simulated monsoon climate over south Asia is analyzed. The study was motivated by a common warm temperature bias over the plains of northern India that has been noticed in several global and regional climate models. To address this warm bias and its relation to STC, two sensitivity experiments have been performed with the regional climate model REMO of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology. The control experiment uses the standard soil thermal characteristic of the model that corresponds to a moist soil. The second experiment uses modified STC that characterize a dry soil, which is more representative of the considered region, as a large part of the region has arid, semi-arid or subtropical summer wet conditions. Both experiments were conducted over 20 years using re-analysis data as lateral boundary conditions. Results show that using the modified STC the predominant regional warm bias has reduced substantially, leading to a better and more realistic surface temperature compared to observations over south Asia. Although, the magnitude of bias has reduced, the warm bias still exists over the region suggesting that other atmospheric and land surface processes also play a role, such as aerosols and irrigation. These need to be addressed adequately in future modeling studies over the region.

  13. 3D numerical model of the Omega Nebula (M17): simulated thermal X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Iturbide, J; Rosado, M; Rodríguez-Gónzalez, A; González, R F; Esquivel, A

    2009-01-01

    We present 3D hydrodynamical simulations of the superbubble M17, also known as the Omega nebula, carried out with the adaptive grid code yguazu'-a, which includes radiative cooling. The superbubble is modelled considering the winds of 11 individual stars from the open cluster inside the nebula (NGC 6618), for which there are estimates of the mass loss rates and terminal velocities based on their spectral types. These stars are located inside a dense interstellar medium, and they are bounded by two dense molecular clouds. We carried out three numerical models of this scenario, considering different line of sight positions of the stars (the position in the plane of the sky is known, thus fixed). Synthetic thermal X-ray emission maps are calculated from the numerical models and compared with ROSAT observations of this astrophysical object. Our models reproduce successfully both the observed X-ray morphology and the total X-ray luminosity, without taking into account thermal conduction effects.

  14. Mathematical modeling and simulation of thermal management in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirfazli, Amir; Asghari, Saeed; Koosha, Morteza

    2014-12-01

    The narrow range of operating temperature and small temperature differences between the stack and the ambient have made the fuel cell thermal management as one of the key factors that influence the performance and durability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stacks. In the present study, an analytical model is developed to investigate coolant flow and temperature distributions within a PEMFC stack. The model consists of a coolant flow distribution submodel and a thermal submodel for determination of coolant mass flow distribution between different cooling flow fields of the stack and the temperature distribution within the stack, respectively. The coolant mass flow rate and the temperature distributions in stacks with U and Z configurations are compared with each other using the developed model. The test results of two 65-cells stacks are presented to verify the simulation. The results indicate that the Z configuration results in more uniform temperature distribution than the U configuration in low values of the manifold cross sectional area. However, the Z configuration cannot be applied in the stacks with very small manifold sizes. A parametric analysis is also conducted to assess the effects of some parameters on the temperature distribution in a stack.

  15. CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulators and thermal cracking of heavy oil and ultraheavy residues using microreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardini, Andre L.; Bineli, Aulus R.R.; Viadana, Adriana M.; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf; Maciel Filho, Rubens [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). School of Chemical Engineering; Medina, Lilian C.; Gomes, Alexandre de O. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES); Barros, Ricardo S. [University Foundation Jose Bonifacio (FUJB), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, the design of microreactor with microfluidics channels has been carried out in Computer Aided Design Software (CAD) and constructed in rapid prototyping system to be used in chemical reaction processing of the heavy oil fractions. The flow pattern properties of microreactor (fluid dynamics, mixing behavior) have been considered through CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulations. CFD calculations are also used to study the design and specification of new microreactor developments. The potential advantages of using a microreactor include better control of reaction conditions, improved safety and portability. A more detailed crude assay of the raw national oil, whose importance was evidenced by PETROBRAS/CENPES allows establishing the optimum strategies and processing conditions, aiming at a maximum utilization of the heavy oil fractions, towards valuable products. These residues are able to be processed in microreactor, in which conventional process like as hydrotreating, catalytic and thermal cracking may be carried out in a much more intensified fashion. The whole process development involves a prior thermal study to define the possible operating conditions for a particular task, the microreactor design through computational fluid dynamics and construction using rapid prototyping. This gives high flexibility for process development, shorter time, and costumer/task oriented process/product development. (author)

  16. Astrophysical fluid simulations of thermally ideal gases with non-constant adiabatic index: numerical implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Vaidya, B; Bodo, G; Massaglia, S

    2015-01-01

    An Equation of State (\\textit{EoS}) closes the set of fluid equations. Although an ideal EoS with a constant \\textit{adiabatic index} $\\Gamma$ is the preferred choice due to its simplistic implementation, many astrophysical fluid simulations may benefit from a more sophisticated treatment that can account for diverse chemical processes. Here, we first review the basic thermodynamic principles of a gas mixture in terms of its thermal and caloric EoS by including effects like ionization, dissociation as well as temperature dependent degrees of freedom such as molecular vibrations and rotations. The formulation is revisited in the context of plasmas that are either in equilibrium conditions (local thermodynamic- or collisional excitation- equilibria) or described by non-equilibrium chemistry coupled to optically thin radiative cooling. We then present a numerical implementation of thermally ideal gases obeying a more general caloric EoS with non-constant adiabatic index in Godunov-type numerical schemes.We discu...

  17. Effect of Particle Orientation during Thermal Processing of Canned Peach Halves: A CFD Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adreas Dimou

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to apply Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD to study the effect of particle orientation on fluid flow, temperature evolution, as well as microbial destruction, during thermal processing of still cans filled with peach halves in sugar syrup. A still metal can with four peach halves in 20% sugar syrup was heated at 100 °C for 20 min and thereafter cooled at 20 °C. Infinite heat transfer coefficient between heating medium and external can wall was considered. Peach halves were orderly placed inside the can with the empty space originally occupied by the kernel facing, in all peaches, either towards the top or the bottom of the can. In a third situation, the can was placed horizontally. Simulations revealed differences on particle temperature profiles, as well as process F values and critical point location, based on their orientation. At their critical points, peach halves with the kernel space facing towards the top of the can heated considerably slower and cooled faster than the peaches having their kernel space facing towards the bottom of the can. The horizontal can case exhibited intermediate cooling but the fastest heating rates and the highest F process values among the three cases examined. The results of this study could be used in designing of thermal processes with optimal product quality.

  18. Characterization of coarse bainite transformation in low carbon steel during simulated welding thermal cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Liangyun, E-mail: lanly@me.neu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Kong, Xiangwei [School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Qiu, Chunlin [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Coarse austenite to bainite transformation in low carbon steel under simulated welding thermal cycles was morphologically and crystallographically characterized by means of optical microscope, transmission electron microscope and electron backscattered diffraction technology. The results showed that the main microstructure changes from a mixture of lath martensite and bainitic ferrite to granular bainite with the increase in cooling time. The width of bainitic laths also increases gradually with the cooling time. For a welding thermal cycle with relatively short cooling time (e.g. t{sub 8/5} is 30 s), the main mode of variant grouping at the scale of individual prior austenite grains changes from Bain grouping to close-packed plane grouping with the progress of phase transformation, which results in inhomogeneous distribution of high angle boundaries. As the cooling time is increased, the Bain grouping of variants becomes predominant mode, which enlarges the effective grain size of product phase. - Highlights: • Main microstructure changes and the width of lath structure increases with cooling time. • Variant grouping changes from Bain zone to close-packed plane grouping with the transformation. • The change of variant grouping results in uneven distribution of high angle grain boundary. • Bain grouping is main mode for large heat input, which lowers the density of high angle boundary.

  19. Mechanical abuse simulation and thermal runaway risks of large-format Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Rule, Evan T.; Winchester, Clinton S.

    2017-02-01

    Internal short circuit of large-format Li-ion pouch cells induced by mechanical abuse was simulated using a modified mechanical pinch test. A torsion force was added manually at ∼40% maximum compressive loading force during the pinch test. The cell was twisted about 5° to the side by horizontally pulling a wire attached to the anode tab. The combined torsion-compression force created small failure at the separator yet allowed testing of fully charged large format Li-ion cells without triggering thermal runaway. Two types of commercial cells were tested using 4-6 cells at each state-of-charge (SOC). Commercially available 18 Ahr LiFePO4 (LFP) and 25 Ahr Li(NiMnCo)1/3O2 (NMC) cells were tested, and a thermal runaway risk (TRR) score system was used to evaluate the safety of the cells under the same testing conditions. The aim was to provide the cell manufacturers and end users with a tool to compare different designs and safety features.

  20. Simulation of residual stresses and their effects on thermal barrier coating systems using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, JianGuo; Chen, Wei; Xie, HuiMin

    2015-03-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems are widely used in industrial gas-turbine engines. However, premature failures have impaired the use of TBCs and cut down their lifetime, which requires a better understanding of their failure mechanisms. In the present study, experimental studies of isothermal cycling are firstly carried out with the observation and estimation of microstructures. According to the experimental results, a finite element model is established for the analysis of stress perpendicular to the TBC/BC interface. Detailed residual stress distributions in TBC are obtained to reflect the influence of mechanical properties, oxidation, and interfacial roughness. The calculated results show that the maximum tensile stress concentration appears at the peak of TBC and continues to increase with thermal cycles. Because of the microstructural characteristics of plasma-sprayed TBCs, cracks initialize in tensile stress concentration (TSC) regions at the peaks of TBC and propagate along the TBC/BC interface resulting in the spallation of TBC. Also, the inclusion of creep is crucial to failure prediction and is more important than the inclusion of sintering in the simulation.

  1. Horizontal steam generator thermal hydraulic simulation in typical steady and transient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiee, Ataollah, E-mail: rabiee@shirazu.ac.ir; Kamalinia, Amir Hossein; Haddad, Kamal

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Simulation of the horizontal steam generator with the available code in typical normal and transient operations. • Replacement of tube bundle with a porous media due to the complexity of the SG geometry. • Simulation of typical transient mode of the VVER 440 steam generator, loss of feed water accident. - Abstract: Thermal hydraulic analysis of the steam generators as one of the main components of the power cycle in pressurized water reactor (PWR) is crucial in the design and safety of the nuclear power plants. Two phase flow field simulation near the tube bundles is important in obtaining logical numerical results however the complexity of the tube bundles due to geometry and arrangement makes the numerical analysis complicated. In this research tube bundle has been assumed as the porous media and the outlet boundary condition as the one of the main challenge in these kind of simulations has been optimized according to similar researches. In order to adjust and tune the available computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code, pressure drop of the typical kettle reboiler tube bundle in two various heat fluxes and vapor volume fraction distribution in VVER 1000 steam generator in normal operation have been investigated. The typical transient mode of the VVER 440 steam generator, loss of feed water accident, has been studied eventually. It was observed that obtained vapor volume fraction can predict experimental data with more accuracy than the similar researches and would be increased with the elevation during the accident. On the other hand, pressure drop and level of the feed water value reduces through time and show good adoption with the measurements.

  2. CFD simulation of a dry scroll vacuum pump with clearances, solid heating and thermal deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spille-Kohoff, A.; Hesse, J.; Andres, R.; Hetze, F.

    2017-08-01

    Although dry scroll vacuum pumps (DSPV) are essential devices in many different industrial processes, the CFD simulation of such pumps is not widely used and often restricted to simplified cases due to its complexity: The working principle with a fixed and an orbiting scroll leads to working chambers that are changing in time and are connected through moving small radial and axial clearances in the range of 10 to 100 μm. Due to the low densities and low mass flow rates in vacuum pumps, it is important to include heat transfer towards and inside the solid components. Solid heating is very slow compared to the scroll revolution speed and the gas behaviour, thus a special workflow is necessary to reach the working conditions in reasonable simulation times. The resulting solid temperature is then used to compute the thermal deformation, which usually results in gap size changes that influence leakage flows. In this paper, setup steps and results for the simulation of a DSVP are shown and compared to theoretical and experimental results. The time-varying working chambers are meshed with TwinMesh, a hexahedral meshing programme for positive displacement machines. The CFD simulation with ANSYS CFX accounts for gas flow with compressibility and turbulence effects, conjugate heat transfer between gas and solids, and leakage flows through the clearances. Time-resolved results for torques, chamber pressure, mass flow, and heat flow between gas and solids are shown, as well as time- and space-resolved results for pressure, velocity, and temperature for different operating conditions of the DSVP.

  3. An efficient modeling method for thermal stratification simulation in a BWR suppression pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Hua Li; Walter Villanueva; Pavel Kudinov

    2012-09-01

    The suppression pool in a BWR plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as LOCA and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; and the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (Available Net Positive Suction Head) and therefore the performance of the pump which draws cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use 0-D lumped parameter methods to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool and therefore have large uncertainty in prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze realistic 3D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, therefore long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. The POOLEX experiments at Finland, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, are used for validation. GOTHIC lumped parameter models are used to obtain boundary conditions for BMIX++ code and CFD simulations. Comparison between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data is discussed in detail.

  4. Understanding materials behavior from atomistic simulations: Case study of al-containing high entropy alloys and thermally grown aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinkai Lei

    Atomistic simulation refers to a set of simulation methods that model the materials on the atomistic scale. These simulation methods are faster and cheaper alternative approaches to investigate thermodynamics and kinetics of materials compared to experiments. In this dissertation, atomistic simulation methods have been used to study the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of two material systems, i.e. the entropy of Al-containing high entropy alloys (HEAs) and the vacancy migration energy of thermally grown aluminum oxide. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  5. Transient electromagnetic simulation and thermal analysis of the DC-biased AC quadrupole magnet for CSNS/RCS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xian-Jing; DENG Chang-Dong; KANG Wen

    2012-01-01

    Due to the large cddy currents at the ends of the quadrupole magnets for CSNS/RCS,the magnetic field properties and the heat generation are of great concern.In this paper,we take transient electromagnetic simulation and make use of the eddy current loss from the transient electromagnetic results to perform thermal analysis.Through analysis of the simulated results,the magnetic field dynamic properties of these magnets and a temperature rise are achieved.Finally,the accuracy of the thermal analysis is confirmed by a test of the prototype quadrupole magnet of the RCS.

