WorldWideScience

Sample records for fuel ratio measurement

  1. The prospect for fuel ion ratio measurements in ITER by collective Thomson scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stejner Pedersen, Morten; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh

    2012-01-01

    We show that collective Thomson scattering (CTS) holds the potential to become a new diagnostic principle for measurements of the fuel ion ratio, nT/nD, in ITER. Fuel ion ratio measurements will be important for plasma control and machine protection in ITER. Measurements of ion cyclotron structures...

  2. Effect of fuel type on equivalence ratio measurements using chemiluminescence in premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orain, Mikaël; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2010-05-01

    Local temporally-resolved measurements of chemiluminescent intensity from OH ∗, CH ∗ and C ∗2 radicals were obtained in premixed counterflow flames operating with propane and prevaporised fuels (isooctane, ethanol and methanol), for different equivalence ratios and strain rates. The results quantified independently the effects of fuel type, strain rate and equivalence ratio on chemiluminescent emissions from flames. The ability of chemiluminescent intensity from OH ∗, CH ∗ and C ∗2 radicals to indicate heat release rate depends strongly on fuel type. The intensity ratio OH ∗/CH ∗ has a monotonic decrease with equivalence ratio for all fuels and can be used to measure equivalence ratio of the reacting mixture. For propane and isooctane, the OH ∗/CH ∗ ratio remains independent of flame strain rate, whereas some dependence is observed for ethanol and methanol.

  3. Principles of fuel ion ratio measurements in fusion plasmas by collective Thomson scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stejner Pedersen, Morten; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Bindslev, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    ratio. Measurements of the fuel ion ratio will be important for plasma control and machine protection in future experiments with burning fusion plasmas. Here we examine the theoretical basis for fuel ion ratio measurements by CTS. We show that the sensitivity to plasma composition is enhanced......For certain scattering geometries collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements are sensitive to the composition of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. CTS therefore holds the potential to become a new diagnostic for measurements of the fuel ion ratio—i.e. the tritium to deuterium density...... by the signatures of ion cyclotron motion and ion Bernstein waves which appear for scattering geometries with resolved wave vectors near perpendicular to the magnetic field. We investigate the origin and properties of these features in CTS spectra and give estimates of their relative importance for fuel ion ratio...

  4. Irradiated Xenon Isotopic Ratio Measurement for Failed Fuel Detection and Location in Fast Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Chikara; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Harano, Hideki

    2009-08-01

    The accuracy of xenon isotopic ratio burn-up calculations used for failed fuel identification was evaluated by an irradiation test of xenon tag gas samples in the Joyo test reactor. The experiment was carried out using pressurized steel capsules containing unique blend ratios of stable xenon tag gases in an on-line creep rupture experiment in Joyo. The tag gas samples were irradiated to total neutron fluences of 1.6 to 4.8 × 1026 n/m2. Laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry was used to analyze the cover gas containing released tag gas diluted to isotopic ratios of 100 to 102 ppb. The isotopic ratios of xenon tag gases after irradiation were calculated using the ORIGEN2 code. The neutron cross sections of xenon nuclides were based on the JENDL-3.3 library. These cross sections were collapsed into one group using the neutron spectra of Joyo. The comparison of measured and calculated xenon isotopic ratios provided C/E values that ranged from 0.92 to 1.10. The differences between calculation and measurement were considered to be mainly due to the measurement errors and the xenon nuclide cross section uncertainties.

  5. O/M ratio measurement in pure and mixed oxide fuels - where are we now?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, J.; Chidester, K.; Thompson, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The scale-down in the US and Russian nuclear weapons stockpiles has produced a surplus of weapons grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium. The incorporation into mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) is one of the currently favored routes for surplus weapons-grade plutonium. The use of MOX as a nuclear reactor fuel is well established, particularly in Europe and Japan but not in the US. The primary purpose of this investigation was to evaluate existing analytical techniques for their applicability to O/M (oxygen-to-metal ratio) measurements of MOX derived from excess weapons plutonium. The second objective of this investigation was to bring up-to-date the literature on O/M measurement methods, which has not been undertaken in over 20 years. There are several classification schemes that can be used to organize O/M measurement methods. The most popular schemes are based on (a) whether the analysis is performed in solution (wet chemical) or on solid material (dry), and (b) whether the concentration of major constituents are analyzed directly (direct) or are inferred (indirect). Solid state coulometric titration is currently used extensively in studies of phase equilibria, defect chemistry, thermochemical measurement of oxides, including ferrites. Regardless of which indirect method is used (solid state coulometric titration or thermogravimetry), a primary, direct method will also be required for the establishment of the MO{sub 2} reference state, determination of method bias, and periodic calibration. It was recommended that the following direct method be adapted for this purpose: oxygen measurement by inert gas fusion/carbon reduction, and total U, Pu by controlled potential coulometry. In a table are listed the experimental values of accuracy for about 30 O/M methods. (A.C.)

  6. Robust Control of the Air to Fuel Ratio in Spark Ignition Engines with Delayed Measurements from a UEGO Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Espinoza-Jurado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A precise control of the normalized air to fuel ratio in spark ignition engines is an essential task. To achieve this goal, in this work we take into consideration the time delay measurement presented by the universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor along with uncertainties in the volumetric efficiency. For that purpose, observers are designed by means of a super-twisting sliding mode estimation scheme. Also two control schemes based on a general nonlinear model and a similar nonlinear affine representation for the dynamics of the normalized air to fuel ratio were designed in this work by using the super-twisting sliding mode methodology. Such dynamics depends on the control input, that is, the injected fuel mass flow, its time derivative, and its reciprocal. The two latter terms are estimated by means of a robust sliding mode differentiator. The observers and controllers are designed based on an isothermal mean value engine model. Numeric and hardware in the loop simulations were carried out with such model, where parameters were taken from a real engine. The obtained results show a good output tracking and rejection of disturbances when the engine is closed loop with proposed control methods.

  7. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown.

  8. Measurements of reaction rate ratios as indexes of breeding performance in mock-up cores of FCA simulating metallic-fueled LMFBR and MOX-fueled LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Nemoto, Tatsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kobayashi, Keiji; Unesaki, Hironobu

    1999-08-01

    Measurements and analysis for reaction rate ratio of {sup 238}U capture to {sup 239}Pu fission (C8/F9) and that of {sup 238}U capture to {sup 235}U fission (C8/F5), which are important as indexes of breeding behavior of a fast breeder reactor, were made at Fast Critical Assembly (FCA) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The measurements were made by a foil activation technique at two assemblies simulating metallic-fueled liquid metal fast breeder reactor and an assembly simulating a MOX-fueled one. The analysis was made based on JENDL3.2 nuclear data file. Calculation to experiment ratios of C8/F9 and C8/F5 were 0.99-1.02 and 1.0-1.03 respectively. Furthermore, the {sup 238}U capture rate and the {sup 235}U fission rate were measured in a thermal neutron standard field in Heavy Water Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor to verify accuracy of the present foil activation technique itself and to confirm these C/E values. (author)

  9. Prospects for measuring the fuel ion ratio in burning ITER plasmas using a DT neutron emission spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesen, C.; Skiba, M.; Dzysiuk, N.; Weiszflog, M.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ericsson, G.; Conroy, S.; Andersson-Sundén, E.; Eriksson, J.; Binda, F.

    2014-11-01

    The fuel ion ratio nt/nd is an essential parameter for plasma control in fusion reactor relevant applications, since maximum fusion power is attained when equal amounts of tritium (T) and deuterium (D) are present in the plasma, i.e., nt/nd = 1.0. For neutral beam heated plasmas, this parameter can be measured using a single neutron spectrometer, as has been shown for tritium concentrations up to 90%, using data obtained with the MPR (Magnetic Proton Recoil) spectrometer during a DT experimental campaign at the Joint European Torus in 1997. In this paper, we evaluate the demands that a DT spectrometer has to fulfill to be able to determine nt/nd with a relative error below 20%, as is required for such measurements at ITER. The assessment shows that a back-scattering time-of-flight design is a promising concept for spectroscopy of 14 MeV DT emission neutrons.

  10. Potential of using stable nitrogen isotope ratio measurements to resolve fuel and thermal NOx in coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenggong Sun; Janos Lakatos; Colin E. Snape; Tony Fallick [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering (SChEME)

    2003-07-01

    In order to examine the potential of applying isotopic analysis to apportion NOx formation from different mechanisms, stable nitrogen isotope ratio measurements have been conducted on a number of thermal/prompt (diesel) and actual (coal) PF NO samples generated from a 1MW test facility at Powergen (UK), together with measurements on a range of pyrolysis and combustion chars obtained from a drop-tube reactor. A highly effective nitrogen-free sorbent, derived from white sugar with Mn as promoter, has been developed using an innovative procedure. This adsorbent has facilitated, for the first time, the determination of {delta}{sup 15}N values without background corrections. The isotopic data indicate that the thermal/prompt NOx collected during start-up with diesel as fuel has a {delta}{sup 15}N of close to 6.5(per thousand) compared to +15(per thousand) for the actual PF sample analysed. Thus, differences of up to ca. 20(per thousand) have been found to exist between thermal and PF fuel (char) NOx isotopic values. This augurs very well for the further development of the approach in order to help quantify the extent of thermal/prompt NOx formation in PF combustion. Measurements on chars have indicated that the extent of isotopic fractionation that occurs between coal-N and NOx from char is related to the reactivity of coals. Further, it would appear that much of the isotopic fractionation that occurs between coal nitrogen and fuel NO arises in the formation of char, although further fractionation can be inferred to occur during char combustion. In contrast, a lesser degree of isotopic fractionation is associated with the formation of thermal NO (ca. 6(per thousand)), atmospheric nitrogen having a value of 0(per thousand). 4 refs., 6 tabs.

  11. Study and development of an instantaneous equivalence air/fuel ratio measurement probe; Etude et developpement d'une sonde de mesure de richesse instantanee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutar, Z.

    2002-06-15

    The objective of this study was to continue the development of a sampling probe intended for the measurement of instantaneous equivalence air/fuel ratio. The developed device must satisfy the schedule of conditions integrating an easy use, a reliable and reproducible measurement and finally to be usable on any type of spark ignition engine without particular arrangement. After a bibliographical study, it was proved that the catalytic hot wire measurement technique has the awaited qualities. This technique is based on hot wire anemometry. It consists in maintaining a wire of 15 {mu}m of diameter, at a constant temperature and sufficiently high in order to carry out on its surface a heterogeneous catalysis reaction of combustion. The purpose of the catalytic reaction is to considerably increase the probe sensitivity to the fuel concentration. Work showed that, to have a precise equivalence air/fuel ratio calculation, it is necessary to know the instantaneous flow characteristics at wire location; those are pressure, temperature and velocity. So, we developed a three hot wires and discontinuous sampling probe. One of the three hot wires functions at the same time as a microcalorimeter and as a catalyst, the two others wires function as micro-calorimeters and are used to determine the flow temperature and velocity. We show how to control the experimental conditions in order to obtain a catalytic reaction on a wire after a calibration procedure of the measure. Tests on a spark ignition engine proved the reliability of the three hot wire probe. (author)

  12. Numerical Estimation of the Spent Fuel Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Durbin, Samuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilke, Jason [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Margraf, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunn, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Sabotage of spent nuclear fuel casks remains a concern nearly forty years after attacks against shipment casks were first analyzed and has a renewed relevance in the post-9/11 environment. A limited number of full-scale tests and supporting efforts using surrogate materials, typically depleted uranium dioxide (DUO 2 ), have been conducted in the interim to more definitively determine the source term from these postulated events. However, the validity of these large- scale results remain in question due to the lack of a defensible spent fuel ratio (SFR), defined as the amount of respirable aerosol generated by an attack on a mass of spent fuel compared to that of an otherwise identical surrogate. Previous attempts to define the SFR in the 1980's have resulted in estimates ranging from 0.42 to 12 and include suboptimal experimental techniques and data comparisons. Because of the large uncertainty surrounding the SFR, estimates of releases from security-related events may be unnecessarily conservative. Credible arguments exist that the SFR does not exceed a value of unity. A defensible determination of the SFR in this lower range would greatly reduce the calculated risk associated with the transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel in dry cask systems. In the present work, the shock physics codes CTH and ALE3D were used to simulate spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and DUO 2 targets impacted by a high-velocity jet at an ambient temperature condition. These preliminary results are used to illustrate an approach to estimate the respirable release fraction for each type of material and ultimately, an estimate of the SFR. This page intentionally blank

  13. Development of novel fuel ion ratio diagnostic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S. B.; Stejner, M.; Bindslev, H.; Furtula, V.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M. [Association EURATOM-Risoe DTU, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G. [Association EURATOM-VR, Uppsala University, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M. [Association EURATOM-ENEA CNR, 20125 Milano (Italy); Hellermann, M. von; Lischtschenko, O.; Delabie, E. [Association EURATOM-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E. [Department of Applied Physics, Fusion Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    To overcome the challenge of measuring the fuel ion ratio in the core ({rho}<0.3) of ITER, a coordinated effort aiming at developing diagnostic techniques has been initiated. The investigated techniques are novel uses or further development of existing methods such as charge exchange recombination spectrometry, neutron spectrometry, and collective Thomson scattering. An overview of the work on the three diagnostic techniques is presented.

  14. Relation between flash point of a emulsfied fuel and its internal phase ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Yasuhide; Hirai, Eiji; Kawara, Nobuhiro; Nakagawa, Yoshihiro

    1988-04-15

    Flash points of emulsified fuels (O/W type) were measured changing volume blending ratio of oil (internal phase ratio). As a result the following facts were revealed. (1) The testing method for flash point of petroleum products by tag closed tester regulated by JIS is inadequate for a sample of poor thermal convection such as a creamy emulsified fuel. (2) Emulsified fuel becomes creamy, when its internal phase ratio becomes more than 60 to 70 %, Such a creamy emulsified fuel is possible to catch fire at lower temperature as a whole, for it tends to get high temperature locally by flame approaching etc. This fact is important from a standpoint of safety engineering. (3) Flash point of emulsified fuel does not depend on its internal phase ratio provided that it is measured at uniform temperature, it seems to be constant. And its constant flash point is higher than of the corresponding pure fuel by a little. (8 figs, 5 refs)

  15. Measurements in liquid fuel sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigier, N.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for studying the events directly preceding combustion in the liquid fuel sprays are being used to provide information as a function of space and time on droplet size, shape, number density, position, angle of flight and velocity. Spray chambers were designed and constructed for: (1) air-assist liquid fuel research sprays; (2) high pressure and temperature chamber for pulsed diesel fuel sprays; and (3) coal-water slurry sprays. Recent results utilizing photography, cinematography, and calibration of the Malvern particle sizer are reported. Systems for simultaneous measurement of velocity and particle size distributions using laser Doppler anemometry interferometry and the application of holography in liquid fuel sprays are being calibrated.

  16. Fuel Distribution Estimate via Spin Period to Precession Period Ratio for the Advanced Composition Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHart, Russell; Smith, Eric; Lakin, John

    2015-01-01

    The spin period to precession period ratio of a non-axisymmetric spin-stabilized spacecraft, the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), was used to estimate the remaining mass and distribution of fuel within its propulsion system. This analysis was undertaken once telemetry suggested that two of the four fuel tanks had no propellant remaining, contrary to pre-launch expectations of the propulsion system performance. Numerical integration of possible fuel distributions was used to calculate moments of inertia for the spinning spacecraft. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of output from a dynamics simulation was employed to relate calculated moments of inertia to spin and precession periods. The resulting modeled ratios were compared to the actual spin period to precession period ratio derived from the effect of post-maneuver nutation angle on sun sensor measurements. A Monte Carlo search was performed to tune free parameters using the observed spin period to precession period ratio over the life of the mission. This novel analysis of spin and precession periods indicates that at the time of launch, propellant was distributed unevenly between the two pairs of fuel tanks, with one pair having approximately 20% more propellant than the other pair. Furthermore, it indicates the pair of the tanks with less fuel expelled all of its propellant by 2014 and that approximately 46 kg of propellant remains in the other two tanks, an amount that closely matches the operational fuel accounting estimate. Keywords: Fuel Distribution, Moments of Inertia, Precession, Spin, Nutation

  17. Adaptive Air-Fuel Ratio Control with MLP Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Wei Wang; Ding-Li Yu

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an application of adaptive neural network model-based predictive control (MPC) to the air-fuel ratio of an engine simulation. A multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network is trained using two on-line training algorithms: a back propagation algorithm and a recursive least squares (RLS) algorithm. It is used to model parameter uncertainties in the nonlinear dynamics of internal combustion (IC) engines. Based on the adaptive model, an MPC strategy for controlling air-fuel ratio is realized, and its control performance compared with that of a traditional PI controller.A reduced Hessian method, a newly developed sequential quadratic programming (SQP) method for solving nonlinear programming (NLP) problems, is implemented to speed up nonlinear optimization in the MPC.

  18. Direct Fuel Injector Temporal Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    optimize engine performance and emissions. Fuel injectors contain an actuator, pintle (or needle), and nozzle. The most common actuator is a solenoid ...Introduction Fuel injectors have a long history in metering fuel in modern engines by either port fuel injection (PFI) or direct fuel injection (DFI...Compared with a carburetor, fuel injectors have more accurate fuel delivering capability, thus giving engineers and technicians more flexibility to

  19. A high voltage ratio and low ripple interleaved DC-DC converter for fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Long-Yi; Chao, Kuei-Hsiang; Chang, Tsang-Chih

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a high voltage ratio and low ripple interleaved boost DC-DC converter, which can be used to reduce the output voltage ripple. This converter transfers the low DC voltage of fuel cell to high DC voltage in DC link. The structure of the converter is parallel with two voltage-doubler boost converters by interleaving their output voltages to reduce the voltage ripple ratio. Besides, it can lower the current stress for the switches and inductors in the system. First, the PSIM software was used to establish a proton exchange membrane fuel cell and a converter circuit model. The simulated and measured results of the fuel cell output characteristic curve are made to verify the correctness of the established simulation model. In addition, some experimental results are made to validate the effectiveness in improving output voltage ripple of the proposed high voltage ratio interleaved boost DC-DC converters.

  20. Spent Fuel Ratio Estimates from Numerical Models in ALE3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margraf, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunn, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-02

    Potential threat of intentional sabotage of spent nuclear fuel storage facilities is of significant importance to national security. Paramount is the study of focused energy attacks on these materials and the potential release of aerosolized hazardous particulates into the environment. Depleted uranium oxide (DUO2) is often chosen as a surrogate material for testing due to the unreasonable cost and safety demands for conducting full-scale tests with real spent nuclear fuel. To account for differences in mechanical response resulting in changes to particle distribution it is necessary to scale the DUO2 results to get a proper measure for spent fuel. This is accomplished with the spent fuel ratio (SFR), the ratio of respirable aerosol mass released due to identical damage conditions between a spent fuel and a surrogate material like depleted uranium oxide (DUO2). A very limited number of full-scale experiments have been carried out to capture this data, and the oft-questioned validity of the results typically leads to overly-conservative risk estimates. In the present work, the ALE3D hydrocode is used to simulate DUO2 and spent nuclear fuel pellets impacted by metal jets. The results demonstrate an alternative approach to estimate the respirable release fraction of fragmented nuclear fuel.

  1. An approach to determine a defensible spent fuel ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2014-03-01

    Sabotage of spent nuclear fuel casks remains a concern nearly forty years after attacks against shipment casks were first analyzed and has a renewed relevance in the post-9/11 environment. A limited number of full-scale tests and supporting efforts using surrogate materials, typically depleted uranium dioxide (DUO2), have been conducted in the interim to more definitively determine the source term from these postulated events. In all the previous studies, the postulated attack of greatest interest was by a conical shape charge (CSC) that focuses the explosive energy much more efficiently than bulk explosives. However, the validity of these large-scale results remain in question due to the lack of a defensible Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), defined as the amount of respirable aerosol generated by an attack on a mass of spent fuel compared to that of an otherwise identical DUO2 surrogate. Previous attempts to define the SFR have resulted in estimates ranging from 0.42 to 12 and include suboptimal experimental techniques and data comparisons. Different researchers have suggested using SFR values of 3 to 5.6. Sound technical arguments exist that the SFR does not exceed a value of unity. A defensible determination of the SFR in this lower range would greatly reduce the calculated risk associated with the transport and dry storage of spent nuclear fuel. Currently, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in possession of several samples of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that were used in the original SFR studies in the 1980s and were intended for use in a modern effort at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 2000s. A portion of these samples are being used for a variety of research efforts. However, the entirety of SNF samples at ORNL is scheduled for disposition at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by approximately the end of 2015. If a defensible SFR is to be determined for use in storage and transportation security analyses, the need to begin this effort

  2. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage : aerosol ratio test program and Phase 2 test results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III; Thompson, N. Slater (U.S. Department of Energy); Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Hibbs, R.S. (U.S. Department of Energy); Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Young, F. I. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Brochard, Didier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Lange, Florentin (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany)

    2004-05-01

    A multinational test program is in progress to quantify the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device, HEDD, impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments; the program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the spent fuel ratio, SFR, the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are crucial for predicting radiological impacts. This document includes a thorough description of the test program, including the current, detailed test plan, concept and design, plus a description of all test components, and requirements for future components and related nuclear facility needs. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2003. All available test results, observations, and analyses - primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. This spent fuel sabotage - aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC, and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  3. Influence of fuel ratios on auto combustion synthesis of barium ferrite nano particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Bahadur; S Rajakumar; Ankit Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Single-domain barium ferrite nano particles have been synthesized with narrow particle-size distribution using an auto combustion technique. In this process, citric acid was used as a fuel. Ratios of cation to fuel were maintained variously at 1 : 1, 1 : 2 and 1 : 3. The pH was 7 in all cases. Of all three cases, a cation to citric acid ratio of 1 : 2 gives better yield in the formation of crystalline and single domain particles with a narrow range of size distribution. Most particles are in the range of 80 to 100 nm. Maximum magnetization and coercivity values are also greater for 1 : 2 ratios. These values measured at room temperature are found to be 55 emu/gram and 5000 Oe respectively. XPS and ESR studies support the results.

  4. Spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program : FY 2004 test and data summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Mo, Tin (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Billone, Michael C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Young, F. I. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Coats, Richard Lee; Burtseva, Tatiana (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Luna, Robert Earl; Dickey, Roy R.; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Thompson, Nancy Slater (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Hibbs, Russell S. (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Gregson, Michael Warren; Lange, Florentin (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Tsai, Han-Chung (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL)

    2005-07-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. The program also provides significant technical and political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are the input for follow-on modeling studies to quantify respirable hazards, associated radiological risk assessments, vulnerability assessments, and potential cask physical protection design modifications. This document includes an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, during FY 2004. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2004. All available test results, observations, and aerosol analyses plus interpretations--primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests, series 2/5A through 2/9B, using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. Advanced plans and progress are described for upcoming tests with unirradiated, depleted uranium oxide and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of

  5. Ratio method of measuring W boson mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Feng [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in DØ experiment. Instead of extracting MW from the fitting of W → ev fast Monte Carlo simulations to W → ev data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W → ev data and Z → ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (MW/MZ). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W → ev and Z → ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb-1 DØ Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives MW = 80435 ± 43(stat) ± 26(sys) MeV.

  6. Development of air fuel ratio sensor; A/F sensor no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakawa, T.; Hori, M. [Denso Corp., Aichi (Japan); Nakamura, Y. [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The Air Fuel Ratio Sensor (A/F sensor), which is applied to a 1997 model year Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) was developed. This sensor enables the detection of the exhaust gas air fuel ratio, both lean and rich of stoichiometric. It has an effective air fuel ratio range from 12 to 18 as required for LEV regulation. It has the fast light off, - within 20 seconds - to minimize exhaust hydrocarbon content. Further, it has fast response time, less than 200 msec, to improve the air fuel ratio controllability. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  7. 30 CFR 7.87 - Test to determine the maximum fuel-air ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test to determine the maximum fuel-air ratio. 7... Use in Underground Coal Mines § 7.87 Test to determine the maximum fuel-air ratio. (a) Test procedure... several speed/torque conditions to determine the concentrations of CO and NOX, dry basis, in the...

  8. Pyrometric fuel particle measurements in pressurised reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R.; Joutsenoja, T. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    A fibre-optic two-colour pyrometric technique for fuel particle temperature and size measurement is modified and applied to three pressurised reactors of different type in Finland, Germany and France. A modification of the pyrometric method for simultaneous in situ measurement of the temperature and size of individual pulverised coal particles at the pressurised entrained flow reactor of VTT Energy in Jyvaeskylae was developed and several series of measurements were made in order to study the effects of oxygen concentration (3-30 vol%) and pressure (0.2-1.0 MPa) on the particle temperature. The fuels used in the experiments were Westerholt, Polish and Goettelborn hvb coals, Gardanne lignite and Niederberg anthracite. The initial nominal fuel particle size varied in the experiments from 70 to 250 ,{mu}m and the gas temperature was typically 1173 K. For the anthracite also the effects of gas temperature (1073-1423K) and CO{sub 2} concentration (6-80 vol%) were studied. In Orleans a fibreoptic pyrometric device was installed to a pressurised thermogravimetric reactor of CNRS and the two-colour temperatures of fuel samples were measured. The fuel in the experiments was pulverised Goettelborn char. The reliability of optical temperature measurement in this particular application was analysed. In Essen a fibre-optic pyrometric technique that is capable to measure bed and fuel particle temperatures was applied to an atmospheric fluidised bed reactor of DMT. The effects of oxygen concentration (3-8 vol%) and bed temperature (1123-1193 K) on the fuel particle temperature were studied. The fuels in these were Westerholt coal and char and EBV-coal. Some results of these measurements are presented. The project belonged to EU`s Joule 2 extension research programme (contract JOU2-CT93-0331). (orig.)

  9. Pyrometric fuel particle measurements in pressurised reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R.; Joutsenoja, T. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    A fiberoptic two-colour pyrometric technique for fuel particle temperature and size measurement is modified and applied to three pressurized reactors of different type in Finland, Germany and France. A modification of the pyrometric method for simultaneous in situ measurement of the temperature and size of individual pulverized coal particles at the pressurized entrained flow reactor in Jyvaeskylae was developed and several series of measurements were made. In Orleans a fiberoptic pyrometric device was installed to a pressurised thermogravimetric reactor and the two-colour temperatures of fuel samples were measured. Some results of these measurements are presented. The project belongs to EU`s Joule 2 extension research programme. (author)

  10. Pyrometric fuel particle measurements in pressurized reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joutsenoja, T.; Stenberg, J.; Hernberg, R.; Aho, M.; Richard, J.-R.; Mallet, C.; Bonn, B. [Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    1998-12-31

    A fibre-optic two-colour pyrometric technique for fuel particle temperature and size measurement is modified and applied to three pressurised reactors of different type in Finland, Germany and France. A modification of the pyrometric method for simultaneous in situ measurement of the temperature and size of individual pulverised coal particles at the pressurised entrained flow reactor of VTT Energy in Jyvaskyla was developed and several series of measurements were made in order to study the effects of oxygen concentration (3-30 vol%) and pressure (0.2-1.0 MPa) on the particle temperature. The fuels used in the experiments were Westerholt, Polish and Gottelborn hvb coals. Gardanne lignite and Niederberg anthracite. The initial nominal fuel particle size varied in the experiments from 70 to 250 {mu}m and the gas temperature was typically 1173 K. For the anthracite also the effects of gas temperature (1073-1423 K) and CO{sub 2} concentration (6-80 vol%) were studied. In Orleans a fibre-optic pyrometric device was installed to a pressurised thermogravimetric reactor of CNRS and the two-colour temperatures of fuel samples were measured. The fuel in the experiments was pulverized Gottelborn char. The reliability of optical temperature measurement in this particular application was analysed. In Essen a fibre-optic pyrometric technique that is capable to measure bed and fuel particle temperatures was applied to an atmospheric fluidised bed reactor of DMT. The effects of oxygen concentration (3-8 vol%) and bed temperature (1123-1193 K) on the fuel particle temperature were studied. The fuels in these were Westerholt coal and char and EBV-coal. 17 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Neutron spectroscopy as a fuel ion ratio diagnostic: lessons from JET and prospects for ITER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, G; Conroy, S; Gatu Johnson, M; Andersson Sundén, E; Cecconello, M; Eriksson, J; Hellesen, C; Sangaroon, S; Weiszflog, M

    2010-10-01

    The determination of the fuel ion ratio n(t)/n(d) in ITER is required at a precision of 20%, time resolution of 100 ms, spatial resolution of a/10, and over a range of 0.01ITER to assess the possibility to use neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) for such measurements. We show that NES meets the requirements for ion temperatures T(i)>6 keV and for n(T)/n(D)ITER due to beam-thermal and tritium-tritium reactions can further enhance the prospects for NES.

  12. Robust Fuzzy PD Method with Parallel Computed Fuel Ratio Estimation Applied to Automotive Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Piltan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Both fuzzy logic and computed fuel ratio can compensate the steady-state error of proportional-derivative (PD method. This paper presents parallel computed fuel ratio compensation for fuzzy plus PID control management with application to internal combustion (IC engine. The asymptotic stability of fuzzy plus PID control methodology with first-order computed fuel ratio estimation in the parallel structure is proven. For the parallel structure, the finite time convergence with a super-twisting second-order sliding-mode is guaranteed.

  13. Transient Air-Fuel Ratio Control in a CNG Engine Using Fuzzy Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo-xiu; ZHANG Xin

    2005-01-01

    The fuzzy neural networks has been used as means of precisely controlling the air-fuel ratio of a lean-burn compressed natural gas (CNG) engine. A control algorithm, without based on engine model, has been utilized to construct a feedforward/feedback control scheme to regulate the air-fuel ratio. Using fuzzy neural networks, a fuzzy neural hybrid controller is obtained based on PI controller. The new controller, which can adjust parameters online, has been tested in transient air-fuel ratio control of a CNG engine.

  14. Spectral ratio method for measuring emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, K.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral ratio method is based on the concept that although the spectral radiances are very sensitive to small changes in temperature the ratios are not. Only an approximate estimate of temperature is required thus, for example, we can determine the emissivity ratio to an accuracy of 1% with a temperature estimate that is only accurate to 12.5 K. Selecting the maximum value of the channel brightness temperatures is an unbiased estimate. Laboratory and field spectral data are easily converted into spectral ratio plots. The ratio method is limited by system signal:noise and spectral band-width. The images can appear quite noisy because ratios enhance high frequencies and may require spatial filtering. Atmospheric effects tend to rescale the ratios and require using an atmospheric model or a calibration site. ?? 1992.

  15. Dimensional Measurements of Fresh CANDU Fuel Bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Ji Su; Jo, Chang Keun; Jung, Jong Yeob; Koo, Dae Seo; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    This paper intends to provide the dimensional measurements of fresh CANDU fuel (37-element) bundle for the estimation of deformation of post-irradiated (PI) bundle. It is expensive and difficult to measure the fretting wear of bearing pad, the element bowing and the waviness of endplate at the two-phase high flow condition (above 24 kg/s) of out-of-reactor test. So, it is recommended to compare the geometry of fresh bundle with that of PI bundle to estimate the integrity of fuel bundle in the CANDU-6 fuel channel with two-phase flow condition. The measurement system has been developed to provide the visual inspection and the dimensional measurements within the accuracy of 10 {mu}m. It is applicable in-air and underwater to the CANDU bundle as well as the CANFLEX bundle. The in-air measurements of the 36 fresh CANDU bundles (S/N: B400892 {approx} B400927) are done by this system from February 2004 to March 2004 in the PHWR fresh fuel storage building of KNFC. These bundles are produced by KNFC manufacturing procedure and are waiting for the delivery to the Wolsong-3 plant, and are planned to load into the proposed test channels. The detail measurements contain the outer rod profile (including the bearing pad), the diameter of bundle, the bowing of bundle, the rod length and the surface profile of end plate (waviness)

  16. Synergistic Smart Fuel For Microstructure Mediated Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Steven L. Garrett; Randall A. Ali

    2013-07-01

    Advancing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants requires enhancing our basic understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The two most significant issues limiting the effectiveness and lifespan of the fuel are the loss of thermal conductivity of the fuel and the mechanical strength of both fuel and cladding. The core of a nuclear reactor presents an extremely harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to elevated temperatures and large fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles from radioactive decay processes. The majority of measurements are made in reactors using “radiation hardened” sensors and materials. A different approach has been pursued in this research that exploits high temperatures and materials that are robust with respect to ionizing radiation. This synergistically designed thermoacoustic sensor will be self-powered, wireless, and provide telemetry. The novel sensor will be able to provide reactor process information even if external electrical power and communication are unavailable. In addition, the form-factor for the sensor is identical to the existing fuel rods within reactors and contains no moving parts. Results from initial proof of concept experiments designed to characterize porosity, surface properties and monitor gas composition will be discussed.

  17. Synergistic smart fuel for microstructure mediated measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A.; Kotter, Dale K.; Ali, Randall A.; Garrett, Steven L.

    2014-02-01

    Advancing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants requires enhancing our basic understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The two most significant issues limiting the effectiveness and lifespan of the fuel are the loss of thermal conductivity of the fuel and the mechanical strength of both fuel and cladding. The core of a nuclear reactor presents an extremely harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to elevated temperatures and large fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles from radioactive decay processes. The majority of measurements are made in reactors using "radiation hardened" sensors and materials. A different approach has been pursued in this research that exploits high temperatures and materials that are robust with respect to ionizing radiation. This synergistically designed thermoacoustic sensor will be self-powered, wireless, and provide telemetry. The novel sensor will be able to provide reactor process information even if external electrical power and communication are unavailable. In addition, the form-factor for the sensor is identical to the existing fuel rods within reactors and contains no moving parts. Results from initial proof of concept experiments designed to characterize porosity, surface properties and monitor gas composition will be discussed.

  18. Synergistic smart fuel for microstructure mediated measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James A.; Kotter, Dale K. [Idaho National Laboratory, Fuel Performance and Design, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho, 83415-6188 (United States); Ali, Randall A. [Graduate Program in Acoustics and Applied Research Laboratory, Penn State University, P. . Box 30, M/S 3520D, State College, PA 16804-0030 (United States); Garrett, Steven L. [Graduate Program in Acoustics and Applied Research Laboratory, Penn State University, P.O. Box 30, M/S 3520D, State College, PA 16804-0030 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Advancing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants requires enhancing our basic understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The two most significant issues limiting the effectiveness and lifespan of the fuel are the loss of thermal conductivity of the fuel and the mechanical strength of both fuel and cladding. The core of a nuclear reactor presents an extremely harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to elevated temperatures and large fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles from radioactive decay processes. The majority of measurements are made in reactors using 'radiation hardened' sensors and materials. A different approach has been pursued in this research that exploits high temperatures and materials that are robust with respect to ionizing radiation. This synergistically designed thermoacoustic sensor will be self-powered, wireless, and provide telemetry. The novel sensor will be able to provide reactor process information even if external electrical power and communication are unavailable. In addition, the form-factor for the sensor is identical to the existing fuel rods within reactors and contains no moving parts. Results from initial proof of concept experiments designed to characterize porosity, surface properties and monitor gas composition will be discussed.

  19. Alternative Observers for SI Engine Air/Fuel Ratio Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert; Poulsen, Jannik; Olsen, Mads Bruun

    1996-01-01

    sensors other than a MAP sensor. In this paper it is shown that it is possible to construct a family of alternative nonlinear observers which “naturally” allow the use of any given air mass flow related sensor or a combination of them for A/F ratio control. This new family of observers provides the SI...

  20. Golden Ratio: A Measure of Physical Beauty

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-01

    Our attraction to another body increases if the body is symmetricaland in proportion. If a face or a structure is in proportion,we are more likely to notice it and find it beautiful.The universal ratio of beauty is the ‘Golden Ratio’, found inmany structures. This ratio comes from Fibonacci numbers.In this article, we explore this concept along with its applications.

  1. A Ratio Scale Measurement of Conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beins, Bernard C.; Porter, J. William

    A sensitive technique for assessing conformity on a ratio scale was designed and tested in one group of 18 naive subjects and one group of 20 volunteer subjects, 10 of whom were naive and 10 of whom were informed. All subjects were undergraduates from Thomas More College (New York). The experiment required subjects to observe a line briefly…

  2. Measuring Isotope Ratios Across the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Chris R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios in C, H, N, O and S are powerful indicators of a wide variety of planetary geophysical processes that can identify origin, transport, temperature history, radiation exposure, atmospheric escape, environmental habitability and biology [1]. For the Allan Hills 84001 meteorite, for example, the (sup 1)(sup 3)C/(sup 1)(sup 2)C ratio identifies it as a Mars (SNC) meteorite; the ??K/??Ar ratio tells us the last time the rock cooled to solid, namely 4 Gya; isotope ratios in (sup 3)He, (sup 2)(sup 1)Ne and (sup 3)?Ar show it was in space (cosmic ray exposure) for 10-20 million years; (sup 1)?C dating that it sat in Antarctica for 13,000 years before discovery; and clumped isotope analysis of (sup 1)?O(sup 1)(sup 3)C(sup 1)?O in its carbonate that it was formed at 18+/-4 ?C in a near-surface aqueous environment [2]. Solar System Formation

  3. Measuring Isotope Ratios Across the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Chris R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios in C, H, N, O and S are powerful indicators of a wide variety of planetary geophysical processes that can identify origin, transport, temperature history, radiation exposure, atmospheric escape, environmental habitability and biology [1]. For the Allan Hills 84001 meteorite, for example, the (sup 1)(sup 3)C/(sup 1)(sup 2)C ratio identifies it as a Mars (SNC) meteorite; the ??K/??Ar ratio tells us the last time the rock cooled to solid, namely 4 Gya; isotope ratios in (sup 3)He, (sup 2)(sup 1)Ne and (sup 3)?Ar show it was in space (cosmic ray exposure) for 10-20 million years; (sup 1)?C dating that it sat in Antarctica for 13,000 years before discovery; and clumped isotope analysis of (sup 1)?O(sup 1)(sup 3)C(sup 1)?O in its carbonate that it was formed at 18+/-4 ?C in a near-surface aqueous environment [2]. Solar System Formation

  4. Estimation of cycle-resolved in-cylinder pressure and air-fuel ratio using spark plug ionization current sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.; Guezennec, Y.G.; Rizzoni, G. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Center for Automotive Research and Intelligent Transportation

    2001-10-01

    In recent years, several new sensor technologies have been developed and implemented within automotive industries due to the increasing requirements for improved engine performance and emission reduction. It requires detailed and specified knowledge of the combustion process inside the engine cylinder along with a sophisticated technique in engine diagnostics and control. During the last few years, the ionization current signal detection has been the emerging technology in the new sensor developments, in which the spark plug is used as a combustion probe, to improve the performance and emissions of an automobile engine. In this paper, a novel methodology will be presented which allows the cycle-resolved as well as the meanvalue estimation of the air-fuel ratio and in-cylinder pressure based on the ionization current signal measurements. The implementation details of this methodology as well as extensive results will be presented for a wide range of air-fuel ratios. The main advantage of this new approach to process the ionization signal is its strong potential for real-time estimation of the air-fuel ratio and combustion diagnostics of individual cylinders and engine cycles. All the complex physics during the actual events (combustion process, ion generation, engine dynamics, etc.) are automatically self-extracted by this technique from acquired data in an initial off-line mapping phase. Once this has been performed, the air-fuel ratio and in-cylinder pressure can easily be estimated for each individual cylinder and combustion event in real-time with few computational requirements. Hence, this methodology has a high potential for the real-time combustion diagnostics and engine control based on the air-fuel ratio and in-cylinder pressure, while eliminating the requirements for installing expensive air-fuel ratio and in-cylinder pressure sensors. The results indicate that estimation of the cycle-resolved air-fuel ratio and in-cylinder pressure is reasonably accurate

  5. Holdup measurement for nuclear fuel manufacturing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucker, M.S.; Degen, M.; Cohen, I.; Gody, A.; Summers, R.; Bisset, P.; Shaub, E.; Holody, D.

    1981-07-13

    The assay of nuclear material holdup in fuel manufacturing plants is a laborious but often necessary part of completing the material balance. A range of instruments, standards, and a methodology for assaying holdup has been developed. The objectives of holdup measurement are ascertaining the amount, distribution, and how firmly fixed the SNM is. The purposes are reconciliation of material unbalance during or after a manufacturing campaign or plant decommissioning, to decide security requirements, or whether further recovery efforts are justified.

  6. Holdup measurement for nuclear fuel manufacturing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucker, M.S.; Degen, M.; Cohen, I.; Gody, A.; Summers, R.; Bisset, P.; Shaub, E.; Holody, D.

    1981-07-13

    The assay of nuclear material holdup in fuel manufacturing plants is a laborious but often necessary part of completing the material balance. A range of instruments, standards, and a methodology for assaying holdup has been developed. The objectives of holdup measurement are ascertaining the amount, distribution, and how firmly fixed the SNM is. The purposes are reconciliation of material unbalance during or after a manufacturing campaign or plant decommissioning, to decide security requirements, or whether further recovery efforts are justified.

  7. Calibration of spent fuel measurement assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleska, Michal; Viererbl, Ladislav; Marek, Milan

    2014-11-01

    The LVR-15 research reactor (Czech Republic) had been converted from the highly enriched IRT-2M to the low enriched IRT-4M fuel. For the possibility of the independent pre-transport evaluation of IRT-2M burnup, a spectrometric system was developed. This spectrometric system consists of the fuel holder, the collimator and the portable Canberra Big MAC HPGe (High Purity Germanium) detector. In order to have well reproducible and reliable experimental data for modeling of the measurement system, calibration with the 110mAg isotope with known activity was performed. This isotope was chosen for having energies similar to isotopes measured in fuel assemblies. The 110mAg isotope was prepared by irradiating of the silver foil in LVR-15 research reactor; its activity was evaluated in the LVR-15's spectrometric laboratory. From the measured data, an efficiency curve of the spectrometric system has been determined. The experimental data were compared to the calculation results with the MCNPX model of the spectrometric system.

  8. The influence of air-fuel ratio on mixture parameters in port fuel injection engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Irimescu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, research in the internal combustion engine field is focusing on detailed understanding of the processes that take place in certain parts of the aggregate, and can have a great influence on the engine’s performance and pollution levels. Such research is developed in this paper, in which using a numerical method based on the i-x air-fuel diagram, one can simulate a series of values for pressure, temperature and intake air humidity before and after mixture formation takes place in a spark ignition engine inlet port. The aim is to evaluate the final temperature of the air-fuel mixture near the inlet valve and evaluating the main factors of influence on the homogeneity of the mixture.

  9. 40 CFR 610.42 - Fuel economy measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel economy measurement. 610.42... ECONOMY RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria General Vehicle Test Procedures § 610.42 Fuel economy measurement. (a) Fuel consumption will be measured by: (1) The carbon balance method, or...

  10. Ignition delay time measurements of primary reference fuel blends

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbad, Mohammed

    2017-02-07

    Ignition delay times of four different primary reference fuels (PRF), mixtures of n-heptane and iso-octane, were measured behind reflected shock waves in a high-pressure shock tube facility. The PRFs were formulated to match the RON of two high-octane gasolines (RON 95 and 91) and two prospective low-octane naphtha fuels (RON 80 and 70). Experiments were carried out over a wide range of temperatures (700–1200K), pressures (10, 20, and 40bar) and equivalence ratios (0.5 and 1). Kinetic modeling predictions from four chemical kinetic mechanisms are compared with the experimental data. Ignition delay correlations are developed to reproduce the measured ignition delay times. Brute force sensitivity analyses are carried out to identify reactions that affect ignition delay times at specific temperature, pressure and equivalence ratio. The large experimental data set provided in the current work will serve as a benchmark for the validation of chemical kinetic mechanisms of primary reference fuel blends.

  11. Effects of temperature and stoichiometric ratio on performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y.H.; Caton, J.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Engines, Emissions, Energy Laboratory; Parulian, A. [Arbin Instruments, College Station, TX (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Relative to any power source using any hydrocarbon fuel, the fuel cell offers the potential to produce power with minimal or zero emissions. Depending on the electrolyte utilized in the cell, there are several types of fuel cells. The most common is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) because of its simplicity, quick start-up, and diversity for any application from powering small portable device to automobile applications. However, the handling and storing of hydrogen is the biggest challenge of the PEMFC. The technology related with the PEMFC, however, enables it to be commercialized in the near future as both hydrogen generation and storage continues to evolve. This paper assessed the effects of temperature and stoichiometric flow rate for various conditions for a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The study investigated the performance associated with the reagent stoichiometric ratio and the desired current starting stoichiometric flow rate, the effect of operating temperature, and the relationship between quantity of air used at the cathode and cell performance. The paper discussed membrane and electrode assembly (MEA) preparation as well as the study results. It was concluded that higher air supply leads to better performance at the constant stoichiometric ratio at the anode, but there is not have much of an increase after the stoichiometric ratio of 5. 14 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  12. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-12-31

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''.

  13. Effects of Oxygen-fuel Ratio on Structure and Property of Detonation Gun Sprayed WC Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Li-ying

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The tungsten carbide coating with both high hardness and dense microstructure was prepared by optimizing the detonation gun spraying parameters. The phase identifications and microstructure of the coating were observed and analyzed by optical microscope, X-ray diffraction (XRD and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS. The results show that with the increase of oxygen-fuel ratio, the hardness and adhesive strength of the coating firstly enhance and then decrease, while porosities firstly decrease and then increase. When the oxygen fuel ratio is too low, slow particle flight speed and insufficient melt are the main reasons for the degradation of the coating compactness and mechanical properties. When the oxygen fuel ratio is too high, particle decarburization and binder phase nonuniform contract in the cooling process are the determining factors to the coating structure and properties. When the oxygen-fuel ratio is 1.15, comprehensive performance of the coating is optimal, and the oxidation and decarburization of the coating can be effectively reduced. The Vickers microhardness HV0.3 of cross-section reaches 1178kg·mm-2, the porosity is 0.86%, and the bonding strength between the coating and substrate is 152MPa.

  14. Method for measuring recovery of catalytic elements from fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Lawrence [Edison, NJ; Matlin, Ramail [Berkeley, NJ

    2011-03-08

    A method is provided for measuring the concentration of a catalytic clement in a fuel cell powder. The method includes depositing on a porous substrate at least one layer of a powder mixture comprising the fuel cell powder and an internal standard material, ablating a sample of the powder mixture using a laser, and vaporizing the sample using an inductively coupled plasma. A normalized concentration of catalytic element in the sample is determined by quantifying the intensity of a first signal correlated to the amount of catalytic element in the sample, quantifying the intensity of a second signal correlated to the amount of internal standard material in the sample, and using a ratio of the first signal intensity to the second signal intensity to cancel out the effects of sample size.

  15. Studying the effect of compression ratio on an engine fueled with waste oil produced biodiesel/diesel fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed EL_Kassaby

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Wasted cooking oil from restaurants was used to produce neat (pure biodiesel through transesterification, and then used to prepare biodiesel/diesel blends. The effect of blending ratio and compression ratio on a diesel engine performance has been investigated. Emission and combustion characteristics was studded when the engine operated using the different blends (B10, B20, B30, and B50 and normal diesel fuel (B0 as well as when varying the compression ratio from 14 to 16 to 18. The result shows that the engine torque for all blends increases as the compression ratio increases. The bsfc for all blends decreases as the compression ratio increases and at all compression ratios bsfc remains higher for the higher blends as the biodiesel percent increase. The change of compression ratio from 14 to 18 resulted in, 18.39%, 27.48%, 18.5%, and 19.82% increase in brake thermal efficiency in case of B10, B20, B30, and B50 respectively. On an average, the CO2 emission increased by 14.28%, the HC emission reduced by 52%, CO emission reduced by 37.5% and NOx emission increased by 36.84% when compression ratio was increased from 14 to 18. In spite of the slightly higher viscosity and lower volatility of biodiesel, the ignition delay seems to be lower for biodiesel than for diesel. On average, the delay period decreased by 13.95% when compression ratio was increased from 14 to 18. From this study, increasing the compression ratio had more benefits with biodiesel than that with pure diesel.

  16. Measurements of fuel-N release during solid fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Di Nola; H. Spliethoff; S. Leiser; W. van de Kamp [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands). Thermal Power Engineering Section

    2003-07-01

    A South American high volatile bituminous coal and two fuel blends obtained by adding 10% cocoa shells and 10% wood, respectively, were selected to investigate the release of fuel nitrogen during devolatilisation and the char burnout behavior. The chars were produced at atmospheric pressure in heated wire mesh (HWM) and isothermal plug flow (IPFR) reactors and subsequently compared for their fuel-N content. Char burnout behavior was investigated comparing data from IPFR with outputs of a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Results showed that the volatile release yield was more affected by the final temperature and the residence time rather than by the heating rate. Fuel nitrogen release occurred to be particularly influenced by the residence time, showing higher total yields in the HWM with longer hold times at peak temperature. The comparison of char combustion rates in the IPFR and TGA showed that the data gained using a TGA is quantitatively not representative for combustion rates found in an industrial boiler. Combustion rates determined with the TGA are approximately three orders of magnitude lower than those determined with the IPFR. However, it was shown that differences in the combustion rates of the different fuels are reproducible qualitatively with both approaches. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Effect of Volatility on Air-Fuel Ratio Distribution and Torque Output of a Carbureted Light Aircraft Piston Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Positive displacement fuel flow sensor Burette type volumetric fuel flowmeter(2) Meriam laminar airflow meter Lamdascan air-fuel ratio meter Lebow inline...therefore the resulting data was not utilized. The volumetric flowrate of engine intake air was calculated from the pressure drop across a Meriam Model 50MC2

  18. Effects of different mixing ratios on emissions from passenger cars fueled with methanol/gasoline blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Ge, Yunshan; Tan, Jianwei; Yin, Hang; Guo, Jiadong; Zhao, Wei; Dai, Peipei

    2011-01-01

    Regulated and unregulated emissions from four passenger cars fueled with methanol/gasoline blends at different mixing ratios (M15, M20, M30, M50, M85 and M100) were tested over the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled by Tenax TA and analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (TD-GC/MS). Carbonyls were trapped on dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) cartridges and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that total emissions of VOCs and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p, m, o-xylene) from all vehicles fueled with methanol/gasoline blends were lower than those from vehicles fueled with only gasoline. Compared to the baseline, the use of M85 decreased BTEX emissions by 97.4%, while the use of M15 decreased it by 19.7%. At low-to-middle mixing ratios (M15, M20, M30 and M50), formaldehyde emissions showed a slight increase while those of high mixing ratios (M85 and M100) were three times compared with the baseline gasoline only. When the vehicles were retrofitted with new three-way catalytic converters (TWC), emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbon (THC), and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) were decreased by 24%-50%, 10%-35%, and 24%-58% respectively, compared with the cars using the original equipment manufacture (OEM) TWC. Using the new TWC, emissions of formaldehyde and BTEX were decreased, while those of other carbonyl increased. It is necessary that vehicles fueled with methanol/gasoline blends be retrofitted with a new TWC. In addition, the specific reactivity of emissions of vehicles fueled with M15 and retrofitted with the new TWC was reduced from 4.51 to 4.08 compared to the baseline vehicle. This indicates that the use of methanol/gasoline blend at a low mixing ratio may have lower effect on environment than gasoline.

  19. Efficiency and exhaust gas analysis of variable compression ratio spark ignition engine fuelled with alternative fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Seshaiah

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering energy crises and pollution problems today, investigations have been concentrated on decreasing fuel consumption by using alternative fuels and on lowering the concentration of toxic components in combustion products. In the present work, the variable compression ratio spark ignition engine designed to run on gasoline has been tested with pure gasoline, LPG (Isobutene, and gasoline blended with ethanol 10%, 15%, 25% and 35% by volume. Also, the gasoline mixed with kerosene at 15%, 25% and 35% by volume without any engine modifications has been tested and presented the result. Brake thermal and volumetric efficiency variation with brake load is compared and presented. CO and CO2 emissions have been also compared for all tested fuels.

  20. Minimum Specific Fuel Consumption of a Liquid-Cooled Multicylinder Aircraft Engine as Affected by Compression Ratio and Engine Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Rinaldo J.; Feder, Melvin S.; Harries, Myron L.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a 12-cylinder V-type liquid-cooled aircraft engine of 1710-cubic-inch displacement to determine the minimum specific fuel consumption at constant cruising engine speed and compression ratios of 6.65, 7.93, and 9.68. At each compression ratio, the effect.of the following variables was investigated at manifold pressures of 28, 34, 40, and 50 inches of mercury absolute: temperature of the inlet-air to the auxiliary-stage supercharger, fuel-air ratio, and spark advance. Standard sea-level atmospheric pressure was maintained at the auxiliary-stage supercharger inlet and the exhaust pressure was atmospheric. Advancing the spark timing from 34 deg and 28 deg B.T.C. (exhaust and intake, respectively) to 42 deg and 36 deg B.T.C. at a compression ratio of 6.65 resulted in a decrease of approximately 3 percent in brake specific fuel consumption. Further decreases in brake specific fuel consumption of 10.5 to 14.1 percent (depending on power level) were observed as the compression ratio was increased from 6.65 to 9.68, maintaining at each compression ratio the spark advance required for maximum torque at a fuel-air ratio of 0.06. This increase in compression ratio with a power output of 0.585 horsepower per cubic inch required a change from . a fuel- lend of 6-percent triptane with 94-percent 68--R fuel at a compression ratio of 6.65 to a fuel blend of 58-percent, triptane with 42-percent 28-R fuel at a compression ratio of 9.68 to provide for knock-free engine operation. As an aid in the evaluation of engine mechanical endurance, peak cylinder pressures were measured on a single-cylinder engine at several operating conditions. Peak cylinder pressures of 1900 pounds per square inch can be expected at a compression ratio of 9.68 and an indicated mean effective pressure of 320 pounds per square inch. The engine durability was considerably reduced at these conditions.

  1. Retrieval of aerosol aspect ratio from optical measurements in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, M.; Horvath, H.; Gangl, M.

    The phase function and extinction coefficient measured simultaneously are interpreted in terms of surface distribution function and mean effective aspect ratio of aerosol particles. All optical data were collected in the atmosphere of Vienna during field campaign in June 2005. It is shown that behavior of aspect ratio of Viennese aerosols has relation to relative humidity in such a way, that nearly spherical particles (with aspect ratio ɛ≈1) might became aspherical with ɛ≈1.3-1.6 under low relative humidity conditions. Typically, >80% of all Viennese aerosols have the aspect ratio Vienna.

  2. Towards absolute laser spectroscopic CO2 isotope ratio measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyangwe Nwaboh, Javis; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of isotope composition of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere is necessary to identify sources and sinks of this key greenhouse gas. In the last years, laser spectroscopic techniques such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) have been shown to perform accurate isotope ratio measurements for CO2 and other gases like water vapour (H2O) [1,2]. Typically, isotope ratios are reported in literature referring to reference materials provided by e.g. the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). However, there could be some benefit if field deployable absolute isotope ratio measurement methods were developed to address issues such as exhausted reference material like the Pee Dee Belemnite (PDB) standard. Absolute isotope ratio measurements would be particularly important for situations where reference materials do not even exist. Here, we present CRDS and TDLAS-based absolute isotope ratios (13C/12C ) in atmospheric CO2. We demonstrate the capabilities of the used methods by measuring CO2 isotope ratios in gas standards. We compare our results to values reported for the isotope certified gas standards. Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) compliant uncertainty budgets on the CRDS and TDLAS absolute isotope ratio measurements are presented, and traceability is addressed. We outline the current impediments in realizing high accuracy absolute isotope ratio measurements using laser spectroscopic methods, propose solutions and the way forward. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been carried out within the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) ENV52 project-HIGHGAS. The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the European Union. References [1] B. Kühnreich, S. Wagner, J. C. Habig,·O. Möhler, H. Saathoff, V. Ebert, Appl. Phys. B 119:177-187 (2015). [2] E. Kerstel, L. Gianfrani, Appl. Phys. B 92, 439-449 (2008).

  3. Precise measurement of stellar temperatures using line-depth ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, D.F.; Johanson, H.L. (Western Ontario, University, London (Canada))

    1991-05-01

    The ratio of line depth for two spectral lines is used to determine stellar temperatures with a precision = 10 K = 0.2 percent. For stars between late-F and early-K spectral types, the V I 6251 to Fe I 6253 depth ratio is easy to measure. It is also applicable to other temperature regimes if suitable lines can be found. 14 refs.

  4. A Sharpe-ratio-based measure for currencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Prado-Dominguez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Sharpe Ratio offers an excellent summary of the excess return required per unit of risk invested. This work presents an adaptation of the ex-ante Sharpe Ratio for currencies where we consider a random walk approach for the currency behavior and implied volatility as a proxy for market expectations of future realized volatility. The outcome of the proposed measure seems to gauge some information on the expected required return attached to the “peso problem”.

  5. LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-13

    Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS.

  6. Measure your septa release ratios: pheromone release ratio variability affected by rubber septa and solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenen, L P S; Siegel, Joel P

    2015-03-01

    The type of solvent and the volume used to load pheromone components onto rubber septa had significant effects on pheromone release ratios, the variability of those release ratios, and the recoverability of the volatile components during subsequent extraction with hexane. Volatile release ratios of synthetic Oriental fruit moth (OFM) pheromone and additional volatile compounds were determined using a gas chromatograph column as a volatile trap for rapid (≤1 hr) analysis from individual rubber septa. Volatile compound solutions were prepared in hexane, pentane, CH2Cl2, and methyl tert-butyl ether, and a 10, 33, or 100 μl aliquot of each solution was applied to rubber septa. Septa loaded with 100 μl of CH2Cl2 emitted significantly (P < 0.05) higher alcohol: acetate (OH:Ac) ratios than septa loaded with the other solvents, which were all similar. Release ratios of the alcohol and acetate components of the OFM pheromone components were assessed over a 3 week period using septa loaded with each solvent. Regardless of loading solvent, the OFM OH:Ac ratios declined logarithmically over 3 weeks; however, the decay slope from septa loaded with CH2Cl2 solutions was different from those of the other three solvents, which were nearly all the same. A high variability in OH:Ac release ratios was measured overall, regardless of the solvent used or the volume it was applied in. Four compounds of near-equal mass: 1-dodecanol, 1-dodecanal, methyl decanoate, and tridecane emitted different release ratios dependent on the solvent, hexane or CH2Cl2, with which a septum was loaded. The more polar and the greater the mass of the test compound, the slower it was emitted from a septum regardless of solvent. These combined results plus comparisons to earlier reports, suggest that researchers should empirically assess the release ratios from septa to be used in bioassays rather than just reporting the type of septum, ratios of compounds applied and solvent used to prepare them.

  7. Influence of Ionomer/Carbon Ratio on the Performance of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Ando

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We have used fibrous carbon materials as polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC electrodes. We have examined the influence of the ionomer/carbon ratio on the performance of the PEFCs. The Marimo carbon is a kind of carbon with a spherical shape, and consists of carbon nanofilaments. Fibrous carbon materials have large specific surface areas without fine pores. The reactant gases and generated water can easily diffuse among the nanofilaments. The ionomer plays two roles; one is a proton transfer activity, and the other is binding the catalyst electrodes. An excess ionomer interferes with the diffusion of gases. The ionomer/carbon ratio should affect the performance of the PEFC, especially at a high current density.

  8. Improved ASTM G72 Test Method for Ensuring Adequate Fuel-to-Oxidizer Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harper, Susana Tapia

    2016-01-01

    The ASTM G72/G72M-15 Standard Test Method for Autogenous Ignition Temperature of Liquids and Solids in a High-Pressure Oxygen-Enriched Environment is currently used to evaluate materials for the ignition susceptibility driven by exposure to external heat in an enriched oxygen environment. Testing performed on highly volatile liquids such as cleaning solvents has proven problematic due to inconsistent test results (non-ignitions). Non-ignition results can be misinterpreted as favorable oxygen compatibility, although they are more likely associated with inadequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios. Forced evaporation during purging and inadequate sample size were identified as two potential causes for inadequate available sample material during testing. In an effort to maintain adequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios within the reaction vessel during test, several parameters were considered, including sample size, pretest sample chilling, pretest purging, and test pressure. Tests on a variety of solvents exhibiting a range of volatilities are presented in this paper. A proposed improvement to the standard test protocol as a result of this evaluation is also presented. Execution of the final proposed improved test protocol outlines an incremental step method of determining optimal conditions using increased sample sizes while considering test system safety limits. The proposed improved test method increases confidence in results obtained by utilizing the ASTM G72 autogenous ignition temperature test method and can aid in the oxygen compatibility assessment of highly volatile liquids and other conditions that may lead to false non-ignition results.

  9. The Proton Form Factor Ratio Measurements at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punjabi, Vina A. [Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Perdrisat, Charles F. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The ratio of the proton form factors, G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp}, has been measured from Q{sup 2} of 0.5 GeV{sup 2} to 8.5 GeV{sup 2}, at the Jefferson Laboratory, using the polarization transfer method. This ratio is extracted directly from the measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the recoiling proton in elastic electron-proton scattering. The discovery that the proton form factor ratio measured in these experiments decreases approximately linearly with four-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}, for values above ~1 GeV{sup 2}, is one of the most significant results to come out of JLab. These results have had a large impact on progress in hadronic physics; and have required a significant rethinking of nucleon structure. The increasingly common use of the double-polarization technique to measure the nucleon form factors, in the last 15 years, has resulted in a dramatic improvement of the quality of all four nucleon electromagnetic form factors, G{sub Ep}, G{sub Mp}, G{sub En} and G{sub Mn}. There is an approved experiment at JLab, GEP(V), to continue the ratio measurements to 12 GeV{sup 2}. A dedicated experimental setup, the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS), will be built for this purpose. It will be equipped with a focal plane polarimeter to measure the polarization of the recoil protons. The scattered electrons will be detected in an electromagnetic calorimeter. In this presentation, I will review the status of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors and discuss a number of theoretical approaches to describe nucleon form factors.

  10. A Measurement of the Tau Topological Branching Ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, Dmitri Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Bellunato, T.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Belous, K.; Benekos, N.C.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bol, J.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R.A.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S.H.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Croix, J.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Ghodbane, N.; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gouz, Yu.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F.J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hertz, O.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Hughes, G.J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovanski, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostioukhine, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumstein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kurowska, J.; Lamsa, J.W.; Laugier, J.P.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; Merle, E.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Miagkov, A.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.M.; Murray, W.J.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Nemecek, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwanda, C.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Y.; Segar, A.M.; Sekulin, R.; Sette, G.; Shellard, R.C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Sokolov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tome, B.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Vander Velde, C.; Van Dam, Piet; Van den Boeck, W.; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zumerle, G.; Zupan, M.

    2001-01-01

    Using data collected in the DELPHI detector at LEP-1, measurements of the inclusive tau branching ratios for decay modes containing one, three, or five charged particles have been performed, giving the following results: B_1 = B(\\tau^- -> (particle)^- \\geq 0pi^0 \\geq 0K^0 \

  11. The Proton Form Factor Ratio Measurements at Jefferson Lab

    CERN Document Server

    Punjabi, Vina

    2014-01-01

    The ratio of the proton form factors, GEp/GMp, has been measured from Q2 of 0.5 GeV2 to 8.5 GeV2, at the Jefferson Laboratory, using the polarization transfer method. This ratio is extracted directly from the measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the recoiling proton in elastic electron-proton scattering. The discovery that the proton form factor ratio measured in these experiments decreases approximately linearly with four-momentum transfer, Q2, for values above ? 1 GeV2, is one of the most significant results to come out of JLab. These results have had a large impact on progress in hadronic physics; and have required a significant rethinking of nucleon structure. The increasingly common use of the double-polarization technique to measure the nucleon form factors, in the last 15 years, has resulted in a dramatic improvement of the quality of all four nucleon electromagnetic form factors, GEp, GMp, GEn and GMn. There is an approved experiment at JLab, GEP(V), to continue...

  12. Drag and distribution measurements of single-element fuel injectors for supersonic combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    The drag caused by several vortex generating fuel injectors for scramjet combustors was measured in a Mach 2 to 3.5 airstream. Injector drag was found to be strongly dependent on injector thickness ratio. The distribution of helium injected into the stream was measured both in the near field and the far field of the injectors for a variety of pressure ratios. The far field results differed appreciably from measurements in the near field. Injection pressure ratio was found to profoundly influence the penetration. One of the aerowing configurations tested yielded low drag consistent with desirable penetration and spreading characteristics.

  13. Measurement of the Radiative Ke3 Branching Ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Anzivino, Giuseppina; Becker, H G; Bertanza, L; Bevan, A; Biino, C; Bocquet, G; Calvetti, M; Carosi, R; Cartiglia, N; Casali, R; Ceccucci, A; Cenci, P; Cerri, C; Cheshkov, C; Chèze, J B; Chollet, J C; Cirilli, M; Cogan, J; Collazuol, G; Contalbrigo, M; Costantini, F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; D'Agostini, G; Dalpiaz, Pietro; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Dibon, Heinz; Doble, Niels T; Dosanjh, R S; Duclos, J; Eppard, K; Eppard, M; Falaleev, V; Fantechi, R; Fayard, L; Fischer, G; Formica, A; Fox, H; Frabetti, P L; Gatignon, L; Gershon, T J; Gianoli, A; Giudici, Sergio; Gonidec, A; Gorini, B; Govi, G; Grafström, P; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Graziani, G; Hay, B; Holder, M; Khristov, P Z; Iacopini, E; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Imbergamo, E; Jeitler, Manfred; Kalmus, George Ernest; Kalter, A; Kekelidze, Vladimir D; Kleinknecht, K; Knowles, I; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Kubischta, Werner; Lacourt, A; Lai, A; Lazzeroni, C; Lenti, M; Litov, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Lubrano, P; Madigozhin, D T; Maier, A; Mannelli, I; Marchetto, F; Markytan, Manfred; Marouelli, P; Marras, D; Martelli, F; Martin, V; Martini, M; Mazzucato, E; Menichetti, E; Mestvirishvili, A; Mikulec, I; Molokanova, N A; Munday, D J; Nappi, A; Nassalski, J P; Neuhofer, G; Norton, A; Ocariz, J; Olaiya, E; Palestini, S; Panzer-Steindel, B; Parker, M A; Pastrone, N; Pellmann, I A; Pepé, M; Pernicka, M; Peters, A; Petrucci, F; Peyaud, B; Piccini, M; Pierazzini, G M; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Renk, B; Rondio, Ewa; Sacco, R; Savrié, M; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Sozzi, M; Stoynev, S; Szleper, M; Taureg, H; Taurok, A; Turlay, René; Unal, G; Vallage, B; Velasco, M; Veltri, M; Wahl, H; Walker, A; Wanke, R; White, T O; Widhalm, L; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winhart, A; Wislicki, W; Wittgen, M; Wotton, S A; Wronka, S; Zinchenko, A I; Ziolkowski, M

    2004-01-01

    We present a measurement of the relative branching ratio of the decay KL -> pi e nu gamma (Ke3gamma) with respect to KL-> pi e nu (gamma) (Ke3+Ke3gamma) decay. The result is based on observation of 19 000 Ke3gamma and 5.6 x 10^6 Ke3 decays. The value of the branching ratio is Br(Ke3gamma, Egamma^*>30 MeV,theta(e,gamma)^*>20^o)/Br(Ke3)= (0.964+-0.008+0.011-0.009)%. This result agrees with theoretical predictions but is at variance with a recently published result.

  14. Continuous measurements of methane mixing ratios from ice cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stowasser

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new, field-deployable technique for continuous, high-resolution measurements of methane mixing ratios from ice cores. The technique is based on a continuous flow analysis system, where ice core samples cut along the long axis of an ice core are melted continuously. The past atmospheric air contained in the ice is separated from the melt water stream via a system for continuous gas extraction. The extracted gas is dehumidified and then analyzed by a Wavelength Scanned-Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer for methane mixing ratios. We assess the performance of the new measurement technique in terms of precision (±0.8 ppbv, 1σ, accuracy (±8 ppbv, temporal (ca. 100 s, and spatial resolution (ca. 5 cm. Using a firn air transport model, we compare the resolution of the measurement technique to the resolution of the atmospheric methane signal as preserved in ice cores in Greenland. We conclude that our measurement technique can resolve all climatically relevant variations as preserved in the ice down to an ice depth of at least 1980 m (66 000 yr before present in the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling ice core. Furthermore, we describe the modifications, which are necessary to make a commercially available spectrometer suitable for continuous methane mixing ratio measurements from ice cores.

  15. Continuous measurements of methane mixing ratios from ice cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stowasser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new, field-deployable technique for continuous, high-resolution measurements of methane mixing ratios from ice cores. The technique is based on a continuous flow analysis system, where ice core samples cut along the long axis of an ice core are melted continuously. The past atmospheric air contained in the ice is separated from the melt water stream via a system for continuous gas extraction. The extracted gas is dehumidified and then analyzed by a Wavelength Scanned-Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer for methane mixing ratios. We assess the performance of the new measurement technique in terms of precision (±0.8 ppbv, 1 σ, accuracy (±8 ppbv, temporal (ca. 100 s and spatial resolution (ca. 6 cm. Using a firn air transport model, we compare the resolution of the measurement technique to the resolution of the atmospheric methane signal as preserved in ice cores in Greenland. We conclude that our measurement technique can resolve all climatically relevant variations as preserved in the ice down to an ice depth of at least 1980 m (66 000 yr before present in the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling ice core. Furthermore, we describe the modifications which are necessary to make a commercially available spectrometer suitable for continuous methane mixing ratio measurements from ice cores.

  16. The influence of number and values of ratios in stepped gearbox on mileage fuel consumption in NEDC test and real traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, P.; Wędrychowicz, D.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the influence of number and values of ratios in stepped gearbox on mileage fuel consumption in a city passenger car. The simulations were conducted for a particular vehicle characterized by its mass, body shape, size of tires and equipped with a combustion engine for which the characteristic of fuel consumption in dynamic states was already designated on the basis of engine test bed measurements. Several designs of transmission with different number of gears and their ratios were used in virtual simulations of road traffic, particularly in the NEDC test, to calculate mileage fuel consumption. This allows for a quantitative assessment of transmission parameters in terms of both vehicle economy and dynamic properties. Also, based on obtained results, recommendations for the selection of a particular vehicle for a specific type of exploitation have been formulated.

  17. Thermal Conductivity Measurement and Analysis of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. G.; Kim, D. J.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S. J. [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    FCM nuclear fuel is composed of tristructural isotropic(TRISO) fuel particle and SiC ceramic matrix. SiC ceramic matrix play an essential part in protecting fission product. In the FCM fuel concept, fission product is doubly protected by TRISO coating layer and SiC ceramic matrix in comparison with the current commercial UO2 fuel system of LWR. In addition to a safety enhancement of FCM fuel, thermal conductivity of SiC ceramic matrix is better than that of UO2 fuel. Because the centerline temperature of FCM fuel is lower than that of the current UO2 fuel due to the difference of thermal conductivity of fuel, an operational release of fission products from the fuel can be reduced. SiC ceramic has attracted for nuclear fuel application due to its high thermal conductivity properties with good radiation tolerant properties, a low neutron absorption cross-section and a high corrosion resistance. Thermal conductivity of ceramic matrix composite depends on the thermal conductivity of each component and the morphology of reinforcement materials such as fibers and particles. There are many results about thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced composite like as SiCf/SiC composite. Thermal conductivity of SiC ceramics and FCM pellets with the volume fraction of TRISO particles were measured and analyzed by analytical models. Polycrystalline SiC ceramics and FCM pellets with TRISO particles were fabricated by hot press sintering with sintering additives. Thermal conductivity of the FCM pellets with TRISO particles of 0 vol.%, 10 vol.%, 20 vol.%, 30 vol.% and 40 vol.% show 68.4, 52.3, 46.8, 43.0 and 34.5 W/mK, respectively. As the volume fraction of TRISO particles increased, the measured thermal conductivity values closely followed the prediction of Maxwell's equation.

  18. Current interruption measurement and analysis for PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, J.C.; Yuan, X.; Wang, H. [National Research Council of Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Inst. for Fuel Cell Innovation

    2007-07-01

    The ohmic resistance, charge transfer resistance and the capacity discharge limit of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells can be evaluated and characterized by a newly developed, low cost, current interruption measuring method. This paper presented the results of a study in which the current interruption measurement for a PEM fuel cell was set up and proven through measurements with a dummy cell. The current interruption characteristics of a 500 W PEM fuel cell stack with an active area of 280 cm{sup 2} was measured using the National Instrument PCI data acquisition unit combined with a TDI electronics load-bank and a FuelCon test station, at different load currents. The ohmic loss of the stack determined by current interruption measurements was in good agreement with that determined by AC impedance spectroscopy. The same setup was shown to be effective for single cell measurements of a small PEM fuel cell and for a PEM fuel cell stack with a load bank. It was concluded that the current interruption measurement is much faster than the AC impedance method, but has lower accuracy, particularly for a signal with high noise. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  19. O/M RATIO MEASUREMENT IN PURE AND MIXED OXIDE FULES - WHERE ARE WE NOW?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. RUBIN; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    The oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio is one of the most critical parameters of nuclear fuel fabrication, and its measurement is closely monitored for manufacturing process control and to ensure the service behavior of the final product. Thermogravimetry is the most widely used method, the procedure for which has remained largely unchanged since its development some thirty years ago. It was not clear to us, however, that this method is still the optimum one in light of advances in instrumentation, and in the current regulatory environment, particularly with regard to waste management and disposal. As part of the MOX fuel fabrication program at Los Alamos, we conducted a comprehensive review of methods for O/M measurements in UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2} and mixed oxide fuels for thermal reactors. A concerted effort was made to access information not available in the open literature. We identified approximately thirty five experimental methods that (a) have been developed with the intent of measuring O/M, (b) provided O/M indirectly by suitable reduction of the measured data, or (c) could provide O/M data with suitable data reduction or when combined with other methods. We will discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of these methods in their application to current routine and small-lot production environment.

  20. Isomeric ratio measurements with the ILL LOHENGRIN spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chebboubi A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modelling of γ heating and neutron damage inside a nuclear reactor is essential to design the next generation of nuclear reactors. The determination of the fission fragment momentum is a key element to perform accurate calculations of the γ heating. One way to assess this information is to look at the isomeric ratio of different nuclei. According to the lifetime of the isomeric state, different experimental techniques were developed at the LOHENGRIN spectrometer. A focus on the measurement of isomeric ratios of 136I in neutron induced fission of 241Pu is presented. A discussion with the current assumptions used in the evaluation process for isomeric ratio is also shown.

  1. Air-fuel ratio and speed control for low emission vehicles based on sliding mode techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puleston, P.F. [UNLP, La Plata (Argentina). Departamento de Electrotecnia, CONICET and LEICI; Monsees, G. [Delft University of Technology (Netherlands). Faculty of Information, Technology and Systems, Control Laboratory; Spurgeon, S.K. [University of Leicester (United Kingdom). Department of Engineering, Control and Instrumentation Group

    2002-05-01

    This paper deals with the combined air-fuel ratio (AFR) and speed control of automotive engines. The robust controller is developed using dynamic sliding mode (SM) control design methods. The proposed controller set-up is tested under realistic operating conditions by means of computer simulation using a comprehensive non-linear model of a four-stroke engine, specifically provided by the automotive industry for these purposes. This accurate industrial model comprises extensive dynamics description and numerous look-up tables representing parameter characteristics obtained from experimental data. The SM controller set-up proves to be robust to model uncertainties and unknown disturbances, regulating effectively the engine speed for a wide range of set-points while maintaining the AFR at the stoichiometric value. (author)

  2. Quantifying fossil fuel CO2 from continuous measurements of APO: a novel approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickers, Penelope; Manning, Andrew C.; Forster, Grant L.; van der Laan, Sander; Wilson, Phil A.; Wenger, Angelina; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Oram, David E.; Sturges, William T.

    2016-04-01

    Using atmospheric measurements to accurately quantify CO2 emissions from fossil fuel sources requires the separation of biospheric and anthropogenic CO2 fluxes. The ability to quantify the fossil fuel component of CO2 (ffCO2) from atmospheric measurements enables more accurate 'top-down' verification of CO2 emissions inventories, which frequently have large uncertainty. Typically, ffCO2 is quantified (in ppm units) from discrete atmospheric measurements of Δ14CO2, combined with higher resolution atmospheric CO measurements, and with knowledge of CO:ffCO2 ratios. In the United Kingdom (UK), however, measurements of Δ14CO2 are often significantly biased by nuclear power plant influences, which limit the use of this approach. We present a novel approach for quantifying ffCO2 using measurements of APO (Atmospheric Potential Oxygen; a tracer derived from concurrent measurements of CO2 and O2) from two measurement sites in Norfolk, UK. Our approach is similar to that used for quantifying ffCO2 from CO measurements (ffCO2(CO)), whereby ffCO2(APO) = (APOmeas - APObg)/RAPO, where (APOmeas - APObg) is the APO deviation from the background, and RAPO is the APO:CO2 combustion ratio for fossil fuel. Time varying values of RAPO are calculated from the global gridded COFFEE (CO2 release and Oxygen uptake from Fossil Fuel Emission Estimate) dataset, combined with NAME (Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment) transport model footprints. We compare our ffCO2(APO) results to results obtained using the ffCO2(CO) method, using CO:CO2 fossil fuel emission ratios (RCO) from the EDGAR (Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research) database. We find that the APO ffCO2 quantification method is more precise than the CO method, owing primarily to a smaller range of possible APO:CO2 fossil fuel emission ratios, compared to the CO:CO2 emission ratio range. Using a long-term dataset of atmospheric O2, CO2, CO and Δ14CO2 from Lutjewad, The Netherlands, we examine the

  3. Alternative Measuring Approaches in Gamma Scanning on Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihm Kvenangen, Karen

    2007-06-15

    In the future, the demand for energy is predicted to grow and more countries plan to utilize nuclear energy as their source of electric energy. This gives rise to many important issues connected to nuclear energy, such as finding methods that can verify that the spent nuclear fuel has been handled safely and used in ordinary power producing cycles as stated by the operators. Gamma ray spectroscopy is one method used for identification and verification of spent nuclear fuel. In the specific gamma ray spectroscopy method called gamma scanning the gamma radiation from the fission products Cs-137, Cs-134 and Eu-154 are measured in a spent fuel assembly. From the results, conclusions can be drawn about the fuels characteristics. This degree project examines the possibilities of using alternative measuring approaches when using the gamma scanning method. The focus is on examining how to increase the quality of the measured data. How to decrease the measuring time as compared with the present measuring strategy, has also been investigated. The main part of the study comprises computer simulations of gamma scanning measurements. The simulations have been validated with actual measurements on spent nuclear fuel at the central interim storage, Clab. The results show that concerning the quality of the measuring data the conventional strategy is preferable, but with other starting positions and with a more optimized equipment. When focusing on the time aspect, the helical measuring strategy can be an option, but this needs further investigation.

  4. Effect of fuel-to-nitrate ratio on the powder characteristics of nanosized CeO{sub 2} synthesized by mixed fuel combustion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palneedi, Haribabu; Mangam, Venu; Das, Siddhartha [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Das, Karabi, E-mail: karabi@metal.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2011-10-13

    Highlights: > Preparation of nanosized ceria powder by mixed fuel combustion synthesis. > Effect of variation of fuel-to-nitrate ratio on the powder characteristics. > Correlation between the results of XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and BET surface analysis. - Abstract: Synthesis of nanocrystalline ceria powders is carried out through the mixed fuel combustion approach by using different combinations of glycine and citric acid. The powders obtained with different fuel-to-nitrate (F/N) ratios are characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET surface area analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. TGA and FTIR spectroscopy studies have revealed the presence of carbonaceous species and residual volatiles in the combustion synthesized ceria powders. It is observed that the variation of fuel-to-nitrate ratio has a profound influence on the carbonaceous residues from combustion, crystallite size (11-44 nm), surface area (9-39 m{sup 2}/g) and morphology of the resultant powders. The Raman spectroscopy results on the variation of particle size with F/N ratio are consistent with the conclusions made from X-ray line broadening and BET surface area analysis.

  5. Advanced Fuels Reactor using Aneutronic Rodless Ultra Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak Hydrogenic Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Celso

    2015-11-01

    The use of advanced fuels for fusion reactor is conventionally envisaged for field reversed configuration (FRC) devices. It is proposed here a preliminary study about the use of these fuels but on an aneutronic Rodless Ultra Low Aspect Ratio (RULART) hydrogenic plasmas. The idea is to inject micro-size boron pellets vertically at the inboard side (HFS, where TF is very high and the tokamak electron temperature is relatively low because of profile), synchronised with a proton NBI pointed to this region. Therefore, p-B reactions should occur and alpha particles produced. These pellets will act as an edge-like disturbance only (cp. killer pellet, although the vertical HFS should make this less critical, since the unablated part should appear in the bottom of the device). The boron cloud will appear at midplance, possibly as a MARFE-look like. Scaling of the p-B reactions by varying the NBI energy should be compared with the predictions of nuclear physics. This could be an alternative to the FRC approach, without the difficulties of the optimization of the FRC low confinement time. Instead, a robust good tokamak confinement with high local HFS TF (enhanced due to the ultra low aspect ratio and low pitch angle) is used. The plasma central post makes the RULART concept attractive because of the proximity of NBI path and also because a fraction of born alphas will cross the plasma post and dragged into it in the direction of the central plasma post current, escaping vertically into a hole in the bias plate and reaching the direct electricity converter, such as in the FRC concept.

  6. Measurement of Contrast Ratios for 3D Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    stereoscopic, autostereoscopic , 3D , display ABSTRACT 3D image display devices have wide applications in medical and entertainment areas. Binocular (stereoscopic...and system crosstalk. In many 3D display systems viewer’ crosstalk is an important issue for good performance, especial in autostereoscopic display...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO 11343 TITLE: Measurement of Contrast Ratios for 3D Display

  7. Measuring the policy effects of changes in reserve requirement ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph H. Haslag; Scott E. Hein

    1995-01-01

    The monetary base is the sum of high-powered money and an adjustment factor that measures changes in reserve requirement ratios. This adjustment factor is calculated so that it responds to changes in deposit levels in addition to changes in reserve requirements. Consequently, researchers and policymakers using the monetary base are seeing a mixture of changes implemented through open market operations, discount window borrowings, and reserve requirements, together with nonpolicy actions actin...

  8. Mitigating Problems in Measuring Hypergolic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    To monitor hydrazine concentrations accurately and safely, hydrazine is converted into a stable derivative that will be monitored and correlated to the actual hydrazine concentration. The hydrazine's reactivity is harnessed to produce a chemical reaction that will form a stable gas-phase derivative which will not react or decompose before it reaches the detector. Hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine belong to a class of compounds known as hypergolic fuels. These fuels self-ignite upon mixing with hypergolic oxidizer (dinitrogen tetroxide), without need of a spark or other ignition source. The resulting reaction produces thrust with exceptionally high energy, making these compounds particularly useful as rocket propellants. Hydrazines are also highly toxic and corrosive. The combined properties of reactivity, corrosivity, and toxicity present the potential for a leak, a disastrous situation in a hypergol-loaded system. Consequently, leak detection is of the utmost importance in protecting equipment and personnel. Hydrazine vapor quantification presents many challenges in addition to the safety concerns. The reactivity of these compounds causes thermal and catalytic decomposition, which results in significant losses. Further complications arise from the sticky nature of hydrazine. Molecules adsorb irreversibly to virtually any surface they make contact with before detection, which results in instrument drift. These properties make it difficult to accurately quantify hydrazines. Current analytical methods seek to minimize these interactions. After an extensive literature search to determine appropriate chemical reactions, a method was devised to quantify hydrazines, without the limitations of monitoring hydrazines.

  9. Fuel cycle analysis of TRU or MA burner fast reactors with variable conversion ratio using a new algorithm at equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvatores, Massimo [CEA Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Argonne National Laboratory, NE Division, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: massimo.salvatores@cea.fr; Chabert, Christine [CEA Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Fazio, Concetta [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hill, Robert [Argonne National Laboratory, NE Division, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Peneliau, Yannick; Slessarev, Igor [CEA Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Yang, Won Sik [Argonne National Laboratory, NE Division, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) strategies assessment and implementation play a key role in the definition of advanced fuel cycles, in order to insure both sustainability and waste minimization. Several options are under study worldwide, and their impact on core design and associated fuel cycles are under investigation, to offer a rationale to down selection and to streamline efforts and resources. Interconnected issues like fuel type, minor actinide content, conversion ratio values, etc. need to be understood and their impact quantified. Then, from a practical point of view, studies related to advanced fuel cycles require a considerable amount of analysis to assess performances both of the reactor cores and of the associated fuel cycles. A physics analysis should provide a sound understanding of major trends and features, in order to provide guidelines for more detailed studies. In this paper, it is presented an improved version of a generalization of the Bateman equation that allows performing analysis at equilibrium for a large number of systems. It is shown that the method reproduces very well the results obtained with full depletion calculations. The method is applied to explore the specific issue of the features of the fuel cycle parameters related to fast reactors with different fuel types, different conversion ratios (CR) and different ratios of Pu over minor actinide (Pu/MA) in the fuel feed. As an example of the potential impact of such analysis, it is shown that for cores with CR below {approx}0.8, the increase of neutron doses and decay heat can represent a significant drawback to implement the corresponding reactors and associated fuel cycles.

  10. Effect of C/N ratio and salinity on power generation in compost microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Khudzari, Jauharah; Tartakovsky, Boris; Raghavan, G S Vijaya

    2016-02-01

    In this work, compost Microbial Fuel Cells (cMFCs) were used to generate electricity from a mix of fruit and vegetable wastes, and soil with different C/N ratios and salinities. Experiments were carried out in 500mL cMFCs equipped with carbon felt anodes and manganese dioxide cathodes. The cMFCs were loaded with fresh compost and operated at 20-23°C for up to 97days. The low C/N ratio (C/N 24) had a greater power production with a maximum power density of 5.29mW/m(2) (71.43mW/m(3)), indicating a more favorable condition for microbial growth. High-saline cMFCs produced lower power, suggesting that their level of salinity (10g/L of NaCl) inhibited electricigenic microorganisms. The closed-circuit cMFC showed an improved degradation of organic matter by 6% to 8% compared to the control MFC operated in an open circuit mode (no external resistor attached).

  11. Measurement of the Radiative $K_{e3}$ Branching Ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, A; Bevan, A; Dosanjh, R S; Gershon, T J; Hay, B; Kalmus, George Ernest; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; White, T O; Wotton, S A; Barr, G; Bocquet,; Ceccucci, A; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; D'Agostini, G; Doble, Niels T; Falaleev, V; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Gorini, B; Govi, G; Grafström, P; Kubischta, Werner; Mikulec, I; Lacourt, A; Norton, A; Palestini, S; Panzer-Steindel, B; Taureg, H; Velasco, M; Wahl, H; Cheshkov, C; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, Vladimir D; Litov, L; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Stoynev, S; Zinchenko, A I; Knowles, I; Martin, V; Sacco, R; Walker, A; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Duclos, J; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savrié, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Veltri, M; Becker, H G; Eppard, K; Eppard, M; Fox, H; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Marouelli, P; Pellmann, I A; Peters, A; Renk, B; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Chollet, J C; Fayard, L; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Nappi, A; Pepé, M; Piccini, M; Bertanza, L; Carosi, R; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Giudici, Sergio; Mannelli, I; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Chèze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Formica, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Maier, A; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Pastrone, N; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, Ewa; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Neuhofer, G; Pernicka, M; Taurok, A; Widhalm, L

    2005-01-01

    We present a measurement of the relative branching ratio of the decay {K}^0 -> pi+-e-+ nu gamma ({K}_e3 gamma) with respect to {K}^0 -> pi+- e-+ nu (gamma) ({k}_e3 + k}_e3 gamma) decay. The result is based on observation of 19 000 {K}_e3 gamma and 5.6 . {10}^6 {K}_e3 decays. The value of branching ratio is Br({K}^0 _e3 gamma{E}^*_gamma > 30 MeV, {theta}^*_e gamma > 20 deg) / Br({K}^0_e3 = (0.964 +- {0.008}^+0.011_0.009)%. This result agrees with the theoretical predictions but is at variance with a recently published result.

  12. Can UK fossil fuel emissions be determined by radiocarbon measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Angelina; O'Doherty, Simon; Rigby, Matthew; Manning, Alistair; Palmer, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The GAUGE project evaluates different methods to estimate UK emissions. However, estimating carbon dioxide emissions as a result of fossil fuel burning is challenging as natural fluxes in and out of the atmosphere are very large. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements offer a way to specifically measure the amount of recently added carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning. This is possible as, due to their age, all the radiocarbon in fossil fuels has decayed. Hence the amount of recently added CO2 from fossil fuel burning can be measured as a depletion of the 14C content in air. While this method has been successfully applied by several groups on a city or a regional scale, this is the first attempt at using the technique for a national emission estimate. Geographically the UK, being an island, is a good location for such an experiment. But are 14CO2 measurements the ideal solution for estimating fossil fuel emissions as they are heralded to be? Previous studies have shown that 14CO2emissions from the nuclear industry mask the 14C depletion caused by fossil fuel burning and result in an underestimation of the fossil fuel CO2. While this might not be a problem in certain regions around the world, many countries like the UK have a substantial nuclear industry. A correction for this enhancement from the nuclear industry can be applied but are invariably difficult as 14CO2emissions from nuclear power plants have a high temporal variability. We will explain how our sampling strategy was chosen to minimize the influence form the nuclear industry and why this proved to be challenging. In addition we present the results from our ground based measurements to show why trying to estimate national emissions using radiocarbon measurements was overambitious, and how practical the technique is for the UK in general.

  13. Numerical study of cell performance and local transport phenomena in PEM fuel cells with various flow channel area ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Duan, Yuan-Yuan; Yan, Wei-Mon

    Three-dimensional models of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with parallel and interdigitated flow channel designs were developed including the effects of liquid water formation on the reactant gas transport. The models were used to investigate the effects of the flow channel area ratio and the cathode flow rate on the cell performance and local transport characteristics. The results reveal that at high operating voltages, the cell performance is independent of the flow channel designs and operating parameters, while at low operating voltages, both significantly affect cell performance. For the parallel flow channel design, as the flow channel area ratio increases the cell performance improves because fuel is transported into the diffusion layer and the catalyst layer mainly by diffusion. A larger flow channel area ratio increases the contact area between the fuel and the diffusion layer, which allows more fuel to directly diffuse into the porous layers to participate in the electrochemical reaction which enhances the reaction rates. For the interdigitated flow channel design, the baffle forces more fuel to enter the cell and participate in the electrochemical reaction, so the flow channel area ratio has less effect. Forced convection not only increases the fuel transport rates but also enhances the liquid water removal, thus interdigitated flow channel design has higher performance than the parallel flow channel design. The optimal performance for the interdigitated flow channel design occurs for a flow channel area ratio of 0.4. The cell performance also improves as the cathode flow rate increases. The effects of the flow channel area ratio and the cathode flow rate on cell performance are analyzed based on the local current densities, oxygen flow rates and liquid water concentrations inside the cell.

  14. Numerical study of cell performance and local transport phenomena in PEM fuel cells with various flow channel area ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong [Department of Thermal Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Duan, Yuan-Yuan [Key Laboratory of Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yan, Wei-Mon [Department of Mechatronic Engineering, Huafan University, Shih-Ting 22305 (China)

    2007-10-11

    Three-dimensional models of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with parallel and interdigitated flow channel designs were developed including the effects of liquid water formation on the reactant gas transport. The models were used to investigate the effects of the flow channel area ratio and the cathode flow rate on the cell performance and local transport characteristics. The results reveal that at high operating voltages, the cell performance is independent of the flow channel designs and operating parameters, while at low operating voltages, both significantly affect cell performance. For the parallel flow channel design, as the flow channel area ratio increases the cell performance improves because fuel is transported into the diffusion layer and the catalyst layer mainly by diffusion. A larger flow channel area ratio increases the contact area between the fuel and the diffusion layer, which allows more fuel to directly diffuse into the porous layers to participate in the electrochemical reaction which enhances the reaction rates. For the interdigitated flow channel design, the baffle forces more fuel to enter the cell and participate in the electrochemical reaction, so the flow channel area ratio has less effect. Forced convection not only increases the fuel transport rates but also enhances the liquid water removal, thus interdigitated flow channel design has higher performance than the parallel flow channel design. The optimal performance for the interdigitated flow channel design occurs for a flow channel area ratio of 0.4. The cell performance also improves as the cathode flow rate increases. The effects of the flow channel area ratio and the cathode flow rate on cell performance are analyzed based on the local current densities, oxygen flow rates and liquid water concentrations inside the cell. (author)

  15. Quality Model and Artificial Intelligence Base Fuel Ratio Management with Applications to Automotive Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdeh Piran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, manage the Internal Combustion (IC engine modeling and a multi-input-multi-output artificial intelligence baseline chattering free sliding mode methodology scheme is developed with guaranteed stability to simultaneously control fuel ratios to desired levels under various air flow disturbances by regulating the mass flow rates of engine PFI and DI injection systems. Modeling of an entire IC engine is a very important and complicated process because engines are nonlinear, multi inputs-multi outputs and time variant. One purpose of accurate modeling is to save development costs of real engines and minimizing the risks of damaging an engine when validating controller designs. Nevertheless, developing a small model, for specific controller design purposes, can be done and then validated on a larger, more complicated model. Analytical dynamic nonlinear modeling of internal combustion engine is carried out using elegant Euler-Lagrange method compromising accuracy and complexity. A baseline estimator with varying parameter gain is designed with guaranteed stability to allow implementation of the proposed state feedback sliding mode methodology into a MATLAB simulation environment, where the sliding mode strategy is implemented into a model engine control module (“software”. To estimate the dynamic model of IC engine fuzzy inference engine is applied to baseline sliding mode methodology. The fuzzy inference baseline sliding methodology performance was compared with a well-tuned baseline multi-loop PID controller through MATLAB simulations and showed improvements, where MATLAB simulations were conducted to validate the feasibility of utilizing the developed controller and state estimator for automotive engines. The proposed tracking method is designed to optimally track the desired FR by minimizing the error between the trapped in-cylinder mass and the product of the desired FR and fuel mass over a given time interval.

  16. Shielding Performance Measurements of Spent Fuel Transportation Container

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Hong-chao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The safety supervision of radioactive material transportation package has been further stressed and implemented. The shielding performance measurements of spent fuel transport container is the important content of supervision. However, some of the problems and difficulties reflected in practice need to be solved, such as the neutron dose rate on the surface of package is too difficult to measure exactly, the monitoring results are not always reliable, etc. The monitoring results using different spectrometers were compared and the simulation results of MCNP runs were considered. An improvement was provided to the shielding performance measurements technique and management of spent fuel transport.

  17. Fuel Character Effects on Current, High Pressure Ratio, Can-Type Turbine Combustion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    out (’ LCF low cycle fatigue TLR fuel lower heating value, MJ/kg Mach number MS Gulf mineral seal oil, fuel additive NO oxides of nitrogen K P...fuel properties are presented in Subsections C (single variable) and D ( multipla variables). Projections of combustor and turtine hardware life based

  18. Temperature measuring analysis of the nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    F., Urban; Ľ., Kučák; Bereznai, J.; Závodný, Z.; Muškát, P.

    2014-08-01

    Study was based on rapid changes of measured temperature values from the thermocouple in the VVER 440 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Task was to determine origin of fluctuations of the temperature values by experiments on physical model of the fuel assembly. During an experiment, heated water was circulating in the system and cold water inlet through central tube to record sensitivity of the temperature sensor. Two positions of the sensor was used. First, just above the central tube in the physical model fuel assembly axis and second at the position of the thermocouple in the VVER 440 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Dependency of the temperature values on time are presented in the diagram form in the paper.

  19. Continental crust composition constrained by measurements of crustal Poisson's ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandt, George; Ammon, Charles J.

    1995-03-01

    DECIPHERING the geological evolution of the Earth's continental crust requires knowledge of its bulk composition and global variability. The main uncertainties are associated with the composition of the lower crust. Seismic measurements probe the elastic properties of the crust at depth, from which composition can be inferred. Of particular note is Poisson's ratio,Σ ; this elastic parameter can be determined uniquely from the ratio of P- to S-wave seismic velocity, and provides a better diagnostic of crustal composition than either P- or S-wave velocity alone1. Previous attempts to measure Σ have been limited by difficulties in obtaining coincident P- and S-wave data sampling the entire crust2. Here we report 76 new estimates of crustal Σ spanning all of the continents except Antarctica. We find that, on average, Σ increases with the age of the crust. Our results strongly support the presence of a mafic lower crust beneath cratons, and suggest either a uniformitarian craton formation process involving delamination of the lower crust during continental collisions, followed by magmatic underplating, or a model in which crust formation processes have changed since the Precambrian era.

  20. Accurate and precise zinc isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Simone; Weiss, Dominik; Coles, Barry; Arnold, Tim; Babinski, Marly

    2008-12-15

    We developed an analytical method and constrained procedural boundary conditions that enable accurate and precise Zn isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols. We also demonstrate the potential of this new isotope system for air pollutant source tracing. The procedural blank is around 5 ng and significantly lower than published methods due to a tailored ion chromatographic separation. Accurate mass bias correction using external correction with Cu is limited to Zn sample content of approximately 50 ng due to the combined effect of blank contribution of Cu and Zn from the ion exchange procedure and the need to maintain a Cu/Zn ratio of approximately 1. Mass bias is corrected for by applying the common analyte internal standardization method approach. Comparison with other mass bias correction methods demonstrates the accuracy of the method. The average precision of delta(66)Zn determinations in aerosols is around 0.05 per thousand per atomic mass unit. The method was tested on aerosols collected in Sao Paulo City, Brazil. The measurements reveal significant variations in delta(66)Zn(Imperial) ranging between -0.96 and -0.37 per thousand in coarse and between -1.04 and 0.02 per thousand in fine particular matter. This variability suggests that Zn isotopic compositions distinguish atmospheric sources. The isotopic light signature suggests traffic as the main source. We present further delta(66)Zn(Imperial) data for the standard reference material NIST SRM 2783 (delta(66)Zn(Imperial) = 0.26 +/- 0.10 per thousand).

  1. The Effect of Compression Ratio, Fuel Octane Rating, and Ethanol Content on Spark-Ignition Engine Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Thomas G; Anderson, James E; Davis, Richard S; Iqbal, Asim; Reese, Ronald A; Shelby, Michael H; Studzinski, William M

    2015-09-15

    Light-duty vehicles (LDVs) in the United States and elsewhere are required to meet increasingly challenging regulations on fuel economy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as well as criteria pollutant emissions. New vehicle trends to improve efficiency include higher compression ratio, downsizing, turbocharging, downspeeding, and hybridization, each involving greater operation of spark-ignited (SI) engines under higher-load, knock-limited conditions. Higher octane ratings for regular-grade gasoline (with greater knock resistance) are an enabler for these technologies. This literature review discusses both fuel and engine factors affecting knock resistance and their contribution to higher engine efficiency and lower tailpipe CO2 emissions. Increasing compression ratios for future SI engines would be the primary response to a significant increase in fuel octane ratings. Existing LDVs would see more advanced spark timing and more efficient combustion phasing. Higher ethanol content is one available option for increasing the octane ratings of gasoline and would provide additional engine efficiency benefits for part and full load operation. An empirical calculation method is provided that allows estimation of expected vehicle efficiency, volumetric fuel economy, and CO2 emission benefits for future LDVs through higher compression ratios for different assumptions on fuel properties and engine types. Accurate "tank-to-wheel" estimates of this type are necessary for "well-to-wheel" analyses of increased gasoline octane ratings in the context of light duty vehicle transportation.

  2. Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Flow Field Measurement Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, H.; Dentz, J.; Doty, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

  3. Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Field Measurement Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Hugh [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative (ARIES), New York, NY (United States); Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative (ARIES), New York, NY (United States); Doty, Chris [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative (ARIES), New York, NY (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

  4. Adaptive critic learning techniques for engine torque and air-fuel ratio control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Derong; Javaherian, Hossein; Kovalenko, Olesia; Huang, Ting

    2008-08-01

    A new approach for engine calibration and control is proposed. In this paper, we present our research results on the implementation of adaptive critic designs for self-learning control of automotive engines. A class of adaptive critic designs that can be classified as (model-free) action-dependent heuristic dynamic programming is used in this research project. The goals of the present learning control design for automotive engines include improved performance, reduced emissions, and maintained optimum performance under various operating conditions. Using the data from a test vehicle with a V8 engine, we developed a neural network model of the engine and neural network controllers based on the idea of approximate dynamic programming to achieve optimal control. We have developed and simulated self-learning neural network controllers for both engine torque (TRQ) and exhaust air-fuel ratio (AFR) control. The goal of TRQ control and AFR control is to track the commanded values. For both control problems, excellent neural network controller transient performance has been achieved.

  5. The Fueling Diagram: Linking Galaxy Molecular-to-Atomic Gas Ratios to Interactions and Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, David V; Wei, Lisa H; Baker, Andrew J; Leroy, Adam K; Eckert, Kathleen D; Vogel, Stuart N

    2013-01-01

    To assess how external factors such as local interactions and fresh gas accretion influence the global ISM of galaxies, we analyze the relationship between recent enhancements of central star formation and total molecular-to-atomic (H2/HI) gas ratios, using a broad sample of field galaxies spanning early-to-late type morphologies, stellar masses of 10^(7.2-11.2) Msun, and diverse stages of evolution. We find that galaxies occupy several loci in a "fueling diagram" that plots H2/HI vs. mass-corrected blue-centeredness, a metric tracing the degree to which galaxies have bluer centers than the average galaxy at their stellar mass. Spiral galaxies show a positive correlation between H2/HI and mass-corrected blue-centeredness. When combined with previous results linking mass-corrected blue-centeredness to external perturbations, this correlation suggests a link between local galaxy interactions and molecular gas inflow/replenishment. Intriguingly, E/S0 galaxies show a more complex picture: some follow the same cor...

  6. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, S.; Tobin, S. J.; Favalli, A.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Hu, J.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Trellue, H.; Vo, D.

    2016-10-01

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative-Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of 137Cs, 154Eu, and 134Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  7. 241Am (n,gamma) isomer ratio measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Evelyn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vieira, David J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moody, Walter A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Slemmons, Alice K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-05

    The objective of this project is to improve the accuracy of the {sup 242}Cm/{sup 241}Am radiochemistry ratio. We have performed an activation experiment to measure the {sup 241}Am(n,{gamma}) cross section leading to either the ground state of {sup 242g}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 16 hr) which decays to {sup 242}Cm (t{sub 1/2} = 163 d) or the long-lived isomer {sup 242m}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 141 yr). This experiment will develop a new set of americium cross section evaluations that can be used with a measured {sup 242}Cm/{sup 241}Am radiochemical measurement for nuclear forensic purposes. This measurement is necessary to interpret the {sup 242}Cm/{sup 241}Am ratio because a good measurement of this neutron capture isomer ratio for {sup 241}Am does not exist. The targets were prepared in 2007 from {sup 241}Am purified from LANL stocks. Gold was added to the purified {sup 241}Am as an internal neutron fluence monitor. These targets were placed into a holder, packaged, and shipped to Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, where they were irradiated at their Van de Graff facility in February 2008. One target was irradiated with {approx}25 keV quasimonoenergetic neutrons produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction for 3 days and a second target was also irradiated for 3 days with {approx}500 keV neutrons. Because it will be necessary to separate the {sup 242}Cm from the {sup 241}Am in order to measure the amount of {sup 242}Cm by alpha spectrometry, research into methods for americium/curium separations were conducted concurrently. We found that anion exchange chromatography in methanol/nitric acid solutions produced good separations that could be completed in one day resulting in a sample with no residue. The samples were returned from Germany in July 2009 and were counted by gamma spectrometry. Chemical separations have commenced on the blank sample. Each sample will be spiked with {sup 244}Cm, dissolved and digested in nitric acid solutions. One third of each sample will be processed at a time

  8. Research on Measuring Technology for In-pile Fuel Element Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The tested fuel assembly for In-pile test for PWR fuel element with instrumentation consisted of 4instrumented fuel elements and total 12 sets of transducers. Double claddings are adopted to raise fueltemperature. Two fuel elements each have 2 thermocouples for measuring separately the fuel centerlinetemperature and the cladding surface temperature. The other two elements have membrane type oressure

  9. Influence of fuel type, dilution and equivalence ratio on the emission reduction from the auto-ignition in an Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim [UPMC Universite Paris 06, ENSCP, 11 rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Universite Libre de Bruxelles, TIPs - Fluid Physics, CP165/67, 50 Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, ENSCP, 11 rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Amouroux, Jacques [UPMC Universite Paris 06, ENSCP, 11 rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2010-04-15

    One technology that seems to be promising for automobile pollution reduction is the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI). This technology still faces auto-ignition and emission-control problems. This paper focuses on the emission problem, since it is incumbent to realize engines that pollute less. For this purpose, this paper presents results concerning the measurement of the emissions of CO, NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and hydrocarbons. HCCI conditions are used, with equivalence ratios between 0.26 and 0.54, inlet temperatures of 70 C and 120 C and compression ratios of 10.2 and 13.5, with different fuel types: gasoline, gasoline surrogate, diesel, diesel surrogate and mixtures of n-heptane/toluene. The effect of dilution is considered for gasoline, while the effect of the equivalence ratio is considered for all the fuels. No significant amount of NO{sub x} has been measured. It appeared that the CO, O{sub 2} and hydrocarbon emissions were reduced by decreasing the toluene content of the fuel and by decreasing the dilution. The opposite holds for CO{sub 2}. The reduction of the hydrocarbon emission appears to compete with the reduction of the CO{sub 2} emission. Diesel seemed to produce less CO and hydrocarbons than gasoline when auto-ignited. An example of emission reduction control is presented in this paper. (author)

  10. Measurement of Bs0→Ds(*)+Ds(*)- branching ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-05-18

    The decays Bs0→Ds(*)+Ds(*)- are reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8  fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron pp[over ¯] collider. All decay modes are observed with a significance of more than 10σ, and we measure the Bs0 production rate times Bs0→Ds(*)+Ds(*)- branching ratios relative to the normalization mode B0→Ds+D-to be 0.183±0.021±0.017 for Bs0→Ds+Ds-, 0.424±0.046±0.035 for Bs0→Ds*±Ds^∓, 0.654±0.072±0.065 for Bs0→Ds*+Ds*-, and 1.261±0.095±0.112 for the inclusive decay Bs0→Ds(*)+Ds(*)-, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. These results are the most precise single measurements to date and provide important constraints for indirect searches for nonstandard model physics in Bs0 mixing.

  11. Fuel Conditioning Facility Electrorefiner Model Predictions versus Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Vaden

    2007-10-01

    Electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel is performed in the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by electrochemically separating uranium from the fission products and structural materials in a vessel called an electrorefiner (ER). To continue processing without waiting for sample analyses to assess process conditions, an ER process model predicts the composition of the ER inventory and effluent streams via multicomponent, multi-phase chemical equilibrium for chemical reactions and a numerical solution to differential equations for electro-chemical transport. The results of the process model were compared to the electrorefiner measured data.

  12. Noise Measurements of High Aspect Ratio Distributed Exhaust Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers far-field acoustic measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratio 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Several variations of nozzle geometry, commonly found in embedded exhaust systems, are explored, including bevels, slants, single broad chevrons and notches, and internal septae. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously for the simple rectangular nozzle, showed that increasing aspect ratio increases the high frequency noise, especially directed in the plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. Detailed changes to the nozzle geometry generally made little difference in the noise, and the differences were greatest at low speed. Having an extended lip on one broad side (bevel) did produce up to 3 decibels more noise in all directions, while extending the lip on the narrow side (slant) produced up to 2 decibels more noise, primarily on the side with the extension. Adding a single, non-intrusive chevron, made no significant change to the noise, while inverting the chevron (notch) produced up to 2decibels increase in the noise. Having internal walls (septae) within the nozzle, such as would be required for structural support or when multiple fan ducts are aggregated, reduced the noise of the rectangular jet, but could produce a highly directional shedding tone from the septae trailing edges. Finally, a nozzle with both septae and a beveled nozzle, representative of the exhaust system envisioned for a distributed electric propulsion aircraft with a common rectangular duct, produced almost as much noise as the beveled nozzle, with the septae not contributing much reduction in noise.

  13. Constraints on explosive silicon burning in core-collapse supernovae from measured Ni/Fe ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Jerkstrand, A; Magkotsios, G; Sim, S A; Fransson, C; Spyromilio, J; Heger, A; Müller, B; Sollerman, J; Smartt, S J

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of explosive nucleosynthesis yields in core-collapse supernovae provide tests for explosion models. We investigate constraints on explosive conditions derivable from measured amounts of nickel and iron after radioactive decays using nucleosynthesis networks with parameterized thermodynamic trajectories. The Ni/Fe ratio is for most regimes dominated by the production ratio of 58Ni/(54Fe + 56Ni), which tends to grow with higher neutron excess and with higher entropy. For SN 2012ec, a supernova that produced a Ni/Fe ratio of $3.4\\pm1.2$ times solar, we find that burning of a fuel with neutron excess $\\eta \\approx 6\\times 10^{-3}$ is required. Unless the progenitor metallicity is over 5 times solar, the only layer in the progenitor with such a neutron excess is the silicon shell. Supernovae producing large amounts of stable nickel thus suggest that this deep-lying layer can be, at least partially, ejected in the explosion. We find that common spherically symmetric models of $M_{\\rm ZAMS} \\lesssim 13$...

  14. In-Pile Thermal Conductivity Measurement Method for Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy L. Rempe; Brandon Fox; Heng Ban; Joshua E. Daw; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie

    2009-08-01

    Thermophysical properties of advanced nuclear fuels and materials during irradiation must be known prior to their use in existing, advanced, or next generation reactors. Thermal conductivity is one of the most important properties for predicting fuel and material performance. A joint Utah State University (USU) / Idaho National Laboratory (INL) project, which is being conducted with assistance from the Institute for Energy Technology at the Norway Halden Reactor Project, is investigating in-pile fuel thermal conductivity measurement methods. This paper focuses on one of these methods – a multiple thermocouple method. This two-thermocouple method uses a surrogate fuel rod with Joule heating to simulate volumetric heat generation to gain insights about in-pile detection of thermal conductivity. Preliminary results indicated that this method can measure thermal conductivity over a specific temperature range. This paper reports the thermal conductivity values obtained by this technique and compares these values with thermal property data obtained from standard thermal property measurement techniques available at INL’s High Test Temperature Laboratory. Experimental results and material properties data are also compared to finite element analysis results.

  15. Isotopic Ratios in Titan's Methane: Measurements and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Temelso, B.; Vinatier, S.; Teanby, N. A.; Bezard, B.; Achterberg, R. K.; Mandt, K. E.; Sherrill, C. D.; Irwin, P. G.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Coustenis, A.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    The existence of methane in Titan's atmosphere (approx. 6% level at the surface) presents a unique enigma, as photochemical models predict that the current inventory will be entirely depleted by photochemistry in a timescale of approx 20 Myr. In this paper, we examine the clues available from isotopic ratios (C-12/C-13 and D/H) in Titan's methane as to the past atmosphere history of this species. We first analyze recent infrared spectra of CH4 collected by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer, measuring simultaneously for the first time the abundances of all three detected minor isotopologues: (13)CH4, (12)CH3D, and (13)CH3D. From these we compute estimates of C-12/C-13 = 86.5 +/- 8.2 and D/H = (1.59 +/- 0.33) x 10(exp -4) , in agreement with recent results from the Huygens GCMS and Cassini INMS instruments. We also use the transition state theory to estimate the fractionation that occurs in carbon and hydrogen during a critical reaction that plays a key role in the chemical depletion of Titan's methane: CH4 + C2H yields CH3 + C2H2. Using these new measurements and predictions we proceed to model the time evolution of C-12/C-13 and D/H in Titan's methane under several prototypical replenishment scenarios. In our Model 1 (no resupply of CH4), we find that the present-day C-12/C-13 implies that the CH4 entered the atmosphere 60-1600 Myr ago if methane is depleted by chemistry and photolysis alone, but much more recently-most likely less than 10 Myr ago-if hydrodynamic escape is also occurring. On the other hand, if methane has been continuously supplied at the replenishment rate then the isotopic ratios provide no constraints, and likewise for the case where atmospheric methane is increasing, We conclude by discussing how these findings may be combined with other evidence to constrain the overall history of the atmospheric methane.

  16. Heavy truck modeling for fuel consumption. Simulations and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, T.

    2001-12-01

    Fuel consumption for heavy trucks depends on many factors like roads, weather, and driver behavior that are hard for a manufacturer to influence. However, one design possibility is the power train configuration. Here a new simulation program for heavy trucks is created to find the configuration of the power train that gives the lowest fuel consumption for each transport task. For efficient simulations the model uses production code for speed and gear control, and it uses exchangeable data sets to allow simulation of the whole production range of engine types, on recorded road profiles from all over the world. Combined with a graphical user interface this application is called STARS (Scania Truck And Road Simulation). The forces of rolling resistance and air resistance in the model are validated through an experiment where the propeller shaft torque of a heavy truck is measured. It is found that the coefficient of rolling resistance is strongly dependent on tire temperature, not only on vehicle speed as expected. This led to the development of a new model for rolling resistance. The model includes the dynamic behavior of the tires and relates rolling resistance to tire temperature and vehicle speed. In another experiment the fuel consumption of a test truck in highway driving is measured. The altitude of the road is recorded with a barometer and used in the corresponding simulations. Despite of the limited accuracy of this equipment the simulation program manage to predict a level of fuel consumption only 2% lower than the real measurements. It is concluded that STARS is a good tool for predicting fuel consumption for trucks in highway driving and for comparing different power train configurations.