  6. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Ma, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Thermal impedance of IGBT modules may vary with operating conditions due to that the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of materials are temperature dependent. This paper proposes a Cauer thermal model for a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module with temperature-dependent thermal resistances and thermal ...... relevant reliability aspect performance. A test bench is built up with an ultra-fast infrared (IR) camera to validate the proposed thermal impedance model.......Thermal impedance of IGBT modules may vary with operating conditions due to that the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of materials are temperature dependent. This paper proposes a Cauer thermal model for a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module with temperature-dependent thermal resistances and thermal...

  7. Complete Numerical Simulation of Subcooled Flow Boiling in the Presence of Thermal and Chemical Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.K. Dhir

    2003-04-28

    At present, guidelines for fuel cycle designs to prevent axial offset anomalies (AOA) in pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores are based on empirical data from several operating reactors. Although the guidelines provide an ad-hoc solution to the problem, a unified approach based on simultaneous modeling of thermal-hydraulics, chemical, and nuclear interactions with vapor generation at the fuel cladding surface does not exist. As a result, the fuel designs are overly constrained with a resulting economic penalty. The objective of present project is to develop a numerical simulation model supported by laboratory experiments that can be used for fuel cycle design with respect to thermal duty of the fuel to avoid economic penalty, as well as, AOA. At first, two-dimensional numerical simulation of the growth and departure of a bubble in pool boiling with chemical interaction is considered. A finite difference scheme is used to solve the equations governing conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentration. The Level Set method is used to capture the evolving liquid-vapor interface. A dilute aqueous boron solution is considered in the simulation. From numerical simulations, the dynamic change in concentration distribution of boron during the bubble growth shows that the precipitation of boron can occur near the advancing and receding liquid-vapor interface when the ambient boron concentration level is 3,000 ppm by weight. Secondly, a complete three-dimensional numerical simulation of inception, growth and departure of a single bubble subjected to forced flow parallel to the heater surface was developed. Experiments on a flat plate heater with water and with boron dissolved in the water were carried out. The heater was made out of well-polished silicon wafer. Numbers of nucleation sites and their locations were well controlled. Bubble dynamics in great details on an isolated nucleation site were obtained while varying the wall superheat, liquid subcooling

  8. Energy and thermal analysis of glazed office buildings using a dynamic energy simulation tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirazis, H.; Blomsterberg, A. [Lund Inst. of Technology, Lund (Sweden). Div. of Energy and Building Design

    2005-07-01

    energy consumption, given improvements in solar shading and glazing techniques. The addition of a second facade may solve issues concerning thermal comfort, and it was anticipated that future research will concentrate on analyses of glazed buildings with double skin facades using advanced daylighting simulations. 11 refs., 7 tabs., 6 figs.

  9. Simulation model of stratified thermal energy storage tank using finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waluyo, Joko

    2016-06-01

    Stratified TES tank is normally used in the cogeneration plant. The stratified TES tanks are simple, low cost, and equal or superior in thermal performance. The advantage of TES tank is that it enables shifting of energy usage from off-peak demand for on-peak demand requirement. To increase energy utilization in a stratified TES tank, it is required to build a simulation model which capable to simulate the charging phenomenon in the stratified TES tank precisely. This paper is aimed to develop a novel model in addressing the aforementioned problem. The model incorporated chiller into the charging of stratified TES tank system in a closed system. The model was developed in one-dimensional type involve with heat transfer aspect. The model covers the main factors affect to degradation of temperature distribution namely conduction through the tank wall, conduction between cool and warm water, mixing effect on the initial flow of the charging as well as heat loss to surrounding. The simulation model is developed based on finite difference method utilizing buffer concept theory and solved in explicit method. Validation of the simulation model is carried out using observed data obtained from operating stratified TES tank in cogeneration plant. The temperature distribution of the model capable of representing S-curve pattern as well as simulating decreased charging temperature after reaching full condition. The coefficient of determination values between the observed data and model obtained higher than 0.88. Meaning that the model has capability in simulating the charging phenomenon in the stratified TES tank. The model is not only capable of generating temperature distribution but also can be enhanced for representing transient condition during the charging of stratified TES tank. This successful model can be addressed for solving the limitation temperature occurs in charging of the stratified TES tank with the absorption chiller. Further, the stratified TES tank can be

  10. Thermal-hydraulics/thermal-mechanics temporal coupling for unprotected loss of flow accidents simulations on a SFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricot Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of ASTRID designing, unprotected loss of flow (ULOF accidents are considered. As the reactor is not scrammed, power evolution is driven by neutronic feedbacks, among which Doppler effect, linked to fuel temperature, is prominent. Fuel temperature is calculated using thermal properties of fuel pins (we will focus on heat transfer coefficient between fuel pellet and cladding, Hgap, and on fuel thermal conductivity, λfuel which vary with irradiation conditions (neutronic flux, mass flow and history for instance and during transient (mainly because of dilatation of materials with temperature. In this paper, we propose an analysis of the impact of spatial variation and temporal evolution of thermal properties of fuel pins on a CFV-like core [M.S. Chenaud et al., Status of the ASTRID core at the end of the pre-conceptual design phase 1, in Proceedings of ICAPP 2013, Jeju Island, Korea (2013] behavior during an ULOF accident. These effects are usually neglected under some a priori conservative assumptions. The vocation of our work is not to provide a best-estimate calculation of ULOF transient, but to discuss some of its physical aspects. To achieve this goal, we used TETAR, a thermal-hydraulics system code developed by our team to calculate ULOF transients, GERMINAL V1.5, a CEA code dedicated to SFR pin thermal-mechanics calculations and APOLLO3®, a neutronic code in development at CEA.

  11. Micrometeorological simulations to predict the impacts of heat mitigation strategies on pedestrian thermal comfort in a Los Angeles neighborhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleghani, Mohammad; Sailor, David; Ban-Weiss, George A.

    2016-02-01

    The urban heat island impacts the thermal comfort of pedestrians in cities. In this paper, the effects of four heat mitigation strategies on micrometeorology and the thermal comfort of pedestrians were simulated for a neighborhood in eastern Los Angeles County. The strategies investigated include solar reflective ‘cool roofs’, vegetative ‘green roofs’, solar reflective ‘cool pavements’, and increased street-level trees. A series of micrometeorological simulations for an extreme heat day were carried out assuming widespread adoption of each mitigation strategy. Comparing each simulation to the control simulation assuming current land cover for the neighborhood showed that additional street-trees and cool pavements reduced 1.5 m air temperature, while cool and green roofs mostly provided cooling at heights above pedestrian level. However, cool pavements increased reflected sunlight from the ground to pedestrians at a set of unshaded receptor locations. This reflected radiation intensified the mean radiant temperature and consequently increased physiological equivalent temperature (PET) by 2.2 °C during the day, reducing the thermal comfort of pedestrians. At another set of receptor locations that were on average 5 m from roadways and underneath preexisting tree cover, cool pavements caused significant reductions in surface air temperatures and small changes in mean radiant temperature during the day, leading to decreases in PET of 1.1 °C, and consequent improvements in thermal comfort. For improving thermal comfort of pedestrians during the afternoon in unshaded locations, adding street trees was found to be the most effective strategy. However, afternoon thermal comfort improvements in already shaded locations adjacent to streets were most significant for cool pavements. Green and cool roofs showed the lowest impact on the thermal comfort of pedestrians since they modify the energy balance at roof level, above the height of pedestrians.

  12. Modeling a Naturally Ventilated Double Skin Façade with a Building Thermal Simulation Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    The use of Double Skin Façade (DSF) has increased during the last decade. There are many reasons for this including e.g. aesthetics, sound insulation, improved indoor environment and energy savings. However, the influence on the indoor environment and energy consumption are very difficult...... to predict. This is manly due to the very transient and complex air flow in the naturally ventilated double skin façade cavity. In this paper the modelling of the DSF using a thermal simulation program, BSim, is discussed. The simulations are based on the measured weather boundary conditions......, and the simulation results are compared to the measurement results like energy consumption for cooling, air temperature, temperature gradient and mass flow rate in the DSF cavity, etc. Details about the measurements are reported in \\Kalyanova et al. 2008\\. The thermal simulation program does not at the moment...

  13. Large eddy simulation of hot and cold fluids mixing in a T-junction for predicting thermal fluctuations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-yu ZHU; Tao LU; Pei-xue JIANG; Zhi-jun GUO; Kui-sheng WANG

    2009-01-01

    Temperature fluctuations in a mixing T-junction have been simulated on the FLUENT platform using the large eddy simulation (LES) turbulent flow model and a sub-grid scale Smagorinsky-Lilly model. The normalized mean and root mean square temperatures for describing time-averaged temperature and temperature fluctuation intensity, and the velocity are obtained. The power spectrum densities of temperature fluctuations, which are key parameters for thermal fatigue analysis and lifetime evaluation, are analyzed. Simulation results are consistent with experimental data published in the literature, showing that the LES is reliable. Several mixing processes under different conditions are simulated in order to analyze the effects of varying Reynolds number and Richardson number on the mixing course and thermal fluctuations.

  14. Thermal stability of interface voids in Cu grain boundaries with molecular dynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xydou, A.; Parviainen, S.; Aicheler, M.; Djurabekova, F.

    2016-09-01

    By means of molecular dynamic simulations, the stability of cylindrical voids is examined with respect to the diffusion bonding procedure. To do this, the effect of grain boundaries between the grains of different crystallographic orientations on the void closing time was studied at high temperatures from 0.7 up to 0.94 of the bulk melting temperature ({{T}\\text{m}} ). The diameter of the voids varied from 3.5 to 6.5 nm. A thermal instability occurring at high temperatures at the surface of the void placed in a grain boundary triggered the eventual closure of the void at all examined temperatures. The closing time has an exponential dependence on the examined temperature values. A model based on the defect diffusion theory is developed to predict the closing time for voids of macroscopic size. The diffusion coefficient within the grain boundaries is found to be overall higher than the diffusion coefficient in the region around the void surface. The activation energy for the diffusion in the grain boundary is calculated based on molecular dynamic simulations. This value agrees well with the experimental given in the Ashby maps for the creep in copper via Coble GB diffusion.

  15. Dissecting the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich-gravitational lensing cross-correlation with hydrodynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hojjati, Alireza; Harnois-Deraps, Joachim; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Hinshaw, Gary; Brun, Amandine M C Le

    2014-01-01

    We use the cosmo-OWLS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, which includes different galactic feedback models, to predict the cross-correlation signal between weak gravitational lensing and the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) $y$-parameter. The predictions are compared to the recent detection reported by van Waerbeke and collaborators. The simulations reproduce the weak lensing-tSZ cross-correlation, $\\xi_{y\\kappa}(\\theta)$, well. The uncertainty arising from different possible feedback models appears to be important on small scales only ($\\theta \\lesssim 10$ arcmin), while the amplitude of the correlation on all scales is sensitive to cosmological parameters that control the growth rate of structure (such as $\\sigma_8$, $\\Omega_m$ and $\\Omega_b$). This study confirms our previous claim (in Ma et al.) that a significant proportion of the signal originates from the diffuse gas component in low-mass ($M_{\\rm{halo}} \\lesssim 10^{14} M_{\\odot}$) clusters as well as from the region beyond the virial ra...

  16. Numerical simulation of thermal bone necrosis during cementation of femoral prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzullo, S; Paolini, M; Verdi, C

    1991-01-01

    The implant of a femoral prosthesis is a critical process because of the relatively high temperature values reached at the bone/cement interface during the cementation of the infibulum. In fact, the cement is actually a polymer that polymerizes in situ generating heat. Moreover, the conversion of monomer into polymer is never 100%; this is dangerous because of the toxicity of the monomer. In this paper, we present a 3-D axisymmetric mathematical model capable of taking into account both the geometry of the implant and the chemical/physical properties of the cement. This model, together with its numerical simulation, thus represents a useful tool to set up the optimal conditions for the new materials developed in this orthopaedic field. The real complex geometry is assumed to be a bone/cement/metallic system having cylindrical symmetry, thus allowing the model to be reduced to two space variables. The cementation process is described by the Fourier heat equation coupled with a suitable polymerization kinetics. The numerical approximation is accomplished by semi-implicit finite differences in time and finite elements in space with numerical quadrature. The full discrete scheme amounts to solve linear positive definite symmetric systems preceded by an elementwise algebraic computation. We present various numerical simulations which confirm some critical aspects of this orthopaedic fixing technique such as thermal bone necrosis and the presence of unreacted residual monomer.

  17. Accelerating the Design of Solar Thermal Fuel Materials through High Throughput Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y; Grossman, JC

    2014-12-01

    Solar thermal fuels (STF) store the energy of sunlight, which can then be released later in the form of heat, offering an emission-free and renewable solution for both solar energy conversion and storage. However, this approach is currently limited by the lack of low-cost materials with high energy density and high stability. In this Letter, we present an ab initio high-throughput computational approach to accelerate the design process and allow for searches over a broad class of materials. The high-throughput screening platform we have developed can run through large numbers of molecules composed of earth-abundant elements and identifies possible metastable structures of a given material. Corresponding isomerization enthalpies associated with the metastable structures are then computed. Using this high-throughput simulation approach, we have discovered molecular structures with high isomerization enthalpies that have the potential to be new candidates for high-energy density STF. We have also discovered physical principles to guide further STF materials design through structural analysis. More broadly, our results illustrate the potential of using high-throughput ab initio simulations to design materials that undergo targeted structural transitions.