  17. Heavy truck modeling for fuel consumption. Simulations and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, T.

    2001-12-01

    Fuel consumption for heavy trucks depends on many factors like roads, weather, and driver behavior that are hard for a manufacturer to influence. However, one design possibility is the power train configuration. Here a new simulation program for heavy trucks is created to find the configuration of the power train that gives the lowest fuel consumption for each transport task. For efficient simulations the model uses production code for speed and gear control, and it uses exchangeable data sets to allow simulation of the whole production range of engine types, on recorded road profiles from all over the world. Combined with a graphical user interface this application is called STARS (Scania Truck And Road Simulation). The forces of rolling resistance and air resistance in the model are validated through an experiment where the propeller shaft torque of a heavy truck is measured. It is found that the coefficient of rolling resistance is strongly dependent on tire temperature, not only on vehicle speed as expected. This led to the development of a new model for rolling resistance. The model includes the dynamic behavior of the tires and relates rolling resistance to tire temperature and vehicle speed. In another experiment the fuel consumption of a test truck in highway driving is measured. The altitude of the road is recorded with a barometer and used in the corresponding simulations. Despite of the limited accuracy of this equipment the simulation program manage to predict a level of fuel consumption only 2% lower than the real measurements. It is concluded that STARS is a good tool for predicting fuel consumption for trucks in highway driving and for comparing different power train configurations.

  18. Measuring hospital performance in multiinstitutional organizations using financial ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, J S

    1985-01-01

    The growth in the number of hospitals participating in MIOs is a critical force in the health services industry. Financial ratios serve as a tool to analyze the performance of these MIOs. Ratios can provide signals of financial stress or strength, which is essential to survival in a price-competitive environment.

  19. Benchmark Evaluation of Fuel Effect and Material Worth Measurements for a Beryllium-Reflected Space Reactor Mockup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Margaret A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Center for Space Nuclear Research; Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The critical configuration of the small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in 1962-1965 have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. The initial intent of these experiments was to support the design of the Medium Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program, whose purpose was to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.” The third configuration in this series of experiments was a beryllium-reflected assembly of stainless-steel-clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuel mockup of a potassium-cooled space power reactor. Reactivity measurements cadmium ratio spectral measurements and fission rate measurements were measured through the core and top reflector. Fuel effect worth measurements and neutron moderating and absorbing material worths were also measured in the assembly fuel region. The cadmium ratios, fission rate, and worth measurements were evaluated for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. The fuel tube effect and neutron moderating and absorbing material worth measurements are the focus of this paper. Additionally, a measurement of the worth of potassium filling the core region was performed but has not yet been evaluated Pellets of 93.15 wt.% enriched uranium dioxide (UO2) were stacked in 30.48 cm tall stainless steel fuel tubes (0.3 cm tall end caps). Each fuel tube had 26 pellets with a total mass of 295.8 g UO2 per tube. 253 tubes were arranged in 1.506-cm triangular lattice. An additional 7-tube cluster critical configuration was also measured but not used for any physics measurements. The core was surrounded on all side by a beryllium reflector. The fuel effect worths were measured by removing fuel tubes at various radius. An accident scenario

  20. Biomass burning fuel consumption rates: a field measurement database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. T. van Leeuwen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Landscape fires show large variability in the amount of biomass or fuel consumed per unit area burned. These fuel consumption (FC rates depend on the biomass available to burn and the fraction of the biomass that is actually combusted, and can be combined with estimates of area burned to assess emissions. While burned area can be detected from space and estimates are becoming more reliable due to improved algorithms and sensors, FC rates are either modeled or taken selectively from the literature. We compiled the peer-reviewed literature on FC rates for various biomes and fuel categories to better understand FC rates and variability, and to provide a~database that can be used to constrain biogeochemical models with fire modules. We compiled in total 76 studies covering 10 biomes including savanna (15 studies, average FC of 4.6 t DM (dry matter ha−1, tropical forest (n = 19, FC = 126, temperate forest (n = 11, FC = 93, boreal forest (n = 16, FC = 39, pasture (n = 6, FC = 28, crop residue (n = 4, FC = 6.5, chaparral (n = 2, FC = 32, tropical peatland (n = 4, FC = 314, boreal peatland (n = 2, FC = 42, and tundra (n = 1, FC = 40. Within biomes the regional variability in the number of measurements was sometimes large, with e.g. only 3 measurement locations in boreal Russia and 35 sites in North America. Substantial regional differences were found within the defined biomes: for example FC rates of temperate pine forests in the USA were 38% higher than Australian forests dominated by eucalypt trees. Besides showing the differences between biomes, FC estimates were also grouped into different fuel classes. Our results highlight the large variability in FC rates, not only between biomes but also within biomes and fuel classes. This implies that care should be taken with using averaged values, and our comparison with FC rates from GFED3 indicates that also modeling studies have difficulty in representing the dynamics governing FC.

  1. Measurement system analysis (MSA) of the isotopic ratio for uranium isotope enrichment process control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Josue C. de; Barbosa, Rodrigo A.; Carnaval, Joao Paulo R., E-mail: josue@inb.gov.br, E-mail: rodrigobarbosa@inb.gov.br, E-mail: joaocarnaval@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Rezende, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Currently, one of the stages in nuclear fuel cycle development is the process of uranium isotope enrichment, which will provide the amount of low enriched uranium for the nuclear fuel production to supply 100% Angra 1 and 20% Angra 2 demands. Determination of isotopic ration n({sup 235}U)/n({sup 238}U) in uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6} - used as process gas) is essential in order to control of enrichment process of isotopic separation by gaseous centrifugation cascades. The uranium hexafluoride process is performed by gas continuous feeding in separation unit which uses the centrifuge force principle, establishing a density gradient in a gas containing components of different molecular weights. The elemental separation effect occurs in a single ultracentrifuge that results in a partial separation of the feed in two fractions: an enriched on (product) and another depleted (waste) in the desired isotope ({sup 235}UF{sub 6}). Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB) has used quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) by electron impact (EI) to perform isotopic ratio n({sup 235}U)/n({sup 238}U) analysis in the process. The decision of adjustments and change te input variables are based on the results presented in these analysis. A study of stability, bias and linearity determination has been performed in order to evaluate the applied method, variations and systematic errors in the measurement system. The software used to analyze the techniques above was the Minitab 15. (author)

  2. COMBUSTION SIMULATION IN A SPARK IGNITION ENGINE CYLINDER: EFFECTS OF AIR-FUEL RATIO ON THE COMBUSTION DURATION

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Combustion is an important subject of internal combustion engine studies. To reduce the air pollution from internal combustion engines and to increase the engine performance, it is required to increase combustion efficiency. In this study, effects of air/fuel ratio were investigated numerically. An axisymmetrical internal combustion engine was modeled in order to simulate in-cylinder engine flow and combustion. Two dimensional transient continuity, momentum, turbulence, energy, and combustion...

  3. Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Variable Compression Ignition Engine Fueled with Jatropha curcas Ethyl Ester Blends at Different Compression Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engine performance and emission characteristics of unmodified biodiesel fueled diesel engines are highly influenced by their ignition and combustion behavior. In this study, emission and combustion characteristics were studied when the engine operated using the different blends (B10, B20, B30, and B40 and normal diesel fuel (B0 as well as when varying the compression ratio from 16.5 : 1 to 17.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. The change of compression ratio from 16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1 resulted in 27.1%, 27.29%, 26.38%, 28.48%, and 34.68% increase in cylinder pressure for the blends B0, B10, B20, B30, and B40, respectively, at 75% of rated load conditions. Higher peak heat release rate increased by 23.19%, 14.03%, 26.32%, 21.87%, and 25.53% for the blends B0, B10, B20, B30, and B40, respectively, at 75% of rated load conditions, when compression ratio was increased from16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. The delay period decreased by 21.26%, CO emission reduced by 14.28%, and NOx emission increased by 22.84% for B40 blends at 75% of rated load conditions, when compression ratio was increased from 16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. It is concluded that Jatropha oil ester can be used as fuel in diesel engine by blending it with diesel fuel.

  4. Measurement of fuel spray vaporisation by laser techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, A. J.; Seng, C. A.; Felton, P. G.; Ungut, A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    Comparison of fuel spray structures in heated and in cold environments is made by using a new laser tomographic technique and laser anemometry. The tomography technique is shown to give accurate and rapid 'point' measurements of droplet sizes and concentrations. Experimental results show acceleration of droplets to the local gas velocity, preferential vaporisation of the smallest droplets and the dispersion of droplets by the turbulence.

  5. Rocket nozzle expansion ratio analysis for dual-fuel earth-to-orbit vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a recent study of the effects of Space Shuttle Main Engine expansion ratio modifications, in the cases of both single-stage and two-stage systems. Two-position nozzles were employed; after varying the lower expansion ratio while the higher was held constant at 120, the lower expansion ratio was held constant at 40 or 60 while the higher expansion ratio was varied. The expansion ratios for minimum vehicle dry mass are different for single-stage and two-stage systems. For two-stage systems, a single expansion ratio of 77.5 provides a lower dry mass than any two-position nozzle.

  6. Rocket nozzle expansion ratio analysis for dual-fuel earth-to-orbit vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a recent study of the effects of Space Shuttle Main Engine expansion ratio modifications, in the cases of both single-stage and two-stage systems. Two-position nozzles were employed; after varying the lower expansion ratio while the higher was held constant at 120, the lower expansion ratio was held constant at 40 or 60 while the higher expansion ratio was varied. The expansion ratios for minimum vehicle dry mass are different for single-stage and two-stage systems. For two-stage systems, a single expansion ratio of 77.5 provides a lower dry mass than any two-position nozzle.

  7. Heat transfer in nuclear fuels: Measurements of gap conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chun Hyung

    Heat transfer in the fuel-clad gap in a nuclear reactor impacts the overall temperature distribution, stored energy and the mechanical properties of a nuclear fuel rod. Therefore, an accurate estimation of the gap conductance between the fuel and the clad is critically important for reactor design and operations. To obtain the requisite accuracy in the gap conductance estimation, it is important to understand the effects of the convective heat transfer coefficient, the gas composition, pressure and temperature, and so forth. The objectives of this study are to build a bench-scale experimental apparatus for the measurement of thermal gap conductances and to develop a better understanding of the differences that have been previously observed between such measured values and those predicted theoretically. This is accomplished by employing improved analyses of the experiments and improved theoretical models. Using laser heating of slightly separated stainless-steel plates, the gap conductance was measured using a technique that compares the theoretical and experimental time dependent temperatures at the back surface of the second plate. To consider the effects of surface temperature and gas pressure, the theoretical temperatures were calculated using a convective heat transfer coefficient that was dependent upon both the temperature and the gas pressure.

  8. Comparison of fresh fuel experimental measurements to MCNPX calculations using self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFleur, Adrienne M., E-mail: alafleur@lanl.gov [Nuclear Nonproliferation Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663 MS E540, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Charlton, William S., E-mail: wcharlton@tamu.edu [Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute, Texas A and M University, 3473 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Menlove, Howard O., E-mail: hmenlove@lanl.gov [Nuclear Nonproliferation Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663 MS E540, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Swinhoe, Martyn T., E-mail: swinhoe@lanl.gov [Nuclear Nonproliferation Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663 MS E540, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-11

    A new non-destructive assay technique called Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is currently being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to improve existing nuclear safeguards measurements for Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies. SINRD consists of four {sup 235}U fission chambers (FCs): bare FC, boron carbide shielded FC, Gd covered FC, and Cd covered FC. Ratios of different FCs are used to determine the amount of resonance absorption from {sup 235}U in the fuel assembly. The sensitivity of this technique is based on using the same fissile materials in the FCs as are present in the fuel because the effect of resonance absorption lines in the transmitted flux is amplified by the corresponding (n,f) reaction peaks in the fission chamber. In this work, experimental measurements were performed in air with SINRD using a reference Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) 15 Multiplication-Sign 15 low enriched uranium (LEU) fresh fuel assembly at LANL. The purpose of this experiment was to assess the following capabilities of SINRD: (1) ability to measure the effective {sup 235}U enrichment of the PWR fresh LEU fuel assembly and (2) sensitivity and penetrability to the removal of fuel pins from an assembly. These measurements were compared to Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended transport code (MCNPX) simulations to verify the accuracy of the MCNPX model of SINRD. The reproducibility of experimental measurements via MCNPX simulations is essential to validating the results and conclusions obtained from the simulations of SINRD for LWR spent fuel assemblies. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of new measurement technique called SINRD to improve LWR safeguards. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Performed SINRD experiment to measure {sup 235}U and pin diversions in PWR fresh assembly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excellent agreement of MCNPX and measured results confirmed accuracy of SINRD model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SINRD

  9. Demonstration of femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for uranium isotopic measurements in U-10Mo nuclear fuel foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havrilla, George Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gonzalez, Jhanis [Applied Spectra Inc., Fremont, CA (United States)

    2015-06-10

    The use of femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the isotopic ratio of uranium directly in U-10Mo fuel foils. The measurements were done on both the flat surface and cross sections of bare and Zr clad U-10Mo fuel foil samples. The results for the depleted uranium content measurements were less than 10% of the accepted U235/238 ratio of 0.0020. Sampling was demonstrated for line scans and elemental mapping over large areas. In addition to the U isotopic ratio measurement, the Zr thickness could be measured as well as trace elemental composition if required. A number of interesting features were observed during the feasibility measurements which could provide the basis for further investigation using this methodology. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using fs-LA-ICP-MS for measuring the U isotopic ratio in U-10Mo fuel foils.

  10. PIV measurement of internal structure of diesel fuel spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Z.M. [Ecotechnology System Lab., Yokohama National Univ. (Japan); Nishino, K. [Div. of Artificial Environment and Systems, Yokohama National Univ. (Japan); Mizuno, S. [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan); Torii, K. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National Univ. (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    This paper reports particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of diesel fuel spray injected from a single-hole nozzle at injection pressures ranging from 30 to 70 MPa, which are comparable to partial-load operating conditions of commercial diesel engines. The fuel is injected into a non-combusting environment pressurized up to 2.0 MPa. A laser-induced fluorescent (LIF) technique is utilized to visualize internal structures of fuel sprays formed by densely-distributing droplets. A specially designed synchronization system is developed to acquire double-frame spray images at an arbitrary time delay after injection. A direct cross-correlation PIV technique is applied to measure instantaneous droplet velocity distribution. Unique large-scale structures in droplet concentration, called 'branch-like structures' by Azetsu et al. (1990), are observed and shown to be associated with active vortical motions, which appear to be responsible for the mixing between droplets and the surrounding gas. It is found that the droplets tend to move out of the vortical structures and accumulate in the regions of low vorticity. Some other interesting features concerning droplet velocity fields are also presented. (orig.)

  11. Knock-Limited Performance of Triptane and Xylidines Blended with 28-R Aviation Fuel at High Compression Ratios and Maximum-Economy Spark Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Louis F.; Pritchard, Ernest I.

    1946-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the possibilities of utilizing the high-performance characteristics of triptane and xylidines blended with 28-R fuel in order to increase fuel economy by the use of high compression ratios and maximum-economy spark setting. Full-scale single-cylinder knock tests were run with 20 deg B.T.C. and maximum-economy spark settings at compression ratios of 6.9, 8.0, and 10.0, and with two inlet-air temperatures. The fuels tested consisted of triptane, four triptane and one xylidines blend with 28-R, and 28-R fuel alone. Indicated specific fuel consumption at lean mixtures was decreased approximately 17 percent at a compression ratio of 10.0 and maximum-economy spark setting, as compared to that obtained with a compression ratio of 6.9 and normal spark setting. When compression ratio was increased from 6.9 to 10.0 at an inlet-air temperature of 150 F, normal spark setting, and a fuel-air ratio of 0.065, 55-percent triptane was required with 28-R fuel to maintain the knock-limited brake power level obtained with 28-R fuel at a compression ratio of 6.9. Brake specific fuel consumption was decreased 17.5 percent at a compression ratio of 10.0 relative to that obtained at a compression ratio of 6.9. Approximately similar results were noted at an inlet-air temperature of 250 F. For concentrations up through at least 20 percent, triptane can be more efficiently used at normal than at maximum-economy spark setting to maintain a constant knock-limited power output over the range of compression ratios tested.

  12. Estimation of measurement uncertainty arising from manual sampling of fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorou, Dimitrios; Liapis, Nikolaos; Zannikos, Fanourios

    2013-02-15

    Sampling is an important part of any measurement process and is therefore recognized as an important contributor to the measurement uncertainty. A reliable estimation of the uncertainty arising from sampling of fuels leads to a better control of risks associated with decisions concerning whether product specifications are met or not. The present work describes and compares the results of three empirical statistical methodologies (classical ANOVA, robust ANOVA and range statistics) using data from a balanced experimental design, which includes duplicate samples analyzed in duplicate from 104 sampling targets (petroleum retail stations). These methodologies are used for the estimation of the uncertainty arising from the manual sampling of fuel (automotive diesel) and the subsequent sulfur mass content determination. The results of the three methodologies statistically differ, with the expanded uncertainty of sampling being in the range of 0.34-0.40 mg kg(-1), while the relative expanded uncertainty lying in the range of 4.8-5.1%, depending on the methodology used. The estimation of robust ANOVA (sampling expanded uncertainty of 0.34 mg kg(-1) or 4.8% in relative terms) is considered more reliable, because of the presence of outliers within the 104 datasets used for the calculations. Robust ANOVA, in contrast to classical ANOVA and range statistics, accommodates outlying values, lessening their effects on the produced estimates. The results of this work also show that, in the case of manual sampling of fuels, the main contributor to the whole measurement uncertainty is the analytical measurement uncertainty, with the sampling uncertainty accounting only for the 29% of the total measurement uncertainty.

  13. Measurements of Branching Ratios for $\\eta$ Decays into Charged Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Adlarson, P; Bardan, W; Bashkanov, M; Bergmann, F S; Berłowski, M; Bhatt, H; Bondar, A; Büscher, M; Calén, H; Ciepał, I; Clement, H; Coderre, D; Czerwiński, E; Demmich, K; Engels, R; Erven, A; Erven, W; Eyrich, W; Fedorets, P; Föhl, K; Fransson, K; Goldenbaum, F; Goswami, A; Grigoryev, K; Gullström, C -O; Heijkenskjöld, L; Hejny, V; Hüsken, N; Jarczyk, L; Johansson, T; Kamys, B; Kemmerling, G; Khan, F A; Khatri, G; Khoukaz, A; Kirillov, D A; Kistryn, S; Kleines, H; Kłos, B; Krzemień, W; Kulessa, P; Kupść, A; Kuzmin, A; Lalwani, K; Lersch, D; Lorentz, B; Magiera, A; Maier, R; Marciniewski, P; Mariański, B; Mikirtychiants, M; Morsch, H -P; Moskal, P; Ohm, H; Ozerianska, I; del Rio, E Perez; Piskunov, N M; Prasuhn, D; Pszczel, D; Pysz, K; Pyszniak, A; Ritman, J; Roy, A; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Sawant, S; Schadmand, S; Sefzick, T; Serdyuk, V; Shwartz, B; Sitterberg, K; Siudak, R; Skorodko, T; Skurzok, M; Smyrski, J; Sopov, V; Stassen, R; Stepaniak, J; Stephan, E; Sterzenbach, G; Stockhorst, H; Ströher, H; Szczurek, A; Täschner, A; Trzciński, A; Varma, R; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wrońska, A; Wüstner, P; Wurm, P; Yamamoto, A; Zabierowski, J; Zieliński, M J; Zink, A; Złomańczuk, J; Żuprański, P; Żurek, M

    2015-01-01

    The WASA-at-COSY experiment has collected $3\\times10^{7}$ events with $\\eta$-mesons produced via the reaction $pd\\rightarrow{^{3}\\textrm{He}}\\eta$ at $\\textrm{T} = 1.0 \\textrm{GeV}$. Using this data set, we evaluate the branching ratios of the decays $\\eta\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\gamma$, $\\eta\\to e^{+}e^{-}\\gamma$, $\\eta\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$ and $\\eta\\to e^{+}e^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$. The branching ratios are normalized to the $\\eta\\rightarrow\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$ decay. In addition an upper limit on a $CP$-violating asymmetry in $\\eta\\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$ is extracted.

  14. Advances in laser-based isotope ratio measurements: selected applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kerstel, E; Gianfrani, L.

    2008-01-01

    Small molecules exhibit characteristic ro-vibrational transitions in the near- and mid-infrared spectral regions, which are strongly influenced by isotopic substitution. This gift of nature has made it possible to use laser spectroscopy for the accurate analysis of the isotopic composition of gaseous samples. Nowadays, laser spectroscopy is clearly recognized as a valid alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Laser-based instruments are leaving the research laboratory stage and are be...

  15. Isomeric ratio measurements with the ILL LOHENGRIN spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Chebboubi A.; Kessedjian G.; Litaize O.; Serot O.; Faust H.; Bernard D.; Blanc A.; Köster U.; Méplan O.; Mutti P.; Sage C.

    2016-01-01

    The modelling of γ heating and neutron damage inside a nuclear reactor is essential to design the next generation of nuclear reactors. The determination of the fission fragment momentum is a key element to perform accurate calculations of the γ heating. One way to assess this information is to look at the isomeric ratio of different nuclei. According to the lifetime of the isomeric state, different experimental techniques were developed at the LOHENGRIN spectrometer. A focus on the measuremen...

  16. An experimental and numerical analysis of the influence of the inlet temperature, equivalence ratio and compression ratio on the HCCI auto-ignition process of Primary Reference Fuels in an engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert (France); Cavadiasa, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert (France)

    2008-11-15

    In order to understand better the auto-ignition process in an HCCI engine, the influence of some important parameters on the auto-ignition is investigated. The inlet temperature, the equivalence ratio and the compression ratio were varied and their influence on the pressure, the heat release and the ignition delays were measured. The inlet temperature was changed from 25 to 70 C and the equivalence ratio from 0.18 to 0.41, while the compression ratio varied from 6 to 13.5. The fuels that were investigated were PRF40 and n-heptane. These three parameters appeared to decrease the ignition delays, with the inlet temperature having the least influence and the compression ratio the most. A previously experimentally validated reduced surrogate mechanism, for mixtures of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene, has been used to explain observations of the auto-ignition process. The same kinetic mechanism is used to better understand the underlying chemical and physical phenomena that make the influence of a certain parameter change according to the operating conditions. This can be useful for the control of the auto-ignition process in an HCCI engine. (author)

  17. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio testing:phase 1 summary and results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, Manuel Gilbert; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Lange, F. (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und reaktorsicherheit (GRS), Germany); Nolte, O. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Koch, W. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Dickey, Roy R.; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), France); Young, F. I. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und reaktorsicherheit (GRS), Germany)

    2005-10-01

    This multinational test program is quantifying the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device (HEDD) impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. The experimental work, performed in four consecutive test phases, has been in progress for several years. The overall program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. This program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation for nuclear security related evaluations. The spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC), and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes the preliminary, Phase 1 work performed in 2001 and 2002 at Sandia National Laboratories and the Fraunhofer Institute, Germany, and documents the experimental results obtained, observations, and preliminary interpretations. Phase 1 testing included: performance quantifications of the HEDD devices; characterization of the HEDD or conical shaped charge (CSC) jet properties with multiple tests; refinement of the aerosol particle collection apparatus being used; and, CSC jet-aerosol tests using leaded glass plates and glass pellets, serving as representative brittle materials. Phase 1 testing was quite important for the design and performance of the following Phase 2 test program and test apparatus.

  18. Measurement of nuclear fuel pin hydriding utilizing epithermal neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.H. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Farkas, D.M.; Lutz, D.R. [General Electric Co., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The measurement of hydrogen or zirconium hydriding in fuel cladding has long been of interest to the nuclear power industry. The detection of this hydrogen currently requires either destructive analysis (with sensitivities down to 1 {mu}g/g) or nondestructive thermal neutron radiography (with sensitivities on the order of a few weight percent). The detection of hydrogen in metals can also be determined by measuring the slowing down of neutrons as they collide and rapidly lose energy via scattering with hydrogen. This phenomenon is the basis for the {open_quotes}notched neutron spectrum{close_quotes} technique, also referred to as the Hysen method. This technique has been improved with the {open_quotes}modified{close_quotes} notched neutron spectrum technique that has demonstrated detection of hydrogen below 1 {mu}g/g in steel. The technique is nondestructive and can be used on radioactive materials. It is proposed that this technique be applied to the measurement of hydriding in zirconium fuel pins. This paper summarizes a method for such measurements.

  19. Effects of finite aspect ratio on wind turbine airfoil measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiefer, Janik; Miller, Mark A.; Hultmark, Marcus;

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbines partly operate in stalled conditions within their operational cycle. To simulate these conditions, it is also necessary to obtain 2-D airfoil data in terms of lift and drag coefficients at high angles of attack. Such data has been obtained previously, but often at low aspect ratios...... and only barely past the stall point, where strong wall boundary layer influence is expected. In this study, the influence of the wall boundary layer on 2D airfoil data, especially in the post stall domain, is investigated. Here, a wind turbine airfoil is tested at different angles of attack and with two...

  20. Performance Improvement of a Portable Electric Generator Using an Optimized Bio-Fuel Ratio in a Single Cylinder Two-Stroke Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Hiroaki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The performance of an electrical generator using bio-fuel and gasoline blends of different composition as fuel in a single cylinder engine is presented. The effect of an optimized blend ratio of bio-fuel with gasoline on engine performance improvement and thereby on the electrical generator output is studied. Bio-fuels such as ethanol, butanol and methanol are blended with gasoline in different proportions and evaluated for performance. The effects of different bio-fuel/gasoline blending ratios are compared experimentally with that of the gasoline alone using the output power developed by the electric generator as the evaluation parameter. With a composition of 10% ethanol–gasoline, the engine performance is increased up to 6% and with a blending ratio of 20% butanol–gasoline the performance is increased up to 8% compared to the use of 100% gasoline. The investigations are performed on a portable generator used in palm tree harvesting applications.

  1. Measurement of the K+ --> pi+ nu nu branching ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, S.; /Brookhaven; Anisimovsky, V.V.; /Moscow, INR; Aoki, M.; /TRIUMF; Ardebili, M.; /Princeton U.; Artamonov, A.V.; /Serpukhov, IHEP; Atiya, M.; /Brookhaven; Bassalleck, B.; /New Mexico U.; Bazarko, A.O.; /Princeton U.; Bhuyan, B.; /Brookhaven; Blackmore, E.W.; /TRIUMF; Bryman, D.A.; /British Columbia U. /Tsinghua U., Beijing /TRIUMF

    2008-03-01

    Experiment E949 at Brookhaven National Laboratory studied the rare decay K{sup +}-->pi{sup +} nu{ovr {nu}} and other processes with an exposure of 1.77 x 10{sup 12} k{sup +}'s. The data were analyzed using a blind analysis technique yielding one candidate event with an estimated background of 0.30 {+-} 0.03 events. Combining this result with the observation of two candidate events by the predecessor experiment E787 gave the branching ratio B(K{sup +}-->pi{sup +} nu{ovr {nu}}) = (1.47{sub -0.89}{sup +1.30}) x 10{sup -10}, consistent with the standard model prediction of (0.74 {+-} 0.20) x 10{sup -10}. This is a more detailed report of results previously published [V.V. Anisimovsky et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 031801 (2004)].

  2. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the mixing of fuel oil with air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, A.; Bombach, R.; Hubschmid, W.; Kaeppeli, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    We report on measurements of the mixing of fuel oil with air at atmospheric pressure in an industrial premixed gas turbine burner. The concentration of the vaporized fuel oil was measured with laser induced fluorescence. We reason that the fuel oil concentration can be considered with good accuracy as proportional to the fluorescence intensity. (author) 6 fig., 3 refs.

  3. 77 FR 47043 - Work Group on Measuring Systems for Electric Vehicle Fueling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Work Group on Measuring Systems for Electric Vehicle Fueling... devices and systems used to assess charges to consumers for electric vehicle fuel. There is no cost for... residential and business locations and those used to measure and sell electricity dispensed as a vehicle fuel...

  4. Size Design of CdZnTe Detector Shield for Measuring Burnup of Spent Fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>It is important to measure the burnup of spent fuel for nuclear safeguards, burnup credit and critical safety in spent-fuel reprocessing process. The purpose of this work is designing a portable device to

  5. Direct measurement of 235U in spent fuel rods with Gamma-ray mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruz, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brejnholt, N. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alameda, J. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Decker, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Descalle, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fernandez-Perea, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hill, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kisner, R. A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Melin, A. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, B. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Soufli, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ziock, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pivovaroff, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-22

    We report here that direct measurement of plutonium and uranium X-rays and gamma-rays is a highly desirable nondestructive analysis method for the use in reprocessing fuel environments. The high background and intense radiation from spent fuel make direct measurements difficult to implement since the relatively low activity of uranium and plutonium is masked by the high activity from fission products. To overcome this problem, we make use of a grazing incidence optic to selectively reflect Kα and Kβ fluorescence of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) into a high-purity position-sensitive germanium detector and obtain their relative ratios.

  6. The influence of external source intensity in accelerator/target/blanket system on conversion ratio and fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochurov, Boris P.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of neutron balance relation for a subcritical system with external source shows that a high ratio of neutron utilization (conversion ratio, breeding ratio) much exceeding similar values for nuclear reactors (both thermal or fast spectrum) is reachable in accelerator/target/blanket system with high external neutron source intensity. An accelerator/target/blanket systems with thermal power in blanket about 1850 Mwt and operating during 30 years have been investigated. Continual feed up by plutonium (fissile material) and Tc-99 (transmuted material) was assumed. Accelerator beam intensity differed 6.3 times (16 mA-Case 1, and 100 mA-Case 2). Conversion ratio (CR) was defined as the ratio of Tc-99 nuclei transmuted to the number of Pu nuclei consumed. The results for two cases are as follows: Case 1Case 2CR 0.77 1.66N(LWR) 8.6 19.1Power MWt(el) 512 225 where N(LWR)-number of LWRs(3000 MWt(th)) from which yearly discharge of Tc-99 is transmuted during 30 years. High value of conversion ratio considerably exceeding 1 (CR=1.66) was obtained in the system with high source intensity as compared with low source system (CR=0.77). Net output of electric power of high source intensity system is about twice lower due to consumption of electric power for accelerator feed up. The loss of energy for Tc-99 transmutation is estimated as 40 Mev(el)/nuclei. Yet high conversion ratio (or breeding ratio) achievable in electronuclear installations with high intensity of external source can effectively be used to close fuel cycle (including incineration of wastes) or to develop growing nuclear power production system.

  7. Isotope- and tracer-based measurements of fossil fuel and biospheric carbon dioxide in Paris during winter 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M.; Schmidt, M.; Delmotte, M.; Colomb, A.; Gros, V.; Janssen, C.; Lehman, S. J.; Mondelain, D.; Perrussel, O.; Ramonet, M.; Xueref-Remy, I.; Bousquet, P.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the mole fraction of the CO2 and its isotopes were performed in Paris during the MEGAPOLI winter campaign (January-February 2010). Radiocarbon (14CO2) measurements were used to identify the relative contributions of 77% CO2 from fossil fuel consumption (CO2ff from liquid and gas combustion) and 23% from biospheric CO2 (CO2 from the use of biofuels and from human and plant respiration: CO2bio). These percentages correspond to average mole fractions of 26.4 ppm and 8.2 ppm for CO2ff and CO2bio, respectively. The 13CO2 analysis indicated that gas and liquid fuel contributed 70% and 30%, respectively, of the CO2 emission from fossil fuel use. Continuous measurements of CO and NOx and the ratios CO/CO2ff and NOx/CO2ff derived from radiocarbon measurements during four days make it possible to estimate the fossil fuel CO2 contribution over the entire campaign. The ratios CO/CO2ff and NOx/CO2ff are functions of air mass origin and exhibited daily ranges of 7.9 to 14.5 ppb ppm-1 and 1.1 to 4.3 ppb ppm-1, respectively. These ratios are sufficiently consistent with different emission inventories given the uncertainties of the different approaches.

  8. Measuring the energy security implications of fossil fuel resource concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, Nicolas [Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, New Jersey (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Economic assessments of the welfare effects of energy insecurity are typically uncertain and fail to provide clear guidance to policy makers. As a result, governments have had little analytical support to complement expert judgment in the assessment of energy security. This is likely to be inadequate when considering multiple policy goals, and in particular the intersections between energy security and climate change mitigation policies. This paper presents an alternative approach which focuses on gauging the causes of energy insecurity as a way to assist policy making. The paper focuses on the energy security implications of fossil fuel resource concentration and distinguishes between the price and physical availability components of energy insecurity. It defines two separate indexes: the energy security price index (ESPI), based on the measure of market concentration in competitive fossil fuel markets, and the energy security physical availability index (ESPAI), based on the measure of supply flexibility in regulated markets. The paper illustrates the application of ESPI and ESPAI with two case studies - France and the United Kingdom - looking at the evolution of both indexes to 2030. (author)

  9. Guidelines and recommended terms for expression of stable-isotope-ratio and gas-ratio measurement results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2011-01-01

    To minimize confusion in the expression of measurement results of stable isotope and gas-ratio measurements, recommendations based on publications of the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) are presented. Whenever feasible, entries are consistent with the Système International d'Unités, the SI (known in English as the International System of Units), and the third edition of the International Vocabulary of Basic and General Terms in Metrology (VIM, 3rd edition). The recommendations presented herein are approved by the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights and are designed to clarify expression of quantities related to measurement of isotope and gas ratios to ensure that quantity equations instead of numerical value equations are used for quantity definitions. Examples of column headings consistent with quantity calculus (also called the algebra of quantities) and examples of various deprecated usages connected with the terms recommended are presented.

  10. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagmann, C., E-mail: hagmann1@llnl.gov; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Grant, P. M.; Gharibyan, N.; Gostic, J. M.; Wooddy, P. T.; Torretto, P. C.; Bandong, B. B.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Herrmann, H. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Knauer, J. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the {sup 198}Au/{sup 196}Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix.

  11. Analysis of experimental measurements of PWR fresh and spent fuel assemblies using Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFleur, Adrienne M., E-mail: alafleur@lanl.gov; Menlove, Howard O., E-mail: hmenlove@lanl.gov

    2015-05-01

    Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a new NDA technique that was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to improve existing nuclear safeguards measurements for LWR fuel assemblies. The SINRD detector consists of four fission chambers (FCs) wrapped with different absorber filters to isolate different parts of the neutron energy spectrum and one ion chamber (IC) to measure the gross gamma rate. As a result, two different techniques can be utilized using the same SINRD detector unit and hardware. These techniques are the Passive Neutron Multiplication Counter (PNMC) method and the SINRD method. The focus of the work described in this paper is the analysis of experimental measurements of fresh and spent PWR fuel assemblies that were performed at LANL and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), respectively, using the SINRD detector. The purpose of these experiments was to assess the following capabilities of the SINRD detector: 1) reproducibility of measurements to quantify systematic errors, 2) sensitivity to water gap between detector and fuel assembly, 3) sensitivity and penetrability to the removal of fuel rods from the assembly, and 4) use of PNMC/SINRD ratios to quantify neutron multiplication and/or fissile content. The results from these simulations and measurements provide valuable experimental data that directly supports safeguards research and development (R&D) efforts on the viability of passive neutron NDA techniques and detector designs for partial defect verification of spent fuel assemblies. - Highlights: • Experimental measurements of PWR fresh and spent FAs were performed with SINRD. • Good agreement of MCNPX and measured results confirmed accuracy of SINRD model. • For fresh fuel, SINRD and PNMC ratios were not sensitive to water gaps of ≤5-mm. • Practical use of SINRD would be in Fork detector to reduce systematic uncertainties.

  12. Method and device for achieving optimum fuel-air ratio for an internal combustion engine with catalytic converter. Verfahren und Vorrichtung zur Einstellung eines optimalen Luft-Brennstoff-Verhaeltnisses bei einer Brennstoffmaschine mit katalytischer Abgasreinigung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogelsang, F.W.

    1991-01-10

    The method and device mentioned above work with at least one catalytic converter and a probe in the exhaust pipes whose stress characteristic has a point of change at a stochiometric ratio of combustion air and fuel which is lambda=1. This point is recorded as power point and the fuel-air ratio in the fresh-gas part of the engine will be controlled accordingly. In order to simplify the necessary devices the controlling will be done during one measuring period to a fuel-air ratio of lambda=1 while during an operating phase which alternates with the measuring period the fuel amount supplied to the fresh gas part will be increased by about 1.25% at constant combustion air supply or, if the fuel amount remains unchanged the amount of the combustion air will be reduced accordingly. The so-called lambda-window can therefore be kept at a lambda-value of 0.985-0.990 during operating phases.

  13. Measurement of B -> D_s K pi branching ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aso, T; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Banerjee, S; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Belous, K S; Bhardwaj, V; Bitenc, U; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C C; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Das, A; Dash, M; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Fratina, S; Fujii, H; Fujikawa, M; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guler, H; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Higuchi, T; Hinz, L; Hoedlmoser, H; Hokuue, T; Horii, Y; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, S; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Jacoby, C; Joshi, N J; Kaga, M; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kajiwara, S; Kakuno, H; Kang, J H; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kurihara, E; Kusaka, A; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lange, J S; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lee, J S; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Limosani, A; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; MacNaughton, J; Majumder, G; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumura, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mikami, Y; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Moloney, G R; Mori, T; Müller, J; Murakami, A; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakayama, H; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Neichi, K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nishio, Y; Nishizawa, I; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, S; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Parslow, N; Peak, L S; Pernicka, M; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Rorie, J; Rózanska, M; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sakamoto, H; Sakaue, H; Sarangi, T R; Satoyama, N; Sayeed, K; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schonmeier, P; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Sekiya, A; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shang, L; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stypula, J; Sugiyama, A; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Taniguchi, N; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tse, Y F; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, K; Uchida, Y; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Wang, M Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Wiechczynski, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, M; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A; Zwahlen, N

    2007-01-01

    We report a measurement of the exclusive $B^+$ meson decay to the final state $D_s^- K^+\\pi^+$ using $520 \\times 10^{6} B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected near the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance, with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider. Using the $D_S^- \\to \\phi \\pi^-$ decay mode to reconstruct $D_s^-$ mesons, we obtain the branching fraction ${\\cal B}(B^+\\to D_s^-K^+\\pi^+)= (1.77^{+0.12}_{-0.12} {\\mathrm (stat)} \\pm 0.16 {\\mathrm (syst)} \\pm 0.23 {\\cal(B)})\\times 10^{-4}$. We also present preliminary results of a study of the two-body $D_sK$, $D_s\\pi$ and $K\\pi$ subsystems observed in this final state.

  14. Standardization for oxygen isotope ratio measurement - still an unsolved problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornexl; Werner; Gehre

    1999-07-01

    Numerous organic and inorganic laboratory standards were gathered from nine European and North American laboratories and were analyzed for their delta(18)O values with a new on-line high temperature pyrolysis system that was calibrated using Vienna standard mean ocean water (VSMOW) and standard light Antartic precipitation (SLAP) internationally distributed reference water samples. Especially for organic materials, discrepancies between reported and measured values were high, ranging up to 2 per thousand. The reasons for these discrepancies are discussed and the need for an exact and reliable calibration of existing reference materials, as well as for the establishment of additional organic and inorganic reference materials is stressed. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Measuring water activity of aviation fuel using a polymer optical fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Webb, David J.; Carpenter, Mark; Williams, Colleen

    2014-05-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings have been used for measuring water activity of aviation fuel. Jet A-1 samples with water content ranging from 100% ERH (wet fuel) to 10 ppm (dried fuel), have been conditioned and calibrated for measurement. The PMMA based optical fiber grating exhibits consistent response and a good sensitivity of 59±3pm/ppm (water content in mass). This water activity measurement allows PMMA based optical fiber gratings to detect very tiny amounts of water in fuels that have a low water saturation point, potentially giving early warning of unsafe operation of a fuel system.

  16. Temperature and flow measurements on near-freezing aviation fuels in a wing-tank model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, R.; Stockemer, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Freezing behavior, pumpability, and temperature profiles for aviation turbine fuels were measured in a 190-liter tank, to simulate internal temperature gradients encountered in commercial airplane wing tanks. Two low-temperature situations were observed. Where the bulk of the fuel is above the specification freezing point, pumpout of the fuel removes all fuel except a layer adhering to the bottom chilled surfaces, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the fuel temperature near these surfaces. Where the bulk of the fuel is at or below the freezing point, pumpout ceases when solids block the pump inlet, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the overall average temperature.

  17. MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

    2007-01-10

    The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions

  18. Energy measures report. Addressing climate change and fuel poverty: energy measures information for local government

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-09-18

    This UK government's report sets out actions that could help local authorities tackle climate change and alleviate fuel poverty. Details are given of the measures covering improving efficiency in the use of electricity, increasing the amount of electricity generated or heat produced by microgeneration, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and reducing the number of households living in fuel poverty. A user guide to the report is presented, and the roles of local authorities in England and in Wales are outlined. Key sources of advice and support, ideas for action, a good practice strategic approach and community leadership are examined along with environmental protection, planning, housing, transport and schools and education.

  19. Thrust measurement method verification and analytical studies on a liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to test the feasibility of a new thrust stand system based on impulse thrust measurement method, a liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine (PDE is designed and built. Thrust performance of the engine is obtained by direct thrust measurement with a force transducer and indirect thrust measurement with an eddy current displacement sensor (ECDS. These two sets of thrust data are compared with each other to verify the accuracy of the thrust performance. Then thrust data measured by the new thrust stand system are compared with the verified thrust data to test its feasibility. The results indicate that thrust data from the force transducer and ECDS system are consistent with each other within the range of measurement error. Though the thrust data from the impulse thrust measurement system is a litter lower than that from the force transducer due to the axial momentum losses of the detonation jet, the impulse thrust measurement method is valid when applied to measure the averaged thrust of PDE. Analytical models of PDE are also discussed in this paper. The analytical thrust performance is higher than the experimental data due to ignoring the losses during the deflagration to detonation transition process. Effect of equivalence ratio on the engine thrust performance is investigated by utilizing the modified analytical model. Thrust reaches maximum at the equivalence ratio of about 1.1.

  20. Thrust measurement method verification and analytical studies on a liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Jie; Zheng Longxi; Wang Zhiwu; Peng Changxin; Chen Xinggu

    2014-01-01

    In order to test the feasibility of a new thrust stand system based on impulse thrust mea-surement method, a liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine (PDE) is designed and built. Thrust per-formance of the engine is obtained by direct thrust measurement with a force transducer and indirect thrust measurement with an eddy current displacement sensor (ECDS). These two sets of thrust data are compared with each other to verify the accuracy of the thrust performance. Then thrust data measured by the new thrust stand system are compared with the verified thrust data to test its feasibility. The results indicate that thrust data from the force transducer and ECDS system are consistent with each other within the range of measurement error. Though the thrust data from the impulse thrust measurement system is a litter lower than that from the force transducer due to the axial momentum losses of the detonation jet, the impulse thrust measurement method is valid when applied to measure the averaged thrust of PDE. Analytical models of PDE are also discussed in this paper. The analytical thrust performance is higher than the experimental data due to ignor-ing the losses during the deflagration to detonation transition process. Effect of equivalence ratio on the engine thrust performance is investigated by utilizing the modified analytical model. Thrust reaches maximum at the equivalence ratio of about 1.1.

  1. Using fine-scale fuel measurements to assess wildland fuels, potential fire behavior and hazard mitigation treatments in the southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Ottmar; John I. Blake; William T. Crolly

    2012-01-01

    The inherent spatial and temporal heterogeneity of fuel beds in forests of the southeastern United States may require fine scale fuel measurements for providing reliable fire hazard and fuel treatment effectiveness estimates. In a series of five papers, an intensive, fine scale fuel inventory from the Savanna River Site in the southeastern United States is used for...

  2. Study on Thermal Degradation Characteristics and Regression Rate Measurement of Paraffin-Based Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songqi Hu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paraffin fuel has been found to have a regression rate that is higher than conventional HTPB (hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene fuel and, thus, presents itself as an ideal energy source for a hybrid rocket engine. The energy characteristics of paraffin-based fuel and HTPB fuel have been calculated by the method of minimum free energy. The thermal degradation characteristics were measured for paraffin, pretreated paraffin, HTPB and paraffin-based fuel in different working conditions by the using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA. The regression rates of paraffin-based fuel and HTPB fuel were tested by a rectangular solid-gas hybrid engine. The research findings showed that: the specific impulse of paraffin-based fuel is almost the same as that of HTPB fuel; the decomposition temperature of pretreated paraffin is higher than that of the unprocessed paraffin, but lower than that of HTPB; with the increase of paraffin, the initial reaction exothermic peak of paraffin-based fuel is reached in advance, and the initial reaction heat release also increases; the regression rate of paraffin-based fuel is higher than the common HTPB fuel under the same conditions; with the increase of oxidizer mass flow rate, the regression rate of solid fuel increases accordingly for the same fuel formulation.

  3. Measurement of relative permeability of fuel cell diffusion media

    KAUST Repository

    Hussaini, I.S.

    2010-06-01

    Gas diffusion layer (GDL) in PEM fuel cells plays a pivotal role in water management. Modeling of liquid water transport through the GDL relies on knowledge of relative permeability functions in the in-plane and through-plane directions. In the present work, air and water relative permeabilities are experimentally determined as functions of saturation for typical GDL materials such as Toray-060, -090, -120 carbon paper and E-Tek carbon cloth materials in their plain, untreated forms. Saturation is measured using an ex situ gravimetric method. Absolute and relative permeability functions in the two directions of interest are presented and new correlations for in-plane relative permeability of water and air are established. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. First Results of Scanning Thermal Diffusivity Microscope (STDM) Measurements on Irradiated Monolithic and Dispersion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. K. Huber; M. K. Figg; J. R. Kennedy; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

    2012-07-01

    The thermal conductivity of the fuel material in a reactor before and during irradiation is a sensitive and fundamental parameter for thermal hydraulic calculations that are useds to correctly determine fuel heat fluxes and meat temperatures and to simulate performance of the fuel elements during operation. Several techniques have been developed to measure the thermal properties of fresh fuel to support these calculations, but it is crucial to also investigate the change of thermal properties during irradiation.

  5. Estimation of the in-cylinder air/fuel ratio of an internal combustion engine by the use of pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunestaal, Per

    2000-03-01

    This thesis investigates the use of cylinder pressure measurements for estimation of the in-cylinder air/fuel ratio in a spark ignited internal combustion engine. An estimation model which uses the net heat release profile for estimating the cylinder air/fuel ratio of a spark ignition engine is developed. The net heat release profile is computed from the cylinder pressure trace and quantifies the conversion of chemical energy of the reactants in the charge into thermal energy. The net heat release profile does not take heat- or mass transfer into account. Cycle-averaged air/fuel ratio estimates over a range of engine speeds and loads show an RMS error of 4.1% compared to measurements in the exhaust. A thermochemical model of the combustion process in an internal combustion engine is developed. It uses a simple chemical combustion reaction, polynominal fits of internal energy as function of temperature, and the first law of thermodynamics to derive a relationship between measured cylinder pressure and the progress of the combustion process. Simplifying assumptions are made to arrive at an equation which relates the net heat release to the cylinder pressure. Two methods for estimating the sensor offset of a cylinder pressure transducer are developed. Both methods fit the pressure data during the pre-combustion phase of the compression stroke to a polytropic curve. The first method assumes a known polytropic exponent, and the other estimates the polytropic exponent. The first method results in a linear least-squares problem, and the second method results in a nonlinear least-squares problem. The nonlinear least-squares problem is solved by separating out the nonlinear dependence and solving the single-variable minimization problem. For this, a finite difference Newton method is derived. Using this method, the cost of solving the nonlinear least-squares problem is only slightly higher than solving the linear least-squares problem. Both methods show good statistical

  6. Modeling the Effects of Transmission Type, Gear Count and Ratio Spread on Fuel Economy and Performance Using ALPHA (SAE 2016-01-1143)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents an analysis of the effects of varying the absolute and relative gear ratios of a given transmission on fuel economy and performance, considers alternative methods of selecting absolute gear ratios, examines the effect of alternative engines on the selections o...

  7. Modeling the Effects of Transmission Type, Gear Count and Ratio Spread on Fuel Economy and Performance Using ALPHA (SAE 2016-01-1143)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents an analysis of the effects of varying the absolute and relative gear ratios of a given transmission on fuel economy and performance, considers alternative methods of selecting absolute gear ratios, examines the effect of alternative engines on the selections o...

  8. Effects of varying the ratio of cooked to uncooked potato on the microbial fuel cell treatment of common potato waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Haixia; Li, Fusheng

    2016-11-01

    The effect of varying the ratio of cooked to uncooked potato in the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC) treating common potato waste was investigated. Four MFCs were fed with a ratio of cooked (boiled) to uncooked (i.e. waste) potato of 0, 48.7, 67.3 and 85.6%. Respectively, the columbic efficiency was estimated as 53.5, 70.5, 92.7 and 71.1%, indicating significantly enhanced electricity generation and waste degradation at an initial feedstock mixing ratio of 2/3 cooked to 1/3 uncooked potato. The hydrolysis rate parameter (estimated using a first-order sequential hydrolysis and degradation model) increased from 0.061 to 0.191day(-1) as cooked potato was added which increased electricity generation efficiency from 24.6 to 278.9mA/m(2)/d and shortened the startup time for maximum current density from 25 to 5days. The potato slurries' chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased by 86.6, 83.9, 84.1 and 86.3%, respectively, indicating no relationship exists between the fraction of boiled potato and the amount of COD reduction.

  9. COMBUSTION SIMULATION IN A SPARK IGNITION ENGINE CYLINDER: EFFECTS OF AIR-FUEL RATIO ON THE COMBUSTION DURATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nureddin Dinler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion is an important subject of internal combustion engine studies. To reduce the air pollution from internal combustion engines and to increase the engine performance, it is required to increase combustion efficiency. In this study, effects of air/fuel ratio were investigated numerically. An axisymmetrical internal combustion engine was modeled in order to simulate in-cylinder engine flow and combustion. Two dimensional transient continuity, momentum, turbulence, energy, and combustion equations were solved. The k-e turbulence model was employed. The fuel mass fraction transport equation was used for modeling of the combustion. For this purpose a computational fluid dynamics code was developed by using the finite volume method with FORTRAN programming code. The moving mesh was utilized to simulate the piston motion. The developed code simulates four strokes of engine continuously. In the case of laminar flow combustion, Arrhenius type combustion equations were employed. In the case of turbulent flow combustion, eddy break-up model was employed. Results were given for rich, stoichiometric, and lean mixtures in contour graphs. Contour graphs showed that lean mixture (l = 1.1 has longer combustion duration.

  10. A Soft Sensor-Based Fault-Tolerant Control on the Air Fuel Ratio of Spark-Ignition Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jia Zhai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The air/fuel ratio (AFR regulation for spark-ignition (SI engines has been an essential and challenging control problem for engineers in the automotive industry. The feed-forward and feedback scheme has been investigated in both academic research and industrial application. The aging effect can often cause an AFR sensor fault in the feedback loop, and the AFR control performance will degrade consequently. In this research, a new control scheme on AFR with fault-tolerance is proposed by using an artificial neural network model based on fault detection and compensation, which can provide the satisfactory AFR regulation performance at the stoichiometric value for the combustion process, given a certain level of misreading of the AFR sensor.

  11. Development, optimisation, and application of ICP-SFMS methods for the measurement of isotope ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuerup, S

    2000-07-01

    The measurement of isotopic composition and isotope ratios in biological and environmental samples requires sensitive, precise, and accurate analytical techniques. The analytical techniques used are traditionally based on mass spectrometry, among these techniques is the ICP-SFMS technique, which became commercially available in the mid 1990s. This technique is characterised by high sensitivity, low background, and the ability to separate analyte signals from spectral interferences. These features are beneficial for the measurement of isotope ratios and enable the measurement of isotope ratios of elements, which it has not previously been possible to measure due to either spectral interferences or poor sensitivity. The overall purpose of the project was to investigate the potential of the single detector ICP-SFMS technique for the measurement of isotope ratios in biological and environmental samples. One part of the work has focused on the fundamental aspects of the ICP-SFMS technique with special emphasize on the features important to the measurement of isotope ratios, while another part has focused on the development, optimisation and application of specific methods for the measurement of isotope ratios of elements of nutritional interest and radionuclides. The fundamental aspects of the ICP-SFMS technique were investigated theoretically and experimentally by the measurement of isotope ratios applying different experimental conditions. It was demonstrated that isotope ratios could be measured reliably using ICP-SFMS by educated choice of acquisition parameters, scanning mode, mass discrimination correction, and by eliminating the influence of detector dead time. Applying the knowledge gained through the fundamental study, ICP-SFMS methods for the measurement of isotope ratios of calcium, zinc, molybdenum and iron in human samples and a method for the measurement of plutonium isotope ratios and ultratrace levels of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples

  12. Assessment of Nuclear Fuels using Radiographic Thickness Measurement Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad Abir; Fahima Islam; Hyoung Koo Lee; Daniel Wachs

    2014-11-01

    The Convert branch of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) focuses on the development of high uranium density fuels for research and test reactors for nonproliferation. This fuel is aimed to convert low density high enriched uranium (HEU) based fuel to high density low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel for high performance research reactors (HPRR). There are five U.S. reactors that fall under the HPRR category, including: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR), the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR), the Missouri University Research Reactor (UMRR), the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). U-Mo alloy fuel phase in the form of either monolithic or dispersion foil type fuels, such as ATR Full-size In center flux trap Position (AFIP) and Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR), are being designed for this purpose. The fabrication process1 of RERTR is susceptible to introducing a variety of fuel defects. A dependable quality control method is required during fabrication of RERTR miniplates to maintain the allowable design tolerances, therefore evaluating and analytically verifying the fabricated miniplates for maintaining quality standards as well as safety. The purpose of this work is to analyze the thickness of the fabricated RERTR-12 miniplates using non-destructive technique to meet the fuel plate specification for RERTR fuel to be used in the ATR.

  13. Guidelines and recommended terms for expression of stable-isotope-ratio and gas-ratio measurement results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B

    2011-09-15

    To minimize confusion in the expression of measurement results of stable isotope and gas-ratio measurements, recommendations based on publications of the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) are presented. Whenever feasible, entries are consistent with the Système International d'Unités, the SI (known in English as the International System of Units), and the third edition of the International Vocabulary of Basic and General Terms in Metrology (VIM, 3rd edition). The recommendations presented herein are approved by the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights and are designed to clarify expression of quantities related to measurement of isotope and gas ratios to ensure that quantity equations instead of numerical value equations are used for quantity definitions. Examples of column headings consistent with quantity calculus (also called the algebra of quantities) and examples of various deprecated usages connected with the terms recommended are presented. Published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Prospects of ratio and differential ({\\delta}) ratio based measurement-models: a case study for IRMS evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, B P

    2015-01-01

    The suitability of a mathematical-model Y = f({Xi}) in serving a purpose whatsoever (should be preset by the function f specific input-to-output variation-rates, i.e.) can be judged beforehand. We thus evaluate here the two apparently similar models: YA = fA(SRi,WRi) = (SRi/WRi) and: YD = fd(SRi,WRi) = ([SRi,WRi] - 1) = (YA - 1), with SRi and WRi representing certain measurable-variables (e.g. the sample S and the working-lab-reference W specific ith-isotopic-abundance-ratios, respectively, for a case as the isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS)). The idea is to ascertain whether fD should represent a better model than fA, specifically, for the well-known IRMS evaluation. The study clarifies that fA and fD should really represent different model-families. For example, the possible variation, eA, of an absolute estimate as the yA (and/ or the risk of running a machine on the basis of the measurement-model fA) should be dictated by the possible Ri-measurement-variations (u_S and u_W) only: eA = (u_S + u_W); i....

  15. Co-production of acetone and ethanol with molar ratio control enables production of improved gasoline or jet fuel blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Zachary C; Bormann, Sebastian; Sreekumar, Sanil; Grippo, Adam; Toste, F Dean; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    The fermentation of simple sugars to ethanol has been the most successful biofuel process to displace fossil fuel consumption worldwide thus far. However, the physical properties of ethanol and automotive components limit its application in most cases to 10-15 vol% blends with conventional gasoline. Fermentative co-production of ethanol and acetone coupled with a catalytic alkylation reaction could enable the production of gasoline blendstocks enriched in higher-chain oxygenates. Here we demonstrate a synthetic pathway for the production of acetone through the mevalonate precursor hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA. Expression of this pathway in various strains of Escherichia coli resulted in the co-production of acetone and ethanol. Metabolic engineering and control of the environmental conditions for microbial growth resulted in controllable acetone and ethanol production with ethanol:acetone molar ratios ranging from 0.7:1 to 10.0:1. Specifically, use of gluconic acid as a substrate increased production of acetone and balanced the redox state of the system, predictively reducing the molar ethanol:acetone ratio. Increases in ethanol production and the molar ethanol:acetone ratio were achieved by co-expression of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) from E. coli MG1655 and by co-expression of pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) from Z. mobilis. Controlling the fermentation aeration rate and pH in a bioreactor raised the acetone titer to 5.1 g L(-1) , similar to that obtained with wild-type Clostridium acetobutylicum. Optimizing the metabolic pathway, the selection of host strain, and the physiological conditions employed for host growth together improved acetone titers over 35-fold (0.14-5.1 g/L). Finally, chemical catalysis was used to upgrade the co-produced ethanol and acetone at both low and high molar ratios to higher-chain oxygenates for gasoline and jet fuel applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2079-2087. © 2016 Wiley

  16. Knock-Limited Performance of Triptane and 28-R Fuel Blends as Affected by Changes in Compression Ratio and in Engine Operating Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Rinaldo J.; Feder, Melvin S.; Fisher, William F.

    1947-01-01

    A knock-limited performance investigation was conducted on blends of triptane and 28-P fuel with a 12-cylinder, V-type, liquid-cooled aircraft engine of 1710-cubic-inch displacement at three compression ratios: 6.65, 7.93, and 9.68. At each compression ratio, the effect of changes in temperature of the inlet air to the auxiliary-stage supercharger and in fuel-air ratio were investigated at engine speeds of 2280 and. 3000 rpm. The results show that knock-limited engine performance, as improved by the use of triptane, allowed operation at both take-off and cruising power at a compression ratio of 9.68. At an inlet-air temperature of 60 deg F, an engine speed of 3000 rpm ; and a fuel-air ratio of 0,095 (approximately take-off conditions), a knock-limited engine output of 1500 brake horsepower was possible with 100-percent 28-R fuel at a compression ratio of 6.65; 20-percent triptane was required for the same power output at a compression ratio of 7.93, and 75 percent at a compression ratio of 9.68 allowed an output of 1480 brake horsepower. Knock-limited power output was more sensitive to changes in fuel-air ratio as the engine speed was increased from 2280 to 3000 rpm, as the compression ratio is raised from 6.65 to 9.68, or as the inlet-air temperature is raised from 0 deg to 120 deg F.

  17. Intensity ratio measurements for density sensitive lines of highly charged Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Safdar, E-mail: safdaruetian@gmail.com; Shimizu, Erina [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University (Japan); Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya [The Graduate University of Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI) (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: n-nakamu@ils.uec.ac.jp [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Intensity ratio of density sensitive emission lines emitted from Fe ions in the extreme ultraviolet region is important for astrophysics applications. We report high-resolution intensity ratio measurements for Fe ions performed at Tokyo EBIT laboratory by employing a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer. The experimental intensity ratios of Fe X and Fe XII are plotted as a function of electron density for different electron beam currents. The experimental results are compared with the predicted intensity ratios from the model calculations.

  18. Cycle-by-cycle Variations in a Direct Injection Hydrogen Enriched Compressed Natural Gas Engine Employing EGR at Relative Air-Fuel Ratios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olalekan Wasiu Saheed

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the pressure development in a combustion chamber is uniquely related to the combustion process, substantial variations in the combustion process on a cycle-by-cycle basis are occurring. To this end, an experimental study of cycle-by-cycle variation in a direct injection spark ignition engine fueled with natural gas-hydrogen blends combined with exhaust gas recirculation at relative air-fuel ratios was conducted. The impacts of relative air-fuel ratios (i.e. λ = 1.0, 1.2, 1.3 and 1.4 which represent stoichiometric, moderately lean, lean and very lean mixtures respectively, hydrogen fractions and EGR rates were studied. The results showed that increasing the relative air-fuel ratio increases the COVIMEP. The behavior is more pronounced at the larger relative air-fuel ratios. More so, for a specified EGR rate; increasing the hydrogen fractions decreases the maximum COVIMEP value just as increasing in EGR rates increases the maximum COVIMEP value. (i.e. When percentage EGR rates is increased from 0% to 17% and 20% respectively. The maximum COVIMEP value increases from 6.25% to 6.56% and 8.30% respectively. Since the introduction of hydrogen gas reduces the cycle-by-cycle combustion variation in engine cylinder; thus it can be concluded that addition of hydrogen into direct injection compressed natural gas engine employing EGR at various relative air-fuel ratios is a viable approach to obtain an improved combustion quality which correspond to lower coefficient of variation in imep, (COVIMEP in a direct injection compressed natural gas engine employing EGR at relative air-fuel ratios.

  19. Perform Thermodynamics Measurements on Fuel Cycle Case Study Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Leigh R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This document was prepared to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M3FT-14IN0304022, “Perform Thermodynamics Measurements on Fuel Cycle Case Study Systems.” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics FCR&D work package. This document reports preliminary work in support of determining the thermodynamic parameters for the ALSEP process. The ALSEP process is a mixed extractant system comprised of a cation exchanger 2-ethylhexyl-phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]) and a neutral solvating extractant N,N,N’,N’-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA). The extractant combination produces complex organic phase chemistry that is challenging for traditional measurement techniques. To neutralize the complexity, temperature dependent solvent extraction experiments were conducted with neat TODGA and scaled down concentrations of the ALSEP formulation to determine the enthalpies of extraction for the two conditions. A full set of thermodynamic data for Eu, Am, and Cm extraction by TODGA from 3.0 M HNO3 is reported. These data are compared to previous extraction results from a 1.0 M HNO3 aqueous medium, and a short discussion of the mixed HEH[EHP]/TODGA system results is offered.

  20. Biomass burning fuel consumption rates: a field measurement database

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Leeuwen, TT

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Landscape fires show large variability in the amount of biomass or fuel consumed per unit area burned. These fuel consumption (FC) rates depend on the biomass available to burn and the fraction of the biomass that is actually combusted, and can...

  1. Qualification of helium measurement system for detection of fuel failures in a BWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, I.; Sihver, L.; Loner, H.; Grundin, A.; Helmersson, J.-O.; Ledergerber, G.

    2014-05-01

    There are several methods for surveillance of fuel integrity during the operation of a boiling water reactor (BWR). The detection of fuel failures is usually performed by analysis of grab samples of off-gas and coolant activities, where a measured increased level of ionizing radiation serves as an indication of new failure or degradation of an already existing one. At some nuclear power plants the detection of fuel failures is performed by on-line nuclide specific measurements of the released fission gases in the off-gas system. However, it can be difficult to distinguish primary fuel failures from degradation of already existing failures. In this paper, a helium measuring system installed in connection to a nuclide specific measuring system to support detection of fuel failures and separate primary fuel failures from secondary ones is presented. Helium measurements provide valuable additional information to measurements of the gamma emitting fission gases for detection of primary fuel failures, since helium is used as a fill gas in the fuel rods during fabrication. The ability to detect fuel failures using helium measurements was studied by injection of helium into the feed water systems at the Forsmark nuclear power plant (NPP) in Sweden and at the nuclear power plant Leibstadt (KKL) in Switzerland. In addition, the influence of an off-gas delay line on the helium measurements was examined at KKL by injecting helium into the off-gas system. By using different injection rates, several types of fuel failures with different helium release rates were simulated. From these measurements, it was confirmed that the helium released by a failed fuel can be detected. It was also shown that the helium measurements for the detection of fuel failures should be performed at a sampling point located before any delay system. Hence, these studies showed that helium measurements can be useful to support detection of fuel failures. However, not all fuel failures which occurred at

  2. Subcritical Noise Analysis Measurements with Fresh and Spent Research Reactor Fuels Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Kryter, R.C.; Miller, V.C.

    1999-02-01

    The verification of the subcriticality is of utmost importance for the safe transportation and storage of nuclear reactor fuels. Transportation containers and storage facilities are designed such that nuclear fuels remain in a subcritical state. Such designs often involve excess conservatism because of the lack of relevant experimental data to verify the accuracy of Monte Carlo codes used in nuclear criticality safety analyses. A joint experimental research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., and the University of Missouri was initiated to obtain measured quantities that could be directly related to the subcriticality of simple arrays of Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) fuel elements. A series of measurement were performed to assess the reactivity of materials such as BORAL, stainless steel, aluminum, and lead that are typically used in the construction of shipping casks. These materials were positioned between the fuel elements. In addition, a limited number of measurements were performed with configurations of fresh and spent (irradiated) fuel elements to ascertain the reactivity of the spent fuel elements. In these experiments, fresh fuel elements were replaced by spent fuel elements such that the subcritical reactivity change could be measured. The results of these measurements were used by Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions to determine the subcriticality of MURR fuel elements isolated by absorbing materials. The measurements were interpreted using the MCNP-DSP Monte Carlo code to obtain the subcritical neutron multiplication factor k(sub eff), and the bias in K(sub eff) that are used in criticality safety analyses.

  3. The underwater coincidence counter (UWCC) for plutonium measurements in mixed oxide fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eccleston, G.W.; Menlove, H.O.; Abhold, M.; Baker, M.; Pecos, J.

    1998-12-31

    The use of fresh uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in light-water reactors (LWR) is increasing in Europe and Japan and it is necessary to verify the plutonium content in the fuel for international safeguards purposes. The UWCC is a new instrument that has been designed to operate underwater and nondestructively measure the plutonium in unirradiated MOX fuel assemblies. The UWCC can be quickly configured to measure either boiling-water reactor (BWR) or pressurized-water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. The plutonium loading per unit length is measured using the UWCC to precisions of less than 1% in a measurement time of 2 to 3 minutes. Initial calibrations of the UWCC were completed on measurements of MOX fuel in Mol, Belgium. The MCNP-REN Monte Carlo simulation code is being benchmarked to the calibration measurements to allow accurate simulations for extended calibrations of the UWCC.

  4. Optical Characterization of a Multipoint Lean Direct Injector for Gas Turbine Combustors: Velocity and Fuel Drop Size Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Anderson, Robert C.; Locke, Randy J.; Hicks, Yolanda R.

    2010-01-01

    Performance of a multipoint, lean direct injection (MP-LDI) strategy for low emission aero-propulsion systems has been tested in a Jet-A fueled, lean flame tube combustion rig. Operating conditions for the series of tests included inlet air temperatures between 672 and 828 K, pressures between 1034 and 1379 kPa and total equivalence ratios between 0.41 and 0.45, resulting in equilibrium flame temperatures approaching 1800 K. Ranges of operation were selected to represent the spectrum of subsonic and supersonic flight conditions projected for the next-generation of commercial aircraft. This document reports laser-based measurements of in situ fuel velocities and fuel drop sizes for the NASA 9-point LDI hardware arranged in a 3 3 square grid configuration. Data obtained represent a region of the flame tube combustor with optical access that extends 38.1-mm downstream of the fuel injection site. All data were obtained within reacting flows, without particle seeding. Two diagnostic methods were employed to evaluate the resulting flow path. Three-component velocity fields have been captured using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI), and two-component velocity distributions using planar particle image velocimetry (PIV). Data from these techniques have also offered insight into fuel drop size and distribution, fuel injector spray angle and pattern, turbulence intensity, degree of vaporization and extent of reaction. This research serves to characterize operation of the baseline NASA 9- point LDI strategy for potential use in future gas-turbine combustor applications. An additional motive is the compilation of a comprehensive database to facilitate understanding of combustor fuel injector aerodynamics and fuel vaporization processes, which in turn may be used to validate computational fluid dynamics codes, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC), among others.

  5. An Electronic Measurement Instrumentation of the Impedance of a Loaded Fuel Cell or Battery

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present an inexpensive electronic measurement instrumentation developed in our laboratory, to measure and plot the impedance of a loaded fuel cell or battery. Impedance measurements were taken by using the load modulation method. This instrumentation has been developed around a VXI system stand which controls electronic cards. Software under Hpvee® was developed for automatic measurements and the layout of the impedance of the fuel cell on load. The measurement environment, l...

  6. Measurement of the Ratio of High Energy Neutron in the Pulse Nuclear Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO; Guo-shu; DING; You-qian; YANG; Lei; MA; Peng; YU; Zhen-hua

    2012-01-01

    <正>In the production of radioisotopes and neutron activation analysis, the fast neutron densities are very important to estimate the yields of the radioisotopes. In order to determine the fast neutron flux ratio, different foils are used to measure the thermal neutron flux and the fast neutron flux. In this paper 238U was used as only a monitor to measure the ratio of high energy neutron (>6 MeV). By measuring the

  7. Measurements and correlations of turbulent burning velocities over wide ranges of fuels and elevated pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Bradley, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The implosion technique has been used to extend measurements of turbulent burning velocities over greater ranges of fuels and pressures. Measurements have been made up to 3.5 MPa and at strain rate Markstein numbers as low as 23. The implosion technique, with spark ignition at two opposite wall positions within a fan-stirred spherical bomb is capable of measuring turbulent burning velocities, at higher pressures than is possible with central ignition. Pressure records and schlieren high speed photography define the rate of burning and the smoothed area of the flame front. The first aim of the study was to extend the previous measurements with ethanol and propane-air, with further measurements over wider ranges of fuels and equivalence ratios with mixtures of hydrogen, methane, 10% hydrogen-90% methane, toluene, and i-octane, with air. The second aim was to study further the low turbulence regime in which turbulent burning co-exists with laminar flame instabilities. Correlations are presented of turbulent burning velocity normalised by the effective rms turbulent velocity acting on the flame front, ut=u0k , with the Karlovitz stretch factor, K, for different strain rate Markstein numbers, a decrease in which increases ut=u0k . Experimental correlations are presented for the present measurements, combined with previous ones. Different burning regimes are also identified, extending from that of mixed turbulence/laminar instability at low values of K to that at high values of K, in which ut=u0k is gradually reduced due to increasing localised flame extinctions. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  8. Spent fuel assembly hardware: Characterization and 10 CFR 61 classification for waste disposal: Volume 1, Activation measurements and comparison with calculations for spent fuel assembly hardware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luksic, A.

    1989-06-01

    Consolidation of spent fuel is under active consideration as the US Department of Energy plans to dispose of spent fuel. During consolidation, the fuel pins are removed from an intact fuel assembly and repackaged into a more compact configuration. After repackaging, approximately 30 kg of residual spent fuel assembly hardware per assembly remains that is also radioactive and requires disposal. Understanding the nature of this secondary waste stream is critical to designing a system that will properly handle, package, store, and dispose of the waste. This report presents a methodology for estimating the radionuclide inventory in irradiated spent fuel hardware. Ratios are developed that allow the use of ORIGEN2 computer code calculations to be applied to regions that are outside the fueled region. The ratios are based on the analysis of samples of irradiated hardware from spent fuel assemblies. The results of this research are presented in three volumes. In Volume 1, the development of scaling factors that can be used with ORIGEN2 calculations to estimate activation of spent fuel assembly hardware is documented. The results from laboratory analysis of irradiated spent-fuel hardware samples are also presented in Volume 1. In Volumes 2 and 3, the calculated flux profiles of spent nuclear fuel assemblies are presented for pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors, respectively. The results presented in Volumes 2 and 3 were used to develop the scaling factors documented in Volume 1. 5 refs., 4 figs., 21 tabs.

  9. Neutron multiplication method for measuring the amount of fissile isotopes in the spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chwaszczewski, S.; Pytel, K. [Institute of Atomic Energy, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Abou-Zaid, A.A. [Atomic Energy Authority, 13759 Cairo (Egypt)

    2001-07-01

    A nondestructive assay method for determination the amount of fissile materials content along the vertical axis of irradiated fuel is presented. The method, called neutron multiplication method, can be realized as passive measurement technique and the active one. The Monte Carlo code has been used for the neutron transport simulation and optimization of the measuring equipment geometry. On the basis of these results, a preliminary experimental stand for MARIA reactor fuel investigation has been designed and the measurements have been performed for the fresh fuel and the fuel mock-up. Based upon both numerical and experimental simulations, an ultimate measuring stand has been designed and the measurements for MARIA spent fuel assemblies as well as for the fresh fuel and mock-up of the fuel have been carried out. The results showed that the active neutron technique does not provide sufficient resolution of the distribution of the amount of fissile materials. But rather can be applied for measurement of the absolute value. The passive one can be used to restore the distribution of the bum-up and the amount of fissile materials along the axial length of the spent fuel assembly. (author)

  10. Material control in nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Part II. Accountability, instrumentation and measurement techniques in fuel fabrication facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgonovi, G.M.; McCartin, T.J.; McDaniel, T.; Miller, C.L.; Nguyen, T.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the measurement techniques, the instrumentation, and the procedures used in accountability and control of nuclear materials, as they apply to fuel fabrication facilities. A general discussion is given of instrumentation and measurement techniques which are presently used being considered for fuel fabrication facilities. Those aspects which are most significant from the point of view of satisfying regulatory constraints have been emphasized. Sensors and measurement devices have been discussed, together with their interfacing into a computerized system designed to permit real-time data collection and analysis. Estimates of accuracy and precision of measurement techniques have been given, and, where applicable, estimates of associated costs have been presented. A general description of material control and accounting is also included. In this section, the general principles of nuclear material accounting have been reviewed first (closure of material balance). After a discussion of the most current techniques used to calculate the limit of error on inventory difference, a number of advanced statistical techniques are reviewed. The rest of the section deals with some regulatory aspects of data collection and analysis, for accountability purposes, and with the overall effectiveness of accountability in detecting diversion attempts in fuel fabrication facilities. A specific example of application of the accountability methods to a model fuel fabrication facility is given. The effect of random and systematic errors on the total material uncertainty has been discussed, together with the effect on uncertainty of the length of the accounting period.

  11. Measurements on power-conversion gain and noise ratio of the 1N26 crystal rectifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dymanus, A.; Bouwknegt, A.

    1960-01-01

    Measurements have been performed on power conversion gain G and noise ratio n of a number of 1N26 silicon rectifiers (Sylvania Co., U.S.A.) using well-known techniques. The noise ratio has been investigated both with microwave excitation (10−6-10−3 W at 24 GHz) and with DC-excitation by currents up

  12. Application of neodymium isotope ratio measurements for the origin assessment of uranium ore concentrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krajko, J.; Varga, Z.; Yalcintas, E.; Wallenius, M.; Mayer, K.

    2014-01-01

    A novel procedure has been developed for the measurement of 143Nd/144Nd isotope ratio in various uranium-bearing materials, such as uranium ores and ore concentrates (UOC) in order to evaluate the usefulness and applicability of variations of 143Nd/144Nd isotope ratio for provenance assessment in nu

  13. The Circulation/Acquisition Ratio: An Input-Output Measure for Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Marilyn M.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring library impact by calculating the ratio of materials circulated in a time unit to those acquired in that period. A breakdown by Dewey Decimal Classification for a hypothetical library is reported, as well as how this ratio can be interpreted. (BK)

  14. Performance evaluation of an advanced air-fuel ratio controller on a stationary, rich-burn natural gas engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochuparampil, Roshan Joseph

    The advent of an era of abundant natural gas is making it an increasingly economical fuel source against incumbents such as crude oil and coal, in end-use sectors such as power generation, transportation and industrial chemical production, while also offering significant environmental benefits over these incumbents. Equipment manufacturers, in turn, are responding to widespread demand for power plants optimized for operation with natural gas. In several applications such as distributed power generation, gas transmission, and water pumping, stationary, spark-ignited, natural gas fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) are the power plant of choice (over turbines) owing to their lower equipment and operational costs, higher thermal efficiencies across a wide load range, and the flexibility afforded to end-users when building fine-resolution horsepower topologies: modular size increments ranging from 100 kW -- 2 MW per ICE power plant compared to 2 -- 5 MW per turbine power plant. Under the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's (EPA) New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (RICE NESHAP) air quality regulations, these natural gas power plants are required to comply with stringent emission limits, with several states mandating even stricter emissions norms. In the case of rich-burn or stoichiometric natural gas ICEs, very high levels of sustained emissions reduction can be achieved through exhaust after-treatment that utilizes Non Selective Catalyst Reduction (NSCR) systems. The primary operational constraint with these systems is the tight air-fuel ratio (AFR) window of operation that needs to be maintained if the NSCR system is to achieve simultaneous reduction of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), total hydrocarbons (THC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and formaldehyde (CH 2O). Most commercially available AFR controllers utilizing lambda (oxygen

  15. Nonlinear torque and air-to-fuel ratio control of spark ignition engines using neuro-sliding mode techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting; Javaherian, Hossein; Liu, Derong

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the calibration and control of spark ignition engines using a combination of neural networks and sliding mode control technique. Two parallel neural networks are utilized to realize a neuro-sliding mode control (NSLMC) for self-learning control of automotive engines. The equivalent control and the corrective control terms are the outputs of the neural networks. Instead of using error backpropagation algorithm, the network weights of equivalent control are updated using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Moreover, a new approach is utilized to update the gain of corrective control. Both modifications of the NSLMC are aimed at improving the transient performance and speed of convergence. Using the data from a test vehicle with a V8 engine, we built neural network models for the engine torque (TRQ) and the air-to-fuel ratio (AFR) dynamics and developed NSLMC controllers to achieve tracking control. The goal of TRQ control and AFR control is to track the commanded values under various operating conditions. From simulation studies, the feasibility and efficiency of the approach are illustrated. For both control problems, excellent tracking performance has been achieved.

  16. Synergistic smart fuel for in-pile nuclear reactor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.A.; Kotter, D.K. [Idaho National Laboratories, Idaho Falls (United States); Ali, R.A.; Garrett, S.L. [Penn State University, University Park, State College, PA 16801 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The thermo-acoustic fuel rod sensor developed in this research has demonstrated a novel technique for monitoring the temperature within the core of a nuclear reactor or the temperature of the surrounding heat-transfer fluid. It uses the heat from the nuclear fuel to generate sustained acoustic oscillations whose frequency will be indicative of the temperature. Converting a nuclear fuel rod into this type of thermo-acoustic sensor simply requires the insertion of a porous material (stack). This sensor has demonstrated a synergy with the elevated temperatures that exist within the nuclear reactor using materials that have only minimal susceptibility to high-energy particle fluxes. When the sensor is in operation, the sound waves radiated from the fuel rod resonator will propagate through the surrounding cooling fluid. The frequency of these oscillations is directly correlated with an effective temperature within the fuel rod resonator. This device is self-powered and is operational even in case of total loss of power of the reactor.

  17. Fat to muscle ratio measurements with dual energy x-ray absorbtiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, A. [Shenzhen College of International Education, 1st HuangGang Park St., Shenzhen, GuangDong (China); Luo, J. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University at Buffalo, 332 Bonner Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260-1920 (United States); Wang, A. [Department of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Broadbent, C. [School of Engineering, Columbia University, 1130 Amsterdam Av., New York, NY 10027 (United States); Zhong, J. [Department of English, Dartmouth College, 6032 Sanborn House, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Dilmanian, F.A. [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Neurology, and Radiology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Zafonte, F.; Zhong, Z. [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg. 743, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-07-11

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. An efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.

  18. Fat to Muscle Ratio Measurements with Dual Energy X Ray Absorbtiometry

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, A; Broadbent, C; Zhong, J; Dilmanian, A; Zafonte, F; Zhong, Z

    2014-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. An efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.

  19. Measurements of the liquid phase temperature in fuel sprays via exciplex fluorescence method. 1st Report. Development of the measuring technique and application to fuel sprays injected into atmospheric pressure and high temperature environments; Exciplex keikoho ni yoru nenryo funmu no ekiso ondo bunpu sokutei. 1. Sokutei shuho no kaihatsu to joatsu koon fun`ikichu ni okeru funmu eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizaki, T.; Nishida, K.; Hiroyasu, H. [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Funahashi, T.

    1998-07-25

    A measuring method based on the exciplex fluorescence technique has been developed for planar measurements of the liquid phase temperature distribution in fuel sprays. The liquid fuel (n-hexadecane or squalane) was doped with pyrene (C16H10). The fluorescence intensity ratios of the pyrene monomer and excimer emissions has temperature dependence, and were used to determine the liquid phase temperatures in the fuel sprays. The spray was excited by laser radiation at 266 nm, and the resulting fluorescence was imaged by an intensified CCD camera. The cross-sectional distribution of the liquid phase temperature was estimated from the fluorescence image by the temperature dependence of the intensity ratio. The results demonstrate that this laser-based thermometry technique is available for 2-D measurements of the liquid phase temperature in fuel sprays. 13 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Development of self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry (SINRD) to measure U-235 and Pu-239 content in a PWR spent fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafleur, Adrienne M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Charlton, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The use of Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) to measure the {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu content in a PWR spent fuel assembly was investigated via Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. The sensitivity of SINRD is based on using the same fissile materials in the fission chambers as are present in the fuel because the effect of resonance absorption lines in the transmitted flux is amplified by the corresponding (n, f) reaction peaks in fission chamber. These simulations utilize the {sup 244}Cm spontaneous fission neutrons to self-interrogate the fuel pins. The amount of resonance absorption of these neutrons in the fuel can be measured using {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu fission chambers placed adjacent to the assembly. We used ratios of different fission chambers to reduce the sensitivity of the measurements to extraneous material present in fuel. The development of SINRD to measure the fissile content in spent fuel is of great importance to the improvement of nuclear safeguards and material accountability. Future work includes the use of this technique to measure the fissile content in FBR spent fuel and heavy metal product from reprocessing methods.

  1. Evaluation of electrical impedance ratio measurements in accuracy of electronic apex locators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pil-Jong Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this paper was evaluating the ratios of electrical impedance measurements reported in previous studies through a correlation analysis in order to explicit it as the contributing factor to the accuracy of electronic apex locator (EAL. Materials and Methods The literature regarding electrical property measurements of EALs was screened using Medline and Embase. All data acquired were plotted to identify correlations between impedance and log-scaled frequency. The accuracy of the impedance ratio method used to detect the apical constriction (APC in most EALs was evaluated using linear ramp function fitting. Changes of impedance ratios for various frequencies were evaluated for a variety of file positions. Results Among the ten papers selected in the search process, the first-order equations between log-scaled frequency and impedance were in the negative direction. When the model for the ratios was assumed to be a linear ramp function, the ratio values decreased if the file went deeper and the average ratio values of the left and right horizontal zones were significantly different in 8 out of 9 studies. The APC was located within the interval of linear relation between the left and right horizontal zones of the linear ramp model. Conclusions Using the ratio method, the APC was located within a linear interval. Therefore, using the impedance ratio between electrical impedance measurements at different frequencies was a robust method for detection of the APC.

  2. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio with the OPERA detector

    CERN Document Server

    Agafonova, N; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Autiero, D; Badertscher, A; Bagulya, A; Bertolin, A; Besnier, M; Bick, D; Boyarkin, V; Bozza, C; Brugière, T; Brugnera, R; Brunetti, G; Buontempo, S; Cazes, A; Chaussard, L; Chernyavsky, M; Chiarella, V; Chon-Sen, N; Chukanov, A; Cozzi, M; D'Amato, G; Corso, F Dal; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; D'eclais, Y; De Serio, M; Di Capua, F; Di Ferdinando, D; Di Giovanni, A; Di Marco, N; Dmitrievski, S; Dracos, M; Duchesneau, D; Dusini, S; Ebert, J; Egorov, O; Enikeev, R; Ereditato, A; Esposito, L S; Favier, J; Felici, G; Ferber, T; Fini, R; Frekers, D; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, C; Galkin, V I; Garfagnini, A; Giacomelli, G; Giorgini, M; Goellnitz, C; Goldberg, J; Golubkov, D; Goncharova, L; Gornushkin, Y; Grella, G; Grianti, F; Guler, M; Gustavino, C; Hagner, C; Hamada, K; Hara, T; Hierholzer, M; Hoshino, K; Ieva, M; Jakovcic, K; Jollet, C; Juget, F; Kazuyama, M; Kim, S H; Kimura, M; Klicek, B; Knuesel, J; Kodama, K; Komatsu, M; Kose, U; Kreslo, I; Kubota, H; Lazzaro, C; Lenkeit, J; Ljubicic, A; Longhin, A; Lutter, G; Malgin, A; Mandrioli, G; Marotta, A; Marteau, J; Matsuo, T; Matveev, V; Mauri, N; Medinaceli, E; Meisel, F; Meregaglia, A; Migliozzi, P; Mikado, S; Miyamoto, S; Monacelli, P; Morishima, K; Moser, U; Muciaccia, M T; Naganawa, N; Naka, T; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Naumov, D; Nikitina, V; Niwa, K; Nonoyama, Y; Ogawa, S; Olchevski, A; Oldorf, C; Orlova, G; Osedlo, V; Paniccia, M; Paoloni, A; Park, B D; Park, I G; Pastore, A; Patrizii, L; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Pilipenko, V; Pistillo, C; Policastro, G; Polukhina, N; Pozzato, M; Pretzl, K; Publichenko, P; Pupilli, F; Rescigno, R; Roganova, T; Rokujo, H; Romano, G; Rosa, G; Rostovtseva, I; Rubbia, A; Russo, A; Ryasny, V; Ryazhskaya, O; Sato, O; Sato, Y; Schembri, A; Parzefall, W Schmidt; Schroeder, H; Lavina, L Scotto; Sheshukov, A; Shibuya, H; Simone, S; Sioli, M; Sirignano, C; Sirri, G; Song, J S; Spinetti, M; Stanco, L; Starkov, N; Stipcevic, M; Strauss, T; Strolin, P; Takahashi, S; Tenti, M; Terranova, F; Tezuka, I; Tioukov, V; Tolun, P; Tran, T; Tufanli, S; Vilain, P; Vladimirov, M; Votano, L; Vuilleumier, J L; Wilquet, G; Wonsak, B; Yakushev, V; Yoon, C S; Yoshioka, T; Yoshida, J; Zaitsev, Y; Zemskova, S; Zghiche, A; Zimmermann, R

    2010-01-01

    The OPERA detector at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) was used to measure the atmospheric muon charge ratio in the TeV energy region. We analyzed 403069 atmospheric muons corresponding to 113.4 days of livetime during the 2008 CNGS run. We computed separately the muon charge ratio for single and for multiple muon events in order to select different energy regions of the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to test the charge ratio dependence on the primary composition. The measured charge ratio values were corrected taking into account the charge-misidentification errors. Data have also been grouped in five bins of the "vertical surface energy". A fit to a simplified model of muon production in the atmosphere allowed the determination of the pion and kaon charge ratios weighted by the cosmic ray energy spectrum.

  3. Direct LSC method for measurements of biofuels in fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krištof, Romana; Logar, Jasmina Kožar

    2013-07-15

    Direct liquid scintillation counting (LSC) for quantification of biofuels content in fuels was implemented and validated on three liquid fossil fuel matrices-ethanol, gasoline and diesel. Fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), hydrogenated vegetable oils (HVO) and bio-ethanol were used as biofuels. The method is applicable in the range up to 100% for all tested combinations of bio components. The sensitivity and precision of the method are suitable for determination of bio component content in the blends which is appearing on the global market. The method does not require special equipment for sample preparation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this

  5. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this

  6. Measurement of the super-allowed branching ratio of $^{10}$C

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to measure the super-allowed branching ratio of $^{10}$C, the lightest of all nuclei decaying by a $0^{+} \\rightarrow 0^{+}$ transition. The light nuclei have a much stronger impact on limits of physics beyond the standard model than heavier nuclei. We propose a measurement which should reach a precision similar to the two latest measurements, however, with a different method employing a precisely efficiency-calibrated germanium detector. As no method exists to greatly improve on previous results, the branching ratio has to be measured with independent methods.

  7. On-site gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements of fission gas release in irradiated nuclear fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsson, I; Grapengiesser, B; Andersson, B

    2007-01-01

    An experimental, non-destructive in-pool, method for measuring fission gas release (FGR) in irradiated nuclear fuel has been developed. Using the method, a significant number of experiments have been performed in-pool at several nuclear power plants of the BWR type. The method utilises the 514 keV gamma-radiation from the gaseous fission product (85)Kr captured in the fuel rod plenum volume. A submergible measuring device (LOKET) consisting of an HPGe-detector and a collimator system was utilised allowing for single rod measurements on virtually all types of BWR fuel. A FGR database covering a wide range of burn-ups (up to average rod burn-up well above 60 MWd/kgU), irradiation history, fuel rod position in cross section and fuel designs has been compiled and used for computer code benchmarking, fuel performance analysis and feedback to reactor operators. Measurements clearly indicate the low FGR in more modern fuel designs in comparison to older fuel types.

  8. Measurements relating fire radiative energy density and surface fuel consumption - RxCADRE 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Matthew B. Dickinson; Benjamin C. Bright; Robert L. Kremens; E. Louise Loudermilk; Joseph J. O' Brien; Benjamin S. Hornsby; Roger D. Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale experiments have demonstrated that fire radiative energy is linearly related to fuel combusted but such a relationship has not been shown at the landscape level of prescribed fires. This paper presents field and remotely sensed measures of pre-fire fuel loads, consumption, fire radiative energy density (FRED) and fire radiative power flux density (FRFD),...

  9. Comparison of Global Sizing Velocimetry and Phase Doppler Anemometry measurements of alternative jet fuel sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Reza; Kannaiyan, Kumaran

    2013-11-01

    Atomization plays a crucial precursor role in liquid fuel combustion that directly affects the evaporation, mixing, and emission levels. Laser diagnostic techniques are often used to study the spray characteristics of liquid fuels. The objective of this work is to compare the spray measurements of Gas-to Liquid (GTL) jet fuels obtained using Global Sizing Velocimetry (GSV) and Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) techniques at global and local levels, respectively. The chemical and physical properties of GTL fuels are different from conventional jet fuels, owing to the difference in their production methodology. In this work, the experimental facility, the measurement techniques, and spray characteristics of two different GTL fuels are discussed and compared with those of Jet A-1 fuel. Results clearly demonstrate that although the global measurement gives an overall picture of the spray, fine details are obtained only through local measurements and complement in gaining more inferences into the spray characteristics. The results also show a close similarity in spray characteristics between GTL and Jet A-1 fuels. Funded by Qatar Science and Technology Park.

  10. Preliminary Study on Method of Quantitative Measurement of Nuclear Fuel Rod by Neutron CT at CARR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI; Guo-hai; HAN; Song-bai; WANG; Hong-li; HE; Lin-feng; WANG; Yu; WU; Mei-mei; LIU; Yun-tao; CHEN; Dong-feng

    2015-01-01

    Neutron CT technique was applied to the quantitative measurement of the key parameters of nuclear fuel rods at China Advanced Research Reactor(CARR).The sample of dummy nuclear fuel rod was rotated in 180°range,and 900neutron projections were obtained.The 3-D neutron

  11. D/H Isotope Ratio Measurements of Atmospheric Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisehen, Thomas; Bühler, Fred; Koppmann, Ralf; Krebsbach, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of isotope ratios in atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOC) is a reliable method to allocate their sources, to estimate atmospheric residence times and investigate physical and chemical processes on various temporal and spatial scales. Most investigations yet focus on carbon isotope ratios. Certainly more detailed information can be gained by the ratio of deuterium (D) to hydrogen (H) in VOC, especially due to the high mass ratio. Combining measurements of carbon and hydrogen isotopes could lead to considerable improvement in our understanding of atmospheric processes. For this purpose we set up and thoroughly characterised a gas chromatograph pyrolysis isotope ratio mass spectrometer to measure the D/H ratio in atmospheric VOC. From a custom-made gas standard mixture VOC were adsorbed on Tenax®TA which has the advantage that CO2 is not preconcentrated when measuring ambient air samples. Our results show that the pyrolysis method has significant impact on the D/H ratios. A pyrolysis temperature of at least 1723 K and conditioning of the ceramic tube on a regular basis is essential to obtain reproducible D/H isotope ratios. For an independent comparison D/H ratios of the pure VOC used in the gas standard were determined using elemental analysis by Agroisolab (Jülich, Germany). Comparisons of 10 VOC show perfect agreement within the standard deviations of our measurements and the errors given by Agroisolab, e.g. for n-pentane, toluene, 4-methyl-2-pentanone and n-octane. A slight mean difference of 5.1 o was obtained for n-heptane while significant mean differences of 15.5 o and 20.3 o arose for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and isoprene, respectively. We further demonstrate the stability of our system and show that the sample preparation does not affect the isotope ratios. Moreover the applicability of our system to ambient air samples is demonstrated.

  12. A STUDY OF THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN FEDERAL AND STATE MEASUREMENTS OF ON-HIGHWAY FUEL CONSUMPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, HL

    2003-08-11

    Annual highway fuel taxes are collected by the Treasury Department and placed in the Highway Trust Fund (HTF). There is, however, no direct connection between the taxes collected by the Treasury Department and the gallons of on-highway fuel use, which can lead to a discrepancy between these totals. This study was conducted to determine how much of a discrepancy exists between the total fuel usages estimated based on highway revenue funds as reported by the Treasury Department and the total fuel usages used in the apportionment of the HTF to the States. The analysis was conducted using data from Highway Statistics Tables MF-27 and FE-9 for the years 1991-2001. It was found that the overall discrepancy is relatively small, mostly within 5% difference. The amount of the discrepancy varies from year to year and varies among the three fuel types (gasoline, gasohol, special fuels). Several potential explanations for these discrepancies were identified, including issues on data, tax measurement, gallon measurement, HTF receipts, and timing. Data anomalies caused by outside forces, such as deferment of tax payments from one fiscal year to the next, can skew fuel tax data. Fuel tax evasion can lead to differences between actual fuel use and fuel taxes collected. Furthermore, differences in data collection and reporting among States can impact fuel use data. Refunds, credits, and transfers from the HTF can impact the total fuel tax receipt data. Timing issues, such as calendar year vs. fiscal year, can also cause some discrepancy between the two data sources.

  13. Clean Cities: AFLEET Measures Impacts of Vehicles and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-12-01

    AFLEET is a free tool from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that fleet managers can use to quantify the environmental and economic impacts of new fuels and vehicle technologies. The AFLEET factsheet explains how the tool works and how to access it.

  14. A novel design approach for a neutron measurement station for burnt fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietler, Rodolfo, E-mail: rodolfo.dietler@axpo.ch [Axpo AG Kernenergie, CH-5401 Baden (Switzerland); Hursin, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.hursin@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Perret, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.perret@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Jordan, Kelly, E-mail: kjordan@mse.ufl.edu [University of Florida, 180 Rhines Hall, PO Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400 (United States); Chawla, Rakesh, E-mail: rakesh.chawla@epfl.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-11-21

    The design and characterization of a passive neutron measurement station for highly burnt fuel has been undertaken at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The measurement station aims at the determination of the total neutron emission rate of full-length light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods, as also the corresponding axial distributions. It is intended that the measurement station be introduced into the hot cells available at PSI to allow measuring the neutron emission of spent fuel rods provided by the Swiss nuclear power plants. In addition, the neutron emission of a large set of burnt fuel samples that have been previously characterized by post-irradiation examination (PIE) will be measured, in order to relate neutron emission to the burnup and isotopic composition of different fuel types. The design of the measurement station is presented in this article. A post-processing algorithm is introduced to improve the spatial resolution of the 'measured' axial profile. In order to quantify the accuracy of the reconstructed neutron source distribution, a figure-of-merit (FOM) is defined and adapted to the detection procedure. With the optimized measurement station and procedure, it is estimated that the neutron emission distribution of a highly burnt, full-length fuel rod would be measurable with acceptable accuracy in about 20 min.

  15. A novel design approach for a neutron measurement station for burnt fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietler, Rodolfo; Hursin, Mathieu; Perret, Gregory; Jordan, Kelly; Chawla, Rakesh

    2012-11-01

    The design and characterization of a passive neutron measurement station for highly burnt fuel has been undertaken at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The measurement station aims at the determination of the total neutron emission rate of full-length light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods, as also the corresponding axial distributions. It is intended that the measurement station be introduced into the hot cells available at PSI to allow measuring the neutron emission of spent fuel rods provided by the Swiss nuclear power plants. In addition, the neutron emission of a large set of burnt fuel samples that have been previously characterized by post-irradiation examination (PIE) will be measured, in order to relate neutron emission to the burnup and isotopic composition of different fuel types. The design of the measurement station is presented in this article. A post-processing algorithm is introduced to improve the spatial resolution of the "measured" axial profile. In order to quantify the accuracy of the reconstructed neutron source distribution, a figure-of-merit (FOM) is defined and adapted to the detection procedure. With the optimized measurement station and procedure, it is estimated that the neutron emission distribution of a highly burnt, full-length fuel rod would be measurable with acceptable accuracy in about 20 min.

  16. BrO/SO2 molar ratios from scanning DOAS measurements in the NOVAC network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lübcke

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The molar ratio of BrO to SO2 is, like other halogen/sulfur ratios, a possible precursor for dynamic changes in the shallow part of a volcanic system. While the predictive significance of the BrO/SO2 ratio has not been well constrained yet, it has the major advantage that this ratio can be readily measured using the remote-sensing technique differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS in the UV. While BrO/SO2 ratios have been measured during several short-term field campaigns, this article presents an algorithm that can be used to obtain long-term time series of BrO/SO2 ratios from the scanning DOAS instruments of the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC or comparable networks. Parameters of the DOAS retrieval of both trace gases are given. The influence of co-adding spectra on the retrieval error and influences of radiative transfer will be investigated. Difficulties in the evaluation of spectroscopic data from monitoring instruments in volcanic environments and possible solutions are discussed. The new algorithm is demonstrated by evaluating data from the NOVAC scanning DOAS systems at Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia, encompassing almost 4 years of measurements between November 2009 and end of June 2013. This data set shows variations of the BrO/SO2 ratio several weeks prior to the eruption on 30 June 2012.

  17. Is Log Ratio a Good Value for Measuring Return in Stock Investments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultsch, Alfred

    Measuring the rate of return is an important issue for theory and practice of investments in the stock market. A common measure for rate of return is the logarithm of the ratio of successive prices (LogRatio). In this paper it is shown that LogRatio as well as arithmetic return rate (Ratio) have several disadvantages. As an alternative relative differences (RelDiff) are proposed to measure return. The stability against numerical and rounding errors of RelDiff is much better than for LogRatios and Ratio). RelDiff values are identical to LogRatios and Return for small absolutes. The usage of RelDiff maps returns to a finite range. For most subsequent analyses this is a big advantage. The usefulness of the approach is demonstrated on daily return rates of a large set of actual stocks. It is shown that returns can be modeled with a very simple mixture of distributions in great precision using Relative differences.

  18. The influence of high-octane fuel blends on the performance of a two-stroke SI engine with knock-limited-compression ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poola, Ramesh B.; Bhasker, T.; Nagalingam, B.; Gopalakrishnan, K. V.

    The use of alcohol-gasoline blends enables the favorable features of alcohols to be utilized in spark ignition (SI) engines while avoiding the shortcomings of their application as straight fuels. Eucalyptus and orange oils possess high octane values and are also good potential alternative fuels for SI engines. The high octane value of these fuels can enhance the octane value of the fuel when it is blended with low-octane gasoline. In the present work, 20 percent by volume of orange oil, eucalyptus oil, methanol and ethanol were blended separately with gasoline, and the performance, combustion and exhaust emission characteristics were evaluated at two different compression ratios. The phase separation problems arising from the alcohol-gasoline blends were minimized by adding eucalyptus oil as a cosolvent. Test results indicate that the compression ratio can be raised from 7.4 to 9 without any detrimental effect, due to the higher octane rating of the fuel blends. Knock-limited maximum brake output also increases due to extension of the knock limit. The knock limit is extended by methanol-eucalyptus-ethanol-orange oil blends, in descending order.

  19. Field Measurement and Calibration of HDM-4 Fuel Consumption Model on Interstate Highway in Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Jiao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fuel consumptions are measured by operating passenger car and tractor-trailer on two interstate roadway sites in Florida. Each site contains flexible pavement and rigid pavement with similar pavement, traffic and environmental condition. Field test reveals that the average fuel consumption differences between vehicle operating on flexible pavement and rigid pavement at given test condition are 4.04% for tractor-trailer and 2.50% for passenger car, with a fuel saving on rigid pavement. The fuel consumption differences are found statistically significant at 95% confidence level for both vehicle types. Test data are then used to calibrate the Highway Development and Management IV (HDM-4 fuel consumption model and model coefficients are obtained for three sets of observations. Field measurement and prediction by calibrated model shows generally good agreement. Nevertheless, verification and adjustment with more experiment or data sources would be expected in future studies.

  20. Experimental Measurement and Numerical Modeling of the Effective Thermal Conductivity of TRISO Fuel Compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folsom, Charles [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept.; Xing, Changhu [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept.; Jensen, Colby [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept.; Ban, Heng [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept.; Marshall, Douglas W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Accurate modeling capability of thermal conductivity of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts is important to fuel performance modeling and safety of Generation IV reactors. To date, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts has not been measured directly. The composite fuel is a complicated structure comprised of layered particles in a graphite matrix. In this work, finite element modeling is used to validate an analytic ETC model for application to the composite fuel material for particle-volume fractions up to 40%. The effect of each individual layer of a TRISO particle is analyzed showing that the overall ETC of the compact is most sensitive to the outer layer constituent. In conjunction with the modeling results, the thermal conductivity of matrix-graphite compacts and the ETC of surrogate TRISO fuel compacts have been successfully measured using a previously developed measurement system. The ETC of the surrogate fuel compacts varies between 50 and 30 W m-1 K-1 over a temperature range of 50-600°C. As a result of the numerical modeling and experimental measurements of the fuel compacts, a new model and approach for analyzing the effect of compact constituent materials on ETC is proposed that can estimate the fuel compact ETC with approximately 15-20% more accuracy than the old method. Using the ETC model with measured thermal conductivity of the graphite matrix-only material indicate that, in the composite form, the matrix material has a much greater thermal conductivity, which is attributed to the high anisotropy of graphite thermal conductivity. Therefore, simpler measurements of individual TRISO compact constituents combined with an analytic ETC model, will not provide accurate predictions of overall ETC of the compacts emphasizing the need for measurements of composite, surrogate compacts.

  1. Technical Development of the Small Fission Gas Measurement in Fuel Rods using the Laser Puncturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Heemoon; Baik, Seungje; Jin, Younggwan; Jung, Yanghong; Yoo, Boungok; Ahn, Sangbok; Yang, Yongsik; Lee, Byoungoon

    2013-12-15

    Information of fuel cladding tube and expected gas amount were obtained from fuel development department to design chamber volume and specification of laser device. Laser puncturing tests for several tubes were performed to setup power and capability. Laser puncturing tests for several tubes were performed to setup power and capability. Vacuum system with chamber was established. Additionally, QMS(Quadruple Mass Spectrometer in high vacuum state) was installed in vacuum system. The system was installed in hotcell following the preliminary test for the puncturing, pressure measuring and gas content analysis. After system test was installed in hotcell following the preliminary test for the puncturing, pressure measuring and gas content analysis. After system test was completed, SFR fuel rods were punctured to measure total gas amount and each gas content(He, Xe, Kr). The system for laser puncturing and measurement of small fission gas amout in fuel rod was designed with considering hotcell facility and fuel rod condition for first year. Chamber size, laser capability were well operated and the system showed reasonable results. In second year, QMS(Quadruple Mass Spectrometer) was installed in the system for quantitative analysis of gas contents. Thus, Laser puncturing, amount of gas measurement and gas analysis were carried out in one time. The system was activated for SFR fuel rods after installation and preliminary test. 9 SFR fuel rods were tested and produced total gas amounts and gas analysis data(He, Xe, Kr)

  2. Simultaneous measurements of plutonium and uranium in spent-fuel dissolver solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, T.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kuno, T.; Kitagawa, O.; Sato, S.; Kurosawa, A.; Kuno, Y. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    The authors have studied the isotope dilution gamma-ray spectrometry (IDGS) technique for simultaneous measurements of elemental concentrations and isotopic compositions for both plutonium and uranium in input spent-fuel dissolver solutions at a reprocessing plant. The technique under development includes both sample preparation and analysis methods. For simultaneous measurements of both plutonium and uranium, a critical issue is to develop a new method to keep both plutonium and uranium in the sample after they are separated from fission products. Furthermore, it is equally important to improve the analysis method so that the precision and accuracy of the plutonium analysis remain unaffected while uranium is retained in the sample. To keep both plutonium and uranium in the sample for simultaneous measurements, extraction chromatography is being studied and shows promise to achieve the goal of cosegregation of the plutonium and uranium. The technique uses U/TEVA{center_dot}Spec resin to separate fission products and recover both uranium and plutonium in the resin from dissolver solutions for subsequent measuring using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Owing to the fact that the U/Pu ratio is altered during the fission product separation phase, it is necessary to develop a method which could accurately correct for this effect. Such a method was developed using the unique decay properties of {sup 241}Pu to {sup 237}U and shows considerable promise in allowing for accurate determination of the {sup 235}U concentrations before the chemical extraction.

  3. Measurement of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons with the CMS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, Vardan [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of positive to negative muon fluxes from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, using data collected by the CMS detector both at ground level and in the underground experimental cavern at the CERN LHC. Muons were detected in the momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The surface flux ratio is measured to be 1.2766 \\pm 0.0032(stat.) \\pm 0.0032 (syst.), independent of the muon momentum, below 100 GeV/c. This is the most precise measurement to date. At higher momenta the data are consistent with an increase of the charge ratio, in agreement with cosmic ray shower models and compatible with previous measurements by deep-underground experiments.

  4. Measurement of the super-allowed branching ratio of $^{22}$Mg

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to measure the super-allowed branching ratio and the half-life of $^{22}$Mg, one of the least-well-measured $0^{+} \\rightarrow 0^{+}$ transitions of the 14 nuclei used to determine V$_{ud}$ and to test the unitarity of the CKM matrix. We propose measurements which should allow to significantly improve the precision on the super-allowed branching ratio employing a precisely efficiency calibrated germanium detector and on the half-life. As no method exists to greatly improve (e.g. an order of magnitude) on previous results, the branching ratio and the half-life have to be measured several times with independent methods and in independent experiments.

  5. The Impact of Diffuse Ionized Gas on Emission-line Ratios and Gas Metallicity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Renbin; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG) is prevalent in star-forming galaxies. Using a sample of galaxies observed by MaNGA, we demonstrate how DIG in star-forming galaxies impact the measurements of emission line ratios, hence the gas-phase metallicity measurements and the interpretation of diagnostic diagrams. We demonstrate that emission line surface brightness (SB) is a reasonably good proxy to separate HII regions from regions dominated by diffuse ionized gas. For spatially-adjacent regions or regions at the same radius, many line ratios change systematically with emission line surface brightness, reflecting a gradual increase of dominance by DIG towards low SB. DIG could significantly bias the measurement of gas metallicity and metallicity gradient. Because DIG tend to have a higher temperature than HII regions, at fixed metallicity DIG displays lower [NII]/[OII] ratios. DIG also show lower [OIII]/[OII] ratios than HII regions, due to extended partially-ionized regions that enhance all low-ionization lines ([NII], [SII], [OII], [OI]). The contamination by DIG is responsible for a substantial portion of the scatter in metallicity measurements. At different surface brightness, line ratios and line ratio gradients can differ systematically. As DIG fraction could change with radius, it can affect the metallicity gradient measurements in systematic ways. The three commonly used strong-line metallicity indicators, R23, [NII]/[OII], O3N2, are all affected in different ways. To make robust metallicity gradient measurements, one has to properly isolate HII regions and correct for DIG contamination. In line ratio diagnostic diagrams, contamination by DIG moves HII regions towards composite or LINER-like regions.

  6. Use and abuse of the medical loss ratio to measure health plan performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J C

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the use and abuse of the medical loss ratio in the contemporary health care system and health policy debate. It begins with a survey of the ways in which the medical loss ratio has been interpreted to be something it is not, such as a measure of quality or efficiency. It then analyzes key organizational features of the emerging health care system that complicate measures of financial performance, including integration between payers and providers, diversification of payers across multiple products and distribution channels, and geographic expansion across metropolitan and state lines. These issues are illustrated using medical loss ratios from a range of nonprofit and for-profit health plans. The paper then sketches a strategy for improving the public's understanding of health plan performance as an alternative to continued reliance on the flawed medical loss ratio. This strategy incorporates data on structure and process, service quality, and financial performance.

  7. Estimation of (n,f) Cross-Sections by Measuring Reaction Probability Ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plettner, C; Ai, H; Beausang, C W; Bernstein, L A; Ahle, L; Amro, H; Babilon, M; Burke, J T; Caggiano, J A; Casten, R F; Church, J A; Cooper, J R; Crider, B; Gurdal, G; Heinz, A; McCutchan, E A; Moody, K; Punyon, J A; Qian, J; Ressler, J J; Schiller, A; Williams, E; Younes, W

    2005-04-21

    Neutron-induced reaction cross-sections on unstable nuclei are inherently difficult to measure due to target activity and the low intensity of neutron beams. In an alternative approach, named the 'surrogate' technique, one measures the decay probability of the same compound nucleus produced using a stable beam on a stable target to estimate the neutron-induced reaction cross-section. As an extension of the surrogate method, in this paper they introduce a new technique of measuring the fission probabilities of two different compound nuclei as a ratio, which has the advantage of removing most of the systematic uncertainties. This method was benchmarked in this report by measuring the probability of deuteron-induced fission events in coincidence with protons, and forming the ratio P({sup 236}U(d,pf))/P({sup 238}U(d,pf)), which serves as a surrogate for the known cross-section ratio of {sup 236}U(n,f)/{sup 238}U(n,f). IN addition, the P({sup 238}U(d,d{prime}f))/P({sup 236}U(d,d{prime}f)) ratio as a surrogate for the {sup 237}U(n,f)/{sup 235}U(n,f) cross-section ratio was measured for the first time in an unprecedented range of excitation energies.

  8. H/L ratio as a measurement of stress in laying hens - methodology and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentfer, T L; Pendl, H; Gebhardt-Henrich, S G; Fröhlich, E K F; Von Borell, E

    2015-04-01

    Measuring the ratio of heterophils and lymphocytes (H/L) in response to different stressors is a standard tool for assessing long-term stress in laying hens but detailed information on the reliability of measurements, measurement techniques and methods, and absolute cell counts is often lacking. Laying hens offered different sites of the nest boxes at different ages were compared in a two-treatment crossover experiment to provide detailed information on the procedure for measuring and the difficulties in the interpretation of H/L ratios in commercial conditions. H/L ratios were pen-specific and depended on the age and aviary system. There was no effect for the position of the nest. Heterophiles and lymphocytes were not correlated within individuals. Absolute cell counts differed in the number of heterophiles and lymphocytes and H/L ratios, whereas absolute leucocyte counts between individuals were similar. The reliability of the method using relative cell counts was good, yielding a correlation coefficient between double counts of r > 0.9. It was concluded that population-based reference values may not be sensitive enough to detect individual stress reactions and that the H/L ratio as an indicator of stress under commercial conditions may not be useful because of confounding factors and that other, non-invasive, measurements should be adopted.

  9. The underwater coincidence counter for plutonium measurements in mixed-oxide fuel assemblies manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. W. Eccleston; H. O. Menlove; M. Abhold; M. Baker; J. Pecos

    1999-05-01

    This manual describes the Underwater Coincidence Counter (UWCC) that has been designed for the measurement of plutonium in mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies prior to irradiation. The UWCC uses high-efficiency {sup 3}He neutron detectors to measure the spontaneous-fission and induced-fission rates in the fuel assembly. Measurements can be made on MOX fuel assemblies in air or underwater. The neutron counting rate is analyzed for singles, doubles, and triples time correlations to determine the {sup 240}Pu effective mass per unit length of the fuel assembly. The system can verify the plutonium loading per unit length to a precision of less than 1% in a measurement time of 2 to 3 minutes. System design, components, performance tests, and operational characteristics are described in this manual.

  10. On-Line Measurement of Heat of Combustion of Gaseous Hydrocarbon Fuel Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Chaturvedi, Sushil K.; Kheireddine, Ali

    1996-01-01

    A method for the on-line measurement of the heat of combustion of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel mixtures has been developed and tested. The method involves combustion of a test gas with a measured quantity of air to achieve a preset concentration of oxygen in the combustion products. This method involves using a controller which maintains the fuel (gas) volumetric flow rate at a level consistent with the desired oxygen concentration in the combustion products. The heat of combustion is determined form a known correlation with the fuel flow rate. An on-line computer accesses the fuel flow data and displays the heat of combustion measurement at desired time intervals. This technique appears to be especially applicable for measuring heats of combustion of hydrocarbon mixtures of unknown composition such as natural gas.

  11. Three-Signal Method for Accurate Measurements of Depolarization Ratio with Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Jens; Baumgart, Rudolf; McGee, Thomsa J.

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented that permits the determination of atmospheric depolarization-ratio profiles from three elastic-backscatter lidar signals with different sensitivity to the state of polarization of the backscattered light. The three-signal method is insensitive to experimental errors and does not require calibration of the measurement, which could cause large systematic uncertainties of the results, as is the case in the lidar technique conventionally used for the observation of depolarization ratios.

  12. Using ratios to measure hospital financial performance: can the process be simplified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counte, M A; Glandon, G L; Holloman, K; Kowalczyk, J

    1988-11-01

    Evaluation of a hospital's financial condition is often contingent upon the analysis of financial ratios. This study of 114 Illinois hospitals sought to simplify the financial assessment process by exploring the empirical dimensions that underlie 25 financial ratios. Results of a factor analytic solution suggest that there are five underlying factors which account for approximately 77% of the total variance. Uses of summative scaled measures in health services financial management and research are discussed.