  18. Application of the general thermal field model to simulate the behaviour of nanoscale Cu field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimre, Kristjan; Aabloo, Alvo [Intelligent Materials and Systems Lab, Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Parviainen, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.parviainen@iki.fi; Djurabekova, Flyura [Helsinki Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Zadin, Vahur [Intelligent Materials and Systems Lab, Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Helsinki Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-07-21

    Strong field electron emission from a nanoscale tip can cause a temperature rise at the tip apex due to Joule heating. This becomes particularly important when the current value grows rapidly, as in the pre-breakdown (the electrostatic discharge) condition, which may occur near metal surfaces operating under high electric fields. The high temperatures introduce uncertainties in calculations of the current values when using the Fowler–Nordheim equation, since the thermionic component in such conditions cannot be neglected. In this paper, we analyze the field electron emission currents as the function of the applied electric field, given by both the conventional Fowler–Nordheim field emission and the recently developed generalized thermal field emission formalisms. We also compare the results in two limits: discrete (atomistic simulations) and continuum (finite element calculations). The discrepancies of both implementations and their effect on final results are discussed. In both approaches, the electric field, electron emission currents, and Joule heating processes are simulated concurrently and self-consistently. We show that the conventional Fowler–Nordheim equation results in significant underestimation of electron emission currents. We also show that Fowler–Nordheim plots used to estimate the field enhancement factor may lead to significant overestimation of this parameter especially in the range of relatively low electric fields.

  19. PIC Simulations of the Effect of Velocity Space Instabilities on Electron Viscosity and Thermal Conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Riquelme, Mario; Verscharen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In low-collisionality plasmas, velocity-space instabilities are a key mechanism providing an effective collisionality for the plasma. We use particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to study the interplay between electron and ion-scale velocity-space instabilities and their effect on electron pressure anisotropy, viscous heating, and thermal conduction. The adiabatic invariance of the magnetic moment in low-collisionality plasmas leads to pressure anisotropy, $p_{\\perp,j} > p_{||,j}$, if the magnetic field $\\vec{B}$ is amplified ($p_{\\perp,j}$ and $p_{||,j}$ denote the pressure of species $j$ [electron, ion] perpendicular and parallel to $\\vec{B}$). If the resulting anisotropy is large enough, it can in turn trigger small-scale plasma instabilities. Our PIC simulations explore the nonlinear regime of the mirror, ion-cyclotron, and electron whistler instabilities, through continuous amplification of the magnetic field $|\\vec{B}|$ by an imposed shear in the plasma. In the regime $1 \\lesssim \\beta_j \\lesssim 20$ ($\\be...

  20. Theoretical simulation of 87Rb absorption spectrum in a thermal cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hong; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Xin, Pei-Pei; Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Hong-Ping

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical simulation of 87Rb absorption spectrum in a thermal cm-cell which is adaptive to the experimental observation. In experiment, the coupling and probe beams are configured to copropagate but perpendicular polarized, making up to five velocity selective optical pumping (VSOP) absorption dips able to be identified. A Λ-type electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is also observed for each group of velocity-selected atoms. The spectrum by only sweeping the probe beam can be decomposed into a combination of Doppler-broadened background and three VSOP dips for each group of velocity-selected atoms, accompanied by an EIT peak. This proposed theoretical model can be used to simulate the spectrum adaptive to the experimental observation by the non-linear least-square fit method. The fit for the high quality of experimental observation can determine valuable transition parameters such as decaying rates and coupling beam power accurately. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922003) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91421305, 91121005, and 11174329).

  1. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory [University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Delettrez, Jacques [Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  2. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Fuel Element Testing in the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    To satisfy the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) testing milestone, a graphite composite fuel element using a uranium simulant was received from the Oakridge National Lab and tested in the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) at various operating conditions. The nominal operating conditions required to satisfy the milestone consisted of running the fuel element for a few minutes at a temperature of at least 2000 K with flowing hydrogen. This milestone test was successfully accomplished without incident.

  3. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Murray, Daw S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic Green-Kubo simulations are performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of the ultra high temperature ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 for a range of temperatures. Recently developed interatomic potentials are used for these simulations. Heat current correlation functions show rapid oscillations which can be identified with mixed metal-Boron optical phonon modes. Agreement with available experimental data is good.

  4. The Climate Analysis Seoul (CAS) simulation for thermal characteristics in different urban locations in Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Gon; Lee, Jisu; Kim, Baek-Jo

    2016-04-01

    The Climate Analysis Seoul (CAS) being tailored for simulating detailed climate was applied to investigate the temperature distribution around the Seonjeongneung Royal Tombs that includes forest and grassland and in the surrounding high-density buildings in Seoul, Korea for a hot summer days of August 6-7, 2015. In this study, we used the digitalized topographical and land-use data of the 5 m resolution and wind and air temperature fields of 100 m resolution produced by the numerical model MetPhoMod (MPM), part of the CAS for the area of interest with an area of 25,000,000 m2. The difference of the temperatures compared with the representative meteorological station of Seoul was analyzed by considering the presence or absence of the Seonjeongneung Royal Tombs. For the case of heat wave issued in Seoul from August 6th, 06 LST to 7th, 18 LST, 2015, the simulation results presented that averaged temperatures in the green area were 2 °C lower than the one of the standard weather station, whereas they showed 1.5 °C higher when the green area was replaced with the building area. From this simulation result, we can suggest that the green area has a temperature reduction effect of 1-3 °C and its influence can be extended up to 150 m from the boundary of the green area. This fact reconfirms that the urban green area generates a micro-scale cool-island effect and this local phenomenon can reduce heat stress produced by surplus thermal sources of the surrounding buildings and paved roads during the hot summer days. Key words: Climate Analysis Seoul (CAS), Urban Green Area, Cool-Island Effect

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yushou; Conner, Joseph; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1 μm, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optical boundary behaviors are simulated. This simulation was first validated through measurements of neutron response from lithium glass cylinders. With good expected light collection, an algorithm based upon the features inherent to alpha and triton particle tracks is proposed to reconstruct the neutron reaction position in the glass fiber array. Given a 1 μm fiber diameter and 0.1mm detector thickness, the neutron spatial resolution is expected to reach σ∼1 μm with a Gaussian fit in each lateral dimension. The detection efficiency was estimated to be 3.7% for a glass fiber assembly with thickness of 0.1mm. When the detector thickness increases from 0.1mm to 1mm, the position resolution is not expected to vary much, while the detection efficiency is expected to increase by about a factor of ten.

  6. Dynamic simulation on effect of flame arrangement on thermal process of regenerative reheating furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Jian-ping; MA Ai-chun; ZHAN Shu-hua; ZHOU Jie-min; XIAO Ze-qiang

    2007-01-01

    By analyzing the characteristics of combustion and billet heating process, a 3-D transient computer fluid dynamic simulation system based on commercial software CFX4.3 and some self-programmed codes were developed to simulate the thermal process in a continuous heating furnace using high temperature air combustion technology. The effects of different switching modes on injection entrancement of multi burners, combustion and billet heating process in furnace were analyzed numerically, and the computational results were compared with on-site measurement, which verified the practicability of this numerical simulation system.The results indicate that the flow pattern and distribution of temperature in regenerative reheating furnace with partial same-side-switching combustion mode are favorable to satisfy the high quality requirements of reheating, in which the terminal heating temperature of billets is more than 1 460 K and the temperature difference between two nodes is not more than 10 K. But since the surface average temperature of billets apart from heating zone is only about 1 350 K and continued heating is needed in soaking zone, the design and operation of current state are still needed to be optimized to improve the temperature schedule of billet heating. The distribution of velocity and temperature in regenerative reheating furnace with same-side-switching combustion mode cannot satisfy the even and fast heating process. The terminal heating temperature of billets is lower than that of the former case by 30 K. The distribution of flow and temperature can be improved by using cross-switching combustion mode, whose terminal temperature of billets is about 1 470 K with small temperature difference within 10 K.

  7. Effect of Illumination Angle on the Performance of Dusted Thermal Control Surfaces in a Simulated Lunar Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    2009-01-01

    JSC-1A lunar simulant has been applied to AZ93 and AgFEP thermal control surfaces on aluminum substrates in a simulated lunar environment. The temperature of these surfaces was monitored as they were heated with a solar simulator using varying angles of incidence and cooled in a 30 K coldbox. Thermal modeling was used to determine the solar absorptivity (a) and infrared emissivity (e) of the thermal control surfaces in both their clean and dusted states. It was found that even a sub-monolayer of dust can significantly raise the a of either type of surface. A full monolayer can increase the a/e ratio by a factor of 3 to 4 over a clean surface. Little angular dependence of the a of pristine thermal control surfaces for both AZ93 and AgFEP was observed, at least until 30 from the surface. The dusted surfaces showed the most angular dependence of a when the incidence angle was in the range of 25 to 35 . Samples with a full monolayer, like those with no dust, showed little angular dependence in a. The e of the dusted thermal control surfaces was within the spread of clean surfaces, with the exception of high dust coverage, where a small increase was observed at shallow angles.

  8. Analysis and thermal simulation of the traditional housing in the south west region of Algeria : hot and dry climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fezzioui, N.; Benyamine, M.; Dahou, Z.; Draoui, B. [Bechar Univ., (Algeria). Dept. of Exact Science; Khoukhi, M. [Sharjah Univ., (United Arab Emirates). Dept. of Architectural Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Energy consumption in buildings in the southern part of Algeria represents nearly 70 per cent of the total energy use during the summer months, since air conditioning is the only means to ensure thermal comfort for inhabitants. In this study, the TRNSYS computer program was used to model and simulate the thermal behaviour and energy flows of a traditional house in the Sahara. The objective was to determine which measures are best suited to reduce thermal loads. The energy simulation involved various components and different modes of heat transfer, taking into account of the effect of air infiltration. Energy use in a traditional house was compared with that of a modern house. The study revealed that typology and the choice of building envelope have a notable influence on energy consumption and thermal comfort. A wrong choice can be very costly in the long term with regard to energy expenditure to ensure thermal comfort inside the house. The best measures to improve energy efficiency were insulating the roof and choosing an appropriate material for the external walls. It was concluded that a material should not be considered according to its intrinsic thermal qualities, but by its location in the wall and its interaction with the other materials as well as the typology of the building itself. 12 refs., 11 tabs., 2 figs.

  9. Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

  10. A method for numerically simulating the thermal state of a tube with punched helical-tape finning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galushchak, I. V.; Gorbatenko, V. Ya.; Shevelev, A. A.

    2011-05-01

    A method for numerically simulating the thermal state of a tube with punched helical-tape finning and heat transfer from heating to heated medium through the finned tube is presented. Results of calculations carried out for one version of finning geometry under the conditions of heating nonboiling water by flue gases are given.

  11. Nuclear power plant accident simulations of gasket materials under simultaneous radiation plus thermal plus mechanical stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillen, K.T.; Malone, G.M.

    1997-07-01

    In order to probe the response of silicone door gasket materials to a postulated severe accident in an Italian nuclear power plant, compression stress relaxation (CSR) and compression set (CS) measurements were conducted under combined radiation (approximately 6 kGy/h) and temperature (up to 230{degrees}C) conditions. By making some reasonable initial assumptions, simplified constant temperature and dose rates were derived that should do a reasonable job of simulating the complex environments for worst-case severe events that combine overall aging plus accidents. Further simplification coupled with thermal-only experiments allowed us to derive thermal-only conditions that can be used to achieve CSR and CS responses similar to those expected from the combined environments that are more difficult to simulate. Although the thermal-only simulations should lead to sealing forces similar to those expected during a severe accident, modulus and density results indicate that significant differences in underlying chemistry are expected for the thermal-only and the combined environment simulations. 15 refs., 31 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations as a feasibility tool for non-metallic land-mine detection by thermal-neutron backscattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M; de Meijer, RJ

    2002-01-01

    The use of Monte Carlo simulations is presented for modelling a simplified land-mine detector system with thermal neutron backscattering (TNB) analysis based on a Cf-252-neutron source. Different aspects and a variety of external conditions, related to localisation and identification of a buried obj

  13. Impact energy analysis of quenched and tempered fine grain structural steel specimens after weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents impact energy results of thermal cycle simulated specimens of quenched and tempered fine grain structural steel S960QL. These results are obtained by examining notched Charpy specimens. Upon performed metallographic analysis and measured hardness, total impact energy is separated into ductile and brittle components.

  14. Mechanical properties of Inconel 718 and Nickel 201 alloys after thermal histories simulating brazing and high temperature service

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to evaluate two nickel base alloys (Nickel-201 and Inconel-718) in three heat treated conditions. These conditions were: (1) annealed; (2) after thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle; and (3) after a thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle plus one operational lifetime of high temperature service. For the Nickel-201, two different braze cycle temperatures were evaluated. A braze cycle utilizing a lower braze temperature resulted in less grain growth for Nickel-201 than the standard braze cycle used for joining Nickel-201 to Inconel-718. It was determined, however, that Nickel-201, was marginal for temperatures investigated due to large grain growth. After the thermal exposures described above, the mechanical properties of Nickel-201 were degraded, whereas similar exposure on Inconel-718 actually strengthened the material compared with the annealed condition. The investigation included tensile tests at both room temperature and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and metallographic examination.

  15. Study of temperature dependence of thermal conductivity in cross-linked epoxies using molecular dynamics simulations with long range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Sundararaghavan, V.; Browning, A. R.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the use of the Green-Kubo integral of the heat flux autocorrelation function, incorporating long-range corrections to model the thermal conductivity versus temperature relationship of cross-linked polymers. The simulations were performed on a cross-linked epoxy made from DGEBA and a curing agent (diamino diphenyl sulfone) using a consistent valence force field (CVFF). A dendrimeric approach was utilized for building equilibrated cross-linked structures that allowed replication of the experimental dilatometric curve for the epoxy system. We demonstrate that the inclusion of a long-range correction within the Ewald/PPPM approach brings the results close to experimentally measured conductivity within an error of 10% while providing a good prediction of the relationship of thermal conductivity versus temperature. This method shows significant promise towards the computation of thermal conductivity from simulations even before synthesis of the polymer for purposes of materials by design.

  16. Modeling technique to simulate thermally-induced stress in an assembly consisting of components made of different materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, W.; Weigand, M.; Renneisen, A.; Hoeerl, S. (Darmstadt, Technische Hochschule (West Germany))

    1991-06-01

    A modeling technique based on the stress-freezing procedure of three-dimensional photoelasticity is presented. This technique makes it possible to freeze the state of stress caused by a restraint in thermal expansion. The method simulates the restraint using the glass-transition effect during the stress-freezing procedure, so that the state of stress can be measured quantitatively. Cured epoxy resins were used as model materials. To achieve the necessary difference between the coefficients of thermal expansion, a prestressing method was used. The experimental stress analysis shows that the prestressing method can be applied when different thermal expansion properties associated with multiple components are required. The modeling technique is illustrated by an example in which the stress in the bottom of a light metal-alloy cylinder head is simulated.