  13. Rapid Evaluation of Water-in-Oil (w/o) Emulsion Stability by Turbidity Ratio Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song; Jho; Kim; Kim

    2000-10-01

    In this Note, we investigated the turbidity ratio method for the evaluation of water-in-oil emulsion stability. The slope of turbidity ratio of water-in-oil emulsions with time was taken as an index of stability; the higher the slope, the less stable the system. Various factors affecting the stability of emulsion such as HLB of emulsifier, amount of emulsifiers, and water were tested using this technique. The results of the turbidity ratio technique for the evaluation of emulsion stability were well consistent with those obtained by the measurement of phase separation when incubated for 30 days at room temperature. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. 油气比对超燃发动机点火过程的影响%Influence of Fuel- Air Ratio on Scramjet Ignition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王西耀; 杨顺华; 乐嘉陵

    2012-01-01

    To study the influence of fuel-air ratio on the scramjet self-ignition, two self-ignition processes of kerosene fu- eled scramjct were simulated with 2D non-equilibrium unsteady numerical method, the total temperature, total pressure and Mach number of the incoming flow were 200OK, 3. OMPa and 3.0 respectively, the two cases had different fuel-air ratios, one was 1.0 and the other 0.2. Four conclusions can be reached. Firstly, the higher the fuel-air ratio is, the faster the fuel propa- gates; fuel propagates through the shear layer downstream first, and when achieving the rear cavity wall, kerosene will be propagated to the cavity upstream and bottom by the vortices. Secondly, the temperature in the cavity is high, so the ignition delay time is short, and as soon as the mixed gas with lower fuel-air ratio propagates into the cavity the ignition will occur downward and upward in the cavity. Thirdly, the flame propagates from top and right to bottom and left in the cavity. Fourthly, the higher the fuel-air ratio is, the more difficult the ignition is.%为了研究油气比对超燃发动机自点火性能的影响,利用二维非定常化学非平衡计算方法模拟了总温2000K,总压3.0MPa,入口马赫数3.0,煤油油气比为0.2和1.0时超燃发动机的自点火过程。具体可以得到以下结论:(1)总油气比越高,燃料传播速度越快;燃料首先沿着剪切层传播至凹槽后缘,之后在凹槽漩涡的带动下向凹槽上游和底部传播。(2)凹槽回流区温度高,点火延迟时间短,低油气比的气体一旦进入凹槽回流区后即可在凹槽后缘和上方点火。(3)火焰从凹槽的上沿和右边向凹槽底部和左边传播。(4)总油气比越高,点火越困难。

  15. Measuring the Effect of Fuel Structures and Blend Distribution on Diesel Emissions Using Isotope Tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, A S; Mueller, C J; Buchholz, B A; Dibble, R W

    2004-02-10

    Carbon atoms occupying specific positions within fuel molecules can be labeled and followed in emissions. Renewable bio-derived fuels possess a natural uniform carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) tracer several orders of magnitude above petroleum-derived fuels. These fuels can be used to specify sources of carbon in particulate matter (PM) or other emissions. Differences in emissions from variations in the distribution of a fuel component within a blend can also be measured. Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), we traced fuel components with biological {sup 14}C/C levels of 1 part in 10{sup 12} against a {sup 14}C-free petroleum background in PM and CO{sub 2}. Different carbon atoms in the ester structure of the diesel oxygenate dibutyl maleate displayed far different propensities to produce PM. Homogeneous cosolvent and heterogeneous emulsified ethanol-in-diesel blends produced significantly different PM despite having the same oxygen content in the fuel. Emulsified blends produced PM with significantly more volatile species. Although ethanol-derived carbon was less likely to produce PM than diesel fuel, it formed non-volatile structures when it resided in PM. The contribution of lubrication oil to PM was determined by measuring an isotopic difference between 100% bio-diesel and the PM it produced. Data produced by the experiments provides validation for combustion models.

  16. Measurement of gamma and neutron radiations inside spent fuel assemblies with passive detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L., E-mail: vie@ujv.cz [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, 250 68 Husinec-Rez 130 (Czech Republic); Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Lahodova, Z.; Voljanskij, A.; Klupak, V.; Koleska, M. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, 250 68 Husinec-Rez 130 (Czech Republic); Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Cabalka, M. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, 250 68 Husinec-Rez 130 (Czech Republic); Turek, K. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Czech Republic)

    2011-10-01

    During operation of a fission nuclear reactor, many radionuclides are generated in fuel by fission and activation of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and other nuclides present in the assembly. After removal of a fuel assembly from the core, these radionuclides are sources of different types of radiation. Gamma and neutron radiation emitted from an assembly can be non-destructively detected with different types of detectors. In this paper, a new method of measurement of radiation from a spent fuel assembly is presented. It is based on usage of passive detectors, such as alanine dosimeters for gamma radiation and track detectors for neutron radiation. Measurements are made on the IRT-2M spent fuel assemblies used in the LVR-15 research reactor. During irradiation of detectors, the fuel assembly is located in a water storage pool at a depth of 6 m. Detectors are inserted into central hole of the assembly, irradiated for a defined time interval, and after the detectors removed from the assembly, gamma dose or neutron fluence are evaluated. Measured profiles of gamma dose rate and neutron fluence rate inside of the spent fuel assembly are presented. This measurement can be used to evaluate relative fuel burn-up.

  17. Measurement of gamma and neutron radiations inside spent fuel assemblies with passive detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Voljanskij, A.; Klupák, V.; Koleška, M.; Cabalka, M.; Turek, K.

    2011-10-01

    During operation of a fission nuclear reactor, many radionuclides are generated in fuel by fission and activation of 235U, 238U and other nuclides present in the assembly. After removal of a fuel assembly from the core, these radionuclides are sources of different types of radiation. Gamma and neutron radiation emitted from an assembly can be non-destructively detected with different types of detectors. In this paper, a new method of measurement of radiation from a spent fuel assembly is presented. It is based on usage of passive detectors, such as alanine dosimeters for gamma radiation and track detectors for neutron radiation. Measurements are made on the IRT-2M spent fuel assemblies used in the LVR-15 research reactor. During irradiation of detectors, the fuel assembly is located in a water storage pool at a depth of 6 m. Detectors are inserted into central hole of the assembly, irradiated for a defined time interval, and after the detectors removed from the assembly, gamma dose or neutron fluence are evaluated. Measured profiles of gamma dose rate and neutron fluence rate inside of the spent fuel assembly are presented. This measurement can be used to evaluate relative fuel burn-up.

  18. An approach for measuring the {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio in fish samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusuno, Haruka, E-mail: kusuno@um.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University Museum, The University of Tokyo, 3-7-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki [The University Museum, The University of Tokyo, 3-7-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nagata, Toshi; Miyairi, Yosuke; Yokoyama, Yusuke [Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8564 (Japan); Ohkouchi, Naohiko [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 2-15, Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka-city, Kanagawa 237-0061 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    The {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio in marine fish samples was measured employing accelerator mass spectrometry. The measurement was successful because of the low experimental background of {sup 129}I. Pyrohydrolysis was applied to extract iodine from fish samples. The experimental background of pyrohydrolysis was checked carefully and evaluated as 10{sup 4}–10{sup 5} atoms {sup 129}I/combustion. The methodology employed in the present study thus required only 0.05–0.2 g of dried fish samples. The methodology was then applied to obtain the {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio of marine fish samples collected from the Western Pacific Ocean as (0.63–1.2) × 10{sup −10}. These values were similar to the ratio for the surface seawater collected at the same station, 0.4 × 10{sup −10}. The {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio of IAEA-414, which was a mix of fish from the Irish Sea and the North Sea, was also measured and determined as 1.82 × 10{sup −7}. Consequently, fish from the Western Pacific Ocean and the North Sea were distinguished by their {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios. The {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio is thus a direct indicator of the area of habitat of fish.

  19. Application of neodymium isotope ratio measurements for the origin assessment of uranium ore concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajkó, Judit; Varga, Zsolt; Yalcintas, Ezgi; Wallenius, Maria; Mayer, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    A novel procedure has been developed for the measurement of (143)Nd/(144)Nd isotope ratio in various uranium-bearing materials, such as uranium ores and ore concentrates (UOC) in order to evaluate the usefulness and applicability of variations of (143)Nd/(144)Nd isotope ratio for provenance assessment in nuclear forensics. Neodymium was separated and pre-concentrated by extraction chromatography and then the isotope ratios were measured by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The method was validated by the measurement of standard reference materials (La Jolla, JB-2 and BCR-2) and the applicability of the procedure was demonstrated by the analysis of uranium samples of world-wide origin. The investigated samples show distinct (143)Nd/(144)Nd ratio depending on the ore type, deposit age and Sm/Nd ratio. Together with other characteristics of the material in question, the Nd isotope ratio is a promising signature for nuclear forensics and suggests being indicative of the source material, the uranium ore.

  20. Development of some exergetic parameters for PEM fuel cells for measuring environmental impact and sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midilli, Adnan [Energy Division, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Nigde University, 51100 Nigde (Turkey); Dincer, Ibrahim [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    This paper presents some new exergy-based parameters for PEM fuel cells to study how some of their operating aspects and system characteristics affect the environment and sustainability, based on some actual and literature data. The exergetic parameters of a PEM fuel cell developed here, in conjunction with environmental impact and sustainable development, are exergy efficiency, exergetic stability factor, environmental benign index and exergetic sustainability index. Any increase in efficiency improves exergetic sustainability. However, any increase in waste exergy ratio, exergy destruction factor, environmental destruction coefficient and environmental destruction index results in an increasing environmental impact of the PEM fuel cell and hence, a decreasing sustainability. Such parameters are expected to quantify how PEM fuel cells become more environmentally benign and sustainable. (author)

  1. Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-31

    distribution unlimited Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis Matthew...Technical Note 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 04 January 2016 - 31 July 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on...Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  2. Resonant tube for measurement of sound absorption in gases at low frequency/pressure ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Griffin, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes a resonant tube for measuring sound absorption in gases, with specific emphasis on the vibrational relaxation peak of N2, over a range of frequency/pressure ratios from 0.1 to 2500 Hz/atm. The experimental background losses measured in argon agree with the theoretical wall losses except at few isolated frequencies. Rigid cavity terminations, external excitation, and a differential technique of background evaluation were used to minimize spurious contributions to the background losses. Room temperature measurements of sound absorption in binary mixtures of N2-CO2 in which both components are excitable resulted in the maximum frequency/pressure ratio in Hz/atm of 0.063 + 123m for the N2 vibrational relaxation peak, where m is mole percent of added CO2; the maximum ratio for the CO2 peak was 34,500 268m where m is mole percent of added N2.

  3. Measurement of the Multiple-Muon Charge Ratio in the MINOS Far Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Aurisano, A; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Carroll, T J; Castromonte, C M; Chen, R; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; de Rijck, S; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Flanagan, W; Frohne, M V; Gabrielyan, M; Gallagher, H R; Germani, S; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Holin, A; Huang, J; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGivern, C; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Sher, S Moed; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; O'Connor, J; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Perch, A; Pfuzner, M; Phan, D D; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sail, P; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tian, X; Timmons, A; Todd, J; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2016-01-01

    The charge ratio, $R_\\mu = N_{\\mu^+}/N_{\\mu^-}$, for cosmogenic multiple-muon events observed at an under- ground depth of 2070 mwe has been measured using the magnetized MINOS Far Detector. The multiple-muon events, recorded nearly continuously from August 2003 until April 2012, comprise two independent data sets imaged with opposite magnetic field polarities, the comparison of which allows the systematic uncertainties of the measurement to be minimized. The multiple-muon charge ratio is determined to be $R_\\mu = 1.104 \\pm 0.006 {\\rm \\,(stat.)} ^{+0.009}_{-0.010} {\\rm \\,(syst.)} $. This measurement complements previous determinations of single-muon and multiple-muon charge ratios at underground sites and serves to constrain models of cosmic ray interactions at TeV energies.

  4. Calibration procedure for plasma polarimetry based on the complex amplitude ratio measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieg, Bohdan, E-mail: b.bieg@am.szczecin.pl [Maritime University, Szczecin (Poland); Kravtsov, Yury A.; Cieplik, Marek [Maritime University, Szczecin (Poland)

    2013-10-15

    New methodology for plasma polarimeters calibration is suggested, based on the complex amplitude ratio (CAR) measurements. This methodology reduces calibration to determination of three complex parameters of transfer matrix, characterizing polarization changes in optical system. Having obtained transfer matrix, full characteristic of the optic system could be obtained: eigenstates, phase shift and relative attenuation of the slow and fast wave. Polarization state of the sounding electromagnetic wave after the plasma is determined from the measured complex amplitude ratio by simple inversion of transfer matrix. Calibration procedure under discussion is simpler, more transparent and reliable than traditional procedures, using Stokes vector technique or angular parameters of polarization ellipse.

  5. Measurement of the Ratio of B+ and B0 Meson Lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B Yu; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Böhnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystrický, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clement, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M C; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; Da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhev, S N; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kado, M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A I; Kharzheev, Yu M; Kim, K H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G L; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A C; Lebrun, P; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J T; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A M; Lokajícek, M; Lounis, A; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A S; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N V; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Nöding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Pérez, E; Peters, O; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F K; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A F S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schukin, A A; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sen-Gupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shephard, W D; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V I; Skubic, P L; Slattery, P F; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Song, Y; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Steinbruck, G; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vlimant, J R; Von Törne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu-Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wang, L; Wang, Z M; Warchol, J; Warsinsky, M; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2004-01-01

    The ratio of B+ and B0 meson lifetimes was measured using data collected in 2002-2004 by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. These mesons were reconstructed in B -> mu+ nu D*- X decays, which are dominated by B0, and B ->mu+ nu D0bar X decays, which are dominated by B+. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be t+/t0 = 1.080 +- 0.016(stat) +- 0.014(syst).

  6. Testing and preformance measurement of straight vegetable oils as an alternative fuel for diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, Arunachalam

    Rising fuel prices, growing energy demand, concerns over domestic energy security and global warming from greenhouse gas emissions have triggered the global interest in bio-energy and bio-fuel crop development. Backlash from these concerns can result in supply shocks of traditional fossil fuels and create immense economic pressure. It is thus widely argued that bio-fuels would particularly benefit developing countries by off-setting their dependencies on imported petroleum. Domestically, the transportation sector accounts for almost 40% of liquid fuel consumption, while on-farm application like tractors and combines for agricultural purposes uses close to an additional 18%. It is estimated that 40% of the farm budget can be attributed to the fuel costs. With the cost of diesel continuously rising, farmers are now looking at using Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO) as an alternative fuel by producing their own fuel crops. This study evaluates conventional diesel compared to the use of SVO like Camelina, Canola and Juncea grown on local farms in Colorado for their performance and emissions on a John Deere 4045 Tier-II engine. Additionally, physical properties like density and viscosity, metal/mineral content, and cold flow properties like CFPP and CP of these oils were measured using ASTM standards and compared to diesel. It was found that SVOs did not show significant differences compared to diesel fuel with regards to engine emissions, but did show an increase in thermal efficiency. Therefore, this study supports the continued development of SVO production as a viable alternative to diesel fuels, particularly for on-farm applications. The need for providing and developing a sustainable, economic and environmental friendly fuel alternative has taken an aggressive push which will require a strong multidisciplinary education in the field of bio-energy. Commercial bio-energy development has the potential to not only alleviate the energy concerns, but also to give renewed

  7. DESIGN AND PRODUCTION OF A FUEL TANK MEASURING SYSTEM USING COMPUTER INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Osueke

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This project took into account the processes involved in the design of the fuel tank measuring system using a computer interface. Our level sensor is Capacitance-based and was used to measure through variations in dielectric constant despite the varying fuel viscosity or tank conditions. A detailed design was done and the components carefully selected to ensure that they are compatible with the fuel to be measured. We Equipped it with a digital indicator to display process values and powering of the sensor with a 12volts battery. Capacitance level sensors are rugged and easy to use without any moving parts. They were used in constricted places due to its compact size. At the end of the design and fabrication, the project was confirmed to be effective for use in any underground storage fuel tank.

  8. On-road measurements of vehicle NO2/NOx emission ratios in Denver, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Robert J.; Dubé, William P.; Aikin, Kenneth C.; Eilerman, Scott J.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Peischl, Jeff; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Brown, Steven S.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) emitted by on-road combustion engines are important contributors to tropospheric ozone production. The NOx fraction emitted as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is usually presumed to be small but can affect ozone production and distribution, and this fraction is generally not reported in emissions inventories. We have developed an accurate method for determination of this primary NO2 emission and demonstrated it during measurement of on-road vehicle emission plumes from a mobile laboratory during July and August 2014 in the region between Denver and Greeley in Colorado. During a total of approximately 90 h of sampling from an instrumented mobile laboratory, we identified 1867 vehicle emission plumes, which were extracted using an algorithm that looks for rapid and large increases in measured NOx. We find a distribution of NO2/NOx emissions similar to a log-normal profile, with an average emission ratio of 0.053 ± 0.002 per sampled NOx plume. The average is not weighted by the total NOx emissions from sampled vehicles, which is not measured here, and so may not represent the NO2/NOx ratio of the total NOx emission if this ratio is a function of NOx itself. Although our current data set does not distinguish between different engine types (e.g., gasoline, light duty diesel and heavy duty diesel), the ratio is on the low end of recent reports of vehicle fleet NO2 to NOx emission ratios in Europe.

  9. Evaluation of the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio as a measure of distress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Melissa P; Hickman, Debra L

    2014-08-01

    The ability to evaluate distress in laboratory animals is needed in order to ensure that husbandry and experimental procedures do not negatively impact animal welfare. Accurate measurement of acute stress and chronic stress, and distinguishing between stress that is harmful (distress) and stress that does no harm (eustress), can be challenging. Whereas corticosterone concentrations are commonly used to measure stress in laboratory animals, the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio has been proposed as a potentially better indicator of chronic stress. Furthermore, an association between such measures of stress and concurrent behavioral indicators of negative welfare is required to determine their accuracy in evaluating distress. The authors compared serum corticosterone concentrations and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratios to assess acute or chronic stress in male Sprague Dawley rats. Elevated serum corticosterone concentrations, but not neutrophil-lymphocyte ratios, were associated with acute stress exposure, whereas elevated neutrophil-lymphocyte ratios, but not serum corticosterone concentrations, were associated with chronic stress exposure. Because the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio differences corresponded with a behavioral indicator of distress in chronically stressed rats, it may serve as a valuable tool for the physiological assessment of distress in rats.

  10. Synergistic Smart Fuel For In-pile Nuclear Reactor Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Randall A. Ali; Steven L . Garrett

    2013-10-01

    In March 2011, an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 on the Richter scale struck Japan with its epicenter on the northeast coast, near the Tohoku region. In addition to the immense physical destruction and casualties across the country, several nuclear power plants (NPP) were affected. It was the Fukushima Daiichi NPP that experienced the most severe and irreversible damage. The earthquake brought the reactors at Fukushima to an automatic shutdown and because the power transmission lines were damaged, emergency diesel generators (EDGs) were activated to ensure that there was continued cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools. The situation was being successfully managed until the tsunami hit about forty-five minutes later with a maximum wave height of approximately 15 m. The influx of water submerged the EDGs, the electrical switchgear, and dc batteries, resulting in the total loss of power to the reactors.2 At this point, the situation became critical. There was a loss of the sensors and instrumentation within the reactor that could have provided valuable information to guide the operators to make informed decisions and avoid the unfortunate events that followed. In the light of these events, we have developed and tested a potential self-powered thermoacoustic system, which will have the ability to serve as a temperature sensor and can transmit data independently of electronic networks. Such a device is synergistic with the harsh environment of the nuclear reactor as it utilizes the heat from the nuclear fuel to provide the input power.

  11. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favalli, A., E-mail: afavalli@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vo, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Commission, DG Energy, Euratom Safeguards Luxemburg, Luxemburg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, Stockholm (Sweden); Tobin, S.J.; Trellue, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vaccaro, S. [European Commission, DG Energy, Euratom Safeguards Luxemburg, Luxemburg (Luxembourg)

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)–Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI–SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute {sup 137}Cs count rate and the {sup 154}Eu/{sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs, {sup 106}Ru/{sup 137}Cs, and {sup 144}Ce/{sup 137}Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity’s behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  12. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, A.; Vo, D.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Tobin, S. J.; Trellue, H.; Vaccaro, S.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)-Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI-SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity's behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  13. Measurement of the Branching Ratio of the KL -> pi+pi- decay with the KLOE Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Bacci, C; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Bowring, D; Branchini, P; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Chi, S; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Di Micco, B; Doria, A; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Fiore, S; Forti, C; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gorini, E; Graziani, E; Incagli, M; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Mei, W; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Xu, G

    2006-01-01

    We present a measurement of the branching ratio of the CP violating decay KL->pi+pi- performed by the KLOE experiment at the phi factory DAFNE. We use 328 pb-1 of data collected in 2001 and 2002, corresponding to ~ 150 million tagged KL mesons. We find BR(KL->pi+pi-) = $(1.963 +/- 0.012 +/- 0.017)x 10^-3. This branching ratio measurement is fully inclusive of final-state radiation. Using the above result, we determine the modulus of the amplitude ratio |\\eta_{+-}| to be (2.219 +/- 0.013)x 10^{-3} and |\\epsilon| to be (2.216 +/- 0.013)x 10^{-3}.

  14. Measurement of the branching ratio for the decay η-->μ+μ-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegg, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Boudard, A.; Briscoe, W.; Fabbro, B.; Garçon, M.; Hermes, E. A.; Jacobs, W. W.; Kessler, R. S.; Lytkin, L.; Mayer, B.; Nefkens, B. M.; Niebuhr, C.; Petrov, A. M.; Poitou, J.; Saudinos, J.; Tippens, B.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; van der Schaaf, A.; van Oers, W. T.; Vigdor, S. E.; Wang, M.; White, D.

    1994-07-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio for the decay η-->μ+μ-, made at the SATURNE II proton synchrotron, resulted in Γ(η-->μ+μ-)/Γ(η-->all)= [5.7+/-0.7(stat.)+/-0.5(syst.)]×10-6. The reaction pd-->3Heη close to threshold yielded 800 s-1 tagged η's in a narrow momentum band around 257 MeV/c. Muon pairs were detected in two range telescopes. The data obtained consist of 114 events η-->μ+μ- on a background of 14 events. The new value for the branching ratio is 1.3+/-0.2 times the unitarity lower limit, consistent with most quark and vector meson dominance models which describe the decay as an electromagnetic transition with a two-photon intermediate state. The result resolves the discrepancy between the two previous measurements of this branching ratio.

  15. High-Sensitivity Measurement of 3He-4He Isotopic Ratios for Ultracold Neutron Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Mumm, H P; Bauder, W; Abrams, N; Deibel, C M; Huffer, C R; Huffman, P R; Schelhammer, K W; Swank, C M; Janssens, R; Jiang, C L; Scott, R H; Pardo, R C; Rehm, K E; Vondrasek, R; O'Shaughnessy, C M; Paul, M; Yang, L

    2016-01-01

    Research efforts ranging from studies of solid helium to searches for a neutron electric dipole moment require isotopically purified helium with a ratio of 3He to 4He at levels below that which can be measured using traditional mass spectroscopy techniques. We demonstrate an approach to such a measurement using accelerator mass spectroscopy, reaching the 10e-14 level of sensitivity, several orders of magnitude more sensitive than other techniques. Measurements of 3He/4He in samples relevant to the measurement of the neutron lifetime indicate the need for substantial corrections. We also argue that there is a clear path forward to sensitivity increases of at least another order of magnitude.

  16. Measuring the Multiplication of Spent Fuel Assemblies – It’s easier than you think!

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, Stephen Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-09

    This is a set of eight slides which advertise how easy it can be to measure the multiplication of a spent fuel assembly. A robust (fission chambers), rapid (under 15 minutes), direct (multiplication is measured, not photons from fission fragments) measurement of multiplication is possible.

  17. A measurement of the neutron to {sup 199}Hg magnetic moment ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afach, S. [ETH Zürich, Institute for Particle Physics, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Hans Berger Department of Neurology, Jena University Hospital, D-07747 Jena (Germany); Baker, C.A. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Ban, G. [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France); Bison, G. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Bodek, K. [Marian Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Burghoff, M. [Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany); Chowdhuri, Z.; Daum, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Fertl, M.; Franke, B. [ETH Zürich, Institute for Particle Physics, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Geltenbort, P. [Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France); Green, K.; Grinten, M.G.D. van der [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Grujic, Z. [Physics Department, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Harris, P.G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Heil, W. [Institut für Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universität, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Hélaine, V. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France); Henneck, R. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); and others

    2014-12-12

    The neutron gyromagnetic ratio has been measured relative to that of the {sup 199}Hg atom with an uncertainty of 0.8 ppm. We employed an apparatus where ultracold neutrons and mercury atoms are stored in the same volume and report the result γ{sub n}/γ{sub Hg}=3.8424574(30)

  18. Effects of Blowing Ratio Measured by Liquid Crystal on Heat Transfer Characteristics of Trailing Edge Cutback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Hepeng; Zhu Huiren; Kong Manzhao

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with the effects of a blowing ratio measured with narrowbend liquid crystal in transonic experiments on the heat transfer characteristics of trailing edge cutback. The experimental results are compared end contrasted in terms of available data for tra-ditional experiments with thermocouples. It is concluded that the blowing ratio exerts rather significant effects on film cooling effec-tiveness distribution of the rib center line. As the blowing ratio decreases, similar to the cooling effectiveness distribution curve of the slot center line, that of the rib center line makes a clockwise rotation about the end. When the blowing ratio increases, the regular film cooling effectiveness curve of the surface becomes rather smooth. On the whole measuring surface, the most intensive heat transfer oc-curs at the extended borderline of the slot end the rib, neither at the rib center line nor at the slot center line. The experimental results of cooling effectiveness measured with thermocouples are lower than those with liquid crystal. In addition, the transient experiments using narrowband liquid crystal can eliminate the higher errors of Nusselt numbers in measurements with thermocouples at the slot outlet.

  19. A measurement of the neutron to 199Hg magnetic moment ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Afach

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The neutron gyromagnetic ratio has been measured relative to that of the 199Hg atom with an uncertainty of 0.8 ppm. We employed an apparatus where ultracold neutrons and mercury atoms are stored in the same volume and report the result γn/γHg=3.8424574(30.

  20. Estimation of membrane hydration status for active proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems by impedance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Török, Lajos; Sahlin, Simon Lennart; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2016-01-01

    , the membrane of which PEMFCs are made of tends to dry out when not in use. This increases the time interval required to start the system up and could lead to the destruction of the fuel cell. In this article a start-up time measurement setup is presented, which is part of a larger project, the membrane......Fuel cells are getting growing interest in industrial areas like backup systems for telecom applications or power source for electric vehicles. Although these systems are characterized by long periods of inactivity, they must be able to start at any instant in the shortest time. However...... hydration status estimator for monitoring the humidity of a fuel cell stack during standby. The fuel cell has been placed in a climatic chamber, connected to hydrogen and the start-up time has been measured with different environmental conditions. Based on the previous results and the ones presented...

  1. Estimation of membrane hydration status for standby proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems by impedance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidoggia, Benoit; Rugholt, Mark; Nielsen, Morten Busk

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells are getting growing interest in both backup systems and electric vehicles. Although these systems are characterized by long periods of inactivity, they must be able to start at any instant in the shortest time. However, the membrane of which PEMFCs are made tends to dry out when...... not in use. This increases the time required to start the system and could lead to the destruction of the fuel cell. In this article an impedance measurement circuit is presented, which is part of a humidity status estimator for monitoring the humidity status of a fuel cell stack during standby....... The impedance measurement circuit has been connected to a fuel cell stack and the operation of estimating the relative humidity has been demonstrated....

  2. Measurements of nitrous acid in commercial aircraft exhaust at the Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ben H; Santoni, Gregory W; Wood, Ezra C; Herndon, Scott C; Miake-Lye, Richard C; Zahniser, Mark S; Wofsy, Steven C; Munger, J William

    2011-09-15

    The Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX), conducted in January of 2009 in Palmdale, California, quantified aerosol and gaseous emissions from a DC-8 aircraft equipped with CFM56-2C1 engines using both traditional and synthetic fuels. This study examines the emissions of nitrous acid (HONO) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x) = NO + NO(2)) measured 145 m behind the grounded aircraft. The fuel-based emission index (EI) for HONO increases approximately 6-fold from idle to takeoff conditions but plateaus between 65 and 100% of maximum rated engine thrust, while the EI for NO(x) increases continuously. At high engine power, NO(x) EI is greater when combusting traditional (JP-8) rather than Fischer-Tropsch fuels, while HONO exhibits the opposite trend. Additionally, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was identified in exhaust plumes emitted only during engine idle. Chemical reactions responsible for emissions and comparison to previous measurement studies are discussed.

  3. Measurement and estimation of species distribution in a direct methanol fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celik, Selahattin; Mat, Mahmut D. [Nigde University, Mechanical Engineering Department, 51100 Nigde (Turkey)

    2010-03-15

    Determination of methanol concentration in a direct methanol fuel cell is crucial for design improvement and performance enhancement. Methanol and water concentrations in a direct methanol fuel cell are experimentally and numerically investigated. In the experimental program, a single cell direct methanol fuel cell is developed and an experimental setup is devised to measure methanol and water concentrations and performance of the cell depending on operating conditions. In theoretical program a mathematical model which includes fluid flow, species distribution, electric field and electrochemistry is adapted and numerically solved. The results showed that the performance of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) is mainly influenced by operating temperature. A large drop in methanol concentration methanol is measured at the inlet section of cell. The mathematical model is found to satisfactorily capture main physics involved in a DMFC. (author)

  4. Evaluation technology for burnup and generated amount of plutonium by measurement of xenon isotopic ratio in dissolver off-gas at reprocessing facility (Joint research)

    OpenAIRE

    岡野 正紀; 久野 剛彦; 高橋 一朗; 白水 秀知; Charlton, W. S.; Wells, C. A.; Hemberger, P. H.; 山田 敬二; 酒井 敏雄

    2006-01-01

    The amount of Pu in the spent fuel was evaluated from Xe isotopic ratio in off-gas in reprocessing facility, is related to burnup. Six batches of dissolver off-gas at spent fuel dissolution process were sampled from the main stack in Tokai Reprocessing Plant during BWR fuel reprocessing campaign. Xenon isotopic ratio was determined with GC/MS. Burnup and generated amount of Pu were evaluated with Noble Gas Environmental Monitoring Application code (NOVA), developed by Los Alamos National Labo...

  5. Measurement of gap and grain-boundary inventories of {sup 129}I in used CANDU fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Moir, D.L.; Kolar, M.; Porth, R.J.; McConnell, J.L.; Kerr, A.H. [AECL Research, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1995-12-31

    Combined gap and grain-boundary inventories of {sup 129}I in 14 used CANDU fuel elements were measured by crushing and simultaneously leaching fuel segments for 4 h in a solution containing KI carrier. From analogy with previous work a near one-to-one correlation was anticipated between the amount of stable Xe and the amount of {sup 128}I in the combined gap and grain-boundary regions of the fuel. However, the results showed that such a correlation was only apparent for low linear power rating (LLPR) fuels with an average linear power rating of < 42 kW/m. For high linear power rating (HLPR) fuels (> 44 kW/m), the {sup 129}I values were considerably smaller than expected. The combined gap and grain-boundary inventories of {sup 129}I in the 14 fuels tested varied from 1.8 to 11.0%, with an average value of 3.6 {+-} 2.4% which suggests that the average value of 8.1 {+-} 1% used in safety assessment calculations overestimates the instant release fraction for {sup 129}I. Segments of used CANDU fuels were leached for 92 d (samples taken at 5, 28 and 92 d) to determine the kinetics of {sup 129}I release. Results could be fitted tentatively to half-order reaction kinetics, implying that {sup 129}I release is a diffusion-controlled process for LLPR fuels, and also for HLPR fuels, once the gap inventory has been leached. However, more data are needed over longer leaching periods to gain more understanding of the processes that control grain-boundary release of {sup 129}I from used CANDU fuel.

  6. a Measurement of the Inclusive Semileptonic Branching Fractions and Lifetime Ratio of the B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Mark Alan

    Separate measurements of the B_ {u} and B_{d} semileptonic branching fractions have been made using 1.4 fb^{-1} of data taken with the CLEO-II detector at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. A new technique is utilized in which a | B meson is exclusively reconstructed in order to tag the charge and flavor. Approximately 2000 fully reconstructed candidates are found in the data sample. Since the Upsilon(4S) decays to B | B, the tracks from the B meson can then be examined for lepton content. The efficiency corrected ratio of the number of leptons and the number of tags determines the semileptonic branching fractions. This method allows for the first separate measurement of the charged B meson semileptonic branching ratio in contrast to other techniques which measure the flavor averaged branching fractions. Assuming that the partial semileptonic decay widths of the charged and neutral B's are equal, the lifetime ratio can be measured from the ratio of semileptonic branching fractions. Since the flavor is explicitly tagged, no assumptions concerning the production fractions of the B_ {u} and B_{d} (f_{+-} and f_ {00}) are used, unlike results of past Upsilon(4S) experiments. Hence, with the exception of the partial semileptonic width equality, the only assumption used is that of the shape of the direct lepton (Btol X) momentum spectrum in efficiency determination. Theoretical dependence is thus kept at a minimum. The measured results for the branching fractions and lifetime ratio are: (UNFORMATTED TABLE OR EQUATION FOLLOWS)eqalign{{cal B}(B^+to Xl^+nu) &= (13.0 +/- 1.8 +/- 1.6)%cr { cal B}(B^0to Xl^+ nu) &= (14.5 +/- 2.1 +/- 1.9)%cr {tau(B^+)overtau(B^0) } &= 0.90 +/- 0.18 +/- 0.12.cr} (TABLE/EQUATION ENDS).

  7. Application of lead and strontium isotope ratio measurements for the origin assessment of uranium ore concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Zsolt; Wallenius, Maria; Mayer, Klaus; Keegan, Elizabeth; Millet, Sylvain

    2009-10-15

    Lead and strontium isotope ratios were used for the origin assessment of uranium ore concentrates (yellow cakes) for nuclear forensic purposes. A simple and low-background sample preparation method was developed for the simultaneous separation of the analytes followed by the measurement of the isotope ratios by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The lead isotopic composition of the ore concentrates suggests applicability for the verification of the source of the nuclear material and by the use of the radiogenic (207)Pb/(206)Pb ratio the age of the raw ore material can be calculated. However, during data interpretation, the relatively high variation of the lead isotopic composition within the mine site and the generally high contribution of natural lead as technological contamination have to be carefully taken into account. The (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratio is less prone to the variation within one mine site and less affected by the production process, thus it was found to be a more purposeful indicator for the origin assessment and source verification than the lead. The lead and strontium isotope ratios measured and the methodology developed provide information on the initial raw uranium ore used, and thus they can be used for source attribution of the uranium ore concentrates.

  8. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio at TeV energies with MINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K.E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D.J.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D.S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barnes, P.D., Jr.; Barr, G.; /Fermilab /University Coll. London /Rutherford /Minnesota U. /Indiana U. /Sussex U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Argonne /Caltech /LLNL, Livermore /Oxford U.

    2007-05-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 m.w.e. in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be N{sub {mu}}+/N{sub {mu}}-=1.374{+-}0.004(stat)-0.010{sup +0.012}(sys). Using the map of the Soudan rock overburden, the muon momenta as measured underground were projected to the corresponding values at the surface in the energy range 1-7 TeV. Within this range of energies at the surface, the MINOS data are consistent with the charge ratio being energy independent at the 2 standard deviation level. When the MINOS results are compared with measurements at lower energies, a clear rise in the charge ratio in the energy range 0.3-1.0 TeV is apparent. A qualitative model shows that the rise is consistent with an increasing contribution of kaon decays to the muon charge ratio.

  9. Silicon isotope ratio measurements by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgiotis, Alkiviadis; Ducasse, Thomas; Barker, Evelyne; Jollivet, Patrick; Gin, Stéphane; Bassot, Sylvain; Cazala, Charlotte

    2017-02-15

    High-level, long-lived nuclear waste arising from spent fuel reprocessing is vitrified in silicate glasses for final disposal in deep geologic formations. In order to better understand the mechanisms driving glass dissolution, glass alteration studies, based on silicon isotope ratio monitoring of (29)Si-doped aqueous solutions, were carried out in laboratories. This work explores the capabilities of the new type of quadrupole-based ICP-MS, the Agilent 8800 tandem quadrupole ICP-MS/MS, for accurate silicon isotope ratio determination for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses. In order to avoid silicon polyatomic interferences, a new analytical method was developed using O2 as the reaction gas in the Octopole Reaction System (ORS), and silicon isotopes were measured in mass-shift mode. A careful analysis of the potential polyatomic interferences on SiO(+) and SiO2(+) ion species was performed, and we found that SiO(+) ion species suffer from important polyatomic interferences coming from the matrix of sample and standard solutions (0.5M HNO3). For SiO2(+), no interferences were detected, and thus, these ion species were chosen for silicon isotope ratio determination. A number of key settings for accurate isotope ratio analysis like, detector dead time, integration time, number of sweeps, wait time offset, memory blank and instrumental mass fractionation, were considered and optimized. Particular attention was paid to the optimization of abundance sensitivity of the quadrupole mass filter before the ORS. We showed that poor abundance sensitivity leads to a significant shift of the data away from the Exponential Mass Fractionation Law (EMFL) due to the spectral overlaps of silicon isotopes combined with different oxygen isotopes (i.e. (28)Si(16)O(18)O(+), (30)Si(16)O(16)O(+)). The developed method was validated by measuring a series of reference solutions with different (29)Si enrichment. Isotope ratio trueness, uncertainty and repeatability were found to be <0

  10. Improving the efficiency of CTDIw annual measurements with established 16 cm: 32 cm phantom ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina T Dodge

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To validate the use of the 16 cm CTDI phantom to estimate the 32 cm phantom CTDIw with tabulated data from previous years.Methods: A retrospective analysis of CTDI measurements was performed from the annual physics testing reports of four Siemens Symbia (Emotion T6, one Siemens Symbia (Emotion T16, one Siemens Sensation Open, one Siemens Sensation 16, one Siemens Sensation 32, two GE LightSpeed 16 and five GE VCT CT scanners. For each annual report, the ratio of the 16 cm: 32 cm CTDI phantom measurements was calculated from mAs-normalized CTDI100. The ratios from a the acceptance test, b one year after the acceptance test or c an average ratio of all of the previous years (range 4-8 years, were then used to estimate 32 cm CTDI phantom measurements based on active 16 cm CTDI measurements. The average percent difference between measured and calculated CTDIw was determined per scanner for all years.Results: The most accurate results were obtained when using the average ratios of all the previous years, -2% to 3% difference across all scanner models. For the ratios of the year after the acceptance test, the difference ranged from -3% to 7%, while the data estimated from the acceptance testing results yielded the largest percent difference -4% to 8%. The 64-detector row system estimates displayed the greatest variation, followed by the 16-detector row scanners, while the 6-detector row system estimates were the most accurate.Conclusion: Compared to the Siemens and GE specified CTDI limits of ± 15-30% , the variation in the estimated 32 cm phantom CTDIw values was 2-15 times lower, dependent on the scanner model and method of estimation. The variation was considerably less (2-3% with ratios of all the previous years, perhaps indicative of year to year variations that can result in greater error.------------------------------Cite this article as: Dodge C, Gress D. Improving the efficiency of CTDIw annual measurements with established 16 cm

  11. A summary of truck fuel-saving measures developed with industry participation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram, K.M.; Saricks, C.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gregory, E.W. II [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Moore, A.J. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1983-09-01

    This report describes the third project undertaken by the Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in a US Department of Energy program designed to develop and distribute compendiums of measures for saving transportation fuel. A matrix, or chart, of more than 60 fuel-saving measures was developed by ANL and refined with the assistance of trucking industry operators and researchers at an industry coordination meeting held in August 1982. The first two projects used similar meetings to refine matrices developed for the international maritime and US railroad industries. The consensus reached by those at the meeting was that the single most important element in a truck fuel-efficiency improvement program is the human element -- namely the development of strong motivation among truck drivers to save fuel. The role of the driver is crucial to the successful use of fuel-saving equipment and operating procedures. Identical conclusions were reached in the earlier maritime and rail meetings, thus providing a strong indication of the pervasive importance of the human element in energy-efficient transportation systems. The number and variety of changes made to the matrix are also delineated, including addition and deletion of various options and revisions of fuel-saving estimates, payback period estimates, and remarks concerning items such as the advantages, disadvantages, and cautions associated with various measures. The quality and quantity of the suggested changes demonstrate the considerable value of using a forum of industry operators and researchers to refine research data that are intended for practical application.

  12. Design and Analyses of High Aspect Ratio Nozzles for Distributed Propulsion Acoustic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Vance F., III

    2016-01-01

    A series of three convergent round-to-rectangular high-aspect ratio nozzles were designed for acoustics measurements. The nozzles have exit area aspect ratios of 8:1, 12:1, and 16:1. With septa inserts, these nozzles will mimic an array of distributed propulsion system nozzles, as found on hybrid wing-body aircraft concepts. Analyses were performed for the three nozzle designs and showed that the flow through the nozzles was free of separated flow and shocks. The exit flow was mostly uniform with the exception of a pair of vortices at each span-wise end of the nozzle.

  13. Measurement of the isomeric yield ratios of fission products with JYFLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelov, D; Hakala, J; Jokinen, A; Kolhinen, V S; Koponen, J; Lantz, M; Matteram, A; Moore, I; Penttilä, H; Pohjalainen, I; Pomp, S; Rakopoulos, V; Reponen, M; Rinta-Antilav, S; Schonnenschein, V; Simutkin, V; Solders, A; Voss, A; Äystö, J

    2014-01-01

    Several isomeric yield ratios of fission products in 25 MeV pr oton-induced fis- sion of 238 U were measured recently at the JYFLTRAP facility. The ion-g uide separator on-line method was utilized to produce radioacti ve ions. The dou- ble Penning-trap mass spectrometer was used to separate iso meric and ground states by their masses. To verify the new experimental techn ique γ -spectro- scopy method was used to obtain the same isomeric ratios.

  14. Iterative Precision Measurement of Branching Ratios Applied to 5P states in 88Sr+

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Helena; Low, Guang Hao; Rines, Richard; Stuart, Jules; Wu, Tailin; Chuang, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    We report on a method for measuring the branching ratios of dipole transitions of trapped atomic ions by performing nested sequences of population inversions. This scheme is broadly applicable and does not use ultrafast pulsed or narrow linewidth lasers. It is simple to perform and insensitive to experimental variables such as laser and magnetic field noise as well as ion heating. To demonstrate its effectiveness, we make the most accurate measurements thus far of the branching ratios of both 5P1/2 and 5P3/2 states in 88Sr+ with sub-1% uncertainties. We measure 17.175(27) for the branching ratio of 5P1/2-5S1/2, 15.845(71) for 5P3/2-5S1/2, and 0.05609(21) for 5P3/2-4D5/2, ten- fold and thirty-fold improvements in precision for 5P1/2 and 5P3/2 branching ratios respectively over the best previous experimental values.

  15. Fission product activity ratios measured at trace level over France during the Fukushima accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vismes Ott, A; Gurriaran, R; Cagnat, X; Masson, O

    2013-11-01

    The nuclear accident of Fukushima Dai-ichi (Japan) which occurred after the tsunami that impacted the northeast coasts of Japan on March 11th, 2011 led to significant releases of radionuclides into the atmosphere and resulted in the detection of those radionuclides at a global scale. In order to track airborne radionuclides from the damaged reactors and to survey their potential impact on the French territory, the French Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (Institut de Radioprotection et de Sureté Nucléaire IRSN) set up an enhanced surveillance system to give quick results as needed and later give quality trace level measurements. Radionuclides usually measured at trace levels such as (137)Cs and in a very sporadic way (131)I were reported. Radionuclides that we had never measured in air since the Chernobyl accident: (134)Cs, (136)Cs, the mother/daughter pairs (129m)Te-(129)Te and (132)Te-(132)I, and (140)La (from the mother-daughter pair (140)Ba- (140)La) were also reported. Except the (131)I/(137)Cs ratio, activity concentration ratios were constant. These ratios could be used to help source term assessment, or as data for transfer studies realized after the passage of contaminated air masses, typically using the (134)Cs/(137)Cs ratio.

  16. Project of multiple controller models for the maintenance of air/fuel ratio in natural gas internal combustion motors; Projeto de controladores multiplos modelos para manutencao da relacao ar/combustivel em motores de combustao interna movidos a gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas Junior, Fernando Sousa e; Fleury, Agenor de Toledo [Sao Paulo Univ. SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mails: ffreitas@usp.br; agfleury@ipt.br

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this work is the study of advanced control techniques for the reduction of pollutant gases generated by internal combustion engines powered by natural gas. In this paper three techniques are applied to control the fuel injection and the ignition timing: the Generalized Predictive Control (GPC), the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and H{infinity} Control by Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMI). To each one of those techniques were developed a multiple model structure seeking to include the vast operation region of the engine. The controller's performance is measured by the efficiency in maintaining the fuel/air ratio around 1% of maximum deviation in relation to the stoichiometric value. The results show the possibility of controlling pollutant emission generated by this kind of engine to conform to international emission standards, improving life quality. (author)

  17. Gross Motor Function Measure Evolution Ratio: Use as a Control for Natural Progression in Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marois, Pierre; Marois, Mikael; Pouliot-Laforte, Annie; Vanasse, Michel; Lambert, Jean; Ballaz, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    To develop a new way to interpret Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-66) score improvement in studies conducted without control groups in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The curves, which describe the pattern of motor development according to the children's Gross Motor Function Classification System level, were used as historical control to define the GMFM-66 expected natural evolution in children with CP. These curves have been modeled and generalized to fit the curve to particular children characteristics. Research center. Not applicable. Not applicable. Not applicable. Assuming that the GMFM-66 score evolution followed the shape of the Rosenbaum curves, by taking into account the age and GMFM-66 score of children, the expected natural evolution of the GMFM-66 score was predicted for any group of children with CP who were Motor Function Measure Evolution Ratio, was defined as follows: Gross Motor Function Measure Evolution Ratio=measured GMFM-66 score change/expected natural evolution. For practical or ethical reasons, it is almost impossible to use control groups in studies evaluating effectiveness of many therapeutic modalities. The Gross Motor Function Measure Evolution Ratio gives the opportunity to take into account the expected natural evolution of the gross motor function of children with CP, which is essential to accurately interpret the therapy effect on the GMFM-66. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Measuring Distance Ratios with CMB-Galaxy Lensing Cross-correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Sudeep; 10.1103/PhysRevD.79.043509

    2009-01-01

    We propose a method for cosmographic measurements by combining gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with cosmic shear surveys. We cross-correlate the galaxy counts in the lens plane with two different source planes: the CMB at $z \\sim 1100$ and galaxies at an intermediate redshift. The ratio of the galaxy count/CMB lensing cross-correlation to the galaxy count/galaxy lensing cross correlation is shown to be a purely geometric quantity, depending only on the distribution function of the source galaxies. By combining Planck, ADEPT and LSST the ratio can be measured to $\\sim 4%$ accuracy, whereas a future polarization based experiment like CMBPOL can make a more precise ($\\sim 1%$) measurement. For cosmological models where the curvature and the equation of state parameter are allowed to vary, the direction of degeneracy defined by the measurement of this ratio is different from that traced out by Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) measurements. Combining this method with the stacked clu...

  19. Measured effect of wind generation on the fuel consumption of an isolated diesel power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1983-01-01

    The Block Island Power Company (BIPCO), on Block Island, Rhode Island, operates an isolated electric power system consisting of diesel generation and an experimental wind turbine. The 150-kW wind turbine, designated MOD-OA by the U.S. Department of Energy is typically operated in parallel with two diesel generators to serve an average winter load of 350 kW. Wind generation serves up to 60 percent of the system demand depending on wind speed and total system load. Results of diesel fuel consumption measurements are given for the diesel units operated in parallel with the wind turbine and again without the wind turbine. The fuel consumption data are used to calculate the amount of fuel displaced by wind energy. Results indicate that the wind turbine displaced 25,700 lbs. of the diesel fuel during the test period, representing a calculated reduction in fuel consumption of 6.7 percent while generating 11 percent of the total electric energy. The amount of displaced fuel depends on operating conditions and system load. It is also shown that diesel engine throttle activity resulting from wind gusts which rapidly change the wind turbine output do not significantly influence fuel consumption.

  20. THE ASYMPTOTIC DISTRIBUTIONS OF EMPIRICAL LIKELIHOOD RATIO STATISTICS IN THE PRESENCE OF MEASUREMENT ERROR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Suppose that several different imperfect instruments and one perfect instrument are independently used to measure some characteristics of a population. Thus, measurements of two or more sets of samples with varying accuracies are obtained. Statistical inference should be based on the pooled samples. In this article, the authors also assumes that all the imperfect instruments are unbiased. They consider the problem of combining this information to make statistical tests for parameters more relevant. They define the empirical likelihood ratio functions and obtain their asymptotic distributions in the presence of measurement error.

  1. Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio, Platelet to Lymphocyte Ratio, Mean Platelet Volume and Red Cell Distribution Width Measures in Bells Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Sahin

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Statistically significant changes in the neutrophil count and NLR were determined in the measurements between Bells Palsy and control group (p = 0.013, p = 0.016 respectively on admission. A grade of the disease and NLR measurements had no statistically significant connection. RDW value was investigated for the first time in the literature for Bells Palsy patients.

  2. Performance measurement of low concentration ratio solar array for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    The measured performance of a silicon and a gallium arsenide low concentration ratio solar array (LCRSA) element is presented. The element characteristics measured in natural sunlight are off pointing performance and response to mechanical distortions. Laboratory measurements of individual silicon and gallium-arsenide solar cell assemblies are also made. The characteristics measured in the laboratory involved responses to temperature and intensity variations as well as to the application of reverse bias potentials. The element design details covered include the materials, the solar cells, and the rationale for selecting these specific characteristics. The measured performance characteristics are contrasted with the predicted values for both laboratory testing and high altitude natural sunlight testing. Excellent agreement between analytical predictions and measured performance is observed.

  3. Enrichment measurement in TRIGA type fuels; Medicion de enriquecimiento en combustibles tipo Triga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F.; Mazon R, R. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-05-15

    The Department of Energy of the United States of North America, through the program 'Idaho Operations Nuclear Spent Fuel Program' of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), in Idaho Falls; Idaho USA, hires to Global Technologies Inc. (GTI) to develop a prototype device of detection enrichment uranium (DEU Detection of Enrichment of Uranium) to determine quantitatively the enrichment in remainder U-235 in a TRIGA fuel element at the end of it useful life. The characteristics of the prototype developed by GTI are the following ones: It allows to carry out no-destructive measurements of TRIGA type fuel. Easily transportable due to that reduced of it size. The determination of the enrichment (in grams of U-235) it is obtained with a precision of 5%. The National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), in its facilities of the Nuclear Center of Mexico, it has TRIGA type fuel of high and low enrichment (standard and FLIP) fresh and with burnt, it also has the infrastructure (hot cells, armor-plating of transport, etc) and qualified personnel to carry out the necessary maneuvers to prove the operation of the DEU prototype. For this its would be used standard type fuel elements and FLIP, so much fresh as with certain burnt one. In the case of the fresh fuels the measurement doesn't represent any risk, the fuels before and after the measurement its don't contain a quantity of fission products that its represent a radiological risk in its manipulation; but in the case of the fuels with burnt the handling of the same ones represents an important radiological risk reason why for its manipulation it was used the transport armor-plating and the hot cells. (Author)

  4. Measurement of the cosmic ray muon charge ratio with the OPERA detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mauri, N

    2010-01-01

    The OPERA detector at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) was used to measure the cosmic ray muon charge ratio Rμ = Nμ+/Nμ− in the TeV energy region. We analyzed 403069 cosmic ray muons corresponding to 113.4 days of livetime during the 2008 CNGS run. We computed separately the muon charge ratio for single and for multiple muon events in order to select different energy regions of the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to test the Rμ dependence on the primary composition. Rμ is also shown as a function of the Òvertical surface energyÓ Eμ cos !. A Þt to a simpliÞed model of muon pro- duction in atmosphere allowed the determination of the pion and kaon charge ratios weighted by the cosmic ray energy spectrum.

  5. Boundary Layer CO2 mixing ratio measurements by an airborne pulsed IPDA lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Allan, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Since the primary signature of CO2 fluxes at the surface occurs in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), remote sensing measurements of CO2 that can resolve the CO2 absorption in the PBL separate from the total column are more sensitive to fluxes than those that can only measure a total column. The NASA Goddard CO2 sounder is a pulsed, range-resolved lidar that samples multiple (presently 30) wavelengths across the 1572.335 nm CO2 absorption line. The range resolution and line shape measurement enable CO2 mixing ratio measurements to be made in two or more altitude layers including the PBL via lidar cloud-slicing and multi-layer retrievals techniques. The pulsed lidar approach allows range-resolved backscatter of scattering from ground and cloud tops. Post flight data analysis can be used split the vertical CO2 column into layers (lidar cloud-slicing) and solve for the CO2 mixing ratio in each layer. We have demonstrated lidar cloud slicing with lidar measurements from a flight over Iowa, USA in August 2011 during the corn-growing season, remotely measuring a ≈15 ppm drawdown in the PBL CO2. We will present results using an improved lidar cloud slicing retrieval algorithm as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming ASCENDS 2014 flight campaign. The CO2 absorption line is also more pressure broadened at lower altitudes. Analyzing the line shape also allows solving for some vertical resolution in the CO2 distribution. By allowing the retrieval process to independently vary the column concentrations in two or more altitude layers, one can perform a best-fit retrieval to obtain the CO2 mixing ratios in each of the layers. Analysis of airborne lidar measurements (in 2011) over Iowa, USA and Four Corners, New Mexico, USA show that for altitudes above 8 km, the CO2 sounder can detect and measure enhanced or diminished CO2 mixing ratios in the PBL even in the absence of clouds. We will present these results as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming

  6. Simulation and Measurement of Neuroelectrodes' Characteristics with Integrated High Aspect Ratio Nano Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Nick

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Improving the interface between electrodes and neurons has been the focus of research for the last decade. Neuroelectrodes should show small geometrical surface area and low impedance for measuring and high charge injection capacities for stimulation. Increasing the electrochemically active surface area by using nanoporous electrode material or by integrating nanostructures onto planar electrodes is a common approach to improve this interface. In this paper a simulation approach for neuro electrodes' characteristics with integrated high aspect ratio nano structures based on a point-contact-model is presented. The results are compared with experimental findings conducted with real nanostructured microelectrodes. In particular, effects of carbon nanotubes and gold nanowires integrated onto microelectrodes are described. Simulated and measured impedance properties are presented and its effects onto the transfer function between the neural membrane potential and the amplifier output signal are studied based on the point-contact-model. Simulations show, in good agreement with experimental results, that electrode impedances can be dramatically reduced by the integration of high aspect ratio nanostructures such as gold nanowires and carbon nanotubes. This lowers thermal noise and improves the signal-to-noise ratio for measuring electrodes. It also may increase the adhesion of cells to the substrate and thus increase measurable signal amplitudes.

  7. a Brief Climatology of Cirrus LIDAR Ratios Measured by High Spectral Resolution LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, R.; Holz, R.; Hair, J. W.; Vaughan, M. A.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2015-12-01

    Our ability to detect and probe the vertical extent of cirrus was hugely improved with the launch of the NASA-CNES CALIPSO mission in April 2006. However, our skill at retrieving the optical properties of the cirrus detected by the CALIPSO lidar is not yet commensurate with our detection abilities. As with any new observing system, CALIPSO faces challenges and uncertainties in the retrieval of the geophysical parameters from its fundamental measurements. Specifically, extinction and optical depth retrievals for elastic backscatter lidars like CALIPSO typically rely on a priori assumptions about layer-mean extinction-to-backscatter ratios (AKA lidar ratios), which can vary regionally and for which uncertainties are high. To improve CALIPSO optical properties retrievals, we show High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements acquired with systems from the University of Wisconsin and NASA Langley. HSRLs can directly determine ice cloud extinction and lidar ratio by separately measuring the molecular and particulate components of the total backscattered signal, thus largely eliminating many of the uncertainties inherent in elastic backscatter retrievals. These measurements were acquired during the SEAC4RS (Huntsville, AL, USA and Singapore), and FRAPPE/DISCOVER-AQ 2014 (BAO tower near Boulder, CO, USA) field campaigns, and an intensive operations period in Hampton, VA, USA.

  8. Evaluation of the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport from rate measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynafarje, B; Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1976-12-10

    The mitochondrial H+/site ratio (i.e. the number of protons ejected per pair of electrons traversing each of the energy-conserving sites of the respiratory chain) has been evaluated employing a new experimental approach. In this method the rates of oxygen uptake and H+ ejection were measured simultaneously during the initial period of respiration evoked by addition of succinate to aerobic, rotenone-inhibited, de-energized mitochondria. Either K+, in the presence of valinomycin, or Ca2+, was used as mobile cation to dissipate the membrane potential and allow quantitative H+ ejection into the medium. The H+/site ratio observed with this method in the absence of precautions to inhibit the uptake of phosphate was close to 2.0, in agreement with values obtained using the oxygen pulse technique (Mitchell, P. and Moyle, J. (1967) Biochem. J. 105, 1147-1162). However, when phosphate movements were eliminated either by inhibition of the phosphate-hydroxide antiporter with N-ethylamaleimide or by depleting the mitochondria of their endogenous phosphate content, H+/site ratios close to 4.0 were consistently observed. This ratio was independent of the concentration of succinate, of mitochondrial protein, of pH between 6 and 8, and of ionic composition of the medium, provided that sufficient K+ (plus valinomycin) or Ca2+ were present. Specific inhibitors of the hydrolysis of endogenous ATP or transport of other ions (adenine nucleotides, tricarboxylates, HCO3-, etc.) were shown not to affect the observed H+/site ratio. Furthermore, the replacement of succinate by alpha-glycerol phosphate, a substrate which is oxidized on the outer surface of the inner membrane and thus does not need to enter the matrix, gave the same H+/site ratios as did succinate. It is concluded that the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport, when phosphate movements are eliminated, may be close to 4.0.