  17. Development of system analysis code for thermal-hydraulic simulation of integral reactor, Rex-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-10-15

    Rex-10 is an environment-friendly and economical small-scale nuclear reactor to provide the energy for district heating as well as the electric power in micro-grid. This integral reactor comprises several innovative concepts supported by advanced primary circuit components, low coolant parameters and natural circulation cooling. To evaluate the system performance and thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor, a system analysis code is being developed so that the new designs and technologies adopted in Rex-10 can be reflected. The research efforts are absorbed in programming the simple and fast-running thermal-hydraulic analysis software. The details of hydrodynamic governing equations component models and numerical solution scheme used in this code are presented in this paper. On the basis of one-dimensional momentum integral model, the models of point reactor neutron kinetics for thorium-fueled core, physical processes in the steam-gas pressurizer, and heat transfers in helically coiled steam generator are implemented to the system code. Implicit numerical scheme is employed to momentum and energy equations to assure the numerical stability. The accuracy of simulation is validated by applying the solution method to the Rex-10 test facility. Calculated natural circulation flow rate and coolant temperature at steady-state are compared to the experimental data. The validation is also carried out for the transients in which the sudden reduction in the core power or the feedwater flow takes place. The code's capability to predict the steady-state flow by natural convection and the qualitative behaviour of the primary system in the transients is confirmed. (Author)

  18. Simulation of Thermal Stratification in BWR Suppression Pools with One Dimensional Modeling Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The suppression pool in a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides the major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as a loss-of-coolant accident and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (available net positive suction head) and therefore the performance of the Emergency Core Cooling System and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System pumps that draw cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use zero dimensional (0-D) lumped parameter models to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool; therefore, they have large uncertainties in the prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods can be used to analyze realistic 3-D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, resulting in a long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by one-dimensional (1-D) transient partial differential equations and substructures (such as free or wall jets) are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to multi-dimensional CFD modeling. One heat-up experiment performed at the Finland POOLEX facility, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, is used for

  19. Changes in the distribution of South Korean forest vegetation simulated using thermal gradient indices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHOI; Sungho; LEE; Woo-Kyun; SON; Yowhan; YOO; Seongjin; LIM; Jong-Hwan

    2010-01-01

    To predict changes in South Korean vegetation distribution,the Warmth Index(WI) and the Minimum Temperature of the Coldest Month Index(MTCI) were used.Historical climate data of the past 30 years,from 1971 to 2000,was obtained from the Korea Meteorological Administration.The Fifth-Generation National Center for Atmospheric Research(NCAR) /Penn State Mesoscale Model(MM5) was used as a source for future climatic data under the A1B scenario from the Special Report on Emission Scenario(SRES) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change(IPCC).To simulate future vegetation distribution due to climate change,the optimal habitat ranges of Korean tree species were delimited by the thermal gradient indices,such as WI and MTCI.To categorize the Thermal Analogy Groups(TAGs) for the tree species,the WI and MTCI were orthogonally plotted on a two-dimensional grid map.The TAGs were then designated by the analogue composition of tree species belonging to the optimal WI and MTCI ranges.As a result of the clustering process,22 TAGs were generated to explain the forest vegetation distribution in Korea.The primary change in distribution for these TAGs will likely be in the shrinkage of areas for the TAGs related to Pinus densiflora and P.koraiensis,and in the expansion of the other TAG areas,mainly occupied by evergreen broad-leaved trees,such as Camellia japonica,Cyclobalanopsis glauca,and Schima superba.Using the TAGs to explain the effects of climate change on vegetation distribution on a more regional scale resulted in greater detail than previously used global or continental scale vegetation models.

  20. Simulation of the thermal behaviour of a concrete dam using in situ measurements : case of Daniel-Johnson dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibeault, N. [Tecsult Inc., Montreal, PQ (Canada); Lariviere, R. [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2004-09-01

    The Daniel-Johnson Dam is the largest multiple-arch dam in the world. It was completed in 1969 at a height of 214 metres. The dam has faced many challenges related to severe thermal conditions, presence of plunging cracks in many arches and opening at the rock-concrete interface. Major concerns lie with the shear resistance in the plane of the plunging cracks. It has been determined that the main cause of arch degradation is related to the thermal behaviour of the dam. A thermal shelter was therefore constructed in the lower part of the arches. This protection has proved to be very effective. A decision was later taken to grout the plunging cracks of some arches. This involved the verification of the structural stability of the arch base. To accomplish this, the shear safety factor during the proposed injection had to be validated. This paper discussed the complex challenge of simulating the thermal behaviour of a concrete dam. It presented an alternative to the conventional methods to implement a thermal profile in a finite element model. Synthetic curves of the thermal profile were used for different thicknesses and boundary conditions. The curves were then interpolated for intermediate thicknesses. A numerical model developed for this project has been verified according to the recommendations of Bulletin 94 of ICOLD (Computer Software for Dams). The loads to consider within the framework study of the Daniel-Johnson Dam gravity; thermal gradient in summer and winter; thermal protection; hydrostatic pressure; uplift pressure in cracks; hydrostatic pressure at upstream on the grout curtain; rock-concrete contact opening; and grout pressures. The proposed method has proven to be simple, efficient and easily implemented to rapidly determine the thermal behaviour of the structures. It is also particularly well suited for multiple-arch dams. The thermal structure analysis was used to determine deformation which was compared with measurements of the pendulums. 8 refs

  1. Modeling and Simulation of the Thermal Runaway Behavior of Cylindrical Li-Ion Cells—Computing of Critical Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Melcher

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The thermal behavior of Li-ion cells is an important safety issue and has to be known under varying thermal conditions. The main objective of this work is to gain a better understanding of the temperature increase within the cell considering different heat sources under specified working conditions. With respect to the governing physical parameters, the major aim is to find out under which thermal conditions a so called Thermal Runaway occurs. Therefore, a mathematical electrochemical-thermal model based on the Newman model has been extended with a simple combustion model from reaction kinetics including various types of heat sources assumed to be based on an Arrhenius law. This model was realized in COMSOL Multiphysics modeling software. First simulations were performed for a cylindrical 18650 cell with a L i C o O 2 -cathode to calculate the temperature increase under two simple electric load profiles and to compute critical system parameters. It has been found that the critical cell temperature T crit , above which a thermal runaway may occur is approximately 400 K , which is near the starting temperature of the decomposition of the Solid-Electrolyte-Interface in the anode at 393 . 15 K . Furthermore, it has been found that a thermal runaway can be described in three main stages.

  2. The effect of interstitial gaseous pressure on the thermal conductivity of a simulated Apollo 12 lunar soil sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horai, K.-I.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of a simulated Apollo 12 soil sample is measured as a function of interstitial gas density, and implications for the thermal properties of lunar and Martian regolith are discussed. Measurements were performed for samples consisting of a mixture of Knippa and Berkely basalt powders with a grain size distribution identical to that of Apollo 12 lunar soil samples by the needle probe technique at interstitial pressures of He, N2, Ar and CO2 from 133,000 to 0.0133 Pa. It is shown that sample thermal conductivity decreases with decreasing interstitial gas pressure down to 1.0 Pa, due to the decreasing effective thermal conductivity of interstitial gas with decreasing gas pressure. Constant thermal conductivity values of 8.8 mW/m per K and 10.9 mW/m per K are obtained for sample densities of 1.70 and 1.85 g/cu cm, respectively, in agreement with in situ lunar regolith measurements. The results, which are greater than those obtained in previous soil studies, are explained by the dense packing of soil particles and enhanced intergranular thermal contact in the present experimental configuration, rather than the influence of interstitial gas pressure. The differences in conductivity between loose soils and packed regolith may also be used to account for the two peaks observed in Martian surface thermal inertia data.

  3. Quantitatively analyzing phonon spectral contribution of thermal conductivity based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. I. From space Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming

    2015-11-01

    Probing detailed spectral dependence of phonon transport properties in bulk materials is critical to improve the function and performance of structures and devices in a diverse spectrum of technologies. Currently, such information can only be provided by the phonon spectral energy density (SED) or equivalently, time domain normal mode analysis (TDNMA) methods in the framework of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (EMD), but has not been realized in nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD) so far. In this paper we generate a scheme directly based on NEMD and lattice dynamics theory, called the time domain direct decomposition method (TDDDM), to predict the phonon mode specific thermal conductivity. Two benchmark cases of Lennard-Jones (LJ) argon and Stillinger-Weber (SW) Si are studied by TDDDM to characterize contributions of individual phonon modes to overall thermal conductivity and the results are compared with that predicted using SED and TDNMA. Similar trends are found for both cases, which indicate that our TDDDM approach captures the major phonon properties in NEMD run. The biggest advantage of TDDDM is that it can be used to investigate the size effect of individual phonon modes in NEMD simulations, which cannot be tackled by SED and TDNMA in EMD simulations currently. We found that the phonon modes with mean free path larger than the system size are truncated in NEMD and contribute little to the overall thermal conductivity. The TDDDM provides direct physical origin for the well-known strong size effects in thermal conductivity prediction by NEMD. Moreover, the well-known common sense of the zero thermal conductivity contribution from the Γ point is rigorously proved by TDDDM. Since TDDDM inherently possesses the nature of both NEMD simulations and lattice dynamics, we anticipate that TDDDM is particularly useful for offering a deep understanding of phonon behaviors in nanostructures or under strong confinement, especially when the

  4. Monte Carlo simulation for thermal assisted reversal process of micro-magnetic torus ring with bistable closure domain structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Kenichi; Suzuki, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko, E-mail: yama@sss.fukushima-u.ac.jp

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed for temperature dependences of closure domain parameter for a magnetic micro-torus ring cluster under magnetic field on limited temperature regions. Simulation results show that magnetic field on tiny limited temperature region can reverse magnetic closure domain structures when the magnetic field is applied at a threshold temperature corresponding to intensity of applied magnetic field. This is one of thermally assisted switching phenomena through a self-organization process. The results show the way to find non-wasteful pairs between intensity of magnetic field and temperature region for reversing closure domain structure by temperature dependence of the fluctuation of closure domain parameter. Monte Carlo method for this simulation is very valuable to optimize the design of thermally assisted switching devices.

  5. Simulations of thermal-hydraulic processes in heat exchangers- station of the cogeneration power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studovic, M.; Stevanovic, V.; Ilic, M.; Nedeljkovic, S. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering of Belgrade (Croatia)

    1995-12-31

    Design of the long district heating system to Belgrade (base load 580 MJ/s) from Thermal Power Station `Nikola Tesla A`, 30 km southwest from the present gas/oil burning boilers in New Belgrade, is being conducted. The mathematical model and computer code named TRP are developed for the prediction of the design basis parameters of heat exchangers station, as well as for selection of protection devices and formulation of operating procedures. Numerical simulations of heat exchangers station are performed for various transient conditions: up-set and abnormal. Physical model of multi-pass, shell and tube heat exchanger in the station represented is by unique steam volume, and with space discretised nodes both for water volume and tube walls. Heat transfer regimes on steam and water side, as well as hydraulic calculation were performed in accordance with TEMA standards for transient conditions on both sides, and for each node on water side. Mathematical model is based on balance equations: mass and energy for lumped parameters on steam side, and energy balances for tube walls and water in each node. Water mass balance is taken as boundary/initial condition or as specified control function. The physical model is proposed for (s) heat exchangers in the station and (n) water and wall volumes. Therefore, the mathematical model consists of 2ns+2, non-linear differential equations, including equations of state for water, steam and tube material, and constitutive equations for heat transfer on steam and water side, solved by the Runge-Kutt method. Five scenarios of heat exchangers station behavior have been simulated with the TRP code and obtained results are presented. (author)

  6. Combined Experimental and Numerical Simulations of Thermal Barrier Coated Turbine Blades Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Awate; Tabakoff, Widen; Swar, Rohan; Shin, Dongyun; Woggon, Nthanial; Miller, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the erosion of thermal barrier coated (TBC) blade surfaces by alumina particles ingestion in a single stage turbine. In the experimental investigation, tests of particle surface interactions were performed in specially designed tunnels to determine the erosion rates and particle restitution characteristics under different impact conditions. The experimental results show that the erosion rates increase with increased impingement angle, impact velocity and temperature. In the computational simulations, an Euler-Lagrangian two stage approach is used in obtaining numerical solutions to the three-dimensional compressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the particles equations of motion in each blade passage reference frame. User defined functions (UDF) were developed to represent experimentally-based correlations for particle surface interaction models which were employed in the three-dimensional particle trajectory simulations to determine the particle rebound characteristics after each surface impact. The experimentally based erosion UDF model was used to predict the TBC erosion rates on the turbine blade surfaces based on the computed statistical data of the particles impact locations, velocities and angles relative to the blade surface. Computational results are presented for the predicted TBC blade erosion in a single stage commercial APU turbine, for a NASA designed automotive turbine, and for the NASA turbine scaled for modern rotorcraft operating conditions. The erosion patterns in the turbines are discussed for uniform particle ingestion and for particle ingestion concentrated in the inner and outer 5 percent of the stator blade span representing the flow cooling the combustor liner.

  7. Simulating High Flux Isotope Reactor Core Thermal-Hydraulics via Interdimensional Model Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis, Adam R [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    A coupled interdimensional model is presented for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the High Flux Isotope Reactor core at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model consists of two domains a solid involute fuel plate and the surrounding liquid coolant channel. The fuel plate is modeled explicitly in three-dimensions. The coolant channel is approximated as a twodimensional slice oriented perpendicular to the fuel plate s surface. The two dimensionally-inconsistent domains are linked to one another via interdimensional model coupling mechanisms. The coupled model is presented as a simplified alternative to a fully explicit, fully three-dimensional model. Involute geometries were constructed in SolidWorks. Derivations of the involute construction equations are presented. Geometries were then imported into COMSOL Multiphysics for simulation and modeling. Both models are described in detail so as to highlight their respective attributes in the 3D model, the pursuit of an accurate, reliable, and complete solution; in the coupled model, the intent to simplify the modeling domain as much as possible without affecting significant alterations to the solution. The coupled model was created with the goal of permitting larger portions of the reactor core to be modeled at once without a significant sacrifice to solution integrity. As such, particular care is given to validating incorporated model simplifications. To the greatest extent possible, the decrease in solution time as well as computational cost are quantified versus the effects such gains have on the solution quality. A variant of the coupled model which sufficiently balances these three solution characteristics is presented alongside the more comprehensive 3D model for comparison and validation.

  8. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2007-07-01

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  9. Computational simulation of thermal hydraulic processes in the model LMFBR fuel assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayaskhalanov, M. V.; Merinov, I. G.; Korsun, A. S.; Vlasov, M. N.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify a developed software module on the experimental fuel assembly with partial blockage of the flow section. The developed software module for simulation of thermal hydraulic processes in liquid metal coolant is based on theory of anisotropic porous media with specially developed integral turbulence model for coefficients determination. The finite element method is used for numerical solution. Experimental data for hexahedral assembly with electrically heated smooth cylindrical rods cooled by liquid sodium are considered. The results of calculation obtained with developed software module for a case of corner blockade are presented. The calculated distribution of coolant velocities showed the presence of the vortex flow behind the blockade. Features vortex region are in a good quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data. This demonstrates the efficiency of the hydrodynamic unit for developed software module. But obtained radial coolant temperature profiles differ significantly from the experimental in the vortex flow region. The possible reasons for this discrepancy were analyzed.

  10. Thermal hydraulic investigations and optimization on the EVC system of a PWR by CFD simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Mengmeng [Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 710049 Xi’an (China); Zhang, Dalin, E-mail: dlzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 710049 Xi’an (China); Tang, Mao [China Nuclear Power Design Engineering Co., Ltd., 518124 Shenzhen (China); Wang, Chenglong; Zheng, Meiyin; Qiu, Suizheng [Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 710049 Xi’an (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • This study constructs a full CFD model for the EVC system of a PWR. • The complex fluid and solid coupling is treated in the computation. • Primary characteristics of the velocity, pressure and temperature distributions in the EVC system are investigated. • The optimization of the EVC system with different inlet boundaries are performed. - Abstract: In order to optimize the design of Reactor Pit Ventilation (EVC) system in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), it is necessary to study the characteristics of the velocity, pressure and temperature fields in the EVC system. A full computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the EVC system is constructed by a commercial CFD code, where the complex fluid and solid coupling is treated. The Shear Stress Transport (SST) model is adopted to perform the turbulence calculation. This paper numerically investigates the characteristics of the velocity, pressure and temperature distributions in the EVC system. In particular, the effects of inlet air parameters on the thermal hydraulic characteristics and the reactor pit structure are also discussed for the EVC system optimization. Simulations are carried out with different mesh sizes and boundary conditions for sensitivity analysis. The computational results are important references to optimize the design and verify the rationality of the EVC system.

  11. Simulation of Thermal Distribution and Airflow for Efficient Energy Consumption in a Small Data Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Ni

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Data centers have become ubiquitous in the last few years in an attempt to keep pace with the processing and storage needs of the Internet and cloud computing. The steady growth in the heat densities of IT servers leads to a rise in the energy needed to cool them, and constitutes approximately 40% of the power consumed by data centers. However, many data centers feature redundant air conditioning systems that contribute to inefficient air distribution, which significantly increases energy consumption. This remains an insufficiently explored problem. In this paper, a typical, small data center with tiles for an air supply system with a raised floor is used. We use a fluent (Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD to simulate thermal distribution and airflow, and investigate the optimal conditions of air distribution to save energy. The effects of the airflow outlet angle along the tile, the cooling temperature and the rate of airflow on the beta index as well as the energy utilization index are discussed, and the optimal conditions are obtained. The reasonable airflow distribution achieved using 3D CFD calculations and the parameter settings provided in this paper can help reduce the energy consumption of data centers by improving the efficiency of the air conditioning.

  12. Modeling simulation of the thermal radiation for high-speed flight vehicles' aero-optical windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Liqin; Guo, Mingjiang

    2015-10-01

    When high-speed flight vehicles fly in the atmosphere, they can generate serious aero-optical effect. The optical window temperature rises sharply because of aerodynamic heating. It will form radiation interference that can lead infrared detectors to producing non-uniform radiation backgrounds, decreasing system SNR and detection range. Besides, there exits temperature difference due to uneven heating. Under the thermo-optical and elastic-optical effects, optical windows change into inhomogeneous mediums which influence the ray propagation. In this paper, a model of thermal radiation effect was built by a finite element analysis method. Firstly, the optical window was divided into uniform grids. Then, radiation distribution on the focal planes at different angles of the window's normal line and optical axis was obtained by tracing light rays of each grid. Finally, simulation results indicate that radiation distribution reflects the two directions-the length and width-of temperature distribution, and the change of angle causes the center of radiation distribution to shift to one direction of the image surface under the same window temperature.

  13. [Implementation results of emission standards of air pollutants for thermal power plants: a numerical simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhan-Shan; Pan, Li-Bo

    2014-03-01

    The emission inventory of air pollutants from the thermal power plants in the year of 2010 was set up. Based on the inventory, the air quality of the prediction scenarios by implementation of both 2003-version emission standard and the new emission standard were simulated using Models-3/CMAQ. The concentrations of NO2, SO2, and PM2.5, and the deposition of nitrogen and sulfur in the year of 2015 and 2020 were predicted to investigate the regional air quality improvement by the new emission standard. The results showed that the new emission standard could effectively improve the air quality in China. Compared with the implementation results of the 2003-version emission standard, by 2015 and 2020, the area with NO2 concentration higher than the emission standard would be reduced by 53.9% and 55.2%, the area with SO2 concentration higher than the emission standard would be reduced by 40.0%, the area with nitrogen deposition higher than 1.0 t x km(-2) would be reduced by 75.4% and 77.9%, and the area with sulfur deposition higher than 1.6 t x km(-2) would be reduced by 37.1% and 34.3%, respectively.

  14. Zero-Point Energy Leakage in Quantum Thermal Bath Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieuc, Fabien; Bronstein, Yael; Dammak, Hichem; Depondt, Philippe; Finocchi, Fabio; Hayoun, Marc

    2016-12-13

    The quantum thermal bath (QTB) has been presented as an alternative to path-integral-based methods to introduce nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations. The method has proved to be efficient, yielding accurate results for various systems. However, the QTB method is prone to zero-point energy leakage (ZPEL) in highly anharmonic systems. This is a well-known problem in methods based on classical trajectories where part of the energy of the high-frequency modes is transferred to the low-frequency modes leading to a wrong energy distribution. In some cases, the ZPEL can have dramatic consequences on the properties of the system. Thus, we investigate the ZPEL by testing the QTB method on selected systems with increasing complexity in order to study the conditions and the parameters that influence the leakage. We also analyze the consequences of the ZPEL on the structural and vibrational properties of the system. We find that the leakage is particularly dependent on the damping coefficient and that increasing its value can reduce and, in some cases, completely remove the ZPEL. When using sufficiently high values for the damping coefficient, the expected energy distribution among the vibrational modes is ensured. In this case, the QTB method gives very encouraging results. In particular, the structural properties are well-reproduced. The dynamical properties should be regarded with caution although valuable information can still be extracted from the vibrational spectrum, even for large values of the damping term.

  15. Rapid Calculation of Thermal Forces in Coarse Grained Simulation of Colloidal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, James; Fiore, Andrew; Donev, Aleksander; Balboa, Florencio

    2016-11-01

    In the presented work, we will demonstrate a spectrally accurate method for calculation of thermal forces in implicit solvent simulations of soft materials such as colloidal dispersions. For implicit solvent models, the stochastic forces must be drawn from a normal distribution whose covariance is a complicated function of the particle configuration. For a system of interacting N particles, drawing a single sample requires O (N3) operations, if numerically exact techniques from linear algebra are employed. So-called "fast" methods can approximate the sampling with roughly O (Nm logN) computational complexity, where m is a coefficient greater than one which depends on the configuration of the particles. The computational complexity of the presented approach is O (N(logN) d / (d + 3)) , where d is the fractal dimension of the particulate structures being modeled. Remarkably, this new approach adapts to the structure of the material under study by leveraging the algebraic structure of Ewald summation and balancing the computational effort spent evaluating near-field and far-field contributions to the hydrodynamic interactions among the suspended particles. Applications of this approach to modeling colloidal gelation and particulate suspensions will be discussed.

  16. Experimental analysis of simulated reinforcement learning control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, S. [Architectural Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, PKI 243, Omaha, NE (United States); Henze, G. P. [Architectural Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, PKI 203D, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-part investigation of a novel approach to optimally control commercial building passive and active thermal storage inventory. The proposed building control approach is based on simulated reinforcement learning, which is a hybrid control scheme that combines features of model-based optimal control and model-free learning control. An experimental study was carried out to analyze the performance of a hybrid controller installed in a full-scale laboratory facility. The first paper introduced the theoretical foundation of this investigation including the fundamental theory of reinforcement learning control. This companion paper presents a discussion and analysis of the experimental results. The results confirm the feasibility of the proposed control approach. Operating cost savings were attained with the proposed control approach compared with conventional building control; however, the savings are lower than for the case of model-based predictive optimal control. As for the case of model-based predictive control, the performance of the hybrid controller is largely affected by the quality of the training model, and extensive real-time learning is required for the learning controller to eliminate any false cues it receives during the initial training period. Nevertheless, compared with standard reinforcement learning, the proposed hybrid controller is much more readily implemented in a commercial building. (author)

  17. Non-equilibrium simulations of thermally induced electric fields in water

    CERN Document Server

    Wirnsberger, Peter; Šarić, Anđela; Neumann, Martin; Dellago, Christoph; Frenkel, Daan

    2016-01-01

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, Bresme and co-workers recently demonstrated that water molecules align in response to an imposed temperature gradient. Employing the Wolf method to truncate the electrostatic interactions, they reported electric fields as high as $3.7\\times10^8~\\text{V/m}$ for a gradient of about $5.2~\\text{K/\\AA}$ [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 014504 (2013)]. Recently, however, Bresme and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 036101 (2015)] advocated that the Wolf method overestimates the induced electric field by an order of magnitude. In this work, we investigate how thermally induced fields depend on the underlying treatment of long-ranged interactions. Our key findings are: Firstly, under identical conditions we find the peak field strength to be $2.8\\times 10^7~\\text{V/m}$ and $2.2\\times 10^7~\\text{V/m}$ for Ewald summation and the Wolf method, respectively. Our value for the short-ranged method is therefore an order of magnitude lower than the original value reported by Bresme and...

  18. Three-dimensional Simulation of Thermal Harmonic Lasing FEL with Detuning of the Fundamental

    CERN Document Server

    Salehi, Elham; Mirian, Najmeh Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Detuning of the fundamental is a way to enhance harmonic generation . By this method, the wiggler is composed of two segments in such a way that the fundamental resonance of the second segment to coincide with the third harmonic of the first segment of the wiggler to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation and x-ray emission. A set of coupled, nonlinear, and first-order differential equations in three dimensions describing the evolution of the electron trajectories and the radiation field with warm beam is solved numerically by CYRUS 3D code in the steady-state for two models (1) seeded free electron laser (FEL) and (2) shot noise on the electron beam (self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL). Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread is considered. Three-dimensional simulation describes self-consistently the longitudinal spatial dependence of radiation waists, curvatures, and amplitudes together with the evaluation of the electron beam. The evolutions of the transverse modes are investigated...

  19. Thermal simulation experiment on the hydrocarbon regeneration of marine carbonate source rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI HuiLi; JIN ZhiJun; HE ZhiLiang; QIN JianZhong; SHAO ZhiBing

    2007-01-01

    Hydrocarbon regeneration of marine carbonate source rock was simulated with thermal experiments in a laboratory. The results reveal that hydrocarbon regeneration does not simply continue the primary hydrocarbon generation process, and that, for marine carbonate source rock, discontinuous hydrocarbon generation differs greatly from the continuous generation. Several different features of hydrocarbon regeneration were observed in the experiments. First, the liquid hydrocarbon generation peak was always observed no matter what the initial maturity of the sample was. Moreover, the maturity and the liquid hydrocarbon yield corresponding to the peak varied with the sample's initial maturity. Second, the hydrocarbon regeneration started earlier than the continuous one. In the experiments, the hydrocarbon could be re-generated when the sample maturity did not rise to any great extent. Third, the accumulative hydrocarbon-generating quantity during discontinuous generation was always more than that during continuous generation. And the hydrocarbon-generating quantity varied with the discontinuous generation history. Chemical kinetic analysis suggests that discontinuous hydrocarbon generation should not only be explained by the parallel reaction mechanism but also by the consecutive reaction mechanism which has been ignored in the traditional chemical kinetic model for continuous hydrocarbon generation.

  20. Conceptual design and simulation analysis of thermal behaviors of TGR blast furnace and oxygen blast furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Extensive use of carbon based fuel is the main inducement for global warming and more extreme weather.Reducing carbon dioxide emission and enhancing energy use is a common subject in steel industry.In the integrated steel plant,decreasing carbon dioxide emission must consider energy balance in the whole iron and steel works,and secondary energy must be actively utilized.As promising blast-furnaces,top gas recovery blast furnace(TGR-BF) and oxygen blast furnace have been investigated.In this paper,conceptual TGR blast furnace and oxygen blast furnace are proposed.Base on the idea of blast furnace gas de-CO2 circulating as reducing agent and the idea of pure oxygen blast decreasing the thermal reserve zone temperature,process modeling is conducted with ASPEN Plus.It is shown that the developed model reasonably describes the energy balance and mass balance feature of the furnace,and provides basic thermodynamic condition for furnaces.The effects of changes in different operation conditions are studied by sensitivity analysis and reference data from simulation.