  9. Engineering on abolishment measure of nuclear fuel facilities. Application of 3D-CAD to abolishment measure of nuclear fuel facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annen, Sotonori; Sugitsue, Noritake [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Ningyo Toge Environmental Engineering Center, Kamisaibara, Okayama (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) progresses some advancing R and Ds required for establishment of the nuclear fuel cycle under considering on safety, economical efficiency, environmental compatibility, and so on. An important item among them is a technology on safe abolishment of a nuclear energy facility ended its role, which is called the abolishment measure technique. Here was introduced at a center of viewpoint called on use of three dimensional CAD (3D-CAD), on outlines of engineering system for abolishment measure (subdivision engineering system) under an object of nuclear fuel facilities, constructed through subdivision and removal of refinement conversion facilities, by the Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center of JNC. (G.K.)

  10. The probability distribution functions of emission line flux measurements and their ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Wesson, R; Scicluna, P

    2016-01-01

    Many physical parameters in astrophysics are derived using the ratios of two observed quantities. If the relative uncertainties on measurements are small enough, uncertainties can be propagated analytically using simplifying assumptions, but for large normally distributed uncertainties, the probability distribution of the ratio become skewed, with a modal value offset from that expected in Gaussian uncertainty propagation. Furthermore, the most likely value of a ratio A/B is not equal to the reciprocal of the most likely value of B/A. The effect is most pronounced when the uncertainty on the denominator is larger than that on the numerator. We show that this effect is seen in an analysis of 12,126 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The intrinsically fixed ratio of the [O III] lines at 4959 and 5007 ${\\AA}$ is conventionally expressed as the ratio of the stronger line to the weaker line. Thus, the uncertainty on the denominator is larger, and non-Gaussian probability distributions result. By taking thi...

  11. Estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions using satellite measurements of "proxy" species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Igor B.; Berezin, Evgeny V.; Ciais, Philippe; Broquet, Grégoire; Zhuravlev, Ruslan V.; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet

    2016-11-01

    Fossil-fuel (FF) burning releases carbon dioxide (CO2) together with many other chemical species, some of which, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO), are routinely monitored from space. This study examines the feasibility of estimation of FF CO2 emissions from large industrial regions by using NO2 and CO column retrievals from satellite measurements in combination with simulations by a mesoscale chemistry transport model (CTM). To this end, an inverse modeling method is developed that allows estimating FF CO2 emissions from different sectors of the economy, as well as the total CO2 emissions, in a given region. The key steps of the method are (1) inferring "top-down" estimates of the regional budget of anthropogenic NOx and CO emissions from satellite measurements of proxy species (NO2 and CO in the case considered) without using formal a priori constraints on these budgets, (2) the application of emission factors (the NOx-to-CO2 and CO-to-CO2 emission ratios in each sector) that relate FF CO2 emissions to the proxy species emissions and are evaluated by using data of "bottom-up" emission inventories, and (3) cross-validation and optimal combination of the estimates of CO2 emission budgets derived from measurements of the different proxy species. Uncertainties in the top-down estimates of the NOx and CO emissions are evaluated and systematic differences between the measured and simulated data are taken into account by using original robust techniques validated with synthetic data. To examine the potential of the method, it was applied to the budget of emissions for a western European region including 12 countries by using NO2 and CO column amounts retrieved from, respectively, the OMI and IASI satellite measurements and simulated by the CHIMERE mesoscale CTM, along with the emission conversion factors based on the EDGAR v4.2 emission inventory. The analysis was focused on evaluation of the uncertainty levels for the top-down NOx and CO emission

  12. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHWINKENDORF, K.N.

    2006-05-12

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements. The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprising two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with ''green'' (fresh) fuel and one with spent fuel. Both the green and spent fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, 3 green fuel and 4 spent fuel loading configurations were considered to serve as benchmark models. However, shortcomings in experimental data failed to meet the high standards for a benchmark problem. Nevertheless, the data provided by these subcritical measurements can

  13. Jules Horowitz Reactor Project- Fuel irradiation device, innovative instrumentation proposal for experimental phenomena real time measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillot, Stephane; Cheymol, Guy [CEA, Paris (France)

    2013-07-01

    The fuel irradiation devices used for the tests or rods allow reproducing at small scales the conditions of the studied nuclear reactors (as LWR type). During the irradiation phase, the tested fuel rod can be stressed due to thermal, mechanical, nuclear effects which can modify its geometry (dilatation, swelling effects). After the test, the return to normal conditions can have as consequence the disappearance of the phenomenon or give access to partial information (final deformation). Generally, to follow the phenomena related to the irradiation phase, the experimental rod contained in the test device is instrumented with thermocouples and LVDT. As complement of this instrumentation, new sensors using innovating technologies are studied (deformation sensor integrating optical fibres). Through the example of a fuel irradiation device foreseen for the JHR, this paper aims to describe the present development of an innovating instrumentation with the objective to measure, in real time and under flux, the fuel rod deformation phenomena during a ramp test.

  14. Strain ratio measurement of femoral cartilage by real-time elastosonography: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipek, Ali; Unal, Ozlem; Kartal, Merve Gulbiz; Arslan, Halil [Yildirim Beyazit University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Isik, Cetin; Bozkurt, Murat [Yildirim Beyazit University, Department of Orthopedics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate strain ratio measurement of femoral cartilage using real-time elastosonography. Twenty-five patients with femoral cartilage pathology on MRI (study group) were prospectively compared with 25 subjects with normal findings on MRI (control group) using real-time elastosonography. Strain ratio measurements of pathologic and normal cartilage were performed and compared, both within the study group and between the two groups. Elastosonography colour-scale coding showed a colour change from blue to red in pathologic cartilage and only blue colour-coding in normal cartilage. In the study group, the median strain ratio was higher in pathologic cartilage areas compared to normal areas (median, 1.49 [interquartile range, 0.80-2.53] vs. median, 0.01 [interquartile range, 0.01-0.01], p < 0.001, respectively). The median strain ratio of the control group was 0.01 (interquartile range, 0.01-0.01), and there was no significant difference compared to normal areas of the study group. There was, however, a significant difference between the control group cartilage and pathologic cartilage of the study group (p < 0.001). Elastosonography may be an effective, easily accessible, and relatively simple tool to demonstrate pathologic cartilage and to differentiate it from normal cartilage in the absence of advanced imaging facility such as MRI. (orig.)

  15. Measurement of the Atmospheric Muon Charge Ratio at TeV Energies with MINOS

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Avvakumov, S; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barish, B; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Beall, E; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bergfeld, T; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, B; Bock, G J; Böhm, J; Böhnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Border, P M; Bower, C; Buckley-Geer, E; Bungau, C; Cabrera, A; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Culling, A J; De Jong, J K; De Santo, A; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Drakoulakos, D; Durkin, T; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk-Harris, E; Feldman, G J; Fields, T H; Ford, R; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Giurgiu, G A; Godley, A; Gogos, J; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hartouni, E P; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Holin, A; Howcroft, C; Hylen, J; Indurthy, D; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jenner, L; Jensen, D; Joffe-Minor, T; Kafka, T; Kang, H J; Kasahara, S M S; Kim, M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kotelnikov, S K; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Lang, K; Lebedev, A; Lee, R; Ling, J; Liu, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marino, A D; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Merzon, G I; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Milburn, R H; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mislivec, A; Miyagawa, P S; Moore, C D; Morfin, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Osiecki, T; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlovic, Z; Pearce, G F; Peck, C W; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Ping, H; Piteira, R; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahman, D; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Reyna, D E; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Ryabov, V A; Saakyan, R; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Semenov, V K; Seun, S M; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Smirnitsky, V; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Symes, P A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tetteh-Lartey, E; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Velissaris, C; Verebryusov, V; Viren, B; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Wu, Q K; Yang, T; Yumiceva, F X; Zheng, H; Zois, M; Zwaska, R

    2007-01-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 meters-water-equivalent in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be 1.374 +/- 0.004 (stat.) +0.012 -0.010(sys.). Using the map of the Soudan rock overburden, the muon momenta as measured underground were projected to the corresponding values at the surface in the energy range 1-7 TeV. Within this range of energies at the surface, the MINOS data are consistent with the charge ratio being energy independent at the two standard deviation level. When the MINOS results are compared with measurements at lower energies, a clear rise in the charge ratio in the energy range 0.3 -- 1.0 TeV is apparent. A qualitativ...

  16. Current density distribution mapping in PEM fuel cells as an instrument for operational measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geske, M.; Heuer, M.; Heideck, G.; Styczynski, Z. A. [Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Chair Electric Power Networks and Renewable Energy Sources, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes. (author)

  17. Current Density Distribution Mapping in PEM Fuel Cells as An Instrument for Operational Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Geske

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC. Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes.

  18. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  19. Recent Measurements of DT Gamma to Neutron Branching Ratio at ICF Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongho

    2011-10-01

    The total T(d,g)5He/T(d,n)4He branching ratio of (4.5 +/- 0.5)E-5 has been measured on Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions at the OMEGA laser facility. Recent measurements have shown that the DT branching ratio at ICF is 2 - 3 times less than that of previously measured at particle accelerator facilities. Measurements were done at ion temperatures of (5 +/- 2) keV, which is quite low compared to previous measurements. Implication of the recent founding is that nuclear properties such as DT branching ratio might be reconsidered at low temperature ICF and stellar conditions. In practical sense, precise measurements of the branching ratio T(d,g)5He relative to T(d,n)4He are important in order to diagnose target areal density and resultant fusion yield of cryogenically-layered implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this work, we have used LANL's Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD), which provides a high bandwidth, energy thresholding capability for gamma-ray detection using gamma/electron/Cherenkov conversion. High-bandwidth aids the detection of D-T fusion gamma rays before the arrival of associated 14.1 MeV neutron-induced gammas; energy thresholding gives further protection against such undesirable backgrounds. In addition, to reduce systematic uncertainty, we have applied three independent calibration methods to characterize GCD response such as (1) D-3He gamma-rays generated at Omega laser where no absolute detector calibration was required because quite similar gamma spectrum from D3He and DT, (2) mono-energetic gamma rays generated at Duke University's High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIgS), and (3) 14-MeV neutron-induced inelastic gamma-rays generated at OMEGA using puck materials of known areal density placed near target center. In conjunction with an independent neutron yield measurements and ACCEPT and GEANT4 simulation codes, the resultant DT branching ratio was inferred. This work was performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory under the

  20. Comparative degradation study of carbon supported proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrocatalysts - The influence of the platinum to carbon ratio on the degradation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speder, Jozsef; Zana, Alessandro; Spanos, Ioannis; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J. K.; Mortensen, Kell; Hanzlik, Marianne; Arenz, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    A colloidal synthesis approach is used to prepare supported proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalysts with various Pt loadings - from low to extremely high ones. The catalyst samples are used to continue our investigation of the role of the Pt:C ratio in the degradation processes. The influence of the platinum loading on the electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss is evaluated in a systematic electrochemical study by using two commercially available carbon blacks, namely Vulcan XC72R and Ketjenblack EC-300J. Accelerated degradation tests simulating load cycle and start-up/shutdown conditions are carried out in accordance with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Conference of Japan (FCCJ) recommendations. Under conditions simulating the load cycle of PEM fuel cells no unambiguous correlation between the ECSA loss and the Pt:C ratio is found. By contrast, under conditions simulating the repetitive start-up/shutdown processes of PEMFCs the ECSA loss first increases with increasing Pt loading. However, it decreases again for very high loadings. Furthermore, the Vulcan samples exhibited higher ECSA losses than the Ketjenblack samples, indicating the important role of the physical and chemical properties of pristine carbon supports in the carbon degradation mechanism.

  1. Validation of measurements of ventilation-to-perfusion ratio inequality in the lung from expired gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J B.; West, John B.; Reed, James W.

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of the gas in a single expirate has long been used to estimate the degree of ventilation-perfusion (Va/Q) inequality in the lung. To further validate this estimate, we examined three measures of Va/Q inhomogeneity calculated from a single full exhalation in nine anesthetized mongrel dogs under control conditions and after exposure to aerosolized methacholine. These measurements were then compared with arterial blood gases and with measurements of Va/Q inhomogeneity obtained using the multiple inert gas elimination technique. The slope of the instantaneous respiratory exchange ratio (R slope) vs. expired volume was poorly correlated with independent measures, probably because of the curvilinear nature of the relationship due to continuing gas exchange. When R was converted to the intrabreath Va/Q (iV/Q), the best index was the slope of iV/Q vs. volume over phase III (iV/Q slope). This was strongly correlated with independent measures, especially those relating to inhomogeneity of perfusion. The correlations for iV/Q slope and R slope considerably improved when only the first half of phase III was considered. We conclude that a useful noninvasive measurement of Va/Q inhomogeneity can be derived from the intrabreath respiratory exchange ratio.

  2. Magic-Wavelengths Measurements of 40Ca+ Clock-Transition for Determining Oscillator Strength Ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Peiliang; Bian, Wu; Shao, Hu; Guan, Hua; Tang, Yongbo; Li, Chengbin; Mitroy, J; Gao, Kelin

    2014-01-01

    The ratio of the oscillator strengths for the 40Ca+ resonance transition was determined by measuring the magic wavelengths for the 4s1/2 - 3d5/2 clock transition. Tuning a perturbing laser to a wavelength intermediate between those of the 4s1/2 - 4p1/2 and 4s1/2 - 4p3/2 transitions, the sensitivity of the clock transition Stark shift to the oscillator strengths for the resonance transition is greatly enhanced. Two magic wavelengths were measured with high precision, giving {\\lambda}|mj|=1/2 = 395.7992(7) nm and {\\lambda}|mj|=3/2 = 395.7990(7) nm respectively. The ratio of the 4s1/2 - 4p1/2 to the 4s1/2 - 4p3/2 line strengths is found to 2.011(6).

  3. Separation of sources in radiofrequency measurements of partial discharges using time-power ratio maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracin, R; Robles, G; Martinez-Tarifa, J M; Ardila-Rey, J

    2015-09-01

    Partial discharges measurement is one of the most useful tools for condition monitoring of high-voltage (HV) equipment. These phenomena can be measured on-line in radiofrequency (RF) with sensors such as the Vivaldi antenna, used in this paper, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio by rejecting FM and low-frequency TV bands. Additionally, the power ratios (PR), a signal-processing technique based on the power distribution of the incoming signals in frequency bands, are used to characterize different sources of PD and electromagnetic noise (EMN). The calculation of the time length of the pulses is introduced to separate signals where the PR alone do not give a conclusive solution. Thus, if several EM sources could be previously calibrated, it is possible to detect pulses corresponding to PD activity. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Generalized weighted ratio method for accurate turbidity measurement over a wide range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Ping; Song, Hong; Guo, Yilu; Zhan, Shuyue; Huang, Hui; Wang, Hangzhou; Tao, Bangyi; Mu, Quanquan; Xu, Jing; Li, Dejun; Chen, Ying

    2015-12-14

    Turbidity measurement is important for water quality assessment, food safety, medicine, ocean monitoring, etc. In this paper, a method that accurately estimates the turbidity over a wide range is proposed, where the turbidity of the sample is represented as a weighted ratio of the scattered light intensities at a series of angles. An improvement in the accuracy is achieved by expanding the structure of the ratio function, thus adding more flexibility to the turbidity-intensity fitting. Experiments have been carried out with an 850 nm laser and a power meter fixed on a turntable to measure the light intensity at different angles. The results show that the relative estimation error of the proposed method is 0.58% on average for a four-angle intensity combination for all test samples with a turbidity ranging from 160 NTU to 4000 NTU.

  5. Measurement of the inclusive b→ τνX branching ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciarri, M.; Adam, A.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Alcaraz, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Anderhub, H.; Anderson, A. L.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelescu, T.; Antonov, L.; Antreasyan, D.; Alkhazov, G.; Arce, P.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Baba, P. V. K. S.; Bagnaia, P.; Bakken, J. A.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Banicz, K.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Baschirotto, A.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Bencze, Gy. L.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Bizzarri, R.; Blaising, J. J.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Bouwens, B.; Brambilla, E.; Branson, J. G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brock, I. C.; Brooks, M.; Bujak, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Burgos, C.; Busenitz, J.; Buytenhuijs, A.; Bykov, A.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Casaus, J.; Castello, R.; Cavallo, N.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Choi, M. T.; Chung, S.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Coan, T. E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Contin, A.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de la Cruz, B.; Cui, X. T.; Cui, X. Y.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Dénes, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; DiBitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; Dimitrov, H. R.; Dionisi, C.; Djambazov, L.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; Easo, S.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Extermann, P.; Fabbretti, R.; Fabre, M.; Falciano, S.; Fan, S. J.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Fernandez, G.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Fukushima, M.; Gailloud, M.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gallo, E.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gentile, S.; Gerald, J.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Gonzalez, E.; Gougas, A.; Goujon, D.; Gratta, G.; Gruenewald, M.; Gu, C.; Guanziroli, M.; Guo, J. K.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gustafson, H. R.; Gutay, L. J.; Hasan, A.; Hauschildt, D.; He, C. F.; He, J. T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, M.; Hervé, A.; Hilgers, K.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S. R.; Hu, G.; Hu, G. Q.; Ille, B.; Ilyas, M. M.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Kapinos, P.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Khokhar, S.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, A.; Kirkby, D.; Kirsch, S.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Koffeman, E.; Kornadt, O.; Koutsenko, V.; Koulbardis, A.; Kraemer, R. W.; Kramer, T.; Krastev, V. R.; Krenz, W.; Kuijten, H.; Kumar, K. S.; Kunin, A.; de Guevara, P. Ladron; Landi, G.; Lanske, D.; Lanzano, S.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, K. Y.; Leedom, I.; Leggett, C.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Li, P. J.; Liao, J. Y.; Lin, W. T.; Lin, Z. Y.; Linde, F. L.; Lindemann, B.; Lista, L.; Liu, Y.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, W.; Lu, Y. S.; Lubbers, J. M.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Ludovici, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; MacDermott, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malik, R.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Maolinbay, M.; Marchesini, P.; Marion, F.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Mazumdar, K.; McBride, P.; McMahon, T.; McNally, D.; Merk, M.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mi, Y.; Mihul, A.; Mills, G. B.; Mir, Y.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Möller, M.; Monteleoni, B.; Morand, R.; Morganti, S.; Moulai, N. E.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Nagy, E.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niaz, M. A.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Organtini, G.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Perrier, J.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Pinto, J. C.; Piroué, P. A.; Plasil, F.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Qi, Z. D.; Qian, J. M.; Qureshi, K. N.; Raghavan, R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Redaelli, M.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Ricker, A.; Riemann, S.; Riemers, B. C.; Rind, O.; Rizvi, H. A.; Ro, S.; Robohm, A.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Roe, B. P.; Röhner, M.; Röhner, S.; Romero, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosmalen, R.; Rosselet, Ph.; van Rossum, W.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sachwitz, M.; Salicio, J.; Salicio, J. M.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, G. S.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Sartorelli, G.; Sassowsky, M.; Sauvage, G.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, N.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Shotkin, S.; Schreiber, H. J.; Shukla, J.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, K.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Scott, I.; Sehgal, R.; Seiler, P. G.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Sheer, I.; Shen, D. Z.; Shevchenko, S.; Shi, X. R.; Shumilov, E.; Shoutko, V.; Son, D.; Sopczak, A.; Soulimov, V.; Spartiotis, C.; Spickermann, T.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Sticozzi, F.; Stone, H.; Strauch, K.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Susinno, G. F.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Syed, A. A.; Tang, X. W.; Taylor, L.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Toker, O.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Trowitzsch, G.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tully, C.; Tuuva, T.; Ulbricht, J.; Urbán, L.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R. T.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vikas, P.; Vikas, U.; Vivargent, M.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vorobyov, An. A.; Vuilleumier, L.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, C. R.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, A.; Weber, J.; Weill, R.; Wenninger, J.; White, M.; Willmott, C.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wright, D.; Wu, S. X.; Wynhoff, S.; Wysłouch, B.; Xie, Y. Y.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z. L.; Yan, D. S.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, G.; Yao, X. Y.; Ye, C. H.; Ye, J. B.; Ye, Q.; Yeh, S. C.; Yin, Z. W.; You, J. M.; Yunus, N.; Yzerman, M.; Zaccardelli, C.; Zeng, M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, G. J.; Zhou, J. F.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zichichi, A.; van der Zwaan, B. C. C.; L3 Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    Using the L3 detector, the branching ratio BR( b → πνX) has been measured using a sample of Z → b overlineb events tagged by high momentum and high transverse momentum leptons in one hemisphere and with missing energy in the opposite hemisphere. From a sample of 948 000 hadronic events we find BR( b → πνX) = (2.4 ± 0.7 (stat.) ± 0.8 (syst.))%.

  6. Research Progress of Series of Uranium Isotope Ratios Measured by AMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN; De-yu; WANG; Chen; HUANG; Guo-rui; DONG; Ke-jun; HE; Ming; RUAN; Xiang-dong; WU; Shao-yong; ZHAO; Yong-gang; LI; Li-li; DOU; Liang; XIE; Lin-bo; WANG; Xiao-bo; YANG; Xu-ran; WANG; Xiao-ming; LAN; Xiao-xi; JIANG; Shan

    2012-01-01

    <正>The nuclear safeguards system which is used to monitor compliance with the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty relies to a significant degree on the analysis of environmental samples. Undeclared nuclear activities can be detected through determination of the isotopic ratios of uranium and plutonium in such samples. It is necessary to be able to measure the full suite of uranium isotopes (234U,

  7. Methodological Study on AMS Measurement of Ultra-trace Pu Isotope Ratios at CIAE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG; Ke-jun; ZHAO; Qing-zhang; WANG; Chen; HE; Ming; JIANG; Shan; ZHANG; Hui; PANG; Yi-jun; SHEN; Hong-tao; WANG; Xiao-ming; XU; Yong-ning; WU; Shao-yong; YANG; Xu-ran; WANG; Xiang-gao

    2015-01-01

    The determination of ultra-trace plutonium is very important in different fields.A new measurement method of plutonium isotopic ratios with accelerator mass spectrometry(AMS)was developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy(CIAE).Two laboratory reference standards of 239Pu/240 Pu(ST1)and 239Pu/242 Pu(ST2)are17.241and 10.059,a flow blank,a commercial blank and three real samples were respectively

  8. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance in a Proton Exchange membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Hussain, Nabeel; Berning, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) remains a critical problem for their durability, cost, and performance. Because the anode side of this fuel cell has the tendency to become dehydrated, measuring the water balance can be an important diagnosis tool during fuel cell...... can be directly converted into the fuel cell water balance. In this work, experimental ex-situ results are presented and the elegance and usefulness of this method is demonstrated....

  9. Fonctionnement transitoire et controle de la richesse des moteurs à allumage commandé à injection multipoint Transient Operation and Air-Fuel Ratio Control of Spark-Ignition Port-Injected Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Moyne L.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Sur les moteurs à allumage commandé à injection multipoint on observe des désadaptations de richesse lors de fonctionnement transitoire. Ces désadaptations sont dues au dépôt, sous forme de film liquide, du carburant injecté dans le collecteur. Elles peuvent être compensées par une gestion adéquate de la masse injectée. Ainsi, afin d'obtenir la masse de carburant qui maintient la richesse constante, nous avons développé un modèle bidimensionnel des écoulements dans le collecteur au cours du cycle moteur. Ce modèle décrit l'écoulement des gaz frais, des gouttes injectées, des gaz brûlés refoulés vers l'admission et du film sur les parois, sur le principe de la séparation des phases. Nous montrons que le modèle reproduit correctement le signal de richesse et comment il permet de supprimer les désadaptations. La mesure de richesse est faite à l'échappement avec une sonde à oxygène dont nous validons le fonctionnement en transitoire avec une corrélation à la pression maximale du cycle dans le cylindre. Air-fuel ratio excursions are observed on port-injected spark ignition engines during transients. This excursions result from the liquid fuel film deposited on intake port. They can be compensated by controlling the injected fuel mass. In order to have the amount of fuel that keeps air-fuel ratio constant, we have developed a 2D model of flows in the intake port during engine cycle. This separate phases model describes the flow of fresh gases, injected droplets, hot burned gases and film on port walls. We show that the model effectively predicts the equivalence ratio and how it allows to eliminate excursions. Equivalence ratio measures are made with an oxygen sensor which functioning is validated during transients by correlating it to maximal pressure during engine cycle.

  10. Differential Drell-Yan measurements and Z/top-pair cross section ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Zinser, Markus; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Precision measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and electroweak processes and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration performed a precision Z/gamma* measurement at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV in the di-lepton mass range up to the TeV scale. These are performed double-differentially in dilepton mass and rapidity or dilepton mass and rapidity separation. The measurements are compared to state-of-the-art theory calculations and are found to bring strong constraints on the high x partons and the poorly constrained photon content of the proton. Z cross sections are also measured at a center-of-mass energies of 8TeV and 13TeV, and cross-section ratios to the top-quark pair production have been derived. This ratio measurement leads to a cancellation of several systematic effects and allows therefore for a high precision comparison to the theory predictions.

  11. Conductivity Measurements of Synthesized Heteropoly Acid Membranes for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Record, K.A.; Haley, B.T.; Turner, J.

    2006-01-01

    Fuel cell technology is receiving attention due to its potential to be a pollution free method of electricity production when using renewably produced hydrogen as fuel. In a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell H2 and O2 react at separate electrodes, producing electricity, thermal energy, and water. A key component of the PEM fuel cell is the membrane that separates the electrodes. DuPont’s Nafion® is the most commonly used membrane in PEM fuel cells; however, fuel cell dehydration at temperatures near 100°C, resulting in poor conductivity, is a major hindrance to fuel cell performance. Recent studies incorporating heteropoly acids (HPAs) into membranes have shown an increase in conductivity and thus improvement in performance. HPAs are inorganic materials with known high proton conductivities. The primary objective of this work is to measure the conductivity of Nafion, X-Ionomer membranes, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Developed Membranes that are doped with different HPAs at different concentrations. Four-point conductivity measurements using a third generation BekkTech conductivity test cell are used to determine membrane conductivity. The effect of multiple temperature and humidification levels is also examined. While the classic commercial membrane, Nafion, has a conductivity of approximately 0.10 S/cm, measurements for membranes in this study range from 0.0030 – 0.58 S/cm, depending on membrane type, structure of the HPA, and the relative humidity. In general, the X-ionomer with H6P2W21O71 HPA gave the highest conductivity and the Nafion with the 12-phosphotungstic (PW12) HPA gave the lowest. The NREL composite membranes had conductivities on the order of 0.0013 – 0.025 S/cm.

  12. Method of measuring the quantity of air liberated in aviation fuel flow at low pipeline pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanin, É. L.; Kitanina, E. É.; Zherebtsov, V. A.; Merkulov, O. A.; Peganova, M. M.; Bondarenko, D. A.; Morrison, D.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies of the quantity of air liberated in the flow of aviation fuel in the pipe at a low pressure. Experiments were carried out in the pressure range from 0.2 to 1.0 bar, and the temperature was varied from -20 to +20°C. We propose a method for determining the mass concentration of air dissolved in the fuel measured with the help of a chromatograph. An attempt to use an optical method for measuring the gas content of the flow has shown that it is useful in combination with a chromatographic method needed to calibrate the optical scheme.

  13. Burnup measurements on spent fuel elements of the RP-10 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela Mora, Mariano; Gallardo Padilla, Alberto; Palomino, Jose Luis Castro, E-mail: mvela@ipen.gob.p [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN/Peru), Lima (Peru). Grupo de Calculo, Analisis y Seguridad de Reactores; Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac, E-mail: laaterre@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the measurement, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, of the average burnup attained by Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the RP-10 research reactor. Measurements were performed at the reactor storage pool area using {sup 137}Cs as the only burnup monitor, even for spent fuel elements with cooling times much shorter than two years. The experimental apparatus was previously calibrated in efficiency to obtain absolute average burnup values, which were compared against corresponding ones furnished by reactor physics calculations. The mean deviation between both values amounts to 6%. (author)

  14. Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) Measurements of LHC Superconducting NbTi Cable Strands

    CERN Document Server

    Charifoulline, Z

    2006-01-01

    The Rutherford-type superconducting NbTi cables of the LHC accelerator are currently manufactured by six industrial companies. As a part of the acceptance tests, the Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) of superconducting strands is systematically measured on virgin strands to qualify the strands before cabling and on extracted strands to qualify the cables and to check the final heat treatment (controlled oxidation to control interstrand resistance). More than 12000 samples of virgin and extracted strands have been measured during last five years. Results show good correlation with the measurements done by the companies and reflect well the technological process of cable production (strand annealing, cabling, cable heat treatment). This paper presents a description of the RRR-test station and the measurement procedure, the summary of the results over all suppliers and finally the correlation between RRR-values of the cables and the magnets.

  15. Particle image velocimetry correlation signal-to-noise ratio metrics and measurement uncertainty quantification

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, Zhenyu; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2014-01-01

    In particle image velocimetry (PIV) the measurement signal is contained in the recorded intensity of the particle image pattern superimposed on a variety of noise sources. The signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) strength governs the resulting PIV cross correlation and ultimately the accuracy and uncertainty of the resulting PIV measurement. Hence we posit that correlation SNR metrics calculated from the correlation plane can be used to quantify the quality of the correlation and the resulting uncertainty of an individual measurement. In this paper we present a framework for evaluating the correlation SNR using a set of different metrics, which in turn are used to develop models for uncertainty estimation. The SNR metrics and corresponding models presented herein are expanded to be applicable to both standard and filtered correlations. In addition, the notion of a valid measurement is redefined with respect to the correlation peak width in order to be consistent with uncertainty quantification principles and distinct ...

  16. Oxygen potential measurements in high burnup LWR U0 2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, Hj.

    1995-05-01

    A miniature solid state galvanic cell was used to measure the oxygen potential Δ overlineG( O2) of reactor irradiated U0 2 fuel at different burnups in the range of 28 to ⩾ 150 GWd d/t M. This very high burnup was achieved in the rim region of a fuel with a cross section average burnup of 75 GWd d/t M. The fuels had different enrichments and therefore different contributions of fission of 235U and 239Pu. The temperature range covered was 900 to 1350 K. None of the fuels showed a significant oxidation. Rather, if allowance is made for the dissolved rare earth fission products and the Pu formed during irradiation, some of the fuels were very slightly substoichiometric and the highest possible degree of oxidation corresponded to U0 2.001. In general, the Δ overlineG( O2) at 750°C was about -400 kJ/mol, corresponding to the Δ overlineG( O2) of the reaction Mo + O 2 → MoO 2. The implication of these results which are in contrast to commonly assumed ideas that U0 2 fuel oxidizes due to burnup, are discussed and the importance of the fission product Mo and of the zircaloy clad as oxygen buffers is outlined.

  17. The Effects of Smoking on Ultrasonographic Thickness and Elastosonographic Strain Ratio Measurements of Distal Femoral Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Harun R; Agladioglu, Kadir; Akkaya, Nuray; Akkaya, Semih; Ok, Nusret; Ozçakar, Levent

    2016-04-21

    Although adverse effects of smoking on bone health are all well known, data on how smoking interacts with cartilage structure in otherwise healthy individuals remains conflicting. Here, we ascertain the effects of cigarette smoking on sonoelastographic properties of distal femoral cartilage in asymptomatic adults. Demographic characteristics and smoking habits (packets/year) of healthy volunteers were recorded. Medial, intercondylar, and lateral distal femoral cartilage thicknesses and strain ratios on the dominant extremity were measured with ultrasonography (US) and real time US elastography. A total of 88 subjects (71 M, 17 F; aged 18-56 years, N = 43 smokers and N = 45 nonsmokers) were evaluated. Mean amount of cigarette smoking was 10.3 ± 8.9 (1-45) packets/year. Medial, intercondylar and lateral cartilage were thicker in smokers than nonsmokers (p = 0.002, p = 0.017, and p = 0.004, respectively). Medial distal femoral cartilage strain ratio was lower in smokers (p = 0.003). The amount of smoking was positively correlated with cartilage thicknesses and negatively correlated with medial cartilage strain ratios (p < 0.05). Femoral cartilage is thicker in smokers but has less strain ratio representing harder cartilage on the medial side. Future studies are needed to understand how these structural changes in the knee cartilage should be interpreted with regard to the development of knee osteoarthritis in smokers.

  18. Selection of noise power ratio spectrum models for electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant

    CERN Document Server

    Coakley, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    In the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant based on Johnson noise thermometry, the ratio of the power spectral densities of thermal noise across a resistor and pseudo-random noise synthetically generated by a quantum-accurate voltage-noise source varies with frequency due to mismatch between transmission lines. We model this ratio spectrum as an even polynomial function of frequency. For any given frequency range, defined by the maximum frequency $f_{max}$, we select the optimal polynomial ratio spectrum model with a cross-validation method and estimate the conditional uncertainty of the constant term in the ratio spectrum model in a way that accounts for both random and systematic effects associated with imperfect knowledge of the model with a resampling method. We select $f_{max}$ by minimizing this conditional uncertainty. Since many values of $f_{max}$ yield conditional uncertainties close to the observed minimum value on a frequency grid, we quantify an additional component of uncertainty as...

  19. Measurement of Ballooning Gap Size of Irradiated Fuels Using Neutron Radiography Transfer Method and HV Image Filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Cheul Muu; Kim, Tae Joo; Oh, Hwa Suk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joon Cheol [Seonam University, Namwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    A transfer method of neutron radiography was developed to measure the size of the end plug and a gap of an intact K102L-2, the irradiated fuel of a ballooned K174L-3, a ballooned and ruptured K98L-3. A typical irradiation time of 25 min. was determined to obtain a film density of between 2 and 3 of SR X-ray film with neutrons of 1.5x10{sup 11}n{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. To validate and calibrate the results, a RISO fuel standard sample, Cd plate and ASTM-BPI/SI were used. An activated latent image formed in the 100 {mu}m Dy foil was subsequently transferred in a dark room for more than 8 hours to the SR film which is a maximum of three half-lives. Due to the L/D ratio an unsharpness of 9.82-14{mu}m and a magnification of 1.0003 were given. After digitizing an image of SR film, the ballooning gap of the plug was discernible by an H/V filter of image processing. The gap size of the ballooned element, K174L-3, is equal to or greater than 1.2 mm. The development of a transfer method played a pivotal role in developing high burn-up of Wolsung and PWR nuclear fuel type.

  20. Novel method for the measurement of liquid film thickness during fuel spray impingement on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, S; Beyrau, F; Hardalupas, Y; Taylor, A M K P

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a novel optical technique for the measurement of liquid film thickness formed on surfaces during the impingement of automotive fuel sprays. The technique makes use of the change of the light scattering characteristics of a metal surface with known roughness, when liquid is deposited. Important advantages of the technique over previously established methods are the ability to measure the time-dependent spatial distribution of the liquid film without a need to add a fluorescent tracer to the liquid, while the measurement principle is not influenced by changes of the pressure and temperature of the liquid or the surrounding gas phase. Also, there is no need for non-fluorescing surrogate fuels. However, an in situ calibration of the dependence of signal intensity on liquid film thickness is required. The developed method can be applied to measure the time-dependent and two-dimensional distribution of the liquid fuel film thickness on the piston or the liner of gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. The applicability of this technique was evaluated with impinging sprays of several linear alkanes and alcohols with different thermo-physical properties. The surface temperature of the impingement plate was controlled to simulate the range of piston surface temperatures inside a GDI engine. Two sets of liquid film thickness measurements were obtained. During the first set, the surface temperature of the plate was kept constant, while the spray of different fuels interacted with the surface. In the second set, the plate temperature was adjusted to match the boiling temperature of each fuel. In this way, the influence of the surface temperature on the liquid film created by the spray of different fuels and their evaporation characteristics could be demonstrated.

  1. Compact diode-laser spectrometer ISOWAT for highly sensitive airborne measurements of water-isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyroff, C.; Fütterer, D.; Zahn, A.

    2010-02-01

    The tunable diode-laser absorption spectrometer ISOWAT for airborne measurements of the water-isotope ratios 18O/16O and D/H is described. The spectrometer uses a distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser to probe fundamental rovibrational water-absorption lines at around 2.66 μm. Very-low-noise system components along with signal averaging allow for a detection limit of 1.2 and 4.5 ‰ for measurements of 18O/16O and D/H, respectively, for a water-vapour mixing ratio of 100 ppmv and an averaging time of 60 s. This corresponds to a minimum detectable absorbance of ˜5×10-6 or ˜6.6×10-10 cm-1 when normalized to pathlength. In addition to its high sensitivity, the spectrometer is highly compact (19-inch rack at a height of 35 cm, excluding pump and calibration unit) and light weight (automated. ISOWAT will be calibrated during flight with known water-isotope ratios using a compact calibration-gas source.

  2. Precision Branching Ratio Measurement for the Superallowed &+circ; Emitter ^62Ga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Paul; Svensson, C. E.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Chaffey, A.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Hyland, B.; Kanungo, R.; Leslie, J. R.; Mattoon, C.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Ressler, J. J.; Sarazin, F.; Savajols, H.

    2007-10-01

    A high-precision branching ratio measurement for the superallowed &+circ; emitter ^62Ga has been made using the 8π γ-ray spectrometer in conjunction with the SCintillating Electron-Positron Tagging ARray (SCEPTAR) as part of an ongoing experimental program in superallowed Fermi beta decay studies at the Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada, which delivered a high-purity beam of ˜10^4 ^62Ga/s in December 2005. The present work represents the highest statistics measurement of the ^62Ga superallowed branching ratio to date. 25 γ rays emitted following non-superallowed decay branches of ^62Ga have been identified and their intensities determined. These data yield a superallowed branching ratio with 10-4 precision, and our observed branch to the first nonanalogue 0^+ state sets a new upper limit on the isospin-mixing correction δC1^1. By comparing our ft value with the world average Ft, we make stringent tests of the different calculations for the isospin-symmetry-breaking correction δC, which is predicted to be large for ^62Ga.

  3. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio with the OPERA detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agafonova, N.; Boyarkin, V.; Enikeev, R.; Malgin, A.; Matveev, V.; Ryasny, V.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Yakushev, V. [INR - Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Anokhina, A.; Galkin, V.I.; Nikitina, V.; Osedlo, V.; Publichenko, P.; Roganova, T. [SINP MSU - Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Aoki, S.; Hara, T.; Rokujo, H. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan); Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Ereditato, A.; Juget, F.; Knuesel, J.; Kreslo, I.; Lutter, G.; Meisel, F.; Moser, U.; Pistillo, C.; Pretzl, K.; Vuilleumier, J.L. [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), Bern (Switzerland); Autiero, D.; Brugiere, T.; Cazes, A.; Chaussard, L.; Declais, Y.; Marteau, J.; Pennacchio, E.; Tran, T. [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, IPNL, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France); Badertscher, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Rubbia, A.; Strauss, T. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bagulya, A.; Chernyavsky, M.; Goncharova, L.; Orlova, G.; Polukhina, N.; Starkov, N.; Vladimirov, M. [LPI - Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bertolin, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Besnier, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Favier, J.; Pessard, H.; Zghiche, A. [Universite de Savoie, LAPP, CNRS/IN2P3, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Bick, D.; Ebert, J.; Ferber, T.; Goellnitz, C.; Hagner, C.; Lenkeit, J.; Oldorf, C.; Schmidt Parzefall, W.; Wonsak, B.; Zimmermann, R. [Hamburg University, Hamburg (Germany); Bozza, C.; D' Amato, G.; Grella, G.; Policastro, G.; Rescigno, R.; Romano, G.; Sirignano, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Salerno (Italy); INFN, Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Brugnera, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Kose, U. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy)] [and others

    2010-05-15

    The OPERA detector at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) was used to measure the atmospheric muon charge ratio R{sub {mu}}=N{sub {mu}}{sup +}/N{sub {mu}}{sup -} in the TeV energy region. We analyzed 403069 atmospheric muons corresponding to 113.4 days of lifetime during the 2008 CNGS run. We computed separately the muon charge ratio for single and for multiple muon events in order to select different energy regions of the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to test the R{sub {mu}} dependence on the primary composition. The measured R{sub {mu}} values were corrected taking into account the charge-misidentification errors. Data have also been grouped in five bins of the ''vertical surface energy'' E{sub {mu}} cos {theta}. A fit to a simplified model of muon production in the atmosphere allowed the determination of the pion and kaon charge ratios weighted by the cosmic ray energy spectrum. (orig.)

  4. An Electronic Measurement Instrumentation of the Impedance of a Loaded Fuel Cell or Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglzim, El-Hassane; Rouane, Amar; El-Moznine, Reddad

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present an inexpensive electronic measurement instrumentation developed in our laboratory, to measure and plot the impedance of a loaded fuel cell or battery. Impedance measurements were taken by using the load modulation method. This instrumentation has been developed around a VXI system stand which controls electronic cards. Software under Hpvee® was developed for automatic measurements and the layout of the impedance of the fuel cell on load. The measurement environment, like the ambient temperature, the fuel cell temperature, the level of the hydrogen, etc…, were taken with several sensors that enable us to control the measurement. To filter the noise and the influence of the 50Hz, we have implemented a synchronous detection which filters in a very narrow way around the useful signal. The theoretical result obtained by a simulation under Pspice® of the method used consolidates the choice of this method and the possibility of obtaining correct and exploitable results. The experimental results are preliminary results on a 12V vehicle battery, having an inrush current of 330A and a capacity of 40Ah (impedance measurements on a fuel cell are in progress, and will be the subject of a forthcoming paper). The results were plotted at various nominal voltages of the battery (12.7V, 10V, 8V and 5V) and with two imposed currents (0.6A and 4A). The Nyquist diagram resulting from the experimental data enable us to show an influence of the load of the battery on its internal impedance. The similitude in the graph form and in order of magnitude of the values obtained (both theoretical and practical) enables us to validate our electronic measurement instrumentation. One of the future uses for this instrumentation is to integrate it with several control sensors, on a vehicle as an embedded system to monitor the degradation of fuel cell membranes.

  5. Measurement of Autolysosomal pH by Dual-Wavelength Ratio Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saric, A; Grinstein, S; Freeman, S A

    2017-01-01

    Cellular components sequestered by autophagosomes during macroautophagy must be degraded and their components recycled in order to maintain homeostasis. To this end cells orchestrate the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes, degradative organelles that are rich in hydrolases. Most of the lysosomal enzymes function optimally at low pH, and products of macromolecular catabolism are cotransported with protons across the autolysosomal membrane. These functions are facilitated by the ability of lysosomes to pump protons inward, acidifying their lumen. Clearly, proper homeostasis of the luminal pH is crucial for autolysosomal function. We describe a method for the measurement of the absolute pH of individual autolysosomes in live cells. This technique involves measurement of the fluorescence of a pH-sensitive probe initially delivered to lysosomes and subsequently determined to have reached autolysosomes. By measuring the fluorescence at two separate wavelengths and calculating their ratio, potential artifacts introduced by photobleaching or by changes in autolysosome size, shape, or positioning are minimized. Combining such ratio determinations with an in situ calibration procedure enables absolute measurements of pH, which are superior to the qualitative estimates obtained with fluorescent weak bases such as LysoTracker.

  6. A method of measuring the [α/Fe] ratios from the spectra of the LAMOST survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Han, Chen; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Shi, Jian-Rong; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Hua-Wei; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Ci, Xuan; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui; Wang, Yue-Fei; Cao, Zi-Huang

    2016-07-01

    The [α/Fe] ratios in stars are good tracers to probe the formation history of stellar populations and the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. The spectroscopic survey of LAMOST provides a good opportunity to determine [α/Fe] of millions of stars in the Galaxy. We present a method of measuring the [α/Fe] ratios from LAMOST spectra using the template-matching technique of the LSP3 pipeline. We use three test samples of stars selected from the ELODIE and MILES libraries, as well as the LEGUE survey to validate our method. Based on the test results, we conclude that our method is valid for measuring [α/Fe] from low-resolution spectra acquired by the LAMOST survey. Within the range of the stellar parameters T eff = [5000, 7500] K, log g = [1.0, 5.0] dex and [Fe/H]= [-1.5, +0.5] dex, our [α/Fe] measurements are consistent with values derived from high-resolution spectra, and the accuracy of our [α/Fe] measurements from LAMOST spectra is better than 0.1 dex with spectral signal-to-noise higher than 20.

  7. Effects of Cigarette Smoking on Elastographic Strain Ratio Measurements of Patellar and Achilles Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ağladıoğlu, Kadir; Akkaya, Nuray; Güngör, Harun R; Akkaya, Semih; Ök, Nusret; Özçakar, Levent

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the sonographic and elastographic properties of patellar and Achilles tendons in smoking and nonsmoking otherwise healthy adults. We conducted a level 3 case-control analytical study. Smoking and nonsmoking volunteers (>18 years) without musculoskeletal system disorders were included in the study. Demographic characteristics and smoking habits (pack-years) were recorded. Proximal, middle, and distal third thicknesses of the patellar and Achilles tendons were measured by B-mode sonography. Strain ratio measurements of the same regions were measured by real-time ultrasound elastography. A total of 69 participants (57 male and 12 female; mean age ± SD, 35.5 ± 7.8 years) were evaluated in the study. Smoking (n = 35) and nonsmoking (n = 34) groups had no significant differences in terms of age, body mass index, sex, and activity level (all P > .05). Proximal, middle, and distal thirds of the patellar and Achilles tendons were significantly thinner in the smoking group (all P smoking group (all Psmoking amount (all P < .05). Thickness and strain ratio measurements of patellar and Achilles tendons were reduced (thinner and harder tendons) in smokers. Clinical implications of these morphologic and elastographic changes should be investigated in future studies. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  8. Measurement of the branching ratio for β-delayed α decay of 16N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Refsgaard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While the C12(α,γ16O reaction plays a central role in nuclear astrophysics, the cross section at energies relevant to hydrostatic helium burning is too small to be directly measured in the laboratory. The β-delayed α spectrum of 16N can be used to constrain the extrapolation of the E1 component of the S-factor; however, with this approach the resulting S-factor becomes strongly correlated with the assumed βα branching ratio. We have remeasured the βα branching ratio by implanting 16N ions in a segmented Si detector and counting the number of βα decays relative to the number of implantations. Our result, 1.49(5×10−5, represents a 24% increase compared to the accepted value and implies an increase of ≈10% in the extrapolated S-factor.

  9. Measurement of the branching ratio for beta-delayed alpha decay of 16N

    CERN Document Server

    Refsgaard, J; Dijck, E A; Fynbo, H O U; Lund, M V; Portela, M N; Raabe, R; Randisi, G; Renzi, F; Sambi, S; Sytema, A; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W

    2015-01-01

    While the 12C(a,g)16O reaction plays a central role in nuclear astrophysics, the cross section at energies relevant to hydrostatic helium burning is too small to be directly measured in the laboratory. The beta-delayed alpha spectrum of 16N can be used to constrain the extrapolation of the E1 component of the S-factor; however, with this approach the resulting S-factor becomes strongly correlated with the assumed beta-alpha branching ratio. We have remeasured the beta-alpha branching ratio by implanting 16N ions in a segmented Si detector and counting the number of beta-alpha decays relative to the number of implantations. Our result, 1.49(5)e-5, represents a 25% increase compared to the accepted value and implies an increase of 14% in the extrapolated S-factor.

  10. A measurement of the semileptonic branching ratio BR(b-baryon $\\rightarrow p l\\overline{\

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Boix, G; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    Inclusive pi^+/-, K^+/- (p,pbar) production is investigated using data recorded by the ALEPH detector between 1992 and 1994. The momentum spectra and multiplicities are measured separately in Z -->bbar, Z-->ccbar and Z-->uubar,ddbar,ssbar decays. The number of protons found in b-hadron decays is used to estimate the fraction of b-baryons in b-events to be (10.2 +/- 0.7 +/- 2.7)%. From an additional study of proton-lepton correlations in b events the branching ratio Br(b-baryon --> plnuX) = (4.63 +/- 0.72 +/- 0.98)% is obtained. The ratio Br(b-baryon --> plnuX)/ Br(b-baryon --> pX) is found to be 0.080 +/- 0.012 +/- 0.014.

  11. Millimeter/submillimeter Spectroscopy to Measure the Branching Ratios for Methanol Photolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Morgan N.; Powers, Carson Reed; Zinga, Samuel; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2016-06-01

    Methanol is one of the most abundant and important molecules in the interstellar medium, playing a key role in driving more complex organic chemistry both on grain surfaces and through gas-phase ion-molecule reactions. Methanol photolysis produces many radicals such as hydroxyl, methoxy, hydroxymethyl, and methyl that may serve as the building blocks for more complex organic chemistry in star-forming regions. The branching ratios for methanol photolysis may govern the relative abundances of many of the more complex species already detected in these environments. However, no direct, comprehensive, quantitative measurement of methanol photolysis branching ratios is available. Using a 193 nm excimer laser, the gas phase photolysis of methanol was studied in the (sub)millimeter range, where the rotational spectroscopic signatures of the photolysis products were probed. Here we present preliminary results from this experiment.

  12. New, high statistics measurement of the K+ -> pi0 e+ nu (Ke3) branching ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Sher, A E; Atoyan, G S; Bassalleck, B; Bergman, D R; Cheung, N; Dhawan, S; Do, H; Egger, J; Eilerts, S W; Fischer, H; Herold, W D; Issakov, V V; Kaspar, H; Kraus, D E; Lazarus, D M; Lichard, P; Lowe, J; Lozano-Bahilo, J; Ma, H; Majid, W A; Pislak, S; Poblaguev, A A; Rehak, P; Sher, A E; Thompson, J A; Truöl, P; Zeller, M E; Sher, Aleksey

    2003-01-01

    E865 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS collected about 70,000 K+(e3) events with the purpose of measuring the relative K+(e3) branching ratio. The pi0 in all the decays was detected using the e+e- pair from pi0 -> e+e-gamma decay and no photons were required. Using the Particle Data Group branching ratios for the normalization decays we obtain BR(K+(e3(gamma))=(5.13+/-0.02(stat)+/-0.09(sys)+/-0.04(norm))%, where $K+(e3(gamma)) includes the effect of virtual and real photons. This result is 2.3 sigma higher than the current Particle Data Group value. The implications of this result for the $V_{us}$ element of the CKM matrix, and the matrix's unitarity are discussed.

  13. Evaluation strategies for isotope ratio measurements of single particles by LA-MC-ICPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, S; Boulyga, S F; Dorta, L; Günther, D; Hattendorf, B; Koffler, D; Laaha, G; Leisch, F; Prohaska, T

    2013-03-01

    Data evaluation is a crucial step when it comes to the determination of accurate and precise isotope ratios computed from transient signals measured by multi-collector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) coupled to, for example, laser ablation (LA). In the present study, the applicability of different data evaluation strategies (i.e. 'point-by-point', 'integration' and 'linear regression slope' method) for the computation of (235)U/(238)U isotope ratios measured in single particles by LA-MC-ICPMS was investigated. The analyzed uranium oxide particles (i.e. 9073-01-B, CRM U010 and NUSIMEP-7 test samples), having sizes down to the sub-micrometre range, are certified with respect to their (235)U/(238)U isotopic signature, which enabled evaluation of the applied strategies with respect to precision and accuracy. The different strategies were also compared with respect to their expanded uncertainties. Even though the 'point-by-point' method proved to be superior, the other methods are advantageous, as they take weighted signal intensities into account. For the first time, the use of a 'finite mixture model' is presented for the determination of an unknown number of different U isotopic compositions of single particles present on the same planchet. The model uses an algorithm that determines the number of isotopic signatures by attributing individual data points to computed clusters. The (235)U/(238)U isotope ratios are then determined by means of the slopes of linear regressions estimated for each cluster. The model was successfully applied for the accurate determination of different (235)U/(238)U isotope ratios of particles deposited on the NUSIMEP-7 test samples.

  14. Measurements of Molecular Cloud Ages using the HI/ H2 Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krco, Marko; Li, Di

    2017-01-01

    We utilize a new chemical evolution model in conjunction with the HI and H2 mass measurements of 9 nearby molecular clouds in order to place lower limits on their chemical ages (the time since the cloud first attained sufficient self-shielding for molecules to persist). HI masses are measured using HI Narrow Self-Absorption (HINSA) features with data taken with the GBT. H2 masses are estimated using 13CO emission data obtained with FCRAO.Since the clouds' geometry (and volume density) are unknown, we examine each cloud under a range of assumptions. Under conditions that favor the lowest age limits, where each cloud is assumed to resemble a sheet and has the highest reasonable volume density, we arrive at age lower limits between 0.3 and 1.5 Myrs. Assuming that the clouds have no preferential orientation yields age lower limits of 4.4 Myrs or older. HI/H2 cloud mass ratios between 0.13x10-3 and 3.8x10-3 were observed. The lack of any observed clouds with higher HI/H2 ratios leaves open the question of why the youngest clouds are not observed. Our models reveal that the clouds studied here should reach a steady-state, where the only remaining HI is due to cosmic ray dissociation, within approximately 7 to 15 Myrs.We determine the HI/H2 ratio, and age lower limit for all clumps and velocity components within each cloud. Though individual clumps within a single cloud, and even along the same line of sight may exhibit very different HI/H2 ratios, they most often exhibit similar ages. This would indicate that the mixing timescale for different clumps within cloud are generally longer than the cloud ages.Ultimately we conclude that the cloud collapse timescale is at least on the order of 10Myrs.

  15. Measurement of the branching ratio of $\\bar{B} \\to D^{(\\ast)} \\tau^- \\bar{\

    CERN Document Server

    Huschle, M; Heck, M; Goldenzweig, P; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Adamczyk, K; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Aziz, T; Badhrees, I; Bakich, A M; Bansal, V; Barberio, E; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bobrov, A; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chang, P; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Frey, A; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Grygier, J; Hamer, P; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasenbusch, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Heider, M; Heller, A; Horiguchi, T; Hou, W -S; Hsu, C -L; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Inguglia, G; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kawasaki, T; Keck, T; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, N; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lee, I S; Li, C; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Masuda, M; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mohanty, S; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mussa, R; Nakamura, K R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Oswald, C; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, C W; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Pulvermacher, C; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Stanič, S; Starič, M; Steder, M; Stypula, J; Sumihama, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Trusov, V; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Ye, H; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    We report a measurement of the branching fraction ratios R(D(*)) of Bbar -> D(*) tau- nubar_tau relative to Bbar -> D()* l- nubar_l (where l = e or mu) using the full Belle data sample of 772 x 10^6 BBbar pairs collected at the Y(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The measured values are R(D)= 0.375 +- 0.064(stat.) +- 0.026(syst.) and R(D*) = 0.293 +- 0.038(stat.) +- 0.015(syst.). The analysis uses hadronic reconstruction of the tag-side B meson and purely leptonic tau decays. The results are consistent with earlier measurements and do not show a significant deviation from the standard model prediction.

  16. Estimating the AmLi Neutron Spectrum from Measured Ring Ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinmann-Smith, Robert [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beddingfield, David H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Enqvist, Andreas [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-10

    These are a set of slides on estimating the AmLi neutron spectrum from measured ring ratios. The IAEA uses an AmLi source in the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL) to verify compliance with nonproliferation treaties. The UNCL requires calibration with known uranium samples. The AmLi spectrum isn’t known well enough to allow simulated calibrations. Alphas lose energy traveling through AmO2 particle of unknown size. Energy reduction below Li threshold enhances O contribution. Unknown Li matrix material affects neutron production and thermalization. There is large variation in spectra from each element. Other topics covered include: applications, physics considerations, current spectra, measurement overview, measurement results - variation between sources, simulations, spectra fitting, other simulations, and conclusions.