  1. submitter Thermal stability of interface voids in Cu grain boundaries with molecular dynamic simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Xydou, A; Aicheler, M; Djurabekova, F

    2016-01-01

    By means of molecular dynamic simulations, the stability of cylindrical voids is examined with respect to the diffusion bonding procedure. To do this, the effect of grain boundaries between the grains of different crystallographic orientations on the void closing time was studied at high temperatures from 0.7 up to 0.94 of the bulk melting temperature $(T_m)$. The diameter of the voids varied from 3.5 to 6.5 nm. A thermal instability occurring at high temperatures at the surface of the void placed in a grain boundary triggered the eventual closure of the void at all examined temperatures. The closing time has an exponential dependence on the examined temperature values. A model based on the defect diffusion theory is developed to predict the closing time for voids of macroscopic size. The diffusion coefficient within the grain boundaries is found to be overall higher than the diffusion coefficient in the region around the void surface. The activation energy for the diffusion in the grain boundary is calculate...

  2. Simulation and experimental study on thermal optimization of the heat exchanger for automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Q. Su

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelectric technology has revealed the potential for automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generator (TEG, which contributes to the improvement of the fuel economy of the engine-powered vehicle. As a major factor, thermal capacity and heat transfer of the heat exchanger affect the performance of TEG effectively. With the thermal energy of exhaust gas harvested by thermoelectric modules, a temperature gradient appears on the heat exchanger surface, so as the interior flow distribution of the heat exchanger. In order to achieve uniform temperature distribution and higher interface temperature, the thermal characteristics of heat exchangers with various heat transfer enhancement features are studied, such as internal structure, material and surface area. Combining the computational fluid dynamics simulations and infrared test on a high-performance engine with a dynamometer, the thermal performance of the heat exchanger is evaluated. Simulation and experiment results show that a plate-shaped heat exchanger made of brass with accordion-shaped internal structure achieves a relatively ideal performance, which can practically improve overall thermal performance of the TEG.

  3. Numerical simulation of thermal behavior of lithium-ion secondary batteries using the enhanced single particle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Naoki; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Nagaoka, Makoto; Okuda, Chikaaki; Kawauchi, Shigehiro

    2014-04-01

    To understand the thermal behavior of lithium-ion secondary batteries, distributed information related to local heat generation across the entire electrode plane, which is caused by the electrochemical reaction that results from lithium-ion intercalation or deintercalation, is required. To accomplish this, we first developed an enhanced single particle (ESP) model for lithium-ion batteries that provides a cost effective, timely, and accurate method for estimating the local heat generation rates without excessive computation costs. This model accounts for all the physical processes, including the solution phase limitation. Next, a two-way electrochemical-thermal coupled simulation method was established. In this method, the three dimensional (3D) thermal solver is coupled with the quasi-3D porous electrode solver that is applied to the unrolled plane of spirally wound electrodes, which allows both thermal and electrochemical behaviors to be reproduced simultaneously at every computational time-step. The quasi-3D porous electrode solver implements the ESP model. This two-way coupled simulation method was applied to a thermal behavior analysis of 18650-type lithium-ion cells where it was found that temperature estimates of the electrode interior and on the cell can wall obtained via the ESP model were in good agreement with actual experimental measurements.

  4. Simulation-based Estimation of Thermal Behavior of Direct Feed Drive Mechanism with Updated Finite Element Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xiankun; LI Yanjun; LI Haolin

    2014-01-01

    Linear motors generate high heat and cause significant deformation in high speed direct feed drive mechanisms. It is relevant to estimate their deformation behavior to improve their application in precision machine tools. This paper describes a method to estimate its thermal deformation based on updated finite element(FE) model methods. Firstly, a FE model is established for a linear motor drive test rig that includes the correlation between temperature rise and its resulting deformation. The relationship between the input and output variables of the FE model is identified with a modified multivariate input/output least square support vector regression machine. Additionally, the temperature rise and displacements at some critical points on the mechanism are obtained experimentally by a system of thermocouples and an interferometer. The FE model is updated through intelligent comparison between the experimentally measured values and the results from the regression machine. The experiments for testing thermal behavior along with the updated FE model simulations is conducted on the test rig in reciprocating cycle drive conditions. The results show that the intelligently updated FE model can be implemented to analyze the temperature variation distribution of the mechanism and to estimate its thermal behavior. The accuracy of the thermal behavior estimation with the optimally updated method can be more than double that of the initial theoretical FE model. This paper provides a simulation method that is effective to estimate the thermal behavior of the direct feed drive mechanism with high accuracy.

  5. Results From an International Simulation Study on Couples Thermal, Hydrological, and Mechanical (THM) Processes Near Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist; D. Barr; J.T. Birkholzer; M. Chijimatsu; O. Kolditz; Q. Liu; Y. Oda; W. Wang; C. Zhang

    2006-08-02

    As part of the ongoing international DECOVALEX project, four research teams used five different models to simulate coupled thermal, hydrological, and mechanical (THM) processes near waste emplacement drifts of geological nuclear waste repositories. The simulations were conducted for two generic repository types, one with open and the other with back-filled repository drifts, under higher and lower postclosure temperatures, respectively. In the completed first model inception phase of the project, a good agreement was achieved between the research teams in calculating THM responses for both repository types, although some disagreement in hydrological responses is currently being resolved. In particular, good agreement in the basic thermal-mechanical responses was achieved for both repository types, even though some teams used relatively simplified thermal-elastic heat-conduction models that neglected complex near-field thermal-hydrological processes. The good agreement between the complex and simplified process models indicates that the basic thermal-mechanical responses can be predicted with a relatively high confidence level.

  6. Determination Of Thermal And Mechanical Properties Of Packaging Materials For The Use In FEM-Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Mike; Boehme, Bjoern; Meier, Karsten; Metasch, René

    2011-09-01

    Conventional and future electronic packages merge several different materials. Polymers, metals, solders, dielectrics, glasses, silicon, composites come together and show strong mechanical and material interaction. These interfacial effects increase if the miniaturization and diversification keep on rising as it is proposed. Many efforts have to be done to assure the system reliability of new electronic packages. The Finite Element Simulation has the ability to support the development process of new packages. The application of the FEM-analysis requires the knowledge about the precise mechanical and thermal behaviour of the materials. The paper presents different measurement methods to determine accurate mechanical material properties of moulding compound polymers, underfillers, solder mask, and wafer photo resist and solder joints. The temperature dependency is essential to be respected. The polymer materials moulding compound as well as solder mask were characterized by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis under humidity influences to determine mechanical properties as function of moisture and temperature. Further experiments on polymer were conducted to extract the cure kinetics by Differential Scanning Calorimetry and to determine Bulk Modulus by Pressure-Volume-Temperature experiments (PVT). Altogether, these material properties need to be modeled in a comprehensive way fitting to each other. The common practice of just compiling data from different sources has been found to fail yielding in reliable and accurate results. The conditions under which the data were determined may cause mismatches between them and cause inconsistencies within the model. If a convergent solution was obtained at all, much simulation time would be needed as many iterations with small time steps were needed. In order to avoid this, the paper reports an approach of characterizing the temperature and time dependent mechanical material properties in one comprehensive scheme. The solder

  7. Cyclic thermal signature in a global MHD simulation of solar convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, J.; Charbonneau, P.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    Space-based observations have clearly established that total solar irradiance (TSI) varies on time scales from minutes to days and months as well as on the longer time scale of the 11-year solar cycle. The most conspicuous of these variations is arguably the slight increase of TSI (0.1%) at solar maxima relative to solar minima. Models that include contributions from surface solar magnetism alone (i.e. sunspots, faculae and magnetic network) have been very successful at reproducing the observed TSI fluctuations on time scales shorter than a year, but leave some doubts as to the origin of the longer decadal fluctuations. In particular, one school of thought argues that surface magnetism alone can explain the entire TSI variance; see (Lean & al. 1998, ApJ, 492, 390), whereas; the other emphasizes on taking into account the effect of a global modulation of solar thermal structure by magnetic activity; see (Li & al. 2003, ApJ, 591, 1267). Observationally, the potential for the occurrence of magnetically-modulated global structural changes is supported by a positive correlation between p-mode oscillation frequencies and the TSI cycle as well as by recent evidence for a long-term trend in the TSI record that is not seen in indicators of surface magnetism; see (Bhatnagar & al. 1999, ApJ, 521, 885; Fröhlich 2013, Space Sci Rev,176, 237). Additionally, 1D structural solar models have demonstrated that the inclusion of a magnetically-modulated turbulent mechanism could explain the observed p-mode oscillation frequency changes with great accuracy. However, these models relied upon an ad-hoc parametrization of the alleged process and therefore obtaining a complete physical picture of the modulating mechanism requires solving the equations governing the self-consistent evolution of the solar plasma. Here we present a global magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulation of solar convection extending over more than a millennium that produces large-scale solar-like axisymmetric magnetic

  8. FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION FOR STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF U7MO DISPERSION FUEL PLATES VIA FLUID-THERMAL-STRUCTURAL INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakan Ozaltun; Herman Shen; Pavel Madvedev

    2010-11-01

    This article presents numerical simulation of dispersion fuel mini plates via fluid–thermal–structural interaction performed by commercial finite element solver COMSOL Multiphysics to identify initial mechanical response under actual operating conditions. Since fuel particles are dispersed in Aluminum matrix, and temperatures during the fabrication process reach to the melting temperature of the Aluminum matrix, stress/strain characteristics of the domain cannot be reproduced by using simplified models and assumptions. Therefore, fabrication induced stresses were considered and simulated via image based modeling techniques with the consideration of the high temperature material data. In order to identify the residuals over the U7Mo particles and the Aluminum matrix, a representative SEM image was employed to construct a microstructure based thermo-elasto-plastic FE model. Once residuals and plastic strains were identified in micro-scale, solution was used as initial condition for subsequent multiphysics simulations at the continuum level. Furthermore, since solid, thermal and fluid properties are temperature dependent and temperature field is a function of the velocity field of the coolant, coupled multiphysics simulations were considered. First, velocity and pressure fields of the coolant were computed via fluidstructural interaction. Computed solution for velocity fields were used to identify the temperature distribution on the coolant and on the fuel plate via fluid-thermal interaction. Finally, temperature fields and residual stresses were used to obtain the stress field of the plates via fluid-thermal-structural interaction.

  9. Simulations of thermally transferred OSL signals in quartz: Accuracy and precision of the protocols for equivalent dose evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, Vasilis, E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.edu [Physics Department, McDaniel College, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Adamiec, Grzegorz [Silesian University of Technology, Institute of Physics, GADAM Centre of Excellence, ul. Krzywoustego 2, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Athanassas, C. [Laboratory of Archaeometry, Institute of Materials Science, N.C.S.R. ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi, Athens153 10 (Greece); Chen Reuven [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Baker, Atlee; Larsen, Meredith; Thompson, Zachary [Physics Department, McDaniel College, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > This paper presents extensive numerical simulations of the ReSAR protocol for luminescence dating. > We simulate several experimental versions of the ReSAR protocol and compare their relative accuracy and precision. > Simulations are carried out using a recently published kinetic model for quartz, consisting of 11 energy levels. > Natural doses above 400 Gy are underestimated in the protocols. > Possible sources of this underestimation are investigated. - Abstract: Thermally-transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) signals in sedimentary quartz have been the subject of several recent studies, due to the potential shown by these signals to increase the range of luminescence dating by an order of magnitude. Based on these signals, a single aliquot protocol termed the ReSAR protocol has been developed and tested experimentally. This paper presents extensive numerical simulations of this ReSAR protocol. The purpose of the simulations is to investigate several aspects of the ReSAR protocol which are believed to cause difficulties during application of the protocol. Furthermore, several modified versions of the ReSAR protocol are simulated, and their relative accuracy and precision are compared. The simulations are carried out using a recently published kinetic model for quartz, consisting of 11 energy levels. One hundred random variants of the natural samples were generated by keeping the transition probabilities between energy levels fixed, while allowing simultaneous random variations of the concentrations of the 11 energy levels. The relative intrinsic accuracy and precision of the protocols are simulated by calculating the equivalent dose (ED) within the model, for a given natural burial dose of the sample. The complete sequence of steps undertaken in several versions of the dating protocols is simulated. The relative intrinsic precision of these techniques is estimated by fitting Gaussian probability functions to the resulting simulated

  10. Thermal and Hydrological Response of Rock Glaciers to Climate Change: A Scenario Based Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaloo, Jotham; Brenning, Alexander; Gruber, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    Rock glaciers are ice-debris landforms characterized by creeping ice-rich permafrost. Recognition of their hydrological significance is increasing and is of particular relevance to the dry Andes, where rock glaciers cover greater area than glaciers. However, additional knowledge and research approaches pertaining to the seasonal hydrological contributions and climatic sensitivities of rock glaciers are necessary for improved water resource planning in many regions around the world. This work explores the utility of the energy and water balance model GEOtop to quantify the thermal and hydrological response of rock glaciers to climate scenarios. Weather data was generated with the intermediate-stochastic weather generator AWE-GEN for a site in the Southeast Swiss Alps, which marked a novel approach in cryospheric studies. Weather data for a reference scenario was generated which approximates conditions during the observation period (1985-2012). AWE-GEN produced time series of weather data for the reference scenario with statistical properties of precipitation in close agreement with observations, but air temperature showed substantial negative biases in summer months, which are attributed to difficulties in modeling local climatic characteristics. To examine the influence of climate change, data for eight climate change scenarios were generated by specifying change factors for mean monthly air temperature. The thermal and hydrological evolution of rock glacier soils were simulated for 50 years under the climatic forcing of the reference scenario followed by 50 years under each climate change scenario. Mean annual ground surface temperature (MAGST), active layer depth, permafrost total ice content, and the potential summer runoff contribution were quantified and compared before and after the onset of the climate change conditions. Air temperature increases in the climate change scenarios were amplified in MAGST. Stable rock glacier points were resistant to changes in

  11. Analysis of human factors on urban heat island and simulation of urban thermal environment in Lanzhou city, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jinghu

    2015-01-01

    Urban heat island (UHI) effect is a global phenomenon caused by urbanization. Because of the number and complexity of factors contributing to the urban thermal environment, traditional statistical methods are insufficient for acquiring data and analyzing the impact of human activities on the thermal environment, especially for identifying which factors are dominant. The UHI elements were extracted using thermal infrared remote sensing data to retrieve the land surface temperatures of Lanzhou city, and then adopting an object-oriented fractal net evolution approach to create an image segmentation of the land surface temperature (LST). The effects of urban expansion on the urban thermal environment were quantitatively analyzed. A comprehensive evaluation system of the urban thermal environment was constructed, the spatial pattern of the urban thermal environment in Lanzhou was assessed, and principal influencing factors were identified using spatial principal component analysis (SPCA) and multisource spatial data. We found that in the last 20 years, the UHI effect in Lanzhou city has been strengthened, as the UHI ratio index has increased from 0.385 in 1993 to 0.579 in 2001 and to 0.653 in 2011. The UHI expansion had a spatiotemporal consistency with the urban expansion. The four major factors that affect the spatial pattern of the urban thermal environment in Lanzhou can be ranked in the following order: landscape configuration, anthropogenic heat release, urban construction, and gradient from man-made to natural land cover. These four together accounted for 91.27% of the variance. A linear model was thus successfully constructed, implying that SPCA is helpful in identifying major contributors to UHI. Regression analysis indicated that the instantaneous LST and the simulated thermal environment have a good linear relationship, the correlation coefficient between the two reached 0.8011, highly significant at a confidence level of 0.001.

  12. Effects of calculation approaches for thermal conductivity on the simulation accuracy of billet continuous casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zun Peng; Yan-ping Bao; Ya-nan Chen; Li-kang Yang; Cao Xie; Feng Zhang

    2014-01-01

    An unsteady, two-dimensional, explicitly solved finite difference heat transfer model of a billet caster was presented to clarify the influence of the thermal conductivity of steel on model accuracy. Different approaches were utilized for calculating the thermal conductivity of solid, mushy and liquid steels. Model results predicted by these approaches were compared, and the advantages of advocated approaches were discussed. It is found that the approach for calculating the thermal conductivity of solid steel notably influences model predictions. Convection effects of liquid steel should be considered properly while calculating the thermal conductivity of mushy steel. Different values of the effective thermal conductivity of liquid steel adopted could partly be explained by the fact that different models adopted dissimilar ap-proaches for calculating the thermal conductivity of solid and mushy steels.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, M.; Srivastava, Deepak; Govindan,T. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have very attractive electronic, mechanical. and thermal properties. Recently, measurements of thermal conductivity in single wall CNT mats showed estimated thermal conductivity magnitudes ranging from 17.5 to 58 W/cm-K at room temperature. which are better than bulk graphite. The cylinderical symmetry of CNT leads to large thermal conductivity along the tube axis, additionally, unlike graphite. CNTs can be made into ropes that can be used as heat conducting pipes for nanoscale applications. The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes has been calculated over temperature range from l00 K to 600 K using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics using Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. Thermal conductivity of single wall CNTs shows a peaking behavior as a function of temperature. Dependence of the peak position on the chirality and radius of the tube will be discussed and explained in this presentation.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, M.; Srivastava, Deepak; Govindan,T. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have very attractive electronic, mechanical. and thermal properties. Recently, measurements of thermal conductivity in single wall CNT mats showed estimated thermal conductivity magnitudes ranging from 17.5 to 58 W/cm-K at room temperature. which are better than bulk graphite. The cylinderical symmetry of CNT leads to large thermal conductivity along the tube axis, additionally, unlike graphite. CNTs can be made into ropes that can be used as heat conducting pipes for nanoscale applications. The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes has been calculated over temperature range from l00 K to 600 K using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics using Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. Thermal conductivity of single wall CNTs shows a peaking behavior as a function of temperature. Dependence of the peak position on the chirality and radius of the tube will be discussed and explained in this presentation.

  15. Numerical Simulation for Thermal Shock Resistance of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics Considering the Effects of Initial Stress Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking the hafnium diboride ceramic as an example, the effects of heating rate, cooling rate, thermal shock initial temperature, and external constraint on the thermal shock resistance (TSR of ultra-high temperature ceramics (UHTCs were studied through numerical simulation in this paper. The results show that the external constraint has an approximately linear influence on the critical rupture temperature difference of UHTCs. The external constraint prepares a compressive stress field in the structure because of the predefined temperature field, and this compressive stress field relieves the tension stress in the structure when it is cooled down and then it improves the TSR of UHTCs. As the thermal shock initial temperature, a danger heating rate (or cooling rate exists where the critical temperature difference is the lowest.

  16. Thermal aging stability of infiltrated solid oxide fuel cell electrode microstructures: A three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxiang; Ni, Meng; Yan, Mufu; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-12-01

    Nanostructured electrodes are widely used for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells, due to their remarkably high activity. However, the industrial applications of the infiltrated electrodes are hindered by the durability issues, such as the microstructure stability against thermal aging. Few strategies are available to overcome this challenge due to the limited knowledge about the coarsening kinetics of the infiltrated electrodes and how the potentially important factors affect the stability. In this work, the generic thermal aging kinetics of the three-dimensional microstructures of the infiltrate electrodes is investigated by a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation model considering surface diffusion mechanism. Effects of temperature, infiltration loading, wettability, and electrode configuration are studied and the key geometric parameters are calculated such as the infiltrate particle size, the total and percolated quantities of three-phase boundary length and infiltrate surface area, and the tortuosity factor of infiltrate network. Through parametric study, several strategies to improve the thermal aging stability are proposed.

  17. Simulation and experimental study of thermal performance of a building roof with a phase change material (PCM)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Mannivannan; M T Jaffarsathiq Ali

    2015-12-01

    Latent heat storage in a phase change material (PCM) is very attractive because of its high-energy storage density and its isothermal behaviour during the phase change process. Low thermal conductivity of the walls and roof reduces the heat gain at a steady state condition. Chloride hexahydrate (CaCl26H2O) as a phase change material (PCM) for a room was proposed in this paper to control the indoor air temperature for a better thermal comfort for human beings. Building concrete roof with vertical cylindrical hole of 0.5 $\\times$ 0.5 m and array of 3 $\\times$ 3 filled with phase change material (PCM) was considered for analysis. A detailed thermal analysis was carried by both simulation and experimental study. Results showed that this type of PCM room can decrease the indoor air temperature fluctuation by a maximum of 4°C.

  18. Coarse-grained simulation of molecular mechanisms of recovery in thermally activated shape-memory polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abberton, Brendan C.; Liu, Wing Kam; Keten, Sinan

    2013-12-01

    Thermally actuated shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are capable of being programmed into a temporary shape and then recovering their permanent reference shape upon exposure to heat, which facilitates a phase transition that allows dramatic increase in molecular mobility. Experimental, analytical, and computational studies have established empirical relations of the thermomechanical behavior of SMPs that have been instrumental in device design. However, the underlying mechanisms of the recovery behavior and dependence on polymer microstructure remain to be fully understood for copolymer systems. This presents an opportunity for bottom-up studies through molecular modeling; however, the limited time-scales of atomistic simulations prohibit the study of key performance metrics pertaining to recovery. In order to elucidate the effects of phase fraction, recovery temperature, and deformation temperature on shape recovery, here we investigate the shape-memory behavior in a copolymer model with coarse-grained potentials using a two-phase molecular model that reproduces physical crosslinking. Our simulation protocol allows observation of upwards of 90% strain recovery in some cases, at time-scales that are on the order of the timescale of the relevant relaxation mechanism (stress relaxation in the unentangled soft-phase). Partial disintegration of the glassy phase during mechanical deformation is found to contribute to irrecoverable strain. Temperature dependence of the recovery indicates nearly full elastic recovery above the trigger temperature, which is near the glass-transition temperature of the rubbery switching matrix. We find that the trigger temperature is also directly correlated with the deformation temperature, indicating that deformation temperature influences the recovery temperatures required to obtain a given amount of shape recovery, until the plateau regions overlap above the transition region. Increasing the fraction of glassy phase results in higher strain

  19. Numerical simulation of a thermal-bubble actuated diffuser-nozzle valveless pump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A valveless micropump actuated by thermal bubbles which are generated by an electrode heater mounted with a pair of diffuser nozzles has been numerically studied by commercial CFD software FLUENT. The relationships between the net flow rate and the superheating and heat supplying frequency have been investigated. The depth of the diffuser-nozzle micropump is 200 μm, the diameter of the actuating chamber is 1 mm, and a pair of diffuser nozzles whose gap has been expanded from 30 μm to 274 μm with an open angle of 7° are connected to the actuating chamber. The working fluid is methanol. In the numerical simulation, the flow pattern is laminar. The results show that the pump has different optimal driving frequencies at different superheating. A cycle resulting from bubble growth and shrinking costs more time at higher superheating temperature; different superheating has different optimal driving frequency; when the superheating increases, the maximum volume flow rate and the maximum pump pressure will increase simultaneously, and the optimal driving frequency decreases as well, the maximum volume flow rate and pump pressure also have the same tendency; in the condition of uncontrolled condensing, the bubble shrinking process is longer than the growth process, thus it is the determining factor to affect the pump performance. The maximum volume flow rate is 9.02 μL/min at △T = 15℃, and the maximum pump pressure is 680 Pa. With the increase of wall superheat, cycle including the bubble growth and condensation will become longer, resulting in a significant impact on the pumping flow; different wall superheat has different optimized frequency, increasing superheat will bring increased pumping flow and pump pressure, the optimized driving frequency will be reduced; liquid supply phase is longer than pumping phase.

  20. In-situ measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of oil-sandstone samples under simulated conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuxia Cheng; Zhilan Li; Xinshi Ge; Jiangan Li; Yongzhong Zhang; Xingan Liang; Youwang Song; Huangqing Feng (University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China). Dept. of Engineering Thermophysics)

    1990-01-01

    A transient-state thermal test apparatus for the in situ measurement of the thermal conductivity of core samples, under simulated conditions has been developed. It has an operational temperature range of 293 to 523k. Confinement pressures of 10 -11 MPa can be applied to the sample to simulate overburden load. Pore fluid pressures up to 8-9 MPa can be generated within the test cell to ensure fluid saturation of the sample throughout a test. The variation of degree of oil/water saturation in a sample can be easily achieved within the test cell. The test apparatus can be used to measure the effects of the material itself, its degree of fluid saturation, and ambient conditions. (author).

  1. Electrical-thermal interaction simulation for resistance spot welding nugget process of mild steel and stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春生; 韩凤武; 陆培德; 赵熹华; 陈勇; 邱冬生

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite difference electrical-thermal model for resistance spot welding nugget process of mild steel and stainless steel is introduced. A simulation method of the interaction of electrical and thermal factors is presented. Meanwhile, calculation method of contact resistance and treatment method of heater structure is provided. The influence of the temperature dependent material properties and various cooling boundary conditions on welding process was also taken into account in the model. A method for improving the mild steel and stainless steel joint was analyzed in numerical simulation process. Experimental verification shows that the model prediction agrees well with the practice. The model provides a useful theoretic tool for the analysis of the process of resistance spot welding of mild steel and stainless steel.

  2. Numerical simulation of long-period fluid temperature fluctuation at a mixing tee for the thermal fatigue problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utanohara, Yoichi, E-mail: utanohara@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Nakamura, Akira, E-mail: a-naka@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Miyoshi, Koji, E-mail: miyoshi.koji@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Kasahara, Naoto, E-mail: kasahara@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A large eddy simulation of a mixing tee was carried out. • Fluid temperature fluctuation could be predicted qualitatively. • Grid convergence was almost attained and the simulation continued until 100 s. • A longer-period temperature fluctuation than the well-known St = 0.2 appeared. • Prediction of long-period temperature fluctuations improves the thermal fatigue assessment. - Abstract: Thermal fatigue cracks may be initiated at mixing tees where high and low temperature fluids flow in and mix. According to a previous study, damage by thermal fatigue depends on the frequency of the fluid temperature fluctuation near the wall surface. Structures have the time constant of structural response that depends on physical properties of the structure and the gain of the frequency response tends to become maximum at the frequency lower than the typical frequency of fluid temperature fluctuation. Hence the effect of the lower frequency, that is, long-period temperature fluctuation is important for the thermal fatigue assessment. The typical frequency of fluid temperature fluctuation is about St = 0.2 (nearly 6 Hz), where St is Strouhal number and means non-dimensional frequency. In the experimental study by Miyoshi et al. (2014), a longer-period fluctuation than St = 0.2 was also observed. Results of a fluid–structure coupled analysis by Kamaya et al. (2011) showed this long-period temperature fluctuation causes severer damage to piping. In the present study, a large eddy simulation was carried out to investigate the predictive performance of the long-period fluid temperature fluctuation more quantitatively. Numerical simulation was conducted for the WATLON experiment which was the water experiment of a mixing tee performed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Four computational grids were used to confirm grid convergence. In the short time (9 s) simulations, tendencies of time-averaged and fluctuated velocities could be followed. Time

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of the lattice thermal conductivity of thermoelectric material CuInTe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Liu, H.J., E-mail: phlhj@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Cheng, L.; Zhang, J.; Jiang, P.H.; Liang, J.H.; Fan, D.D.; Shi, J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2017-05-10

    Highlights: • A simple but effective Morse potential is constructed to accurately describe the interatomic interactions of CuInTe{sub 2}. • The lattice thermal conductivity of CuInTe{sub 2} predicted by MD agrees well with those measured experimentally, as well as those calculated from phonon BTE. • Introducing Cd impurity or Cu vacancy can effectively reduce the lattice thermal conductivity of CuInTe{sub 2} and thus further enhance its thermoelectric performance. - Abstract: The lattice thermal conductivity of thermoelectric material CuInTe{sub 2} is predicted using classical molecular dynamics simulations, where a simple but effective Morse-type interatomic potential is constructed by fitting first-principles total energy calculations. In a broad temperature range from 300 to 900 K, our simulated results agree well with those measured experimentally, as well as those obtained from phonon Boltzmann transport equation. By introducing the Cd impurity or Cu vacancy, the thermal conductivity of CuInTe{sub 2} can be effectively reduced to further enhance the thermoelectric performance of this chalcopyrite compound.

  4. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF THERMALLY-STRATIFIED TURBULENT CHANNEL FLOW WITH TEMPERATURE OSCILLATION ON THE BOTTOM WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-hong; LU Xi-yun; ZHUANG Li-xian

    2004-01-01

    Thermally-stratified shear turbulent channel flow with temperature oscillation on the bottom wall of the channel was investigated with the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach coupled with dynamic Sub-Grid-Scale (SGS) models. The effect of temperature oscillation on the turbulent channel flow behavior was examined. The phase-averaged velocities and temperature, and flow structures at different Richardson numbers and periods of the oscillation was analyzed.

  5. Quantitatively analyzing phonon spectral contribution of thermal conductivity based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. II. From time Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Hu, Ming

    2015-11-01

    From a nanoscale heat transfer point of view, currently one of the most interesting and challenging tasks is to quantitatively analyze phonon mode specific transport properties in solid materials, which plays a vital role in many emerging and diverse technological applications. It has not been long that such information can be provided by the phonon spectral energy density (SED) or equivalently time domain normal mode analysis (TDNMA) methods in the framework of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations. However, few methods have been developed for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations [Phys. Rev. B 91, 115426 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.115426], the other widely used computational method for calculating thermal transport of materials in addition to EMD. In this work, a computational scheme based on time Fourier transform of atomistic heat current, called the frequency domain direct decomposed method (FDDDM), is proposed to analyze the contributions of frequency dependent thermal conductivity in NEMD simulations. The FDDDM results of Lennard-Jones argon and Stillinger-Weber Si are compared with the TDNMA method from EMD simulation. Similar trends are found for both cases, which confirm the validity of our FDDDM approach. Benefiting from the inherent nature of NEMD and the theoretical formula that does not require any temperature assumption, the FDDDM can be directly used to investigate the size and temperature effect. Moreover, the unique advantage of FDDDM prior to previous methods (such as SED and TDNMA) is that it can be straightforwardly used to characterize the phonon frequency dependent thermal conductivity of disordered systems, such as amorphous materials. The FDDDM approach can also be a good candidate to be used to understand the phonon behaviors and thus provides useful guidance for designing efficient structures for advanced thermal management.

  6. Coupled optical and thermal detailed simulations for the accurate evaluation and performance improvement of molten salts solar towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Barberena, Javier; Mutuberria, Amaia; Palacin, Luis G.; Sanz, Javier L.; Pereira, Daniel; Bernardos, Ana; Sanchez, Marcelino; Rocha, Alberto R.

    2017-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Centre of Spain, CENER, and the Technology & Innovation area of ACS Cobra, as a result of their long term expertise in the CSP field, have developed a high-quality and high level of detail optical and thermal simulation software for the accurate evaluation of Molten Salts Solar Towers. The main purpose of this software is to make a step forward in the state-of-the-art of the Solar Towers simulation programs. Generally, these programs deal with the most critical systems of such plants, i.e. the solar field and the receiver, on an independent basis. Therefore, these programs typically neglect relevant aspects in the operation of the plant as heliostat aiming strategies, solar flux shapes onto the receiver, material physical and operational limitations, transient processes as preheating and secure cloud passing operating modes, and more. The modelling approach implemented in the developed program consists on effectively coupling detailed optical simulations of the heliostat field with also detailed and full-transient thermal simulations of the molten salts tube-based external receiver. The optical model is based on an accurate Monte Carlo ray-tracing method which solves the complete solar field by simulating each of the heliostats at once according to their specific layout in the field. In the thermal side, the tube-based cylindrical external receiver of a Molten Salts Solar Tower is modelled assuming one representative tube per panel, and implementing the specific connection layout of the panels as well as the internal receiver pipes. Each tube is longitudinally discretized and the transient energy and mass balances in the temperature dependent molten salts and steel tube models are solved. For this, a one dimensional radial heat transfer model based is used. The thermal model is completed with a detailed control and operation strategy module, able to represent the appropriate operation of the plant. An integration framework has been

  7. Diffusion and thermal escape of CH4 and H2 from Titan's upper atmosphere: Direct Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, O. J.; Tenishev, V.; Combi, M. R.; Nagy, A. F.; Johnson, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    We expand on our previous studies using a similar Direct Monte Carlo Simulation (DSMC) technique to examine the role of thermal conduction and escape in Titan's upper atmosphere for comparison to Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) densities for N2, CH4 and H2 for the T43 encounter. Recent studies have shown the INMS N2 density measurements in Titan's upper atmosphere are indicative of a highly variable thermal structure, however the energy sources and sinks to the atmosphere that result in the large gradients remain unclear (e.g., Snowden et al., 2013a, b). In our previous study (Tucker et al., 2013) we showed that H2 escape from Titan's upper atmosphere adiabatically cools both N2 and CH4 resulting in density profiles that mimic outward flow. Furthermore, we found from steady state calculations that, over the range of temperatures suggested for Titan's upper atmosphere, the H2 densities in our simulations separated from background atmosphere at altitudes lower than in the Cassini data. In this study we include heating in the simulation domain and we model both CH4 and H2 in the background N2 atmosphere. At a lower boundary of the simulation domain, well below the exobase, we will use the INMS density data and a temperature obtained from published results (e.g., Snowden et al., 2013b, Westlake et al., 2011). In the simulation domain we will use typical energy deposition rates suggested for solar UV and precipitating ions from Saturn's magnetosphere into the upper atmosphere (e.g., Johnson et al., 2009), as well as, the heating rates suggested to reproduce the T43 temperature profile in Snowden et al, (2013b). For comparison the heating rates will be used for both steady state and temporal, over 1 Titan day, calculations. Support for this work was provided by grant NNH12ZDA001N-OPR from the NASA ROSES Outer Planets Research Program. Johnson, R.E., 2009. Titan from Cassini Huygens. Mass Loss Processes in Titan's Upper Atmosphere. Springer, New York (Chapter

  8. Hybrid (particle in cell-fluid) simulation of ion-acoustic soliton generation including super-thermal and trapped electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nopoush, M.; Abbasi, H. [Faculty of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P. O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    The present paper is devoted to the simulation of the nonlinear disintegration of a localized perturbation into an ion-acoustic soliton in a plasma. Recently, this problem was studied by a simple model [H. Abbasi et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 095007 (2008)]. The main assumptions were (i) in the electron velocity distribution function (DF), the ion-acoustic soliton velocity was neglected in comparison to the electron thermal velocity, (ii) on the ion-acoustic evolution time-scale, the electron velocity DF was assumed to be stationary, and (iii) the calculation was restricted to the small amplitude case. In order to generalize the model, one has to consider the evolution of the electron velocity DF for finite amplitudes. For this purpose, a one dimensional electrostatic hybrid code, particle in cell (PIC)-fluid, was designed. It simulates the electrons dynamics by the PIC method and the cold ions dynamics by the fluid equations. The plasma contains a population of super-thermal electrons and, therefore, a Lorentzian (kappa) velocity DF is used to model the high energy tail in the electron velocity DF. Electron trapping is included in the simulation in view of their nonlinear resonant interaction with the localized perturbation. A Gaussian initial perturbation is used to model the localized perturbation. The influence of both the trapped and the super-thermal electrons on this process is studied and compared with the previous model.

  9. Development of a higher-order finite volume method for simulation of thermal oil recovery process using moving mesh strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, M. [Heriot Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    This paper described a project in which a higher order up-winding scheme was used to solve mass/energy conservation equations for simulating steam flood processes in an oil reservoir. Thermal recovery processes are among the most complex because they require a detailed accounting of thermal energy and chemical reaction kinetics. The numerical simulation of thermal recovery processes involves localized phenomena such as saturation and temperatures fronts due to hyperbolic features of governing conservation laws. A second order accurate FV method that was improved by a moving mesh strategy was used to adjust for moving coordinates on a finely gridded domain. The Finite volume method was used and the problem of steam injection was then tested using derived solution frameworks on both mixed and moving coordinates. The benefits of using a higher-order Godunov solver instead of lower-order ones were qualified. This second order correction resulted in better resolution on moving features. Preferences of higher-order solvers over lower-order ones in terms of shock capturing is under further investigation. It was concluded that although this simulation study was limited to steam flooding processes, the newly presented approach may be suitable to other enhanced oil recovery processes such as VAPEX, SAGD and in situ combustion processes. 23 refs., 28 figs.

  10. Theoretical modelling, experimental studies and clinical simulations of urethral cooling catheters for use during prostate thermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Sean R H [Division of Medical Physics, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Sherar, Michael D [Division of Medical Physics, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)

    2003-03-21

    Urethral cooling catheters are used to prevent thermal damage to the urethra during thermal therapy of the prostate. Quantification of a catheter's heat transfer characteristics is necessary for prediction of the catheter's influence on the temperature and thermal dose distribution in periurethral tissue. Two cooling catheters with different designs were examined: the Dornier Urowave catheter and a prototype device from BSD Medical Corp. A convection coefficient, h, was used to characterize the cooling ability of each catheter. The value of the convection coefficient (h = 330 W m{sup -2} deg C{sup -1} for the Dornier catheter, h = 160 W m{sup -2} deg C{sup -1} for the BSD device) was obtained by comparing temperatures measured in a tissue-equivalent phantom material to temperatures predicted by a finite element method simulation of the phantom experiments. The coefficient was found to be insensitive to the rate of coolant flow inside the catheter between 40 and 120 ml min{sup -1}. The convection coefficient method for modelling urethral catheters was incorporated into simulations of microwave heating of the prostate. Results from these simulations indicate that the Dornier device is significantly more effective than the BSD catheter at cooling the tissue surrounding the urethra.

  11. Multi-scale numerical simulations of thermal expansion properties of CNT-reinforced nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamusi, Affa; Hu, Ning; Qiu, Jianhui; Li, Yuan; Chang, Christiana; Atobe, Satoshi; Fukunaga, Hisao; Liu, Yaolu; Ning, Huiming; Wu, Liangke; Li, Jinhua; Yuan, Weifeng; Watanabe, Tomonori; Yan, Cheng; Zhang, Yajun

    2013-01-07

    In this work, the thermal expansion properties of carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced nanocomposites with CNT content ranging from 1 to 15 wt% were evaluated using a multi-scale numerical approach, in which the effects of two parameters, i.e., temperature and CNT content, were investigated extensively. For all CNT contents, the obtained results clearly revealed that within a wide low-temperature range (30°C ~ 62°C), thermal contraction is observed, while thermal expansion occurs in a high-temperature range (62°C ~ 120°C). It was found that at any specified CNT content, the thermal expansion properties vary with temperature - as temperature increases, the thermal expansion rate increases linearly. However, at a specified temperature, the absolute value of the thermal expansion rate decreases nonlinearly as the CNT content increases. Moreover, the results provided by the present multi-scale numerical model were in good agreement with those obtained from the corresponding theoretical analyses and experimental measurements in this work, which indicates that this multi-scale numerical approach provides a powerful tool to evaluate the thermal expansion properties of any type of CNT/polymer nanocomposites and therefore promotes the understanding on the thermal behaviors of CNT/polymer nanocomposites for their applications in temperature sensors, nanoelectronics devices, etc.

  12. Thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons under shear deformation: A molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Hao, Xiao-Li; Wang, Cui-Xia; Wei, Ning; Rabczuk, Timon

    2017-01-25

    Tensile strain and compress strain can greatly affect the thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). However, the effect of GNRs under shear strain, which is also one of the main strain effect, has not been studied systematically yet. In this work, we employ reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (RNEMD) to the systematical study of the thermal conductivity of GNRs (with model size of 4 nm × 15 nm) under the shear strain. Our studies show that the thermal conductivity of GNRs is not sensitive to the shear strain, and the thermal conductivity decreases only 12-16% before the pristine structure is broken. Furthermore, the phonon frequency and the change of the micro-structure of GNRs, such as band angel and bond length, are analyzed to explore the tendency of thermal conductivity. The results show that the main influence of shear strain is on the in-plane phonon density of states (PDOS), whose G band (higher frequency peaks) moved to the low frequency, thus the thermal conductivity is decreased. The unique thermal properties of GNRs under shear strains suggest their great potentials for graphene nanodevices and great potentials in the thermal managements and thermoelectric applications.

  13. Thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons under shear deformation: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Hao, Xiao-Li; Wang, Cui-Xia; Wei, Ning; Rabczuk, Timon

    2017-01-01

    Tensile strain and compress strain can greatly affect the thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). However, the effect of GNRs under shear strain, which is also one of the main strain effect, has not been studied systematically yet. In this work, we employ reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (RNEMD) to the systematical study of the thermal conductivity of GNRs (with model size of 4 nm × 15 nm) under the shear strain. Our studies show that the thermal conductivity of GNRs is not sensitive to the shear strain, and the thermal conductivity decreases only 12–16% before the pristine structure is broken. Furthermore, the phonon frequency and the change of the micro-structure of GNRs, such as band angel and bond length, are analyzed to explore the tendency of thermal conductivity. The results show that the main influence of shear strain is on the in-plane phonon density of states (PDOS), whose G band (higher frequency peaks) moved to the low frequency, thus the thermal conductivity is decreased. The unique thermal properties of GNRs under shear strains suggest their great potentials for graphene nanodevices and great potentials in the thermal managements and thermoelectric applications. PMID:28120921

  14. Opportunities and constraints of presently used thermal manikins for thermo-physiological simulation of the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psikuta, Agnes; Kuklane, Kalev; Bogdan, Anna; Havenith, George; Annaheim, Simon; Rossi, René M.

    2016-03-01

    Combining the strengths of an advanced mathematical model of human physiology and a thermal manikin is a new paradigm for simulating thermal behaviour of humans. However, the forerunners of such adaptive manikins showed some substantial limitations. This project aimed to determine the opportunities and constraints of the existing thermal manikins when dynamically controlled by a mathematical model of human thermal physiology. Four thermal manikins were selected and evaluated for their heat flux measurement uncertainty including lateral heat flows between manikin body parts and the response of each sector to the frequent change of the set-point temperature typical when using a physiological model for control. In general, all evaluated manikins are suitable for coupling with a physiological model with some recommendations for further improvement of manikin dynamic performance. The proposed methodology is useful to improve the performance of the adaptive manikins and help to provide a reliable and versatile tool for the broad research and development domain of clothing, automotive and building engineering.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Temperature Field and Thermal Stress Field of Work Roll During Hot Strip Rolling