  17. Measurement of the branching ratio of the Z0 into heavy quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Adam, I; Akimoto, H; Aston, D; Baird, K G; Baltay, C; Band, H R; Barklow, T L; Bauer, J M; Bellodi, G; Berger, R; Blaylock, G; Bogart, J R; Bower, G R; Brau, J E; Breidenbach, M; Bugg, W M; Burke, D; Burnett, T H; Burrows, P N; Calcaterra, A; Cassell, R; Chou, A; Cohn, H O; Coller, J A; Convery, M R; Cook, V; Cowan, R F; Crawford, G; Damerell, C J S; Daoudi, M; De Groot, N; De Sangro, R; Dong, D N; Doser, Michael; Dubois, R; Erofeeva, I; Eschenburg, V; Etzion, E; Fahey, S; Falciai, D; Fernández, J P; Flood, K; Frey, R; Hart, E L; Hasuko, K; Hertzbach, S S; Huffer, M E; Huynh, X; Iwasaki, M; Jackson, D J; Jacques, P; Jaros, J A; Jiang, Z Y; Johnson, A S; Johnson, J R; Kajikawa, R; Kalelkar, M; Kang, H J; Kofler, R R; Kroeger, R S; Langston, M; Leith, D W G S; Lia, V; Lin, C; Mancinelli, G; Manly, S; Mantovani, G C; Markiewicz, T W; Maruyama, T; McKemey, A K; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Moore, T B; Morii, M; Müller, D; Murzin, V; Narita, S; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Nesom, G; Oishi, N; Onoprienko, D; Osborne, L S; Panvini, R S; Park, C H; Peruzzi, I; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Plano, R J; Prepost, R; Prescott, C Y; Ratcliff, B N; Reidy, J; Reinertsen, P L; Rochester, L S; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Saxton, O H; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Shapiro, G; Sinev, N B; Snyder, J A; Stängle, H; Stahl, A; Stamer, P; Steiner, H; Su, D; Suekane, F; Sugiyama, A; Suzuki, A; Swartz, M; Taylor, F E; Thom, J; Torrence, E; Usher, T; Vavra, J; Verdier, R; Wagner, D L; Waite, A P; Walston, S; Weidemann, A W; Weiss, E R; Whitaker, J S; Williams, S H; Willocq, S; Wilson, R J; Wisniewski, W J; Wittlin, J L; Woods, M; Wright, T R; Yamamoto, R K; Yashima, J; Yellin, S J; Young, C C; Yuta, H

    2005-01-01

    We measure the hadronic branching ratios of the Z0 boson into heavy quarks: Rb=Gamma(Z0->bb)/Gamma(Z0->hadrons) and Rc=Gamma(Z0->cc/Gamma(Z0->hadrons) using a multi-tag technique. The measurement was performed using about 400,000 hadronic Z0 events recorded in the SLD experiment at SLAC between 1996 and 1998. The small and stable SLC beam spot and the CCD-based vertex detector were used to reconstruct bottom and charm hadron decay vertices with high efficiency and purity, which enables us to measure most efficiencies from data. We obtain, Rb=0.21610 +- 0.00098(stat.) +- 0.00073(syst.) -+ 0.00012(Rc) and, Rc= 0.1745 +- 0.0031(stat.) +- 0.0020(syst.) -+ 0.0006(Rb)

  18. Estimation of uncertainty bounds for individual particle image velocimetry measurements from cross-correlation peak ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charonko, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2013-06-01

    Numerous studies have established firmly that particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a robust method for non-invasive, quantitative measurements of fluid velocity, and that when carefully conducted, typical measurements can accurately detect displacements in digital images with a resolution well below a single pixel (in some cases well below a hundredth of a pixel). However, to date, these estimates have only been able to provide guidance on the expected error for an average measurement under specific image quality and flow conditions. This paper demonstrates a new method for estimating the uncertainty bounds to within a given confidence interval for a specific, individual measurement. Here, cross-correlation peak ratio, the ratio of primary to secondary peak height, is shown to correlate strongly with the range of observed error values for a given measurement, regardless of flow condition or image quality. This relationship is significantly stronger for phase-only generalized cross-correlation PIV processing, while the standard correlation approach showed weaker performance. Using an analytical model of the relationship derived from synthetic data sets, the uncertainty bounds at a 95% confidence interval are then computed for several artificial and experimental flow fields, and the resulting errors are shown to match closely to the predicted uncertainties. While this method stops short of being able to predict the true error for a given measurement, knowledge of the uncertainty level for a PIV experiment should provide great benefits when applying the results of PIV analysis to engineering design studies and computational fluid dynamics validation efforts. Moreover, this approach is exceptionally simple to implement and requires negligible additional computational cost.

  19. Improved sensitivity in flow cytometric intracellular ionized calcium measurement using fluo-3/Fura Red fluorescence ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, E J; Rabinovitch, P S

    1994-10-01

    Measurement of changes in intracellular ionized calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) has proved to be of wide use in the study of cellular responses to activating stimuli. The fluorescent dye Indo-1 has successfully been used in flow cytometry for this purpose, and when used as a ratiometric indicator it provides optimum sensitivity and accuracy. Unfortunately, this dye requires ultraviolet (UV) excitation which is often not available. We show here that similar results can be obtained using a ratio of green to red fluorescence from the simultaneous loading of the dyes Fura Red and fluo-3. Both Fura Red and fluo-3 are excited using the commonly available blue 488 nm laser line. With appropriate concentrations of the two dyes, the magnitude of response with the fluo-3/Fura Red ratio is greater than that achieved with indo-1, while the intercellular variation in measurement is similar to that seen with indo-1. Analyses can be simultaneously combined with immunofluorescent detection of PE-labeled antibodies to enable [Ca2+]i measurement within cell subsets.

  20. An Electronic Measurement Instrumentation of the Impedance of a Loaded Fuel Cell or Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddad El-Moznine

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an inexpensive electronic measurement instrumentationdeveloped in our laboratory, to measure and plot the impedance of a loaded fuel cell orbattery. Impedance measurements were taken by using the load modulation method. Thisinstrumentation has been developed around a VXI system stand which controls electroniccards. Software under Hpvee® was developed for automatic measurements and the layout ofthe impedance of the fuel cell on load. The measurement environment, like the ambienttemperature, the fuel cell temperature, the level of the hydrogen, etc..., were taken withseveral sensors that enable us to control the measurement. To filter the noise and theinfluence of the 50Hz, we have implemented a synchronous detection which filters in a verynarrow way around the useful signal. The theoretical result obtained by a simulation underPspice® of the method used consolidates the choice of this method and the possibility ofobtaining correct and exploitable results. The experimental results are preliminary results ona 12V vehicle battery, having an inrush current of 330A and a capacity of 40Ah (impedancemeasurements on a fuel cell are in progress, and will be the subject of a forthcoming paper.The results were plotted at various nominal voltages of the battery (12.7V, 10V, 8V and 5Vand with two imposed currents (0.6A and 4A. The Nyquist diagram resulting from theexperimental data enable us to show an influence of the load of the battery on its internalimpedance. The similitude in the graph form and in order of magnitude of the valuesobtained (both theoretical and practical enables us to validate our electronic measurementinstrumentation. One of the future uses for this instrumentation is to integrate it with several control sensors, on a vehicle as an embedded system to monitor the degradation of fuel cell membranes.

  1. Online stable carbon isotope ratio measurement in formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol in water by high performance liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagami, Keiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: k_tagami@nirs.go.jp; Uchida, Shigeo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2008-05-05

    A suitable analysis condition was determined for high performance liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC-IRMS) while making sequential measurements of stable carbon isotope ratios of {delta}{sup 13}C in formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol dissolved in water. For this online column separation method, organic reagents are not applicable due to carbon contamination; thus, water and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} at low concentrations were tested as mobile phase in combination with a HyPURITY AQUASTAR{sup TM} column. Formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol were separated when 2 mM KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} aqueous solution was used. Under the determined analysis condition for HPLC-IRMS, carbon concentrations could be measured quantitatively as well as carbon isotope ratio when carbon concentration was higher than 0.4 mM L for each chemical.

  2. Measurement of the W pair production cross section and W branching ratios with the DELPHI detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cossutti, F

    2001-01-01

    Data collected with the DELPHI detector at centre-of-mass energies up to the highest values explored by the LEP collider of about 206 GeV have been used to extract preliminary values of the cross-section for the process e/sup +/e/sup -/ to W/sup +/W/sup -/. The branching ratios of the W decay were also measured; from them the value of  V /sub cs/  was extracted. The results are compared with the most recent calculations in the framework of the standard model. (5 refs).

  3. Testing temperature on interfacial shear strength measurements of epoxy resins at different mixing ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Thomason, James L.; Minty, Ross;

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial properties as Interfacial Shear Stress (IFSS) in fibre reinforced polymers are essential for further understanding of the mechanical properties of the composite. In this work a single fibre testing method is used in combination with an epoxy matrix made from Araldite 506 epoxy resin...... and triethylenetetramine (TETA) hardener. The IFSS was measured by a microbond test developed for a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer. The preliminary results indicate that IFSS has an inverse dependency of both testing temperature and the mixing ratio of hardener and epoxy resin. Especially interesting was the decreasing...

  4. The proton gyromagnetic ratio by low field method measured at KRISS

    CERN Document Server

    Park, P G; Kim, C S; Shifrin, V Y; Khorev, V N

    1999-01-01

    The proton gyromagnetic ratio (gamma sup ' sub p) in water has been obtained by the low-field method using the atomic magnetic resonance in sup 4 He, a multi-current solenoid and an induction technique for the dimensional measurement for the solenoid. The final result is gamma sup ' sub p (low) = 2.675 154 18 x 10 sup 8 s sup - sup 1 T sup - sup 1 (0.18 x 10 sup - sup 6 , by K sub j sub - sub 9 sub 0 = 483 597.9 GHz/V, R sub k sub - sub 9 sub 0 = 25 812.807 OMEGA).

  5. Improved measurement of the branching ratio of J/psi-->K_S K_L

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, J Z; Bian, J G; Cai, X; Chang, J F; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, H L; Dai, Y S; Deng, Z Y; Dong, L Y; Du, S X; Du, Z Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Fu, H Y; Fu, L P; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, Y N; Gong, M Y; Gong, W X; Gu, S D; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Han, S W; Harris, F A; He, J; He, K L; He, M; He, X; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, L; Huang, X P; Ji, X B; Jia, Q Y; Jiang, C H; Jiang, X S; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jin, Y; Lai, Y F; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, Q J; Li, R B; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X Q; Li, X S; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Liu, H M; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Z X; Lu, G R; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Luo, X L; Ma, F C; Ma, J M; Ma, L L; Ma, X Y; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Nie, Z D; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Qi, N D; Qian, C D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, F; Shi, X; Song, L W; Sun, H S; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tao, N; Tian, Y R; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, J Z; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S Z; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Zhe Wang; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wei, C L; Wu, N; Wu, Y M; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xin, B; Xu, G F; Xu, H; Xu, Y; Xue, S T; Yan, M L; Yan, W B; Yang, F; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, S D; Yang, Y X; Yi, L H; Yi, Z Y; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Yue, Q; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang Bing Yun; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J M; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L S; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang Xiao Min; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y J; Zhang, Y Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Q; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J B; Zhao, J W; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, X J; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, L S; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, X C; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G M; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zou, B S

    2004-01-01

    The branching ratio of J/psi-->K_S K_L is measured with improved precision to be B(J/psi-->K_S K_L) = (1.82\\pm 0.04\\pm 0.13)\\times 10^{-4}. using J/psi data collected with the Beijing Spectrometer (BESII) at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider. This result is used to test the perturbative QCD ``12%'' rule between psi(2S) and J/psi decays and to investigate the relative phase between the three-gluon and one-photon annihilation amplitudes in J/psi decays.

  6. Comprehensive Laboratory Measurements of the Emissions From Fires in Indonesian and African Fuels Measured by FTIR, PTR-MS, and GC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, T. J.; Yokelson, R. J.; Holzinger, R.; Kleiss, B.; Crutzen, P. J.; Hao, W. M.

    2002-12-01

    In large-scale laboratory experiments at the USFS Fire Sciences Laboratory we captured and measured the emissions produced by 46 separate burns of 16 fuel types from Indonesia, southern Africa, Canada, the U.S., and Germany. Five of the most significant Indonesian fuel types (rice straw, peat, grass, litter, brush) and two of the most significant African savanna fuel types (miombo, dambo) are represented here by 32 experimental fires. We deployed both a closed cell and open-path FTIR to quantify CO2, CO, VOC, NOx, HCN, and NH3, and a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) to measure VOC. We included dedicated instruments to measure CO2 and CO and filled numerous canisters for analysis by GC-FID for CO2, CO, and hydrocarbons. PTR-MS can quantify VOC emissions at pptv levels and can detect compounds with a wide range of molecular weights. Drawbacks to using PTR-MS include molecular mass signals complicated by more than one compound, insensitivity to compounds with proton affinities near or below that of water, and reduced signal for compounds that may stick to sample lines. FTIR is capable of positive identification based on many spectral features for each compound. Open-path FTIR is not subject to sampling artifacts. Drawbacks include lower sensitivity which limits the range of expected analytes, dependence on absorption cross-section, which is low for certain trace gases, and complicated spectra that require de-convolution. The combination of these two techniques, however, provides a very powerful analytical tool. The trace gases emitted from Indonesian biomass burning have never been fully characterized. This study provides initial emission ratios and emission factors for five important Indonesian fuel types for 20 compounds, half of which are OVOC. Results from the African fuels are being carefully interwoven into our recent field results to supplement a list of the top trace gas emissions from African savanna fires. These results constitute the most

  7. Electrical test methods for on-line fuel cell ohmic resistance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K. R.; Smith, M.

    The principles and trade-offs of four electrical test methods suitable for on-line measurement of the ohmic resistance (R Ω) of fuel cells is presented: current interrupt, AC resistance, high frequency resistance (HFR), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The internal resistance of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell determined with the current interrupt, HFR and EIS techniques is compared. The influence of the AC amplitude and frequency of the HFR measurement on the observed ohmic resistance is examined, as is the ohmic resistance extracted from the EIS data by modeling the spectra with a transmission line model for porous electrodes. The ohmic resistance of a H 2/O 2 PEM fuel cell determined via the three methods was within 10-30% of each other. The current interrupt technique consistently produced measured cell resistances that exceeded those of the other two techniques. For the HFR technique, the frequency at which the measurement was conducted influenced the measured resistance (i.e., higher frequency providing smaller R Ω), whereas the AC amplitude did not effect the observed value. The difference in measured ohmic resistance between these techniques exceeds that reasonably accounted for by measurement error. The source of the discrepancy between current interrupt and impedance-based methods is attributed to the difference in the response of a non-uniformly polarized electrode, such as a porous electrode with non-negligible ohmic resistance, to a large perturbation (current interrupt event) as compared to a small perturbation (impedance measurement).

  8. Mobile lidar system for measurement of water vapor mixing ratio and ozone number density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Water Vapor Lidar was modified and extended to make differential absorption measurements of ozone. Water vapor measurements make use of a weak molecular scattering process known as Raman scattering. It is characterized by a shift in wavelength of the scattered beam of light relative to the incident one. Some of the energy of the incident photon is converted to vibrational or rotational energy within the molecule leaving the scattered photon shifted to a slightly longer wavelength. When performing water vapor measurements, profiles are acquired of water vapor mixing ratio from near the ground to beyond 7 km every 2 minutes. By forming a color composite image of the individual profiles, the spatial and temporal evolution of water vapor is visible with vertical resolution of 75 to 150m and temporal resolution of 2 minutes. The ozone lidar is intended for use as a cross calibration facility for other stationary ozone lidar systems. The ozone measurement employs the technique known as differential absorption. The backscattered laser radiation from two different wavelengths is measured. Successful measurements of 308 nm returns were made from 80 km with an averaging period of 6 hours. Using these data and a standard atmosphere density curve, an ozone number density profile was made which agrees very well with the standard ozone curve between 20 and 40 km.

  9. High-speed microprobe for roughness measurements in high-aspect-ratio microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Lutz; Brand, Uwe; Bütefisch, Sebastian; Ahbe, Thomas; Weimann, Thomas; Peiner, Erwin; Frank, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Cantilever-type silicon microprobes with an integrated tip and a piezoresistive signal read out have successfully proven to bridge the gap between scanning force microscopy and stylus profilometry. Roughness measurements in high-aspect-ratio microstructures (HARMS) with depths down to 5 mm and widths down to 50 µm have been demonstrated. To improve the scanning speed up to 15 mm s‑1, the wear of the tip has to be reduced. The atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique with alumina (Al2O3) has been tested for this purpose. Repeated wear measurements with coated and uncoated microprobe cantilevers have been carried out on a roughness standard at a speed of 15 mm s‑1. The tip shape and the wear have been measured using a new probing tip reference standard containing rectangular silicon grooves with widths from 0.3 µm to 3 µm. The penetration depth of the microprobe allows one to measure the wear of the tip as well as the tip width and the opening angle of the tip. The roughness parameters obtained on the roughness standard during wear experiments agree well with the reference values measured with a calibrated stylus instrument, nevertheless a small amount of wear still is observable. Further research is necessary in order to obtain wear resistant microprobe tips for non-destructive inspection of microstructures in industry and microform measurements, for example in injection nozzles.

  10. WormGender - Open-Source Software for Automatic Caenorhabditis elegans Sex Ratio Measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta K Labocha

    Full Text Available Fast and quantitative analysis of animal phenotypes is one of the major challenges of current biology. Here we report the WormGender open-source software, which is designed for accurate quantification of sex ratio in Caenorhabditis elegans. The software functions include, i automatic recognition and counting of adult hermaphrodites and males, ii a manual inspection feature that enables manual correction of errors, and iii flexibility to use new training images to optimize the software for different imaging conditions. We evaluated the performance of our software by comparing manual and automated assessment of sex ratio. Our data showed that the WormGender software provided overall accurate sex ratio measurements. We further demonstrated the usage of WormGender by quantifying the high incidence of male (him phenotype in 27 mutant strains. Mutants of nine genes (brc-1, C30G12.6, cep-1, coh-3, him-3, him-5, him-8, skr-1, unc-86 showed significant him phenotype. The WormGender is written in Java and can be installed and run on both Windows and Mac platforms. The source code is freely available together with a user manual and sample data at http://www.QuantWorm.org/. The source code and sample data are also available at http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1541248.

  11. Accuracy of delta 18O isotope ratio measurements on the same sample by continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The doubly labeled water method is considered the reference method to measure energy expenditure. Conventional mass spectrometry requires a separate aliquot of the same sample to be prepared and analyzed separately. With continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, the same sample could be analy...

  12. Laboratory measurements of trace gas emissions from biomass burning of fuel types from the southeastern and southwestern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Burling

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation commonly managed by prescribed burning was collected from five southeastern and southwestern US military bases and burned under controlled conditions at the US Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The smoke emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR spectrometer for measurement of gas-phase species. The OP-FTIR detected and quantified 19 gas-phase species in these fires: CO2, CO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C3H6, HCHO, HCOOH, CH3OH, CH3COOH, furan, H2O, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3, HCN, HCl, and SO2. Emission factors for these species are presented for each vegetation type burned. Gas-phase nitrous acid (HONO, an important OH precursor, was detected in the smoke from all fires. The HONO emission factors ranged from 0.15 to 0.60 g kg−1 and were higher for the southeastern fuels. The fire-integrated molar emission ratios of HONO (relative to NOx ranged from approximately 0.03 to 0.20, with higher values also observed for the southeastern fuels. The majority of non-methane organic compound (NMOC emissions detected by OP-FTIR were oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs with the total identified OVOC emissions constituting 61 ± 12% of the total measured NMOC on a molar basis. These OVOC may undergo photolysis or further oxidation contributing to ozone formation. Elevated amounts of gas-phase HCl and SO2 were also detected during flaming combustion, with the amounts varying greatly depending on location and vegetation type. The fuels with the highest HCl emission factors were all located in the coastal regions, although HCl was also observed from fuels farther inland. Emission factors for HCl were generally higher for the southwestern fuels

  13. 2D and 3D fault basis for fuel cell diagnosis by external magnetic field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifrek, Lyes; Cauffet, Gilles; Chadebec, Olivier; Bultel, Yann; Rosini, Sébastien; Rouveyre, Luc

    2017-07-01

    An original approach used for the identification of faults in fuel cell stacks is presented. It is based on the 3D reconstruction of the current density from external magnetic field measurements which is an ill-posed magnetostatic linear inverse problem. A suitable and original current density and magnetic field basis are proposed in order to define both local and global faults on a fuel cell stack. The inverse problem is regularized by truncated singular value decomposition (SVD) to ensure the uniqueness of the solution. Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2016)", edited by Adel Razek

  14. Active and passive measures to maintain pressure in LNG fuel systems for ships

    OpenAIRE

    Hernes, Hugo Eugen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this master thesis is to investigate the effects of active and passive measures to maintain the pressure in LNG fuel systems for ships. The background was two de-loading events that occurred on the gas engines on KV Bergen, a Norwegian Coast Guard vessel, in 2012 and 2013. The events triggered research, both on why a sudden large drop in the fuel tank pressure can occur, and how they could be prevented in the future. The task required development of two models or simulation ...

  15. Using the ratio of means as the effect size measure in combining results of microarray experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Celia MT

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of efficient analytic methodologies for combining microarray results is a major challenge in gene expression analysis. The widely used effect size models are thought to provide an efficient modeling framework for this purpose, where the measures of association for each study and each gene are combined, weighted by the standard errors. A significant disadvantage of this strategy is that the quality of different data sets may be highly variable, but this information is usually neglected during the integration. Moreover, it is widely known that the estimated standard deviations are probably unstable in the commonly used effect size measures (such as standardized mean difference when sample sizes in each group are small. Results We propose a re-parameterization of the traditional mean difference based effect measure by using the log ratio of means as an effect size measure for each gene in each study. The estimated effect sizes for all studies were then combined under two modeling frameworks: the quality-unweighted random effects models and the quality-weighted random effects models. We defined the quality measure as a function of the detection p-value, which indicates whether a transcript is reliably detected or not on the Affymetrix gene chip. The new effect size measure is evaluated and compared under the quality-weighted and quality-unweighted data integration frameworks using simulated data sets, and also in several data sets of prostate cancer patients and controls. We focus on identifying differentially expressed biomarkers for prediction of cancer outcomes. Conclusion Our results show that the proposed effect size measure (log ratio of means has better power to identify differentially expressed genes, and that the detected genes have better performance in predicting cancer outcomes than the commonly used effect size measure, the standardized mean difference (SMD, under both quality-weighted and quality

  16. Change in Seismic Attenuation of the Nojima Fault Zone Measured Using Spectral Ratios from Borehole Seismometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Y.; Tadokoro, K.; Nishigami, K.; Mori, J.

    2006-12-01

    We measured the seismic attenuation of the rock mass surrounding the Nojima fault, Japan, by estimating the P-wave quality factor, Qp, using spectral ratios derived from a multi-depth (800 m and 1800 m) seismometer array. We detected an increase of Qp in 2003-2006 compared to 1999-2000. Following the 1995 Kobe earthquake, the project "Fault Zone Probe" drilled three boreholes to depths of 500 m, 800 m, 1800 m, in Toshima, along the southern part of the Nojima fault. The 1800-m borehole was reported to reach the fault surface. One seismometer (TOS1) was installed at the bottom of the 800-m borehole in 1996 and another (TOS2) at the bottom of 1800-m borehole in 1997. The sampling rate of the seismometers is 100 Hz. The slope of the spectral ratios for the two stations plotted on a linear-log plot is -π t^{*}, where t^{*} is the travel time divided by the Qp for the path difference between the stations. For the estimation of Qp, we used events recorded by both TOS1 and TOS2 for periods of 1999-2000 and 2003-2006. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectral ratios, we first calculated spectra ratios between TOS1 and TOS2 for each event and averaged the values over the earthquakes for each period. We used the events that occurred within 10 km from TOS2, and the numbers of events are 74 for 1999-2000 and 105 for 2003-2006. Magnitudes of the events range from M0.5 to M3.1. The average value of Qp for 1999-2000 increased significantly compared to 2003-2006. The attenuation of rock mass surrounding the fault in 2003-2006 is smaller than that in 1999-2000, which suggests that the fault zone became stiffer after the earthquake. At the Nojima fault, permeability measured by repeated pumping tests decreased with time from the Kobe earthquake, infering the closure of cracks and a fault healing process occurred The increase of Qp is another piece of evidence for the healing process of the Nojima fault zone. u.ac.jp/~kano/

  17. FITTING A THREE DIMENSIONAL PEM FUEL CELL MODEL TO MEASUREMENTS BY TUNING THE POROSITY AND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Mads; Odgaard, Madeleine; Condra, Thomas Joseph

    2004-01-01

    PEM fuel cell are dealt with in detail.The model solves the convective and diffusive transport of thegaseous phase in the fuel cell and allows prediction of theconcentration of the species present. A special feature of themodel is a method that allows detailed modelling and predictionof electrode kinetics...... dependency on the gas concentration andactivation overpotential can thereby be addressed. The proposedmodel makes it possible to predict the effect of geometrical andmaterial properties on the fuel cell?s performance. It is shownhow the ionic conductivity and porosity of the catalyst layeraffects...... the distribution of current density and further how thisaffects the polarization curve.The porosity and conductivity of the catalyst layer are some ofthe most difficult parameters to measure, estimate and especiallycontrol. Yet the proposed model shows how these two parameterscan have significant influence...

  18. Electromagnetic modeling for gap measurement between nuclear fuel channel and liquid injection nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D. H.; Heo, H.; Jeong, H. G. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    Fuel channels including Pressure Tube(PT) and Calandria Tube(CT) are important components of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor(PHWR). A sagging for fuel channel increases by heat and radiation exposure with the increasing operating time. The possibility of contact to Liquid Injection Nozzle(LIN) is thus a critical issue in power plant safety. In order to solve this safety issue, electromagnetic technique was applied to compliment the ultrasonic technology. Electromagnetic fields were investigated for the gap measurement between CT and LIN using computer modeling. We calculated the electromagnetic fields, such as, magnetic flux density, current density near the fuel channel and simulated an impedance and a phase angle in receiving coil for obtaining the optimal inspection parameters, such as, frequency, inter-coil spacing, coil size and configuration. This paper shows that the simulated eddy current signals in variance with the CT/LIN gap can be used for baseline data of experimental electromagnetic technique.

  19. Measurement of the form factor ratios in semileptonic decays of charm mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaliznyak, Renata [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    I have measured the form factor ratios r2 = A2 (0)/A1 (0) and rV = V (0)/A1 (0) in the semileptonic charm meson decay D+ → $\\bar{K}$*0 e+ve from data collected by the Fermilab E791 collaboration. Form factors are introduced in the calculation of the hadronic current in semileptonic decays of strange, charm, or bottom mesons, such as D+ → $\\bar{K}$*0 e+ ve . Semileptonic decays provide insight into quark coupling to the W boson since the leptonic and hadronic amplitudes in the Feynman diagram for the decay are completely separate. There are no strong interactions between the final state leptons and quarks. A number of theoretical models predict the values of the form factors for D+ → $\\bar{K}$*0 e+ ve , though there is a large range of predictions. E791 is a hadroproduction experiment that recorded over 20 billion interactions with a 500 GeV π- beam incident on five thin targets during the 1991-92 Fermilab fixed-target run. Approximately 3000 D+ → $\\bar{K}$*0 e+ ve decays are fully reconstructed. In order to extract the form factor ratios from the data, I implement a multidimensional unbinned maximum likelihood fit with a large sample of simulated (Monte Carlo) D+ → $\\bar{K}$*0 e+ve events. The large E791 data sample provides the most precise measurement of the form factor ratios to date. The measured values for the form factor ratios are r2 = 0.71 ± 0.08 ± 0.09 and rV = 1.84 ± 0.11 ±} 0.08. These results are in good agreement with some Lattice Gauge calculations. However the agreement with quark model predictions is not as good.

  20. Electron density profile measurements from hydrogen line intensity ratio method in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YooSung; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Yang, Jeong-hun; Kim, SeongCheol; Kim, Young-Gi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Yang, Seongmoo; Jo, Jungmin; Oh, Soo-Ghee; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density profiles of versatile experiment spherical torus plasmas are measured by using a hydrogen line intensity ratio method. A fast-frame visible camera with appropriate bandpass filters is used to detect images of Balmer line intensities. The unique optical system makes it possible to take images of Hα and Hβ radiation simultaneously, with only one camera. The frame rate is 1000 fps and the spatial resolution of the system is about 0.5 cm. One-dimensional local emissivity profiles have been obtained from the toroidal line of sight with viewing dumps. An initial result for the electron density profile is presented and is in reasonable agreement with values measured by a triple Langmuir probe.

  1. Correlation techniques for the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio in measurements with stochastic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, V R; Reddy, T G; Reddy, P Y; Reddy, K R

    2003-01-01

    An AC modulation technique is described to convert stochastic signal variations into an amplitude variation and its retrieval through Fourier analysis. It is shown that this AC detection of signals of stochastic processes when processed through auto- and cross-correlation techniques improve the signal-to-noise ratio; the correlation techniques serve a similar purpose of frequency and phase filtering as that of phase-sensitive detection. A few model calculations applied to nuclear spectroscopy measurements such as Angular Correlations, Mossbauer spectroscopy and Pulse Height Analysis reveal considerable improvement in the sensitivity of signal detection. Experimental implementation of the technique is presented in terms of amplitude variations of harmonics representing the derivatives of normal spectra. Improved detection sensitivity to spectral variations is shown to be significant. These correlation techniques are general and can be made applicable to all the fields of particle counting where measurements ar...

  2. Measurement of isomeric ratios in sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th photofission products

    CERN Document Server

    Besshejko, O A; Zheltonozhskij, V A; Strilchuk, N V

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of activity of sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th photofission products with T sub 1 sub / sub 2 1 min / 10 h has been carried out using g-spectroscopy technique. The targets were irradiated by Bremsstrahlung gamma-quanta from Mevatron KD2 linear electron accelerator with boundary energy of 23 MeV. Using obtained data about photofission fragments yield isomeric ratios for sup 1 sup 1 7In, sup 1 sup 3 sup 0 Sb, sup 1 sup 3 sup 3 Te, sup 1 sup 3 sup 4 sup g I and sup 1 sup 3 sup 5 Xe nuclei have been measured for the first time at boundary energy of 23 MeV. For the first time mean angular momenta for mentioned above nuclei at sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th photofission have been determined.

  3. Spent Fuel Test - Climax: technical measurements. Interim report, fiscal year 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, W.C.; Ballou, L.B.; Butkovich, T.R.; Carlson, R.C.; Durham, W.B.; Hage, G.L.; Majer, E.L.; Montan, D.N.; Nyholm, R.A.; Rector, N.L.

    1983-02-01

    The Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) is located 420 m below surface in the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site. The test is being conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the technical direction of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized April to May 1980, thus initiating a test with a planned 3- to 5-year fuel storage phase. The SFT-C operational objective of demonstrating the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner has been met. Three exchanges of spent fuel between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility furthered this demonstration. Technical objectives of the test led to development of a technical measurements program, which is the subject of this and two previous interim reports. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data have been recorded on a continuing basis for the first 2-1/2 years of the test on more than 900 channels. Data continue to be acquired from the test. Some data are now available for analysis and are presented here. Highlights of activities this year include analysis of fracture data obtained during site characterization, laboratory studies of radiation effects and drilling damage in Climax granite, improved calculations of near-field heat transfer and thermomechanical response, a ventilation effects study, and further development of the data acquisition and management systems.

  4. Measurement of Fission Gas Release from Irradiated U-Mo Monolithic Fuel Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Luscher, Walter G.; Rice, Francine; Pool, Karl N.

    2015-06-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An apparatus capable of annealing post-irradiated small-scale samples cut from larger fuel segments according to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere has been installed into a hot cell. Results show that optimized experimental parameters to investigate fission product release from small samples have been established. Initial measurements conducted on aluminum alloy clad uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel samples reveal three clear fission gas release events over the temperature range of 30-1050 C. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in literature.

  5. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated U–Mo monolithic fuel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Andrew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Luscher, Walter G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rice, Francine J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pool, Karl N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The uranium–molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An apparatus capable of heating post-irradiated small-scale samples cut from larger fuel segments according to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere has been installed into a hot cell. Results show that optimized experimental parameters to investigate fission product release from small samples have been established. Initial measurements conducted on aluminum alloy clad uranium–molybdenum monolithic fuel samples reveal three clear fission gas release events over the temperature range of 30-1000 °C. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature.

  6. Spent fuel measurements. passive neutron albedo reactivity (PNAR) and photon signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eigenbrodt, Julia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-29

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) safeguards technical objective is the timely detection of a diversion of a significant quantity of nuclear material from peaceful activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. An important IAEA task towards meeting this objective is the ability to accurately and reliably measure spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to verify reactor operating parameters and verify that the fuel has not been removed from reactors or SNF storage facilities. This dissertation analyzes a method to improve the state-of-the-art of nuclear material safeguards measurements using two combined measurement techniques: passive neutron albedo reactivity (PNAR) and passive spectral photon measurements.

  7. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinzhen; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2014-05-01

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  8. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jinzhen; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling, E-mail: linling@tju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Tianjin University, Tianjin, People' s Republic of China, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomedical Detecting Techniques and Instruments, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Qiao, Xiaoyan [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Shanxi University, Shanxi (China); Wang, Mengjun [School of Information Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Weibo [Institute of Acupuncture and Moxibustion China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2014-05-15

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  9. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinzhen; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2014-05-01

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  10. Effect of metal-ion-to-fuel ratio on the phase formation of bioceramic phosphates synthesized by self-propagating combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swamiappan Sasikumar and Rajagopalan Vijayaraghavan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca10 (PO46 (OH2 is a well-known bioceramic material used in orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent biocompatibility and bone-bonding ability due to its structural and compositional similarity to human bone. Here we report, for the first time, the synthesis of HAP by combustion employing tartaric acid as a fuel. Calcium nitrate is used as the source of calcium and diammonium hydrogen phosphate serves as the source of phosphate ions. Reaction processing parameters such as the pH, fuel-oxidant ratio and autoignition temperature are controlled and monitored. The products were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, which revealed the formation of a hexagonal hydroxyapatite phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR spectra showed that the substitution of a carbonate ion occurs at the phosphate site. The morphology of the particles was imaged by scanning electron microscopy, which also revealed that the particles are of submicron size. Thermal analysis showed that the phase formation takes place at the time of combustion. Surface area and porosity analysis showed that the surface area is high and that the pores are of nanometer size. The mean grain size of the HAP powder, determined by the Debye–Scherrer formula, is in the range 20–30 nm. Chemical analyses to determine the Ca : P atomic ratio in synthesized ceramics were performed, and it was found to be 1 : 1.66.

  11. Measurements of the Fuel Mileage of a KC-135 Aircraft with and Without Winglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temanson, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    The KC-135A Winglet Flight Research and Demonstration Program was a joint effort of the Air Force, NASA and the Boeing Military Airplane Company to flight test winglets on the KC-135A. The primary objective of the program was to verify the cruise performance improvements predicted by analysis and wind tunnel tests. Flight test data were obtained for winglets positioned at 15 deg cant/-2 deg incidence, 0 deg cant/-4 deg incidence, 15 deg cant/-4 deg incidence and for winglets off (baseline). Both fuel mileage and drag measurements were obtained. The 15 deg cant/-4 deg incidence winglet configuration provided the greatest performance improvement. The flight test measured fuel mileage improvement for a 0.78 Mach number was 3.1 percent at 8 x 10(5) pounds W/delta and 5.5 percent at 1.05 x 10(6) pounds W/delta. Correcting the flight measured data for surface pressure differences between wind tunnel and flight resulted in a fuel mileage improvement of 4.4 percent at 8 x 10(5) pounds W/delta and 7.2 percent at 1.05 x 10(6) pounds W/delta. The agreement between the fuel mileage and drag data was excellent.

  12. Density and Viscosity Measurement of Diesel Fuels at Combined High Pressure and Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Schaschke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the measurement of the viscosity and density of various diesel fuels, obtained from British refineries, at elevated pressures up to 500 MPa and temperatures in the range 298 K to 373 K. The measurement and prediction procedures of fluid properties under high pressure conditions is of increasing interest in many processes and systems including enhanced oil recovery, automotive engine fuel injection, braking, and hydraulic systems. Accurate data and understanding of the fluid characteristic in terms of pressure, volume and temperature is required particularly where the fluid is composed of a complex mixture or blend of aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbons. In this study, high pressure viscosity data was obtained using a thermostatically-controlled falling sinker-type high pressure viscometer to provide reproducible and reliable viscosity data based on terminal velocity sinker fall times. This was supported with density measurements using a micro-pVT device. Both high-pressure devices were additionally capable of illustrating the freezing points of the hydrocarbon mixtures. This work has, thus, provided data that can extend the application of mixtures of commercially available fuels and to test the validity of available predictive density and viscosity models. This included a Tait-style equation for fluid compressibility prediction. For complex diesel fuel compositions, which have many unidentified components, the approach illustrates the need to apply appropriate correlations, which require accurate knowledge or prediction of thermodynamic properties.

  13. Depolarization Ratio of Clouds Measured by Multiple-Field of view Multiple Scattering Polarization Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori; Makino, Toshiyuki; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Jin, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    We have developed the Multiple Field of view Multiple Scattering Polarization Lidar (MFMSPL) system for the study of optically thick low-level clouds. It has 8 telescopes; 4 telescopes for parallel channels and another 4 for perpendicular channels. The MFMSPL is the first lidar system that can measure depolarization ratio for optically thick clouds where multiple scattering is dominant. Field of view of each channel was 10mrad and was mounted with different angles ranging from 0 mrad (vertical) to 30mrad. And footprint size from the total FOV was achieved to be close to that of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar at the altitude of 1km in order to reproduce similar degree of multiple scattering effects as observed from space. The MFMSPL has started observations since June 2014 and has been continuously operated at National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) in Tsukuba, Japan. Observations proved expected performance such that measured depolarization ratio was comparable to the one observed by CALIPSO lidar.

  14. Measuring ion velocity distribution functions through high-aspect ratio holes in inductively coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunge, G., E-mail: gilles.cunge@cea.fr; Darnon, M.; Dubois, J.; Bezard, P.; Mourey, O.; Petit-Etienne, C.; Vallier, L.; Despiau-Pujo, E.; Sadeghi, N. [Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microélectronique, CNRS, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2016-02-29

    Several issues associated with plasma etching of high aspect ratio structures originate from the ions' bombardment of the sidewalls of the feature. The off normal angle incident ions are primarily due to their temperature at the sheath edge and possibly to charging effects. We have measured the ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) at the wafer surface in an industrial inductively coupled plasma reactor by using multigrid retarding field analyzers (RFA) in front of which we place 400 μm thick capillary plates with holes of 25, 50, and 100 μm diameters. The RFA then probes IVDF at the exit of the holes with Aspect Ratios (AR) of 16, 8, and 4, respectively. The results show that the ion flux dramatically drops with the increase in AR. By comparing the measured IVDF with an analytical model, we concluded that the ion temperature is 0.27 eV in our plasma conditions. The charging effects are also observed and are shown to significantly reduce the ion energy at the bottom of the feature but only with a “minor” effect on the ion flux and the shape of the IVDF.

  15. Determination of the base composition of deoxyribonucleic acid by measurement of the adenine/guanine ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, J. T. O.

    1967-01-01

    A method is described for determination of the base composition (as guanine+cytosine or adenine+thymine content) of DNA by accurate measurement of the adenine/guanine ratio. The DNA is hydrolysed with 0·03n-hydrochloric acid for 40min. to release the purines. The hydrolysate is subjected to ion-exchange chromatography on Zeo-Karb 225. Apurinic acids are eluted with 0·03n-hydrochloric acid and then guanine and adenine are eluted separately with 2n-hydrochloric acid. Guanine and adenine are each collected as a single fraction, and the amount of base in each case is determined by measuring the volume and the extinction at suitable wavelengths. For use in the calculations, millimolar extinction coefficients in 2n-hydrochloric acid of 12·09 for adenine at 262mμ, and 10·77 for guanine at 248mμ, were determined with authentic samples of bases. The method gives extremely reproducible results: from 12 determinations with calf thymus DNA the adenine/guanine molar ratio had a standard deviation of 0·011; this corresponds to a standard deviation in guanine+cytosine content of 0·2% guanine+cytosine. PMID:5626094

  16. Determination of the base composition of deoxyribonucleic acid by measurement of the adenine-granine ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, J T

    1967-11-01

    A method is described for determination of the base composition (as guanine+cytosine or adenine+thymine content) of DNA by accurate measurement of the adenine/guanine ratio. The DNA is hydrolysed with 0.03n-hydrochloric acid for 40min. to release the purines. The hydrolysate is subjected to ion-exchange chromatography on Zeo-Karb 225. Apurinic acids are eluted with 0.03n-hydrochloric acid and then guanine and adenine are eluted separately with 2n-hydrochloric acid. Guanine and adenine are each collected as a single fraction, and the amount of base in each case is determined by measuring the volume and the extinction at suitable wavelengths. For use in the calculations, millimolar extinction coefficients in 2n-hydrochloric acid of 12.09 for adenine at 262mmu, and 10.77 for guanine at 248mmu, were determined with authentic samples of bases. The method gives extremely reproducible results: from 12 determinations with calf thymus DNA the adenine/guanine molar ratio had a standard deviation of 0.011; this corresponds to a standard deviation in guanine+cytosine content of 0.2% guanine+cytosine.

  17. First shock tuning and backscatter measurements for large case-to-capsule ratio beryllium targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Eric; Yi, Austin; Kline, John; Kyrala, George; Simakov, Andrei; Wilson, Doug; Ralph, Joe; Dewald, Eduard; Strozzi, David; Celliers, Peter; Millot, Marius; Tommasini, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    The current under performance of target implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has necessitated scaling back from high convergence ratio to access regimes of reduced physics uncertainties. These regimes, we expect, are more predictable by existing radiation hydrodynamics codes giving us a better starting point for isolating key physics questions. One key question is the lack of predictable in-flight and hot spot shape due to a complex hohlraum radiation environment. To achieve more predictable, shape tunable implosions we have designed and fielded a large 4.2 case-to-capsule ratio (CCR) target at the NIF using 6.72 mm diameter Au hohlraums and 1.6 mm diameter Cu-doped Be capsules. Simulations show that at these dimensions during a 10 ns 3-shock laser pulse reaching 270 eV hohlraum temperatures, the interaction between hohlraum and capsule plasma, which at lower CCR lead to beam propagation impedance by artificial plasma stagnation, are reduced. In this talk we will present measurements of early time drive symmetry using two-axis line-imaging velocimetry (VISAR) and streaked radiography measuring velocity of the imploding shell and their comparisons to post-shot calculations using the code HYDRA (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory).

  18. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TOFFER, H.

    2006-07-18

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Fuel that had experienced a neutron environment in a reactor is known as spent, exposed, or irradiated fuel. In contrast fuel that has not yet been placed in a reactor is known as green, unexposed, or unirradiated fuel. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled (References 1 and 2) and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements (Reference 3). The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprised of two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with unirradiated fuel and one with irradiated fuel. Both the unirradiated and irradiated fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, three (3) green fuel

  19. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known C ox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ??0.036 Cox units (??0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ?? 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  20. Quantitative Surface Emissivity and Temperature Measurements of a Burning Solid Fuel Accompanied by Soot Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Nancy D.; Pettegrew, Richard D.; Ferkul, Paul; Sacksteder, K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Surface radiometry is an established technique for noncontact temperature measurement of solids. We adapt this technique to the study of solid surface combustion where the solid fuel undergoes physical and chemical changes as pyrolysis proceeds, and additionally may produce soot. The physical and chemical changes alter the fuel surface emissivity, and soot contributes to the infrared signature in the same spectral band as the signal of interest. We have developed a measurement that isolates the fuel's surface emissions in the presence of soot, and determine the surface emissivity as a function of temperature. A commercially available infrared camera images the two-dimensional surface of ashless filter paper burning in concurrent flow. The camera is sensitive in the 2 to 5 gm band, but spectrally filtered to reduce the interference from hot gas phase combustion products. Results show a strong functional dependence of emissivity on temperature, attributed to the combined effects of thermal and oxidative processes. Using the measured emissivity, radiance measurements from several burning samples were corrected for the presence of soot and for changes in emissivity, to yield quantitative surface temperature measurements. Ultimately the results will be used to develop a full-field, non-contact temperature measurement that will be used in spacebased combustion investigations.

  1. High aspect ratio, nanostructured, platinum based electrodes for proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Design, development and ionic conduction of the proposed structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, Odysseas

    High aspect ratio nanostructures can provide substantial benefits when used as fuel cell electrodes since they can alleviate problems associated with conventional carbon supports. In this work the potential of incorporating high aspect ratio nanostructures as electrodes for fuel cells was studied. Moreover, a model was created that demonstrated the potential for the nanostructures to yield high performance. The creation of Pt nanorods using anodic aluminum oxide templates was investigated and experiments showed complete utilization of the electrodes surface area. However, the Pt nanorod structure was found to not be effective in terms of Pt mass utilization, since only the outer surface of the rod is utilized for catalytic activity. An alternate method was developed to coat (with Pt) high aspect ratio structures made from a cost-effective support material. Thus far, methods used to conformally coat Pt either cannot be used directly on several materials or tend not to be cost-effective. A non-vacuum method based on an Aerosol Assisted Deposition (AAD) technique was developed and optimized. Initial experiments showed feasibility of the technique to coat a large variety of substrates. Dimensions of the particles were controlled by the deposition parameters and ranged from 4 nm up to several hundreds of nm in diameter. Experiments where Pt nanoparticles were deposited on gas diffusion layer substrates, showed higher electrochemical performance compared to commercial catalyst. The need for electrolyte coating on the high aspect ratio structures was also investigated. Initial experiments were performed by splitting an MEA in half and using an intermediate Pt film. These experiments showed that ionic conduction on Pt surface is possible. Moreover these studies indicated that ionic conduction on Pt could result from hydrophilic groups that can exist on its surface. Since these groups can either be physisorbed due to presence of water or chemisorbed on the oxidized Pt

  2. Dimensional measurement of micro parts with high aspect ratio in HIT-UOI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hong; Cui, Jiwen; Feng, Kunpeng; Li, Junying; Zhao, Shiyuan; Zhang, Haoran; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-11-01

    Micro parts with high aspect ratios have been widely used in different fields including aerospace and defense industries, while the dimensional measurement of these micro parts becomes a challenge in the field of precision measurement and instrument. To deal with this contradiction, several probes for the micro parts precision measurement have been proposed by researchers in Center of Ultra-precision Optoelectronic Instrument (UOI), Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT). In this paper, optical fiber probes with structures of spherical coupling(SC) with double optical fibers, micro focal-length collimation (MFL-collimation) and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) are described in detail. After introducing the sensing principles, both advantages and disadvantages of these probes are analyzed respectively. In order to improve the performances of these probes, several approaches are proposed. A two-dimensional orthogonal path arrangement is propounded to enhance the dimensional measurement ability of MFL-collimation probes, while a high resolution and response speed interrogation method based on differential method is used to improve the accuracy and dynamic characteristics of the FBG probes. The experiments for these special structural fiber probes are given with a focus on the characteristics of these probes, and engineering applications will also be presented to prove the availability of them. In order to improve the accuracy and the instantaneity of the engineering applications, several techniques are used in probe integration. The effectiveness of these fiber probes were therefore verified through both the analysis and experiments.

  3. Measurement of the ratio h/e with a photomultiplier tube and a set of LEDs

    CERN Document Server

    Loparco, F; Rainò, S; Spinelli, P

    2016-01-01

    We propose a laboratory experience aimed at undergraduate physics students to understand the main features of the photoelectric effect and to perform a measurement of the ratio h/e, where h is the Planck's constant and e is the electron charge. The experience is based on the method developed by Millikan for his measurements on the photoelectric effect in the years from 1912 to 1915. The experimental setup consists of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) equipped with a voltage divider properly modified to set variable retarding potentials between the photocathode and the first dynode, and a set of LEDs emitting at different wavelengths. The photocathode is illuminated with the various LEDs and, for each wavelength of the incident light, the output anode current is measured as a function of the retarding potential applied between the cathode and the first dynode. From each measurement, a value of the stopping potential for the anode current is derived. Finally, the stopping potentials are plotted as a function of the ...

  4. Material control in nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Part II. Accountability, instrumntation, and measurement techniques in fuel fabrication facilities, P. O. 1236909. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgonovi, G.M.; McCartin, T.J.; McDaniel, T.; Miller, C.L.; Nguyen, T.

    1978-12-01

    This report describes the measurement techniques, the instrumentation, and the procedures used in accountability and control of nuclear materials, as they apply to fuel fabrication facilities. Some of the material included has appeared elswhere and it has been summarized. An extensive bibliography is included. A spcific example of application of the accountability methods to a model fuel fabrication facility which is based on the Westinghouse Anderson design.

  5. Urban Visible/SWIR surface reflectance ratios from satellite and sun photometer measurements in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. de Almeida Castanho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface reflectance ratio between the visible (VIS and shortwave infrared (SWIR radiation is an important quantity for the retrieval of the aerosol optical depth (τa from the MODIS sensor data. Based on empirically determined VIS/SWIR ratios, MODIS τa retrieval uses the surface reflectance in the SWIR band (2.1 μm, where the interaction between solar radiation and the aerosol layer is small, to predict the visible reflectances in the blue (0.47 μm and red (0.66 μm bands. Therefore, accurate knowledge of the VIS/SWIR ratio is essential for achieving accurate retrieval of aerosol optical depth from MODIS. The heterogeneity of the surface cover in an urban environment increases the uncertainties in the estimation of the surface reflectance and, consequently, τa. We analyzed the surface reflectance over some distinct surface covers in and around the Mexico City metropolitan area (MCMA using MODIS radiances at 0.66 μm and 2.1 μm. The analysis was performed at 1.5 km×1.5 km spatial resolution. Also, ground-based AERONET sun-photometer data acquired in Mexico City from 2002 to 2005 were analyzed for aerosol optical thickness and other aerosol optical properties. In addition, a network of hand-held sun-photometers deployed in Mexico City, as part of the MCMA-2006 Study during the MILAGRO Campaign, provided an unprecedented measurement of τa in 5 different sites well distributed in the city. We found that the average RED/SWIR ratio representative of the urbanized sites analyzed is 0.73±0.06. This average ratio was significantly different for non-urban sites, which was approximately 0.55. The aerosol optical thickness retrieved from MODIS radiances at a spatial resolution of 1.5 km×1.5 km and averaged within 10 x 10 km boxes were compared with collocated 1-h τa averaged from sun-photometer measurements. The use of the new RED/SWIR ratio of 0.73 in

  6. Relating Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Performance to Measurements in a Liquid Half Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christoffer Mølleskov; Tynelius, Oskar; Lund-Olesen, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) could act as a replacement for batteries in low power electronics. For instance, micro—DMFC’s could be used to power hearing instruments[1]. The power output of a DMFC is limited by the sluggish kinetics of both the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) on the anode......) in the presence of methanol. By comparing the two measurements, we make recommendations for performing liquid half-cell measurements under realistic conditions. [1] J.H. Hales, C. Kallesøe, T. Lund-Olesen, A.-C. Johansson, H.C. Fanøe, Y. Yu, et al., Micro fuel cells power the hearing aids of the future, Fuel...... allow further miniaturization or powering more advanced and more power hungry devices. The activity of fuel cell catalysts is often probed in the form of thin films in liquid half cells. However, it is challenging to mimic the conditions in an actual DMFC. On the other hand, it can also be problematic...

  7. Simulations and measurements of adiabatic annular flows in triangular, tight lattice nuclear fuel bundle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Abhishek, E-mail: asaxena@lke.mavt.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Laboratory for Nuclear Energy Systems, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Zboray, Robert [Laboratory for Thermal-hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Prasser, Horst-Michael [ETH Zurich, Laboratory for Nuclear Energy Systems, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Laboratory for Thermal-hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-04-01

    High conversion light water reactors (HCLWR) having triangular, tight-lattice fuels bundles could enable improved fuel utilization compared to present day LWRs. However, the efficient cooling of a tight lattice bundle has to be still proven. Major concern is the avoidance of high-quality boiling crisis (film dry-out) by the use of efficient functional spacers. For this reason, we have carried out experiments on adiabatic, air-water annular two-phase flows in a tight-lattice, triangular fuel bundle model using generic spacers. A high-spatial-resolution, non-intrusive measurement technology, cold neutron tomography, has been utilized to resolve the distribution of the liquid film thickness on the virtual fuel pin surfaces. Unsteady CFD simulations have also been performed to replicate and compare with the experiments using the commercial code STAR-CCM+. Large eddies have been resolved on the grid level to capture the dominant unsteady flow features expected to drive the liquid film thickness distribution downstream of a spacer while the subgrid scales have been modeled using the Wall Adapting Local Eddy (WALE) subgrid model. A Volume of Fluid (VOF) method, which directly tracks the interface and does away with closure relationship models for interfacial exchange terms, has also been employed. The present paper shows first comparison of the measurement with the simulation results.

  8. Material accountancy measurement techniques in dry-powdered processing of nuclear spent fuels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, S. F.

    1999-03-24

    The paper addresses the development of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICPMS), thermal ionization-mass spectrometry (TIMS), alpha-spectrometry, and gamma spectrometry techniques for in-line analysis of highly irradiated (18 to 64 GWD/T) PWR spent fuels in a dry-powdered processing cycle. The dry-powdered technique for direct elemental and isotopic accountancy assay measurements was implemented without the need for separation of the plutonium, uranium and fission product elements in the bulk powdered process. The analyses allow the determination of fuel burn-up based on the isotopic composition of neodymium and/or cesium. An objective of the program is to develop the ICPMS method for direct fissile nuclear materials accountancy in the dry-powdered processing of spent fuel. The ICPMS measurement system may be applied to the KAERI DUPIC (direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors) experiment, and in a near-real-time mode for international safeguards verification and non-proliferation policy concerns.

  9. Household air pollution from coal and biomass fuels in China: Measurements, health impacts, and interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.J.; Smith, K.R. [University of Medicine & Dentistry New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States). School of Public Health

    2007-06-15

    Nearly all China's rural residents and a shrinking fraction of urban residents use solid fuels (biomass and coal) for household cooking and/or heating. Consequently, global meta-analyses of epidemiologic studies indicate that indoor air pollution from solid fuel use in China is responsible for approximately 420,000 premature deaths annually, more than the approximately 300,000 attributed to urban outdoor air pollution in the country. Our objective in this review was to help elucidate the extent of this indoor air pollution health hazard. We reviewed approximately 200 publications in both Chinese- and English language journals that reported health effects, exposure characteristics, and fuel/stove intervention options. Observed health effects include respiratory illnesses, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, weakening of the immune system, and reduction in lung function. Arsenic poisoning and fluorosis resulting from the use of 'Poisonous' coal have been observed in certain regions of China. Although attempts have been made in a few studies to identify specific coal smoke constituents responsible for specific adverse health effects, the majority of indoor air measurements include those of only particulate matter, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and/or nitrogen dioxide. These measurements indicate that pollution levels in households using solid fuel generally exceed China's indoor air quality standards. Intervention technologies ranging from simply adding a chimney to the more complex modernized bioenergy program are available, but they can be viable only with coordinated support from the government and the commercial sector.

  10. Method and apparatus for real-time measurement of fuel gas compositions and heating values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelepouga, Serguei; Pratapas, John M.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Jangale, Vilas V.

    2016-03-22

    An exemplary embodiment can be an apparatus for real-time, in situ measurement of gas compositions and heating values. The apparatus includes a near infrared sensor for measuring concentrations of hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide, a mid infrared sensor for measuring concentrations of carbon monoxide and a semiconductor based sensor for measuring concentrations of hydrogen gas. A data processor having a computer program for reducing the effects of cross-sensitivities of the sensors to components other than target components of the sensors is also included. Also provided are corresponding or associated methods for real-time, in situ determination of a composition and heating value of a fuel gas.

  11. A Widely Tunable Infrared Laser Spectrometer for Measurements of Isotopic Ratios of Carbon Cycle Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joanne H. Shorter; J. Barry McManus; David D. Nelson; Charles E. Kolb; Mark S. Zahniser; Ray Bambha; Uwe Lehmann; Tomas Kulp; Stanley C. Tyler

    2005-01-31

    The atmospheric abundances of carbon dioxide and methane have increased dramatically during the industrial era. Measurements of the isotopic composition of these gases can provide a powerful tool for quantifying their sources and sinks. This report describes the development of a portable instrument for isotopic analysis CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} using tunable infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. This instrument combines novel optical design and signal processing methods with a widely tunable mid-infrared laser source based on difference frequency generation (DFG) which will can access spectral regions for all the isotopes of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} with a single instrument. The instrument design compensates for the large difference in concentration between major and minor isotopes by measuring them with path lengths which differ by a factor of 100 within the same multipass cell. During Phase I we demonstrated the basic optical design and signal processing by determining {sup 13}CO{sub 2} isotopic ratios with precisions as small as 0.2{per_thousand} using a conventional lead salt diode laser. During Phase II, the DFG laser source was coupled with the optical instrument and was demonstrated to detect {sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4} ratios with a precision of 0.5{per_thousand} and an averaging time of 20 s using concentrated methane in air with a mixing ratio of 2700 ppm. Methods for concentrating ambient air for isotopic analysis using this technique have been evaluated. Extensions of this instrument to other species such as {sup 13}CO{sub 2}, C{sup 18}OO, and CH{sub 3}D are possible by substituting lasers at other wavelengths in the DFG source module. The immediate commercial application of this instrument will be to compete with existing mass spectrometric isotope instruments which are expensive, large and relatively slow. The novel infrared source developed in this project can be applied to the measurement of many other gas species and will have wide

  12. In situ laser measurements of CO and CH4 close to the surface of a burning single fuel particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, M.; Totschnig, G.; Winter, F.; Maiorov, M. A.; Garbuzov, D. Z.; Connolly, J. C.

    2002-10-01

    The combustion behaviour of three different fuels, bituminous coal, beech wood and fir wood, was investigated by monitoring the concentrations of CO, CH4, CO2 and O2 during devolatilization and char combustion. Single fuel particles (4-6 mm diameter, 55 mm in length) were positioned in the freeboard of a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor. The superficial velocity was 0.3 m s-1. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy was used to investigate in situ the concentration histories of the evolving species CO and CH4. An InGaAsSb/AlGaAsSb diode laser was frequency tuned around 2.3 µm at 300 Hz and traversed the reactor directly above the particle. This enabled for the first time, to the knowledge of the authors, the accurate measurement of species concentrations close to the surface of a burning particle. The influence of the oxygen partial pressure (5, 10, 15, 21 kPa), the bed temperature (700, 800, 900̂C), the distance of the laser beam from the particle (4, 10, 21, 31 mm) and hence the residence time (12, 30, 60, 90 ms), the particle size (4, 6 mm diameter) and the fuel type were investigated by independently changing these governing parameters. Conventional methods were deployed to determine CO, CO2 and O2 in the exhaust gas. The evolving CO could be tracked down to 12 ms after its generation. Biomass was found to produce four times as much CO as coal. The CO/CO2 ratio was found to be about five times higher for beech wood (a typical hardwood) than for fir wood (a typical softwood). The comparison of the in situ results with conventionally measured concentrations showed that the CO is normally underestimated during devolatilization and overestimated during char combustion. The discrepancy was attributed to more efficient degradation mechanisms for CO during devolatilization.

  13. Relation of ratio indices of anthropometric measures to obesity in a stunted population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Suzanne E; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Stein, Aryeh D

    2008-01-01

    The ratios of anthropometric measures are used to estimate obesity while controlling for allometric scaling. A good index should be uncorrelated with its denominator; this often requires exponentiation of the denominator. The stability of the derived exponents across populations is not known. We obtained subscapular (SUBS) and triceps (TRI) skinfolds, weight (WT), height (HT), waist circumference (WC), fat mass (FM), and fat-free mass (FFM) in a population of Guatemalan adults [height 1.63 +/- 0.06 m (868 males); 1.51 +/- 0.06 m (1047 females)]. We derived exponents for the indices WT/HT(P), SUBS/TRI(P), TRI/SUBS(P), WC/HT(P), FM/WT(P), and FM/FFM(P) such that the ratios were free from association with their denominators. The derived exponents were (Men: SUBS/TRI(0.88), FM/WT(2.69), FM/FFM(2.86), WC/HT(0.68), and WT/HT(2.17); Women: SUBS/TRI(0.93), FM/WT(2.01), FM/FFM(3.37), WC/HT(0.47), WT/HT(2.03)). For all examined indices the derived exponents differed (P Victora [2005]: Int J Obes 29:483-489). The derived indices were not more strongly correlated with adiposity than were simple unexponentiated ratios. Although exponentiation of the denominator eliminates the association of index with its denominator, the resulting exponents lack generalizability across populations, especially those where stunting remains prevalent.

  14. ICP-MS with hexapole collision cell for isotope ratio measurements of Ca, Fe, and Se.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, S F; Becker, J S

    2001-07-01

    To avoid mass interferences on analyte ions caused by argon ions and argon molecular ions via reactions with collision gases, an rf hexapole filled with helium and hydrogen has been used in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and its performance has been studied. Up to tenfold improvement in sensitivity was observed for heavy elements (m > 100 u), because of better ion transmission through the hexapole ion guide. A reduction of argon ions Ar+ and the molecular ions of argon ArX+ (X = O, Ar) by up to three orders of magnitude was achieved in a hexapole collision cell of an ICP-MS ("Platform ICP", Micromass, Manchester, UK) as a result of gas-phase reactions with hydrogen when the hexapole bias (HB) was set to 0 V; at an HB of 1.6 V argon, and argon-based ions of masses 40 u, 56 u, and 80 u, were reduced by approximately four, two, and five orders of magnitude, respectively. The signal-to-noise ratio 80Se/ 40Ar2+ was improved by more than five orders of magnitude under optimized experimental conditions. Dependence of mass discrimination on collision-cell properties was studied in the mass range 10 u (boron) to 238 u (uranium). Isotopic analysis of the elements affected by mass-spectrometric interference, Ca, Fe, and Se, was performed using a Meinhard nebulizer and an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN). The measured isotope ratios were comparable with tabulated values from IUPAC. Precision of 0.26%, 0.19%, and 0.12%, respectively, and accuracy of 0.13% 0.25%, and 0.92%, respectively, was achieved for isotope ratios 44Ca/ 40Ca and 56Fe/57Fe in 10 microg L(-1) solution nebulized by means of a USN and for 78Se/80Se in 100 microg L(-1) solution nebulized by means of a Meinhard nebulizer.

  15. Verifying the distributed temperature sensing Bowen ratio method for measuring evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilperoort, Bart; Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Luxemburg, Willem; Cisneros Vaca, César; Ucer, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Evaporation is an important process in the hydrological cycle, therefore measuring evaporation accurately is essential for water resource management, hydrological management and climate change models. Current techniques to measure evaporation, like eddy covariance systems, scintillometers, or lysimeters, have their limitations and therefore cannot always be used to estimate evaporation correctly. Also the conventional Bowen ratio surface energy balance method has as drawback that two sensors are used, which results in large measuring errors. In Euser et al. (2014) a new method was introduced, the DTS-based Bowen ratio (BR-DTS), that overcomes this drawback. It uses a distributed temperature sensing technique (DTS) whereby a fibre optic cable is placed vertically, going up and down along a measurement tower. One stretch of the cable is dry, the other wrapped with cloth and kept wet, akin to a psychrometer. Using this, the wet and dry bulb temperatures are determined every 12.5 cm over the height, from which the Bowen ratio can be determined. As radiation and wind have an effect on the cooling and heating of the cable's sheath as well, the DTS cables do not necessarily always measure dry and wet bulb temperature of the air accurately. In this study the accuracy in representing the dry and wet bulb temperatures of the cable are verified, and evaporation observations of the BR-DTS method are compared to Eddy Covariance (EC) measurements. Two ways to correct for errors due to wind and solar radiation warming up the DTS cables are presented: one for the dry cable and one for the wet cable. The measurements were carried out in a pine forest near Garderen (The Netherlands), along a 46-meter tall scaffold tower (15 meters above the canopy). Both the wet (Twet) and dry (Tdry) temperature of the DTS cable were compared to temperature and humidity (from which Twet is derived) observations from sensors placed along the height of the tower. Underneath the canopy, where there was

  16. Precision measurement of the ratio of the $\\Lambda^0_b$ to $\\overline{B}^0$ lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Callot, Olivier; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Caponio, Francesco; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coca, Cornelia; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bonis, Isabelle; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dorosz, Piotr; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Esen, Sevda; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Hafkenscheid, Tom; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Wallaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Ian; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Muryn, Bogdan; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pavel-Nicorescu, Carmen; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Roberts, Douglas; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Oksana; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spinella, Franco; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teodorescu, Eliza; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Webber, Adam Dane; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiechczynski, Jaroslaw; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb measurement of the lifetime ratio of the $\\Lambda^0_b$ to the $\\overline{B}^0$ meson is updated using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected using 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy $pp$ collisions at the LHC. The decay modes used are $\\overline{\\Lambda}^0_b \\to J/\\psi p K^-$ and $\\overline{B}^0 \\to J/\\psi \\pi^+ K^-$, where the $\\pi^+K^-$ mass is consistent with that of the $\\overline{K}^{*0}(892)$ meson. The lifetime ratio is determined with unprecedented precision to be $0.974\\pm0.006\\pm0.004$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This result is in agreement with original theoretical predictions based on the heavy quark expansion. Using the current world average of the $\\overline{B}^0$ lifetime, the $\\Lambda^0_b$ lifetime is found to be $1.479 \\pm 0.009 \\pm 0.010$ ps.

  17. Measurement of fluorescent probes concentration ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenic process of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, begins years before the clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a novel method which may detect AD up to nine years earlier than current exams, minimally invasive, with minimal risk, pain and side effects. The method is based on previous reports which relate the concentrations of biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) (Aβ and Tau proteins) to the future development of AD in mild cognitive impairment patients. Our method, which uses fluorescence measurements of the relative concentrations of the CSF biomarkers, replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing. The process uses a miniature needle coupled trough an optical fiber to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites fluorescent probes which were prior injected and bond to the CSF biomarkers. Using the ratio between the fluorescence intensities emitted from the two biomarkers, which is correlated to their concentration ratio, the patient's risk of developing AD is estimated. A theoretical model was developed and validated using Monte Carlo simulations, demonstrating the relation between fluorescence emission and biomarker concentration. The method was tested using multi-layered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, the CSF in the sub-arachnoid space and the bone. These phantoms were prepared with different scattering and absorption coefficients, thicknesses and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate variations in human anatomy and in the needle location. The theoretical and in-vitro results are compared and the method's accuracy is discussed.

  18. Evaluation of a low cost wireless heat ratio method system for measuring transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiriksson, D.; Boyer, B.; Aishlin, P. S.; Bowling, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    For decades, environmental measurements in remote locations have consisted of sensors hard wired to loggers that send data to central servers via radio, satellite, or cellular telemetry. This model of data collection is effective when all sensors are located in close proximity to the central data logger, such as on a weather station. Frequently, however, in order to adequately capture the spatial heterogeneity associated with environmental processes (e.g., transpiration, soil moisture, or snow depth), it is necessary to install many sensors 10's to 100's of meters from a central data logging station. This presents a practical and financial obstacle when considering the cost of cabling and conduit, in addition to the potential data collection and data quality problems associated with long cable runs. We offer a solution to this persistent challenge with a hybrid datalogging system that combines the power and reliability of Campbell Scientific logging and telemetry equipment with low cost Xbee radios and Arduino based data logging platforms. To evaluate the promise of this hybrid datalogging concept we developed a new generation of low cost, homemade heat ratio sapflux sensors and tested them at a forested site in the Wasatch Mountains, near Salt Lake City, Utah. We present data from this test site, heat ratio method sensor construction details, and example code that merges the capabilities of Arduino and Campbell Scientific datalogging systems.

  19. Measurement and properties of the dose-area product ratio in external small-beam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Jarkko; Partanen, Mari; Ojala, Jarkko; Sipilä, Petri; Björkqvist, Mikko; Kapanen, Mika; Keyriläinen, Jani

    2017-06-01

    In small-beam radiation therapy (RT) the measurement of the beam quality parameter, i.e. the tissue-phantom ratio or TPR20,10, using a conventional point detector is a challenge. To obtain reliable results, one has to consider potential sources of error, including volume averaging and adjustment of the point detector into the narrow beam. To overcome these challenges, a different type of beam quality parameter in small beams was studied, namely the dose-area product ratio, or DAPR20,10. With this method, the measurement of a dose-area product (DAP) using a large-area plane-parallel chamber (LAC) eliminates the uncertainties in detector positioning and volume averaging that are present when using a point detector. In this study, the properties of the DAPR20,10 of a cone-collimated 6 MV photon beam were investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and the obtained values were compared to measurements obtained using two LAC detectors, PTW Type 34073 and PTW Type 34070. In addition, the possibility of determining the DAP using EBT3 film and a Razor diode detector was studied. The determination of the DAPR20,10 value was found to be feasible in external small-beam radiotherapy using cone-collimated beams with diameters from 4-40 mm, based on the results of the two LACs, the MC calculations and the Razor diode. The measurements indicated a constant DAPR20,10 value for fields 20-40 mm in diameter, with a maximum relative change of 0.6%, but an increase of 7.0% for fields from 20-4 mm in diameter for the PTW Type 34070 chamber. Simulations and measurements showed an increase of DAPR20,10 with increasing LAC size or dose integral area for the studied 4-40 mm cone-collimated 6 MV photon beams. This has the consequence that there should be a reference to the size of the used LAC active area or the DAP integration area with the reported DAPR20,10 value.

  20. Measurement and properties of dose-area product ratio in external small-beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Jarkko Tapio; Partanen, Mari; Ojala, Jarkko; Sipilae, Petri; Björkqvist, Mikko; Kapanen, Mika; Keyriläinen, Jani

    2017-03-22

    In small-beam radiation therapy (RT) the measurement of beam quality parameter i.e. tissue-phantom ratio or TPR20,10 with conventional point detector is a challenge. To obtain reliable results, one has to consider potential sources of error, including volume averaging and adjustment of the point detector into the narrow beam. To overcome these challenges, a different type of possible beam quality parameter in small beams was studied, namely the dose-area product ratio or DAPR20,10. With this method, the measurement of a dose-area product (DAP) with a large-area plane-parallel chamber (LAC) eliminates the uncertainties in detector positioning and volume averaging present with the use of a point detector. In this study, properties of DAPR20,10 of cone-collimated 6 MV photon beam were investigated with Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and the obtained values were compared to measurements obtained by two LAC detectors PTW Type 34073 and PTW Type 34070. In addition, the possibility of determining the DAP with EBT3 film and Razor diode detector was studied. The determination of DAPR20,10 value was found to be feasible in external small-beam radiotherapy of cone-collimated beams with diameters from 4 to 40 mm with the two LACs, MC calculation and Razor diode. Measurements indicated a constant DAPR20,10 value for fields from 20 to 40 mm in diameter with maximum relative change of 0.6%, but an increase of 7.0% for fields from 20 to 4 mm in diameter for PTW Type 34070 chamber. Simulations and measurements showed an increase of DAPR20,10 with increasing LAC size or dose integral area for studied cone-collimated 6 MV photon beams from 4 to 40 mm in diameter. This has a consequence that with reported DAPR20,10 value there should be a reference to the size of the used LAC active area or the DAP integration area.

  1. Surrogate gas prediction model as a proxy for Δ14C-based measurements of fossil fuel CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Kevin J.; Miller, John B.; Montzka, Stephen A.; Sweeney, Colm; Miller, Ben R.

    2016-06-01

    The measured 14C:12C isotopic ratio of atmospheric CO2 (and its associated derived Δ14C value) is an ideal tracer for determination of the fossil fuel derived CO2 enhancement contributing to any atmospheric CO2 measurement (Cff). Given enough such measurements, independent top-down estimation of U.S. fossil fuel CO2 emissions should be possible. However, the number of Δ14C measurements is presently constrained by cost, available sample volume, and availability of mass spectrometer measurement facilities. Δ14C is therefore measured in just a small fraction of samples obtained by flask air sampling networks around the world. Here we develop a projection pursuit regression (PPR) model to predict Cff as a function of multiple surrogate gases acquired within the NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network (GGGRN). The surrogates consist of measured enhancements of various anthropogenic trace gases, including CO, SF6, and halocarbon and hydrocarbon acquired in vertical airborne sampling profiles near Cape May, NJ and Portsmouth, NH from 2005 to 2010. Model performance for these sites is quantified based on predicted values corresponding to test data excluded from the model building process. Chi-square hypothesis test analysis indicates that these predictions and corresponding observations are consistent given our uncertainty budget which accounts for random effects and one particular systematic effect. However, quantification of the combined uncertainty of the prediction due to all relevant systematic effects is difficult because of the limited range of the observations and their relatively high fractional uncertainties at the sampling sites considered here. To account for the possibility of additional systematic effects, we incorporate another component of uncertainty into our budget. Expanding the number of Δ14C measurements in the NOAA GGGRN and building new PPR models at additional sites would improve our understanding of

  2. Surrogate gas prediction model as a proxy for Δ(14)C-based measurements of fossil fuel-CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Kevin J; Miller, John B; Montzka, Stephen A; Sweeney, Colm; Miller, Ben R

    2016-06-27

    The measured (14)C:(12)C isotopic ratio of atmospheric CO2 (and its associated derived Δ(14)C value) is an ideal tracer for determination of the fossil fuel derived CO2 enhancement contributing to any atmospheric CO2 measurement (Cff ). Given enough such measurements, independent top-down estimation of US fossil fuel-CO2 emissions should be possible. However, the number of Δ(14)C measurements is presently constrained by cost, available sample volume, and availability of mass spectrometer measurement facilities. Δ(14)C is therefore measured in just a small fraction of samples obtained by ask air sampling networks around the world. Here, we develop a Projection Pursuit Regression (PPR) model to predict Cff as a function of multiple surrogate gases acquired within the NOAA/ESRL Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network (GGGRN). The surrogates consist of measured enhancements of various anthropogenic trace gases, including CO, SF6, and halo- and hydrocarbons acquired in vertical airborne sampling profiles near Cape May, NJ and Portsmouth, NH from 2005 through 2010. Model performance for these sites is quantified based on predicted values corresponding to test data excluded from the model building process. Chi-square hypothesis test analysis indicates that these predictions and corresponding observations are consistent given our uncertainty budget which accounts for random effects and one particular systematic effect. However, quantification of the combined uncertainty of the prediction due to all relevant systematic effects is difficult because of the limited range of the observations and their relatively high fractional uncertainties at the sampling sites considered here. To account for the possibility of additional systematic effects, we incorporate another component of uncertainty into our budget. Expanding the number of Δ(14)C measurements in the NOAA GGGRN and building new PPR models at additional sites would improve our understanding of uncertainties and

  3. Improvement in Thermal-Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) using Total Flash Evaporation (TFE) method for lanthanides isotope ratio measurements in transmutation targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mialle, S.; Gourgiotis, A.; Aubert, M.; Stadelmann, G.; Gautier, C.; Isnard, H. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA Saclay, DEN/DPC/SECR/LANIE, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Chartier, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA Saclay, DEN/DPC, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2011-07-01

    The experiments involved in the PHENIX french nuclear reactor to obtain precise and accurate data on the total capture cross sections of the heavy isotopes and fission products require isotopic ratios measurements with uncertainty of a few per mil. These accurate isotopic ratio measurements are performed with mass spectrometer equipped with multi-collector system. The major difficulty for the analyses of these actinides and fission products is the low quantity of the initial powder enclosed in steel container (3 to 5 mg) and the very low quantities of products formed (several {mu}g) after irradiation. Specific analytical developments are performed by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) to be able to analyse several nanograms of elements with this technique. A specific method of acquisition named Total Flash Evaporation was adapted in this study in the case of lanthanide measurements for quantity deposited on the filament in the order of 2 ng and applied on irradiated fuel. To validate the analytical approach and discuss about the accuracy of the data, the isotopic ratios obtained by TIMS are compared with other mass spectrometric techniques such as Multiple-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (MC-ICPMS). (authors)

  4. Sialic acid-to-urea ratio as a measure of airway surface hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esther, Charles R; Hill, David B; Button, Brian; Shi, Shuai; Jania, Corey; Duncan, Elizabeth A; Doerschuk, Claire M; Chen, Gang; Ranganathan, Sarath; Stick, Stephen M; Boucher, Richard C

    2017-03-01

    Although airway mucus dehydration is key to pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) and other airways diseases, measuring mucus hydration is challenging. We explored a robust method to estimate mucus hydration using sialic acid as a marker for mucin content. Terminal sialic acid residues from mucins were cleaved by acid hydrolysis from airway samples, and concentrations of sialic acid, urea, and other biomarkers were analyzed by mass spectrometry. In mucins purified from human airway epithelial (HAE), sialic acid concentrations after acid hydrolysis correlated with mucin concentrations (r(2) = 0.92). Sialic acid-to-urea ratios measured from filters applied to the apical surface of cultured HAE correlated to percent solids and were elevated in samples from CF HAEs relative to controls (2.2 ± 1.1 vs. 0.93 ± 1.8, P gold standard measure of mucus hydration. The method proved robust and has potential to serve as flexible techniques to assess mucin hydration, particularly in samples like BALF in which established methods such as percent solids cannot be utilized.

  5. Size specific indoor aerosol deposition measurements and derived I/O concentrations ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, C.L.; Byrne, M.A.; Roed, Jørn;

    1997-01-01

    The process of aerosol deposition on indoor surfaces has implications for human exposure to particulate contaminants of both indoor and outdoor origin. In the radiological context, current accident models assume a uniform Dose Reduction Factor (DRF) of 0.5 for indoor residence during the outdoor...... and dispersed in unfurnished and furnished rooms; the decay rate of the particles was then inferred from analysis of sequential air samples. Allowing for the differences in furnishing and level of occupancy between the tests, consistent aerosol deposition velocities were determined and, for furnished rooms...... with previous measurements of I/O ratios for fine and coarse particles. It was concluded that, for realistic dose estimates, a radioisotope-specific factor may be merited. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  6. Shape coexistence from lifetime and branching-ratio measurements in 68,70Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crider, B. P.; Prokop, C. J.; Liddick, S. N.; Al-Shudifat, M.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Carroll, J. J.; Chen, J.; Chiara, C. J.; David, H. M.; Dombos, A. C.; Go, S.; Grzywacz, R.; Harker, J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Larson, N.; Lauritsen, T.; Lewis, R.; Quinn, S. J.; Recchia, F.; Spyrou, A.; Suchyta, S.; Walters, W. B.; Zhu, S.

    2016-12-01

    Shape coexistence near closed-shell nuclei, whereby states associated with deformed shapes appear at relatively low excitation energy alongside spherical ones, is indicative of the rapid change in structure that can occur with the addition or removal of a few protons or neutrons. Near 68Ni (Z = 28, N = 40), the identification of shape coexistence hinges on hitherto undetermined transition rates to and from low-energy 0+ states. In 68,70Ni, new lifetimes and branching ratios have been measured. These data enable quantitative descriptions of the 0+ states through the deduced transition rates and serve as sensitive probes for characterizing their nuclear wave functions. The results are compared to, and consistent with, large-scale shell-model calculations which predict shape coexistence. With the firm identification of this phenomenon near 68Ni, shape coexistence is now observed in all currently accessible regions of the nuclear chart with closed proton shells and mid-shell neutrons.

  7. Shape coexistence from lifetime and branching-ratio measurements in 68,70Ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.P. Crider

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shape coexistence near closed-shell nuclei, whereby states associated with deformed shapes appear at relatively low excitation energy alongside spherical ones, is indicative of the rapid change in structure that can occur with the addition or removal of a few protons or neutrons. Near 68Ni (Z=28, N=40, the identification of shape coexistence hinges on hitherto undetermined transition rates to and from low-energy 0+ states. In 68,70Ni, new lifetimes and branching ratios have been measured. These data enable quantitative descriptions of the 0+ states through the deduced transition rates and serve as sensitive probes for characterizing their nuclear wave functions. The results are compared to, and consistent with, large-scale shell-model calculations which predict shape coexistence. With the firm identification of this phenomenon near 68Ni, shape coexistence is now observed in all currently accessible regions of the nuclear chart with closed proton shells and mid-shell neutrons.

  8. Measurement of the branching ratio for η→π0γγ decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakhov, S.; Nefkens, B. M.; Allgower, C. E.; Bekrenev, V.; Briscoe, W. J.; Clajus, M.; Comfort, J. R.; Craig, K.; Grosnick, D.; Huber, G. M.; Isenhower, D.; Knecht, N.; Koetke, D.; Koulbardis, A.; Kozlenko, N.; Kruglov, S.; Lolos, G.; Lopatin, I.; Manley, D. M.; Manweiler, R.; Marušić, A.; McDonald, S.; Olmsted, J.; Papandreou, Z.; Peaslee, D.; Phaisangittisakul, N.; Price, J. W.; Ramirez, A. F.; Sadler, M.; Shafi, A.; Spinka, H.; Stanislaus, T. D.; Starostin, A.; Staudenmaier, H. M.; Supek, I.; Tippens, W. B.

    2005-08-01

    The branching ratio (BR) for the rare decay η→π0γγ was measured with the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer. The result, BR(η→π0γγ)=(3.5±0.7stat±0.6syst)×10-4, is in agreement with calculations of chiral perturbation theory to third order. We have used a sample of 28 million η mesons produced at the BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron using the π-p→ηn reaction close to threshold. We detail the intricate extraction of the signal, which has about 1.6 thousand η→π0γγ events, from the overwhelming background of η→3π0 decays and from the π-p→π0π0n reaction.

  9. First observation of the decay Bs0-->Ds-Ds+ and measurement of its branching ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-01-18

    We report the observation of the exclusive decay Bs0-->Ds-Ds+ at the 7.5 standard deviation level using 355 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We measure the relative branching ratio B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)/B(B0-->D-Ds+)=1.44(-0.44)(+0.48). Using the world average value for B(B0-->D-Ds+), we find B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)=(9.4(-4.2)(+4.4))x10(-3). This provides a lower bound DeltaGammasCP/Gammas>or=2B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)>1.2x10(-2) at 95% C.L.

  10. A measurement of the inclusive $b \\rightarrow s \\gamma$ branching ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Alemany, R; Boix, G; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Robertson, N A; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Etienne, F; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Schune, M H; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The flavour changing neutral current decay b -> s gamma has been detected in hadronic Z decays collected by ALEPH at LEP. The signal is isolated in lifetime-tagged b-bbar events by the presence of a hard photon associated with a system of high momentum and high rapidity hadrons. The background processes are normalised from the data themselves. The inclusive branching ratio is measured to be 3.11 +- 0.80_stat +- 0.72_syst DistList PSforwarding done files helpND.html images insert_new.sh insert_new.sh~ log modify modifying pending running waiting 10**-4, consistent with the Standa rd Model expectation via penguin processes.

  11. Measurement of the Branching Ratio Lambda_c+ -> p pi+ pi-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Hinojosa, Guillermo; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-03-01

    The confirmation of the Cabibbo-suppressed charm baryon decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is reported. All data analyzed are from SELEX, a fixed target experiment at Fermilab that took data during 1996 and 1997, mainly with a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratio of the Cabibbo-suppressed decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to the Cabibbo-favored mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured to be: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.103 {+-} 0.022.

  12. Measurement of Branching Ratios and CP Asymmetries in B- -> D0(CP)K- Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    We present preliminary results of the analysis of B -> D0 h decays, with h = pi, K and the D0 reconstructed in the channels K- pi+, K- pi+ pi+ pi-, K- pi+ pi0 and in the CP eigenstate K-K+, using data collected by the BABAR detector during the years 2000-2002 at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We have measured the ratio of the branching fractions R = Br(B- -> D0 K-) / Br(B- -> D0 pi-) = (8.31 +- 0.35 (stat) +- 0.20 (syst))% and the direct CP asymmetry A(CP) = (Br(B- -> D0(CP) K-) - Br(B+ -> D0(CP) K+)) / (Br(B- -> D0(CP) K-)+Br(B+ -> D0(CP) K+)) = 0.17 +- 0.23 (stat) +0.09 -0.07 (syst).

  13. Recent β-delayed neutron branching ratios of measurements with heavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Folch, Roger; Dillmann, Iris; Agramunt, Jorge; Tain, Jose Luis

    2016-09-01

    The understanding of the nuclear structure of the neutron-rich nuclei and several astrophysical phenomena, such as the r-process, is a challenge that need new experimental values to provide more realistic data inputs in theoretical models. The aim of this study is to achieve new β-delayed neutron branching ratios, Pn, of very neutron-rich nuclei. Experiments recently performed at the RIB facilities of GSI Darmstadt (Germany) and IGISOL in Jyväskylä (Finland) allowed to determine Pn values for heavier isotopes than those measured so far with a 4pi neutron detector based on 3He counters. At GSI it was possible to measure β1n emitters for several Hg and Tl isotopes with masses beyond A>200 and N>126, and at IGISOL the β2n emitter 136Sb, which represents an important leap in terms of mass since the heaviest known were around A 150 for β1n and A 100 for β2n. Results of P1n and P2n values will be presented, together with the new plans for β-delayed neutron emitter measurements at RIKEN (Japan). The BRIKEN project aims to measure more than a hundred of β1n, and many β2n and β3n emitters, a lot of them for the first time. These isotopes will be the most neutron-rich species measured so far. This work was partially supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitivity under Grant FPA2011-28770-C03-03. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  14. Field evaluation of polymer capacitive humidity sensors for Bowen ratio energy balance flux measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of reliable, reasonably accurate and relatively inexpensive estimates of sensible heat and latent energy fluxes was investigated using a commercial combination thin-film polymer capacitive relative humidity and adjacent temperature sensor instrument. Long-term and unattended water vapour pressure profile difference measurements using low-power combination instruments were compared with those from a cooled dewpoint mirror hygrometer, the latter often used with Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) systems. An error analysis, based on instrument relative humidity and temperature errors, was applied for various capacitive humidity instrument models. The main disadvantage of a combination capacitive humidity instrument is that two measurements, relative humidity and temperature, are required for estimation of water vapour pressure as opposed to one for a dewpoint hygrometer. In a laboratory experiment using an automated procedure, water vapour pressure differences generated using a reference dewpoint generator were measured using a commercial model (Dew-10) dewpoint hygrometer and a combination capacitive humidity instrument. The laboratory measurement comparisons showed that, potentially, an inexpensive model combination capacitive humidity instrument (CS500 or HMP50), or for improved results a slightly more expensive model (HMP35C or HMP45C), could substitute for the more expensive dewpoint hygrometer. In a field study, in a mesic grassland, the water vapour pressure measurement noise for the combination capacitive humidity instruments was greater than that for the dewpoint hygrometer. The average water vapour pressure profile difference measured using a HMP45C was highly correlated with that from a dewpoint hygrometer with a slope less than unity. Water vapour pressure measurements using the capacitive humidity instruments were not as accurate, compared to those obtained using a dewpoint hygrometer, but the resolution magnitudes for the profile

  15. Field Evaluation of Polymer Capacitive Humidity Sensors for Bowen Ratio Energy Balance Flux Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Savage

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of reliable, reasonably accurate and relatively inexpensive estimates of sensible heat and latent energy fluxes was investigated using a commercial combination thin-film polymer capacitive relative humidity and adjacent temperature sensor instrument. Long-term and unattended water vapour pressure profile difference measurements using low-power combination instruments were compared with those from a cooled dewpoint mirror hygrometer, the latter often used with Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB systems. An error analysis, based on instrument relative humidity and temperature errors, was applied for various capacitive humidity instrument models. The main disadvantage of a combination capacitive humidity instrument is that two measurements, relative humidity and temperature, are required for estimation of water vapour pressure as opposed to one for a dewpoint hygrometer. In a laboratory experiment using an automated procedure, water vapour pressure differences generated using a reference dewpoint generator were measured using a commercial model (Dew-10 dewpoint hygrometer and a combination capacitive humidity instrument. The laboratory measurement comparisons showed that, potentially, an inexpensive model combination capacitive humidity instrument (CS500 or HMP50, or for improved results a slightly more expensive model (HMP35C or HMP45C, could substitute for the more expensive dewpoint hygrometer. In a field study, in a mesic grassland, the water vapour pressure measurement noise for the combination capacitive humidity instruments was greater than that for the dewpoint hygrometer. The average water vapour pressure profile difference measured using a HMP45C was highly correlated with that from a dewpoint hygrometer with a slope less than unity. Water vapour pressure measurements using the capacitive humidity instruments were not as accurate, compared to those obtained using a dewpoint hygrometer, but the resolution magnitudes for the

  16. Evaluation of Affinity-Tagged Protein Expression Strategies using Local and Global Isotope Ratio Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hervey, IV, William Judson [ORNL; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K [ORNL; Lankford, Patricia K [ORNL; Owens, Elizabeth T [ORNL; McKeown, Catherine K [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan S [ORNL; Foote, Linda J [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL; McDonald, W Hayes [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Protein enrichments of engineered, affinity-tagged (or bait ) fusion proteins with interaction partners are often laden with background, non-specific proteins, due to interactions that occur in vitro as an artifact of the technique. Furthermore, the in vivo expression of the bait protein may itself affect physiology or metabolism. In this study, intrinsic affinity purification challenges were investigated in a model protein complex, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), encompassing chromosome- and plasmid-encoding strategies for bait proteins in two different microbial species: Escherichia coli and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Isotope ratio measurements of bait protein expression strains relative to native, wild-type strains were performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to assess bait protein expression strategies in each species. Authentic interacting proteins of RNAP were successfully discerned from artifactual co-isolating proteins by the isotopic differentiation of interactions as random or targeted (I-DIRT) method (A. J. Tackett et al. J. Proteome Res. 2005, 4 (5), 1752-1756). To investigate broader effects of bait protein production in the bacteria, we compared proteomes from strains harboring a plasmid that encodes an affinity-tagged subunit (RpoA) of the RNAP complex with the corresponding wild-type strains using stable isotope metabolic labeling. The ratio of RpoA abundance in plasmid strains versus wild type was 0.8 for R. palustris and 1.7 for E. coli. While most other proteins showed no appreciable difference, proteins significantly increased in abundance in plasmid-encoded bait-expressing strains of both species included the plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance protein, GenR and proteins involved in amino acid biosynthesis. Together, these local, complex-specific and more global, whole proteome isotopic abundance ratio measurements provided a tool for evaluating both in vivo and in vitro effects of plasmid

  17. THE CALCULATION OF BURNABLE POISON CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PWR FRESH FUEL ACTIVE COLLAR MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} burnable poison on the measurement of fresh pressurized water reactor fuel. To empirically determine the response function over the range of historical and future use we have considered enrichments up to 5 wt% {sup 235}U/{sup tot}U and Gd weight fractions of up to 10 % Gd/UO{sub 2}. Parameterized correction factors are presented.

  18. Spent fuel test - Climax: technical measurements. Interim report, Fiscal Year 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, W.C.; Butkovich, T.R.; Carlson, R.C.; Durham, W.B.; Ganow, H.C.; Hage, G.L.; Majer, E.L.; Montan, D.N.; Nyholm, R.A.; Rector, N.L.

    1984-02-01

    The Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) is located 420 m below surface in the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site. The test is being conducted as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized April-May 1980. The spent-fuel canisters were retrieved and the thermal sources were de-energized in March-April 1983 when test data indicated that test objectives were met during the 3-year storage phase. The SFT-C operational objective of demonstrating the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner has been met. In addition to emplacement and retrieval operations, three exchanges of spent-fuel between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility, conducted during the storage phase, furthered this demonstration. Technical objectives of the test led to development of a technical measurements program, which is the subject of this and three previous interim reports. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data have been recorded on a continuing basis for the 3-1/2 year duration of the test on more than 900 channels. Data acquisition from the test is now limited to instrumentation calibration and evaluation activities. Data now available for analysis are presented here. Highlights of activities this year include a campaign of in situ stress measurements, mineralogical and petrological studies of pretest core samples, microfracture analyses of laboratory irradiated cores, improved calculations of near-field heat transfer and thermomechanical response during the final months of heating as well as during a six-month cool-down period, metallurgical analyses of selected test components, and further development of the data acquisition and data management systems. 27 references, 68 figures, 10 tables.

  19. Challenges faced when using radiocarbon measurements to estimate fossil fuel emissions in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, A.; O'Doherty, S.; Rigby, M. L.; Ganesan, A.; Manning, A.; Allen, G.

    2015-12-01

    Estimating the anthropogenic component of carbon dioxide emissions from direct atmospheric measurements is difficult, due to the large natural carbon dioxide fluxes. One way of determining the fossil fuel component of atmospheric carbon dioxide is the use of radiocarbon measurements. Whilst carbon reservoirs with a reasonably fast carbon exchange rate all have a similar radiocarbon content, fossil fuels are completely devoid of radiocarbon due to their age. Previous studies have 14CO2 (UK) this approach is compromised by the high density of 14CO2 emitting nuclear power plants. Of the 16 nuclear reactors in the UK, 14 are advanced gas cooled reactors, which have one of the highest 14CO2 emission rates of all reactor types. These radiocarbon emissions not only lead to a serious underestimation of the recently added fossil fuel CO2, by masking the depletion of 14C in CO2, but can in fact overshadow the depletion by a factor of 2 or more. While a correction for this enhancement can be applied, the emissions from the nuclear power plants are highly variable, and an accurate correction is therefore not straightforward. We present the first attempt to quantify UK fossil fuel CO2 emissions through the use of 14CO2. We employ a sampling strategy that makes use of a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, in combination with nuclear industry emission estimates, to forecast "good" sampling times, in an attempt to minimize the correction due to emissions from the nuclear industry. As part of the Greenhouse gAs Uk and Global Emissions (GAUGE) project, 14CO2measurements are performed at two measurement sites in the UK and Ireland, as well as during science flights around the UK. The measurement locations have been chosen with a focus on high emitting regions such as London and the Midlands. We discuss the unique challenges that face the determination of fossil fuel emissions through radiocarbon measurements in the UK and our sampling strategy to deal with them. In addition we

  20. Laser Anemometer Measurements of the Flow Field in a 4:1 Pressure Ratio Centrifugal Impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoch, G. J.; Prahst, P. S.; Wernet, M. P.; Wood, J. R.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    A laser-doppler anemometer was used to obtain flow-field velocity measurements in a 4:1 pressure ratio, 4.54 kg/s (10 lbm/s), centrifugal impeller, with splitter blades and backsweep, which was configured with a vaneless diffuser. Measured through-flow velocities are reported for ten quasi-orthogonal survey planes at locations ranging from 1% to 99% of main blade chord. Measured through-flow velocities are compared to those predicted by a 3-D viscous steady flow analysis (Dawes) code. The measurements show the development and progression through the impeller and vaneless diffuser of a through-flow velocity deficit which results from the tip clearance flow and accumulation of low momentum fluid centrifuged from the blade and hub surfaces. Flow traces from the CFD analysis show the origin of this deficit which begins to grow in the inlet region of the impeller where it is first detected near the suction surface side of the passage. It then moves toward the pressure side of the channel, due to the movement of tip clearance flow across the impeller passage, where it is cut by the splitter blade leading edge. As blade loading increases toward the rear of the channel the deficit region is driven back toward the suction surface by the cross-passage pressure gradient. There is no evidence of a large wake region that might result from flow separation and the impeller efficiency is relatively high. The flow field in this impeller is quite similar to that documented previously by NASA Lewis in a large low-speed backswept impeller.

  1. Laser Spectrometric Measurement System for Local Express Diagnostics of Flame at Combustion of Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobtsev, V. D.; Kozlov, D. N.; Kostritsa, S. A.; Smirnov, V. V.; Stel'makh, O. M.; Tumanov, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    A laboratory laser spectrometric measurement system for investigation of spatial distributions of local temperatures in a flame at combustion of vapors of various liquid hydrocarbon fuels in oxygen or air at atmospheric pressure is presented. The system incorporates a coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectrometer with high spatial resolution for local thermometry of nitrogen-containing gas mixtures in a single laser shot and a continuous operation burner with a laminar diffusion flame. The system test results are presented for measurements of spatial distributions of local temperatures in various flame zones at combustion of vapor—gas n-decane/nitrogen mixtures in air. Its applicability for accomplishing practical tasks in comparative laboratory investigation of characteristics of various fuels and for research on combustion in turbulent flames is discussed.

  2. Description of heat flux measurement methods used in hydrocarbon and propellant fuel fires at Sandia.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the methods commonly used to measure heat flux in fire applications at Sandia National Laboratories in both hydrocarbon (JP-8 jet fuel, diesel fuel, etc.) and propellant fires. Because these environments are very severe, many commercially available heat flux gauges do not survive the test, so alternative methods had to be developed. Specially built sensors include 'calorimeters' that use a temperature measurement to infer heat flux by use of a model (heat balance on the sensing surface) or by using an inverse heat conduction method. These specialty-built sensors are made rugged so they will survive the environment, so are not optimally designed for ease of use or accuracy. Other methods include radiometers, co-axial thermocouples, directional flame thermometers (DFTs), Sandia 'heat flux gauges', transpiration radiometers, and transverse Seebeck coefficient heat flux gauges. Typical applications are described and pros and cons of each method are listed.

  3. Nuclear fuel assemblies' deformations measurement by optoelectronic methods in cooling ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senchenko, E. S.; Zavyalov, P. S.; Finogenov, L. V.; Khakimov, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing the reliability and life-time of nuclear fuel is actual problems for nuclear power engineering. It takes to provide the high geometric stability of nuclear fuel assemblies (FA) under exploitation, since various factors cause FA mechanical deformation (bending and twisting). To obtain the objective information and make recommendations for the FA design improvement one have to fulfill the post reactor FA analysis. Therefore it takes measurements of the FA geometric parameters in cooling ponds of nuclear power plants. As applied to this problem we have developed and investigated the different optoelectronic methods, namely, structured light method, television and shadow ones. In this paper effectiveness of these methods has been investigated using the special experimental test stand and fulfilled researches are described. The experimental results of FA measurements by different methods and recommendation for their usage is given.

  4. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated UMo dispersion fuel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-09-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an Al-Si matrix has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. In this paper, two irradiated samples containing 53.6 vol% U-7wt% Mo fuel particles dispersed in an Al-2wt% Si matrix were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Measurements revealed three distinct fission gas release events for the samples from 400 to 700 oC, as well as a number of minor fission gas releases below and above this temperature range. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature with exceptional agreement.

  5. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated Usbnd Mo dispersion fuel samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-09-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (Usbnd Mo) alloy dispersed in an Alsbnd Si matrix has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world's highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. In this paper, two irradiated samples containing 53.9 vol% U-7wt% Mo fuel particles dispersed in an Al-2wt% Si matrix were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Measurements revealed three distinct fission gas release events for the samples from 400 to 700 °C, as well as a number of minor fission gas releases below and above this temperature range. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature with exceptional agreement.

  6. Measurement of Nucleate Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Limit using Fuel Cladding Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chi Young; Shin, Chang Hwan; Oh, Dong Seok; Chun, Tae Hyun; In, Wang Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Zircaloy has been widely used as a fuel cladding material of light water reactor for more than three decades because it has a lower neutron absorption cross section and cracking rate. Recently, HANA-6 has been developed in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) as the advanced fuel cladding for high burn-up fuel. Generally, under the normal and accident operating conditions of a nuclear reactor, the nuclear fuel cladding of zirconium based alloys undergoes the surface change, and the oxide layer can be formed. In such a case, the previous CHF correlations should be assessed and examined using the experimental results for not a fresh zircaloy surface but an oxidized one, to predict and examine the thermal margin and safety of a nuclear reactor core. Therefore, the experimental data using the oxidized zircaloy surface need to be provided quantitatively. In this paper, the CHF in saturated water pool boiling is measured and discussed using the specimens of zircaloy-4, HANA-6, and oxidized zircaloy-4 in high temperature air environment. The CHF of zircaloy-4, HANA-6, and oxidized surface was tested. Zircaloy-4 and HANA-6 had a similar CHF performance. This is because both are the zirconium based alloys, and appear the almost same water contact angle. On the other hands, the oxidized specimen became to be higher CHF than plain zircaloy-4 and HANA-6 specimens, due to smaller water contact angle (i. e., good hydrophilicity of specimen). The Kandlikar's (2001) correlation reasonably predicted the present experimental data.

  7. Focus: relative vulnerability of fossil fuel net exporters to climate change mitigation measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change contains explicit reference to the need to protect the interests of countries whose economies are particularly vulnerable to climate change mitigation measures. A recent study by the OPEC Secretariat showed that net exporters of fossil fuel in general, and OPEC in particular, would suffer from losses in export revenue as a result of climatic change mitigation measures. In this new study, an attempt is made to identify in more detail those countries that are likely to be most affected by such measures. 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Absolute Isotopic Abundance Ratios and the Accuracy of Δ47 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeron, M.; Blamart, D.; Peral, M.; Affek, H. P.

    2016-12-01

    Conversion from raw IRMS data to clumped isotope anomalies in CO2 (Δ47) relies on four external parameters: the (13C/12C) ratio of VPDB, the (17O/16O) and (18O/16O) ratios of VSMOW (or VPDB-CO2), and the slope of the triple oxygen isotope line (λ). Here we investigate the influence that these isotopic parameters exert on measured Δ47 values, using real-world data corresponding to 7 months of measurements; simulations based on randomly generated data; precise comparisons between water-equilibrated CO2 samples and between carbonate standards believed to share quasi-identical Δ47 values; reprocessing of two carbonate calibration data sets with different slopes of Δ47 versus T. Using different sets of isotopic parameters generally produces systematic offsets as large as 0.04 ‰ in final Δ47 values. What's more, even using a single set of isotopic parameters can produce intra- and inter-laboratory discrepancies in final Δ47 values, if some of these parameters are inaccurate. Depending on the isotopic compositions of the standards used for conversion to "absolute" values, these errors should correlate strongly with either δ13C or δ18O, or more weakly with both. Based on measurements of samples expected to display identical Δ47 values, such as 25°C water-equilibrated CO2 with different carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, or high-temperature standards ETH-1 and ETH-2, we conclude that the isotopic parameters used so far in most clumped isotope studies produces large, systematic errors controlled by the relative bulk isotopic compositions of samples and standards, which should be one of the key factors responsible for current inter-laboratory discrepancies. By contrast, the isotopic parameters of Brand et al. [2010] appear to yield accurate Δ47 values regardless of bulk isotopic composition. References:Brand, Assonov and Coplen [2010] http://dx.doi.org/10.1351/PAC-REP-09-01-05

  9. Branching Ratios and Spectral Functions of $\\tau$ Decays final ALEPH measurements and physics implications

    CERN Document Server

    Schael, S.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Kraan, A.C.; Nilsson, B.S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Phys., Kirchhoff Inst.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; White, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Muller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Yuan, C.Z.; Zhang, Z.Q.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Ward, J.J.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, G.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Bohrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2005-01-01

    The full LEP-1 data set collected with the ALEPH detector at the $Z$ pole during 1991-1995 is analysed in order to measure the $\\tau$ decay branching fractions. The analysis follows the global method used in the published study based on 1991-1993 data, but several improvements are introduced, especially concerning the treatment of photons and $\\pi^0$'s. Extensive systematic studies are performed, in order to match the large statistics of the data sample corresponding to over 300\\,000 measured and identified $\\tau$ decays. Branching fractions are obtained for the two leptonic channels and eleven hadronic channels defined by their respective numbers of charged particles and $\\pi^0$'s. Using previously published ALEPH results on final states with charged and neutral kaons, corrections are applied to the hadronic channels to derive branching ratios for exclusive final states without kaons. Thus the analyses of the full LEP-1 ALEPH data are combined to yield a complete description of $\\tau$ decays, encompassing 22...

  10. High-Precision Isotope Ratio Measurements of Sub-Picogram Actinide Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollington, A. D.; Kinman, W.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most exciting trends in analytical geochemistry over the past decade is the push towards smaller and smaller sample sizes while simultaneously achieving high precision isotope ratio measurements. This trend has been driven by advances in clean chemistry protocols, and by significant breakthroughs in mass spectrometer ionization efficiency and detector quality (stability and noise for low signals). In this presentation I will focus on new techniques currently being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the characterization of ultra-small samples (pg, fg, ag), with particular focus on actinide measurements by MC-ICP-MS. Analyses of U, Pu, Th and Am are routinely carried out in our facility using multi-ion counting techniques. I will describe some of the challenges associated with using exclusively ion counting methods (e.g., stability, detector cross calibration, etc.), and how we work to mitigate them. While the focus of much of the work currently being carried out is in the broad field of nuclear forensics and safeguards, the techniques that are being developed are directly applicable to many geologic questions that require analyses of small samples of U and Th, for example. In addition to the description of the technique development, I will present case studies demonstrating the precision and accuracy of the method as applied to real-world samples.

  11. Measuring the tensor to scalar ratio from CMB B-modes in presence of foregrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Betoule, Marc; Delabrouille, J; Jeune, M Le; Cardoso, Jean-François

    2009-01-01

    Abreg: We investigate the impact of polarized foreground emission on the performances of future CMB experiments in measuring the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. We design a component separation pipeline, based on the Smica method, aimed at estimating r and the foreground contamination from the data with no prior assumption on the frequency dependence or spatial distribution of the foregrounds. We derive error bars accounting for the uncertainty on foreground contribution. We use the current knowledge of galactic and extra-galactic foregrounds as implemented in the Planck Sky Model (PSM), to build simulations of the sky emission for various experimental setups. Our method, permits us to detect r = 0.1 at more than 3 sigma from B-modes only with Planck data, and r = 0.001 at 6 sigma for the most ambitious designs of the future EPIC probe. We find that all-sky experiments permit a proper measurement of the reionization bump despite the large scale foreground emission and are nearly insensitive to contamination from po...

  12. Shock tube measurements of the branching ratios of propene + OH -> products

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi

    2014-07-25

    Absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of OH radical with propene (C3H6) and five deutrated isotopes, propene-1-d1 (CDHCHCH3), propene-1,1-d2 (CD2CHCH3), propene-2-d1 (CH2CDCH3), propene-3,3,3-d3 (CH2CHCD3), and propene-d6 (C3D6), were measured in a shock tube behind reflected shock conditions over the temperature range of 812 K – 1460 K and pressures near 1 atm. The reaction progress was followed by monitoring OH radical near 306.7 nm using UV laser absorption. The first experimental measurements for the branching ratio of the title reaction are reported and compared with theoretical calculations. The allylic H atom abstraction of propene by OH radicals was found to be the most dominant reaction pathway followed by propen-1-yl and propen-2-yl channels over the entire temperature range of this study which is in line with theoretical predictions. Arrhenius parameters for various site-specific rate coefficients are provided for kinetic modeling.

  13. Measurement of Pi-K Ratios from the NuMI Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seun, Sin Man [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Interactions of protons (p) with the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) target are used to create the neutrino beam for the MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) Experiment. Using the MIPP (Main Injector Particle Production) experimental apparatus, the production of charged pions and kaons in p+NuMI interactions is studied. The data come from a sample of 2 x 106 events obtained by MIPP using the 120 GeV/c proton beam from the Main Injector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, USA. Pions and kaons are identified by measurement in a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector. Presented are measurements of π-+, K-/K+, π+/K+ and π-/K- production ratios in the momentum range pT < 2 GeV/c transversely and 20 GeV/c < pz < 90 GeV/c longitudinally. Also provided are detailed comparisons of the MIPP NuMI data with the MIPP Thin Carbon data, the MIPP Monte Carlo simulation and the current MINOS models in the relevant momentum ranges.

  14. Authenticity of carbon dioxide bubbles in French ciders through multiflow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Laetitia; Guyon, Francois; Salagoïty, Marie-Hélène; Médina, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    A procedure to detect whether carbon dioxide was added to French ciders has been developed. For this purpose, an optimised and simplified method is proposed to determine (13)C/(12)C isotope ratio of carbon dioxide (δ(13)C) in ciders. Three critical steps were checked: (1) influence of atmospheric CO2 remaining in the loaded vial, (2) impact of helium flush, (3) sampling speed. This study showed that atmospheric CO2 does not impact the measurement, that helium flush can lead to isotopic fractionation and finally, that a fractionation occurs only 5h after bottle opening. The method, without any other preparation, consists in sampling 0.2 mL of cold (4 °C) cider in a vial that is passed in an ultrasonic bath for 10 min at room temperature to enhance cider de-carbonation. The headspace CO2 is then analysed using the link Multiflow®-isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Each year, a data bank is developed by fermenting authentic apples juices in order to control cider authenticity. Over a four year span (2008-2011), the CO2 produced during the fermentation step was studied. This set of 61 authentic ciders, from various French production areas, was used to determine a δ(13)C value range of -22.59±0.92‰ for authentic ciders CO2 bubbles. 75 commercial ciders were analysed with this method. Most of the samples analysed present a gas δ(13)C value in the expected range. Nevertheless, some ciders have δ(13)C values outside the 3σ limit, revealing carbonation by technical CO2. This practice is not allowed for organic, "Controlled Appellation of Origin" ciders and ciders specifying natural carbonation on the label. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. ICP-MS with hexapole collision cell for isotope ratio measurements of Ca, Fe, and Se

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F. [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk (Belarus); Becker, J.S. [Central Department for Analytical Chemistry, Research Centre Juelich (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    To avoid mass interferences on analyte ions caused by argon ions and argon molecular ions via reactions with collision gases, an rf hexapole filled with helium and hydrogen has been used in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and its performance has been studied. Up to tenfold improvement in sensitivity was observed for heavy elements (m > 100 u), because of better ion transmission through the hexapole ion guide. A reduction of argon ions Ar{sup +} and the molecular ions of argon ArX{sup +} (X = O, Ar) by up to three orders of magnitude was achieved in a hexapole collision cell of an ICP-MS (''Platform ICP'', Micromass, Manchester, UK) as a result of gas-phase reactions with hydrogen when the hexapole bias (HB) was set to 0 V; at an HB of 1.6 V argon, and argon-based ions of masses 40 u, 56 u, and 80 u, were reduced by approximately four, two, and five orders of magnitude, respectively. The signal-to-noise ratio {sup 80}Se/ {sup 40}Ar{sub 2}{sup +} was improved by more than five orders of magnitude under optimized experimental conditions. Dependence of mass discrimination on collision-cell properties was studied in the mass range 10 u (boron) to 238 u (uranium). Isotopic analysis of the elements affected by mass-spectrometric interference, Ca, Fe, and Se, was performed using a Meinhard nebulizer and an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN). The measured isotope ratios were comparable with tabulated values from IUPAC. Precision of 0.26%, 0.19%, and 0.12%, respectively, and accuracy of 0.13% 0.25%, and 0.92%, respectively, was achieved for isotope ratios {sup 44}Ca/ {sup 40}Ca and {sup 56}Fe/{sup 57}Fe in 10 {mu}g L{sup -1} solution nebulized by means of a USN and for {sup 78}Se/{sup 80}Se in 100 {mu}g L{sup -1} solution nebulized by means of a Meinhard nebulizer. (orig.)

  16. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  17. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2012-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  18. Three-Dimensional Measurements of Fuel Distribution in High-Pressure, High- Temperature, Next-Generation Aviation Gas Turbine Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; Locke, Randy J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Zaller, Michelle M.

    1998-01-01

    In our world-class, optically accessible combustion facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center, we have developed the unique capability of making three-dimensional fuel distribution measurements of aviation gas turbine fuel injectors at actual operating conditions. These measurements are made in situ at the actual operating temperatures and pressures using the JP-grade fuels of candidate next-generation advanced aircraft engines for the High Speed Research (HSR) and Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) programs. The inlet temperature and pressure ranges used thus far are 300 to 1100 F and 80 to 250 psia. With these data, we can obtain the injector spray angles, the fuel mass distributions of liquid and vapor, the degree of fuel vaporization, and the degree to which fuel has been consumed. The data have been used to diagnose the performance of injectors designed both in-house and by major U.S. engine manufacturers and to design new fuel injectors with overall engine performance goals of increased efficiency and reduced environmental impact. Mie scattering is used to visualize the liquid fuel, and laser-induced fluorescence is used to visualize both liquid and fuel vapor.

  19. Thermal signature measurements for ammonium nitrate/fuel mixtures by laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarian, Ashot; Presser, Cary, E-mail: cpresser@nist.gov

    2016-01-10

    Highlights: • LDTR is a useful diagnostic for characterizing AN/fuel mixture thermochemical behavior. • Each AN/fuel mixture thermal signature was different. • AN/fuel mixture signature features were defined by the individual constituents. • Baseline signatures changed after an experiment. - Abstract: Measurements were carried out to obtain thermal signatures of several ammonium nitrate/fuel (ANF) mixtures, using a laser-heating technique referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR). The mixtures were ammonium nitrate (AN)/kerosene, AN/ethylene glycol, AN/paraffin wax, AN/petroleum jelly, AN/confectioner's sugar, AN/cellulose (tissue paper), nitromethane/cellulose, nitrobenzene/cellulose, AN/cellulose/nitromethane, AN/cellulose/nitrobenzene. These mixtures were also compared with AN/nitromethane and AN/diesel fuel oil, obtained from an earlier investigation. Thermograms for the mixtures, as well as individual constituents, were compared to better understand how sample thermal signature changes with mixture composition. This is the first step in development of a thermal-signature database, to be used along with other signature databases, to improve identification of energetic substances of unknown composition. The results indicated that each individual thermal signature was associated unambiguously with a particular mixture composition. The signature features of a particular mixture were shaped by the individual constituent signatures. It was also uncovered that the baseline signature was modified after an experiment due to coating of unreacted residue on the substrate surface and a change in the reactor sphere oxide layer. Thus, care was required to pre-oxidize the sphere prior to an experiment. A minimum sample mass (which was dependent on composition) was required to detect the signature characteristics. Increased laser power served to magnify signal strength while preserving the signature features. For the mixtures examined, the thermal

  20. Structural integrity assessment and stress measurement of CHASNUPP-1 fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waseem,, E-mail: wazim_me@hotmail.com; Murtaza, Ghulam; Elahi, Nadeem

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Finite element model of CHASNUPP-1 fuel assembly produced, using Shell181 elements. • Non-linear contact and buckling analysis have been performed. • Structural integrity and stress measurement of fuel assembly is calculated. • Calculated stresses and deformations, are compared with test results. • Results of both studies are comparable, which validate finite element methodology. - Abstract: Fuel assembly of the PWR nuclear power plant is a long and flexible structure. This study has been made in an attempt to find the structural integrity of the fuel assembly (FA) of Chashma Nuclear Power Plant-1 (CHASNUPP-1) at room temperature in air. Non-linear contact and buckling analyses have been performed using ANSYS 13.0, in-order to determine the FA's deformation behaviour as well as the location/values of the maximum stress intensity and stresses developed in axial direction under applied compression load of 7350 N or 1.6 g being the FA's handling load (Zhang et al., 1994). The finite element (FE) model comprises spacer grids, fuel rods, flexible contact between the fuel rods and grids’ supports system (springs and dimples) and guide thimbles with dash-pots and flow holes, in addition to the spot welds between spacer grids and guide thimbles, has been developed using Shell181, Conta174 and Targe170 elements. FA is a non-straight structure. The actual behaviour of the geometry is non-linear. The value of the perturbation force is related to the geometry of the model and/or the tolerance defined for the geometry. Therefore, a sensitivity study has been made to determine the appropriate value of an arbitrary perturbation load. It has been observed that FA deformation values obtained through FE analysis and experiment (SNERDI Tech Doc, 1994) under applied compression load are comparable and show linear behaviours. Therefore, it is confirmed that buckling of FA will not occur at the specified load. Moreover, the values of stresses obtained

  1. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering