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Sample records for fuel performance modelling

  1. Advances in HTGR fuel performance models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stansfield, O.M.; Goodin, D.T.; Hanson, D.L.; Turner, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in HTGR fuel performance models have improved the agreement between observed and predicted performance and contributed to an enhanced position of the HTGR with regard to investment risk and passive safety. Heavy metal contamination is the source of about 55% of the circulating activity in the HTGR during normal operation, and the remainder comes primarily from particles which failed because of defective or missing buffer coatings. These failed particles make up about 5 x 10 -4 fraction of the total core inventory. In addition to prediction of fuel performance during normal operation, the models are used to determine fuel failure and fission product release during core heat-up accident conditions. The mechanistic nature of the models, which incorporate all important failure modes, permits the prediction of performance from the relatively modest accident temperatures of a passively safe HTGR to the much more severe accident conditions of the larger 2240-MW/t HTGR. (author)

  2. Modelling fuel cell performance using artificial intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogaji, S.O.T.; Singh, R.; Pilidis, P.; Diacakis, M. [Power Propulsion and Aerospace Engineering Department, Centre for Diagnostics and Life Cycle Costs, Cranfield University (United Kingdom)

    2006-03-09

    Over the last few years, fuel cell technology has been increasing promisingly its share in the generation of stationary power. Numerous pilot projects are operating worldwide, continuously increasing the amount of operating hours either as stand-alone devices or as part of gas turbine combined cycles. An essential tool for the adequate and dynamic analysis of such systems is a software model that enables the user to assess a large number of alternative options in the least possible time. On the other hand, the sphere of application of artificial neural networks has widened covering such endeavours of life such as medicine, finance and unsurprisingly engineering (diagnostics of faults in machines). Artificial neural networks have been described as diagrammatic representation of a mathematical equation that receives values (inputs) and gives out results (outputs). Artificial neural networks systems have the capacity to recognise and associate patterns and because of their inherent design features, they can be applied to linear and non-linear problem domains. In this paper, the performance of the fuel cell is modelled using artificial neural networks. The inputs to the network are variables that are critical to the performance of the fuel cell while the outputs are the result of changes in any one or all of the fuel cell design variables, on its performance. Critical parameters for the cell include the geometrical configuration as well as the operating conditions. For the neural network, various network design parameters such as the network size, training algorithm, activation functions and their causes on the effectiveness of the performance modelling are discussed. Results from the analysis as well as the limitations of the approach are presented and discussed. (author)

  3. Modelling fuel cell performance using artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogaji, S. O. T.; Singh, R.; Pilidis, P.; Diacakis, M.

    Over the last few years, fuel cell technology has been increasing promisingly its share in the generation of stationary power. Numerous pilot projects are operating worldwide, continuously increasing the amount of operating hours either as stand-alone devices or as part of gas turbine combined cycles. An essential tool for the adequate and dynamic analysis of such systems is a software model that enables the user to assess a large number of alternative options in the least possible time. On the other hand, the sphere of application of artificial neural networks has widened covering such endeavours of life such as medicine, finance and unsurprisingly engineering (diagnostics of faults in machines). Artificial neural networks have been described as diagrammatic representation of a mathematical equation that receives values (inputs) and gives out results (outputs). Artificial neural networks systems have the capacity to recognise and associate patterns and because of their inherent design features, they can be applied to linear and non-linear problem domains. In this paper, the performance of the fuel cell is modelled using artificial neural networks. The inputs to the network are variables that are critical to the performance of the fuel cell while the outputs are the result of changes in any one or all of the fuel cell design variables, on its performance. Critical parameters for the cell include the geometrical configuration as well as the operating conditions. For the neural network, various network design parameters such as the network size, training algorithm, activation functions and their causes on the effectiveness of the performance modelling are discussed. Results from the analysis as well as the limitations of the approach are presented and discussed.

  4. Analysis on fuel thermal conductivity model of the computer code for performance prediction of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hai; Huang Chen; Du Aibing; Xu Baoyu

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity is one of the most important parameters in the computer code for performance prediction for fuel rods. Several fuel thermal conductivity models used in foreign computer code, including thermal conductivity models for MOX fuel and UO 2 fuel were introduced in this paper. Thermal conductivities were calculated by using these models, and the results were compared and analyzed. Finally, the thermal conductivity model for the native computer code for performance prediction for fuel rods in fast reactor was recommended. (authors)

  5. Atomic scale simulations for improved CRUD and fuel performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-06

    A more mechanistic description of fuel performance codes can be achieved by deriving models and parameters from atomistic scale simulations rather than fitting models empirically to experimental data. The same argument applies to modeling deposition of corrosion products on fuel rods (CRUD). Here are some results from publications in 2016 carried out using the CASL allocation at LANL.

  6. WWER reactor fuel performance, modelling and experimental support. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, S.; Chantoin, P.; Kolev, I.

    1994-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of 36 papers presented at the International Seminar on WWER Reactor Fuel Performance, Modelling and Experimental Support, organised by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (BG), in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Seminar was attended by 76 participants from 16 countries, including representatives of all major Russian plants and institutions responsible for WWER reactor fuel manufacturing, design and research. The reports are grouped in four chapters: 1) WWER Fuel Performance and Economics: Status and Improvement Prospects: 2) WWER Fuel Behaviour Modelling and Experimental Support; 3) Licensing of WWER Fuel and Fuel Analysis Codes; 4) Spent Fuel of WWER Plants. The reports from the corresponding four panel discussion sessions are also included. All individual papers are recorded in INIS as separate items

  7. Analytic models for fuel pin transient performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bard, F.E.; Fox, G.L.; Washburn, D.F.; Hanson, J.E.

    1976-09-01

    HEDL's ability to analyze various mechanisms that operate within a fuel pin has progressed substantially through development of codes such as PECTCLAD, which solves cladding response, and DSTRESS, which solves fuel response. The PECTCLAD results show good correlation with a variety of mechanical tests on cladding material and also demonstrate the significance of cladding strength when applying the life fraction rule. The DSTRESS results have shown that fuel deforms sufficiently during overpower transient tests that available volumes are filled, whether in the form of a central cavity or start-up cracks

  8. BISON and MARMOT Development for Modeling Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williamson, Richard L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Medvedev, Pavel G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    BISON and MARMOT are two codes under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for engineering scale and lower length scale fuel performance modeling. It is desired to add capabilities for fast reactor applications to these codes. The fast reactor fuel types under consideration are metal (U-Pu-Zr) and oxide (MOX). The cladding types of interest include 316SS, D9, and HT9. The purpose of this report is to outline the proposed plans for code development and provide an overview of the models added to the BISON and MARMOT codes for fast reactor fuel behavior. A brief overview of preliminary discussions on the formation of a bilateral agreement between the Idaho National Laboratory and the National Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom is presented.

  9. Modelling of LOCA Tests with the BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    BISON is a modern finite-element based, multidimensional nuclear fuel performance code that is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (USA). Recent advances of BISON include the extension of the code to the analysis of LWR fuel rod behaviour during loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). In this work, BISON models for the phenomena relevant to LWR cladding behaviour during LOCAs are described, followed by presentation of code results for the simulation of LOCA tests. Analysed experiments include separate effects tests of cladding ballooning and burst, as well as the Halden IFA-650.2 fuel rod test. Two-dimensional modelling of the experiments is performed, and calculations are compared to available experimental data. Comparisons include cladding burst pressure and temperature in separate effects tests, as well as the evolution of fuel rod inner pressure during ballooning and time to cladding burst. Furthermore, BISON three-dimensional simulations of separate effects tests are performed, which demonstrate the capability to reproduce the effect of azimuthal temperature variations in the cladding. The work has been carried out in the frame of the collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and Halden Reactor Project, and the IAEA Coordinated Research Project FUMAC.

  10. Radionuclide release rates from spent fuel for performance assessment modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    In a scenario of aqueous transport from a high-level radioactive waste repository, the concentration of radionuclides in water in contact with the waste constitutes the source term for transport models, and as such represents a fundamental component of all performance assessment models. Many laboratory experiments have been done to characterize release rates and understand processes influencing radionuclide release rates from irradiated nuclear fuel. Natural analogues of these waste forms have been studied to obtain information regarding the long-term stability of potential waste forms in complex natural systems. This information from diverse sources must be brought together to develop and defend methods used to define source terms for performance assessment models. In this manuscript examples of measures of radionuclide release rates from spent nuclear fuel or analogues of nuclear fuel are presented. Each example represents a very different approach to obtaining a numerical measure and each has its limitations. There is no way to obtain an unambiguous measure of this or any parameter used in performance assessment codes for evaluating the effects of processes operative over many millennia. The examples are intended to suggest by example that in the absence of the ability to evaluate accuracy and precision, consistency of a broadly based set of data can be used as circumstantial evidence to defend the choice of parameters used in performance assessments

  11. Multiscale Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estep, Donald [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); El-Azab, Anter [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Pernice, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Peterson, John W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Polyakov, Peter [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Tavener, Simon [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Xiu, Dongbin [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2017-03-23

    In this project, we will address the challenges associated with constructing high fidelity multiscale models of nuclear fuel performance. We (*) propose a novel approach for coupling mesoscale and macroscale models, (*) devise efficient numerical methods for simulating the coupled system, and (*) devise and analyze effective numerical approaches for error and uncertainty quantification for the coupled multiscale system. As an integral part of the project, we will carry out analysis of the effects of upscaling and downscaling, investigate efficient methods for stochastic sensitivity analysis of the individual macroscale and mesoscale models, and carry out a posteriori error analysis for computed results. We will pursue development and implementation of solutions in software used at Idaho National Laboratories on models of interest to the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program.

  12. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Tsvetkov, Pavel [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  13. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-01-01

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  14. TRISO-Fuel Element Performance Modeling for the Hybrid LIFE Engine with Pu Fuel Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMange, P; Marian, J; Caro, M; Caro, A

    2010-02-18

    A TRISO-coated fuel thermo-mechanical performance study is performed for the hybrid LIFE engine to test the viability of TRISO particles to achieve ultra-high burnup of a weapons-grade Pu blanket. Our methodology includes full elastic anisotropy, time and temperature varying material properties for all TRISO layers, and a procedure to remap the elastic solutions in order to achieve fast fluences up to 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2} (E > 0.18 MeV). In order to model fast fluences in the range of {approx} 7 {approx} 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2}, for which no data exist, careful scalings and extrapolations of the known TRISO material properties are carried out under a number of potential scenarios. A number of findings can be extracted from our study. First, failure of the internal pyrolytic carbon (PyC) layer occurs within the first two months of operation. Then, the particles behave as BISO-coated particles, with the internal pressure being withstood directly by the SiC layer. Later, after 1.6 years, the remaining PyC crumbles due to void swelling and the fuel particle becomes a single-SiC-layer particle. Unrestrained by the PyC layers, and at the temperatures and fluences in the LIFE engine, the SiC layer maintains reasonably-low tensile stresses until the end-of-life. Second, the PyC creep constant, K, has a striking influence on the fuel performance of TRISO-coated particles, whose stresses scale almost inversely proportional to K. Obtaining more reliable measurements, especially at higher fluences, is an imperative for the fidelity of our models. Finally, varying the geometry of the TRISO-coated fuel particles results in little differences in the scope of fuel performance. The mechanical integrity of 2-cm graphite pebbles that act as fuel matrix has also been studied and it is concluded that they can reliable serve the entire LIFE burnup cycle without failure.

  15. HTGR Fuel performance basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamasundar, B.I.; Stansfield, O.M.; Jensen, D.D.

    1982-05-01

    The safety characteristics of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) during normal and accident conditions are determined in part by HTGR fuel performance. During normal operation, less than 0.1% fuel failure occurs, primarily from defective particles. This low fuel failure fraction limits circulating activity to acceptable levels. During severe accidents, the radiological consequence is influenced by high-temperature fuel particle behavior. An empirical fuel failure model, supported by recent experimental data, is presented. The onset of significant fuel particle failure occurs at temperatures in excess of 1600/sup 0/C, and complete fuel failure occurs at 2660/sup 0/C. This indicates that the fuel is more retentive at higher temperatures than previously assumed. The more retentive nature of the fuel coupled with the high thermal capacitance of the core results in slow release of fission products from the core during severe accidents.

  16. FRAPCON-3: Modifications to fuel rod material properties and performance models for high-burnup application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    This volume describes the fuel rod material and performance models that were updated for the FRAPCON-3 steady-state fuel rod performance code. The property and performance models were changed to account for behavior at extended burnup levels up to 65 Gwd/MTU. The property and performance models updated were the fission gas release, fuel thermal conductivity, fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, solid-solid contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion and hydriding, cladding mechanical properties, and cladding axial growth. Each updated property and model was compared to well characterized data up to high burnup levels. The installation of these properties and models in the FRAPCON-3 code along with input instructions are provided in Volume 2 of this report and Volume 3 provides a code assessment based on comparison to integral performance data. The updated FRAPCON-3 code is intended to replace the earlier codes FRAPCON-2 and GAPCON-THERMAL-2. 94 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs

  17. FRAPCON-3: Modifications to fuel rod material properties and performance models for high-burnup application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    This volume describes the fuel rod material and performance models that were updated for the FRAPCON-3 steady-state fuel rod performance code. The property and performance models were changed to account for behavior at extended burnup levels up to 65 Gwd/MTU. The property and performance models updated were the fission gas release, fuel thermal conductivity, fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, solid-solid contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion and hydriding, cladding mechanical properties, and cladding axial growth. Each updated property and model was compared to well characterized data up to high burnup levels. The installation of these properties and models in the FRAPCON-3 code along with input instructions are provided in Volume 2 of this report and Volume 3 provides a code assessment based on comparison to integral performance data. The updated FRAPCON-3 code is intended to replace the earlier codes FRAPCON-2 and GAPCON-THERMAL-2. 94 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Performance of fire behavior fuel models developed for the Rothermel Surface Fire Spread Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Ziel; W. Matt Jolly

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, 40 new fire behavior fuel models were published for use with the Rothermel Surface Fire Spread Model. These new models are intended to augment the original 13 developed in 1972 and 1976. As a compiled set of quantitative fuel descriptions that serve as input to the Rothermel model, the selected fire behavior fuel model has always been critical to the resulting...

  19. CANDU fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanoff, N.V.; Bazeley, E.G.; Hastings, I.J.

    1982-01-01

    CANDU fuel has operated successfully in Ontario Hydro's power reactors since 1962. In the 19 years of experience, about 99.9% of all fuel bundles have performed as designed. Most defects occurred before 1979 and subsequent changes in fuel design, fuel management, reactor control, and manufacturing quality control have reduced the current defect rate to near zero. Loss of power production due to defective fuel has been negligible. The outstanding performance continues while maintaining a low unit energy cost for fuel

  20. 11. International conference on WWER fuel performance, modelling and experimental support. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolova, M.; Boneva, S.; Mitev, M.

    2015-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of the papers presented in 11th International Conference on WWER Fuel Performance, Modeling and Experimental Support, organized by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in co-operation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna, Austria, supported by the Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP), the Bulgarian Nuclear Regulatory Agency, and TVEL Fuel Company, Russia. The Conference took place in hotel Bolero, Golden Sands Resort, Bulgaria, from 26 September 2015 to 3 October 2015. It was attended by 117 participants, among them more than 100 experts and specialists from 22 countries, including representatives of 3 international organizations, 16 Russian organizations and other 36 foreign institutes, nuclear fuel plants, nuclear power plants and organizations responsible for WWER and PWR fuel design, manufacturing and research, and 3 Bulgarian organizations, working for the Bulgarian nuclear industry. 70 papers have been presented in the Conference in 6 oral and 1 poster session, covering: (1) general overview lectures; (2) fuel performance and operational experience; (3) fuel modeling and experimental support; (4) fuel safety and QA; (5) spent fuel performance and management; (6) specific issues of WWER-1000 fuel reliability. The proceedings provide Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations of the Conference, together with the full text of the presentations. IAEA Technical Meeting (TM) “Achieving zero fuel failure rates: challenges and perspectives”, 1 – 2 October 2015 was organized in conjunction with the 11th International Conference on WWER Fuel Performance, Modelling and Experimental Support. The reports presented on TM sessions are included in the Conference Proceedings too

  1. Development of an analytical model to assess fuel property effects on combustor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, R. D.; Troth, D. L.; Miles, G. A.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    A generalized first-order computer model has been developed in order to analytically evaluate the potential effect of alternative fuels' effects on gas turbine combustors. The model assesses the size, configuration, combustion reliability, and durability of the combustors required to meet performance and emission standards while operating on a broad range of fuels. Predictions predicated on combustor flow-field determinations by the model indicate that fuel chemistry, as defined by hydrogen content, exerts a significant influence on flame retardation, liner wall temperature, and smoke emission.

  2. International experience and status of fuel element performance and modelling for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    Current knowledge concerning water reactor fuel performance and technology is reviewed (212 references). The emphasis is on aspects of in-reactor performance including behaviour in accidents. Computer models for predicting fuel behaviour during the ordinary running of the reactor and during accidents are described. These codes include COMETHE, HOTROD, SLEUTH-SEER and FRAPCON. Their agreement with experimental data is examined. (U.K.)

  3. TACO: fuel pin performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoudt, R.H.; Buchanan, D.T.; Buescher, B.J.; Losh, L.L.; Wilson, H.W.; Henningson, P.J.

    1977-08-01

    The thermal performance of fuel in an LWR during its operational lifetime must be described for LOCA analysis as well as for other safety analyses. The determination of stored energy in the LOCA analysis, for example, requires a conservative fuel pin thermal performance model that is capable of calculating fuel and cladding behavior, including the gap conductance between the fuel and cladding, as a function of burnup. The determination of parameters that affect the fuel and cladding performance, such as fuel densification, fission gas release, cladding dimensional changes, fuel relocation, and thermal expansion, should be accounted for in the model. Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) has submitted a topical report, BAW-10087P, December 1975, which describes their thermal performance model TACO. A summary of the elements that comprise the TACO model and an evaluation are presented

  4. Prediction models for performance and emissions of a dual fuel CI ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    use artificial intelligence modelling techniques like fuzzy logic, Artificial Neural Net- work (ANN), Genetic Algorithm (GA), etc. This paper uses a neuro fuzzy modelling technique, Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) for developing predic- tion models for performance and emission parameter of a dual fuel engine.

  5. Fuel performance experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofer, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The history of LWR fuel supply has been characterized by a wide range of design developments and fuel cycle cost improvements. Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. has pursued an aggressive fuel research and development program aimed at improved fuel performance. Exxon Nuclear has introduced many design innovations which have improved fuel cycle economics and operating flexibility while fuel failures remain at very low levels. The removable upper tie plate feature of Exxon Nuclear assemblies has helped accelerate this development, enabling repeated inspections during successive plant outages. Also, this design feature has made it possible to repair damaged fuel assemblies during refueling outages, thereby minimizing the economic impact of fuel failure from all causes

  6. Overall models and experimental database for UO2 and MOX fuel increasing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, L.C.; Blanpain, P.

    2001-01-01

    COPERNIC is an advanced fuel rod performance code developed by Framatome. It is based on the TRANSURANUS code that contains a clear and flexible architecture, and offers many modeling possibilities. The main objectives of COPERNIC are to accurately predict steady-state and transient fuel operations at high burnups and to incorporate advanced materials such as the Framatome M5-alloy cladding. An extensive development program was undertaken to benchmark the code to very high burnups and to new M5-alloy cladding data. New models were developed for the M5-alloy cladding and the COPERNIC thermal models were upgraded and improved to extend the predictions to burnups over 100 GWd/tM. Since key phenomena, like fission gas release, are strongly temperature dependent, many other models were upgraded also. The COPERNIC qualification range extends to 67, 55, 53 GWd/tM respectively for UO 2 , UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 , and MOX fuels with Zircaloy-4 claddings. The range extends to 63 GWd/tM with UO 2 fuel and the advanced M5-alloy cladding. The paper focuses on thermal and fission gas release models, and on MOX fuel modeling. The COPERNIC thermal model consists of several submodels: gap conductance, gap closure, fuel thermal conductivity, radial power profile, and fuel rim. The fuel thermal conductivity and the gap closure models, in particular, have been significantly improved. The model was benchmarked with 3400 fuel centerline temperature data from many French and international programs. There are no measured to predicted statistical biases with respect to linear heat generation rate or burnup. The overall quality of the model is state-of-the-art as the model uncertainty is below 10 %. The fission gas release takes into account athermal and thermally activated mechanisms. The model was adapted to MOX and Gadolinia fuels. For the heterogeneous MOX MIMAS fuels, an effective burnup is used for the incubation threshold. For gadolinia fuels, a scaled temperature effect is used. The

  7. Nuclear fuel elements design, fabrication and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Frost, Brian R T

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Elements: Design, Fabrication and Performance is concerned with the design, fabrication, and performance of nuclear fuel elements, with emphasis on fast reactor fuel elements. Topics range from fuel types and the irradiation behavior of fuels to cladding and duct materials, fuel element design and modeling, fuel element performance testing and qualification, and the performance of water reactor fuels. Fast reactor fuel elements, research and test reactor fuel elements, and unconventional fuel elements are also covered. This volume consists of 12 chapters and begins with an overvie

  8. GEN-IV Benchmarking of Triso Fuel Performance Models under accident conditions modeling input data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document presents the benchmark plan for the calculation of particle fuel performance on safety testing experiments that are representative of operational accidental transients. The benchmark is dedicated to the modeling of fission product release under accident conditions by fuel performance codes from around the world, and the subsequent comparison to post-irradiation experiment (PIE) data from the modeled heating tests. The accident condition benchmark is divided into three parts: • The modeling of a simplified benchmark problem to assess potential numerical calculation issues at low fission product release. • The modeling of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis safety testing experiments. • The comparison of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis modeling results with PIE data. The simplified benchmark case, thereafter named NCC (Numerical Calculation Case), is derived from “Case 5” of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on coated particle fuel technology [IAEA 2012]. It is included so participants can evaluate their codes at low fission product release. “Case 5” of the IAEA CRP-6 showed large code-to-code discrepancies in the release of fission products, which were attributed to “effects of the numerical calculation method rather than the physical model” [IAEA 2012]. The NCC is therefore intended to check if these numerical effects subsist. The first two steps imply the involvement of the benchmark participants with a modeling effort following the guidelines and recommendations provided by this document. The third step involves the collection of the modeling results by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the comparison of these results with the available PIE data. The objective of this document is to provide all necessary input data to model the benchmark cases, and to give some methodology guidelines and recommendations in order to make all results suitable for comparison with each other. The participants should read

  9. CANDU fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzer, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents a review of CANDU fuel performance including a 28-element bundle for Pickering reactors, a 37-element bundle for the Bruce and Darlington reactors, and a 37-element bundle for the CANDU-6 reactors. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of fuel defect formation and propagation and definition of fuel element operating thresholds for normal operation and accident conditions. (author)

  10. Main concepts and objectives of fuel performance modelling and core development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassmann, K.; O'Carroll, C.; Van de Laar, J.; Ray, I.

    1994-01-01

    The basic concepts of the fuel rod modelling was reviewed and their limitations are discussed.Three more general modelling concepts are briefly outlined: one-dimensional models versus 2-D or 3-D models; steady-state versus transient modelling; empirical versus mechanical models. The fuel rod behaviour is determined by thermal, mechanical and physical processes such as densification, swelling, gas release, irradiation damage etc. It is shown that the macroscopic behaviour of a fuel rod is to a large extent determined by the local UO 2 microstructure. Any fuel rod model must include the solution of the heat conduction equation and the principal mechanical equations i. e. equilibrium and compatibility, together with constitutive equations. The basic limitations from the different assumptions made for the solution of the governing equations are identified. It was shown that the thermal and the mechanical analysis are strongly coupled and therefore errors are propagated. The individual correlations and processes are also not error-free and in only some cases can individual errors be estimated. There is almost for all processes a good understanding of the dominating parameters but the unsolved problem is how local quantities such as pores and grain structure, stresses etc. evolve during the irradiation. Thus the wrong input data for local processes is considered as one of the main source of uncertainty. Fission gas release and swelling could not be described by the corresponding equations without introducing some free parameters. The center line predictions of two codes for FUMEX blind exercise are given. It is stated that since the D-COM exercise in 1984, fuel rod performance codes have been improved considerably and must be now considered as mature tools for further optimisation of fuel rods. 1 tab., 12 figs., 22 refs

  11. An introduction to current modeling techniques in nuclear fuel performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faya, S.C.S.

    1981-10-01

    An overview of several important phenomena considered in fuel performance analysis, such as fuel restructuring, fuel swelling, fission gas release, pellet cracking, etc... are provided. All these phenomena are independent. For the purpose of illustration of integral fuel rod analysis the LIFE-1 computer code is discussed. (Author) [pt

  12. Performance analysis of a biogas-fueled micro gas turbine using a validated thermodynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikpey Somehsaraei, Homam; Mansouri Majoumerd, Mohammad; Breuhaus, Peter; Assadi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on an investigation of the fuel flexibility and performance analysis of micro gas turbines (MGTs) in biogas application. For this purpose, a steady state thermodynamic model of an MGT was developed and validated by experimental data obtained from a 100 kW MGT test rig. Quite good agreement was obtained between the measurements and the simulation results. A wide range of biogas compositions with varying methane content was simulated for this study. Necessary minor modifications to fuel valves and compressor were assumed to allow engine operation with the simulated biogas composition. The effects of biogas on the engine performance were fully analyzed at various operational conditions by changing the power demand and also the ambient temperature. Compared to the natural gas fueled case, the mass flow and pressure ratio in the MGT decreased, which resulted in a slight reduction of the surge margin. This effect became more severe, however, at low power loads and/or low ambient temperatures. For all operational conditions, the electrical efficiency decreased with decreasing methane content of the biogas. The results also indicated the negative effect of the biogas on the heat recovery in the recuperator, which lowered as the methane content of the fuel decreased. - Highlights: •The MGT performance and fuel flexibility were investigated in biogas application. •A thermodynamic model of the MGT was developed and validated with experimental data. •Changes in performance and operating conditions of components were studied. •The results showed the viability of the MGT for use in biogas application

  13. Fuel performance analysis code 'FAIR'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swami Prasad, P.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1994-01-01

    For modelling nuclear reactor fuel rod behaviour of water cooled reactors under severe power maneuvering and high burnups, a mechanistic fuel performance analysis code FAIR has been developed. The code incorporates finite element based thermomechanical module, physically based fission gas release module and relevant models for modelling fuel related phenomena, such as, pellet cracking, densification and swelling, radial flux redistribution across the pellet due to the build up of plutonium near the pellet surface, pellet clad mechanical interaction/stress corrosion cracking (PCMI/SSC) failure of sheath etc. The code follows the established principles of fuel rod analysis programmes, such as coupling of thermal and mechanical solutions along with the fission gas release calculations, analysing different axial segments of fuel rod simultaneously, providing means for performing local analysis such as clad ridging analysis etc. The modular nature of the code offers flexibility in affecting modifications easily to the code for modelling MOX fuels and thorium based fuels. For performing analysis of fuel rods subjected to very long power histories within a reasonable amount of time, the code has been parallelised and is commissioned on the ANUPAM parallel processing system developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC). (author). 37 refs

  14. Safety analysis of MOX fuels by fuel performance code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    Performance of plutonium rick mixed oxide fuels specified for the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) has been analysed by modified fuel performance code. Thermodynamic properties of these fuels up to 120 GWd/t burnup have not been measured and estimated using existing uranium fuel models. Fission product release, pressure rise inside fuel rods and mechanical loads of fuel cans due to internal pressure have been preliminarily assessed based on assumed axial power distribution history, which show the integrity of fuel performance. Detailed evaluation of fuel-cladding interactions due to thermal expansion or swelling of fuel pellets due to high burnup will be required for safety analysis of mixed oxide fuels. Thermal conductivity and swelling of plutonium rich mixed oxide fuels shall be taken into consideration. (T. Tanaka)

  15. Metal fuel safety performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, K.J. Jr.; Tentner, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The current development of breeder reactor systems has lead to the renewed interest in metal fuels as the driver material. Modeling efforts were begun to provide a mechanistic description of the metal fuel during anticipated and hypothetical transients within the context of the SAS4A accident analysis code system. Through validation exercises using experimental results of metal fuel TREAT tests, confidence is being developed on the nature and accuracy of the modeling and implementation. Prefailure characterization, transient pin response, margins to failure, axial in-pin fuel relocation prior to cladding breach, and molten fuel relocation after cladding breach are considered. Transient time scales ranging from milliseconds to many hours can be studied with all the reactivity feedbacks evaluated

  16. Generalized Thermohydraulics Module GENFLO for Combining With the PWR Core Melting Model, BWR Recriticality Neutronics Model and Fuel Performance Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, Jaakko; Hamalainen, Anitta; Pekkarinen, Esko

    2002-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic simulation capability for accident conditions is needed at present in VTT in several programs. Traditional thermal hydraulic models are too heavy for simulation in the analysis tasks, where the main emphasis is the rapid neutron dynamics or the core melting. The GENFLO thermal hydraulic model has been developed at VTT for special applications in the combined codes. The basic field equations in GENFLO are for the phase mass, the mixture momentum and phase energy conservation equations. The phase separation is solved with the drift flux model. The basic variables to be solved are the pressure, void fraction, mixture velocity, gas enthalpy, liquid enthalpy, and concentration of non-condensable gas fractions. The validation of the thermohydraulic solution alone includes large break LOCA reflooding experiments and in specific for the severe accident conditions QUENCH tests. In the recriticality analysis the core neutronics is simulated with a two-dimensional transient neutronics code TWODIM. The recriticality with one rapid prompt peak is expected during a severe accident scenario, where the control rods have been melted and ECCS reflooding is started after the depressurization. The GENFLO module simulates the BWR thermohydraulics in this application. The core melting module has been developed for the real time operator training by using the APROS engineering simulators. The core heatup, oxidation, metal and fuel pellet relocation and corium pool formation into the lower plenum are calculated. In this application the GENFLO model simulates the PWR vessel thermohydraulics. In the fuel performance analysis the fuel rod transient behavior is simulated with the FRAPTRAN code. GENFLO simulates the subchannel around a single fuel rod and delivers the heat transfer on the cladding surface for the FRAPTRAN. The transient boundary conditions for the subchannel are transmitted from the system code for operational transient, loss of coolant accidents and

  17. Prediction models for performance and emissions of a dual fuel CI ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dual fuel engines are being used these days to overcome shortage of fossil fuels and fulfill stringent exhaust gas emission regulations. They have several advantages over conventional diesel engines. In this context, this paper makes use of experimental results obtained from a dual fuel engine for developing models to ...

  18. Dry process fuel performance technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Kim, K. W.; Kim, B. K. (and others)

    2006-06-15

    The objective of the project is to establish the performance evaluation system of DUPIC fuel during the Phase III R and D. In order to fulfil this objectives, property model development of DUPIC fuel and irradiation test was carried out in Hanaro using the instrumented rig. Also, the analysis on the in-reactor behavior analysis of DUPIC fuel, out-pile test using simulated DUPIC fuel as well as performance and integrity assessment in a commercial reactor were performed during this Phase. The R and D results of the Phase III are summarized as follows: Fabrication process establishment of simulated DUPIC fuel for property measurement, Property model development for the DUPIC fuel, Performance evaluation of DUPIC fuel via irradiation test in Hanaro, Post irradiation examination of irradiated fuel and performance analysis, Development of DUPIC fuel performance code (KAOS)

  19. Dry process fuel performance technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Kim, K. W.; Kim, B. K.

    2006-06-01

    The objective of the project is to establish the performance evaluation system of DUPIC fuel during the Phase III R and D. In order to fulfil this objectives, property model development of DUPIC fuel and irradiation test was carried out in Hanaro using the instrumented rig. Also, the analysis on the in-reactor behavior analysis of DUPIC fuel, out-pile test using simulated DUPIC fuel as well as performance and integrity assessment in a commercial reactor were performed during this Phase. The R and D results of the Phase III are summarized as follows: Fabrication process establishment of simulated DUPIC fuel for property measurement, Property model development for the DUPIC fuel, Performance evaluation of DUPIC fuel via irradiation test in Hanaro, Post irradiation examination of irradiated fuel and performance analysis, Development of DUPIC fuel performance code (KAOS)

  20. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL MANUFACTURING COST MODEL: SIMULATING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PERFORMANCE, MANUFACTURING, AND COST OF PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric J. Carlson; Yong Yang; Chandler Fulton

    2004-04-20

    The successful commercialization of fuel cells will depend on the achievement of competitive system costs and efficiencies. System cost directly impacts the capital equipment component of cost of electricity (COE) and is a major contributor to the O and M component. The replacement costs for equipment (also heavily influenced by stack life) is generally a major contributor to O and M costs. In this project, they worked with the SECA industrial teams to estimate the impact of general manufacturing issues of interest on stack cost using an activities-based cost model for anode-supported planar SOFC stacks with metallic interconnects. An earlier model developed for NETL for anode supported planar SOFCs was enhanced by a linkage to a performance/thermal/mechanical model, by addition of Quality Control steps to the process flow with specific characterization methods, and by assessment of economies of scale. The 3-dimensional adiabatic performance model was used to calculate the average power density for the assumed geometry and operating conditions (i.e., inlet and exhaust temperatures, utilization, and fuel composition) based on publicly available polarizations curves. The SECA team provided guidance on what manufacturing and design issues should be assessed in this Phase I demonstration of cost modeling capabilities. They considered the impact of the following parameters on yield and cost: layer thickness (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) on cost and stress levels, statistical nature of ceramic material failure on yield, and Quality Control steps and strategies. In this demonstration of the capabilities of the linked model, only the active stack (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) and interconnect materials were included in the analysis. Factory costs are presented on an area and kilowatt basis to allow developers to extrapolate to their level of performance, stack design, materials, seal and system configurations, and internal corporate overheads and margin

  1. Modelling of PEM Fuel Cell Performance: Steady-State and Dynamic Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idoia San Martín

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the modelling of a commercial 1.2 kW proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC, based on interrelated electrical and thermal models. The electrical model proposed is based on the integration of the thermodynamic and electrochemical phenomena taking place in the FC whilst the thermal model is established from the FC thermal energy balance. The combination of both models makes it possible to predict the FC voltage, based on the current demanded and the ambient temperature. Furthermore, an experimental characterization is conducted and the parameters for the models associated with the FC electrical and thermal performance are obtained. The models are implemented in Matlab Simulink and validated in a number of operating environments, for steady-state and dynamic modes alike. In turn, the FC models are validated in an actual microgrid operating environment, through the series connection of 4 PEMFC. The simulations of the models precisely and accurately reproduce the FC electrical and thermal performance.

  2. Fuel Property Blend Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mehl, Marco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wagnon, Scott J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhang, Kuiwen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kukkadapu, Goutham [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-12

    The object of this project is to develop chemical models and associated correlations to predict the blending behavior of bio-derived fuels when mixed with conventional fuels like gasoline and diesel fuels.

  3. TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jeffrey J.

    2011-12-01

    This study focused on creating a new tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel performance model and demonstrating the integration of this model into an existing system of neutronics and heat transfer codes, creating a user-friendly option for including fuel performance analysis within system design optimization and system-level trade-off studies. The end product enables both a deeper understanding and better overall system performance of nuclear energy systems limited or greatly impacted by TRISO fuel performance. A thorium-fueled hybrid fusion-fission Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) blanket design was used for illustrating the application of this new capability and demonstrated both the importance of integrating fuel performance calculations into mainstream design studies and the impact that this new integrated analysis had on system-level design decisions. A new TRISO fuel performance model named TRIUNE was developed and verified and validated during this work with a novel methodology established for simulating the actual lifetime of a TRISO particle during repeated passes through a pebble bed. In addition, integrated self-consistent calculations were performed for neutronics depletion analysis, heat transfer calculations, and then fuel performance modeling for a full parametric study that encompassed over 80 different design options that went through all three phases of analysis. Lastly, side studies were performed that included a comparison of thorium and depleted uranium (DU) LIFE blankets as well as some uncertainty quantification work to help guide future experimental work by assessing what material properties in TRISO fuel performance modeling are most in need of improvement. A recommended thorium-fueled hybrid LIFE engine design was identified with an initial fuel load of 20MT of thorium, 15% TRISO packing within the graphite fuel pebbles, and a 20cm neutron multiplier layer with beryllium pebbles in flibe molten salt coolant. It operated

  4. TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Jeffrey James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-11-30

    This study focused on creating a new tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel performance model and demonstrating the integration of this model into an existing system of neutronics and heat transfer codes, creating a user-friendly option for including fuel performance analysis within system design optimization and system-level trade-off studies. The end product enables both a deeper understanding and better overall system performance of nuclear energy systems limited or greatly impacted by TRISO fuel performance. A thorium-fueled hybrid fusion-fission Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) blanket design was used for illustrating the application of this new capability and demonstrated both the importance of integrating fuel performance calculations into mainstream design studies and the impact that this new integrated analysis had on system-level design decisions. A new TRISO fuel performance model named TRIUNE was developed and verified and validated during this work with a novel methodology established for simulating the actual lifetime of a TRISO particle during repeated passes through a pebble bed. In addition, integrated self-consistent calculations were performed for neutronics depletion analysis, heat transfer calculations, and then fuel performance modeling for a full parametric study that encompassed over 80 different design options that went through all three phases of analysis. Lastly, side studies were performed that included a comparison of thorium and depleted uranium (DU) LIFE blankets as well as some uncertainty quantification work to help guide future experimental work by assessing what material properties in TRISO fuel performance modeling are most in need of improvement. A recommended thorium-fueled hybrid LIFE engine design was identified with an initial fuel load of 20MT of thorium, 15% TRISO packing within the graphite fuel pebbles, and a 20cm neutron multiplier layer with beryllium pebbles in flibe molten salt coolant. It operated

  5. Dry Process Fuel Performance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Song, K. C.; Moon, J. S. and others

    2005-04-15

    The objective of the project is to establish the performance evaluation system of DUPIC fuel during the Phase II R and D. In order to fulfil this objectives, irradiation test of DUPIC fuel was carried out in HANARO using the non-instrumented and SPND-instrumented rig. Also, the analysis on the in-reactor behavior analysis of DUPIC fuel, out-pile test using simulated DUPIC fuel as well as performance and integrity assessment in a commercial reactor were performed during this Phase. The R and D results of the Phase II are summarized as follows : - Performance evaluation of DUPIC fuel via irradiation test in HANARO - Post irradiation examination of irradiated fuel and performance analysis - Development of DUPIC fuel performance code (modified ELESTRES) considering material properties of DUPIC fuel - Irradiation behavior and integrity assessment under the design power envelope of DUPIC fuel - Foundamental technology development of thermal/mechanical performance evaluation using ANSYS (FEM package)

  6. Specialists' meeting on fuel element performance computer modelling, Preston, United Kingdom, 15-19 March 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The 46 papers of the meeting concerned with computer models of Water Reactor fuel elements cover practically all aspects of behavior of fuel elements in normal operation and in accident condition. Each session of the meeting produced a critical evaluation of one of the 5 topics into which the subject area had been divided. The sessions' report summarize the papers and make recommendations for further work. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers presented at this meeting

  7. Performance assessment modeling of high level nuclear wasteforms from the pyroprocess fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, W.M.; Hill, R.N.; Bullen, D.B.

    1995-01-01

    Several performance assessment (PA) analyses have been completed to estimate the release to the accessible environment of radionuclides from spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel emplaced in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Probabilistic methods were utilized based on the complexity of the repository system. Recent investigations have been conducted to identify the merits of a pyroprocess fuel cycle. This cycle utilizes high temperature molten salts and metals to partially separate actinides and fission products. In a closed liquid metal reactor (LMR) fuel cycle, this allows recycling of nearly all of the actinides. In a once-through cycle, this isolates the actinides for storage into a wasteform which can be specifically tailored for their retention. With appropriate front-end treatment, this Process can also be used to treat LWR spent fuel

  8. A semi-empirical model of the direct methanol fuel cell performance. Part I. Model development and verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyropoulos, P.; Scott, K.; Shukla, A. K.; Jackson, C.

    A model equation is developed to predict the cell voltage versus current density response of a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The equation is based on a semi-empirical approach in which methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction kinetics are combined with effective mass transport coefficients for the fuel cell electrodes. The model equation is validated against experimental data for a small-scale fuel cell and is applicable over a wide range of methanol concentration and temperatures.

  9. Handbook of fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, T.G.; Camara, E.H.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1980-05-01

    The intent of this document is to provide a description of fuel cells, their performances and operating conditions, and the relationship between fuel processors and fuel cells. This information will enable fuel cell engineers to know which fuel processing schemes are most compatible with which fuel cells and to predict the performance of a fuel cell integrated with any fuel processor. The data and estimates presented are for the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells because they are closer to commercialization than other types of fuel cells. Performance of the cells is shown as a function of operating temperature, pressure, fuel conversion (utilization), and oxidant utilization. The effect of oxidant composition (for example, air versus O/sub 2/) as well as fuel composition is examined because fuels provided by some of the more advanced fuel processing schemes such as coal conversion will contain varying amounts of H/sub 2/, CO, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/O, and sulfur and nitrogen compounds. A brief description of fuel cells and their application to industrial, commercial, and residential power generation is given. The electrochemical aspects of fuel cells are reviewed. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is discussed, including how it is affected by operating conditions; and the molten carbonate fuel cell is discussed. The equations developed will help systems engineers to evaluate the application of the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells to commercial, utility, and industrial power generation and waste heat utilization. A detailed discussion of fuel cell efficiency, and examples of fuel cell systems are given.

  10. High performance fuel technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koon, Yang Hyun; Kim, Keon Sik; Park, Jeong Yong; Yang, Yong Sik; In, Wang Kee; Kim, Hyung Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    {omicron} Development of High Plasticity and Annular Pellet - Development of strong candidates of ultra high burn-up fuel pellets for a PCI remedy - Development of fabrication technology of annular fuel pellet {omicron} Development of High Performance Cladding Materials - Irradiation test of HANA claddings in Halden research reactor and the evaluation of the in-pile performance - Development of the final candidates for the next generation cladding materials. - Development of the manufacturing technology for the dual-cooled fuel cladding tubes. {omicron} Irradiated Fuel Performance Evaluation Technology Development - Development of performance analysis code system for the dual-cooled fuel - Development of fuel performance-proving technology {omicron} Feasibility Studies on Dual-Cooled Annular Fuel Core - Analysis on the property of a reactor core with dual-cooled fuel - Feasibility evaluation on the dual-cooled fuel core {omicron} Development of Design Technology for Dual-Cooled Fuel Structure - Definition of technical issues and invention of concept for dual-cooled fuel structure - Basic design and development of main structure components for dual- cooled fuel - Basic design of a dual-cooled fuel rod.

  11. Assessment of Energy Performance and Emission Control Using Alternative Fuels in Cement Industry through a Process Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cement manufacturing is one of the most energy intensive processes and is accountable for substantial pollutant emissions. Increasing energy costs compel stakeholders and researchers to search for alternative options to improve energy performance and reduce CO2 emissions. Alternative fuels offer a realistic solution towards the reduction of the usage of fossil fuels and the mitigation of pollutant emissions. This paper developed a process model of a precalciner kiln system in the cement industry using Aspen Plus software to simulate the effect of five alternative fuels on pollutant emissions and energy performance. The alternatives fuels used were tyre, municipal solid waste (MSW, meat and bone meal (MBM, plastic waste and sugarcane bagasse. The model was developed on the basis of energy and mass balance of the system and was validated against data from a reference cement plant. This study also investigated the effect of these alternative fuels on the quality of the clinker. The results indicated that up to a 4.4% reduction in CO2 emissions and up to a 6.4% reduction in thermal energy requirement could be achieved using these alternative fuels with 20% mix in coal. It was also found that the alternative fuels had minimum influence on the clinker quality except in the case of MSW. Overall, MBM was found to be a better option as it is capable on reducing energy requirement and CO2 emissions more than others. The outcomes of the study offer better understanding of the effects of solid alternative fuels to achieve higher energy performance and on mitigating pollutant emissions in cement industry.

  12. Fueling for Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bytomski, Jeffrey R

    Proper nutrition is crucial for an athlete to optimize his or her performance for training and competition. Athletes should be able to meet their dietary needs through eating a wide variety of whole food sources. PubMed was searched for relevant articles published from 1980 to 2016. Clinical review. Level 4. An athlete should have both daily and activity-specific goals for obtaining the fuel necessary for successful training. Depending on the timing of their season, athletes may be either trying to gain lean muscle mass, lose fat, or maintain their current weight. An athlete will have different macronutrient goals depending on sport, timing of exercise, and season status. There are no specific athletic micronutrient guidelines, but testing should be considered for athletes with deficiency or injury. Also, some athletes who eliminate certain whole food groups (eg, vegetarian) may need to supplement their diet to avoid deficiencies.

  13. A model-based parametric analysis of a direct ethanol polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreadis, G.M.; Podias, A.K.M.; Tsiakaras, P.E. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 383 34, Volos (Greece)

    2009-10-20

    In the present work, a model-based parametric analysis of the performance of a direct ethanol polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (DE-PEMFC) is conducted with the purpose to investigate the effect of several parameters on the cell's operation. The analysis is based on a previously validated one-dimensional mathematical model that describes the operation of a DE-PEMFC in steady state. More precisely, the effect of several operational and structural parameters on (i) the ethanol crossover rate from the anode to the cathode side of the cell, (ii) the parasitic current generation (mixed potential formation) and (iii) the total cell performance is investigated. According to the model predictions it was found that the increase of the ethanol feed concentration leads to higher ethanol crossover rates, higher parasitic currents and higher mixed potential values resulting in the decrease of the cell's power density. However there is an optimum ethanol feed concentration (approximately 1.0 mol L{sup -1}) for which the cell power density reaches its highest value. The platinum (Pt) loading of the anode and the cathode catalytic layers affects strongly the cell performance. Higher values of Pt loading of the catalytic layers increase the specific reaction surface area resulting in higher cell power densities. An increase of the anode catalyst loading compared to an equal one of the cathode catalyst loading has greater impact on the cell's power density. Another interesting finding is that increasing the diffusion layers' porosity up to a certain extent, improves the cell power density despite the fact that the parasitic current increases. This is explained by the fact that the reactants' concentrations over the catalysts are increased, leading to lower activation overpotential values, which are the main source of the total cell overpotentials. Moreover, the use of a thicker membrane leads to lower ethanol crossover rate, lower parasitic current and

  14. Nuclear fuel performance evaluation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerresen, S.; Pomeroy, D.L.; Rolstad, E.; Sauar, T.O.

    1977-06-01

    An evaluation has been made of the ability of Scandpower's empirical fuel performance model POSHO (''Power Shock'') to predict the probability of fuel pin failures resulting from pellet-clad interaction in commercial nuclear power plants. POSHO provides an analytical method to calculate the failure probabilities associated with power level maneuvers for different fuel assembly designs. Application of the method provides a basis for risk-benefit decisions concerning operational procedures, fuel designs and fuel management strategies. One boiling water reactor (BWR) and one pressurized water reactor (PWR) were selected for study to compare model predictions with actual failures, as determined from post irradiation examination of the fuel and activity release data. The fuel duty cycles were reconstructed from operating records and nodal power histories were created by using Scandpower's FMS computer programs. Nodal power histories, coupled with the relative pin power distribution in each node, were processed by the fuel failure prediction model, which tracks the interaction power level for each pin group in each node and calculates the power shocks and the probability for pellet-clad interaction cracks. The results of these calculations are processed statistically to give the expected number of cracks, the number of failed fuel pins in each assembly and the total number of failed assemblies in the core. Fuel performance in the BWR, Quad Cities Unit Two, was calculated by the model in approximate agreement with the observed performance. Fuel performance in the PWR, Maine Yankee, was calculated in approximate agreement for two of the three fuel designs. The high failure rate in the third design, Type B fuel, was not calculated by the POSHO pellet-clad interaction model

  15. Modelling Accident Tolerant Fuel Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    The catastrophic events that occurred at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011 have led to widespread interest in research of alternative fuels and claddings that are proposed to be accident tolerant. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) through its Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program has funded an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) High Impact Problem (HIP). The ATF HIP is a three-year project to perform research on two accident tolerant concepts. The final outcome of the ATF HIP will be an in-depth report to the DOE Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) giving a recommendation on whether either of the two concepts should be included in their lead test assembly scheduled for placement into a commercial reactor in 2022. The two ATF concepts under investigation in the HIP are uranium silicide fuel and iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloy cladding. Utilizing the expertise of three national laboratory participants (Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory), a comprehensive multiscale approach to modeling is being used that includes atomistic modeling, molecular dynamics, rate theory, phase-field, and fuel performance simulations. Model development and fuel performance analysis are critical since a full suite of experimental studies will not be complete before AFC must prioritize concepts for focused development. In this paper, we present simulations of the two proposed accident tolerance fuel systems: U3Si2 fuel with Zircaloy-4 cladding, and UO2 fuel with FeCrAl cladding. Sensitivity analyses are completed using Sandia National Laboratories’ Dakota software to determine which input parameters (e.g., fuel specific heat) have the greatest influence on the output metrics of interest (e.g., fuel centerline temperature). We also outline the multiscale modelling approach being employed. Considerable additional work is required prior to preparing the recommendation report for the Advanced

  16. Irradiation and performance evaluation of DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ki Kwang; Yang, M. S.; Song, K. C. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The objectives of the project is to establish the performance evaluation system for the experimental verification of DUPIC fuel. The scope and content for successful accomplishment of the phase 1 objectives is established as follows : irradiation test of DUPIC fuel at HANARO using a noninstrument capsule, study on the characteristics of DUPIC pellets, development of the analysis technology on the thermal behaviour of DUPIC fuel, basic design of a instrument capsule. The R and D results of the phase 1 are summarized as follows : - Performance analysis technology development of DUPIC fuel by model development for DUPIC fuel, review on the extendability of code(FEMAXI-IV, FRAPCON-3, ELESTRESS). - Study on physical properties of DUPIC fuel by design and fabrication of the equipment for measuring the thermal property. - HANARO irradiation test of simulated DUPIC fuel by the noninstrument capsule development. - PIE and result analysis.

  17. Improved Modeling and Understanding of Diffusion-Media Wettability on Polymer-Electrolyte-Fuel-Cell Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Adam

    2010-03-05

    A macroscopic-modeling methodology to account for the chemical and structural properties of fuel-cell diffusion media is developed. A previous model is updated to include for the first time the use of experimentally measured capillary pressure -- saturation relationships through the introduction of a Gaussian contact-angle distribution into the property equations. The updated model is used to simulate various limiting-case scenarios of water and gas transport in fuel-cell diffusion media. Analysis of these results demonstrate that interfacial conditions are more important than bulk transport in these layers, where the associated mass-transfer resistance is the result of higher capillary pressures at the boundaries and the steepness of the capillary pressure -- saturation relationship. The model is also used to examine the impact of a microporous layer, showing that it dominates the response of the overall diffusion medium. In addition, its primary mass-transfer-related effect is suggested to be limiting the water-injection sites into the more porous gas-diffusion layer.

  18. Development of improved thermal hydraulics and fuel performance technology; development of turbulence model and simulation code for flow analysis in nuclear fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myung, H. K.; Yang, S. Y.; Kim, B. H.; Song, J. H.; Oh, J. Z. [Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    The flow through a nuclear rod bundle with mixing vanes is very complex and so required a suitable turbulence model for its accurate prediction. Subchannel flow in a nuclear bundle having vanes to mix flow appears complex turbulent flow. Objective of this study is to investigate performance of prediction about turbulence model contained in STAR-CD code and to develop suitable turbulence model which can predict complex flow in nuclear assembly. For several nonlinear {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence models, their performance were investigated in the prediction of the flow in nuclear fuel assembly, and also their problems were discussed in detail. The results obtained from the present research would give a help for the development of turbulence model which can accurately predict the flow through the rod bundles with mixing vanes. 19 refs., 32 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  19. Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    evaluation for quality assurance and the application of advanced analytical tools to a complex physicochemical process. 15. SUBJECT TERMS N/A 16...thermal performance evaluation for quality assurance and the application of advanced analytical tools to a complex physicochemical process. I...Testing Conditions: RP-1 (Sample 18): 355°C, 5 hr . All others: 325°C, 5 hr . Fuel Type JP-7 JP-8 RP-1 RP-2 RP-2 RP-1 RP-2 RP-1 POSF/Sample 3327/15

  20. Thermal performance sensitivity studies in support of material modeling for extended storage of used nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuta, Judith M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suffield, Sarah R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fort, James A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Adkins, Harold E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-08-15

    The work reported here is an investigation of the sensitivity of component temperatures of a storage system, including fuel cladding temperatures, in response to age-related changes that could degrade the design-basis thermal behavior of the system. The purpose of these sensitivity studies is to provide a realistic example of how changes in the physical properties or configuration of the storage system components can affect temperatures and temperature distributions. The magnitudes of these sensitivities can provide guidance for identifying appropriate modeling assumptions for thermal evaluations extending long term storage out beyond 50, 100, 200, and 300 years.

  1. A CFD model for analysis of performance, water and thermal distribution, and mechanical related failure in PEM fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive three–dimensional, multi–phase, non-isothermal model of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM fuel cell that incorporates significant physical processes and key parameters affecting the fuel cell performance. The model construction involves equations derivation, boundary conditions setting, and solution algorithm flow chart. Equations in gas flow channels, gas diffusion layers (GDLs, catalyst layers (CLs, and membrane as well as equations governing cell potential and hygro-thermal stresses are described. The algorithm flow chart starts from input of the desired cell current density, initialization, iteration of the equations solution, and finalizations by calculating the cell potential. In order to analyze performance, water and thermal distribution, and mechanical related failure in the cell, the equations are solved using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD code. Performance analysis includes a performance curve which plots the cell potential (Volt against nominal current density (A/cm2 as well as losses. Velocity vectors of gas and liquid water, liquid water saturation, and water content profile are calculated. Thermal distribution is then calculated together with hygro-thermal stresses and deformation. The CFD model was executed under boundary conditions of 20°C room temperature, 35% relative humidity, and 1 MPA pressure on the lower surface. Parameters values of membrane electrode assembly (MEA and other base conditions are selected. A cell with dimension of 1 mm x 1 mm x 50 mm is used as the object of analysis. The nominal current density of 1.4 A/cm2 is given as the input of the CFD calculation. The results show that the model represents well the performance curve obtained through experiment. Moreover, it can be concluded that the model can help in understanding complex process in the cell which is hard to be studied experimentally, and also provides computer aided tool for design and optimization of PEM

  2. MONJU fuel pin performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, H.; Yamanaka, T.; Hayashi, H.

    1979-01-01

    Monju fuel pin has almost the same properties as other LMFBR fuel pins, i.e. Phenix, PFR, CRBR, but would be irradiated under severe conditions: maximum linear heat rate of 381 watt/cm, hot spot cladding temperature of 675 deg C, peak burnup of 131,000 MWd/t, peak fluence (E greater than 0.1 MeV) of 2.3 10 23 n/cm 2 . In order to understand in-core performance of Monju fuel pin, its thermal and mechanical behaviour was predicted using the fast running performance code SIMPLE. The code takes into account pellet-cladding interaction due to thermal expansion and swelling, gap conductance, structural changes of fuel pellets, fission product gas release with burnup and temperature increase, swelling and creep of fuel pellets, corrosion of cladding due to sodium flow and chemical attack by fission products, and cumulative damage of the cladding due to thermal creep

  3. Prediction models for performance and emissions of a dual fuel CI ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Dual fuel engines are being used these days to overcome shortage of fossil fuels and fulfill stringent exhaust gas emission regulations. They have several advantages over conventional diesel engines. In this context, this paper makes use of experimental results obtained from a dual fuel engine for ...

  4. The Fuel Performance Analysis of LWR Fuel containing High Thermal Conductivity Reinforcements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Su; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of fuel affects many performance parameters including the fuel centerline temperature, fission gas release and internal pressure. In addition, enhanced safety margin of fuel might be expected when the thermal conductivity of fuel is improved by the addition of high thermal conductivity reinforcements. Therefore, the effects of thermal conductivity enhancement on the fuel performance of reinforced UO2 fuel with high thermal conductivity compounds should be analyzed. In this study, we analyzed the fuel performance of modified UO2 fuel with high thermal conductivity reinforcements by using the FRAPCON-3.5 code. The fissile density and mechanical properties of the modified fuel are considered the same with the standard UO2 fuel. The fuel performance of modified UO2 with high thermal conductivity reinforcements were analyzed by using the FRAPCON-3.5 code. The thermal conductivity enhancement factors of the modified fuels were obtained from the Maxwell model considering the volume fraction of reinforcements

  5. Helicopter fuel burn modeling in AEDT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    This report documents work done to enhance helicopter fuel consumption modeling in the Federal Aviation : Administrations Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT). Fuel consumption and flight performance data : were collected from helicopter flig...

  6. Fuel burn modeling of turboprop aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    This report documents work done to enhance turbo-propeller aircraft fuel consumption modeling in the Federal Aviation Administrations Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT). Fuel consumption and flight performance data were collected from aircr...

  7. Water chemistry and fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loner, H.; Blaser, W.; Zwicky, H.-U.

    1998-01-01

    A data base in water chemistry and fuel performance has been built up over 13 years of operation in the Leibstadt Nuclear Power Plant. Changes in the water chemistry are reflected in the data base. Measured crud build-up was compared with estimated values from mass calculations. Fuel cladding problems such as enhanced spacer shadow corrosion (ESSC) occurred after the last major change in the water chemistry. The affected fuel is SVEA-96 with Atoms LK2 type Zircaloy-2 as cladding material and Inconel 750 as spacer material. Changes in the fuel crud composition and different modifications at Zircaloy-2 on ESSC is shown. The water chemistry has now coordinated iron to zinc in the feed water which are thought to be the key parameters in the ESSC. However, cladding modifications (LK2 + ) may also contribute to an improvement. Recently the corrosion behaviour of fuel from different fuel suppliers is observed carefully. NPP Leibstadt will run fuel elements from three different suppliers in the following cycle. After a detailed surveillance program the most suitable fuel will be chosen

  8. Fuel performance annual report for 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.; Tokar, M.

    1982-12-01

    This annual report, the fourth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1981 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel operating experience, fuel problems, fuel design changes and fuel surveillance programs, and high-burnup fuel experience are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included

  9. A GUIDE TO FUEL PERFORMANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITZKE,W.

    2004-08-01

    Heating oil, as its name implies, is intended for end use heating consumption as its primary application. But its identity in reference name and actual chemical properties may vary based on a number of factors. By name, heating oil is sometimes referred to as gas oil, diesel, No. 2 distillate (middle distillate), or light heating oil. Kerosene, also used as a burner fuel, is a No. 1 distillate. Due to the higher heat content and competitive price in most markets, No. 2 heating oil is primarily used in modern, pressure-atomized burners. Using No. 1 oil for heating has the advantages of better cold-flow properties, lower emissions, and better storage properties. Because it is not nearly as abundant in supply, it is often markedly more expensive than No. 2 heating oil. Given the advanced, low-firing rate burners in use today, the objective is for the fuel to be compatible and achieve combustion performance at the highest achievable efficiency of the heating systems--with minimal service requirements. Among the Oil heat industry's top priorities are improving reliability and reducing service costs associated with fuel performance. Poor fuel quality, fuel degradation, and contamination can cause burner shut-downs resulting in ''no-heat'' calls. Many of these unscheduled service calls are preventable with routine inspection of the fuel and the tank. This manual focuses on No. 2 heating oil--its performance, properties, sampling and testing. Its purpose is to provide the marketer, service manager and technician with the proper guidelines for inspecting the product, maintaining good fuel quality, and the best practices for proper storage. Up-to-date information is also provided on commercially available fuel additives, their appropriate use and limitations.

  10. Behaviour of defective CANDU fuel: fuel oxidation kinetic and thermodynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgs, J.

    2005-01-01

    The thermal performance of operating CANDU fuel under defect conditions is affected by the ingress of heavy water into the fuel element. A mechanistic model has been developed to predict the extent of fuel oxidation in defective fuel and its affect on fuel thermal performance. A thermodynamic treatment of such oxidized fuel has been performed as a basis for the boundary conditions in the kinetic model. Both the kinetic and thermodynamic models have been benchmarked against recent experimental work. (author)

  11. EFFECT OF FUEL IMPURITIES ON FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE AND DURABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H.

    2010-09-28

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device that produces electricity during the combination of hydrogen and oxygen to produce water. Proton exchange membranes fuel cells are favored for portable applications as well as stationary ones due to their high power density, low operating temperature, and low corrosion of components. In real life operation, the use of pure fuel and oxidant gases results in an impractical system. A more realistic and cost efficient approach is the use of air as an oxidant gas and hydrogen from hydrogen carriers (i.e., ammonia, hydrocarbons, hydrides). However, trace impurities arising from different hydrogen sources and production increases the degradation of the fuel cell. These impurities include carbon monoxide, ammonia, sulfur, hydrocarbons, and halogen compounds. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has set maximum limits for trace impurities in the hydrogen stream; however fuel cell data is needed to validate the assumption that at those levels the impurities will cause no degradation. This report summarizes the effect of selected contaminants tested at SRNL at ISO levels. Runs at ISO proposed concentration levels show that model hydrocarbon compound such as tetrahydrofuran can cause serious degradation. However, the degradation is only temporary as when the impurity is removed from the hydrogen stream the performance completely recovers. Other molecules at the ISO concentration levels such as ammonia don't show effects on the fuel cell performance. On the other hand carbon monoxide and perchloroethylene shows major degradation and the system can only be recovered by following recovery procedures.

  12. Fuel performance under normal PWR conditions: A review of relevant experimental results and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, M.; Lemaignan, C.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments conducted at Grenoble (CEA/DRN) over the past 20 years in the field of nuclear fuel behaviour are reviewed. Of particular concern is the need to achieve a comprehensive understanding of and subsequently overcome the limitations associated with high burnup and load-following conditions (pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), fission gas release (FGR), water-side corrosion). A general view is given of the organization of research work as well as some ecperimental details (irradiation, postirradiation examination - PIE). Based on various experimental programmes (Cyrano, Medicis, Anemone, Furet, Tango, Contact, Cansar, Hatac, Flog, Decor), the main contributions of the thermomechanical behaviour of a PWR fuel rod are described: thermal conductivity, in-pile densification, swelling, fission gas release in steady state and moderate transient conditions, gap thermal conductance, formation of primary and secondary ridges under PCI conditions. Specific programmes (Gdgrif, Thermox, Grimox) are devoted to the behaviour of particular fuels (gadolinia-bearing fuel, MOX fuel). Moreover, microstructure-based studies have been undertaken on fission gas release (fine analysis of the bubble population inside irradiated fuel samples), and on cladding behaviour (PCI related studies on stress-corrosion cracking (SCC), irradiation effects on ziraloy microstructure). (orig.)

  13. Performance optimization of a PEM hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell

    OpenAIRE

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to develop a semi-empirical model that would simulate the performance of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells without extensive calculations. A fuel cell mathematical module has been designed and constructed to determine the performance of a PEM fuel cell. The influence of some operating parameters on the performance of PEM fuel cell has been investigated using pure hydrogen on the anode side and oxygen on the cathode side. The present model can be used to investigate t...

  14. Multiphysics modeling of fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serincan, Mustafa Fazil

    Fuel cells are expected to resist permanent changes in performance over time, to tolerate unexpected changes in the ambient conditions for a stable operation, and to sustain a structural integrity under different operating conditions. However, during the operation, both solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) are prone to many hazards that may cause degradation of the performance even to the extent of complete failure of these devices. In this study performance and degradation of SOFCs and PEFCs is studied. A computational modeling framework has been established to investigate the transport phenomena and the electrochemical performance as well as the mechanical behavior of SOFCs and PEFCs. The electrochemical performance of the SOFC is investigated both in steady-state and transient operations while elucidating the transport phenomena related to the fuel cell operation. The proposed computational framework for the SOFC comprises two separate models for the test furnace and the single cell in order to more accurately model the actual test system while decreasing the computational cost. The fuel cell performance in transient operation is also studied. The performance of the SOFC is investigated in case of a failure in the fuel supply system. Mechanical behavior of the SOFC is also considered to help assessing the durability of the cells. The same modeling framework is utilized for the PEFCs to investigate electrochemical and mechanical degradation during the fuel cell operation. To assess the performance degradation as a result of gas contamination, a cation transport model is presented. It is found that the effect of fuel side contamination of cationic species is much more significant than the air side contamination while there still is a significant performance degradation associated with the latter. Further, the stresses induced during the PEFC operation due to the swelling and shrinkage of the membrane with hydration changes are

  15. Microcomputer simulation model for facility performance assessment: a case study of nuclear spent fuel handling facility operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chockie, A.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Otis, P.T.

    1985-10-01

    A microcomputer based simulation model was recently developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to assist in the evaluation of design alternatives for a proposed facility to receive, consolidate and store nuclear spent fuel from US commercial power plants. Previous performance assessments were limited to deterministic calculations and Gantt chart representations of the facility operations. To insure that the design of the facility will be adequate to meet the specified throughput requirements, the simulation model was used to analyze such factors as material flow, equipment capability and the interface between the MRS facility and the nuclear waste transportation system. The simulation analysis model was based on commercially available software and application programs designed to represent the MRS waste handling facility operations. The results of the evaluation were used by the design review team at PNL to identify areas where design modifications should be considered. 4 figs.

  16. Modeling the performance of hydrogen-oxygen unitized regenerative proton exchange membrane fuel cells for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Massimo; Alotto, Piergiorgio; Moro, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Thanks to the independent sizing of power and energy, hydrogen-based energy storage is one of the very few technologies capable of providing long operational times in addition to the other advantages offered by electrochemical energy storage, for example scalability, site versatility, and mobile service. The typical design consists of an electrolyzer in charge mode and a separate fuel cell in discharge mode. Instead, a unitized regenerative fuel cell (URFC) is a single device performing both energy conversions, achieving a higher compactness and power-to-weight ratio. This paper presents a performance model of a URFC based on a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyte and working on hydrogen and oxygen, which can provide high energy and power densities (>0.7 W cm-2). It provides voltage, power, and efficiency at varying load conditions as functions of the controlling physical quantities: temperature, pressure, concentration, and humidification. The model constitutes a tool for designing the interface and control sub-system as well as for exploring optimized cell/stack designs and operational conditions. To date, only a few of such analyses have been carried out and more research is needed in order to explore the true potential of URFCs.

  17. Large scale model predictions on the effect of GDL thermal conductivity and porosity on PEM fuel cell performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obaid ur Rehman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The performance of proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell majorly relies on properties of gas diffusion layer (GDL which supports heat and mass transfer across the membrane electrode assembly. A novel approach is adopted in this work to analyze the activity of GDL during fuel cell operation on a large-scale model. The model with mesh size of 1.3 million computational cells for 50 cm2 active area was simulated by parallel computing technique via computer cluster. Grid independence study showed less than 5% deviation in criterion parameter as mesh size was increased to 1.8 million cells. Good approximation was achieved as model was validated with the experimental data for Pt loading of 1 mg cm-2. The results showed that GDL with higher thermal conductivity prevented PEM from drying and led to improved protonic conduction. GDL with higher porosity enhanced the reaction but resulted in low output voltage which demonstrated the effect of contact resistance. In addition, reduced porosity under the rib regions was significant which resulted in lower gas diffusion and heat and water accumulation.

  18. Performance model to assist solar thermal power plant siting in northern Chile based on backup fuel consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larrain, Teresita; Escobar, Rodrigo; Vergara, Julio [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Metalurgica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2010-08-15

    In response to environmental awareness, Chile introduced sustainability goals in its electricity law. Power producers must deliver 5% from renewable sources by 2010 and 10% by 2024. The Chilean desert has a large available surface with one of the highest radiation levels and clearest skies in the World. These factors imply that solar power is an option for this task. However, a commercial plant requires a fossil fuel system to backup the sunlight intermittency. The authors developed a thermodynamical model to estimate the backup fraction needed in a 100 MW hybrid -solar-fossil- parabolic trough power plant. This paper presents the model aiming to predicting the performance and exploring its usefulness in assisting site selection among four locations. Since solar radiation data are only available in a monthly average, we introduced two approaches to feed the model. One data set provided an average month with identical days throughout and the other one considered an artificial month of different daylight profiles on an hourly basis for the same monthly average. We recommend a best plant location based on minimum fossil fuel backup, contributing to optimal siting from the energy perspective. Utilities will refine their policy goals more closely when a precise solar energy data set becomes available. (author)

  19. Low-enriched fuel particle performance review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.; Nabielek, H.; Yang, L.

    1978-08-01

    The available data on low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel particles were reviewed under the United States-Federal Republic of Germany Agreement. The most influential factors controlling the irradiation performance of LEU fuel particles were found to be plutonium transport, fission product transport, fuel particle mechanical performance, and fuel particle chemical performance

  20. PWR and WWER fuel performance. A comparison of major characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidinger, H.

    2006-01-01

    PWR and WWER fuel technologies have the same basic performance targets: most effective use of the energy stored in the fuel and highest possible reliability. Both fuel technologies use basically the same strategies to reach these targets: 1) Optimized reload strategies; 2) Maximal use of structural material with low neutron cross sections; 3) Decrease the fuel failure frequency towards a 'zero failure' performance by understanding and eliminating the root causes of those defects. The key driving force of the technology of both, PWR and WWER fuel is high burn-up. Presently a range of 45 - 50 MWD/kgU have been reached commercially for PWR and WWER fuel. The main technical limitations to reach high burn-up are typically different for PWR and WWER fuel: for PWR fuel it is the corrosion and hydrogen uptake of the Zr-based materials; for WWER fuel it is the mechanical and dimensional stability of the FA (and the whole core). Corrosion and hydrogen uptake of Zr-materials is a 'non-problem' for WWER fuel. Other performance criteria that are important for high burn-up are the creep and growth behaviour of the Zr materials and the fission gas release in the fuel rod. There exists a good and broad data base to model and design both fuel types. FA and fuel rod vibration appears to be a generic problem for both fuel types but with more evidence for PWR fuel performance reliability. Grid-to-rod fretting is still a major issue in the fuel failure statistics of PWR fuel. Fuel rod cladding defects by debris fretting is no longer a key problem for PWR fuel, while it still appears to be a significant root cause for WWER fuel failures. 'Zero defect' fuel performance is achievable with a high probability, as statistics for US PWR and WWER-1000 fuel has shown

  1. Theoretical models to predict the transient heat transfer performance of HIFAR fuel elements under non-forced convective conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    Simple theoretical models have been developed which are suitable for predicting the thermal responses of irradiated research fuel elements of markedly different geometries when they are subjected to loss-of-coolant accident conditions. These models have been used to calculate temperature responses corresponding to various non-forced convective conditions. Comparisons between experimentally observed temperatures and calculated values have shown that a suitable value for surface thermal emissivity is 0.35; modelling of the fuel element beyond the region of the fuel plate needs to be included since these areas account for approximately 25 per cent of the thermal power dissipated; general agreement between calculated and experimental temperatures for both transient and steady-state conditions is good - the maximum discrepancy between calculated and experimental temperatures for a HIFAR Mark IV/V fuel element is ∼ 70 deg C, and for an Oak Ridge Reactor (ORR) box-type fuel element ∼ 30 deg C; and axial power distribution does not significantly affect thermal responses for the conditions investigated. Overall, the comparisons have shown that the models evolved can reproduce experimental data to a level of accuracy that provides confidence in the modelling technique and the postulated heat dissipation mechanisms, and that these models can be used to predict thermal responses of fuel elements in accident conditions that are not easily investigated experimentally

  2. Modeling of fuel performance and fission product release behavior during HTTR normal operation. A comparative study of the FZJ and JAERI modeling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl; Sumita, Junya; Ueta, Shohei; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2001-03-01

    For the prediction of fuel performance and fission product release behavior in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, HTTR of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute(JAERI), during its normal operation, calculation tools were applied as have been used at the Research Center Juelich (FZJ) in safety analyses for pebble-bed HTGR designs. Calculations were made assuming the HTTR operation with a nominal operation time of 660 efpd including a 110 efpd period with elevated fuel temperatures. Fuel performance calculations by the PANAMA code with given fuel temperature distribution in the core have shown that the additional failure level of about 5x10 -6 is expected which is about twice as much as the as-fabricated through-coatings failure level. Under the extreme safety design conditions, the predicted particle failure fraction in the core increases to about 1x10 -3 in maximum. The diffusive release of metallic fission products from the fuel primarily occurs in the core layer with the maximum fuel temperature (layer 3) whereas there is hardly any contribution from layer 1 except for the recoil fraction. Silver most easily escapes the fuel; the predicted release fractions from the fuel compacts are 10% (expected) and 50% (safety design). The figures for strontium (expected: 1.5x10 -3 ), safety design: 3.1x10 -2 ) and cesium (5.6x10 -4 , 2.9x10 -2 ) reveal as well a significant fraction to originate already from intact particles. Comparison with the calculation based on JAERI's diffusion model for cesium shows a good agreement for the release behavior from the particles. The differences in the results can be explained mainly by the different diffusion coefficients applied. The release into the coolant can not modelled because of the influence of the gap between compact and graphite sleeve lowering the release by a factor of 3 to 10. For the prediction of performance and fission product release behavior of advanced ZrC TRISO particles, more experimental work is

  3. Early implementation of SiC cladding fuel performance models in BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-18

    SiC-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) [5–8] are being developed and evaluated internationally as potential LWR cladding options. These development activities include interests within both the DOE-NE LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and the DOE-NE Advanced Fuels Campaign. The LWRS Program considers SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) as offering potentially revolutionary gains as a cladding material, with possible benefits including more efficient normal operating conditions and higher safety margins under accident conditions [9]. Within the Advanced Fuels Campaign, SiC-based composites are a candidate ATF cladding material that could achieve several goals, such as reducing the rates of heat and hydrogen generation due to lower cladding oxidation rates in HT steam [10]. This work focuses on the application of SiC cladding as an ATF cladding material in PWRs, but these work efforts also support the general development and assessment of SiC as an LWR cladding material in a much broader sense.

  4. Fuel performance: Annual report for 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.J.; Wu, S.

    1989-03-01

    This annual report, the tenth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1987 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related US Nuclear Regulator Commission evaluations are included. 384 refs., 13 figs., 33 tabs.

  5. Fuel performance annual report for 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.; Wu, S.

    1992-06-01

    This annual report, the twelfth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1989 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related US Nuclear Regulatory Commission evaluations are included

  6. Fuel performance: Annual report for 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.; Wu, S.

    1989-03-01

    This annual report, the tenth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1987 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related US Nuclear Regulator Commission evaluations are included. 384 refs., 13 figs., 33 tabs

  7. The advanced-fuel performance model Euges-Aries. Description and listing of the computer program and introduction to its use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchi, C.; van de Laar, J.

    1984-01-01

    The paper contains a brief description of the model for fission gas behavior and swelling in advanced LMFBR fuels (mixed carbide, particularly) which has been developed at Joint Research Centre of the European Communities in Karlsruhe. The model is based on mechanistic hypotheses on gas bubble formation and is therefore able to provide a detailed picture of the relevant macro- and microstructural modifications produced by swelling. An introduction to the computer program EUGES-ARIES, constructed to perform fuel performance calculations with this model, is given with thorough instructions for use. A listing of the program is attached

  8. Progress of the DUPIC Fuel Compatibility Analysis (IV) - Fuel Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Ryu, Ho Jin; Roh, Gyu Hong; Jeong, Chang Joon; Park, Chang Je; Song, Kee Chan; Lee, Jung Won

    2005-10-01

    This study describes the mechanical compatibility of the direct use of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel, when it is loaded into a CANDU reactor. The mechanical compatibility can be assessed for the fuel management, primary heat transport system, fuel channel, and the fuel handling system in the reactor core by both the experimental and analytic methods. Because the physical dimensions of the DUPIC fuel bundle adopt the CANDU flexible (CANFLEX) fuel bundle design which has already been demonstrated for a commercial use in CANDU reactors, the experimental compatibility analyses focused on the generation of material property data and the irradiation tests of the DUPIC fuel, which are used for the computational analysis. The intermediate results of the mechanical compatibility analysis have shown that the integrity of the DUPIC fuel is mostly maintained under the high power and high burnup conditions even though some material properties like the thermal conductivity is a little lower compared to the uranium fuel. However it is required to slightly change the current DUPIC fuel design to accommodate the high internal pressure of the fuel element. It is also strongly recommended to perform more irradiation tests of the DUPIC fuel to accumulate a database for the demonstration of the DUPIC fuel performance in the CANDU reactor

  9. DUPIC fuel irradiation test and performance evaluation; the performance analysis of pellet-cladding contact fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K. I.; Kim, H. M.; Yang, K. B.; Choi, S. J. [Suwon University, Whasung (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    Thermal and mechanical models were reviewed, and selected for the analysis of nuclear fuel performance in reactor. 2 dimensional FEM software was developed. Thermal models-gap conductances, thermal conductivity of pellets, fission gas release, temperature distribution-were set and packaged into a software. Both thermal and mechanical models were interrelated to each other, and the final results, fuel performance during irradiation is obtained by iteration calculation. Also, the contact phenomena between pellet and cladding was analysed by mechanical computer software which was developed during this work. dimensional FEM program was developed which estimate the mechanical behavior and the thermal behaviors of nuclear fuel during irradiation. Since there is a importance during the mechanical deformation analysis in describing pellet-cladding contact phenomena, simplified 2 dimensional calculation method is used after the contact. The estimation of thermal fuel behavior during irradiation was compared with the results of other. 8 refs., 17 figs. (Author)

  10. VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Abdellatif M. Yacout; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; David E. Shropshire

    2009-04-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle is a very complex system that includes considerable dynamic complexity as well as detail complexity. In the nuclear power realm, there are experts and considerable research and development in nuclear fuel development, separations technology, reactor physics and waste management. What is lacking is an overall understanding of the entire nuclear fuel cycle and how the deployment of new fuel cycle technologies affects the overall performance of the fuel cycle. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing and delays in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works and can transition as technologies are changed. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model and some examples of how to use VISION.

  11. Proceedings of the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting - WRFPM / Top Fuel 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-15

    SFEN, ENS, SNR, ANS, AESJ, CNS KNS, IAEA and NEA are jointly organizing the 2009 International Water Reactor Fuel Performance / TopFuel 2009 Meeting following the 2008 KNS Water Reactor Performance Meeting held during October 19-23, 2008 in Seoul, Korea. This meeting is held annually on a tri-annual rotational basis in Europe, USA and Asia. In 2009, this meeting will be held in Paris, September 6-10, 2009 in coordination with the Global 2009 Conference at the same date and place. That would lead to a common opening session, some common technical presentations, a common exhibition and common social events. The technical scope of the meeting includes all aspects of nuclear fuel from fuel rod to core design as well as manufacturing, performance in commercial and test reactors or on-going and future developments and trends. Emphasis will be placed on fuel reliability in the general context of nuclear 'Renaissance' and recycling perspective. The meeting includes selectively front and/or back end issues that impact fuel designs and performance. In this frame, the conference track devoted to 'Concepts for transportation and interim storage of spent fuels and conditioned waste' will be shared with 'GLOBAL' conference. Technical Tracks: - 1. Fuel Performance, Reliability and Operational Experience: Fuel operating experience and performance; experience with high burn-up fuels; water side corrosion; stress corrosion cracking; MOX fuel performance; post irradiation data on lead fuel assemblies; radiation effects; water chemistry and corrosion counter-measures. - 2. Transient Fuel Behaviour and Safety Related Issues: Transient fuel behavior and criteria (RIA, LOCA, ATWS, Ramp tests..). Fuel safety-related issues such as PCI (pellet cladding interaction), transient fission gas releases and cladding bursting/ballooning during transient events - Advances in fuel performance modeling and core reload methodology, small and large-scale fuel testing

  12. Predictive Maturity of Multi-Scale Simulation Models for Fuel Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atamturktur, Sez; Unal, Cetin; Hemez, Francois; Williams, Brian; Tome, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The project proposed to provide a Predictive Maturity Framework with its companion metrics that (1) introduce a formalized, quantitative means to communicate information between interested parties, (2) provide scientifically dependable means to claim completion of Validation and Uncertainty Quantification (VU) activities, and (3) guide the decision makers in the allocation of Nuclear Energy's resources for code development and physical experiments. The project team proposed to develop this framework based on two complimentary criteria: (1) the extent of experimental evidence available for the calibration of simulation models and (2) the sophistication of the physics incorporated in simulation models. The proposed framework is capable of quantifying the interaction between the required number of physical experiments and degree of physics sophistication. The project team has developed this framework and implemented it with a multi-scale model for simulating creep of a core reactor cladding. The multi-scale model is composed of the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) code at the meso-scale, which represents the visco-plastic behavior and changing properties of a highly anisotropic material and a Finite Element (FE) code at the macro-scale to represent the elastic behavior and apply the loading. The framework developed takes advantage of the transparency provided by partitioned analysis, where independent constituent codes are coupled in an iterative manner. This transparency allows model developers to better understand and remedy the source of biases and uncertainties, whether they stem from the constituents or the coupling interface by exploiting separate-effect experiments conducted within the constituent domain and integral-effect experiments conducted within the full-system domain. The project team has implemented this procedure with the multi- scale VPSC-FE model and demonstrated its ability to improve the predictive capability of the model. Within this

  13. Predictive Maturity of Multi-Scale Simulation Models for Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atamturktur, Sez [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Williams, Brian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tome, Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-16

    The project proposed to provide a Predictive Maturity Framework with its companion metrics that (1) introduce a formalized, quantitative means to communicate information between interested parties, (2) provide scientifically dependable means to claim completion of Validation and Uncertainty Quantification (VU) activities, and (3) guide the decision makers in the allocation of Nuclear Energy’s resources for code development and physical experiments. The project team proposed to develop this framework based on two complimentary criteria: (1) the extent of experimental evidence available for the calibration of simulation models and (2) the sophistication of the physics incorporated in simulation models. The proposed framework is capable of quantifying the interaction between the required number of physical experiments and degree of physics sophistication. The project team has developed this framework and implemented it with a multi-scale model for simulating creep of a core reactor cladding. The multi-scale model is composed of the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) code at the meso-scale, which represents the visco-plastic behavior and changing properties of a highly anisotropic material and a Finite Element (FE) code at the macro-scale to represent the elastic behavior and apply the loading. The framework developed takes advantage of the transparency provided by partitioned analysis, where independent constituent codes are coupled in an iterative manner. This transparency allows model developers to better understand and remedy the source of biases and uncertainties, whether they stem from the constituents or the coupling interface by exploiting separate-effect experiments conducted within the constituent domain and integral-effect experiments conducted within the full-system domain. The project team has implemented this procedure with the multi- scale VPSC-FE model and demonstrated its ability to improve the predictive capability of the model. Within this

  14. Control-Oriented Models for SO Fuel Cells from the Angle of V&V: Analysis, Simplification Possibilities, Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Auer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we take a look at the analysis and parameter identification for control-oriented, dynamic models for the thermal subsystem of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC from the systematized point of view of verification and validation (V&V. First, we give a possible classification of models according to their verification degree which depends, for example, on the kind of arithmetic used for both formulation and simulation. Typical SOFC models, consisting of several coupled differential equations for gas preheaters and the temperature distribution in the stack module, do not have analytical solutions because of spatial nonlinearity. Therefore, in the next part of the paper, we describe in detail two possible ways to simplify such models so that the underlying differential equations can be solved analytically while still being sufficiently accurate to serve as the basis for control synthesis. The simplifying assumption is to approximate the heat capacities of the gases by zero-order polynomials (or first-oder polynomials, respectively in the temperature. In the last, application-oriented part of the paper, we identify the parameters of these models as well as compare their performance and their ability to reflect the reality with the corresponding characteristics of models in which the heat capacities are represented by quadratic polynomials (the usual case. For this purpose, the framework UniVerMeC (Unified Framework for Verified GeoMetric Computations is used, which allows us to employ different kinds of arithmetics including the interval one. This latter possibility ensures a high level of reliability of simulations and of the subsequent validation. Besides, it helps to take into account bounded uncertainty in measurements.

  15. Numerical modelling of fuel sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, C.

    1999-06-01

    The way the fuel is introduced into the combustion chamber is one of the most important parameters for the power output and the generation of emissions in the combustion of liquid fuels. The interaction between the turbulent gas flow field and the liquid fuel droplets, the vaporisation of them and the mixing of the gaseous fuel with the ambient air that are vital parameters in the combustion process. The use of numerical calculations is an important tool to better understand these complex interacting phenomena. This thesis reports on the numerical modelling of fuel sprays in non-reacting cases using an own developed spray module. The spray module uses the stochastic parcel method to represent the spray. The module was made in such manner that it could by coupled with different gas flow solver. Results obtained from four different gas flow solvers are presented in the thesis, including the use of two different kinds of turbulence models. In the first part the spray module is coupled with a k-{eta} based 2-D cylindrical gas flow solver. A thorough sensitivity analysis was performed on the spray and gas flow solver parameters, such as grid size dependence and sensitivity to initial values of k-{eta}. The results of the spray module were also compared to results from other spray codes, e.g. the well known KIVA code. In the second part of this thesis the spray was injected into a turbulent and fully developed crossflow studied. The spray module was attached to a LES (Large Eddy Simulation) based flow solvers enabling the study of the complex structures and time dependent phenomena involved in spray in crossflows. It was found that the spray performs an oscillatory motion and that the Strouhal number in the wake was about 0.1. Different spray breakup models were evaluated by comparing with experimental results 66 refs, 56 figs

  16. Fuel performance in water storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, A.P.; Scott, J.G.; Shelton-Davis, C.V.; McDannel, G.E.

    1993-11-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Department of Energy (DOE). A variety of different types of fuels have been stored there since the 1950's prior to reprocessing for uranium recovery. In April of 1992, the DOE decided to end fuel reprocessing, changing the mission at ICPP. Fuel integrity in storage is now viewed as long term until final disposition is defined and implemented. Thus, the condition of fuel and storage equipment is being closely monitored and evaluated to ensure continued safe storage. There are four main areas of fuel storage at ICPP: an original underwater storage facility (CPP-603), a modern underwater storage facility (CPP-666), and two dry fuel storage facilities. The fuels in storage are from the US Navy, DOE (and its predecessors the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Atomic Energy Commission), and other research programs. Fuel matrices include uranium oxide, hydride, carbide, metal, and alloy fuels. In the underwater storage basins, fuels are clad with stainless steel, zirconium, and aluminum. Also included in the basin inventory is canned scrap material. The dry fuel storage contains primarily graphite and aluminum type fuels. A total of 55 different fuel types are currently stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The corrosion resistance of the barrier material is of primary concern in evaluating the integrity of the fuel in long term water storage. The barrier material is either the fuel cladding (if not canned) or the can material

  17. An algebraic model on the performance of a direct methanol fuel cell with consideration of methanol crossover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ken-Ming

    An algebraic one-dimensional model on the membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is proposed. Non-linear regression procedure was imposed on the model to retrieve important parameters: solid polymer electrolyte conductivity κ m, exchange current density of methanol electro-oxidation at anode catalyst surface i oM,ref, and mass diffusivity of methanol in aqueous phase within the porous electrode D a that correspond to the experimentally measured polarization curves. Although numerical iteration is required for a complete solution, the explicit relationships of methanol concentration, methanol crossover rate, oxygen concentration and cell discharge current density do provide a clear picture of the mass transport and electrochemical kinetics within the various porous media in the MEA. It is shown the cathode mixed potential induced by the parallel reactions of oxygen reduction and oxidation of crossover methanol elucidates the potential drop of the cathode and the decrease of the cell open circuit voltage (OCV). Methanol transport in the membrane is described by the diffusion, electro-osmosis, and pressure induced convection. Detailed accounts of the effects of anode methanol and cathode oxygen feed concentrations on the cell discharge performance are given with correlation to the physical structure and chemical compositions of the catalyst layers (CLs).

  18. MMSNF 2005. Materials models and simulations for nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyss, M.; Durinck, J.; Carlot, G.; Sabathier, C.; Martin, P.; Garcia, P.; Ripert, M.; Blanpain, P.; Lippens, M.; Schut, H.; Federov, A.V.; Bakker, K.; Osaka, M.; Miwa, S.; Sato, I.; Tanaka, K.; Kurosaki, K.; Uno, M.; Yamanaka, S.; Govers, K.; Verwerft, M.; Hou, M.; Lemehov, S.E.; Terentyev, D.; Govers, K.; Kotomin, E.A.; Ashley, N.J.; Grimes, R.W.; Van Uffelen, P.; Mastrikov, Y.; Zhukovskii, Y.; Rondinella, V.V.; Kurosaki, K.; Uno, M.; Yamanaka, S.; Minato, K.; Phillpot, S.; Watanabe, T.; Shukla, P.; Sinnott, S.; Nino, J.; Grimes, R.; Staicu, D.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Wiss, T.; Rondinella, V.V.; Ronchi, C.; Yakub, E.; Kaye, M.H.; Morrison, C.; Higgs, J.D.; Akbari, F.; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Gueneau, C.; Gosse, S.; Chatain, S.; Dumas, J.C.; Sundman, B.; Dupin, N.; Konings, R.; Noel, H.; Veshchunov, M.; Dubourg, R.; Ozrin, C.V.; Veshchunov, M.S.; Welland, M.T.; Blanc, V.; Michel, B.; Ricaud, J.M.; Calabrese, R.; Vettraino, F.; Tverberg, T.; Kissane, M.; Tulenko, J.; Stan, M.; Ramirez, J.C.; Cristea, P.; Rachid, J.; Kotomin, E.; Ciriello, A.; Rondinella, V.V.; Staicu, D.; Wiss, T.; Konings, R.; Somers, J.; Killeen, J

    2006-07-01

    The MMSNF Workshop series aims at stimulating research and discussions on models and simulations of nuclear fuels and coupling the results into fuel performance codes.This edition was focused on materials science and engineering for fuel performance codes. The presentations were grouped in three technical sessions: fundamental modelling of fuel properties; integral fuel performance codes and their validation; collaborations and integration of activities. (A.L.B.)

  19. Fuel performance of DOE fuels in water storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, A.P.; Scott, J.G.; Shelton-Davis, C.V.; McDannel, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In April of 1992, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) decided to end the fuel reprocessing mission at ICPP. Fuel performance in storage received increased emphasis as the fuel now needs to be stored until final dispositioning is defined and implemented. Fuels are stored in four main areas: an original underwater storage facility, a modern underwater storage facility, and two dry fuel storage facilities. As a result of the reactor research mission of the DOE and predecessor agencies, the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Atomic Energy Commission, many types of nuclear fuel have been developed, used, and assigned to storage at the ICPP. Fuel clad with stainless steel, zirconium, aluminum, and graphite are represented. Fuel matrices include uranium oxide, hydride, carbide, metal, and alloy fuels, resulting in 55 different fuel types in storage. Also included in the fuel storage inventory is canned scrap material

  20. High Burnup Fuel Performance and Safety Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Je Keun; Lee, Chan Bok; Kim, Dae Ho (and others)

    2007-03-15

    The worldwide trend of nuclear fuel development is to develop a high burnup and high performance nuclear fuel with high economies and safety. Because the fuel performance evaluation code, INFRA, has a patent, and the superiority for prediction of fuel performance was proven through the IAEA CRP FUMEX-II program, the INFRA code can be utilized with commercial purpose in the industry. The INFRA code was provided and utilized usefully in the universities and relevant institutes domesticallly and it has been used as a reference code in the industry for the development of the intrinsic fuel rod design code.

  1. State of art in FE-based fuel performance codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Fuel performance codes approximate this complex behavior using an axisymmetric, axially-stacked, one-dimensional radial representation to save computation cost. However, the need for improved modeling of PCMI and, particularly, the importance of multidimensional capability for accurate fuel performance simulation has been identified as safety margin decreases. Finite element (FE) method that is reliable and proven solution in mechanical field has been introduced into fuel performance codes for multidimensional analysis. The present state of the art in numerical simulation of FE-based fuel performance predominantly involves 2-D axisymmetric model and 3-D volumetric model. The FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN own 1.5-D and 2-D FE model to simulate PCMI and cladding ballooning. In 2-D simulation, the FALCON code, developed by EPRI, is a 2-D (R-Z and R-θ) fully thermal-mechanically coupled steady-state and transient FE-based fuel behavior code. The French codes TOUTATIS and ALCYONE which are 3-D, and typically used to investigate localized behavior. In 2008, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing multidimensional (2-D and 3-D) nuclear fuel performance code called BISON. In this paper, the current state of FE-based fuel performance code and their models are presented. Based on investigation into the codes, requirements and direction of development for new FE-based fuel performance code can be discussed. Based on comparison of models in FE-based fuel performance code, status of art in the codes can be discussed. A new FE-based fuel performance code should include typical pellet and cladding models which all codes own. In particular, specified pellet and cladding model such as gaseous swelling and high burnup structure (HBS) model should be developed to improve accuracy of code as well as consider AC condition. To reduce computation cost, the approximated gap and the optimized contact model should be also developed

  2. Inert matrix fuel performance during the first two irradiation cycles in a test reactor: comparison with modelling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Ch.; Kasemeyer, U.

    2003-06-01

    In the inert matrix fuel (IMF) type investigated at Paul Scherrer Institut, plutonium is dissolved in the yttrium stabilised zirconium oxide (YSZ), a highly radiation resistant cubic phase with additions of erbium as burnable poison for reactivity control. A first irradiation experiment of YSZ based IMF is ongoing in the OECD Material Test Reactor in Halden together with mixed oxide fuel. The results of the first two cycles for IMF to a burnup of some 105 kW d cm -3 are presented and the modelling results in comparison with the experimental results are shown. A first approximation for a simple swelling model for this YSZ based IMF can be given. Possible fission gas release mechanisms are briefly discussed. The implications of the modelling results are discussed.

  3. Mathematical modeling of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ruy; Gonzalez, Ernesto R.

    Fuel cells with a polymer electrolyte membrane have been receiving more and more attention. Modeling plays an important role in the development of fuel cells. In this paper, the state-of-the-art regarding modeling of fuel cells with a polymer electrolyte membrane is reviewed. Modeling has allowed detailed studies concerning the development of these cells, e.g. in discussing the electrocatalysis of the reactions and the design of water-management schemes to cope with membrane dehydration. Two-dimensional models have been used to represent reality, but three-dimensional models can cope with some important additional aspects. Consideration of two-phase transport in the air cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell seems to be very appropriate. Most fuel cells use hydrogen as a fuel. Besides safety concerns, there are problems associated with production, storage and distribution of this fuel. Methanol, as a liquid fuel, can be the solution to these problems and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are attractive for several applications. Mass transport is a factor that may limit the performance of the cell. Adsorption steps may be coupled to Tafel kinetics to describe methanol oxidation and methanol crossover must also be taken into account. Extending the two-phase approach to the DMFC modeling is a recent, important point.

  4. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Harold E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Under current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation, it is not sufficient for used nuclear fuel (UNF) to simply maintain its integrity during the storage period, it must maintain its integrity in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and moving it to treatment or recycling facilities, or a geologic repository. Hence it is necessary to understand the performance characteristics of aged UNF cladding and ancillary components under loadings stemming from transport initiatives. Researchers would like to demonstrate that enough information, including experimental support and modeling and simulation capabilities, exists to establish a preliminary determination of UNF structural performance under normal conditions of transport (NCT). This research, development and demonstration (RD&D) plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. This methodology will be used to provide a preliminary assessment of the performance characteristics of UNF cladding and ancillary components under rail-related NCT loading. The methodology couples modeling and simulation and experimental efforts currently under way within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC). The methodology will involve limited uncertainty quantification in the form of sensitivity evaluations focused around available fuel and ancillary fuel structure properties exclusively. The work includes collecting information via literature review, soliciting input/guidance from subject matter experts, performing computational analyses, planning experimental measurement and possible execution (depending on timing), and preparing a variety of supporting documents that will feed into and provide the basis for future initiatives. The methodology demonstration will focus on structural performance evaluation of

  5. Approaches to modeling of high burn-up structure and analysis of its effects on the behaviour of light water reactor fuels in the START-3 fuel performance code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostov, Grigori; Novikov, Vladimir; Medvedev, Anatoli; Bogatyr, Serguey

    2005-01-01

    An advanced model GRSWEL-A for fission gas behavior and micro-structural evolutions in Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels was developed for and embedded in the START-3 fuel performance code. This paper represents the physical basis and verification of the model with emphasis on analysis of High Burn-up Structure (HBS), which is generally ascribed to a so-called rim-layer of high burn-up fuel pellets. Specifically, the issues of microscopic polygonization, loss of matrix fission gas, growth of fuel porosity and fission gas release are highlighted. The effects of HBS on total fission gas release, temperature distribution in the pellet, pellet swelling and permanent strain of the cladding are considered in the appropriate section of the paper by means of comparative and sensitivity analysis with the use of both modeling and available experimental data. In all the cases, an accounting for the present effects is found to be an important integral part of thorough analysis of LWR fuel behavior. Aside from the description of current capabilities of modeling, some priority directions of further improvement are outlined. (author)

  6. Irradiation performance of HTGR recycle fissile fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.

    1976-08-01

    The irradiation performance of candidate HTGR recycle fissile fuel under accelerated testing conditions is reviewed. Failure modes for coated-particle fuels are described, and the performance of candidate recycle fissile fuels is discussed in terms of these failure modes. The bases on which UO 2 and (Th,U)O 2 were rejected as candidate recycle fissile fuels are outlined, along with the bases on which the weak-acid resin (WAR)-derived fissile fuel was selected as the reference recycle kernel. Comparisons are made relative to the irradiation behavior of WAR-derived fuels of varying stoichiometry and conclusions are drawn about the optimum stoichiometry and the range of acceptable values. Plans for future testing in support of specification development, confirmation of the results of accelerated testing by real-time experiments, and improvement in fuel performance and reliability are described

  7. Sensitivity assessment of fuel performance codes for LOCA accident scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Alfredo; Gomes, Daniel; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    FRAPCON code predicts fuel rod performance in LWR (Light Water Reactor) by modeling fuel responses under normal operating conditions and anticipated operational occurrences; FRAPTRAN code is applied for fuel transient under fast transient and accident conditions. The codes are well known and applied for different purposes and one of the use is to address sensitivity analysis considering fuel design parameters associated to fabrication, moreover can address the effect of physical models bias. The objective of this work was to perform an assessment of fuel manufacturing parameters tolerances and fuel models bias using FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN codes for Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario. The preliminary analysis considered direct approach taken into account most relevant manufacturing tolerances (lower and upper bounds) related to design parameters and physical models bias without considering their statistical distribution. The simulations were carried out using the data available in the open literature related to the series of LOCA experiment performed at the Halden reactor (specifically IFA-650.5). The manufacturing tolerances associated to design parameters considered in this paper were: enrichment, cladding thickness, pellet diameter, pellet density, and filling gas pressure. The physical models considered were: fuel thermal expansion, fission gas release, fuel swelling, irradiation creep, cladding thermal expansion, cladding corrosion, and cladding hydrogen pickup. The results obtained from sensitivity analysis addressed the impact of manufacturing tolerances and physical models in the fuel cladding burst time observed for the IFA-650.5 experiment. (author)

  8. Sensitivity assessment of fuel performance codes for LOCA accident scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Alfredo; Gomes, Daniel; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Muniz, Rafael O.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo, E-mail: ayabe@ipen.br, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (LABRISCO/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Análise, Avaliação e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2017-07-01

    FRAPCON code predicts fuel rod performance in LWR (Light Water Reactor) by modeling fuel responses under normal operating conditions and anticipated operational occurrences; FRAPTRAN code is applied for fuel transient under fast transient and accident conditions. The codes are well known and applied for different purposes and one of the use is to address sensitivity analysis considering fuel design parameters associated to fabrication, moreover can address the effect of physical models bias. The objective of this work was to perform an assessment of fuel manufacturing parameters tolerances and fuel models bias using FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN codes for Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario. The preliminary analysis considered direct approach taken into account most relevant manufacturing tolerances (lower and upper bounds) related to design parameters and physical models bias without considering their statistical distribution. The simulations were carried out using the data available in the open literature related to the series of LOCA experiment performed at the Halden reactor (specifically IFA-650.5). The manufacturing tolerances associated to design parameters considered in this paper were: enrichment, cladding thickness, pellet diameter, pellet density, and filling gas pressure. The physical models considered were: fuel thermal expansion, fission gas release, fuel swelling, irradiation creep, cladding thermal expansion, cladding corrosion, and cladding hydrogen pickup. The results obtained from sensitivity analysis addressed the impact of manufacturing tolerances and physical models in the fuel cladding burst time observed for the IFA-650.5 experiment. (author)

  9. Hydraulic modelling of the CARA Fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasnarof, Daniel O.; Juanico, Luis; Giorgi, M.; Ghiselli, Alberto M.; Zampach, Ruben; Fiori, Jose M.; Yedros, Pablo A.

    2004-01-01

    The CARA fuel element is been developing by the National Atomic Energy Commission for both Argentinean PHWRs. In order to keep the hydraulic restriction in their fuel channels, one of CARA's goals is to keep its similarity with both present fuel elements. In this paper is presented pressure drop test performed at a low-pressure facility (Reynolds numbers between 5x10 4 and 1,5x10 5 ) and rational base models for their spacer grid and rod assembly. Using these models, we could estimate the CARA hydraulic performance in reactor conditions that have shown to be satisfactory. (author) [es

  10. Development of the DUPIC fuel performance analysis code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K. H. [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea); Ho, K. I.; Uhm, T. S. [Suwon Univ., Suwon (Korea); Kim, H. M. [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    DUPIC fuel cycle reduces heavy radioactive wastes per electricity by using spent LWR fuel into CANDU reactors again. Since DUPIC fuel contains lots of fission products in fuel matrix initially, the behavior of DUPIC fuel is expected to be quite different from typical CANDU fuel. Hence, the goal of this work is to set up a software structure that is applicable to DUPIC fuel performance analysis. Thermal and mechanical models were reviewed, and selected for the analysis of nuclear fuel performance in reactor. 2 dimensional F.E.M. structure was developed. Both thermal and mechanical models are interrelated to each other, and the final result, fuel performance during irradiation is obtained by iterational calculation. A software package for this calculation was developed. A software that estimates the thermal and mechanical behaviors of nuclear fuel during irradiation was made. Since there is a limit in F.E.M. calculation in describing pellet-cladding contact phenomena, one dimensional calculation method is additionally used after the contact. The estimation of fuel behaviors during irradiation was compared with the results of FRAPCON-3. Generally, the calculational results were acceptable. 32 refs., 33 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  11. Performance concerns for high duty fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, V.J.; Gutierrez, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    One of the goals of the nuclear industry is to achieve economic performance such that nuclear power plants are competitive in a de-regulated market. The manner in which nuclear fuel is designed and operated lies at the heart of economic viability. In this sense reliability, operating flexibility and low costs are the three major requirements of the NPP today. The translation of these three requirements to the design is part of our work. The challenge today is to produce a fuel design which will operate with long operating cycles, high discharge burnup, power up-rating and while still maintaining all design and safety margins. European Fuel Group (EFG) understands that to achieve the required performance high duty/energy fuel designs are needed. The concerns for high duty design includes, among other items, core design methods, advanced Safety Analysis methodologies, performance models, advanced material and operational strategies. The operational aspects require the trade-off and evaluation of various parameters including coolant chemistry control, material corrosion, boiling duty, boron level impacts, etc. In this environment MAEF is the design that EFG is now offering based on ZIRLO alloy and a robust skeleton. This new design is able to achieve 70 GWd/tU and Lead Test Programs are being executed to demonstrate this capability. A number of performance issues which have been a concern with current designs have been resolved such as cladding corrosion and incomplete RCCA insertion (IRI). As the core duty becomes more aggressive other new issues need to be addressed such as Axial Offset Anomaly. These new issues are being addressed by combination of the new design in concert with advanced methodologies to meet the demanding needs of NPP. The ability and strategy to meet high duty core requirements, flexibility of operation and maintain acceptable balance of all technical issues is the discussion in this paper. (authors)

  12. State of art in FE-based fuel performance codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Finite element (FE) method that is reliable and proven solution in mechanical field has been introduced into fuel performance codes for multidimensional analysis. The present state of the art in numerical simulation of FE-based fuel performance predominantly involves 2-D axisymmetric model and 3-D volumetric model. The FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN own 1.5-D and 2-D FE model to simulate PCMI and cladding ballooning. In 2-D simulation, the FALCON code, developed by EPRI, is a 2-D (R-Z and R-θ) fully thermal-mechanically coupled steady-state and transient FE-based fuel behavior code. The French codes TOUTATIS and ALCYONE which are 3-D, and typically used to investigate localized behavior. In 2008, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing multidimensional (2-D and 3-D) nuclear fuel performance code called BISON. In this paper, the current state of FE-based fuel performance code and their models are presented. Based on investigation into the codes, requirements and direction of development for new FE-based fuel performance code can be discussed. Based on comparison of models in FE-based fuel performance code, status of art in the codes can be discussed. A new FE-based fuel performance code should include typical pellet and cladding models which all codes own. In particular, specified pellet and cladding model such as gaseous swelling and high burnup structure (HBS) model should be developed to improve accuracy of code as well as consider AC condition. To reduce computation cost, the approximated gap and the optimized contact model should be also developed. Nuclear fuel operates in an extreme environment that induces complex multiphysics phenomena, occurring over distances ranging from inter-atomic spacing to meters, and times scales ranging from microseconds to years. This multiphysics behavior is often tightly coupled, a well known example being the thermomechanical behavior. Adding to this complexity, important aspects of fuel behavior are inherently

  13. CANDU fuel performance and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, D.G.; Wood, J.C.; Bain, A.S.

    1978-12-01

    The fuel defect rate in CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) reactors continues to be very low, 0.06% since 1972. The power ramp defects, which constituted the majority of the early defects, have been virtually eliminated by changed fuelling schemes and through the introduction of graphite CANLUB coatings on the inside of the sheath. Laboratory and loop irradiations have demonstrated that the graphite CANLUB layers increase the tolerance to power ramps, but to obtain the maximum benefit, coating parameters such as thickness, adhesion and wear resistance must be optimized. Siloxane CANLUB coated fuel offers greater tolerance to power ramps than most graphite coatings; quality control appears simpler and no instance of localized sheath hydriding has been seen with cured and irradiated coatings. Limited testing has shown that fuel with graphite discs between fuel pellets also has high tolerance to power ramps, but it is more costly and has lower burnup. The number of defects due to faulty components has been extremely small (0.00014%), but improved quality control and welding procedures can lower this number even further. Defects from causes external to the bundle have also been very few. (author)

  14. FUEL3-D: A Spatially Explicit Fractal Fuel Distribution Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell A. Parsons

    2006-01-01

    Efforts to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of fuels treatments are hampered by inconsistencies between the spatial scale at which fuel treatments are implemented and the spatial scale, and detail, with which we model fire and fuel interactions. Central to this scale inconsistency is the resolution at which variability within the fuel bed is considered. Crown...

  15. MARMOT update for oxide fuel modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jiang, Chao [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Aagesen, Larry [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ahmed, Karim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jiang, Wen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, Bulent [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Tonks, Michael [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Millett, Paul [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the lower-length-scale research and development progresses in FY16 at Idaho National Laboratory in developing mechanistic materials models for oxide fuels, in parallel to the development of the MARMOT code which will be summarized in a separate report. This effort is a critical component of the microstructure based fuel performance modeling approach, supported by the Fuels Product Line in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program. The progresses can be classified into three categories: 1) development of materials models to be used in engineering scale fuel performance modeling regarding the effect of lattice defects on thermal conductivity, 2) development of modeling capabilities for mesoscale fuel behaviors including stage-3 gas release, grain growth, high burn-up structure, fracture and creep, and 3) improved understanding in material science by calculating the anisotropic grain boundary energies in UO$_2$ and obtaining thermodynamic data for solid fission products. Many of these topics are still under active development. They are updated in the report with proper amount of details. For some topics, separate reports are generated in parallel and so stated in the text. The accomplishments have led to better understanding of fuel behaviors and enhance capability of the MOOSE-BISON-MARMOT toolkit.

  16. Space reactor fuels performance and development issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wewerka, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three compact reactor concepts are now under consideration by the US Space Nuclear Power Program (the SP-100 Program) as candidates for the first 100-kWe-class space reactor. Each of these reactor designs puts unique constraints and requirements on the fuels system, and raises issues of fuel systems feasibility and performance. This paper presents a brief overview of the fuel requirements for the proposed space reactor designs, a delineation of the technical feasibility issues that each raises, and a description of the fuel systems development and testing program that has been established to address key technical issues

  17. Experimental and modeling study of high performance direct carbon solid oxide fuel cell with in situ catalytic steam-carbon gasification reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haoran; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Houcheng; Tan, Peng; Yang, Guangming; Irvine, John T. S.; Ni, Meng

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, 2D models for direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells (DC-SOFCs) with in situ catalytic steam-carbon gasification reaction are developed. The simulation results are found to be in good agreement with experimental data. The performance of DC-SOFCs with and without catalyst are compared at different operating potential, anode inlet gas flow rate and operating temperature. It is found that adding suitable catalyst can significantly speed up the in situ steam-carbon gasification reaction and improve the performance of DC-SOFC with H2O as gasification agent. The potential of syngas and electricity co-generation from the fuel cell is also evaluated, where the composition of H2 and CO in syngas can be adjusted by controlling the anode inlet gas flow rate. In addition, the performance DC-SOFCs and the percentage of fuel in the outlet gas are both increased with increasing operating temperature. At a reduced temperature (below 800 °C), good performance of DC-SOFC can still be obtained with in-situ catalytic carbon gasification by steam. The results of this study form a solid foundation to understand the important effect of catalyst and related operating conditions on H2O-assisted DC-SOFCs.

  18. Mathematical modeling of solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Yi; Maloney, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    Development of predictive techniques, with regard to cell behavior, under various operating conditions is needed to improve cell performance, increase energy density, reduce manufacturing cost, and to broaden utilization of various fuels. Such technology would be especially beneficial for the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) at it early demonstration stage. The development of computer models to calculate the temperature, CD, reactant distributions in the tubular and monolithic SOFCs. Results indicate that problems of nonuniform heat generation and fuel gas depletion in the tubular cell module, and of size limitions in the monolithic (MOD 0) design may be encountered during FC operation.

  19. Modeling of PWR fuel at extended burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Raphael Mejias

    2016-01-01

    This work studies the modifications implemented over successive versions in the empirical models of the computer program FRAPCON used to simulate the steady state irradiation performance of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods under high burnup condition. In the study, the empirical models present in FRAPCON official documentation were analyzed. A literature study was conducted on the effects of high burnup in nuclear fuels and to improve the understanding of the models used by FRAPCON program in these conditions. A steady state fuel performance analysis was conducted for a typical PWR fuel rod using FRAPCON program versions 3.3, 3.4, and 3.5. The results presented by the different versions of the program were compared in order to verify the impact of model changes in the output parameters of the program. It was observed that the changes brought significant differences in the results of the fuel rod thermal and mechanical parameters, especially when they evolved from FRAPCON-3.3 version to FRAPCON-3.5 version. Lower temperatures, lower cladding stress and strain, lower cladding oxide layer thickness were obtained in the fuel rod analyzed with the FRAPCON-3.5 version. (author)

  20. Thermodynamic properties of the DUPIC fuel and its performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Heon; Kim, Hee Moon [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    This study describes thermodynamic properties of DUPIC fuel and performance. In initial state, DUPIC fuel which contains fissile materials is different from general nuclear fuel. So this study analyzed oxygen potential, thermal conductivity and specific heat of the DUPIC fuel.

  1. Fuel performance update at Japanese BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Yasuyuki; Abe, Moriyasu

    2008-01-01

    Fuel Performance of Japanese BWRs has shown excellency with a very low fuel failure rate over the past couple of decades. In order to eliminate debris-fretting failures, which is considered as a dominant cause, efforts have been made to work out strict FME program and introduce lower tie plate with debris filters. Regarding a measure to detect failures without delay, an online off-gas monitor is installed, and there occurred no significant secondary failures leading to unnecessary plant shutdowns thanks to the monitor. Current standard fuel designs are 9x9 lattice configuration with the design maximum burnup set at 55 GWd/t and the bundle average discharge burnup at 45 GWd/t. Satisfactory performance of many fuels has gained so far to the burnup level. However recent data show an increase in hydrogen pickup of fuel claddings and spacers in the region of high burnup or high irradiation period, and this is one of the issues that should be addressed to maintain and improve fuel reliability for the reasons that hydrogen concentration may affect ductility of zirconium alloy. Furthermore, a recent study showed abnormally high hydrogen concentration in fuel cladding. Comprehensive root cause analyses were made, which include a poolside measurement for a number of high burnup fuels and development of new technique for tenacious crud removal, with the result that it is confirmed that a unique combination of cladding material, irradiation period and environment caused the phenomenon and it is not expected to occur again. New iron enhanced zirconium alloys, which have been investigated in for a long time, are expected to have greater resistance to hydrogen pickup, and introduction of the alloys is considered as the future materials. Regarding extensive inspections of fuel assemblies and channel boxes at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPS, no abnormality due to Niigata-ken Chuetsu-oki earthquake was observed for all plants. This paper deals with the current fuel performance at Japanese

  2. Development of fuel performance and thermal hydraulic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Youn Ho; Song, K. N.; Kim, H. K. and others

    2000-03-01

    Space grid in LWR fuel assembly is a key structural component to support fuel rods and to enhance heat transfer from fuel rod to the coolant. Therefore, the original spacer grid has been developed. In addition, new phenomena in fuel behavior occurs at the high burnup, so that models to analyze those new phenomena were developed. Results of this project can be summarized as follows. - Seven different spacer grid candidates have been invented and submitted for domestic and US patents. Spacer grid test specimen(3x3 array and 5x5 array) were fabricated for each candidate and the mechanical tests were performed. - Basic technologies in the mechanical and thermal hydraulic behavior in the spacer grid development are studied and relevant test facilities were established - Fuel performance analysis models and programs were developed for the high burnup pellet and cladding, and fuel performance data base were compiled - Procedures of fuel characterization and in-/out of-pile tests were prepared - Conceptual design of fuel rod for integral PWR was carried out. (author)

  3. Modeling of hybrid vehicle fuel economy and fuel engine efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    "Near-CV" (i.e., near-conventional vehicle) hybrid vehicles, with an internal combustion engine, and a supplementary storage with low-weight, low-energy but high-power capacity, are analyzed. This design avoids the shortcoming of the "near-EV" and the "dual-mode" hybrid vehicles that need a large energy storage system (in terms of energy capacity and weight). The small storage is used to optimize engine energy management and can provide power when needed. The energy advantage of the "near-CV" design is to reduce reliance on the engine at low power, to enable regenerative braking, and to provide good performance with a small engine. The fuel consumption of internal combustion engines, which might be applied to hybrid vehicles, is analyzed by building simple analytical models that reflect the engines' energy loss characteristics. Both diesel and gasoline engines are modeled. The simple analytical models describe engine fuel consumption at any speed and load point by describing the engine's indicated efficiency and friction. The engine's indicated efficiency and heat loss are described in terms of several easy-to-obtain engine parameters, e.g., compression ratio, displacement, bore and stroke. Engine friction is described in terms of parameters obtained by fitting available fuel measurements on several diesel and spark-ignition engines. The engine models developed are shown to conform closely to experimental fuel consumption and motored friction data. A model of the energy use of "near-CV" hybrid vehicles with different storage mechanism is created, based on simple algebraic description of the components. With powertrain downsizing and hybridization, a "near-CV" hybrid vehicle can obtain a factor of approximately two in overall fuel efficiency (mpg) improvement, without considering reductions in the vehicle load.

  4. Performance of bio fuels in diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez I, Manuel L; Prada V, Laura P

    2007-01-01

    This paper shows the preliminary results of pilot plant tests developed in oil catalytic hydrotreating process, where the crude palm oil or a mixture of crude palm oil and mineral diesel is treated with an injection of 99% pure hydrogen flux, in a fixed bed reactor at high pressures and temperatures, in a presence of Nickel Molybdenum catalyst supported on alumina bed. The main product of this process is a fuel (bio diesel) which has the same or better properties than the diesel obtained by petroleum refining. It has been made some performance fuel tests in diesel engine? with good results in terms of power, torque and fuel consumption, without any changes in engine configuration. Considering the characteristics of the Catalytic hydrotreated bio diesel compare to conventional diesel, both fuels have similar distillation range? however, bio diesel has better flash point, cetane index and thermal stability. Gas fuels (methane, ethane, and propane) CO 2 and water are the secondary products of the process.

  5. Proceedings of the 2006 International Meeting on LWR fuel performance 'Nuclear Fuel: Addressing the future' - TopFuel 2006 Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    From 22-26 October, 340 researchers, nuclear engineers and scientists from across Europe and beyond congregated in the ancient university city of Salamanca, Spain, to discuss the challenges facing the developers and manufacturers of new high-performance nuclear fuels-fuels that will help meet current and future energy demand and reduce man's over dependence upon CO 2 -emitting fossil fuels. TopFuel is an annual topical meeting organised by ENS, the American Nuclear Society and the Atomic Energy Society of Japan. This year it was co-sponsored by the IAEA, the OECD/NEA and the Spanish Nuclear Society (SNE). TopFuel's primary objective was to bring together leading specialists in the field from around the world to analyse advances in nuclear fuel management technology and to use the findings of the latest cutting-edge research to help manufacture the high performance nuclear fuels of today and tomorrow. The TopFuel 2006 agenda revolved around ten technical sessions dedicated to priority issues such as security of supply, new fuel and reactor core designs, fuel cycle strategies and spent fuel management. Among the many topics under discussion were new developments in fuel performance modelling, advanced fuel assembly design and the improved conditioning and processing of spent fuel. During the week, a poster exhibition also gave delegates the opportunity to display and discuss the results of their latest work and to network with fellow professionals. One important statement to emerge from TopFuel 2006 was that the world has enough reserves of uranium to support the large-scale and long-term production of nuclear energy. The OECD/NEA and the IAEA recently published a report entitled Uranium 2005: Resources, Production and Demand (the Red Book). The report, which makes a comprehensive assessment of uranium supplies and projected demand up until the year 2025, concludes by saying 'the uranium resource base is adequate to meet projected future requirements'. With the

  6. Development and validation of a multi-zone combustion model for performance and nitric oxide formation in syngas fueled spark ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakopoulos, C.D.; Michos, C.N.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a zero-dimensional, multi-zone combustion model is presented for predicting the performance and nitric oxide (NO) emissions of a spark ignition (SI) engine. The model is validated against experimental data from a multi-cylinder, four-stroke, turbocharged and aftercooled, SI gas engine running with syngas fuel. This alternative fuel, the combustible part of which consists mainly of CO and H 2 with the rest containing non-combustible gases, has been recently identified as a promising substitute of fossil fuels in view of environmentally friendly engine operation. The basic concept of the model is the division of the burned gas into several distinct zones, unlike the simpler two-zone models, for taking into account the temperature stratification of the burned mixture during combustion. This is especially important for accurate NO emissions predictions, since NO formation is strongly temperature dependent. The multi-zone formulation provides the chemical species concentrations gradient existing in the burned zones, as well as the relative contribution of each burned zone to the total in-cylinder NO formation. The burning rate required as input to the model is expressed as a Wiebe function, fitted to experimentally derived burn rates. All model's constants are calibrated at one operating point and then kept unchanged. Zone-resolved combustion related information is obtained, assisting in the understanding of the complex phenomena occurring during combustion in SI engines. Combustion characteristics of the lean-burn gas engine tested are provided for the complete load range, aiding the interpretation of its performance and knocking tendency. Computed NO emissions from the multi-zone model for various values of the engine load (i.e. air-fuel ratios) are presented and found to be in good agreement with the respective experimental ones, providing confidence for the predictive capability of the model. The superiority of the multi-zone model over its two

  7. Theoretical and experimental analysis of fast reactor fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kummerer, K.R.; Freund, D.; Steiner, H.

    1982-09-01

    In order to predict behavior, performance, and capability of prototypic fuel pins a standard operational scheme for the SNR-300 fast breeder reactor is established considering besides normal operation unscheduled power changes and shutdowns. The behavior during the whole lifetime is calculated using the updated SATURN codes and - for special conditions as power transients and skewed fuel rod power - the new TRANSIENT and TEXDIF codes. The results of these calculations are compared to experimental findings. It is demonstrated that the level of modeling and the knowledge of material properties under irradiation are sufficient for a quantitative description of the fuel pin performance under the above mentioned conditions. (orig.) [de

  8. Summary of fuel economy performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-09

    This report contains estimated fleet production numbers and CAFE figures obtained from pre-model year (source I) and mid-model year (source 2) documents assembled prior to or during the model year. The actual mpg values reported to EPA at the end of ...

  9. Fuel accident performance testing for small HTRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, W.; Pott, G.; Nabielek, H.

    1990-04-01

    Irradiated spherical fuel elements containing 16400 coated UO 2 particles each were heated at temperatures between 1600 and 1800°C and the fission product release was measured. The demonstrated fission product retention at 1600°C establishes the basis for the design of small modular HTRs which inherently limit the temperature to 1600°C by passive means. In addition to this demonstration, the test data show that modern TRISO fuels provide an ample performance margin: release normally sets in at 1800°C; this occurs at 1600°C only with fuels irradiated under conditions which significantly exceed current reactor design requirements.

  10. Fuel analysis code FAIR and its high burnup modelling capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, P.S.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1995-01-01

    A computer code FAIR has been developed for analysing performance of water cooled reactor fuel pins. It is capable of analysing high burnup fuels. This code has recently been used for analysing ten high burnup fuel rods irradiated at Halden reactor. In the present paper, the code FAIR and its various high burnup models are described. The performance of code FAIR in analysing high burnup fuels and its other applications are highlighted. (author). 21 refs., 12 figs

  11. Metal fuel manufacturing and irradiation performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, D.R.; Walters, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    The advances in metal fuel by the Integral Fast Reactor Program at Argonne National Laboratory are the subject of this paper. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The advances stressed in the paper include fuel irradiation performance, and improved passive safety. The goals and the safety philosophy of the Integral Fast Reactor Program are stressed

  12. Nuclear safety. Romania. Nuclear fuel performance, modeling and evaluation. Technical report. Report prepared for the Government of Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Tai-Ran

    1992-08-01

    The document contains the technical report submitted by an IAEA expert as a result of a field mission undertaken in June-July 1992 at the Institute for Nuclear Power Research, Pitesti, Romania, in the frame of the project IAEA/UNDP-Rom/87/002 (Nuclear Safety). The objectives of the mission were to assist the Institute in understanding the physical processes during fuel power cycling, to develop a computer code for power cycling behavior of fuel elements under both normal operation and power transient conditions, to advise on the design of irradiation tests aiming at the evaluation of fuel behavior during power cycling, and on the application of Computer-Aided Design (CAD) for fuel bundles

  13. Fuel performance annual report for 1990. Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preble, E.A.; Painter, C.L.; Alvis, J.A.; Berting, F.M.; Beyer, C.E.; Payne, G.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wu, S.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1993-11-01

    This annual report, the thirteenth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1990 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience and trends, fuel problems high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided . References to additional, more detailed information, and related NRC evaluations are included where appropriate.

  14. SGHWR fuel performance, safety and reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickman, D.O.; Inglis, G.H.

    1977-05-01

    The design principles involved in fuel pins and elements need to take account of the sometimes conflicting requirements of safety and reliability. The principal factors involved in this optimisation are discussed and it is shown from fuel irradiation experience in the Winfrith SGHWR that the necessary bias towards safety has not resulted in a reliability level lower than that shown by other successful water reactor designs. Reliability has important economic implications. By a detailed evaluation of SGHWR fuel defects it is shown that very few defects can be shown to be related to design, rating, or burn-up. This demonstrates that economic aspects have not over-ridden necessary criteria that most be met to achieve the desirable reliability level. It is possible that large scale experience on SGHWR fuel may eventually demonstrate that the balance is too much in favour of reliability and consideration may be given to whether design changes favouring economy could be achieved without compromising safety. The safety criteria applied to SGHWR fuel are designed to avoid any possibility of a temperature runaway in any credible accident situation. the philosophy and supporting experimental work programme are outlines and the fuel design features which particularly contribute to maximising safety margins are outlined. Reference is made to the new 60-pin fuel element to be used in the commercial SGHWRs and to its comparison in design and performance aspects with the 36-pin element that has been used to date in the Winfrith SGHWR. (author)

  15. Improving performance with accident tolerant-fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Daniel S.; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Giovedi, Claudia; Universidade de São Paulo

    2017-01-01

    After the Fukushima reactor accident, efforts to improve risk management in nuclear operations have included the intensification of research on accident-tolerant fuels (ATFs). In this investigation, the physical properties of recently developed ATFs were compared with those of the current standard fuel, UO 2 - Zr. The goals for innovative fuel design include a rigorous characterization of the thermal, mechanical, and chemical considerations. The intentions are to lengthen the burnup cycle, raise the power density, and improve safety. Fuels must have a high uranium density - above that supported by UO 2 - and possess a coating that exhibits better oxidation resistance than Zircaloys. ATFs such as U 3 Si 2 , UN, and UC contain a higher uranium density and thermal conductivity than UO 2 , providing significant benefits. The ideal combination of fuel and cladding must increase performance in a loss-of-coolant accident. However, U 3 Si 2 , UN, and UC have a disadvantage; their respective swelling rates are higher than that of UO 2 . These ATFs also have thermal conductivities approximately four times higher than that of UO 2 . A study was conducted investigating the hydrogen generated by the oxidation of zirconium alloys in contact with steam using cladding options such as Fe-Cr-Al and silicon carbide. It was confirmed that ferritic alloys offer a better response under severe conditions, because of their mechanical properties as creep rate. The findings of this study indicate that advanced fuels should replace UO 2 - Zr as the fuel system of choice. (author)

  16. Predictive Bias and Sensitivity in NRC Fuel Performance Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geelhood, Kenneth J.; Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.; Lanning, Donald D.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2009-10-01

    The latest versions of the fuel performance codes, FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN were examined to determine if the codes are intrinsically conservative. Each individual model and type of code prediction was examined and compared to the data that was used to develop the model. In addition, a brief literature search was performed to determine if more recent data have become available since the original model development for model comparison.

  17. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1973. [HTGR fuel reprocessing, fuel fabrication, fuel irradiation, core materials, and fission product distribution; GCFR fuel irradiation and steam generator modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Coobs, J.H.; Lotts, A.L.

    1976-04-01

    Progress is summarized in studies relating to HTGR fuel reprocessing, refabrication, and recycle; HTGR fuel materials development and performance testing; HTGR PCRV development; HTGR materials investigations; HTGR fuel chemistry; HTGR safety studies; and GCFR irradiation experiments and steam generator modeling.

  18. Spent Fuel Transportation Package Performance Study - Experimental Design Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, A. M.; Murphy, A. J.; Sprung, J. L.; Ammerman, D. J.; Lopez, C.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous studies of spent nuclear fuel transportation accident risks have been performed since the late seventies that considered shipping container design and performance. Based in part on these studies, NRC has concluded that the level of protection provided by spent nuclear fuel transportation package designs under accident conditions is adequate. [1] Furthermore, actual spent nuclear fuel transport experience showcase a safety record that is exceptional and unparalleled when compared to other hazardous materials transportation shipments. There has never been a known or suspected release of the radioactive contents from an NRC-certified spent nuclear fuel cask as a result of a transportation accident. In 1999 the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated a study, the Package Performance Study, to demonstrate the performance of spent fuel and spent fuel packages during severe transportation accidents. NRC is not studying or testing its current regulations, a s the rigorous regulatory accident conditions specified in 10 CFR Part 71 are adequate to ensure safe packaging and use. As part of this study, NRC currently plans on using detailed modeling followed by experimental testing to increase public confidence in the safety of spent nuclear fuel shipments. One of the aspects of this confirmatory research study is the commitment to solicit and consider public comment during the scoping phase and experimental design planning phase of this research

  19. Development and validation of a fuel performance analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majalee, Aaditya V.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2015-01-01

    CAD has been developing a computer code 'FRAVIZ' for calculation of steady-state thermomechanical behaviour of nuclear reactor fuel rods. It contains four major modules viz., Thermal module, Fission Gas Release module, Material Properties module and Mechanical module. All these four modules are coupled to each other and feedback from each module is fed back to others to get a self-consistent evolution in time. The computer code has been checked against two FUMEX benchmarks. Modelling fuel performance in Advance Heavy Water Reactor would require additional inputs related to the fuel and some modification in the code.(author)

  20. Improved microstructures for better fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutty, T.R.G.

    2009-01-01

    The microstructure of fuel pellet is very important since it is deeply related to the irradiation behaviour. It acts as the link between nuclear engineering and materials science of nuclear fuel for understanding thermal transport, swelling, fission-gas release, mechanical behavior. The microstructure of the fuel is intimately related to the behavior of the fission gases. The basic factors that have greatest influence on microstructure are crystal structure, defects concentration and phase stability. The improvement in plasticity and fission gas release can be attained by modifying the microstructures during fabrication. The role of microstructure and crystal defects in determining the engineering properties are always acknowledged. Conventional nuclear ceramic fabrication process consists of a number of stages including calcination, milling, incorporating additives, pressing, drying and densification. Since each of these steps affects the microstructure of fuel pellets they must all be understood. Moreover, the defect structures in the crystal lattice are very important for in-pile behaviour in classical UO 2 and MOX fuels. Defect structures, such as defect clusters or grain boundaries, play a crucial role in the stability of the matrices and the underlying mechanisms to defect stability are at least partly related to the nature of the 5f electrons. It is possible to obtain a wide range of microstructures by incorporating innovation in the fabrication procedure. This paper deals with the development fuels for improved performance by modifying the microstructures. (author)

  1. Steady-state fuel behavior modeling of nitride fuels in FRAPCON-EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bo; Karahan, Aydın; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2012-08-01

    Fuel material properties and mechanistic fission gas models in FRAPCON-EP were updated to model the steady-state behavior of high-porosity nitride fuel operating at temperatures below half of the melting point. The fuel thermal conductivity and fuel thermal expansion models were updated with correlations for UN and (U,Pu)N fuels. Hot-pressing of the as-fabricated porosity was modeled as a function of the hydrostatic pressure and creep rate. The solid fission product swelling was assumed to increase linearly with burnup. Fission gas swelling constitutive models were updated to appropriately capture the intragranular gas bubble evolution in nitride fuel. Intergranular gas swelling was neglected due to the assumed high porosity of the fuel. The fission gas release behavior was modeled by fitting the fission gas diffusion coefficient in UN to FRAPCON's default fission gas release model. This fitted gas diffusion coefficient reflects the effects of porosity, burnup, operating temperature, fission rate, and bubble sink strength. Fission gas release and fuel swelling benchmarks against irradiation data were performed. The updated code was applied to UN fuel in typical PWR geometry and operating conditions, with an extended cycle length of 24 months. The results show that swelling of the nitride fuel up to 60 MWd/kg burnup did not lead to excessive straining of the cladding. Furthermore, this study showed that a porous (>15% porosity) nitride fuel pellet could achieve a much higher margin to failure from the cladding collapse and grid-to-rod fretting.

  2. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of IFA-796 Rod 3 & 4 and Investigation of the Impact of Fuel Creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sweet, Ryan T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace the currently used zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromiumaluminum (FeCrAl) alloys because they exhibit slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and slow cladding consumption in the presence of high temperature steam. These alloys should also exhibit increased “coping time” in the event of an accident scenario by improving the mechanical performance at high temperatures, allowing greater flexibility to achieve core cooling. As a continuation of the development of these alloys, in-reactor irradiation testing of FeCrAl cladded fuel rods has started. In order to provide insight on the possible behavior of these fuel rods as they undergo irradiation in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor, engineering analysis has been performed using FeCrAl material models implemented into the BISON fuel performance code. This milestone report provides an update on the ongoing development of modeling capability to predict FeCrAl cladding fuel performance and to provide an early look at the possible behavior of planned in-reactor FeCrAl cladding experiments. In particular, this report consists of two separate analyses. The first analysis consists of fuel performance simulations of IFA-796 rod 4 and two segments of rod 3. These simulations utilize previously implemented material models for the C35M FeCrAl alloy and UO2 to provide a bounding behavior analysis corresponding to variation of the initial fuel cladding gap thickness within the fuel rod. The second analysis is an assessment of the fuel and cladding stress states after modification of the fuel creep model that is currently implemented in the BISON fuel performance code. Effects from modifying the fuel creep model were identified for the BISON simulations

  3. What Happens Inside a Fuel Cell? Developing an Experimental Functional Map of Fuel Cell Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Brett, Daniel J. L.

    2010-08-20

    Fuel cell performance is determined by the complex interplay of mass transport, energy transfer and electrochemical processes. The convolution of these processes leads to spatial heterogeneity in the way that fuel cells perform, particularly due to reactant consumption, water management and the design of fluid-flow plates. It is therefore unlikely that any bulk measurement made on a fuel cell will accurately represent performance at all parts of the cell. The ability to make spatially resolved measurements in a fuel cell provides one of the most useful ways in which to monitor and optimise performance. This Minireview explores a range of in situ techniques being used to study fuel cells and describes the use of novel experimental techniques that the authors have used to develop an \\'experimental functional map\\' of fuel cell performance. These techniques include the mapping of current density, electrochemical impedance, electrolyte conductivity, contact resistance and CO poisoning distribution within working PEFCs, as well as mapping the flow of reactant in gas channels using laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). For the high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), temperature mapping, reference electrode placement and the use of Raman spectroscopy are described along with methods to map the microstructural features of electrodes. The combination of these techniques, applied across a range of fuel cell operating conditions, allows a unique picture of the internal workings of fuel cells to be obtained and have been used to validate both numerical and analytical models. © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH& Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. SGHWR fuel performance, safety and reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickman, D.O.; Inglis, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    The design principles involved in fuel pins and elements need to take account of the sometimes conflicting requirements of performance, safety and reliability. The principal factors involved in this optimisation are discussed and it is shown from fuel irradiation experience in the Winfrith S.G.H.W.R. that the necessary bias toward safety has not resulted in a reliability level lower than that shown by other successful water reactor designs. Reliability has important economic implications and has to be paid for. By a detailed evaluation of S.G.H.W.R. fuel defects it is shown that very few defects can be shown to be related to design, rating or burn-up. This demonstrates that economic aspects have not over-ridden necessary criteria that must be met to achieve the desirable reliability level. It is possible that large-scale experience with S.G.H.W.R. fuel may eventually demonstrate that the balance is too much in favour of reliability and consideration may be given to whether design changes favouring economy could be achieved without compromising safety. The safety criteria applied to S.G.H.W.R. fuel are designed to avoid any possibility of a temperature runaway in any credible accident situation. The philosophy and supporting experimental work programme are outlined and the fuel design features which particularly contribute to maximising safety margins are outlined. Reference is made to new 60 pin fuel element to be used in the commercial S.G.H.W.R.'s and how it compares in design and performance aspects with the 36 pin element that has been used to date in the Winfrith S.G.H.W.R

  5. Impact of recycling on fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, S.; Gupta, L.K.; Hemant Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Fuel performance in the initial phase (1972-1991) of Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) was not up to the mark as indicated by the presence of iodine in the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system in two digits most of the time. Adoption of graphite coating and many other changes in the fuel bundle design have helped in achieving and containing the iodine activity values in single digit during most of the operation. However managing iodine free core has been a dream for Indian PHWR operation. To conserve the natural uranium bundles, a scheme of recycling the high burnup fuel has been adopted since 2003. There have been apprehensions that the recycling might deteriorate the fuel performance and result in higher iodine activity in PHT. This paper describes the unique operating experience at Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit-3 (RAPS-3) which brings out the facts that present design of fuel is able to remain defect free even at higher burnup with recycling option and at the same time, it is possible to maintain iodine below detection limit during the operation. (author)

  6. A unified model for energy and environmental performance assessment of natural gas-fueled poly-generation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicco, Gianfranco; Mancarella, Pierluigi

    2008-01-01

    Poly-generation systems for combined production of manifold energy vectors such as electricity, heat at different enthalpy levels (for instance, in the form of hot water and steam), and cooling power from a unique source of primary energy (typically natural gas) are increasingly spreading, above all on a small-scale basis (below 1 MW e ), owing to their enhanced energy, environmental and economic characteristics. Availability of suitable tools for assessing the performance of such systems is therefore fundamental. In this paper, a unified general model is proposed for assessing the energy and CO 2 emission performance of any type of poly-generation system with natural gas as the energy input. In particular, the classical energy saving model for cogeneration systems is extended to include in the analysis further energy vectors by defining the novel PPES (Poly-generation Primary Energy Saving) indicator. In addition, equivalent efficiencies for CO 2 emission assessment are defined and used in the formulation of the new PCO2ER (Poly-generation CO 2 Emission Reduction) indicator, specifically introduced for environmental analysis. The formal analogy between the PPES and the PCO2ER indicators is highlighted. Numerical applications are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed models and to quantify the typical benefits that poly-generation systems can bring. In particular, the new indicators are of relevant interest for both energy planners and policy makers, above all in the outlook of formulating financial incentive strategies, as it already occurs for cogeneration systems, or of participating to specific energy-related markets such as the ones for trading white certificates or emission allowances

  7. Progress Toward Quality Assurance Standards for Advanced Hydrocarbon Fuels Based on Thermal Performance Testing and Chemometric Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-15

    hydrocarbon-fueled liquid rocket engines , combustion enthalpy is transferred at high rates to thrust chamber surfaces, which are maintained at acceptably...thermal management of engine and vehicle structures , and more precisely the fuel’s ability to absorb heat without detrimentally affecting cooling...Specifically, reliable and predictable thermal management of engine and vehicle structures , and more precisely the fuel’s ability to absorb heat without

  8. Improving performance with accident tolerant-fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel S.; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: rafael.orm@gmail.com, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Naval e Oceânica

    2017-07-01

    After the Fukushima reactor accident, efforts to improve risk management in nuclear operations have included the intensification of research on accident-tolerant fuels (ATFs). In this investigation, the physical properties of recently developed ATFs were compared with those of the current standard fuel, UO{sub 2} - Zr. The goals for innovative fuel design include a rigorous characterization of the thermal, mechanical, and chemical considerations. The intentions are to lengthen the burnup cycle, raise the power density, and improve safety. Fuels must have a high uranium density - above that supported by UO{sub 2} - and possess a coating that exhibits better oxidation resistance than Zircaloys. ATFs such as U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, UN, and UC contain a higher uranium density and thermal conductivity than UO{sub 2}, providing significant benefits. The ideal combination of fuel and cladding must increase performance in a loss-of-coolant accident. However, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, UN, and UC have a disadvantage; their respective swelling rates are higher than that of UO{sub 2}. These ATFs also have thermal conductivities approximately four times higher than that of UO{sub 2}. A study was conducted investigating the hydrogen generated by the oxidation of zirconium alloys in contact with steam using cladding options such as Fe-Cr-Al and silicon carbide. It was confirmed that ferritic alloys offer a better response under severe conditions, because of their mechanical properties as creep rate. The findings of this study indicate that advanced fuels should replace UO{sub 2} - Zr as the fuel system of choice. (author)

  9. Features of fuel performance at high fuel burnups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proselkov, V.N.; Scheglov, A.S.; Smirnov, A.V.; Smirnov, V.P.

    2001-01-01

    Some features of fuel behavior at high fuel burnups, in particular, initiation and development of rim-layer, increase in the rate of fission gas release from the fuel and increase in the inner gas pressure in the fuel rod are briefly described. Basing on the analysis of the data of post-irradiation examinations of fuel rods of WWER-440 working FA and CR fuel followers, that have been operated for five fuel cycles and got the average fuel burnup or varies as 50MW-day/kgU, a conclusion is made that the WWER-440 fuel burnup can be increased at least to average burnups of 55-58 MW-day/kgU per fuel assembly (Authors)

  10. Modeling of Pem Fuel Cell Systems Including Controls and Reforming Effects for Hybrid Automotive Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boettner, Daisie

    2001-01-01

    .... This study develops models for a stand-alone Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack, a direct-hydrogen fuel cell system including auxiliaries, and a methanol reforming fuel cell system for integration into a vehicle performance simulator...

  11. Fuel performance annual report, period through December 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, M.D.

    1979-12-01

    This annual report, intended to be the first in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries are given for the reporting period of on-site fuel surveillance programs, fuel performance problems, and changes in commercial fuel designs. The report provides many references to more detailed information and to related NRC evaluations. 57 references

  12. Model of U3Si2 Fuel System using BISON Fuel Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. E. Metzger; T. W. Knight; R. L. Williamson

    2014-04-01

    This research considers the proposed advanced fuel system: U3Si2 combined with an advanced cladding. U3Si2 has a number of advantageous thermophysical properties, which motivate its use as an accident tolerant fuel. This preliminary model evaluates the behavior of U3Si2 using available thermophysical data to predict the cladding-fuel pellet temperature and stress using the fuel performance code: BISON. The preliminary results obtained from the U3Si2 fuel model describe the mechanism of Pellet-Clad Mechanical Interaction for this system while more extensive testing including creep testing of U3Si2 is planned for improved understanding of thermophysical properties for predicting fuel performance.

  13. Final report on LDRD project : elucidating performance of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells via computational modeling with experimental discovery and validation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao Yang (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Pasaogullari, Ugur (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Noble, David R.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Hickner, Michael A.; Chen, Ken Shuang

    2006-11-01

    In this report, we document the accomplishments in our Laboratory Directed Research and Development project in which we employed a technical approach of combining experiments with computational modeling and analyses to elucidate the performance of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In the first part of this report, we document our focused efforts on understanding water transport in and removal from a hydrogen-fed PEMFC. Using a transparent cell, we directly visualized the evolution and growth of liquid-water droplets at the gas diffusion layer (GDL)/gas flow channel (GFC) interface. We further carried out a detailed experimental study to observe, via direct visualization, the formation, growth, and instability of water droplets at the GDL/GFC interface using a specially-designed apparatus, which simulates the cathode operation of a PEMFC. We developed a simplified model, based on our experimental observation and data, for predicting the onset of water-droplet instability at the GDL/GFC interface. Using a state-of-the-art neutron imaging instrument available at NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology), we probed liquid-water distribution inside an operating PEMFC under a variety of operating conditions and investigated effects of evaporation due to local heating by waste heat on water removal. Moreover, we developed computational models for analyzing the effects of micro-porous layer on net water transport across the membrane and GDL anisotropy on the temperature and water distributions in the cathode of a PEMFC. We further developed a two-phase model based on the multiphase mixture formulation for predicting the liquid saturation, pressure drop, and flow maldistribution across the PEMFC cathode channels. In the second part of this report, we document our efforts on modeling the electrochemical performance of PEMFCs. We developed a constitutive model for predicting proton conductivity in polymer electrolyte membranes and compared

  14. Fuel performance annual report for 1984. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.J.; Dunenfeld, M.S.

    1986-03-01

    This annual report, the seventh in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1984 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included. 279 refs., 11 figs., 29 tabs.

  15. Thermal performance of fresh mixed-oxide fuel in a fast flux LMR [liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethridge, J.L.; Baker, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    A test was designed and irradiated to provide power-to-melt (heat generation rate necessary to initiate centerline fuel melting) data for fresh mixed-oxide UO 2 -PuO 2 fuel irradiated in a fast neutron flux under prototypic liquid metal reactor (LMR) conditions. The fuel pin parameters were selected to envelope allowable fabrication ranges and address mass production of LMR fuel using sintered-to-size techniques. The test included fuel pins with variations in fabrication technique, pellet density, fuel-to-cladding gap, Pu concentration, and fuel oxygen-to-metal ratios. The resulting data base has reestablished the expected power-to-melt in mixed-oxide fuels during initial reactor startup when the fuel temperatures are expected to be the highest. Calibration of heat transfer models of fuel pin performance codes with these data are providing more accurate capability for predicting steady-state thermal behavior of current and future mixed-oxide LMR fuels

  16. PEM fuel cell geometry optimisation using mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Carcadea

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available There have been extensive efforts devoted to proton exchangemembrane (PEM fuel cell modeling and simulations to study fuel cellperformance. Although fuel cells have been successfully demonstrated inboth automotive and stationary power applications, there are numeroustechnical and logistic issues that still have to be solved, such asperformance, cost, and system issues. A model based on steady,isothermal, electrochemical, three-dimensional computational fluiddynamics using the FLUENT CFD software package has been developedto predict the fluid flow pattern within a PEMFC. Three types of flow field areinvestigated with serpentine, parallel or spiral channels in order todetermine the best configuration for the fuel cell performance. In thiscontext, the paper presents the results that we have obtained and, as aconclusion of the simulations, we have achieved the best configurationregarding the performance for the fuel cell with serpentine channels. Weconsider the mathematical and computational modeling as an importantalternative for fuel cell optimization and for the exploitation/experimentationin cost reduction.

  17. High energy-density liquid rocket fuel performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel performance database of liquid hydrocarbons and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuels was compiled using engine parametrics from the Space Transportation Engine Program as a baseline. Propellant performance parameters are introduced. General hydrocarbon fuel performance trends are discussed with respect to hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and heat of formation. Aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is discussed with respect to aluminum metal loading. Hydrocarbon and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is presented with respect to fuel density, specific impulse and propellant density specific impulse.

  18. Modeling of constituent redistribution in U Pu Zr metallic fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Hayes, S. L.; Hofman, G. L.; Yacout, A. M.

    2006-12-01

    A computer model was developed to analyze constituent redistribution in U-Pu-Zr metallic nuclear fuels. Diffusion and thermochemical properties were parametrically determined to fit the postirradiation data from a fuel test performed in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The computer model was used to estimate redistribution profiles of fuels proposed for the conceptual designs of small modular fast reactors. The model results showed that the level of redistribution of the fuel constituents of the designs was similar to the measured data from EBR-II.

  19. Development of high performance hybrid rocket fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaseck, Christopher R.

    . In order to examine paraffin/additive combustion in a motor environment, I conducted experiments on well characterized aluminum based additives. In particular, I investigate the influence of aluminum, unpassivated aluminum, milled aluminum/polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and aluminum hydride on the performance of paraffin fuels for hybrid rocket propulsion. I use an optically accessible combustor to examine the performance of the fuel mixtures in terms of characteristic velocity efficiency and regression rate. Each combustor test consumes a 12.7 cm long, 1.9 cm diameter fuel strand under 160 kg/m 2s of oxygen at up to 1.4 MPa. The experimental results indicate that the addition of 5 wt.% 30 mum or 80 nm aluminum to paraffin increases the regression rate by approximately 15% compared to neat paraffin grains. At higher aluminum concentrations and nano-scale particles sizes, the increased melt layer viscosity causes slower regression. Alane and Al/PTFE at 12.5 wt.% increase the regression of paraffin by 21% and 32% respectively. Finally, an aging study indicates that paraffin can protect air and moisture sensitive particles from oxidation. The opposed burner and aluminum/paraffin hybrid rocket experiments show that additives can alter bulk fuel properties, such as viscosity, that regulate entrainment. The general effect of melt layer properties on the entrainment and regression rate of paraffin is not well understood. Improved understanding of how solid additives affect the properties and regression of paraffin is essential to maximize performance. In this document I investigate the effect of melt layer properties on paraffin regression using inert additives. Tests are performed in the optical cylindrical combustor at ˜1 MPa under a gaseous oxygen mass flux of ˜160 kg/m2s. The experiments indicate that the regression rate is proportional to mu0.08rho 0.38kappa0.82. In addition, I explore how to predict fuel viscosity, thermal conductivity, and density prior to testing

  20. Development of 3D Oxide Fuel Mechanics Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B. W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Casagranda, A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pitts, S. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jiang, W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-27

    This report documents recent work to improve the accuracy and robustness of the mechanical constitutive models used in the BISON fuel performance code. These developments include migration of the fuel mechanics models to be based on the MOOSE Tensor Mechanics module, improving the robustness of the smeared cracking model, implementing a capability to limit the time step size based on material model response, and improving the robustness of the return mapping iterations used in creep and plasticity models.

  1. Performance and reliability of LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairiot, H.; Deramaix, P.; Vandenberg, C.

    1977-01-01

    boric acid (since 1963), variable D 2 O-H 2 O moderation (1966), the utilization of pyrex (1972) and of gadolinium, first in a BWR (1973) and then in a PWR (1976). The succession and progressive completion of the experience which is detailed in the paper is mainly based on the fact that before loading a fuel in a reactor at least 3 years of preparation are required if it is a first of the kind. The results can only be fully assessed if after the life-time in the power reactor (3 years for a PWR, 5 years for a BWR), a proper postirradiation assessment is performed which requires another 1 to 3 years taking into account the extent of the programme. The data acquisition is therefore a process requiring 9 to 10 years between the decision to go ahead and the full availability of the experience [fr

  2. Thermal model of spent fuel transport cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.E.M.; Rahman, F.A.; Sultan, G.F.; Khalil, E.E.

    1996-01-01

    The investigation provides a theoretical model to represent the thermal behaviour of the spent fuel elements when transported in a dry shipping cask under normal transport conditions. The heat transfer process in the spent fuel elements and within the cask are modeled which include the radiant heat transfer within the cask and the heat transfer by thermal conduction within the spent fuel element. The model considers the net radiant method for radiant heat transfer process from the inner most heated element to the surrounding spent elements. The heat conduction through fuel interior, fuel-clad interface and on clad surface are also presented. (author) 6 figs., 9 refs

  3. Final Report - Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent Molter

    2012-08-18

    This program is focused on the experimental determination of the effects of key hydrogen side impurities on the performance of PEM fuel cells. Experimental data has been leveraged to create mathematical models that predict the performance of PEM fuel cells that are exposed to specific impurity streams. These models are validated through laboratory experimentation and utilized to develop novel technologies for mitigating the effects of contamination on fuel cell performance. Results are publicly disseminated through papers, conference presentations, and other means.

  4. Fuels Performance: Navigating the Intersection of Fuels and Combustion (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-12-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the only national laboratory dedicated 100% to renewable energy and energy efficiency, recognize that engine and infrastructure compatibility can make or break the impact of even the most promising fuel. NREL and its industry partners navigate the intersection of fuel chemistry, ignition kinetics, combustion, and emissions, with innovative approaches to engines and fuels that meet drivers' expectations, while minimizing petroleum use and GHGs.

  5. Effects of mixing system and pilot fuel quality on diesel-biogas dual fuel engine performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Iván Darío; Arrieta, Andrés Amell; Cadavid, Francisco Javier

    2009-12-01

    This paper describes results obtained from CI engine performance running on dual fuel mode at fixed engine speed and four loads, varying the mixing system and pilot fuel quality, associated with fuel composition and cetane number. The experiments were carried out on a power generation diesel engine at 1500 m above sea level, with simulated biogas (60% CH(4)-40% CO(2)) as primary fuel, and diesel and palm oil biodiesel as pilot fuels. Dual fuel engine performance using a naturally aspirated mixing system and diesel as pilot fuel was compared with engine performance attained with a supercharged mixing system and biodiesel as pilot fuel. For all loads evaluated, was possible to achieve full diesel substitution using biogas and biodiesel as power sources. Using the supercharged mixing system combined with biodiesel as pilot fuel, thermal efficiency and substitution of pilot fuel were increased, whereas methane and carbon monoxide emissions were reduced.

  6. Fuel Retrieval Sub-Project (FRS) Stuck Fuel Station Performance Test Data Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the test data report for Stuck Fuel Station Performance Testing in support of the Fuel Retrieval Sub-Project. The stuck fuel station was designed to provide a means of cutting open a canister barrel to release fuel elements, etc

  7. Fuel performance annual report for 1991. Volume 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, C.L.; Alvis, J.M.; Beyer, C.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Marion, A.L. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Payne, G.A. [Northwest Coll. and Univ. Association for Science, Richland, WA (United States); Kendrick, E.D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-08-01

    This report is the fourteenth in a series that provides a compilation of information regarding commercial nuclear fuel performance. The series of annual reports were developed as a result of interest expressed by the public, advising bodies, and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for public availability of information pertaining to commercial nuclear fuel performance. During 1991, the nuclear industry`s focus regarding fuel continued to be on extending burnup while maintaining fuel rod reliability. Utilities realize that high-burnup fuel reduces the amount of generated spent fuel, reduces fuel costs, reduces operational and maintenance costs, and improves plant capacity factors by extending operating cycles. Brief summaries of fuel operating experience, fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, high-burnup experience, problem areas, and items of general significance are provided.

  8. Model Year 2012 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  9. Model Year 2011 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  10. Model Year 2013 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  11. Model Year 2017 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  12. Model Year 2018 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-12-07

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  13. Use of advanced simulations in fuel performance codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Uffelen, P.

    2015-01-01

    The simulation of the cylindrical fuel rod behaviour in a reactor or a storage pool for spent fuel requires a fuel performance code. Such tool solves the equations for the heat transfer, the stresses and strains in fuel and cladding, the evolution of several isotopes and the behaviour of various fission products in the fuel rod. The main equations along with their limitations are briefly described. The current approaches adopted for overcoming these limitations and the perspectives are also outlined. (author)

  14. Solid Polymer Fuel Cells. Electrode and membrane performance studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller-Holst, S.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis studies aspects of fuel cell preparation and performance. The emphasis is placed on preparation and analysis of low platinum-loading solid polymer fuel cell (SPEC) electrodes. A test station was built and used to test cells within a wide range of real operating conditions, 40-150{sup o}C and 1-10 bar. Preparation and assembling equipment for single SPFCs was designed and built, and a new technique of spraying the catalyst layer directly onto the membrane was successfully demonstrated. Low Pt-loading electrodes (0.1 mg Pt/cm{sup 2}) prepared by the new technique exhibited high degree of catalyst utilization. The performance of single cells holding these electrodes is comparable to state-of-the-art SPFCs. Potential losses in single cell performance are ascribed to irreversibilities by analysing the efficiency of the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell by means of the second law of thermodynamics. The water management in membranes is discussed for a model system and the results are relevant to fuel cell preparation and performance. The new spray deposition technique should be commercially interesting as it involves few steps as well as techniques that are adequate for larger scale production. 115 refs., 43 figs., 18 tabs.

  15. Support vector machine to predict diesel engine performance and emission parameters fueled with nano-particles additive to diesel fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, M.; Najafi, G.; Ghobadian, B.; Mamat, R.; Noor, M. M.; Moosavian, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the use of adaptive Support Vector Machine (SVM) to predict the performance parameters and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine operating on nanodiesel blended fuels. In order to predict the engine parameters, the whole experimental data were randomly divided into training and testing data. For SVM modelling, different values for radial basis function (RBF) kernel width and penalty parameters (C) were considered and the optimum values were then found. The results demonstrate that SVM is capable of predicting the diesel engine performance and emissions. In the experimental step, Carbon nano tubes (CNT) (40, 80 and 120 ppm) and nano silver particles (40, 80 and 120 ppm) with nanostructure were prepared and added as additive to the diesel fuel. Six cylinders, four-stroke diesel engine was fuelled with these new blended fuels and operated at different engine speeds. Experimental test results indicated the fact that adding nano particles to diesel fuel, increased diesel engine power and torque output. For nano-diesel it was found that the brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) was decreased compared to the net diesel fuel. The results proved that with increase of nano particles concentrations (from 40 ppm to 120 ppm) in diesel fuel, CO2 emission increased. CO emission in diesel fuel with nano-particles was lower significantly compared to pure diesel fuel. UHC emission with silver nano-diesel blended fuel decreased while with fuels that contains CNT nano particles increased. The trend of NOx emission was inverse compared to the UHC emission. With adding nano particles to the blended fuels, NOx increased compared to the net diesel fuel. The tests revealed that silver & CNT nano particles can be used as additive in diesel fuel to improve complete combustion of the fuel and reduce the exhaust emissions significantly.

  16. Assessment of MARMOT. A Mesoscale Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, M. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Y. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, X. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fromm, B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yu, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Teague, M. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andersson, D. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    MARMOT is the mesoscale fuel performance code under development as part of the US DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Program. In this report, we provide a high level summary of MARMOT, its capabilities, and its current state of validation. The purpose of MARMOT is to predict the coevolution of microstructure and material properties of nuclear fuel and cladding. It accomplished this using the phase field method coupled to solid mechanics and heat conduction. MARMOT is based on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE), and much of its basic capability in the areas of the phase field method, mechanics, and heat conduction come directly from MOOSE modules. However, additional capability specific to fuel and cladding is available in MARMOT. While some validation of MARMOT has been completed in the areas of fission gas behavior and grain growth, much more validation needs to be conducted. However, new mesoscale data needs to be obtained in order to complete this validation.

  17. Performance of Fragema fuel in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, A.; Ravier, G.; Ballot, B.

    1986-06-01

    FRAGEMA fuel operating experience in power reactors is very extensive. Performance over a range of power and burnup levels for various operating conditions is quite satisfactory. However significant development programs are presently in progress to further extend our knowledge under increasingly severe operating conditions. In particular, upcoming data acquisition programs (1985-1988) will cover site and hot cell measurements on Gd poison rods, 4.5 % overenriched fuel rods over four operating cycles, 17 x 17 AFA fuel assemblies. For these products the same surveillance strategy as the one used for the standard assembly has been adopted, in order to continuously provide more data which can be used to upgrade design models and pave the way for the development of future products

  18. Fuel modelling and its economical competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, A.C.; Savino, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to reasons of economical competitiveness, there is at present a strong need in the nuclear industry to improve fuel performance under more demanding operating conditions, such as those resulting from an extended burnup. This requires a good understanding of the properties of fuel rod materials and their in-service performance. As it can be easily foreseen, thermal, mechanical and microstructural irradiation effects are strongly interrelated while the fuel is at reactor operating conditions. (author). 7 refs., 16 figs

  19. Use of impedance tagging to monitor fuel cell stack performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gregory

    Fuel cells are electrochemical device that are traditionally assembled in stacks to perform meaningful work. Monitoring the state of the stack is vitally important to ensure that it is operating efficiently and that constituent cells are not failing for one of a several common reasons including membrane dehydration, gas diffusion layer flooding, reactant starvation, and physical damage. Current state-of-the-art monitoring systems are costly and require at least one connection per cell on the stack, which introduces reliability concerns for stacks consisting of hundreds of cells. This thesis presents a novel approach for diagnosing problems in a fuel cell stack that attempts to reduce the cost and complexity of monitoring cells in a stack. The proposed solution modifies the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) response of each cell in the stack by connecting an electrical tag in parallel with each cell. This approach allows the EIS response of the entire stack to identify and locate problems in the stack. Capacitors were chosen as tags because they do not interfere with normal stack operation and because they can generate distinct stack EIS responses. An experiment was performed in the Center for Automation Technologies an Systems (CATS) fuel cell laboratory at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) to perform EIS measurements on a single cell with and without capacitor tags to investigate the proposed solution. The EIS data collected from this experiment was used to create a fuel cell model to investigate the proposed solution under ideal conditions. This thesis found that, although the concept shows some promise in simulations, significant obstacles to implementing the proposed solution. Observed EIS response when the capacitor tags were connected did not match the expected EIS response. Constraints on the capacitor tags found by the model impose significant manufacturing challenges to the proposed solution. Further development of the proposed solution is

  20. Effects of variations in fuel pellet composition and size on mixed-oxide fuel pin performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makenas, B.J.; Jensen, B.W.; Baker, R.B.

    1980-10-01

    Experiments have been conducted which assess the effects on fuel pin performance of specific minor variations from nominal in both fuel pellet size and pellet composition. Such pellets are generally referred to in the literature as rogue pellets. The effect of these rogue pellets on fuel pin and reactor performance is shown to be minimal

  1. Fuel assembly bow: analytical modeling and resulting design improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabel, J.; Huebsch, H.P.

    1995-01-01

    The bowing of fuel assemblies may result in a contact between neighbouring fuel assemblies and in connection with a vibration to a resulting wear or even perforation at the corners of the spacer grids of neighbouring assemblies. Such events allowed reinsertion of a few fuel assemblies in Germany only after spacer repair. In order to identify the most sensitive parameters causing the observed bowing of fuel assemblies a new computer model was develop which takes into a account the highly nonlinear behaviour of the interaction between fuel rods and spacers. As a result of the studies performed with this model, design improvements such as a more rigid connection between guide thimbles and spacer grids, could be defined. First experiences with this improved design show significantly better fuel behaviour. (author). 5 figs., 1 tabs

  2. Preliminary Modeling of Accident Tolerant Fuel Concepts under Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle A.; Hales, Jason D.

    2016-12-01

    The catastrophic events that occurred at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011 have led to widespread interest in research of alternative fuels and claddings that are proposed to be accident tolerant. Thus, the United States Department of Energy through its NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) program has funded an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) High Impact Problem (HIP). The ATF HIP is funded for a three-year period. The purpose of the HIP is to perform research into two potential accident tolerant concepts and provide an in-depth report to the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) describing the behavior of the concepts, both of which are being considered for inclusion in a lead test assembly scheduled for placement into a commercial reactor in 2022. The initial focus of the HIP is on uranium silicide fuel and iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloy cladding. Utilizing the expertise of three national laboratory participants (INL, LANL, and ANL) a comprehensive mulitscale approach to modeling is being used including atomistic modeling, molecular dynamics, rate theory, phase-field, and fuel performance simulations. In this paper, we present simulations of two proposed accident tolerant fuel systems: U3Si2 fuel with Zircaloy-4 cladding, and UO2 fuel with FeCrAl cladding. The simulations investigate the fuel performance response of the proposed ATF systems under Loss of Coolant and Station Blackout conditions using the BISON code. Sensitivity analyses are completed using Sandia National Laboratories’ DAKOTA software to determine which input parameters (e.g., fuel specific heat) have the greatest influence on the output metrics of interest (e.g., fuel centerline temperature). Early results indicate that each concept has significant advantages as well as areas of concern. Further work is required prior to formulating the proposition report for the Advanced Fuels Campaign.

  3. Analysis performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubin, A. N. A.; Bahrom, M. H.; Azri, M.; Ibrahim, Z.; Rahim, N. A.; Raihan, S. R. S.

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has gained much attention to the technology of renewable energy due to its mechanically ideal and zero emission power source. PEMFC performance reflects from the surroundings such as temperature and pressure. This paper presents an analysis of the performance of the PEMFC by developing the mathematical thermodynamic modelling using Matlab/Simulink. Apart from that, the differential equation of the thermodynamic model of the PEMFC is used to explain the contribution of heat to the performance of the output voltage of the PEMFC. On the other hand, the partial pressure equation of the hydrogen is included in the PEMFC mathematical modeling to study the PEMFC voltage behaviour related to the input variable input hydrogen pressure. The efficiency of the model is 33.8% which calculated by applying the energy conversion device equations on the thermal efficiency. PEMFC’s voltage output performance is increased by increasing the hydrogen input pressure and temperature.

  4. Fuel cycle assessment: A compendium of models, methodologies, and approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to profile analytical tools and methods which could be used in a total fuel cycle analysis. The information in this document provides a significant step towards: (1) Characterizing the stages of the fuel cycle. (2) Identifying relevant impacts which can feasibly be evaluated quantitatively or qualitatively. (3) Identifying and reviewing other activities that have been conducted to perform a fuel cycle assessment or some component thereof. (4) Reviewing the successes/deficiencies and opportunities/constraints of previous activities. (5) Identifying methods and modeling techniques/tools that are available, tested and could be used for a fuel cycle assessment.

  5. The manufacturing role in fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    Manufacturing companies have been involved in the CANDU fuel industry for more than 40 years. Early manufacturing contributions were the development of materials and processes used to fabricate the CANDU fuel bundle. As CANDU reactors were commissioned, the manufacturing contribution has been to produce economical, high quality fuel for the CANDU market. (author)

  6. Device and materials modeling in PEM fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Promislow, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Device and Materials Modeling in PEM Fuel Cells is a specialized text that compiles the mathematical details and results of both device and materials modeling in a single volume. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells will likely have an impact on our way of life similar to the integrated circuit. The potential applications range from the micron scale to large scale industrial production. Successful integration of PEM fuel cells into the mass market will require new materials and a deeper understanding of the balance required to maintain various operational states. This book contains articles from scientists who contribute to fuel cell models from both the materials and device perspectives. Topics such as catalyst layer performance and operation, reactor dynamics, macroscopic transport, and analytical models are covered under device modeling. Materials modeling include subjects relating to the membrane and the catalyst such as proton conduction, atomistic structural modeling, quantum molecular dynamics, an...

  7. Exploiting the steady state, continuous fueling reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.; Cunningham, G.W.; Fowler, T.B.

    1979-01-01

    A continuously fueled reactor presents an analysis challenge, especially so when the neutron accounting is sensitive to the core design and the fuel handling. A scheme was implemented to solve the steady state, continuous fueling problem. This problem is an accurate model of the reactor for assessing performance at a point in its operating history. Available capability in a modular code system developed to treat fixed fuel reactors was extended in this effort. Parametric studies have been made with this capability to assess the performance of a pebble bed power plant reactor over a wide range of fueling possibilities. The model and the calculational methods are discussed. A global iteration scheme is used to effect a solution for the critical reactor state. The schemes used to accelerate the rate of convergence of one- and two-dimensional problems are described and the interactive behavior is shown for representative problems

  8. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  9. Modeling the Thermal Rocket Fuel Preparation Processes in the Launch Complex Fueling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zolin

    2015-01-01

    hydrocarbon fuel returning to the storage tank.Mathematical models of cooling and heating processes are built on the assumption that the heat exchange process of storage and environment is quasistationary.The paper presents relationships for determining the relative masses of nitrogen and time to perform the operation of cooling fuel from the initial to the desired final temperature as well as relationships to define the time of heating operation for a given capacity of the heat exchanger-heater and the pump station fueling system.The results of calculations of the relative liquid nitrogen costs during cooling of hydrocarbon gases depending on the mass flow rate of nitrogen in the cooling fuel system are shown in comparison with experimental data and numerical calculations. The maximum error of analytical calculation results and experimental values of the relative cost of liquid nitrogen does not exceed 4.5% and the error in determining the time required for operations of temperature preparation does not exceed 5%.Analytical relationships and results of calculations obtained on their basis are adequate and in compliance with experimental results, in accuracy are on a par with results of numerical calculations and, as compared to numerical solution, greatly simplify a procedure of implemented design calculations of fuel temperature preparation processes. Using these relationships allows to analyze the effectiveness of the operations of heating and cooling hydrocarbon fuel depending on the design parameters of the storage capacity, its thermal insulation, mass of fuel, thermal power of the heating devices, flow of nitrogen, as well as to determine the required mass of liquid nitrogen and the operation parameters of cooling (heating fuel for filling systems of launch complexes for different values of the environmental parameters, the initial and desired final temperaturesof the fuel.

  10. Fuel performance evaluation for the CAFE experimental device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovedi, Claudia; Hirota, Leandro T.

    2011-01-01

    Fuel rod cladding material is the second barrier to prevent the release of radioactive inventories in a PWR reactor. In this sense, an important safety aspect is to assess the fuel behavior under operational conditions. This can be made by means of fuel performance codes and confirmed by experimental measurements. In order to evaluate the fuel behavior of fuel rods in steady-state conditions, it was designed an experimental irradiation device, the Nuclear Fuel Irradiation Circuit (CAFE-Mod1). This device will allow controlling the surface rod temperature, to measure the power associated to the rod and the evolution of fission gas release for a typical PWR fuel pin. However, to support the experimental irradiation program, it is extremely important to simulate the experimental conditions using a fuel performance code. The aim of this paper is to evaluate some parameters and aspects related to the fuel rod behavior during the irradiation program. This evaluation was carried out by means of an adapted fuel performance code. Obtained results have shown that besides of the variation observed for parameters, such as, fuel temperature and fission gas release as a function of fuel enrichment level, the fuel rod integrity was preserved in all studied conditions. (author)

  11. Performance of candu-6 fuel bundles manufactured in romania nuclear fuel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailescu, A.; Barbu, A.; Din, F.; Dinuta, G.; Dumitru, I.; Musetoiu, A.; Serban, G.; Tomescu, A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the performance of nuclear fuel produced by Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti during 1995 - 2012 and irradiated in units U1 and U2 from Nuclear Power Plant (N.P.P.) Cernavoda and also present the Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti concern for providing technology to prevent the failure causes of fuel bundles in the reactor. This article presents Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti experience on tracking performance of nuclear fuel in reactor and strategy investigation of fuel bundles notified as suspicious and / or defectives both as fuel element and fuel bundle, it analyzes the possible defects that can occur at fuel bundle or fuel element and can lead to their failure in the reactor. Implementation of modern technologies has enabled optimization of manufacturing processes and hence better quality stability of achieving components (end caps, chamfered sheath), better verification of end cap - sheath welding. These technologies were qualified by Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti on automatic and Computer Numerical Control (C.N.C.) programming machines. A post-irradiation conclusive analysis which will take place later this year (2013) in Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (the action was initiated earlier this year by bringing a fuel bundle which has been reported defective by pool visual inspection) will provide additional information concerning potential damage causes of fuel bundles due to manufacturing processes. (authors)

  12. Fuel performance-experience to date and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proebstle, R.A.; Klepfer, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    The experience in the USA to date, as reported in the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission data, conforms a very favorable cost trend for nuclear fuel costs relative to fossil fuel costs. The nuclear fuel cost promose relative to other fuels looks even better in future. Uranium supply surplus and advances in enrichment technology suggest that this trend should continue. Threats to the economic potential for nuclear fuel costs include unexpected problems in actural versus projected core and fuel technical performance. The New designs for BWR's nuclear fuel are extended to 38,000 MWd/MTU and the fuel rod reliabilities of 0.999994 are achievable. This reliability is equivalent to less than 3 fuel rod failures over the 40 year life of a reactor. (Liu)

  13. IAMBUS, a computer code for the design and performance prediction of fast breeder fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toebbe, H.

    1990-05-01

    IAMBUS is a computer code for the thermal and mechanical design, in-pile performance prediction and post-irradiation analysis of fast breeder fuel rods. The code deals with steady, non-steady and transient operating conditions and enables to predict in-pile behavior of fuel rods in power reactors as well as in experimental rigs. Great effort went into the development of a realistic account of non-steady fuel rod operating conditions. The main emphasis is placed on characterizing the mechanical interaction taking place between the cladding tube and the fuel as a result of contact pressure and friction forces, with due consideration of axial and radial crack configuration within the fuel as well as the gradual transition at the elastic/plastic interface in respect to fuel behavior. IAMBUS can be readily adapted to various fuel and cladding materials. The specific models and material correlations of the reference version deal with the actual in-pile behavior and physical properties of the KNK II and SNR 300 related fuel rod design, confirmed by comparison of the fuel performance model with post-irradiation data. The comparison comprises steady, non-steady and transient irradiation experiments within the German/Belgian fuel rod irradiation program. The code is further validated by comparison of model predictions with post-irradiation data of standard fuel and breeder rods of Phenix and PFR as well as selected LWR fuel rods in non-steady operating conditions

  14. Business cycles and the financial performance of fuel cell companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, I.; Sadorsky, P.

    2005-01-01

    Fuel cells are expected to play a major role in a hydrogen powered world. They will provide power to homes, modes of transportation and appliances. Hydrogen is the most abundant element in nature, but it must be extracted in order to be usable. It can be produced from oil, natural gas and coal or from renewable sources such as biomass, thermal or nuclear reactions. Fuel cells running on hydrogen extracted from non renewable resources have an efficiency of 30 per cent, which is twice as efficient as an internal combustion engine. The greatest barrier to mass commercialization is the cost of making hydrogen-powered auto engines. Also, an infrastructure must be developed to refill hydrogen cars. One solution is to build a hydrogen highway using the existing natural gas grid to produce hydrogen and sell it at existing filling stations. The cost of building 12,000 refueling pumps in urban areas which will provide access to 70 per cent of America's population is estimated at $10 to $15 billion. This paper described the vector autoregression (VAR) model which empirically examines the relationship between financial performance of fuel cell companies and business cycles. It was used to measure how sensitive the financial performance of fuel cell companies are to changes in macroeconomic activity. A four variable VAR model was developed to examine the relationship between stock prices, oil prices and interest rates. It was shown that the stock prices of fuel cell companies are affected by shocks to technology stock prices and oil prices, with the former having a longer lasting impact. These results add to the growing literature that oil price movements are not as important as once thought. 15 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  15. Performance of metallic fuels in liquid-metal fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, B.R.; Walters, L.C.; Kittel, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Interest in metallic fuels for liquid-metal fast reactors has come full circle. Metallic fuels are once again a viable alternative for fast reactors because reactor outlet temperature of interest to industry are well within the range where metallic fuels have demonstrated high burnup and reliable performance. In addition, metallic fuel is very tolerant of off-normal events of its high thermal conductivity and fuel behavior. Futhermore, metallic fuels lend themselves to compact and simplified reprocessing and refabrication technologies, a key feature in a new concept for deployment of fast reactors called the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). The IFR concept is a metallic-fueled pool reactor(s) coupled to an integral-remote reprocessing and fabrication facility. The purpose of this paper is to review recent metallic fuel performance, much of which was tested and proven during the twenty years of EBR-II operation

  16. RA3: Application of a calculation model for fuel management with SEFE (Slightly Enriched Fuel Elements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estryk, G.; Higa, M.

    1993-01-01

    The RA-3 (5 MW, MTR) reactor is mainly utilized to produce radioisotopes (Mo-99, I-131, etc.). It started operating with Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) in 1990, and spends around 12 fuels per year. Although this consumption is small compared to a nuclear power station. It is important to do a good management of them. The present report describes: - A reactor model to perform the Fuel Shuffling. - Results of fuel management simulations for 2 and a half years of operation. Some features of the calculations can be summarized as follows: 1) A 3D calculation model is used with the code PUMA. It does not have experimental adjustments, except for some approximations in the reflector representation and predicts: power, flux distributions and reactivity of the core in an acceptable way. 2) Comparisons have been made with the measurements done in the commissioning with LEU fuels, and it has also been compared with the empirical method (the previous one) which had been used in the former times of operation with LEU fuel. 3) The number of points of the model is approximately 13500, an it can be run in 80386 personal computer. The present method has been verified as a good tool to perform the simulations for the fuel management of RA-3 reactor. It is expected to produce some economic advantages in: - Achieving a better utilization of the fuels. - Leaving more time of operation for radioisotopes production. The activation measurements through the whole core required by the previous method can be significantly reduced. (author)

  17. Research in Supercritical Fuel Properties and Combustion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-18

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0296 RESEARCH IN SUPERCRITICAL FUEL PROPERTIES AND COMBUSTION MODELING Gregory Faris SRI INTERNATIONAL MENLO PARK CA Final... Faris , Gregory P. Smith 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) SRI International...International Final Technical Report • September 14, 2015 RESEARCH IN SUPERCRITICAL FUEL PROPERTIES AND COMBUSTION MODELING Prepared by: Gregory W. Faris

  18. Modelling of fuel rod hydriding failures in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'eva, E.Yu.; Evdokimov, I.A.; Khoruzhij, O.V.; Likhanskij, V.V.; Sorokin, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Mechanistic models which were developed to describe primary hydriding phenomena in claddings of initially intact rods with residual moisture are described. The models include the following key processes: fuel rod thermal behavior, UO 2 fuel oxidation in steam-hydrogen atmosphere under irradiation, hydrogen diffusion in zirconium and in the hydride, growth of the hydride phase. Fuel rod thermomechanical behavior is calculated by using RTOP integral fuel code. An oxidation model represents the effects of temperature dynamics and temperature profile along fuel axis and radius on fuel oxidation as well as on hydrogen accumulation inside the fuel rod. Along with ordinary thermal dissociation of water molecules, the oxidation model also addresses radiolysis of the steam-hydrogen mixture due to fission fragments. The present radiolysis model takes into account the effects of the gas mixture composition, temperature and pressure. A new model of cladding hydriding is proposed in which calculation of the massive hydride growth is performed in 2-D geometry. Hydrogen transport in zirconium cladding is modeled with account for thermodiffusion. The RTOP code comprising the models developed allows us to calculate different scenarios of hydriding rod failures under given operation conditions. Test calculations were carried out and compared to available data. It is shown that there are threshold values of initial steam content inside the intact fuel rod which lead to the possibility of through-cladding hydride growth and formation of the primary defect. The threshold values depend on the oxidation state of the cladding inner surface, linear power profile in the fuel rod, fuel rod geometry, cladding temperature conditions and hydrogen diffusivities in zirconium and zirconium hydride

  19. IRRADIATION PERFORMANCE OF U-Mo MONOLITHIC FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. MEYER

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power to high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. Research reactor fuels are designed for efficient heat rejection, and are composed of assemblies of thin-plates clad in aluminum alloy. The development of low-enriched fuels to replace high-enriched fuels for these reactors requires a substantially increased uranium density in the fuel to offset the decrease in enrichment. Very few fuel phases have been identified that have the required combination of very-high uranium density and stable fuel behavior at high burnup. UMo alloys represent the best known tradeoff in these properties. Testing of aluminum matrix U-Mo aluminum matrix dispersion fuel revealed a pattern of breakaway swelling behavior at intermediate burnup, related to the formation of a molybdenum stabilized high aluminum intermetallic phase that forms during irradiation. In the case of monolithic fuel, this issue was addressed by eliminating, as much as possible, the interfacial area between U-Mo and aluminum. Based on scoping irradiation test data, a fuel plate system composed of solid U-10Mo fuel meat, a zirconium diffusion barrier, and Al6061 cladding was selected for development. Developmental testing of this fuel system indicates that it meets core criteria for fuel qualification, including stable and predictable swelling behavior, mechanical integrity to high burnup, and geometric stability. In addition, the fuel exhibits robust behavior during power-cooling mismatch events under irradiation at high power.

  20. Study on the Use of Hydride Fuel in High-Performance Light Water Reactor Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Haileyesus Tsige-Tamirat; Luca Ammirabile

    2015-01-01

    Hydride fuels have features which could make their use attractive in future advanced power reactors. The potential benefit of use of hydride fuel in HPLWR without introducing significant modification in the current core design concept of the high-performance light water reactor (HPLWR) has been evaluated. Neutronics and thermal hydraulic analyses were performed for a single assembly model of HPLWR with oxide and hydride fuels. The hydride assembly shows higher moderation with softer neutron s...

  1. Development of High Performance Hybrid Fuels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's strategic goals call for innovation in space technology for our nation's explorative future. Early phase paraffin fuel technology could enable practical...

  2. High performance zinc air fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Pucheng; Ma, Ze; Wang, Keliang; Wang, Xizhong; Song, Mancun; Xu, Huachi

    2014-03-01

    A zinc air fuel cell (ZAFC) stack with inexpensive manganese dioxide (MnO2) as the catalyst is designed, in which the circulation flowing potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte carries the reaction product away and acts as a coolant. Experiments are carried out to investigate the characteristics of polarization, constant current discharge and dynamic response, as well as the factors affecting the performance and uniformity of individual cells in the stack. The results reveal that the peak power density can be as high as 435 mW cm-2 according to the area of the air cathode sheet, and the influence factors on cell performance and uniformity are cell locations, filled state of zinc pellets, contact resistance, flow rates of electrolyte and air. It is also shown that the time needed for voltages to reach steady state and that for current step-up or current step-down are both in milliseconds, indicating the ZAFC can be excellently applied to vehicles with rapid dynamic response demands.

  3. Model Year 2014 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  4. Model Year 2010 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-10-14

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  5. Model Year 2016 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  6. Model Year 2015 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  7. Model Year 2005 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  8. Model Year 2006 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  9. Model Year 2009 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  10. Model Year 2008 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2007-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  11. Model Year 2007 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2007-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  12. Modeling Fuel Efficiency: MPG or GPHM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkovich, Kevin G.

    2013-01-01

    The standard for measuring fuel efficiency in the U.S. has been miles per gallon (mpg). However, the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) switch in rating fuel efficiency from miles per gallon to gallons per hundred miles with the 2013 model-year cars leads to interesting and relevant mathematics with real-world connections. By modeling…

  13. PEM fuel cell modeling and simulation using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Spiegel, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    Although, the basic concept of a fuel cell is quite simple, creating new designs and optimizing their performance takes serious work and a mastery of several technical areas. PEM Fuel Cell Modeling and Simulation Using Matlab, provides design engineers and researchers with a valuable tool for understanding and overcoming barriers to designing and building the next generation of PEM Fuel Cells. With this book, engineers can test components and verify designs in the development phase, saving both time and money.Easy to read and understand, this book provides design and modelling tips for

  14. Proceedings of the Topical meeting on the reactor fuel performance - TopFuel 2012 Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    TopFuel is an annual topical meeting organised by ENS, the American Nuclear Society and the Atomic Energy Society of Japan. TopFuel's primary objective is to bring together leading specialists in the field from around the world to analyse advances in nuclear fuel management technology and to use the findings of the latest cutting-edge research to help manufacture the high performance nuclear fuels of today and tomorrow. Aim is to discuss the challenges facing the developers and manufacturers of new high-performance nuclear fuels - fuels that will help meet current and future energy demand and reduce man's over dependence upon CO 2 -emitting fossil fuels. The technical scope of Top Fuel 2012 includes all aspects of nuclear fuel from fuel rod to core design as well as manufacturing, performance in commercial and test reactors or on-going and future developments and trends. The meeting includes selectively front and/or back end issues that impact fuel designs and performance. (authors)

  15. LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberman, Ben [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States); Martinez-Baca, Carlos [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States); Rush, Greg [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States)

    2013-05-31

    This report presents a summary of the work performed by LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. during the project LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development (DOE Award Number: DE-FE0000773) which commenced on October 1, 2009 and was completed on March 31, 2013. The aim of this project is for LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (formerly known as Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc.) (LGFCS) to develop a multi-physics solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) computer code (MPC) for performance calculations of the LGFCS fuel cell structure to support fuel cell product design and development. A summary of the initial stages of the project is provided which describes the MPC requirements that were developed and the selection of a candidate code, STAR-CCM+ (CD-adapco). This is followed by a detailed description of the subsequent work program including code enhancement and model verification and validation activities. Details of the code enhancements that were implemented to facilitate MPC SOFC simulations are provided along with a description of the models that were built using the MPC and validated against experimental data. The modeling work described in this report represents a level of calculation detail that has not been previously available within LGFCS.

  16. A Stochastic Programming Model for Fuel Treatment Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohannad Kabli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work considers a two-stage stochastic integer programming (SIP approach for optimizing fuel treatment planning under uncertainty in weather and fire occurrence for rural forests. Given a set of areas for potentially performing fuel treatment, the problem is to decide the best treatment option for each area under uncertainty in future weather and fire occurrence. A two-stage SIP model is devised whose objective is to minimize the here-and-now cost of fuel treatment in the first-stage, plus the expected future costs due to uncertain impact from potential fires in the second-stage calculated as ecosystem services losses. The model considers four fuel treatment options: no treatment, mechanical thinning, prescribed fire, and grazing. Several constraints such as budgetary and labor constraints are included in the model and a standard fire behavior model is used to estimate some of the parameters of the model such as fuel levels at the beginning of the fire season. The SIP model was applied to data for a study area in East Texas with 15 treatment areas under different weather scenarios. The results of the study show, for example, that unless the expected ecosystem services values for an area outweigh fuel treatment costs, no treatment is the best choice for the area. Thus the valuation of the area together with the probability of fire occurrence and behavior strongly drive fuel treatment choices.

  17. A novel approach coupling neutron imaging and numerical modelling for the analysis of the impact of water on fuel cell performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iranzo, Alfredo; Boillat, Pierre; Oberholzer, Pierre; Guerra, José

    2014-01-01

    A novel modelling framework for the simulation of the diffusive mass transport limitations occurring at GDL local scale of PEFCs is presented, in particular in relation with the distribution of liquid water in the porous media. The distinctive characteristic of this framework is the fact that the distribution of liquid water is not predicted by the model but it is instead mapped into the simulation model from available experimental measurements, obtained with neutron imaging. The presence of liquid water is thus included in the model as a modifier for the gas diffusion transport, and not directly calculated by the model. This allows for a coupling of experimental measurements and model development that is expected to allow a further progress of highly reliable models for the understanding of local fuel cell phenomena. A 1D cell is analyzed, and the effective diffusion coefficient and the n exponent in the diffusion correction factor is calculated from the results of the combination of modelling and experimental data. An extension of the method for a 2D cell is also introduced. - Highlights: • Novel modelling framework for the research of GDL diffusive mass transport. • Liquid water distribution is mapped into the model from neutron imaging data. • The approach provides a stronger coupling of experimental measurements and modelling. • Analysis of 1D and 2D cells presented as introduction to the development approach

  18. Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION): A Tool for Analyzing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Futures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, Jacob J.; Piet, Steven J.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Shropshire, David E.; Jeffers, Robert F.; Yacout, A.M.; Schweitzer, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a set of complex components that are intended to work together. To support the nuclear renaissance, it is necessary to understand the impacts of changes and timing of events in any part of the fuel cycle system such as how the system would respond to each technological change, a series of which moves the fuel cycle from where it is to a postulated future state. The system analysis working group of the United States research program on advanced fuel cycles (formerly called the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative) is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing, and changes in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model components and some examples of how to use VISION. For example, VISION users can now change yearly the selection of separation or reactor technologies, the performance characteristics of those technologies, and/or the routing of material among separation and reactor types - with the model still operating on a PC in <5 min.

  19. Transient performance simulation of aircraft engine integrated with fuel and control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Li, Y.G.; Yang, B.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new performance simulation method for engine hydraulic fuel systems is introduced. • Time delay of engine performance due to fuel system model is noticeable but small. • The method provides details of fuel system behavior in engine transient processes. • The method could be used to support engine and fuel system designs. - Abstract: A new method for the simulation of gas turbine fuel systems based on an inter-component volume method has been developed. It is able to simulate the performance of each of the hydraulic components of a fuel system using physics-based models, which potentially offers more accurate results compared with those using transfer functions. A transient performance simulation system has been set up for gas turbine engines based on an inter-component volume (ICV) method. A proportional-integral (PI) control strategy is used for the simulation of engine controller. An integrated engine and its control and hydraulic fuel systems has been set up to investigate their coupling effect during engine transient processes. The developed simulation system has been applied to a model aero engine. The results show that the delay of the engine transient response due to the inclusion of the fuel system model is noticeable although relatively small. The developed method is generic and can be applied to any other gas turbines and their control and fuel systems.

  20. Overview on MOX fuel for LWRs: Design, performance and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.; Callens, C.; Goll, W.; Lippens, M.

    2000-01-01

    This overview looks at the historical background to the design, performance and testing of LWR MOX fuel over the last 30 to 40 years. It briefly examines the scenarios which encouraged the development of MOX fuel for utilisation in LWRs and looks at the design changes required on moving from UO 2 to MOX fuel. The paper summarises the national irradiation testing programmes, the commercial developments and performance data obtained throughout this period, highlighting those aspects which have had an impact on manufacturing and design choices. The paper thus provides the historical background information for the contributed papers in Session 3 (Fuel Design, Performance and Testing) of the symposium. (author)

  1. Sensitivity of fire behavior simulations to fuel model variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucy A. Salazar

    1985-01-01

    Stylized fuel models, or numerical descriptions of fuel arrays, are used as inputs to fire behavior simulation models. These fuel models are often chosen on the basis of generalized fuel descriptions, which are related to field observations. Site-specific observations of fuels or fire behavior in the field are not readily available or necessary for most fire management...

  2. Numerical Study on the Performance Characteristics of Hydrogen Fueled Port Injection Internal Combustion Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Rosli A. Bakar; Mohammed K. Mohammed; M. M. Rahman

    2009-01-01

    This study was focused on the engine performance of single cylinder hydrogen fueled port injection internal combustion engine. GT-Power was utilized to develop the model for port injection engine. One dimensional gas dynamics was represented the flow and heat transfer in the components of the engine model. The governing equations were introduced first, followed by the performance parameters and model description. Air-fuel ratio was varied from stoichiometric limit to a lean limit and the rota...

  3. MODELLING OF NUCLEAR FUEL CLADDING TUBES CORROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Cech

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes materials made of zirconium-based alloys used for nuclear fuel cladding fabrication. It is focused on corrosion problems their theoretical description and modeling in nuclear engineering.

  4. Standard fire behavior fuel models: a comprehensive set for use with Rothermel's surface fire spread model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe H. Scott; Robert E. Burgan

    2005-01-01

    This report describes a new set of standard fire behavior fuel models for use with Rothermel's surface fire spread model and the relationship of the new set to the original set of 13 fire behavior fuel models. To assist with transition to using the new fuel models, a fuel model selection guide, fuel model crosswalk, and set of fuel model photos are provided.

  5. Nuclear fuel: modelling the advanced plutonium assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaoua, Th.; Lenain, R.

    2004-01-01

    The benefits of modeling in the nuclear sector are illustrated by the example of the design study for a new plutonium fuel assembly, APA, capable of ensuring maximum consumption of this fuel in pressurized-water reactors. Beyond the physical design of the assembly and its integration into the reactor, this serves for the working out of a complete materials flow and assists in modeling production from the entire inventory of nuclear power stations. (authors)

  6. Overview of the BISON Multidimensional Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer; D. M. Perez; G. Pastore; R. C. Martineau

    2013-10-01

    BISON is a modern multidimensional multiphysics finite-element based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (USA) since 2009. A brief background is provided on the code’s computational framework (MOOSE), governing equations, and material and behavioral models. Ongoing code verification and validation work is outlined, and comparative results are provided for select validation cases. Recent applications are discussed, including specific description of two applications where 3D treatment is important. A summary of future code development and validation activities is given. Numerous references to published work are provided where interested readers can find more complete information.

  7. Biodiesel Performance within Internal Combustion Engine Fuel System - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.A. Khan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This review paper highlights the tribological performance of biodiesel at contacting surfaces in the fuel delivery system of compression ignition (diesel engines. The focus is on the injection components that include low and high pressure injection pumps, diesel fuel injectors, electro-hydraulic valves, diesel fuel lubricity measurements and effects of biodiesel on the running conditions in a diesel fuel injection system. The common rail system and the distributor pump injection systems with electronic diesel control are among the modern trends that are specifically highlighted. Boundary, mixed and hydrodynamic lubrication regimes together with lubricant oil film thickness, pressure and engine performance are also considered.

  8. Advanced modeling of oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chungen Yin

    2011-01-15

    The main goal of this small-scale project is to investigate oxy-combustion of natural gas (NG) through advanced modeling, in which radiation, chemistry and mixing will be reasonably resolved. 1) A state-of-the-art review was given regarding the latest R and D achievements and status of oxy-fuel technology. The modeling and simulation status and achievements in the field of oxy-fuel combustion were also summarized; 2) A computer code in standard c++, using the exponential wide band model (EWBM) to evaluate the emissivity and absorptivity of any gas mixture at any condition, was developed and validated in detail against data in literature. A new, complete, and accurate WSGGM, applicable to both air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion modeling and applicable to both gray and non-gray calculation, was successfully derived, by using the validated EWBM code as the reference mode. The new WSGGM was implemented in CFD modeling of two different oxy-fuel furnaces, through which its great, unique advantages over the currently most widely used WSGGM were demonstrated. 3) Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed for oxy-NG flame and air-NG flame, in which dissociation effects were considered to different degrees. Remarkable differences in oxy-fuel and air-fuel combustion were revealed, and main intermediate species that play key roles in oxy-fuel flames were identified. Different combustion mechanisms are compared, e.g., the most widely used 2-step global mechanism, refined 4-step global mechanism, a global mechanism developed for oxy-fuel using detailed chemical kinetic modeling (CHEMKIN) as reference. 4) Over 15 CFD simulations were done for oxy-NG combustion, in which radiation, chemistry, mixing, turbulence-chemistry interactions, and so on were thoroughly investigated. Among all the simulations, RANS combined with 2-step and refined 4-step mechanism, RANS combined with CHEMKIN-based new global mechanism for oxy-fuel modeling, and LES combined with different combustion

  9. A Theoretical Study of the SI Engine Performance Operating with Different Fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Osama H. Ghazal

    2013-01-01

    The intension in this work is to investigate the effect of different fuels type on engine performance for different engine speed. Brake Power, Brake Torque, and specific fuel consumption were calculated and presented to show the effect of varying fuel type on them for all cases considered. A special program used to carry out the calculations. A simulation model for one-cylinder spark ignition engine has been built and calculated. The analysis of the results shows that for methanol the pow...

  10. Spent fuel metal storage cask performance testing and future spent fuel concrete module performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinnon, M.A.; Creer, J.M.

    1988-10-01

    REA-2023 Gesellshaft fur Nuklear Service (GNS) CASTOR-V/21, Transnuclear TN-24P, and Westinghouse MC-10 metal storage casks, have been performance tested under the guidance of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine their thermal and shielding performance. The REA-2023 cask was tested under Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship at General Electric's facilities in Morris, Illinois, using BWR spent fuel from the Cooper Reactor. The other three casks were tested under a cooperative agreement between Virginia Power Company and DOE at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by EGandG Idaho, Inc., using intact spent PWR fuel from the Surry reactors. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) made contributions to both programs. A summary of the various cask designs and the results of the performance tests is presented. The cask designs include: solid and liquid neutron shields; lead, steel, and nodular cast iron gamma shields; stainless steel, aluminum, and copper baskets; and borated materials for criticality control. 4 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Hydrogen-fueled postal vehicle performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Fuel consumption, range, and emissions data were obtained while operating a hydrogen-fueled postal delivery vehicle over a defined Postal Service Driving Cycle and the 1975 Urban Driving Cycle. The vehicle's fuel consumption was 0.366 pounds of hydrogen per mile over the postal driving cycle and 0.22 pounds of hydrogen per mile over the urban driving cycle. These data correspond to 6.2 and 10.6 mpg equivalent gasoline mileage for the two driving cycles, respectively. The vehicle's range was 24.2 miles while being operated on the postal driving cycle. Vehicle emissions were measured over the urban driving cycle. HC and CO emissions were quite low, as would be expected. The oxides of nitrogen were found to be 4.86 gm/mi, a value which is well above the current Federal and California standards. Vehicle limitations discussed include excessive engine flashbacks, inadequate acceleration capability the engine air/fuel ratio, the water injection systems, and the cab temperature. Other concerns are safety considerations, iron-titanium hydride observed in the fuel system, evidence of water in the engine rocker cover, and the vehicle maintenance required during the evaluation.

  12. On direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles modelling and demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraldsson, Kristina

    2005-03-01

    In this thesis, direct hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems in vehicles are investigated through modelling, field tests and public acceptance surveys. A computer model of a 50 kW PEM fuel cell system was developed. The fuel cell system efficiency is approximately 50% between 10 and 45% of the rated power. The fuel cell auxiliary system, e.g. compressor and pumps, was shown to clearly affect the overall fuel cell system electrical efficiency. Two hydrogen on-board storage options, compressed and cryogenic hydrogen, were modelled for the above-mentioned system. Results show that the release of compressed gaseous hydrogen needs approximately 1 kW of heat, which can be managed internally with heat from the fuel cell stack. In the case of cryogenic hydrogen, the estimated heat demand of 13 kW requires an extra heat source. A phase change based (PCM) thermal management solution to keep a 50 kW PEM fuel cell stack warm during dormancy in a cold climate (-20 deg C) was investigated through simulation and experiments. It was shown that a combination of PCM (salt hydrate or paraffin wax) and vacuum insulation materials was able to keep a fuel cell stack from freezing for about three days. This is a simple and potentially inexpensive solution, although development on issues such as weight, volume and encapsulation materials is needed. Two different vehicle platforms, fuel cell vehicles and fuel cell hybrid vehicles, were used to study the fuel consumption and the air, water and heat management of the fuel cell system under varying operating conditions, e.g. duty cycles and ambient conditions. For a compact vehicle, with a 50 kW fuel cell system, the fuel consumption was significantly reduced, {approx}50 %, compared to a gasoline-fuelled vehicle of similar size. A bus with 200 kW fuel cell system was studied and compared to a diesel bus of comparable size. The fuel consumption of the fuel cell bus displayed a reduction of 33-37 %. The performance of a fuel

  13. The FIT Model - Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Candido Pereira; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Meliisa C Teague; Gregory M Teske; Kurt G Vedros

    2010-09-01

    All mass streams from fuel separation and fabrication are products that must meet some set of product criteria – fuel feedstock impurity limits, waste acceptance criteria (WAC), material storage (if any), or recycle material purity requirements such as zirconium for cladding or lanthanides for industrial use. These must be considered in a systematic and comprehensive way. The FIT model and the “system losses study” team that developed it [Shropshire2009, Piet2010] are an initial step by the FCR&D program toward a global analysis that accounts for the requirements and capabilities of each component, as well as major material flows within an integrated fuel cycle. This will help the program identify near-term R&D needs and set longer-term goals. The question originally posed to the “system losses study” was the cost of separation, fuel fabrication, waste management, etc. versus the separation efficiency. In other words, are the costs associated with marginal reductions in separations losses (or improvements in product recovery) justified by the gains in the performance of other systems? We have learned that that is the wrong question. The right question is: how does one adjust the compositions and quantities of all mass streams, given uncertain product criteria, to balance competing objectives including cost? FIT is a method to analyze different fuel cycles using common bases to determine how chemical performance changes in one part of a fuel cycle (say used fuel cooling times or separation efficiencies) affect other parts of the fuel cycle. FIT estimates impurities in fuel and waste via a rough estimate of physics and mass balance for a set of technologies. If feasibility is an issue for a set, as it is for “minimum fuel treatment” approaches such as melt refining and AIROX, it can help to make an estimate of how performances would have to change to achieve feasibility.

  14. High performance direct methanol fuel cell with thin electrolyte membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Nianfang

    2017-06-01

    A high performance direct methanol fuel cell is achieved with thin electrolyte membrane. 320 mW cm-2 of peak power density and over 260 mW cm-2 at 0.4 V are obtained when working at 90 °C with normal pressure air supply. It is revealed that the increased anode half-cell performance with temperature contributes primarily to the enhanced performance at elevated temperature. From the comparison of iR-compensated cathode potential of methanol/air with that of H2/air fuel cell, the impact of methanol crossover on cathode performance decreases with current density and becomes negligible at high current density. Current density is found to influence fuel efficiency and methanol crossover significantly from the measurement of fuel efficiency at different current density. At high current density, high fuel efficiency can be achieved even at high temperature, indicating decreased methanol crossover.

  15. Implications of manufacturing deviations on fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chellapandi, P.; Clement Ravi Chandar, S.; Chetal, S.C.; Baldev Raj

    2009-01-01

    Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) core consists of 181 Fuel subassembly (FSA), 120 blanket SA and shielding SA of steel and B 4 C besides 9 Control Safety Rod SA and 3 Diverse Safety Rod SA. All the subassemblies (SA) stand vertically on the grid plate. PFBR FSA consists of 217 fuel pins of 2540 mm length arranged in a triangular pitch standing vertically on the rails inside a hexagonal duct. The bottom of the hexagon is screwed and welded to a cylindrical foot of length 600 mm. The SA foot has radial slots that provide an entry to the coolant sodium and also houses flow control devices. While the foot of the A handling head is welded to the top of hexagon, provides an aid for fuel handling machine to insert and withdraw the FSA from the grid plate. The length of the FSA is 4500 mm.

  16. Modelling the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helfer, Th.

    2006-03-01

    This thesis aims to model the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod. Fuel cracking has two main consequences. It relieves the stress in the pellet, upon which the majority of the mechanical and physico-chemical phenomena are dependent. It also leads to pellet fragmentation. Taking fuel cracking into account is therefore necessary to adequately predict the mechanical loading of the cladding during the course of an irradiation. The local approach to fracture was chosen to describe fuel pellet cracking. Practical considerations brought us to favour a quasi-static description of fuel cracking by means of a local damage models. These models describe the appearance of cracks by a local loss of rigidity of the material. Such a description leads to numerical difficulties, such as mesh dependency of the results and abrupt changes in the equilibrium state of the mechanical structure during unstable crack propagations. A particular attention was paid to these difficulties because they condition the use of such models in engineering studies. This work was performed within the framework of the ALCYONE fuel performance package developed at CEA/DEC/SESC which relies on the PLEIADES software platform. ALCYONE provides users with various approaches for modelling nuclear fuel behaviour, which differ in terms of the type geometry considered for the fuel rod. A specific model was developed and implemented to describe fuel cracking for each of these approaches. The 2D axisymmetric fuel rod model is the most innovative and was particularly studied. We show that it is able to assess, thanks to an appropriate description of fuel cracking, the main geometrical changes of the fuel rod occurring under normal and off-normal operating conditions. (author)

  17. Performance Evaluation of a High Bandwidth Liquid Fuel Modulation Valve for Active Combustion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saus, Joseph R.; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, a characterization rig was designed and constructed for the purpose of evaluating high bandwidth liquid fuel modulation devices to determine their suitability for active combustion control research. Incorporated into the rig s design are features that approximate conditions similar to those that would be encountered by a candidate device if it were installed on an actual combustion research rig. The characterized dynamic performance measures obtained through testing in the rig are planned to be accurate indicators of expected performance in an actual combustion testing environment. To evaluate how well the characterization rig predicts fuel modulator dynamic performance, characterization rig data was compared with performance data for a fuel modulator candidate when the candidate was in operation during combustion testing. Specifically, the nominal and off-nominal performance data for a magnetostrictive-actuated proportional fuel modulation valve is described. Valve performance data were collected with the characterization rig configured to emulate two different combustion rig fuel feed systems. Fuel mass flows and pressures, fuel feed line lengths, and fuel injector orifice size was approximated in the characterization rig. Valve performance data were also collected with the valve modulating the fuel into the two combustor rigs. Comparison of the predicted and actual valve performance data show that when the valve is operated near its design condition the characterization rig can appropriately predict the installed performance of the valve. Improvements to the characterization rig and accompanying modeling activities are underway to more accurately predict performance, especially for the devices under development to modulate fuel into the much smaller fuel injectors anticipated in future lean-burning low-emissions aircraft engine combustors.

  18. Neutronics and Fuel Performance Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Fuel under Normal Operation Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Wu; Piyush Sabharwall; Jason Hales

    2014-07-01

    This report details the analysis of neutronics and fuel performance analysis for enhanced accident tolerance fuel, with Monte Carlo reactor physics code Serpent and INL’s fuel performance code BISON, respectively. The purpose is to evaluate two of the most promising candidate materials, FeCrAl and Silicon Carbide (SiC), as the fuel cladding under normal operating conditions. Substantial neutron penalty is identified when FeCrAl is used as monolithic cladding for current oxide fuel. From the reactor physics standpoint, application of the FeCrAl alloy as coating layer on surface of zircaloy cladding is possible without increasing fuel enrichment. Meanwhile, SiC brings extra reactivity and the neutron penalty is of no concern. Application of either FeCrAl or SiC could be favorable from the fuel performance standpoint. Detailed comparison between monolithic cladding and hybrid cladding (cladding + coating) is discussed. Hybrid cladding is more practical based on the economics evaluation during the transition from current UO2/zircaloy to Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) system. However, a few issues remain to be resolved, such as the creep behavior of FeCrAl, coating spallation, inter diffusion with zirconium, etc. For SiC, its high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, low thermal neutron absorption cross section, irradiation stability (minimal swelling) make it an excellent candidate materials for future nuclear fuel/cladding system.

  19. Fuel swelling importance in PCI mechanistic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimescu, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    Under certain conditions, fuel pellet swelling is the most important factor in determining the intensity of the pellet-to-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). This is especially true during power ramps, which lead to a temperature increase to a higher terminal plateau that is maintained for hours. The time-dependent gaseous swelling is proportional to temperature and is also enhanced by the increased gas atom migration to the grain boundary during the power ramp. On the other hand, gaseous swelling is inhibited by a compressive hydrostatic stress in the pellet. Therefore, PCMI is the net result of combining gaseous swelling and pellet thermal expansion with the opposing feedback from the cladding mechanical reaction. The coupling of the thermal and mechanical processes, mentioned above, with various feedback loops is best simulated by a mechanistic fuel code. This paper discusses a mechanistic swelling model that is coupled with a fission gas release model as well as a mechanical model of the fuel pellet. The role of fuel swelling is demonstrated for typical power ramps at different burn-ups. Also, fuel swelling plays a significant role in avoiding the thermal instability for larger gap fuel rods, by limiting the potentially exponentially increasing gap due to the positive feedback loop effect of increasing fission gas release and the associated over-pressure inside the cladding. (author)

  20. System level modeling and component level control of fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xingjian

    This dissertation investigates the fuel cell systems and the related technologies in three aspects: (1) system-level dynamic modeling of both PEM fuel cell (PEMFC) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); (2) condition monitoring scheme development of PEM fuel cell system using model-based statistical method; and (3) strategy and algorithm development of precision control with potential application in energy systems. The dissertation first presents a system level dynamic modeling strategy for PEM fuel cells. It is well known that water plays a critical role in PEM fuel cell operations. It makes the membrane function appropriately and improves the durability. The low temperature operating conditions, however, impose modeling difficulties in characterizing the liquid-vapor two phase change phenomenon, which becomes even more complex under dynamic operating conditions. This dissertation proposes an innovative method to characterize this phenomenon, and builds a comprehensive model for PEM fuel cell at the system level. The model features the complete characterization of multi-physics dynamic coupling effects with the inclusion of dynamic phase change. The model is validated using Ballard stack experimental result from open literature. The system behavior and the internal coupling effects are also investigated using this model under various operating conditions. Anode-supported tubular SOFC is also investigated in the dissertation. While the Nernst potential plays a central role in characterizing the electrochemical performance, the traditional Nernst equation may lead to incorrect analysis results under dynamic operating conditions due to the current reverse flow phenomenon. This dissertation presents a systematic study in this regard to incorporate a modified Nernst potential expression and the heat/mass transfer into the analysis. The model is used to investigate the limitations and optimal results of various operating conditions; it can also be utilized to perform the

  1. Fuel cycle model and the cost of a recycling thorium in the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok; Park, Chang Je

    2005-01-01

    The dry process fuel technology has a high proliferation-resistance, which allows applications not only to the existing but also to the future nuclear fuel cycle systems. In this study, the homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 recycling fuel cycle in a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor was assessed for a fuel cycle cost evaluation. A series of parametric calculations were performed for the uranium fraction, enrichment of the initial uranium fuel, and the fission product removal rated of the recycled fuel. The fuel cycle cost was estimated by the levelized lifetime cost model provided by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency. Though it is feasible to recycle the homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel in the CANDU reactor from the viewpoint of a mass balance, the recycling fuel cycle cost is much higher than the conventional natural uranium fuel cycle cost for most cases due to the high fuel fabrication cost. (author)

  2. Modeling of the repository behavior of TRISO fuel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, E. E.; Bauer, T. H.

    2006-01-31

    This report satisfies Milestone 4295 for Work Package A0403K11. The long-term behavior of TRISO nuclear reactor fuel in a geologic repository is examined in terms of its durability and thermal impact. The TRISO fuel concept, under development at General Atomics[1] involves embedding fissile uranium and/or actinides in a carbonaceous material as shown in Fig. 1. In the concept, fuel kernels containing fissile material are surrounded with a porous carbon buffer and coated with inner and outer pyrocarbon layers separated with a SiC layer. The fuel particles are then imbedded in a graphite compact and the compacts placed in fuel channels drilled in fuel assembly blocks as shown in the lower right-hand corner of the figure. Dimensions are listed in Table 1. Available data on the degradation of the carbonaceous materials in an aqueous environment is reviewed. A model accounting for waste package failure and the resulting degradation of the waste forms is used to evaluate the potential for the long-term sequestration of radionuclides from spent TRISO fuel in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Finally, thermal analyses of decay heat assess the potential benefits in repository space utilization from recycling actinides from PWR spent fuel as very high burnup TRISO fuel. Experimental data on the aqueous dissolution of carbonaceous materials is relatively sparse and in some cases is based on measurements carried out at temperatures much higher than would be expected in the repository. In addition, the degree to which the aqueous solutions used in the measurements are representative of Yucca Mountain groundwater is uncertain. However, the available dissolution rate data are generally two or more orders of magnitude lower than the Yucca Mountain Project's dissolution model for borosilicate glass. Model calculations show that if the observed rates are applicable to the Yucca Mountain environment, directly disposed TRISO fuel has the potential to prevent significant release of

  3. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport- Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Fuel Performance Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Harold [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Ken [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bignell, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flores, Gregg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wang, Jy-An [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sanborn, Scott [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spears, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klymyshyn, Nick [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This document addresses Oak Ridge National Laboratory milestone M2FT-13OR0822015 Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Nuclear Fuel Performance Characterization. This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies that have been performed. Finally, discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this initiative are provided.

  4. Anode-Engineered Protonic Ceramic Fuel Cell with Excellent Performance and Fuel Compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, B.; Yan, N.; Li, M.; Sun, Y.-F.; Zhang, Y.-Q.; Li, J.; Etsell, T.; Sarkar, P.; Luo, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Directly utilizing hydrocarbon fuels, particularly methane, is advantageous yet challenging in high-performance protonic ceramic fuel cells. In this work, this technological hurdle is well addressed by selective deposition of secondary electrocatalysts within the porous Ni-cermet anode. This novel

  5. Utility industry evaluation of the metal fuel facility and metal fuel performance for liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burstein, S.; Gibbons, J.P.; High, M.D.; O'Boyle, D.R.; Pickens, T.A.; Pilmer, D.F.; Tomonto, J.R.; Weinberg, C.J.

    1990-02-01

    A team of utility industry representatives evaluated the liquid metal reactor metal fuel process and facility conceptual design being developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) under Department of Energy sponsorship. The utility team concluded that a highly competent ANL team was making impressive progress in developing high performance advanced metal fuel and an economic processing and fabrication technology. The utility team concluded that the potential benefits of advanced metal fuel justified the development program, but that, at this early stage, there are considerable uncertainties in predicting the net overall economic benefit of metal fuel. Specific comments and recommendations are provided as a contribution towards enhancing the development program. 6 refs

  6. Fuel cycle related parametric study considering long lived actinide production, decay heat and fuel cycle performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raepsaet, X.; Damian, F.; Lenain, R.; Lecomte, M.

    2001-01-01

    One of the very attractive HTGR reactor characteristics is its highly versatile and flexible core that can fulfil a wide range of diverse fuel cycles. Based on a GTMHR-600 MWth reactor, analyses of several fuel cycles were carried out without taking into account common fuel particle performance limits (burnup, fast fluence, temperature). These values are, however, indicated in each case. Fuel derived from uranium, thorium and a wide variety of plutonium grades has been considered. Long-lived actinide production and total residual decay heat were evaluated for the various types of fuel. The results presented in this papers provide a comparison of the potential and limits of each fuel cycle and allow to define specific cycles offering lowest actinide production and residual heat associated with a long life cycle. (author)

  7. Burnup performance of rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel in small pebble bed reactor with accumulative fuel loading scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanullang, Irwan Liapto; Obara, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Burnup performance using ROX fuel in PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme was analyzed. • Initial excess reactivity was suppressed by reducing 235 U enrichment in the startup condition. • Negative temperature coefficient was achieved in all condition of PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme using ROX fuel. • Core lifetime of PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme using ROX fuel was shorter than with UO 2 fuel. • In PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme using ROX fuel, achieved discharged burnup can be as high as that for UO 2 fuel. - Abstract: The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has proposed rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel as a new, once-through type fuel concept. Here, burnup performance using ROX fuel was simulated in a pebble bed reactor with an accumulative fuel loading scheme. The MVP-BURN code was used to simulate the burnup calculation. Fuel of 5 g-HM/pebble with 20% 235 U enrichment was selected as the optimum composition. Discharged burnup could reach up to 218 GWd/t, with a core lifetime of about 8.4 years. However, high excess reactivity occurred in the initial condition. Initial fuel enrichment was therefore reduced from 20% to 4.65% to counter the initial excess reactivity. The operation period was reduced by the decrease of initial fuel enrichment, but the maximum discharged burnup was 198 GWd/t. Burnup performance of ROX fuel in this reactor concept was compared with that of UO 2 fuel obtained previously. Discharged burnup for ROX fuel in the PBR with an accumulative fuel loading scheme was as high as UO 2 fuel. Maximum power density could be lowered by introducing ROX fuel compared to UO 2 fuel. However, PBR core lifetime was shorter with ROX fuel than with UO 2 fuel. A negative temperature coefficient was achieved for both UO 2 and ROX fuels throughout the operation period.

  8. Effects of ambient conditions on fuel cell vehicle performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsson, K.; Alvfors, P.

    Ambient conditions have considerable impact on the performance of fuel cell hybrid vehicles. Here, the vehicle fuel consumption, the air compressor power demand, the water management system and the heat loads of a fuel cell hybrid sport utility vehicle (SUV) were studied. The simulation results show that the vehicle fuel consumption increases with 10% when the altitude increases from 0 m up to 3000 m to 4.1 L gasoline equivalents/100 km over the New European Drive Cycle (NEDC). The increase is 19% on the more power demanding highway US06 cycle. The air compressor is the major contributor to this fuel consumption increase. Its load-following strategy makes its power demand increase with increasing altitude. Almost 40% of the net power output of the fuel cell system is consumed by the air compressor at the altitude of 3000 m with this load-following strategy and is thus more apparent in the high-power US06 cycle. Changes in ambient air temperature and relative humidity effect on the fuel cell system performance in terms of the water management rather in vehicle fuel consumption. Ambient air temperature and relative humidity have some impact on the vehicle performance mostly seen in the heat and water management of the fuel cell system. While the heat loads of the fuel cell system components vary significantly with increasing ambient temperature, the relative humidity did not have a great impact on the water balance. Overall, dimensioning the compressor and other system components to meet the fuel cell system requirements at the minimum and maximum expected ambient temperatures, in this case 5 and 40 °C, and high altitude, while simultaneously choosing a correct control strategy are important parameters for efficient vehicle power train management.

  9. Effects of coal-derived trace species on performance of molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The Carbonate Fuel Cell is a very promising option for highly efficient generation of electricity from many fuels. If coal-gas is to be used, the interactions of coal-derived impurities on various fuel cell components need to be understood. Thus the effects on Carbonate Fuel Cell performance due to ten different coal-derived contaminants viz., NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, HC{ell}, H{sub 2}Se, AsH{sub 3}, Zn, Pb, Cd, Sn, and Hg, have been studied at Energy Research Corporation. Both experimental and theoretical evaluations were performed, which have led to mechanistic insights and initial estimation of qualitative tolerance levels for each species individually and in combination with other species. The focus of this study was to investigate possible coal-gas contaminant effects on the anode side of the Carbonate Fuel Cell, using both out-of-cell thermogravimetric analysis by isothermal TGA, and fuel cell testing in bench-scale cells. Separate experiments detailing performance decay in these cells with high levels of ammonia contamination (1 vol %) and with trace levels of Cd, Hg, and Sn, have indicated that, on the whole, these elements do not affect carbonate fuel cell performance. However, some performance decay may result when a number of the other six species are present, singly or simultaneously, as contaminants in fuel gas. In all cases, tolerance levels have been estimated for each of the 10 species and preliminary models have been developed for six of them. At this stage the models are limited to isothermal, benchscale (300 cm{sup 2} size) single cells. The information obtained is expected to assist in the development of coal-gas cleanup systems, while the contaminant performance effects data will provide useful basic information for modeling fuel cell endurance in conjunction with integrated gasifier/fuel-cell systems (IGFC).

  10. Effects of coal-derived trace species on performance of molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The Carbonate Fuel Cell is a very promising option for highly efficient generation of electricity from many fuels. If coal-gas is to be used, the interactions of coal-derived impurities on various fuel cell components need to be understood. Thus the effects on Carbonate Fuel Cell performance due to ten different coal-derived contaminants viz., NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, HC{ell}, H{sub 2}Se, AsH{sub 3}, Zn, Pb, Cd, Sn, and Hg, have been studied at Energy Research Corporation. Both experimental and theoretical evaluations were performed, which have led to mechanistic insights and initial estimation of qualitative tolerance levels for each species individually and in combination with other species. The focus of this study was to investigate possible coal-gas contaminant effects on the anode side of the Carbonate Fuel Cell, using both out-of-cell thermogravimetric analysis by isothermal TGA, and fuel cell testing in bench-scale cells. Separate experiments detailing performance decay in these cells with high levels of ammonia contamination (1 vol %) and with trace levels of Cd, Hg, and Sn, have indicated that, on the whole, these elements do not affect carbonate fuel cell performance. However, some performance decay may result when a number of the other six species are present, singly or simultaneously, as contaminants in fuel gas. In all cases, tolerance levels have been estimated for each of the 10 species and preliminary models have been developed for six of them. At this stage the models are limited to isothermal, benchscale (300 cm{sup 2} size) single cells. The information obtained is expected to assist in the development of coal-gas cleanup systems, while the contaminant performance effects data will provide useful basic information for modeling fuel cell endurance in conjunction with integrated gasifier/fuel-cell systems (IGFC).

  11. Steady State and Transient Fuel Rod Performance Analyses by Pad and Transuranus Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slyeptsov, O.; Slyeptsov, S.; Kulish, G.; Ostapov, A.; Chernov, I.

    2013-01-01

    The report performed under IAEA research contract No.15370/L2 describes the analysis results of WWER and PWR fuel rod performance at steady state operation and transients by means of PAD and TRANSURANUS codes. The code TRANSURANUS v1m1j09 developed by Institute for of Transuranium Elements (ITU) was used based on the Licensing Agreement N31302. The code PAD 4.0 developed by Westinghouse Electric Company was utilized in the frame of the Ukraine Nuclear Fuel Qualification Project for safety substantiation for the use of Westinghouse fuel assemblies in the mixed core of WWER-1000 reactor. The experimental data for the Russian fuel rod behavior obtained during the steady-state operation in the WWER-440 core of reactor Kola-3 and during the power transients in the core of MIR research reactor were taken from the IFPE database of the OECD/NEA and utilized for assessing the codes themselves during simulation of such properties as fuel burnup, fuel centerline temperature (FCT), fuel swelling, cladding strain, fission gas release (FGR) and rod internal pressure (RIP) in the rod burnup range of (41 - 60) GWD/MTU. The experimental data of fuel behavior at steady-state operation during seven reactor cycles presented by AREVA for the standard PWR fuel rod design were used to examine the code FGR model in the fuel burnup range of (37 - 81) GWD/MTU. (author)

  12. Toxicological and performance aspects of oxygenated motor vehicle fuels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff; Commission on Life Sciences; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council; National Academy of Sciences

    .... Other questions have been raised about reduced fuel economy and engine performance and pollution of ground water due to the use of MTBE in gasoline. The book provides conclusions and recommendations about each major topic addressed in the government's report.

  13. The effectiveness and limitations of fuel modeling using the fire and fuels extension to the Forest Vegetation Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin K. Noonan-Wright; Nicole M. Vaillant; Alicia L. Reiner

    2014-01-01

    Fuel treatment effectiveness is often evaluated with fire behavior modeling systems that use fuel models to generate fire behavior outputs. How surface fuels are assigned, either using one of the 53 stylized fuel models or developing custom fuel models, can affect predicted fire behavior. We collected surface and canopy fuels data before and 1, 2, 5, and 8 years after...

  14. Fuel Cycle Performance of Thermal Spectrum Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrall, Andrew [ORNL; Todosow, Michael [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    2016-01-01

    Small modular reactors may offer potential benefits, such as enhanced operational flexibility. However, it is vital to understand the holistic impact of small modular reactors on the nuclear fuel cycle and fuel cycle performance. The focus of this paper is on the fuel cycle impacts of light water small modular reactors in a once-through fuel cycle with low-enriched uranium fuel. A key objective of this paper is to describe preliminary reactor core physics and fuel cycle analyses conducted in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Options Campaign. Challenges with small modular reactors include: increased neutron leakage, fewer assemblies in the core (and therefore fewer degrees of freedom in the core design), complex enrichment and burnable absorber loadings, full power operation with inserted control rods, the potential for frequent load-following operation, and shortened core height. Each of these will impact the achievable discharge burn-up in the reactor and the fuel cycle performance. This paper summarizes the results of an expert elicitation focused on developing a list of the factors relevant to small modular reactor fuel, core, and operation that will impact fuel cycle performance. Preliminary scoping analyses were performed using a regulatory-grade reactor core simulator. The hypothetical light water small modular reactor considered in these preliminary scoping studies is a cartridge type one-batch core with 4.9% enrichment. Some core parameters, such as the size of the reactor and general assembly layout, are similar to an example small modular reactor concept from industry. The high-level issues identified and preliminary scoping calculations in this paper are intended to inform on potential fuel cycle impacts of one-batch thermal spectrum SMRs. In particular, this paper highlights the impact of increased neutron leakage and reduced number of batches on the achievable burn-up of the reactor. Fuel cycle performance

  15. Impact on burnup performance of coated particle fuel design in pebble bed reactor with ROX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Hai Quan; Obara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The pebble bed reactor (PBR), a kind of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is expected to be among the next generation of nuclear reactors as it has excellent passive safety features, as well as online refueling and high thermal efficiency. Rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel has been studied at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as a new once-through type fuel concept. Rock-like oxide used as fuel in a PBR can be expected to achieve high burnup and improve chemical stabilities. In the once-through fuel concept, the main challenge is to achieve as high a burnup as possible without failure of the spent fuel. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact on burnup performance of different coated fuel particle (CFP) designs in a PBR with ROX fuel. In the study, the AGR-1 Coated Particle design and Deep-Burn Coated Particle design were used to make the burnup performance comparison. Criticality and core burnup calculations were performed by MCPBR code using the JENDL-4.0 library. Results at equilibrium showed that the two reactors utilizing AGR-1 Coated Particle and Deep-Burn Coated Particle designs could be critical with almost the same multiplication factor k eff . However, the power peaking factor and maximum power per fuel ball in the AGR-1 coated particle design was lower than that of Deep-Burn coated particle design. The AGR-1 design also showed an advantage in fissions per initial fissile atoms (FIFA); the AGR-1 coated particle design produced a higher FIFA than the Deep-Burn coated particle design. These results suggest that the difference in coated particle fuel design can have an effect on the burnup performance in ROX fuel. (author)

  16. The development of the fuel rod transient performance analysis code FTPAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Zhijie; Ji Songtao

    2014-01-01

    Fuel rod behavior, especially the integrity of cladding, played an important role in fuel safety research during reactor transient and hypothetical accidents conditions. In order to study fuel rod performance under transient accidents, FTPAC (Fuel Transient Performance Analysis Code) has been developed for simulating light water reactor fuel rod transient behavior when power or coolant boundary conditions are rapidly changing. It is composed of temperature, mechanical deformation, cladding oxidation and gas pressure model. The assessment was performed by comparing FTPAC code analysis result to experiments data and FRAPTRAN code calculations. Comparison shows that, the FTPAC gives reasonable agreement in temperature, deformation and gas pressure prediction. And the application of slip coefficient is more suitable for simulating the sliding between pellet and cladding when the gap is closed. (authors)

  17. Long Term Performance Study of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Fed with Alcohol Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleuterio Mora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of alcohol blends in direct alcohol fuel cells may be a more environmentally friendly and less toxic alternative to the use of methanol alone in direct methanol fuel cells. This paper assesses the behaviour of a direct methanol fuel cell fed with aqueous methanol, aqueous ethanol and aqueous methanol/ethanol blends in a long term experimental study followed by modelling of polarization curves. Fuel cell performance is seen to decrease as the ethanol content rises, and subsequent operation with aqueous methanol only partly reverts this loss of performance. It seems that the difference in the oxidation rate of these alcohols may not be the only factor affecting fuel cell performance.

  18. Performance of the Westinghouse WWER-1000 fuel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoglund, J.; Riznychenko, O.; Latorre, R.; Lashevych, P.

    2011-01-01

    In 2005 six (6) Westinghouse WWER-1000 Lead Test Assemblies (LTAs) were loaded in the South Ukraine Unit 3. This design has demonstrated full compatibility with resident fuel designs and all associated fuel handling and reactor components. Operations have further demonstrated adequacy of performance margins and the reliability requirements for multiple cycles of operation. The LTA's have now been discharged after completing the planned four cycles of operation and having reached an average assembly burnup in excess of 43 MWd/kgU. Post Irradiation Examinations were performed after completion of each cycle. The final LTA inspection program at end of Cycle 20 in 2010 yielded satisfactory results on all counts, and it was concluded that the 6 Westinghouse LTA's performed as expected during their operational regimes. Very good performance was demonstrated in the WWER-1000 reactor environment for the Zr-1%Nb as grid material, and ZIRLO fuel cladding and structural components. Control Rod Assemblies drop times and drag forces were all within the accepted values. The LTA program demonstrated that this fuel design is suitable for full core applications. However, the topic of fuel assembly distortion resistance was re-visited and Westinghouse therefore considered operational experience and design features from multiple development programs to enhance the basic Westinghouse WWER-1000 fuel design for Ukrainian reactors. The design now includes features that further mitigate assembly bow while at the same time improving the fuel cycle economy. This paper describes briefly the development of the Westinghouse WWER-1000 fuel design and how test results and operational experiences from multiple sources have been utilized to produce a most suitable fuel design. Early in 2011 a full region of the Westinghouse WWER-1000 design completed another full cycle of operation at South Ukraine Unit 3, all with excellent results. All 42 fuel assemblies were examined for visible damage or non

  19. Fabrication and performance testing of CANDU mixed-oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimayuga, F.C.; Floyd, M.R.; Cox, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    AECL's mixed-oxide fuel fabrication activities are performed in the Recycle Fuel Fabrication Laboratories (RFFL) at the Chalk River Laboratories. Since the start-up of the RFFL in the mid-1970s, several fabrication campaigns have been conducted in the facility, producing various types of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, which were used for both irradiation and physics testing. More recently, CANDU fuel bundles containing 0.5 w-t % plutonium in natural uranium, produced in the RFFL, were successfully irradiated in the NRU reactor at powers up to 65 kW/m and to burnups ranging from 13 to 23 MW·d/kg HE. Two of the bundles had power histories that bound the normal powers and burnups of natural UO 2 CANDU fuel ( 2 fuel. Significantly more grain growth was observed than that expected for UO 2 fuel; however, this increase in grain growth had no effect on the overall performance of the fuel. Two other bundles operated to extended burnups of 19 to 23 MW·d/kg HE. Burnup extension above 15 MW·d/kg HE only had a small effect on FGR. (author)

  20. System modeling of spent fuel transfers at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imel, G.R.; Houshyar, A.

    1994-01-01

    The unloading of spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) for interim storage and subsequent processing in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) is a multi-stage process, involving complex operations at a minimum of four different facilities at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) site. Each stage typically has complicated handling and/or cooling equipment that must be periodically maintained, leading to both planned and unplanned downtime. A program was initiated in October, 1993 to replace the 330 depleted uranium blanket subassemblies (S/As) with stainless steel reflectors. Routine operation of the reactor for fuels performance and materials testing occurred simultaneously in FY 1994 with the blanket unloading. In the summer of 1994, Congress dictated the October 1, 1994 shutdown of EBR-2. Consequently, all blanket S/As and fueled drivers will be removed from the reactor tank and replaced with stainless steel assemblies (which are needed to maintain a precise configuration within the grid so that the under sodium fuel handling equipment can function). A system modeling effort was conducted to determine the means to achieve the objective for the blanket and fuel unloading program, which under the current plan requires complete unloading of the primary tank of all fueled assemblies in 2 1/2 years. A simulation model of the fuel handling system at ANL-W was developed and used to analyze different unloading scenarios; the model has provided valuable information about required resources and modifications to equipment and procedures. This paper reports the results of this modeling effort

  1. Models for fuel rod behaviour at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernkvist, Lars O.; Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    This report deals with release of fission product gases and irradiation-induced restructuring in uranium dioxide nuclear fuel. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloy clad tubes to light water reactor fuel rods is also discussed. Computational models, suitable for implementation in the FRAPCON-3.2 computer code, are proposed for these potentially life-limiting phenomena. Hence, an integrated model for the calculation or thermal fission gas release by intragranular diffusion, gas trapping in grain boundaries, irradiation-induced re-solution, grain boundary saturation, and grain boundary sweeping in UO{sub 2} fuel, under time varying temperature loads, is formulated. After a brief review of the status of thermal fission gas release modelling, we delineate the governing equations for the aforementioned processes. Grain growth kinetic modelling is briefly reviewed and pertinent data on grain growth of high burnup fuel obtained during power ramps in the Third Risoe Fission Gas Release Project are evaluated. Sample computations are performed, which clearly show the connection between fission gas release and gram growth as a function of time at different isotherms. Models are also proposed for the restructuring of uranium dioxide fuel at high burnup, the so-called rim formation, and its effect on fuel porosity build-up, fuel thermal conductivity and fission gas release. These models are assessed by use of recent experimental data from the High Burnup Rim Project, as well as from post irradiation examinations of high-burnup fuel, irradiated in power reactors. Moreover, models for clad oxide growth and hydrogen pickup in PWRs, applicable to Zircaloy-4, ZIRLO or M5 cladding, are formulated, based on recent in-reactor corrosion data for high-burnup fuel rods. Our evaluation of these data indicates that the oxidation rate of ZIRLO-type materials is about 20% lower than for standard Zircaloy-4 cladding under typical PWR conditions. Likewise, the oxidation rate of M5 seems to be

  2. Evaluating the performance and mapping of three fuel classification systems using Forest Inventory and Analysis surface fuel measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Jason M. Herynk; Chris Toney; Shawn P. Urbanski; Duncan C. Lutes; Roger D. Ottmar

    2013-01-01

    Fuel Loading Models (FLMs) and Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCSs) fuelbeds are used throughout wildland fire science and management to simplify fuel inputs into fire behavior and effects models, but they have yet to be thoroughly evaluated with field data. In this study, we used a large dataset of Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) surface fuel...

  3. Improving dynamic performance of proton-exchange membrane fuel cell system using time delay control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Bae

    Transient behaviour is a key parameter for the vehicular application of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The goal of this presentation is to construct better control technology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell. The PEM fuel cell model comprises a compressor, an injection pump, a humidifier, a cooler, inlet and outlet manifolds, and a membrane-electrode assembly. The model includes the dynamic states of current, voltage, relative humidity, stoichiometry of air and hydrogen, cathode and anode pressures, cathode and anode mass flow rates, and power. Anode recirculation is also included with the injection pump, as well as anode purging, for preventing anode flooding. A steady-state, isothermal analytical fuel cell model is constructed to analyze the mass transfer and water transportation in the membrane. In order to prevent the starvation of air and flooding in a PEM fuel cell, time delay control is suggested to regulate the optimum stoichiometry of oxygen and hydrogen, even when there are dynamical fluctuations of the required PEM fuel cell power. To prove the dynamical performance improvement of the present method, feed-forward control and Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control with a state estimator are compared. Matlab/Simulink simulation is performed to validate the proposed methodology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell system.

  4. Irradiation performance of uranium-molybdenum alloy dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Cirila Tacconi de

    2005-01-01

    The U-Mo-Al dispersion fuels of Material Test Reactors (MTR) are analyzed in terms of their irradiation performance. The irradiation performance aspects are associated to the neutronic and thermal hydraulics aspects to propose a new core configuration to the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP using U-Mo-Al fuels. Core configurations using U-10Mo-Al fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 8 gU/cm 3 were analyzed with the computational programs Citation and MTRCR-IEA R1. Core configurations for fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 5 gU/cm 3 showed to be adequate to use in IEA-R1 reactor e should present a stable in reactor performance even at high burn-up. (author)

  5. Modeling Thermal and Stress Behavior of the Fuel-clad Interface in Monolithic Fuel Mini-plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Gregory K.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Burkes, Douglas E.; Wachs, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, a fuel development and qualification program is in process with the objective of qualifying very high density low enriched uranium fuel that will enable the conversion of high performance research reactors with operational requirements beyond those supported with currently available low enriched uranium fuels. The high density of the fuel is achieved by replacing the fuel meat with a single monolithic low enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel foil. Doing so creates differences in the mechanical and structural characteristics of the fuel plate because of the planar interface created by the fuel foil and cladding. Furthermore, the monolithic fuel meat will dominate the structural properties of the fuel plate rather than the aluminum matrix, which is characteristic of dispersion fuel types. Understanding the integrity and behavior of the fuel-clad interface during irradiation is of great importance for qualification of the new fuel, but can be somewhat challenging to determine with a single technique. Efforts aimed at addressing this problem are underway within the fuel development and qualification program, comprised of modeling, as-fabricated plate characterization, and post-irradiation examination. An initial finite element analysis model has been developed to investigate worst-case scenarios for the basic monolithic fuel plate structure, using typical mini-plate irradiation conditions in the Advanced Test Reactor. Initial analysis shows that the stress normal to the fuel-clad interface dominates during irradiation, and that the presence of small, rounded delaminations at the interface is not of great concern. However, larger and/or fuel-clad delaminations with sharp corners can create areas of concern, as maximum principal cladding stress, strain, displacement, and peak fuel temperature are all significantly increased. Furthermore, stresses resulting from temperature gradients that cause the plate to bow or buckle in

  6. Fabrication and irradiation performance of French HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, C.; Ballagny, A.; Bujas, R.; Holder, J.; Ranc, R.; Soulhier, R.

    1977-01-01

    The fabrication of fuel for high-temperature reactors has been carried out in France either by using the techniques of the General Atomic Company or by adapting European techniques to the characteristics of the American fuel. Currently, the principal efforts are directed towards fuel containing enriched uranium and thorium. Prior to this, a large body of experience had been accumulated on the low enriched fuel of the type used in the Dragon reactor. Installations now in service permit fabrication, at realistic levels, of all the different parts comprising the fuel block. The kernels of fissile particles are made by loading of ion-exchange resin beads and conversion by thermal treatment. The fertile kernels are obtained by dry agglomeration of thorine powder. The coatings, of either BISO or TRISO design (pyrocarbon or pyrocarbon and silicon carbide), are deposited in a fluidized bed in a 127-mm-diameter industrial furnace. The fuel rods (or compacts) are obtained by injecting a pitch loaded with graphite powder into a bed of particles. Another technique, which is now under development, consists of hot-pressing the particles which have been mixed with resin-impregnated graphite powder and then polymerizing them. In both cases, a final thermal treatment is carried out at 1800 0 C. Research and development in the machining of the prismatic graphite blocks has been performed by the Atelier ''Graphite'' at the Marcoule Research Centre. A large programme of irradiations has permitted testing of the individual fuel components followed by tests on complete fuel assemblies. Particles, fuel rods and graphite have been tested in capsules placed in experimental French reactors. Fuel elements have been proof-tested either in the irradiation loops of the Osiris and Pegasus reactors or in the Dragon reactor. The results of these tests have shown that the French fuel can withstand the operating conditions in a power reactor (temperature, fast fluence, burnup) without exceeding the

  7. Performance of a Fuel-Cell-Powered, Small Electric Airplane Assessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2004-01-01

    Rapidly emerging fuel-cell-power technologies may be used to launch a new revolution of electric propulsion systems for light aircraft. Future small electric airplanes using fuel cell technologies hold the promise of high reliability, low maintenance, low noise, and - with the exception of water vapor - zero emissions. An analytical feasibility and performance assessment was conducted by NASA Glenn Research Center's Airbreathing Systems Analysis Office of a fuel-cell-powered, propeller-driven, small electric airplane based on a model of the MCR-01 two-place kitplane (Dyn'Aero, Darois, France). This assessment was conducted in parallel with an ongoing effort by the Advanced Technology Products Corporation and the Foundation for Advancing Science and Technology Education. Their project - partially funded by a NASA grant - is to design, build, and fly the first manned, continuously propelled, nongliding electric airplane. In our study, an analytical performance model of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell propulsion system was developed and applied to a notional, two-place light airplane modeled after the MCR-01 kitplane. The PEM fuel cell stack was fed pure hydrogen fuel and humidified ambient air via a small automotive centrifugal supercharger. The fuel cell performance models were based on chemical reaction analyses calibrated with published data from the fledgling U.S. automotive fuel cell industry. Electric propeller motors, rated at two shaft power levels in separate assessments, were used to directly drive a two-bladed, variable-pitch propeller. Fuel sources considered were compressed hydrogen gas and cryogenic liquid hydrogen. Both of these fuel sources provided pure, contaminant-free hydrogen for the PEM cells.

  8. Validation of fuel rod performance analysis code COPERNIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yebin; Wang Jun; Ren Qisen; Liu Tong; Zhou Yuemin

    2012-01-01

    IAEA has sponsored the FUMEX Ⅲ (FUel Modeling at Extended Burnup) coordinated research project to improve computer code used for fuel behaviour simulation. As one of over thirty international participants, CGNPC has been engaged in testing and developing the fuel modelling code COPERNIC against data and cases provided by the IAEA and OECD/NEA. Investigations focused on high burnup and transient analysis, and include dimensional change model- ling. Data from several 6 calculation cases have been compared with COPERNIC predictions by far. Due to different purposes of tests, these cases had different designs including rod refabrication and annular pellet and were under different operation conditions including normal operation and ramp test. The comparison and preliminary analysis between predicted and measured results in such as fuel temperature, cladding outer diameter, cladding corrosion layer thickness, and fission gas release have been conducted, which demonstrated that the COPERNIC code was applicable to different rod designs under different operation conditions with an accurate prediction. (authors)

  9. Performance of fuel system at different diesel temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyong; Li, Xiaolu; Sun, Zai

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents the findings about performance of the fuel system of a diesel engine at different diesel temperature obtained through simulation and experiment. It can be seen from these findings that at the same rotational speed of fuel pump, the initial pressure in the fuel pipe remain unchanged as the fuel temperature increases, the peak pressure at the side of fuel pipe near the injector delays, and its largest value of pressure decreases. Meanwhile, at the same temperature, as the rotational speed increases, the initial pressure of fuel pipe is also essentially the same, the arrival of its peaks delays, and its largest value of pressure increases. The maximum fuel pressure at the side of fuel pipe near the injector has an increase of 28.9 %, 22.3%, and 13.9% respectively than the previous ones according to its conditions. At the same rotational speed, as the temperature increases, the injection quantity through the nozzle orifice decreases. At the same temperature, as the rotational speed increases, the injection quantity through the nozzle orifice increases. These experimental results are consistent with simulation results.

  10. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Humidity Effect on Performance of PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Al Shakhshir, Saher; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a single proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrical performance is tested and modelled. The aim is to investigate the effect of reactants and membrane humidity on cell electrical performance. We discuss cell performance in terms of various variables affecting water transport...... and the impact of cell hydration on ohmic resistance....

  11. Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Papastergiou, C.

    1992-01-01

    The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed

  12. Methodological aspects of fuel performance system analysis at raw hydrocarbon processing plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbjakina, A. V.; Dolotovskij, I. V.

    2018-01-01

    The article discusses the methodological aspects of fuel performance system analysis at raw hydrocarbon (RH) processing plants. Modern RH processing facilities are the major consumers of energy resources (ER) for their own needs. To reduce ER, including fuel consumption, and to develop rational fuel system structure are complex and relevant scientific tasks that can only be done using system analysis and complex system synthesis. In accordance with the principles of system analysis, the hierarchical structure of the fuel system, the block scheme for the synthesis of the most efficient alternative of the fuel system using mathematical models and the set of performance criteria have been developed on the main stages of the study. The results from the introduction of specific engineering solutions to develop their own energy supply sources for RH processing facilities have been provided.

  13. Improving the service life and performance of CANDU fuel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Cheadle, B.A.; Causey, A.R.; Doubt, G.L.; Fong, R.W.L.; Venkatapathi, S.

    1996-03-01

    The development objective for CANDU fuel channels is to produce a design that can operate for 40 years at 90% capacity. Steady progress toward this objective is being made. The factors that determine the life of a CANDU fuel channel are reviewed and the processes necessary to achieve the objectives are identified. Performance of future fuel channels will be enhanced by reduced operating costs and increased safety margins to postulated accident conditions compared with those for current channels. The approaches to these issues are discussed briefly in this report. (author)

  14. Improving the service life and performance of CANDU fuel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causey, A.R.; Cheadle, B.A.; Coleman, C.E.; Price, E.G.

    1996-02-01

    The development objective for CANDU fuel channels is to produce a design that can operate for 40 years at 90% capacity. Steady progress toward this objective is being made. The factors that determine the life of a CANDU fuel channel are reviewed and the processes necessary to achieve the objectives identified. Performance of future fuel channels will be enhanced by reduced operating costs, increased safety margins to postulated accident conditions, and reduced retubing costs compared with those for current channels. The approaches to these issues are discussed briefly in this report. (author). 14 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs

  15. Fuel additives: keys to quality, distribution, and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tupa, R.C.; Dorer, C.J.

    1985-10-01

    The performance and formulations of some additives currently used to improve gasoline and diesel fuel are examined. Fuel additives are characterized according to purposes. Trace metal compounds are examined as powerful catalysts for gasoline oxidation. Frequent sources for such contamination are described: copper-containing alloys in refinery equipment, product distribution systems, chemicals used in refining, and automotive fuel systems. Discussions are presented on how to minimize copper's effect by transforming the copper compound into another which has no pro-oxidant behavior.

  16. Performance assessment of DOE spent nuclear fuel and surplus plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duguid, J.O.; Vallikat, V.; McNeish, J.

    1998-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is under consideration by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a potential site for the disposal of the nation's radioactive wastes in a geologic repository. The wastes consist of commercial spent fuel, DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF), high level waste (HLW), and surplus plutonium. The DOE was mandated by Congress in the fiscal 1997 Energy and Water Appropriations Act to complete a viability assessment (VA) of the repository in September of 1998. The assessment consists of a preliminary design concept for the critical elements of the repository, a total system performance assessment (TSPA), a plan and cost estimate for completion of the license application, and an estimate of the cost to construct and operate the repository. This paper presents the results of the sensitivity analyses that were conducted to examine the behavior of DOE SNF and plutonium waste forms in the environment of the base case repository that was modeled for the TSPA-VA. Fifteen categories of DOE SNF and two Plutonium waste forms were examined and their contribution to radiation dose to humans was evaluated

  17. Modeling bark beetles and fuels on landscapes: A demonstration of ArcFuels and a discussion of possible model enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. McMahan; Alan A. Ager; Helen Maffei; Jane L. Hayes; Eric L. Smith

    2008-01-01

    The Westwide Pine Beetle Model and the Fire and Fuels Extension were used to simulate a mountain pine beetle outbreak under different fuel treatment scenarios on a 173,000 acre landscape on the Deschutes National Forest. The goal was to use these models within ArcFuels to analyze the interacting impacts of bark beetles and management activities on landscape fuel...

  18. Review of cell performance in anion exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekel, Dario R.

    2018-01-01

    Anion exchange membrane fuel cells (AEMFCs) have recently received increasing attention since in principle they allow for the use of non-precious metal catalysts, which dramatically reduces the cost per kilowatt of power in fuel cell devices. Until not long ago, the main barrier in the development of AEMFCs was the availability of highly conductive anion exchange membranes (AEMs); however, improvements on this front in the past decade show that newly developed AEMs have already reached high levels of conductivity, leading to satisfactory cell performance. In recent years, a growing number of research studies have reported AEMFC performance results. In the last three years, new records in performance were achieved. Most of the literature reporting cell performance is based on hydrogen-AEMFCs, although an increasing number of studies have also reported the use of fuels others than hydrogen - such as alcohols, non-alcohol C-based fuels, as well as N-based fuels. This article reviews the cell performance and performance stability achieved in AEMFCs through the years since the first reports in the early 2000s.

  19. The data requirements for the verification and validation of a fuel performance code - the transuranus perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, A.; Di Marcello, V.; Rondinella, V.; Van De Laar, J.; Van Uffelen, P.

    2013-01-01

    In general, the verification and validation (V and V) of a fuel performance code like TRANSURANUS consists of three basic steps: a) verifying the correctness and numerical stability of the sub-models; b) comparing the sub-models with experimental data; c) comparing the results of the integral fuel performance code with experimental data Only the second and third steps of the V and V rely on experimental information. This scheme can be further detailed according to the physical origin of the data: on one hand, in-reactor ('in-pile') experimental data are generated in the course of the irradiation; on the other hand ex-reactor ('out-of-pile') experimental data are obtained for instance from various postirradiation examinations (PIE) or dedicated experiments with fresh samples. For both categories, we will first discuss the V and V of sub-models of TRANSURANUS related to separate aspects of the fuel behaviour: this includes the radial variation of the composition and fissile isotopes, the thermal properties of the fuel (e.g. thermal conductivity, melting temperature, etc.), the mechanical properties of fuel and cladding (e.g. elastic constants, creep properties), as well as the models for the fission product behaviour. Secondly, the integral code verification will be addressed as it treats various aspects of the fuel behaviour, including the geometrical changes in the fuel and the gas pressure and composition of the free volume in the rod. (authors)

  20. ENVI Model Development for Korean Nuclear Spent Fuel Options Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sunyoung; Jeong, Yon Hong; Han, Jae-Jun; Lee, Aeri; Hwang, Yong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    The disposal facility of the spent nuclear fuel will be operated from 2051. This paper presents the ENVI code developed by GoldSim Software to simulate options for managing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in South Korea. The ENVI is a simulator to allow decision-makers to assist to evaluate the performance for spent nuclear fuel management. The multiple options for managing the spent nuclear fuel including the storage and transportation are investigated into interim storage, permanent disposal in geological repositories and overseas and domestic reprocessing. The ENVI code uses the GoldSim software to simulate the logistics of the associated activities. The result by the ENVI model not only produces the total cost to compare among the multiple options but also predict the sizes and timings of different facilities required. In order to decide the policy for spent nuclear management this purpose of this paper is to draw the optimum management plan to solve the nuclear spent fuel issue in the economical aspects. This paper is focused on the development of the ENVI's logic and calculations to simulate four options(No Reprocessing, Overseas Reprocessing, Domestic Reprocessing, and Overseas and Domestic Reprocessing) for managing the spent nuclear fuel in South Korea. The time history of the spent nuclear fuel produced from both the existing and future NPP's can be predicted, based on the Goldsim software made available very user friendly model. The simulation result will be used to suggest the strategic plans for the spent nuclear fuel management

  1. ENVI Model Development for Korean Nuclear Spent Fuel Options Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Sunyoung; Jeong, Yon Hong; Han, Jae-Jun; Lee, Aeri; Hwang, Yong-Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The disposal facility of the spent nuclear fuel will be operated from 2051. This paper presents the ENVI code developed by GoldSim Software to simulate options for managing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in South Korea. The ENVI is a simulator to allow decision-makers to assist to evaluate the performance for spent nuclear fuel management. The multiple options for managing the spent nuclear fuel including the storage and transportation are investigated into interim storage, permanent disposal in geological repositories and overseas and domestic reprocessing. The ENVI code uses the GoldSim software to simulate the logistics of the associated activities. The result by the ENVI model not only produces the total cost to compare among the multiple options but also predict the sizes and timings of different facilities required. In order to decide the policy for spent nuclear management this purpose of this paper is to draw the optimum management plan to solve the nuclear spent fuel issue in the economical aspects. This paper is focused on the development of the ENVI's logic and calculations to simulate four options(No Reprocessing, Overseas Reprocessing, Domestic Reprocessing, and Overseas and Domestic Reprocessing) for managing the spent nuclear fuel in South Korea. The time history of the spent nuclear fuel produced from both the existing and future NPP's can be predicted, based on the Goldsim software made available very user friendly model. The simulation result will be used to suggest the strategic plans for the spent nuclear fuel management.

  2. Post-irradiation examination techniques for CANDU fuel performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvan, Marcel; Mincu, Marin; Uta, Octavian; Ionescu, Silviu

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Research Institute at Pitesti has a set of nuclear facilities consisting of TRIGA 14 MW(th) materials testing reactor and LEPI (Romanian acronym for Post-Irradiation Examination Laboratory) which enable investigating the behaviour of the nuclear fuel and materials under various irradiation conditions. The LEPI is an alpha-gamma hot cell facility able to manipulate and examine radioactive materials having an activity up to 10 6 Ci (E average = 1 MeV) and a high content of transuranium elements (Pu, Am, Cm). In order to obtain relevant information on CANDU nuclear fuel performance, a significant number of fuel elements manufactured by INR has been tested at different power histories in TRIGA 14 MW(th) reactor. Most important tests have been performed in conditions of power ramping, overpower and accident. After testing, the fuel elements have been examined in the hot cells at LEPI using various post-irradiation examination techniques. These techniques include both non-destructive methods (visual inspection and photography, eddy current testing, profilometry, gamma scanning) and destructive methods (fission gas release and analysis, metallography, ceramography, burnup determination by mass spectrometry, mechanical testings). The data obtained from post-irradiation examinations are used on one hand to confirm the integrity, safety and performance of the irradiated fuel and on the other hand for further progress in CANDU fuel development. (authors)

  3. Advanced fuel technology and performance: Current status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    During the last years the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Division of the IAEA has been giving great attention to the collection, analysis and exchange of information in the field of reactor fuel technology. Most of these activities are being conducted in the framework of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT). The purpose of this Advisory Group Meeting on Advanced Fuel Technology and Performance was to update and to continue the previous work, and to review the experience of advanced fuel technology, its performance with regard to all types of reactors and to outline the future trends on the basis of national experience and discussions during the meeting. As a result of the meeting a Summary Report was prepared which reflected the status of the advanced nuclear fuel technology up to 1990. The 10 papers presented by participants of this meeting are also published here. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Poly (Ethylene-Alit-Tetrafluoroethylene) Based Membranes For Fuel Cells: Synthesis And Fuel Cell Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan Guersel, S.; Gubler, L.; Scherer, G.G.

    2005-03-01

    Proton exchange membranes have been synthesized by pre-irradiation grafting of styrene onto poly (ethylene-alt-tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE) in the presence of divinyl benzene (DVB) as the cross linker and characterized ex-situ for their fuel cell relevant properties. The optimum graft level was determined as between 20 and 30 %. ETFE based membranes exhibited encouraging fuel cell performance yet, there is room for improvement through optimization of the membrane-electrode interface. (author)

  5. Modelling the effect of oxide fuel fracturing on the mechanical behaviour of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helfer, T.; Garcia, P.; Ricaud, J.M.; Plancq, D.; Sidoroff, F.; Bernard, L.

    2005-01-01

    Computing stress and strain fields in fuel pellets is essential to modelling the in-pile behaviour of PWR fuel rods, especially under pellet-cladding interaction conditions. Fuel cracking occurs immediately after reactor start-up and is effective in relaxing stresses in the pellet. It is therefore important that the brittle behaviour of oxide fuels be modelled. A first attempt to take into account fuel cracking involved describing radial and axial fuel cracks in the pellet through a phenomenological modification of Hooke's law. A description of the model is given along with its two-dimensional extension applied to axisymmetrical fuel pellet simulations. The first results pertaining to this model are discussed. Another approach to modelling the damage to pellets induced by cracking involves the use of so-called cohesive models. These models describe the progressive loss of cohesion of the material in the damaged area ahead of the crack tip. A short review of these models is presented. (authors)

  6. A Model for Molten Fuel-Coolant Interaction during Melt Slumping in a Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohal, Manohar Singh; Siefken, Larry James

    1999-10-01

    This paper describes a simple fuel melt slumping model to replace the current parametric model in SCDAP/RELAP5. Specifically, a fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) model is developed to analyze the slumping molten fuel, molten fuel breakup, heat transfer to coolant, relocation of the molten droplets, size of a partially solidified particles that settle to the bottom of the lower plenum, and melt-plenum interaction, if any. Considering our objectives, the molten fuel jet breakup model, and fuel droplets Lagrangian model as included in a code TEXAS-V with Eulerian thermal hydraulics for water and steam from SCDAP/RELAP5 were used. The model was assessed with experimental data from MAGICO-2000 tests performed at University of California at Santa Barbara, and FARO Test L-08 performed at Joint Research Center, Ispra, Italy. The comparison was found satisfactory.

  7. How does a servant leader fuel the service fire? A multilevel model of servant leadership, individual self identity, group competition climate, and customer service performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijun; Zhu, Jing; Zhou, Mingjian

    2015-03-01

    Building on a social identity framework, our cross-level process model explains how a manager's servant leadership affects frontline employees' service performance, measured as service quality, customer-focused citizenship behavior, and customer-oriented prosocial behavior. Among a sample of 238 hairstylists in 30 salons and 470 of their customers, we found that hair stylists' self-identity embedded in the group, namely, self-efficacy and group identification, partially mediated the positive effect of salon managers' servant leadership on stylists' service performance as rated by the customers, after taking into account the positive influence of transformational leadership. Moreover, group competition climate strengthened the positive relationship between self-efficacy and service performance. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Pressurized water reactor fuel performance problems connected with fuel cladding corrosion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrevski, I.; Zaharieva, N.

    2008-01-01

    Generally, Pressurized Water Reactor (WWER, PWR) Fuel Element Performance is connected with fuel cladding corrosion and crud deposition processes. By transient to extended fuel cycles in nuclear power reactors, aiming to achieve higher burnup and better fuel utilization, the role of these processes increases significantly. This evolution modifies the chemical and electrochemical conditions in the reactor primary system, including change of fuel claddings' environment. The higher duty cores are always attended with increased boiling (sub-cooled nucleate boiling) mainly on the feed fuel assemblies. This boiling process on fuel cladding surfaces can cause different consequences on fuel element cladding's environment characteristics. In the case of boiling at the cladding surfaces without or with some cover of corrosion product deposition, the behavior of gases dissolved in water phase is strongly influenced by the vapor generation. The increase of vapor partial pressure will reduce the partial pressures of dissolved gases and will cause their stripping out. By these circumstances the concentrations of dissolved gases in cladding wall water layer can dramatically decrease, including also the case by which all dissolved gases to be stripped out. On the other hand it is known that the hydrogen is added to primary coolant in order to avoid the production of oxidants by radiolysis of water. It is clear that if boiling strips out dissolved hydrogen, the creation of oxidizing conditions at the cladding surfaces will be favored. In this case the local production of oxidants will be a result from local processes of water radiolysis, by which not only both oxygen (O 2 ) and hydrogen (H 2 ) but also hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) will be produced. While these hydrogen and oxygen will be stripped out preferentially by boiling, the bigger part of hydrogen peroxide will remain in wall water phase and will act as the most important factor for creation of oxidizing conditions in fuel

  9. Multi-pulse fuel injection controller design using quadratic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, X.; Donkers, M.C.F.; Jager, A.G. de; Willems, F.P.T.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-pulse fuel injection in diesel engines enables a large flexibility in controlling the fueling profile, such that the engine performance can be maintained subject to disturbances, i.e., ambient condition changes and fuel injection deviations. Based on linearized systems, current fuel injection

  10. Modeling two-phase flow in PEM fuel cell channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yun; Basu, Suman; Wang, Chao-Yang [Electrochemical Engine Center (ECEC), and Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the simultaneous flow of liquid water and gaseous reactants in mini-channels of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Envisaging the mini-channels as structured and ordered porous media, we develop a continuum model of two-phase channel flow based on two-phase Darcy's law and the M{sup 2} formalism, which allow estimate of the parameters key to fuel cell operation such as overall pressure drop and liquid saturation profiles along the axial flow direction. Analytical solutions of liquid water saturation and species concentrations along the channel are derived to explore the dependences of these physical variables vital to cell performance on operating parameters such as flow stoichiometric ratio and relative humility. The two-phase channel model is further implemented for three-dimensional numerical simulations of two-phase, multi-component transport in a single fuel-cell channel. Three issues critical to optimizing channel design and mitigating channel flooding in PEM fuel cells are fully discussed: liquid water buildup towards the fuel cell outlet, saturation spike in the vicinity of flow cross-sectional heterogeneity, and two-phase pressure drop. Both the two-phase model and analytical solutions presented in this paper may be applicable to more general two-phase flow phenomena through mini- and micro-channels. (author)

  11. Modelling and validation of Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, A. K. M.; Basran, N.; Khan, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is the outcome of a small scale fuel cell project. Fuel cell is an electrochemical device that converts energy from chemical reaction to electrical work. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the different types of fuel cell, which is more efficient, having low operational temperature and fast start up capability results in high energy density. In this study, a mathematical model of 1.2 W PEMFC is developed and simulated using MATLAB software. This model describes the PEMFC behaviour under steady-state condition. This mathematical modeling of PEMFC determines the polarization curve, power generated, and the efficiency of the fuel cell. Simulation results were validated by comparing with experimental results obtained from the test of a single PEMFC with a 3 V motor. The performance of experimental PEMFC is little lower compared to simulated PEMFC, however both results were found in good agreement. Experiments on hydrogen flow rate also been conducted to obtain the amount of hydrogen consumed to produce electrical work on PEMFC.

  12. Modelling the effects of transport policy levers on fuel efficiency and national fuel consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, H.R.; Hutton, B.; McQuaid, R.W.; Napier Univ., Edinburgh; Raeside, R.; Napier Univ., Edinburgh; Zhang, Xiayoan; Napier Univ., Edinburgh

    2000-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the main features of a Vehicle Market Model (VMM) which estimates changes to vehicle stock/kilometrage, fuel consumed and CO 2 emitted. It is disaggregated into four basic vehicle types. The model includes: the trends in fuel consumption of new cars, including the role of fuel price: a sub-model to estimate the fuel consumption of vehicles on roads characterised by user-defined driving cycle regimes; procedures that reflect distribution of traffic across different area/road types; and the ability to vary the speed (or driving cycle) from one year to another, or as a result of traffic growth. The most significant variable influencing fuel consumption of vehicles was consumption in the previous year, followed by dummy variables related to engine size. the time trend (a proxy for technological improvements), and then fuel price. Indeed the effect of fuel price on car fuel efficiency was observed to be insignificant (at the 95% level) in two of the three versions of the model, and the size of fuel price term was also the smallest. This suggests that the effectiveness of using fuel prices as a direct policy tool to reduce fuel consumption may he limited. Fuel prices may have significant indirect impacts (such as influencing people to purchase more fuel efficient cars and vehicle manufacturers to invest in developing fuel efficient technology) as may other factors such as the threat of legislation. (Author)

  13. MOX and UOX PWR fuel performances EDF operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provost, Jean-Luc; Debes, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Based on a large program of experimentations implemented during the 90s, the industrial achievement of new FAs designs with increased performances opens up new prospects. The currently UOX fuels used on the 58 EDF PWR units are now authorized up to a maximum FA burn-up of 52 GWd/t with a large experience from 45 to 50 GWd/t. Today, the new products, along with the progress made in the field of calculation methods, still enable to increase further the fuel performances with respect to the safety margins. Thus, the conditions are met to implement in the next years new fuel managements on each NPPs series of the EDF fleet with increased enrichment (up to 4.5%) and irradiation limits (up to 62 GWd/t). The recycling of plutonium is part of EDF's reprocessing/recycling strategy. Up to now, 20 PWR 900 MW reactors are managed in MOX hybrid management. The feedback experience of 18 years of PWR operation with MOX is satisfactory, without any specific problem regarding manoeuvrability or plant availability. EDF is now looking to introduce MOX fuels with a higher plutonium content (up to 8.6%) equivalent to natural uranium enriched to 3.7%. It is the goal of the MOX Parity core management which achieve balance of MOX and UOX fuel performance with a significant increase of the MOX average discharge burn-up (BU max: 52 GWd/t for MOX and UOX). The industrial maturity of new FAs designs, with increased performances, allows the implementation in the next years of new fuel managements on each NPPs series of the EDF fleet. The scheduling of the implementation of the new fuel managements on the PWRs fleet is a great challenge for EDF, with important stakes: the nuclear KWh cost decrease with the improvement of the plant operation performance. (author)

  14. BEHAVE: fire behavior prediction and fuel modeling system--FUEL subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Burgan; Richard C. Rothermel

    1984-01-01

    This manual documents the fuel modeling procedures of BEHAVE--a state-of-the-art wildland fire behavior prediction system. Described are procedures for collecting fuel data, using the data with the program, and testing and adjusting the fuel model.

  15. Fuel consumption models for pine flatwoods fuel types in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton S. Wright

    2013-01-01

    Modeling fire effects, including terrestrial and atmospheric carbon fluxes and pollutant emissions during wildland fires, requires accurate predictions of fuel consumption. Empirical models were developed for predicting fuel consumption from fuel and environmental measurements on a series of operational prescribed fires in pine flatwoods ecosystems in the southeastern...

  16. Thermal hydraulic model validation for HOR mixed core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Vries, J.W. de; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1997-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic core management model has been developed for the Hoger Onderwijsreactor (HOR), a 2 MW pool-type university research reactor. The model was adopted for safety analysis purposes in the framework of HEU/LEU core conversion studies. It is applied in the thermal-hydraulic computer code SHORT (Steady-state HOR Thermal-hydraulics) which is presently in use in designing core configurations and for in-core fuel management. An elaborate measurement program was performed for establishing the core hydraulic characteristics for a variety of conditions. The hydraulic data were obtained with a dummy fuel element with special equipment allowing a.o. direct measurement of the true core flow rate. Using these data the thermal-hydraulic model was validated experimentally. The model, experimental tests, and model validation are discussed. (author)

  17. Performance comparison of low and high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Experimental examinations, modelling and numerical simulation; Leistungsvergleich von Nieder- und Hochtemperatur-Polymerelektrolytmembran-Brennstoffzellen. Experimentelle Untersuchungen, Modellierung und numerische Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehn, Helmut

    2010-11-03

    danger of washing out of the phosphoric acid. In an additional test row the Celtec-P-1000 HT-MEA was subjected to temperature change cycles (40 - 160 C), which lead to irreversible voltage losses. In a final test row performance tests were carried out with a HT-PEM fuel cell stack (16 cells /1 kW), developed in the fuel cell research centre of Volkswagen with a special gas diffusion electrode, which should avoid the degradation at deep temperatures. In these examinations no irreversible voltage losses could be detected, but the tests had to be aborted because of leakage problems. The by the experimental examinations gained insight of the superior operating behaviour and the further advantages of the HT-PEMFC in comparison to the LT-PEMFC were crucial for the construction of a simulation model for a single HT-PEM fuel cell in the theoretical part of this thesis, that also should be suitable as process simulation model for the computer based development of a virtual fuel cell within the interdisciplinary project ''Virtual Fuel Cell'' at the TU Darmstadt. The model is a numerical 2D ''along the channel'' - model, that was constructed with the finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics (version 3.5 a). The stationary, one phase model comprises altogether ten dependent variables in seven application modules in a highly complex, coupled non linear system of equations with 33713 degrees of freedom (1675 rectangle elements with 1768 nodes). The simulation model describes the mass transport processes and the electro-chemical reactions in a HT-PEM fuel cell with good accuracy, the model validation by comparing the model results with experimental data could be proved. So the 2D-model is basically suitable as process simulation model for the projecting of a virtual HT-PEM fuel cell. (orig.)

  18. PWR fuel performance and future trend in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Since the first PWR power plant Mihama Unit 1 initiated its commercial operation in 1970, Japanese utilities and manufacturers have expended much of their resources and efforts to improve PWR technology. The results are already seen in significantly improved performance of 16 PWR plants now in operation. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. (MHI) has been supplying them with nuclear fuel assemblies, which are over 5700. As the reliability of the current design fuel has been achieved, the direction of R and D on nuclear fuel has changed to make nuclear power more competitive to the other power generation methods. The most important R and D targets are the burnup extension, Gd contained fuel, Pu utilizatoin and the load follow capacility. (author)

  19. Fueling Performance: Ketones Enter the Mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Brendan; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2016-09-13

    Ketone body metabolites serve as alternative energy substrates during prolonged fasting, calorie restriction, or reduced carbohydrate (CHO) availability. Using a ketone ester supplement, Cox et al. (2016) demonstrate that acute nutritional ketosis alters substrate utilization patterns during exercise, reduces lactate production, and improves time-trial performance in elite cyclists. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Current Status of the LIFE Fast Reactors Fuel Performance Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacout, A.M.; Billone, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    The LIFE-4 (Rev. 1) code was calibrated and validated using data from (U,Pu)O2 mixed-oxide fuel pins and UO2 blanket rods which were irradiation tested under steady-state and transient conditions. – It integrates a broad material and fuel-pin irradiation database into a consistent framework for use and extrapolation of the database to reactor design applications. – The code is available and running on different computer platforms (UNIX & PC) – Detailed documentations of the code’s models, routines, calibration and validation data sets are available. LIFE-METAL code is based on LIFE4 with modifications to include key phenomena applicable to metallic fuel, and metallic fuel properties – Calibrated with large database from irradiations in EBR-II – Further effort for calibration and detailed documentation. Recent activities with the codes are related to reactor design studies and support of licensing efforts for 4S and KAERI SFR designs. Future activities are related to re-assessment of the codes calibration and validation and inclusion of models for advanced fuels (transmutation fuels)

  1. Fuel R and D international programmes, a way to demonstrate future fuel performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderborck, Y.; Mertens, L.; Dekeyser, J.; Sannen, L.

    1997-01-01

    As a MOX fuel manufacturer, BELGONUCLEAIRE have spent more than 15 years promoting and managing International R and D Programmes, many of them in close cooperation with SCK''centrdot'' CEN. Such programmes dedicated to MOX versus UO 2 fuel behaviour are most of the time based on irradiation in research reactors in which the investigated fuel is submitted to power variations and to ramp testing or are performed in commercial reactors. This paper is focused on recent programmes concerned by high and medium burn-up in BWR and PWR conditions for MOX fuel. It will present also the new opportunities for new programmes. The goals, the programmes descriptions and the expected data being part of these R and D programmes is presented. (author)

  2. Tradeoffs in fuel cycle performance for most promising options - 15346

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taiwo, T.; Kim, T.K.; Feng, B.; Stauff, N.; Hoffman, E.; Ganda, F.; Todosow, M.; Brown, N.; Raitses, G.; Gehin, J.; Powers, J.; Youinou, G.; Hiruta, H.; Wigeland, R.

    2015-01-01

    A recent Evaluation and Screening (E/S) study of nuclear fuel cycle options was conducted by grouping all potential options into 40 Evaluation Groups (EGs) based on similarities in fundamental physics characteristics and fuel cycle performance. Through a rigorous evaluation process considering benefit and challenge metrics, 4 of these EGs were identified by the E/S study as 'most promising'. All 4 involve continuous recycle of U/Pu or U/TRU with natural uranium feed in fast critical reactors. However, these most promising EGs also include fuel cycle groups with variations on feed materials, neutron spectra, and reactor criticality. Therefore, the impacts of the addition of natural thorium fuel feed to a system that originally only used natural uranium fuel feed, using an intermediate spectrum instead of a fast spectrum, and using externally-driven systems versus critical reactors were evaluated. It was found that adding thorium to the natural uranium feed mixture leads to lower burnup, higher mass flows, and degrades fuel cycle benefit metrics (waste management, resource utilization, etc.) for fuel cycles that continuously recycle U/Pu or U/TRU. Adding thorium results in fissions of 233 U instead of just 239 Pu and in turn results in a lower average number of neutrons produced per absorption (η) for the fast reactor system. For continuous recycling systems, the lower η results in lower excess reactivity and subsequently lower achievable fuel burnup. This in turn leads to higher mass flows (fabrication, reprocessing, disposal, etc.) to produce a given amount of energy and subsequent lower metrics performance. The investigated fuel cycle options with intermediate spectrum reactors also exhibited degraded performance in the benefit metrics compared to fast spectrum reactors. Similarly, this is due to lower η values as the spectrum softens. The best externally-driven systems exhibited similar performance as fast critical reactors in terms of mass flows

  3. New high burnup fuel models for NRC's licensing audit code, FRAPCON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    Fuel behavior models have recently been updated within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission steady-state FRAPCON code used for auditing of fuel vendor/utility-codes and analyses. These modeling updates have concentrated on providing a best estimate prediction of steady-state fuel behavior up to the maximum burnup level s of current data (60 to 65 GWd/MTU rod-average). A decade has passed since these models were last updated. Currently, some U.S. utilities and fuel vendors are requesting approval for rod-average burnups greater than 60 GWd/MTU; however, until these recent updates the NRC did not have valid fuel performance models at these higher burnup levels. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has reviewed 15 separate effects models within the FRAPCON fuel performance code (References 1 and 2) and identified nine models that needed updating for improved prediction of fuel behavior at high burnup levels. The six separate effects models not updated were the cladding thermal properties, cladding thermal expansion, cladding creepdown, fuel specific heat, fuel thermal expansion and open gap conductance. Comparison of these models to the currently available data indicates that these models still adequately predict the data within data uncertainties. The nine models identified as needing improvement for predicting high-burnup behavior are fission gas release (FGR), fuel thermal conductivity (accounting for both high burnup effects and burnable poison additions), fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, fuel-cladding contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion, cladding mechanical properties and cladding axial growth. Each of the updated models will be described in the following sections and the model predictions will be compared to currently available high burnup data

  4. Demonstration of uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis for PWR fuel performance with BISON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua; Zou, Ling; Burns, Douglas; Ladd, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    BISON is an advanced fuels performance code being developed at Idaho National Laboratory and is the code of choice for fuels performance by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Program. An approach to uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis with BISON was developed and a new toolkit was created. A PWR fuel rod model was developed and simulated by BISON, and uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis were performed with eighteen uncertain input parameters. The maximum fuel temperature and gap conductance were selected as the figures of merit (FOM). Pearson, Spearman, and partial correlation coefficients were considered for all of the figures of merit in sensitivity analysis. (author)

  5. Demonstration of Uncertainty Quantification and Sensitivity Analysis for PWR Fuel Performance with BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Ladd, Jacob; Zhao, Haihua; Zou, Ling; Burns, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    BISON is an advanced fuels performance code being developed at Idaho National Laboratory and is the code of choice for fuels performance by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Program. An approach to uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis with BISON was developed and a new toolkit was created. A PWR fuel rod model was developed and simulated by BISON, and uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis were performed with eighteen uncertain input parameters. The maximum fuel temperature and gap conductance were selected as the figures of merit (FOM). Pearson, Spearman, and partial correlation coefficients were considered for all of the figures of merit in sensitivity analysis.

  6. Investigation of Burnup Credit Modeling Issues Associated with BWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2000-10-12

    two-dimensional (2-D) HELIOS9 assembly calculations are compared to one-dimensional (1-D) cylindrical approximations performed using the SAS2H sequence of SCALE.10 SAS2H uses a 1-D transport solution (XSDRNPM) to generate three-group fuel-averaged fluxes, which are used in the point depletion ORIGEN-S code. Studies focused on the effect of geometric modeling with approximate 1-D models and the effect of variations in relevant depletion parameters are presented.

  7. Method of improving fuel cell performance by removing at least one metal oxide contaminant from a fuel cell electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos, NM; Choi, Jong-Ho [Los Alamos, NM; Zelenay, Piotr [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-08-18

    A method of removing contaminants from a fuel cell catalyst electrode. The method includes providing a getter electrode and a fuel cell catalyst electrode having at least one contaminant to a bath and applying a voltage sufficient to drive the contaminant from the fuel cell catalyst electrode to the getter electrode. Methods of removing contaminants from a membrane electrode assembly of a fuel cell and of improving performance of a fuel cell are also provided.

  8. FREC-4A: a computer program to predict fuel rod performance under normal reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harayama, Yasuo; Izumi, Fumio

    1981-10-01

    The program FREC-4A (Fuel Reliability Evaluation Code-version 4A) is used for predicting fuel rod performance in normal reactor operation. The performance is calculated in accordance with the irradiation history of fuel rods. Emphasis is placed on the prediction of the axial elongation of claddings induced by pellet-cladding mechanical interaction, including the influence of initially preloaded springs inserted in fuel rod lower plenums. In the FREC-4A, an fuel rod is divided into axial segments. In each segment, it is assumed that the temperature, stress and strain are axi-symmetrical, and the axial strain in constant in fuel pellets and in a cladding, though the values in the pellets and in the cladding are different. The calculation of the contact load and the clearance along the length of a fuel rod and the stress and strain in each segment is explained. The method adopted in the FREC-4A is simple, and suitable to predict the deformation of fuel rods over their full length. This report is described on the outline of the program, the method of solving the stiffness equations, the calculation models, the input data such as irradiation history, output distribution, material properties and pores, the printing-out of input data and calculated results. (Kako, I.)

  9. Study on the Use of Hydride Fuel in High-Performance Light Water Reactor Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haileyesus Tsige-Tamirat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydride fuels have features which could make their use attractive in future advanced power reactors. The potential benefit of use of hydride fuel in HPLWR without introducing significant modification in the current core design concept of the high-performance light water reactor (HPLWR has been evaluated. Neutronics and thermal hydraulic analyses were performed for a single assembly model of HPLWR with oxide and hydride fuels. The hydride assembly shows higher moderation with softer neutron spectrum and slightly more uniform axial power distribution. It achieves a cycle length of 18 months with sufficient excess reactivity. At Beginning of Cycle the fuel temperature coefficient of the hydride assembly is higher whereas the moderator and void coefficients are lower. The thermal hydraulic results show that the achievable fuel temperature in the hydride assembly is well below the design limits. The potential benefits of the use of hydride fuel in the current design of the HPLWR with the achieved improvements in the core neutronics characteristics are not sufficient to justify the replacement of the oxide fuel. Therefore for a final evaluation of the use of hydride fuels in HPLWR concepts additional studies which include modification of subassembly and core layout designs are required.

  10. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction for PWRs reactors fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The pellet-cladding interaction that can occur in a PWR fuel rod design is modelled with the computer codes FRAPCON-1 and ANSYS. The fuel performance code FRAPCON-1 analyzes the fuel rod irradiation behavior and generates the initial conditions for the localized fuel rod thermal and mechanical modelling in two and three-dimensional finite elements with ANSYS. In the mechanical modelling, a pellet fragment is placed in the fuel rod gap. Two types of fuel rod cladding materials are considered: Zircaloy and austenitic stainless steel. Linear and non-linear material behaviors are allowed. Elastic, plastic and creep behaviors are considered for the cladding materials. The modelling is applied to Angra-II fuel rod design. The results are analyzed and compared. (author)

  11. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    predictions. After confirming that the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF worked and provided consistent results with FRAPTRAN predictions for a single fuel rod configuration, the same type of analysis was carried out for a bigger system which is the 4x4 PWR bundle consisting of 15 fuel pins and one control guide tube. Steady- state calculations at Hot Full Power (HFP) conditions for control guide tube out (unrodded) were performed using the 4x4 PWR array with CTF/TORT-TD coupled code system. Fuel centerline, surface and average temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD with and without the new fuel thermal conductivity model were compared against CTF/TORT-TD/FRAPTRAN predictions to demonstrate the improvement in fuel centerline predictions when new model was used. In addition to that constant and CTF dynamic gap conductance model were used with the new thermal conductivity model to show the performance of the CTF dynamic gap conductance model and its impact on fuel centerline and surface temperatures. Finally, a Rod Ejection Accident (REA) scenario using the same 4x4 PWR array was run both at Hot Zero Power (HZP) and Hot Full Power (HFP) condition, starting at a position where half of the control rod is inserted. This scenario was run using CTF/TORT-TD coupled code system with and without the new fuel thermal conductivity model. The purpose of this transient analysis was to show the impact of thermal conductivity degradation (TCD) on feedback effects, specifically Doppler Reactivity Coefficient (DRC) and, eventually, total core reactivity.

  12. Shielding Performance Measurements of Spent Fuel Transportation Container

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Hong-chao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The safety supervision of radioactive material transportation package has been further stressed and implemented. The shielding performance measurements of spent fuel transport container is the important content of supervision. However, some of the problems and difficulties reflected in practice need to be solved, such as the neutron dose rate on the surface of package is too difficult to measure exactly, the monitoring results are not always reliable, etc. The monitoring results using different spectrometers were compared and the simulation results of MCNP runs were considered. An improvement was provided to the shielding performance measurements technique and management of spent fuel transport.

  13. Modelling of fission gas swelling in the high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Chan Bock; Bang, Je Gun; Jung, Yeon Ho

    1999-06-01

    Discharge burnup of the fuel in LWR has been increased to improve the fuel economy, and currently the high burnup fuel of over 70 MWd/kg U-rod avg. is being developed by the fuel vendors worldwide. At high burnup, thermal / mechanical properties of the fuel is known to change and new phenomenon could arise. This report describes the model development on fission gas swelling in high burnup UO 2 fuel. For the low burnup fuel, swelling only by the solid fission products has been considered in the fuel performance analysis. However, at high burnup fuel, swelling by fission gas bubbles can not be neglected anymore. Therefore, fission gas swelling model which can predict bubble swelling of the high burnup UO 2 fuel during the steady-state and the transient conditions in LWR was developed. Based on the bubble growth model, the empirical fission gas swelling model was developed as function of burnup, time and temperature. The model showed that fuel bubble swelling would be proportional to the burnup by the power of 1.157 and to the time by the power of 0.157. Comparison of the model prediction with the measured fission gas swelling data under the various burnup and temperature conditions showed that the model would predict the measured data reasonably well. (author). 20 refs., 8 tabs., 17 figs

  14. Modeling fuels and fire effects in 3D: Model description and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois Pimont; Russell Parsons; Eric Rigolot; Francois de Coligny; Jean-Luc Dupuy; Philippe Dreyfus; Rodman R. Linn

    2016-01-01

    Scientists and managers critically need ways to assess how fuel treatments alter fire behavior, yet few tools currently exist for this purpose.We present a spatially-explicit-fuel-modeling system, FuelManager, which models fuels, vegetation growth, fire behavior (using a physics-based model, FIRETEC), and fire effects. FuelManager's flexible approach facilitates...

  15. Assessment of uranium dioxide fuel performance with the addition of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Abe, Alfredo; Gomes, Daniel S.; Silva, Antonio T.; Giovedi, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident in 2011 pointed the problem related to the hydrogen generation under accident scenarios due to the oxidation of zirconium-based alloys widely used as fuel rod cladding in water-cooled reactors. This problem promoted research programs aiming the development of accident tolerant fuels (ATF) which are fuels that under accident conditions could keep longer its integrity enabling the mitigation of the accident effects. In the framework of the ATF program, different materials have been studied to be applied as cladding to replace zirconium-based alloy; also efforts have been made to improve the uranium dioxide thermal conductivity doping the fuel pellet. This paper evaluates the addition of beryllium oxide (BeO) to the uranium dioxide in order to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fuel pellet. Investigations performed in this area considering the addition of 10% in volume of BeO, resulting in the UO 2 -BeO fuel, have shown good results with the improvement of the fuel thermal conductivity and the consequent reduction of the fuel temperatures under irradiation. In this paper, two models obtained from open literature for the thermal conductivity of UO 2 - BeO fuel were implemented in the FRAPCON 3.5 code and the results obtained using the modified code versions were compared. The simulations were carried out using a case available in the code documentation related to a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rod irradiated under steady state condition. The results show that the fuel centerline temperatures decrease with the addition of BeO, when compared to the conventional UO 2 pellet, independent of the model applied. (author)

  16. Assessment of uranium dioxide fuel performance with the addition of beryllium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Abe, Alfredo; Gomes, Daniel S.; Silva, Antonio T., E-mail: romuniz@usp.br, E-mail: ayabe@ipen.br, E-mail: danieldesouza@gmail.com, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energética s e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (LabRisco/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Análise, Avaliação e Gerenciamento de Risco; Aguiar, Amanda A., E-mail: amanda.abati.aguiar@gmail.com [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident in 2011 pointed the problem related to the hydrogen generation under accident scenarios due to the oxidation of zirconium-based alloys widely used as fuel rod cladding in water-cooled reactors. This problem promoted research programs aiming the development of accident tolerant fuels (ATF) which are fuels that under accident conditions could keep longer its integrity enabling the mitigation of the accident effects. In the framework of the ATF program, different materials have been studied to be applied as cladding to replace zirconium-based alloy; also efforts have been made to improve the uranium dioxide thermal conductivity doping the fuel pellet. This paper evaluates the addition of beryllium oxide (BeO) to the uranium dioxide in order to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fuel pellet. Investigations performed in this area considering the addition of 10% in volume of BeO, resulting in the UO{sub 2}-BeO fuel, have shown good results with the improvement of the fuel thermal conductivity and the consequent reduction of the fuel temperatures under irradiation. In this paper, two models obtained from open literature for the thermal conductivity of UO{sub 2}- BeO fuel were implemented in the FRAPCON 3.5 code and the results obtained using the modified code versions were compared. The simulations were carried out using a case available in the code documentation related to a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rod irradiated under steady state condition. The results show that the fuel centerline temperatures decrease with the addition of BeO, when compared to the conventional UO{sub 2} pellet, independent of the model applied. (author)

  17. Reactivity Insertion Accident (RIA) Capability Status in the BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Richard L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Folsom, Charles Pearson [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Veeraraghavan, Swetha [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-05-01

    One of the Challenge Problems being considered within CASL relates to modelling and simulation of Light Water Reactor LWR) fuel under Reactivity Insertion Accident (RIA) conditions. BISON is the fuel performance code used within CASL for LWR fuel under both normal operating and accident conditions, and thus must be capable of addressing the RIA challenge problem. This report outlines required BISON capabilities for RIAs and describes the current status of the code. Information on recent accident capability enhancements, application of BISON to a RIA benchmark exercise, and plans for validation to RIA behavior are included.

  18. Simulation of the fuel rod thermal hydraulic performance during the blow down phase in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadelha, J.A.M.

    1982-10-01

    A digital computer code to predict the fuel rod thermalhydraulic performance during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in the primary circuit of a PWR nuclear power plant is developed. The fuel rod corresponds to that in an average channel in the core. Only the blowdown phase is considered during the accident. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, and the heat conduction equation are solved to determine the fuel rod conditions during the accident. Finite differences are applied as a numerical method in the solution of the equations modelling the rod and coolant conditions. (Author) [pt

  19. Performance Evaluation of Fuel Assembly Simulator for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Young Jung; Ko, Yung Joo; Chu, In Cheol; Euh, Dong Jin; Shin, Yong Cheol; Cho, Young Il; Kwon, Tae Soon

    2010-01-01

    SMART reactor has been being developed by KAERI for the generation of electric power and for seawater desalination. An experimental facility, called SCOP, is being constructed in order to evaluate the flow and pressure distribution in the SMART reactor core. The SCOP facility has a 1/5 linear scale of the prototype. The flow distribution at the inlet of 57 fuel assemblies will be measured at SCOP, and the experimental results will be used to evaluate the core thermal margin of SMART reactor. Each fuel assembly of SMART reactor will be simulated by single flow channel in the SCOP test facility. The fuel assembly simulator has a venturi tube at the front part to measure the flow rate through the channel, and several perforated plates to preserve the total pressure drop of the SMART fuel assembly. A CFD analysis was carried out to draw basic design parameters of the venturi tube and the perforated plates in the fuel assembly simulator. In the present work, the actual performance of the fuel assembly simulator was evaluated using a CALIP (Calibration Loop for Internal Pressure drop) test facility

  20. Fuel performance and fission product behaviour in gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Validation of Predictive Methods for Fuel and Fission Product Behaviour was organized within the frame of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. This International Working Group serves as a forum for exchange of information on national programmes, provides advice to the IAEA on international co-operative activities in advanced technologies of gas cooled reactors (GCRs), and supports the conduct of these activities. The objectives of this CRP were to review and document the status of the experimental data base and of the predictive methods for GCR fuel performance and fission product behaviour; and to verify and validate methodologies for the prediction of fuel performance and fission product transport

  1. Multi-physicochemical modeling of direct methane fueled solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuanyuan; Ding, Hanping; Xue, Xingjian

    2013-11-01

    Both H2-H2O and CO-CO2 electro-oxidation processes are considered in direct methane fueled SOFC model and incorporated into the comprehensive couplings between multi bulk transport processes, diffusion processes, surface chemical processes and the cell polarization performance. The model is validated using the experimental data of polarization performance at 600 °C, 650 °C and 700 °C respectively. Upon the model validation, extensive simulations are carried out to elucidate the complicated interaction mechanisms with emphasis on surface reaction processes and surface adsorbates under SOFC operating conditions. Results show that the surface reactions of methane are strongly dependent on the cell operating conditions and increase with increasing the operating temperature and cell current. The bulk gas species and surface adsorbates show different degree of sensitivities to cell operating conditions. Surface carbon deposition can be mitigated through increasing the operating temperature, the cell operating current, and the exchange current of electrodes as well as suitable increasing H2O content in the fuel. Surface carbon deposition may also be mitigated through suitable reducing the content of CH4, CO, and/or CO2 in the fuel.

  2. Study on performance of blended fuel PPO - Diesel at generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Joni; Prasetyo, Dwi Husodo; Murti, S. D. Sumbogo; Adiarso, Priyanto, Unggul

    2018-02-01

    Bio-energy is renewable energy made from plant. Biomass-based energy sources are potentially CO2 neutral and recycle the same carbon atoms. In order to reduce pollution caused by fossil fuel combustion either for mechanical or electrical energy generation, the performance characteristic of purified palm oil blends are analyzed at various ratios. Bio-energy, Pure Plant Oil, represent a sustainable solution.A generator has been modified due to adapt the viscosity ofblended fuel, PPO - diesel, by pre-heating. Several PPO - diesel composition and injection timing were tested in order to investigate the characteristic of mixed fuel with and without pre-heating. The term biofuel refers to liquid or gaseous fuels for the internal combustion engines that are predominantly produced fro m biomass. Surprising result showed that BSFC of blended PPO - diesel was more efficient when injection timing set more than 15° BTDC. The mixed fuel produced power with less mixed fuel even though the calorie content of diesel is higher than PPO. The most efficient was 20% PPO in diesel with BSFC 296 gr fuel / kwh rather than 100% diesel with BSFC 309 gr fuel / kwh at the same injection timing 18° BTDC with pre-heating. The improvement of BSFC is caused by heating up of mixed fuel which it added calorie in the mixed fuel. Therefore, the heating up of blended PPO - diesel is not only to adapt the viscosity but also improving the efficiency of fuel usage representing by lower BSFC. In addition, torque of the 20% PPO was also as smooth as 100% diesel representing by almost the same torqueat injection timing 15° BTDC. The AIP Proceedings article template has many predefined paragraph styles for you to use/apply as you write your paper. To format your abstract, use the Microsoft Word template style: Abstract. Each paper must include an abstract. Begin the abstract with the word "Abstract" followed by a period in bold font, and then continue with a normal 9 point font.

  3. Water channel reactor fuels and fuel channels: Design, performance, research and development. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) recommended holding a Technical Committee Meeting on Water Channel Reactor Fuel including into this category fuels and pressure tubes/fuel channels for Atucha-I and II, BWR, CANDU, FUGEN and RBMK reactors. The IWGFPT considered that even if the characteristics of Atucha, CANDUs, BWRs, FUGEN and RBMKs differ considerably, there are also common features. These features include materials aspects, as well as core, fuel assembly and fuel rod design, and some safety issues. There is also some similarity in fuel power history and operating conditions (Atucha-I and II, FUGEN and RBMK). Experts from 11 countries participated at the meeting and presented papers on technology, performance, safety and design, and materials aspects of fuels and pressure tubes/fuel channels for the above types of water channel reactors

  4. Final report on accident tolerant fuel performance analysis of APMT-Steel Clad/UO₂ fuel and APMT-Steel Clad/UN-U₃Si₅ fuel concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-12

    In FY2014 our group completed and documented analysis of new Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) concepts using BISON. We have modeled the viability of moving from Zircaloy to stainless steel cladding in traditional light water reactors (LWRs). We have explored the reactivity penalty of this change using the MCNP-based burnup code Monteburns, while attempting to minimize this penalty by increasing the fuel pellet radius and decreasing the cladding thickness. Fuel performance simulations using BISON have also been performed to quantify changes to structural integrity resulting from thinner stainless steel claddings. We account for thermal and irradiation creep, fission gas swelling, thermal swelling and fuel relocation in the models for both Zircaloy and stainless steel claddings. Additional models that account for the lower oxidation stainless steel APMT are also invoked where available. Irradiation data for HT9 is used as a fallback in the absence of appropriate models. In this study the isotopic vectors within each natural element are varied to assess potential reactivity gains if advanced enrichment capabilities were levied towards cladding technologies. Recommendations on cladding thicknesses for a robust cladding as well as the constitutive components of a less penalizing composition are provided. In the first section (section 1-3), we present results accepted for publication in the 2014 TOPFUEL conference regarding the APMT/UO₂ ATF concept (J. Galloway & C. Unal, Accident Tolerant and Neutronically Favorable LWR Cladding, Proceedings of WRFPM 2014, Sendai, Japan, Paper No.1000050). Next we discuss our preliminary findings from the thermo-mechanical analysis of UN-U₃Si₅ fuel with APMT clad. In this analysis we used models developed from limited data that need to be updated when the irradiation data from ATF-1 test is available. Initial results indicate a swelling rate less than 1.5% is needed to prevent excessive clad stress.

  5. A transient fuel cell model to simulate HTPEM fuel cell impedance spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Jakob Rabjerg; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a spatially resolved transient fuel cell model applied to the simulation of high temperature PEM fuel cell impedance spectra. The model is developed using a 2D finite volume method approach. The model is resolved along the channel and across the membrane. The model considers...

  6. High-quality thorium TRISO fuel performance in HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Nabielek, Heinz; Kania, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    Thorium as a nuclear fuel has received renewed interest, because of its widespread availability and the good irradiation performance of Th and mixed (Th,U) oxide compounds as fuels in nuclear power systems. Early HTGR development employed thorium together with high-enriched uranium (HEU). After 1980, HTGR fuel systems switched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). After completing fuel development for the AVR and the THTR with BISO coated particles, the German program expanded its efforts utilizing thorium and HEU TRISO coated particles in advanced HTGR concepts for process heat applications (PNP) and direct-cycle electricity production (HHT). The combination of a low-temperature isotropic (LTI) inner and outer pyrocarbon layers surrounding a strong, stable SiC layer greatly improved manufacturing conditions and the subsequent contamination and defective particle fractions in production fuel elements. In addition, this combination provided improved mechanical strength and a higher degree of solid fission product retention, not known previously with high-temperature isotropic (HTI) BISO coatings. The improved performance of the HEU (Th, U)O{sub 2} TRISO fuel system was successfully demonstrated in three primary areas of development: manufacturing, irradiation testing under normal operating conditions, and accident simulation testing. In terms of demonstrating performance for advanced HTGR applications, the experimental failure statistic from manufacture and irradiation testing are significantly below the coated particle requirements specified for PNP and HHT designs at the time. Covering a range to 1300 C in normal operations and 1600 C in accidents, with burnups to 13% FIMA and fast fluences to 8 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E> 16 fJ), the performance results exceed the design limits on manufacturing and operational requirements for the German HTR-Modul concept, which are 6.5 x 10{sup -5} for manufacturing, 2 x 10{sup -4} for normal operating conditions, and 5 x 10{sup -4

  7. High-quality thorium TRISO fuel performance in HTGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl; Allelein, Hans-Josef; Nabielek, Heinz; Kania, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Thorium as a nuclear fuel has received renewed interest, because of its widespread availability and the good irradiation performance of Th and mixed (Th,U) oxide compounds as fuels in nuclear power systems. Early HTGR development employed thorium together with high-enriched uranium (HEU). After 1980, HTGR fuel systems switched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). After completing fuel development for the AVR and the THTR with BISO coated particles, the German program expanded its efforts utilizing thorium and HEU TRISO coated particles in advanced HTGR concepts for process heat applications (PNP) and direct-cycle electricity production (HHT). The combination of a low-temperature isotropic (LTI) inner and outer pyrocarbon layers surrounding a strong, stable SiC layer greatly improved manufacturing conditions and the subsequent contamination and defective particle fractions in production fuel elements. In addition, this combination provided improved mechanical strength and a higher degree of solid fission product retention, not known previously with high-temperature isotropic (HTI) BISO coatings. The improved performance of the HEU (Th, U)O 2 TRISO fuel system was successfully demonstrated in three primary areas of development: manufacturing, irradiation testing under normal operating conditions, and accident simulation testing. In terms of demonstrating performance for advanced HTGR applications, the experimental failure statistic from manufacture and irradiation testing are significantly below the coated particle requirements specified for PNP and HHT designs at the time. Covering a range to 1300 C in normal operations and 1600 C in accidents, with burnups to 13% FIMA and fast fluences to 8 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E> 16 fJ), the performance results exceed the design limits on manufacturing and operational requirements for the German HTR-Modul concept, which are 6.5 x 10 -5 for manufacturing, 2 x 10 -4 for normal operating conditions, and 5 x 10 -4 for accident conditions. These

  8. Toxicological and performance aspects of oxygenated motor vehicle fuels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff

    1996-01-01

    ... COMMITTEE ON TOXICOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE ASPECTS OXYGENATED MOTOR VEHICLE FUELS ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TOXICOLOGY COMMISSION LIFE SCIENCES NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL AND OF BOARD ON AND ON NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1996 i Copyrightoriginal retained, the be not from cannot book, paper original however, for version formatting, authoritative the t...

  9. Toxicological and performance aspects of oxygenated motor vehicle fuels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff; Commission on Life Sciences; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council; National Academy of Sciences

    ... COMMITTEE ON TOXICOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE ASPECTS OXYGENATED MOTOR VEHICLE FUELS ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TOXICOLOGY COMMISSION LIFE SCIENCES NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL AND OF BOARD ON AND ON NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1996 i Copyrightoriginal retained, the be not from cannot book, paper original however, for version formatting, authoritative the t...

  10. Transport Studies and Modeling in PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K. [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States); Xu, Hui [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States); Brawn, Shelly [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States)

    2014-07-30

    This project’s aim was to develop fuel cell components (i.e. membranes, gas-diffusion media (GDM), bipolar plates and flow fields) that possess specific properties (i.e. water transport and conductivity). A computational fluid dynamics model was developed to elucidate the effect of certain parameters on these specific properties. Ultimately, the model will be used to determine sensitivity of fuel cell performance to component properties to determine limiting components and to guide research. We have successfully reached our objectives and achieved most of the milestones of this project. We have designed and synthesized a variety of hydrocarbon block polymer membranes with lower equivalent weight, structure, chemistry, phase separation and process conditions. These membranes provide a broad selection with optimized water transport properties. We have also designed and constructed a variety of devices that are capable of accurately measuring the water transport properties (water uptake, water diffusivity and electro-osmatic drag) of these membranes. These transport properties are correlated to the membranes’ structures derived from X-ray and microscopy techniques to determine the structure-property relationship. We successfully integrated hydrocarbon membrane MEAs with a current distribution board (CBD) to study the impact of hydrocarbon membrane on water transport in fuel cells. We have designed and fabricated various GDM with varying substrate, diffusivity and micro-porous layers (MPL) and characterized their pore structure, tortuosity and hydrophobicity. We have derived a universal chart (MacMullin number as function of wet proofing and porosity) that can be used to characterize various GDM. The abovementioned GDMs have been evaluated in operating fuel cells; their performance is correlated to various pore structure, tortuosity and hydrophobicity of the GDM. Unfortunately, determining a universal relationship between the MacMullin number and these properties

  11. Well performance model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.K.; Evans, C.E.; Pierson, R.G.; Scott, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a comprehensive oil or gas well performance model. The model contains six distinct sections: stimulation design, tubing and/or casing flow, reservoir and near-wellbore calculations, production forecasting, wellbore heat transmission, and economics. These calculations may be performed separately or in an integrated fashion with data and results shared among the different sections. The model analysis allows evaluation of all aspects of well completion design, including the effects on future production and overall well economics

  12. Models for predicting fuel consumption in sagebrush-dominated ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton S. Wright

    2013-01-01

    Fuel consumption predictions are necessary to accurately estimate or model fire effects, including pollutant emissions during wildland fires. Fuel and environmental measurements on a series of operational prescribed fires were used to develop empirical models for predicting fuel consumption in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentate Nutt.) ecosystems....

  13. Prediction and optimization of fuel cell performance using a multi-objective genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques Hobold, Gustavo [Laboratory of Energy Conversion Engineering and Technology, Federal University of Santa Catarina (Brazil); Washington University in St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Agarwal, Ramesh K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The attention that is currently being given to the emission of pollutant gases in the atmosphere has made the fuel cell (FC), an energy conversion device that cleanly converts chemical energy into electrical energy, a good alternative to other technologies that still use carbon-based fuels. The temperature plays an important role on the efficiency of an FC as it influences directly the humidity of the membrane, the reversible thermodynamic potential and the partial pressure of water; therefore the thermal control of the fuel cell is the focus of this paper. We present models for both high and low temperature fuel cells based on the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). A thermodynamic analysis is performed on the cells and the methods of controlling their temperature are discussed. The cell parameters are optimized for both high and low temperatures using a Java-based multi-objective genetic algorithm, which makes use of the logic of the biological theory of evolution to classify individual parameters based on a fitness function in order to maximize the power of the fuel cell. Applications to high and low temperature fuel cells are discussed.

  14. Ontario Hydro Pickering Generating Station fuel handling system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underhill, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    The report briefly describes the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) on-power fuel handling system and refuelling cycle. Lifetime performance parameters of the fuelling system are presented, including station incapability charged to the fuel handling system, cost of operating and maintenance, dose expenditure, events causing system unavailability, maintenance and refuelling strategy. It is concluded that the 'CANDU' on-power fuelling system, by consistently contributing less than 1% to the PNGS incapability, has been credited with a 6 to 20% increase in reactor capacity factor, compared to off-power fuelling schemes. (author)

  15. Improving the service life and performance of CANDU fuel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causey, A.R.; Cheadle, B.A.; Coleman, C.E.; Price, E.G.

    1997-01-01

    The development objective for CANDU fuel channels is to produce a design that can operate for 40 years at 90% capacity. Steady progress toward this objective is being made. The factors that determine the life of the channel are reviewed and the processes necessary to achieve the objectives identified. Performance of future fuel channels will be enhanced by reduced operating costs, increased safety margins to postulated accident conditions, and reduced retubing costs compared to current channels. The approaches to these issues are discussed briefly in the paper. (author)

  16. Advanced methods of solid oxide fuel cell modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Jaroslaw; Santarelli, Massimo; Leone, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cells are widely regarded as the future of the power and transportation industries. Intensive research in this area now requires new methods of fuel cell operation modeling and cell design. Typical mathematical models are based on the physical process description of fuel cells and require a detailed knowledge of the microscopic properties that govern both chemical and electrochemical reactions. ""Advanced Methods of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Modeling"" proposes the alternative methodology of generalized artificial neural networks (ANN) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) modeling. ""Advanced Methods

  17. High performance internal reforming unit for high temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiwen [Sandy Hook, CT; Venkataraman, Ramakrishnan [New Milford, CT; Novacco, Lawrence J [Brookfield, CT

    2008-10-07

    A fuel reformer having an enclosure with first and second opposing surfaces, a sidewall connecting the first and second opposing surfaces and an inlet port and an outlet port in the sidewall. A plate assembly supporting a catalyst and baffles are also disposed in the enclosure. A main baffle extends into the enclosure from a point of the sidewall between the inlet and outlet ports. The main baffle cooperates with the enclosure and the plate assembly to establish a path for the flow of fuel gas through the reformer from the inlet port to the outlet port. At least a first directing baffle extends in the enclosure from one of the sidewall and the main baffle and cooperates with the plate assembly and the enclosure to alter the gas flow path. Desired graded catalyst loading pattern has been defined for optimized thermal management for the internal reforming high temperature fuel cells so as to achieve high cell performance.

  18. Performance assessment modeling of pyrometallurgical process wasteforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, W.M.; Hill, R.N.; Bullen, D.B.

    1995-01-01

    Performance assessment analyses have been completed to estimate the behavior of high-level nuclear wasteforms generated from the pyrometallurgical processing of liquid metal reactor (LMR) and light water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel. Waste emplaced in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is investigated as the basis for the study. The resulting cumulative actinide and fission product releases to the accessible environment within a 100,000 year period from the various pyrometallurgical process wasteforms are compared to those of directly disposed LWR spent fuel using the same total repository system model. The impact of differing radionuclide transport models on the overall release characteristics is investigated

  19. Induction Heating Model of Cermet Fuel Element Environmental Test (CFEET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carlos F.; Bradley, D. E.; Cavender, D. P.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Trent, D.; Stewart, E.

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) are capable of producing a high specific impulse by employing heat produced by a fission reactor to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements due to large thermal gradients; therefore, high-melting-point ceramics-metallic matrix composites (cermets) are one of the fuels under consideration as part of the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Advance Exploration System (AES) technology project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of testing and analytical modeling is to determine their ability to survive and maintain thermal performance in a prototypical NTR reactor environment of exposure to hydrogen at very high temperatures and obtain data to assess the properties of the non-nuclear support materials. The fission process and the resulting heating performance are well known and do not require that active fissile material to be integrated in this testing. A small-scale test bed; Compact Fuel Element Environmental Tester (CFEET), designed to heat fuel element samples via induction heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed at MSFC to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without utilizing fissile material. This paper details the analytical approach to help design and optimize the test bed using COMSOL Multiphysics for predicting thermal gradients induced by electromagnetic heating (Induction heating) and Thermal Desktop for radiation calculations.

  20. A semi empirical model of the direct methanol fuel cell. Part II. Parametric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, K.; Jackson, C.; Argyropoulos, P.

    A parametric analysis of a model equation developed to predict the cell voltage versus current density response of a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell is presented. The equation is based on a semi-empirical approach in which methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction kinetics are combined with effective mass transport coefficients for the fuel cell electrodes. The model equation is applied to experimental data for a small-scale fuel cell and produces electrochemical parameters generally consistent with those expected for the individual components of the fuel cell MEA. The parameters thus determined are also used in the model to predict the performance of a DMFC with a new membrane electrode assembly.

  1. Performance of advanced oxide fuel pins in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, L.A.; Jensen, S.M.; Hales, J.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Makenas, B.J.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of design and operating parameters on mixed-oxide fuel pin irradiation performance were established for the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) advanced oxide EBR-II test series. Fourteen fuel pins breached in-reactor with reference 316 SS cladding. Seven of the breaches are attributed to FCMI. Of the remaining seven breached pins, three are attributed to local cladding over-temperatures similar to the breach mechanism for the reference oxide pins irradiated in EBR-II. FCCI was found to be a contributing factor in two high burnup, i.e., 11.7 at. % breaches. The remaining two breaches were attributed to mechanical interaction of UO 2 fuel and fission products accumulated in the lower cladding insulator gap, and a loss of cladding ductility possibly due to liquid metal embrittlement. Fuel smear density appears to have the most significant impact on lifetime. Quantitative evaluations of cladding diameter increases attributed to FCMI, established fuel smear density, burnup, and cladding thickness-to-diameter ratio as the major parameters influencing the extent of cladding strain

  2. Nuclear power performance and safety. V.5. Nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The International Conference on Nuclear Power Performance and Safety, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, was held at the Austria Centre Vienna (ACV) in Vienna, Austria, from 28 September to 2 October 1987. The objective of the Conference was to promote an exchange of worldwide information on the current trends in the performance and safety of nuclear power and its fuel cycle, and to take a forward look at the expectations and objectives for the 1990s. Policy decisions for waste management have already been taken in many countries and the 1990s should be a period of demonstration and implementation of these policies. As ilustrated by data presented from a number of countries, many years of experience in radioactive waste management have been achieved and the technology exists to implement the national plans and policies that have been developed. The establishment of criteria, the development of safety performance methodology and site investigation work are key activities essential to the successful selection, characterization and construction of geological repositories for the final disposal of radioactive waste. Considerable work has been done in these areas over the last ten years and will continue into the 1990s. However, countries that are considering geological disposal for high level waste now recognize the need for relating the technical aspects to public understanding and acceptance of the concept and decision making activities. The real challenge for the 1990s in waste disposal will be successfully to integrate technological activities within a process which responds to institutional and public concern. Volume 5 of the Proceedings comprehends the contributions on waste management in the 1990s. Decontamination and decommissioning, waste management, treatment and disposal, nuclear fuel cycle - present and future. Enrichment services and advanced reactor fuels, improvements in reactor fuel utilization and performance, spent fuel management

  3. NIF capsule performance modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-shot modeling of NIF capsule implosions was performed in order to validate our physical and numerical models. Cryogenic layered target implosions and experiments with surrogate targets produce an abundance of capsule performance data including implosion velocity, remaining ablator mass, times of peak x-ray and neutron emission, core image size, core symmetry, neutron yield, and x-ray spectra. We have attempted to match the integrated data set with capsule-only simulations by adjusting the drive and other physics parameters within expected uncertainties. The simulations include interface roughness, time-dependent symmetry, and a model of mix. We were able to match many of the measured performance parameters for a selection of shots.

  4. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard R. Parresol; Joe H. Scott; Anne Andreu; Susan Prichard; Laurie Kurth

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or...

  5. Modeling defect and fission gas properties in U-Si fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Noordhoek, Mark J. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Besmann, Theodore M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Middleburgh, Simon C. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, Vasteras (Sweden); Lahoda, E. J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Woods, PA (United States); Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Grimes, Robin W. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-14

    Uranium silicides, in particular U3Si2, are being explored as an advanced nuclear fuel with increased accident tolerance as well as competitive economics compared to the baseline UO2 fuel. They benefit from high thermal conductivity (metallic) compared to UO2 fuel (insulator or semi-conductor) used in current Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The U-Si fuels also have higher fissile density. In order to perform meaningful engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations, the material properties of the fuel, including the response to irradiation environments, must be known. Unfortunately, the data available for USi fuels are rather limited, in particular for the temperature range where LWRs would operate. The ATF HIP is using multi-scale modeling and simulations to address this knowledge gap.

  6. Modeling defect and fission gas properties in U-Si fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Noordhoek, Mark [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Besmann, Theodore [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Middleburgh, Simon C. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, Vasteras (Sweden); Lahoda, E. J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Woods, PA (United States); Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Grimes, Robin W. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-27

    Uranium silicides, in particular U3Si2, are being explored as an advanced nuclear fuel with increased accident tolerance as well as competitive economics compared to the baseline UO2 fuel. They benefit from high thermal conductivity (metallic) compared to UO2 fuel (insulator or semi-conductor) used in current Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The U-Si fuels also have higher fissile density. In order to perform meaningful engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations, the material properties of the fuel, including the response to irradiation environments, must be known. Unfortunately, the data available for USi fuels are rather limited, in particular for the temperature range where LWRs would operate. The ATF HIP is using multi-scale modeling and simulations to address this knowledge gap.

  7. Determining the optimum conditions for modified diesel fuel combustion considering its emission, properties and engine performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayyazbakhsh, Ahmad; Pirouzfar, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Gas emissions, fuel properties and performance engine modeling. • Optimization of new modified fuel prepared from n-Butanol and Nano particles. • Model accuracy analysis. - Abstract: This essay scrutinizes an experimental study conducted to appraise the influence of using n-Butanol with diesel fuel in 5% and 10% (volume) n-Butanol, 1% nitro methane (NM), injection timing and two Nano-particles (alumina and a type of silica powder) on the engine performance (brake specific fuel consumption and engine power), fuel properties (Cetane number and flash point) and exhaust emissions (soot, NO x and CO) of an engine with 4-cylinder (with a system of common rail fuel injection), intercooling, cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), and turbocharged. The tests are conducted by varying the engine load (25 and 75 nm) and changing engine speed (1500 and 2200 rpm). Normal Butanol presents better brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) but this blend doesn’t reflect better engine power. All the percentages of n-Butanol in the fuel make Cetane number decrease but adding 1% of nitro methane makes Cetane number increase. For all the n-Butanol, the percentage flash makes the fuel decrease in comparison to pure diesel fuel. The current experimental study demonstrates that adding the n-Butanol and nitro methane to diesel fuel direct into diminishing soot emission. In contrast, this blend raises NO x and CO emissions. Furthermore, this research indicates that the increase of engine speed dwindle air pollutants and enhances BSFC. It also remarks that power gets increased at low engine speed. However, power gets reducedat high speed. This article represents that the increasing of engine load leads to increasing all of air pollutant, increasing of power and decreasing of brake specific fuel consumption. Both the Cetane number and flash point are independent from engine speed and engine load. The present paper shows that the effect of silica with high percentage of n

  8. Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Merrill; Melissa Teague; Robert Youngblood; Larry Ott; Kevin Robb; Michael Todosow; Chris Stanek; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Billone; Robert Montgomery; Nicholas Brown; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2014-02-01

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. As a result, continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) initiated an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Development program. The complex multiphysics behavior of LWR nuclear fuel makes defining specific material or design improvements difficult; as such, establishing qualitative attributes is critical to guide the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. This report summarizes a common set of technical evaluation metrics to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs. As used herein, “metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. Furthermore, this report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to assess the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed for lead test rod or lead test assembly

  9. Software Design Document for the AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Cochran, Bill [ORNL

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the design of the AMP nuclear fuel performance code. It provides an overview of the decomposition into separable components, an overview of what those components will do, and the strategic basis for the design. The primary components of a computational physics code include a user interface, physics packages, material properties, mathematics solvers, and computational infrastructure. Some capability from established off-the-shelf (OTS) packages will be leveraged in the development of AMP, but the primary physics components will be entirely new. The material properties required by these physics operators include many highly non-linear properties, which will be replicated from FRAPCON and LIFE where applicable, as well as some computationally-intensive operations, such as gap conductance, which depends upon the plenum pressure. Because there is extensive capability in off-the-shelf leadership class computational solvers, AMP will leverage the Trilinos, PETSc, and SUNDIALS packages. The computational infrastructure includes a build system, mesh database, and other building blocks of a computational physics package. The user interface will be developed through a collaborative effort with the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Capability Transfer program element as much as possible and will be discussed in detail in a future document.

  10. Modeling closed nuclear fuel cycles processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmidt, O.V. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials, Rogova, 5a street, Moscow, 123098 (Russian Federation); Makeeva, I.R. [Zababakhin All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Technical Physics, Vasiliev street 13, Snezhinsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456770 (Russian Federation); Liventsov, S.N. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Lenin Avenue, 30, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    Computer models of processes are necessary for determination of optimal operating conditions for closed nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) processes. Computer models can be quickly changed in accordance with new and fresh data from experimental research. 3 kinds of process simulation are necessary. First, the VIZART software package is a balance model development used for calculating the material flow in technological processes. VIZART involves taking into account of equipment capacity, transport lines and storage volumes. Secondly, it is necessary to simulate the physico-chemical processes that are involved in the closure of NFC. The third kind of simulation is the development of software that allows the optimization, diagnostics and control of the processes which implies real-time simulation of product flows on the whole plant or on separate lines of the plant. (A.C.)

  11. Performance of carbon dioxide vent for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Shruti; Kohl, Paul A.

    Direct methanol fuel cells have potentially high energy density if the balance of plant and fuel losses can be kept to a minimum. CO 2 accumulation in the fuel tank can lower the efficiency and performance of closed-tank methanol fuel cells. This report discusses the implementation of a passive CO 2 vent fabricated with poly(1-trimethyl silyl propyne) and 1,6-divinylperfluorohexane. The performance of the membrane as a selective vent for carbon dioxide in the presence of methanol has been studied at various operating conditions. First, the selectivity of the vent membrane improved with temperature. Second, the activation energy for permeation through the polymer membrane corresponded to diffusion controlled transport of CO 2 and sorption controlled transport for methanol vapor. The activation energy for CO 2 transport through the poly(1-trimethyl silyl propyne) and 1,6-divinylperfluorohexane membrane was less than that for a pure poly(1-trimethyl silyl propyne) membrane. Finally, the polymer had a high selectivity for carbon dioxide compared to both liquid and vapor phase methanol.

  12. MODELING AND DESIGN FOR A DIRECT CARBON FUEL CELL WITH ENTRAINED FUEL AND OXIDIZER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan A. Kornhauser; Ritesh Agarwal

    2005-04-01

    The novel molten carbonate fuel cell design described in this report uses porous bed electrodes. Molten carbonate, with carbon fuel particles and oxidizer entrained, is circulated through the electrodes. Carbon may be reacted directly, without gasification, in a molten carbonate fuel cell. The cathode reaction is 2CO{sub 2} + O{sub 2} 4e{sup -} {yields} 2CO{sub 3}{sup =}, while the anode reaction can be either C + 2CO{sub 3}{sup =} {yields} 3CO{sub 2} + 4e{sup -} or 2C + CO{sub 3}{sup =} {yields} 3CO + 2e{sup -}. The direct carbon fuel cell has an advantage over fuel cells using coal-derived synthesis gas in that it provides better overall efficiency and reduces equipment requirements. Also, the liquid electrolyte provides a means for transporting the solid carbon. The porous bed cell makes use of this carbon transport ability of the molten salt electrolyte. A one-dimensional model has been developed for predicting the performance of this cell. For the cathode, dependent variables are superficial O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes in the gas phase, superficial O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes in the liquid phase, superficial current density through the electrolyte, and electrolyte potential. The variables are related by correlations, from the literature, for gas-liquid mass transfer, liquid-solid mass transfer, cathode current density, electrode overpotential, and resistivity of a liquid with entrained gas. For the anode, dependent variables are superficial CO{sub 2} flux in the gas phase, superficial CO{sub 2} flux in the liquid phase, superficial C flux, superficial current density through the electrolyte, and electrolyte potential. The same types of correlations relate the variables as in the cathode, with the addition of a correlation for resistivity of a fluidized bed. CO production is not considered, and axial dispersion is neglected. The model shows behavior typical of porous bed electrodes used in electrochemical processes. Efficiency is comparable to that of

  13. The FIT 2.0 Model - Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Gregory M Teske

    2011-06-01

    All mass streams from fuel separation and fabrication are products that must meet some set of product criteria – fuel feedstock impurity limits, waste acceptance criteria (WAC), material storage (if any), or recycle material purity requirements such as zirconium for cladding or lanthanides for industrial use. These must be considered in a systematic and comprehensive way. The FIT model and the “system losses study” team that developed it [Shropshire2009, Piet2010b] are steps by the Fuel Cycle Technology program toward an analysis that accounts for the requirements and capabilities of each fuel cycle component, as well as major material flows within an integrated fuel cycle. This will help the program identify near-term R&D needs and set longer-term goals. This report describes FIT 2, an update of the original FIT model.[Piet2010c] FIT is a method to analyze different fuel cycles; in particular, to determine how changes in one part of a fuel cycle (say, fuel burnup, cooling, or separation efficiencies) chemically affect other parts of the fuel cycle. FIT provides the following: Rough estimate of physics and mass balance feasibility of combinations of technologies. If feasibility is an issue, it provides an estimate of how performance would have to change to achieve feasibility. Estimate of impurities in fuel and impurities in waste as function of separation performance, fuel fabrication, reactor, uranium source, etc.

  14. The impact of interface bonding efficiency on high-burnup spent nuclear fuel dynamic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hao, E-mail: jiangh@ornl.gov; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • To investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on its dynamic performance. • Flexural rigidity, EI = M/κ, estimated from FEA results were benchmarked with SNF dynamic experimental results, and used to evaluate interface bonding efficiency. • Interface bonding efficiency can significantly dictate the SNF system rigidity and the associated dynamic performance. • With consideration of interface bonding efficiency and fuel cracking, HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with SNF static and dynamic experimental data. - Abstract: Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on system dynamic performance. Bending moments M were applied to FEA model to evaluate the system responses. From bending curvature, κ, flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI = M/κ. The FEA simulation results were benchmarked with experimental results from cyclic integrated reversal bending fatigue test (CIRFT) of HBR fuel rods. The consequence of interface debonding between fuel pellets and cladding is a redistribution of the loads carried by the fuel pellets to the clad, which results in a reduction in composite rod system flexural rigidity. Therefore, the interface bonding efficiency at the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces can significantly dictate the SNF system dynamic performance. With the consideration of interface bonding efficiency, the HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with CIRFT test data.

  15. Performance of the Westinghouse WWER-1000 fuel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höglund, J.; Jansson, A.; Latorre, R.; Davis, D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2005, six (6) Westinghouse WWER-1000 Lead Test Assemblies (LTAs) were loaded in South Ukraine Unit 3 (SU3). The LTAs completed the planned four cycles of operation and reached an average assembly burnup in excess of 43 MWd/ kgU. Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) inspections were performed after completion of each cycle and it was concluded that the 6 Westinghouse LTAs performed as expected during their operational regimes. In 2010, a full region of 42 assemblies of an enhanced WWER-1000 fuel design for Ukrainian reactors, designated WFA, was loaded in SU3. The WFA includes features that further mitigate assembly bow while at the same time improving the fuel cycle economy. In 2015, 26 WFAs completed their planned four cycles of operation reaching an average assembly burnup in excess of 42 MWd/ kgU. Currently 36 WFAs continue operating their fourth cycle in SU3. In addition, South Ukraine Unit 2 (SU2) has been loaded with WFAs and 27 assemblies have completed two cycles of operation reaching an average assembly burnup above 24 MWd/kgU. PIE for the WFAs has been completed after each cycle of operation. All assemblies have been examined for visible damage or non-standard position of fuel assembly components during unloading and reloading. All WFAs have also been subject to the standard leak testing process, with all fuel rods found to be hermetically sealed and non-leaking. Each outage, six WFAs have been subject to a more extensive inspection program. In 2012, 2013, and 2015, the Westinghouse Fuel Inspection and Repair Equipment (FIRE) workstation were used for the SU3 inspections. Excellent irradiation fuel performance has been observed and measured on all WFAs. The fuel assembly growth, rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) drag forces, oxide thickness, total fuel rod-to-nozzle gap channel closure, and fuel assembly bow data were within the bounds of the Westinghouse experience database. Results and concluding remarks from the PIEs are provided in this paper. In

  16. Some properties for modeling of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, F.A.

    1979-01-01

    Two areas key to the materials modeling of fuel element behavior are discussed. The relative importance of atomic diffusion vs. bubble migration is first surveyed and the interplay of bubble mobility and re-solution parameter is highlighted. It is concluded that biased bubble migration at higher temperatures is required to explain available gas-release data, especially during transients. At intermediate temperatures, random bubble migration is required to explain both gas-release rates and the observation of large (approx. 700A) intragranular bubbles following in-pile and post-irradiation transients. Different fuel models employ different values of re-solution parameter, both below and above an experimentally determined value. Bubble mobilities are deduced to approach theoretical, surface diffusion-controlled values during transients, but they may be somewhat less mobile during steady-state operation. Next, the present understanding of radiation-induced hardening and creep is discussed, highlighting the interplay of these two phenomena. An overall constitutive scheme is presented and predictions of failure limits are deduced therefrom employing instability analysis

  17. Modelling strategic responses to car and fuel taxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, P.; Kooreman, P.

    We develop a model to analyse the interactions between actors involved in car and fuel taxation: consumers, car producers, fuel producers and the government. Heterogeneous consumers choose between two versions of a car that differ in engine type (diesel or gasoline). Car manufacturers and fuel

  18. Optimization of a local district heating plant under fuel flexibility and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Rosendahl, Lasse; From, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Brovst is a small district in Denmark. Based on the case of Brovst, this paper analyses the role of district heating in future Renewable Energy Systems. The present use of fossil fuels in the Brovst DHP (district heating plant) represents an increasing environmental and climate-related load. So......, an investigation has been made to reduce the use of fossil fuels for district heating system and make use of the local renewable resources (Biogas, Solar and Geothermal) for district heating purpose. In this article, the techno-economic assessment is achieved through the development of a suite of models...... that are combined to give cost and performance data for this district heating system. Different local fuels have been analyzed for different perspectives to find the way to optimize the whole integrated system in accordance with fuel availability and cost. This paper represents the energy system analysis mode...

  19. Fuel performance at high burnup for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    The present meeting was scheduled by the International Atomic Energy Agency, upon proposal of the Members of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology. The purpose of this meeting was to review the ''state-of-the-art'' in the area of Fuel Performance at High Burnup for Water Reactors. Previous IAEA meetings on this topic were held in Mol in 1981 and 1984 and on related topics in Stockholm and Lyon in 1987. Fifty-five participants from 16 countries and two international organizations attended the meeting and 28 papers were presented and discussed. The papers were presented in five sub-sessions and during the meeting, working groups composed of the session chairmen and paper authors prepared the summary of each session with conclusions and recommendations for future work. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Mathematical Model of the Jet Engine Fuel System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimko Marek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the design of a simplified mathematical model of the jet (turbo-compressor engine fuel system. The solution will be based on the regulation law, where the control parameter is a fuel mass flow rate and the regulated parameter is the rotational speed. A differential equation of the jet engine and also differential equations of other fuel system components (fuel pump, throttle valve, pressure regulator will be described, with respect to advanced predetermined simplifications.

  1. Mathematical Model of the Jet Engine Fuel System

    OpenAIRE

    Klimko Marek

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the design of a simplified mathematical model of the jet (turbo-compressor) engine fuel system. The solution will be based on the regulation law, where the control parameter is a fuel mass flow rate and the regulated parameter is the rotational speed. A differential equation of the jet engine and also differential equations of other fuel system components (fuel pump, throttle valve, pressure regulator) will be described, with respect to advanced predetermined simplifications.

  2. Mathematical Model of the Jet Engine Fuel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimko, Marek

    2015-05-01

    The paper discusses the design of a simplified mathematical model of the jet (turbo-compressor) engine fuel system. The solution will be based on the regulation law, where the control parameter is a fuel mass flow rate and the regulated parameter is the rotational speed. A differential equation of the jet engine and also differential equations of other fuel system components (fuel pump, throttle valve, pressure regulator) will be described, with respect to advanced predetermined simplifications.

  3. Research of power fuel low-temperature vortex combustion in industrial boiler based on numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlova K.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the presented research is to perform numerical modelling of fuel low-temperature vortex combustion in once-through industrial steam boiler. Full size and scaled-down furnace model created with FIRE 3D software and was used for the research. All geometrical features were observed. The baseline information for the low-temperature vortex furnace process are velocity and temperature of low, upper and burner blast, air-fuel ratio, fuel consumption, coal dust size range. The obtained results are: temperature and velocity three dimensional fields, furnace gases and solid fuel ash particles concentration.

  4. The fuel performance code Celaeno, conception and simulation of fuel elements for gas-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfer, Thomas; Brunon, E.; Castelier, E.; Ravenet, A.; Chauvin, N. [CEA, Saint Paul Lez Durance, 04 100 (France)

    2009-06-15

    Gas-cooled fast reactor are extensively studied at Atomic Energy Commission for the fourth generation reactors. An innovative plate-type fuel element, made of two plates enclosing a honeycomb structure containing cylindrical fuel pellets, has been proposed to meet the specifications of these reactors. To sustain high coolant temperature, refractory materials have to be used for plates and honeycomb structure. The reference material is a silicon carbide composite matrix ceramic SiCf/SiC, but studies on refractory metals are also underway. The most regarded fuel material is a mixed uranium-plutonium carbide UPuC. To analyse and evaluate the performance of such fuel elements and materials, reactor concept design studies and experimental irradiations are being performed, both requiring advanced modelling tools. Based on the PLEIADES software platform, which uses Cast3M finite-element code as its thermomechanical component, the fuel-performance code celaeno has been designed for studying the thermal, mechanical and physical evolutions of the fuel-element concepts of interest under the following constraints: - provide a unified approach for all case studies, including experimental irradiations and basic material characterisation; - account for all relevant phenomena, such as mechanical non linear behaviour, irradiation induced swelling, fission gas release, or material properties evolution under irradiation, under normal and off-normal conditions; - provide robust and efficient numerical algorithms; - allow fast developpement of new case studies; - guarantee the flexibility of the code for almost all aspects of the fuel element, from geometrical changes to material changes; - assess the quality of studies by enabling designers to focus on physics, which is by far the most important and difficult task. This paper provides an overview of celaeno abilities. We demonstrate how complex simulations can easily be set up, the most time consuming part being the meshing. On the

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of FEAST-Metal Fuel Performance Code: Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelmann, Paul Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Laboratories

    2012-06-27

    This memo documents the completion of the LANL milestone, M3FT-12LA0202041, describing methodologies and initial results using FEAST-Metal. The FEAST-Metal code calculations for this work are being conducted at LANL in support of on-going activities related to sensitivity analysis of fuel performance codes. The objective is to identify important macroscopic parameters of interest to modeling and simulation of metallic fuel performance. This report summarizes our preliminary results for the sensitivity analysis using 6 calibration datasets for metallic fuel developed at ANL for EBR-II experiments. Sensitivity ranking methodology was deployed to narrow down the selected parameters for the current study. There are approximately 84 calibration parameters in the FEAST-Metal code, of which 32 were ultimately used in Phase II of this study. Preliminary results of this sensitivity analysis led to the following ranking of FEAST models for future calibration and improvements: fuel conductivity, fission gas transport/release, fuel creep, and precipitation kinetics. More validation data is needed to validate calibrated parameter distributions for future uncertainty quantification studies with FEAST-Metal. Results of this study also served to point out some code deficiencies and possible errors, and these are being investigated in order to determine root causes and to improve upon the existing code models.

  6. Performance optimization and microbiological analysis of microbial fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajun WANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the operation performance of microbial fuel cells, improved the degradation rate of nitrate and the power output of microbial fuel cell, a typical single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell (AC-MFC is inoculated and operated with urban sewage treatment plant clarifier sludge as inoculum source and sodium nitrate as electron acceptor. It is successfully started by synthetic wastewater containing a phosphate buffered nutrient solution (PBS, 50 mmol/L and sodium acetate (1 g/L. After successful starting, the four factors of carbon source, C/N, nitrate concentration and temperature are considered to optimize the operation performance of MFC. The test result shows that the operation performance of MFC is best under the conditions of anhydrous sodium acetate as carbon source, C/N of 5∶1, 200 mg/L nitrate concentration and at 30 ℃, and the degradation rate of nitrate reaches more than 90% and the voltage of MFC is 0.462 V. After 6 cycles of operation, the voltage and power density of MFC reaches 0.62 V and 4.53 W /m2. AC impedance analysis indicates that the MFC resistance is 130 Ω. Scanning electron microscopy of electrode surface illustrates that the number of microbial species are significantly increased. The results indicate that MFC can be an effective technology for nitrate contained wastewater treatment and energy production.

  7. The graphic model of the spent fuel rod extracting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jee Sup; Kim, Sung Hyun

    1997-01-01

    The spent fuel rod extracting system is being developed in KAERI to deal with problems associated with utilization of storage pools at nuclear power plants. This system consists of an equipment system for extracting rods from spent fuel assemblies, a machine controller, and a supervisory controller. The performance of extraction system has been investigated through a series of experiments. Even though the system is designed to automatically perform sequential procedures, several problems have been found such as the gripper stucking to fuel rod caused by misaligned positioning and the socket jamming of impact wrench into the nut, etc. Up to this end the graphical model of the rod extracting system has been made so that possible sequences of operations including error detection and recovery actions are verified by using a graphic simulation before real operations. For the implementation, IGRIP is being used as a multifunctional tool for developing the rod extraction system. IGRIP is not only an excellent visualization tool, but it also highlights modeling virtual machine. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  8. Fuel behavior modeling using the MARS computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faya, S.C.S.; Faya, A.J.G.

    1983-01-01

    The fuel behaviour modeling code MARS against experimental data, was evaluated. Two cases were selected: an early comercial PWR rod (Maine Yankee rod) and an experimental rod from the Canadian BWR program (Canadian rod). The MARS predictions are compared with experimental data and predictions made by other fuel modeling codes. Improvements are suggested for some fuel behaviour models. Mars results are satisfactory based on the data available. (Author) [pt

  9. Development of PRIME for irradiation performance analysis of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gwan Yoon; Kim, Yeon Soo; Jeong, Yong Jin; Park, Jong Man; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2018-04-01

    A prediction code for the thermo-mechanical performance of research reactor fuel (PRIME) has been developed with the implementation of developed models to analyze the irradiation behavior of U-Mo dispersion fuel. The code is capable of predicting the two-dimensional thermal and mechanical performance of U-Mo dispersion fuel during irradiation. A finite element method was employed to solve the governing equations for thermal and mechanical equilibria. Temperature-and burnup-dependent material properties of the fuel meat constituents and cladding were used. The numerical solution schemes in PRIME were verified by benchmarking solutions obtained using a commercial finite element analysis program (ABAQUS).The code was validated using irradiation data from RERTR, HAMP-1, and E-FUTURE tests. The measured irradiation data used in the validation were IL thickness, volume fractions of fuel meat constituents for the thermal analysis, and profiles of the plate thickness changes and fuel meat swelling for the mechanical analysis. The prediction results were in good agreement with the measurement data for both thermal and mechanical analyses, confirming the validity of the code. (c) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of PRIME for irradiation performance analysis of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Gwan Yoon; Kim, Yeon Soo; Jeong, Yong Jin; Park, Jong Man; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2018-04-01

    A prediction code for the thermo-mechanical performance of research reactor fuel (PRIME) has been developed with the implementation of developed models to analyze the irradiation behavior of U-Mo dispersion fuel. The code is capable of predicting the two-dimensional thermal and mechanical performance of U-Mo dispersion fuel during irradiation. A finite element method was employed to solve the governing equations for thermal and mechanical equilibria. Temperature- and burnup-dependent material properties of the fuel meat constituents and cladding were used. The numerical solution schemes in PRIME were verified by benchmarking solutions obtained using a commercial finite element analysis program (ABAQUS). The code was validated using irradiation data from RERTR, HAMP-1, and E-FUTURE tests. The measured irradiation data used in the validation were IL thickness, volume fractions of fuel meat constituents for the thermal analysis, and profiles of the plate thickness changes and fuel meat swelling for the mechanical analysis. The prediction results were in good agreement with the measurement data for both thermal and mechanical analyses, confirming the validity of the code.

  11. Fuel load modeling from mensuration attributes in temperate forests in northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricela Morales-Soto; Marín Pompa-Garcia

    2013-01-01

    The study of fuels is an important factor in defining the vulnerability of ecosystems to forest fires. The aim of this study was to model a dead fuel load based on forest mensuration attributes from forest management inventories. A scatter plot analysis was performed and, from explanatory trends between the variables considered, correlation analysis was carried out...

  12. Model and algorithm for bi-fuel vehicle routing problem to reduce GHG emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Behroz; MirHassani, Seyed Ali; Hooshmand, Farnaz

    2017-09-01

    Because of the harmful effects of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted by petroleum-based fuels, the adoption of alternative green fuels such as biodiesel and compressed natural gas (CNG) is an inevitable trend in the transportation sector. However, the transition to alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) fleets is not easy and, particularly at the beginning of the transition period, drivers may be forced to travel long distances to reach alternative fueling stations (AFSs). In this paper, the utilization of bi-fuel vehicles is proposed as an operational approach. We present a mathematical model to address vehicle routing problem (VRP) with bi-fuel vehicles and show that the utilization of bi-fuel vehicles can lead to a significant reduction in GHG emissions. Moreover, a simulated annealing algorithm is adopted to solve large instances of this problem. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated on some random instances.

  13. Modelling spent fuel and HLW behaviour in repository conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esparza, A. M.; Esteban, J. A.

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this report is to give the reader an overall insight of the different models, which are used to predict the long-term behaviour of the spent fuels and HLW disposed in a repository. The models must be established on basic data and robust kinetics describing the mechanisms controlling spent fuel alteration/dissolution in a repository. The UO2 matrix, or source term, contains embedded in it the , majority of radionuclides of the spent fuel (some are in the gap cladding). For this reason the SF radionuclides release models play a significant role in the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The differences existing between models published in the literature are due to the conceptual understanding of the processes and the degree of the conservatism used with the parameter values, and the boundary conditions. They mainly differ in their level of simplification and their final objective. Sometimes are focused the show compliance with regulatory requirements, other to support decision making, to increase the level of confidence of public and scientific community, could be empirical, semi-empirical or analytical. The models take into account the experimental results from radionuclides releases and their extrapolation to the very long term. Its necessary a great statistics for have a representative dissolution rate, due at the number of experimental results is not very high and many of them show a great scatter, independently of theirs different compositions by axial and radial variations, due to linear power or local burnup. On the other hand, it is difficult to predict the spent fuel behaviour over the long term, based in short term experiments. In this report is given a little description of the radionuclides distribution in the spent fuel and also in the cladding/pellet gap, grain boundary, cracks and rim zones (the matrix rim zone can be considered with an especial characteristics very different to the rest of the spent fuel), and structural

  14. Recent Advances in Enzymatic Fuel Cells: Experiments and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic fuel cells convert the chemical energy of biofuels into electrical energy. Unlike traditional fuel cell types, which are mainly based on metal catalysts, the enzymatic fuel cells employ enzymes as catalysts. This fuel cell type can be used as an implantable power source for a variety of medical devices used in modern medicine to administer drugs, treat ailments and monitor bodily functions. Some advantages in comparison to conventional fuel cells include a simple fuel cell design and lower cost of the main fuel cell components, however they suffer from severe kinetic limitations mainly due to inefficiency in electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. In this review article, the major research activities concerned with the enzymatic fuel cells (anode and cathode development, system design, modeling by highlighting the current problems (low cell voltage, low current density, stability will be presented.

  15. Fuel cycle optimization using the nonlinear reactivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yueksel, Z.; Cecen, Y.; Tombakoglu, M.

    2002-01-01

    Fuel cycle optimization is one of the key subjects of reactor operation. In this study, fuel cycles of Spectral Shift PWR and Pebble Bed HTGR are optimized by using nonlinear reactivity model. The Spectral Shift concept is based on the adjustments of fuel to moderator ratio as a function of burnup. For n-batch fuel cycle, where n is equal to 3 and 4, the fuel to moderator ratio is determined as a function of burnup to maximize discharge burnup, Bd. Results show that it is possible to increase discharge burnup up to 25 percent compared to typical commercial PWR designs. Another problem arises in the design of PB-HTGR's fuel pebbles and mixing ratio. The optimization of the composition of fuel pebbles and mixing ratio for direct and n-pass fuel cycles are analyzed to maximize discharge burnup. We compared our results with the current design parameters of HTR-10 and PBMR.(author)

  16. Modeling of Diffusive Convective and Electromechanical Processes in PEM fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Mads

    of their impact on the operational performance of the fuel cell. In the modelling work presented, the commercial CFD package CFX4.4 is used as the foundation to generate a model of a PEM fuel cell. The CFX4.4 platform provides the framework of solving the three-dimensional transport equations for mass, momentum......In the report, the transport phenomena in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell fueled by hydrogen and air, is analyzed, and a comprehensive three dimensional computerized model of the cell is presented. The model accounts for most of the major transport processes and allow the prediction...... of the gaseous phase in the fuel cell and allows prediction of the concentration of the species present. A special feature of the approach developed is a method that allows detailed modelling and prediction of electrode kinetics. The transport of electrons in the gas diffusion layer and catalyst layer, as well...

  17. Modeling Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    The objective of this doctoral thesis was to develop reliable steady-state and transient component models suitable to asses-, develop- and optimize proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Several components in PEM fuel cell systems were characterized and modeled. The developed component......- and system models match experimental data from the literature. However, limited data were available for verification so further work is necessary to confirm detailed aspects of the models. It is nonetheless expected that the developed models will be useful for system modeling and optimization of PEM fuel...... cell systems. Consequences of indirectly fueling PEM stacks with hydrocarbons using reforming technology were investigated using a PEM stack model including CO poisoning kinetics and a transient Simulink steam reforming system model. Aspects regarding the optimization of PEM fuel cell systems...

  18. Effect of Biodiesel Fuel Injection Timing and Venture for Gaseous Fuel Induction on the Performance, Emissions and Combustion Characteristics of Dual Fuel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjun Bhovi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Advancing or retarding pilot fuel injection timing in a diesel engine provided with either conventional mechanical fuel injection (CMFIS or high pressure injection as in common rail fuel injection (CRDI systems can significantly affect its performance and tail pipe emissions. Performance of diesel engine when fueled with various biofuels as well as gaseous fuels tends to vary with subsequent changes in pilot fuel injection timings. Biodiesel derived from rubber seed oil called Rubber Seed Oil Methyl Ester (RuOME and hydrogen (H2 and hydrogen enriched compressed natural gas called (HCNG both being renewable fuels when used in diesel engines modified to operate in dual fuel mode can provide complete replacement for fossil diesel. In the present study, effect of injection timings and venture design for gas mixing on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of dual fuel engine fitted with both CMFIS and CRDI injection systems and operated on RuOME and HCNG/hydrogen has been investigated. Results showed that high pressure CRDI assisted injection of RuOME with optimized mixing chamber (carburetor for hydrogen induction in dual fuel engine performed improved compared to that with CMFIS. In addition, for the same fuel combinations, CRDI resulted in lower biodiesel consumption, lower carbon monoxide (BSCO and hydrocarbon (BSHC emissions and increased NOx emissions than CMFIS operation.

  19. Effects of homogeneous geometry models in simulating the fuel balls in HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mengjen; Liang Jenqhorng; Peir Jinnjer; Chao Dersheng

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the core geometry of HTR-10 was simulated using four different models including: (1) model 1 - an explicit double heterogeneous geometry, (2) model 2 - a mixing of UO 2 kernel and four layers in each TRISO particle into one, (3) model 3 - a mixing of 8,335 TRISO particles and the inner graphite matrix in each fuel ball into one, and (4) model 4 - a mixing of the outer graphite shell, 8,335 TRISO particles, and the inner graphite matrix in each fuel ball into one. The associated initial core computations were performed using the MCNP version 1.51 computer code. The experimental fuel loading height of 123 cm was employed for each model. The results revealed that the multiplication factors ranged from largest to smallest with model 1, model 2, model 3, and model 4. The neutron spectrum in the fuel region of each models varied from the hardest to the softest are model 1, model 2, model 3, and model 4 while the averaged neutron spectrum in fuel ball from hardest to softest are model 4, model 3, model 2, and model 1. In addition, the CPU execution times extended from longest to shortest with model 1, model 2, model 3, and model 4. (author)

  20. Irradiation performance of thorium oxide based coated particle fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiratori, Tetsuo; Itoh, Akinori; Akabori, Mitsuo; Shiba, Koreyuki; Adachi, Mamoru

    1988-11-01

    BISO coated ThO 2 particles as fertile fuel and BISO or TRISO coated (Th, U)O 2 particles as fissile fuel for a High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) were irradiated to investigate particle performances in loosely-packed condition of two capsules in JRR-2 and one capsule in JMTR. Irradiation of these coated particles was achieved to a maximum fast neutron fluence of 2.22 x 10 21 neutrons/cm 2 (E > 0.18 MeV) and a maximum thermal neutron fluence of 1.35 x 10 21 neutrons/cm 2 at temperatures of 770 to 1225 deg C. And a maximum burnup of fissile particles was 2.42 % FIMA. It was found in the post-irradiation examinations that the coated particles were intact except a little of the BISO coated fissile particles, and the thorium oxide based coated particles performed well under the irradiation conditions. The data were also taken on the fission product behavior released from the fuel kernels during the irradiation. And density of the outer LTIPyC (OPyC) increased as increasing the fluence of fast neutron. As a result of the densification of the OPyC, the crushing strength of the BISO coated particles increased, otherwise the TRISO coated particles decreased. (author)

  1. Performance of a Yeast-mediated Biological Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip To

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae present in common Baker’s yeast was used in a microbial fuel cell in which glucose was the carbon source. Methylene blue was used as the electronophore in the anode compartment, while potassium ferricyanide and methylene blue were tested as electron acceptors in the cathode compartment. Microbes in a mediator-free environment were used as the control. The experiment was performed in both open and closed circuit configurations under different loads ranging from 100 kΩ to 400Ω. The eukaryotic S. cerevisiae-based fuel cell showed improved performance when methylene blue and ferricyanide were used as electron mediators, rendering a maximum power generation of 146.71±7.7 mW/m3. The fuel cell generated a maximum open circuit voltage of 383.6±1.5 mV and recorded a maximum efficiency of 28±1.8 % under 100 kΩ of external load.

  2. Key differences in the fabrication of US and German TRISO-coated particle fuel, and their implications on fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, D.A.; Buongiorno, J.; Maki, J.T.; Miller, G.K.; Hobbins, R.R.

    2002-01-01

    Historically, the irradiation performance of TRISO-coated gas reactor particle fuel in Germany has been superior to that in the US. German fuel generally displayed in-pile gas release values that were three orders of magnitude lower than US fuel. Thus, we have critically examined the TRISO-coated fuel fabrication processes in the US and German and the associated irradiation database with a goal of understanding why the German fuel behaves acceptably, why the US fuel has not faired as well, and what process/production parameters impart the reliable performance to this fuel form. The postirradiation examination results are also reviewed to identify failure mechanisms that may be the cause of the poorer US irradiation performance. This comparison will help determine the roles that particle fuel process/product attributes and irradiation conditions (burnup, fast neutron fluence, temperature, degree of acceleration, power per particle) have on the behavior of the fuel during irradiation and provide a more quantitative linkage between acceptable processing parameters, as-fabricated fuel properties and subsequent in-reactor performance. (author)

  3. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of FeCrAl cladding with updated properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-30

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, suitability for normal operation must also be demonstrated. This research is focused on modeling the integral thermo-mechanical performance of FeCrAl-cladded fuel during normal reactor operation. Preliminary analysis has been performed to assess FeCrAl alloys (namely Alkrothal 720 and APMT) as a suitable fuel cladding replacement for Zr-alloys, using the MOOSE-based, finite-element fuel performance code BISON and the best available thermal-mechanical and irradiation-induced constitutive properties. These simulations identify the effects of the mechanical-stress and irradiation response of FeCrAl, and provide a comparison with Zr-alloys. In comparing these clad materials, fuel rods have been simulated for normal reactor operation and simple steady-state operation. Normal reactor operating conditions target the cladding performance over the rod lifetime (~4 cycles) for the highest-power rod in the highest-power fuel assembly under reactor power maneuvering. The power histories and axial temperature profiles input into BISON were generated from a neutronics study on full-core reactivity equivalence for FeCrAl using the 3D full core simulator NESTLE. Evolution of the FeCrAl cladding behavior over time is evaluated by using steady-state operating conditions such as a simple axial power profile, a constant cladding surface temperature, and a constant fuel power history. The fuel rod designs and

  4. Microstructured Electrolyte Membranes to Improve Fuel Cell Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xue

    Fuel cells, with the advantages of high efficiency, low greenhouse gas emission, and long lifetime are a promising technology for both portable power and stationary power sources. The development of efficient electrolyte membranes with high ionic conductivity, good mechanical durability and dense structure at low cost remains a challenge to the commercialization of fuel cells. This thesis focuses on exploring novel composite polymer membranes and ceramic electrolytes with the microstructure engineered to improve performance in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), respectively. Polymer/particle composite membranes hold promise to meet the demands of DMFCs at lower cost. The structure of composite membranes was controlled by aligning proton conducting particles across the membrane thickness under an applied electric field. The field-induced structural changes caused the membranes to display an enhanced water uptake, proton conductivity, and methanol permeability in comparison to membranes prepared without an applied field. Although both methanol permeability and proton conductivity are enhanced by the applied field, the permeability increase is relatively lower than the proton conductivity improvement, which results in enhanced proton/methanol selectivity and improved DMFC performance. Apatite ceramics are a new class of fast ion conductors being studied as alternative SOFC electrolytes in the intermediate temperature range. An electrochemical/hydrothermal deposition method was developed to grow fully dense apatite membranes containing well-developed crystals with c-axis alignment to promote ion conductivity. Hydroxyapatite seed crystals were first deposited onto a metal substrate electrochemically. Subsequent ion substitution during the hydrothermal growth process promoted the formation of dense, fully crystalline films with microstructure optimal for ion transport. The deposition parameters were systematically investigated, such as

  5. Supply chain modeling of forest fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, Helene; Lundgren, Jan T.; Roennqvist, Mikael

    2001-04-01

    We study the problem of deciding when and where forest residues are to be converted into forest fuel, and how the residues are to be transported and stored in order to satisfy demand at heating plants. Decisions also include whether or not additional harvest areas and saw-mills are to be contracted. In addition, we consider the flow of products from saw-mills and import harbors, and address the question about which terminals to use. The planning horizon is one year and monthly time periods are considered. The supply chain problem is formulated as a large mixed integer linear programming model. In order to obtain solutions within reasonable time we have developed a heuristic solution approach. Computational results from a large Swedish supplying entrepreneur are reported

  6. Models for Microbial Fuel Cells: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chengshuo; Zhang, Daxing; Pedrycz, Witold; Zhu, Yingmin; Guo, Yongxian

    2018-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been widely viewed as one of the most promising alternative sources of renewable energy. A recognition of needs of efficient development methods based on multidisciplinary research becomes crucial for the optimization of MFCs. Modeling of MFCs is an effective way for not only gaining a thorough understanding of the effects of operation conditions on the performance of power generation but also becomes of essential interest to the successful implementation of MFCs. The MFC models encompass the underlying reaction process and limiting factors of the MFC. The models come in various forms, such as the mathematical equations or the equivalent circuits. Different modeling focuses and approaches of the MFC have emerged. In this study, we present a state of the art of MFCs modeling; the past modeling methods are reviewed as well. Models and modeling methods are elaborated on based on the classification provided by Mechanism-based models and Application-based models. Mechanisms, advantages, drawbacks, and application fields of different models are illustrated as well. We exhibit a complete and comprehensive exposition of the different models for MFCs and offer further guidance to promote the performance of MFCs.

  7. Fully-Coupled Metallic Fuel Performance Simulations using BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-27

    This document is a set of slides intended to accompany a talk at a meeting. The first topic taken up is zirconium redistribution. The rod edge Zr increase is evidently due to the Soret term and temperature gradient. Then metallic fission gas release modeling is considered. Based on a GRSIS/FEAST model, the approach of generating fission gas in the fuel matrix is described. A sensitivity study on parameters is presented, including sodium bond & diffusion coefficient sensitivity along with dt sensitivity. Finally, results of some coupled simulations are shown, with ideas about future work.

  8. Modelling of Water Cooled Fuel Including Design Basis and Severe Accidents. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-11-01

    The demands on nuclear fuel have recently been increasing, and include transient regimes, higher discharge burnup and longer fuel cycles. This has resulted in an increase of loads on fuel and core internals. In order to satisfy these demands while ensuring compliance with safety criteria, new national and international programmes have been launched and advanced modelling codes are being developed. The Fukushima Daiichi accident has particularly demonstrated the need for adequate analysis of all aspects of fuel performance to prevent a failure and also to predict fuel behaviour were an accident to occur.This publication presents the Proceedings of the Technical Meeting on Modelling of Water Cooled Fuel Including Design Basis and Severe Accidents, which was hosted by the Nuclear Power Institute of China (NPIC) in Chengdu, China, following the recommendation made in 2013 at the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology. This recommendation was in agreement with IAEA mid-term initiatives, linked to the post-Fukushima IAEA Nuclear Safety Action Plan, as well as the forthcoming Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Fuel Modelling in Accident Conditions. At the technical meeting in Chengdu, major areas and physical phenomena, as well as types of code and experiment to be studied and used in the CRP, were discussed. The technical meeting provided a forum for international experts to review the state of the art of code development for modelling fuel performance of nuclear fuel for water cooled reactors with regard to steady state and transient conditions, and for design basis and early phases of severe accidents, including experimental support for code validation. A round table discussion focused on the needs and perspectives on fuel modelling in accident conditions. This meeting was the ninth in a series of IAEA meetings, which reflects Member States’ continuing interest in nuclear fuel issues. The previous meetings were held in 1980 (jointly with

  9. Thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Akbari, F.; Thompson, D.M.; Thurgood, C.; Higgs, J.

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical treatment has been developed to predict the fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective nuclear fuel elements. The equilibrium stoichiometry deviation in the hyper-stoichiometric fuel has been derived from thermodynamic considerations using a self-consistent set of thermodynamic properties for the U-O system, which emphasizes replication of solubilities and three-phase invariant conditions displayed in the U-O binary phase diagram. The kinetics model accounts for multi-phase transport including interstitial oxygen diffusion in the solid and gas-phase transport of hydrogen and steam in the fuel cracks. The fuel oxidation model is further coupled to a heat conduction model to account for the feedback effect of a reduced thermal conductivity in the hyper-stoichiometric fuel. A numerical solution has been developed using a finite-element technique with the FEMLAB software package. The model has been compared to available data from several in-reactor X-2 loop experiments with defective fuel conducted at the Chalk River Laboratories. The model has also been benchmarked against an O/U profile measurement for a spent defective fuel element discharged from a commercial reactor

  10. Modeling of a HTPEM fuel cell using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Kristian Kjær; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Sahlin, Simon Lennart

    2015-01-01

    In this work an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model of the voltage of a fuel cell is developed. The inputs of this model are the fuel cell temperature, current density and the carbon monoxide concentration of the anode supply gas. First an identification experiment which spans the...... between performance and fast model evaluation. This model has a mean absolute error of 0.70%. It is concluded that the developed ANFIS model is suitable for optimization of fuel cell systems and as the steady state component in larger dynamic system models.......In this work an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model of the voltage of a fuel cell is developed. The inputs of this model are the fuel cell temperature, current density and the carbon monoxide concentration of the anode supply gas. First an identification experiment which spans...... the expected operating range of the fuel cell is performed in a test station. The data from this experiment is then used to train ANFIS models with 2, 3, 4 and 5 membership functions. The performance of these models is then compared and it is found that using 3 membership functions provides the best compromise...

  11. Thermal conductivity model of vibro-packed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon Soo, Kim

    2001-01-01

    In an effort to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium accumulated in the cold war era in the United States and the Russian Federation, one method currently under investigation is the conversion of the plutonium into mixed oxide (MOX) reactor fuel for LWRs and fast reactors in the Russian Federation. A fuel option already partly developed at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad is that of vibro-packed MOX. Fuel rod fabrication using powder vibro-packing is attractive because it includes neither a process too complex to operate in glove boxes (or remotely), nor a waste-producing step necessary for the conventional pellet rod fabrication. However, because of its loose bonding between fuel particles at the beginning of life, vibro-packed MOX fuel has a somewhat less effective thermal conductivity than fully sintered pellet fuel, and undergoes more restructuring. Helium would also likely be pressurized in vibro-packed MOX fuel rods for LWRs to enhance initial fuel thermal conductivity. The combination of these two factors complicates development of an accurate thermal conductivity model. But clearly in order to predict fuel thermomechanical responses during irradiation of vibro-packed MOX fuel, fuel thermal conductivity must be known. The Vibropac fuel of interest in this study refers the fuel that is compacted with irregular fragments of mixed oxide fuel. In this paper, the thermal-conductivity models in the literature that dealt with relatively similar situations to the present case are examined. Then, the best model is selected based on accuracy of prediction and applicability. Then, the selected model is expanded to fit the various situations of interest. (author)

  12. Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology is one of the most attractive candidates for transportation applications due to its inherently high efficiency and high power density. However, the fuel cell system efficiency can suffer because of the need for forced air supply and water-cooling systems. Hence the operating strategy of the fuel cell system can have a significant impact on the fuel cell system efficiency and thus vehicle fuel economy. The key issues are how the fuel cell b...

  13. Physics-based modeling of live wildland fuel ignition experiments in the Forced Ignition and Flame Spread Test apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Anand; B. Shotorban; S. Mahalingam; S. McAllister; D. R. Weise

    2017-01-01

    A computational study was performed to improve our understanding of the ignition of live fuel in the forced ignition and flame spread test apparatus, a setup where the impact of the heating mode is investigated by subjecting the fuel to forced convection and radiation. An improvement was first made in the physics-based model WFDS where the fuel is treated as fixed...

  14. Fuel Injection Pressure Effect on Performance of Direct Injection Diesel Engines Based on Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Rosli A. Bakar; Semin; Abdul R.  Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Fuel injection pressures in diesel engine plays an important role for engine performance obtaining treatment of combustion. The present diesel engines such as fuel direct injection, the pressures can be increased about 100 200 Mpa bar in fuel pump injection system. The experimental investigated effects of fuel injection pressure on engine performance. Experiments have been performed on a diesel engine with four-cylinder, two-stroke, direct injection. Engine performance values such as indicat...

  15. Modelling of spray evaporation and penetration for alternative fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Azami, M. H.; Savill, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this work is on the modelling of evaporation and spray penetration for alternative fuels. The extension model approach is presented and validated for alternative fuels, namely, Kerosene (KE), Ethanol (ETH), Methanol (MTH), Microalgae biofuel (MA), Jatropha biofuel (JA), and Camelina biofuel (CA). The results for atomization and spray penetration are shown in a time variant condition. Comparisons have been made to visualize the transient behaviour of these fuels. The vapour pressu...

  16. Computational Analysis of Dynamic SPK(S8)-JP8 Fueled Combustor-Sector Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, R.; Hendricks, Roberts C.; Huber, M. L.; Shouse, D. T.

    2010-01-01

    Civil and military flight tests using blends of synthetic and biomass fueling with jet fuel up to 50:50 are currently considered as "drop-in" fuels. They are fully compatible with aircraft performance, emissions and fueling systems, yet the design and operations of such fueling systems and combustors must be capable of running fuels from a range of feedstock sources. This paper provides Smart Combustor or Fuel Flexible Combustor designers with computational tools, preliminary performance, emissions and particulates combustor sector data. The baseline fuel is kerosene-JP-8+100 (military) or Jet A (civil). Results for synthetic paraffinic kerosene (SPK) fuel blends show little change with respect to baseline performance, yet do show lower emissions. The evolution of a validated combustor design procedure is fundamental to the development of dynamic fueling of combustor systems for gas turbine engines that comply with multiple feedstock sources satisfying both new and legacy systems.

  17. SIEX3: A correlated computer code for prediction of fast reactor mixed oxide fuel and blanket pin performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.B.; Wilson, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    The SIEX3 computer program was developed to calculate the fuel and cladding performance of oxide fuel and oxide blanket pins irradiated in the fast neutron environment of a liquid metal cooled reactor. The code is uniquely designed to be accurate yet quick running and use a minimum of computer core storage. This was accomplished through the correlation of physically based models to very large data bases of irradiation test results. Data from over 200 fuel pins and over 800 transverse fuel microscopy samples were used in the calibrations

  18. 76 FR 3587 - Standards of Performance for Fossil-Fuel-Fired, Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... Standards of Performance for Fossil-Fuel-Fired, Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial-Institutional, and... Fossil fuel-fired electric utility steam generating units. Federal Government 22112 Fossil fuel-fired... 22112 Fossil fuel-fired electric utility steam generating units owned by municipalities. 921150 Fossil...

  19. An Equivalent Electrical Circuit Model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Mathematical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh An Nguyen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC models proposed in the literature consist of mathematical equations. However, they are not adequately practical for simulating power systems. The proposed model takes into account phenomena such as activation polarization, ohmic polarization, double layer capacitance and mass transport effects present in a PEM fuel cell. Using electrical analogies and a mathematical modeling of PEMFC, the circuit model is established. To evaluate the effectiveness of the circuit model, its static and dynamic performances under load step changes are simulated and compared to the numerical results obtained by solving the mathematical model. Finally, the applicability of our model is demonstrated by simulating a practical system.

  20. Combustion Characterization and Model Fuel Development for Micro-tubular Flame-assisted Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milcarek, Ryan J; Garrett, Michael J; Baskaran, Amrish; Ahn, Jeongmin

    2016-10-02

    Combustion based power generation has been accomplished for many years through a number of heat engine systems. Recently, a move towards small scale power generation and micro combustion as well as development in fuel cell research has created new means of power generation that combine solid oxide fuel cells with open flames and combustion exhaust. Instead of relying upon the heat of combustion, these solid oxide fuel cell systems rely on reforming of the fuel via combustion to generate syngas for electrochemical power generation. Procedures were developed to assess the combustion by-products under a wide range of conditions. While theoretical and computational procedures have been developed for assessing fuel-rich combustion exhaust in these applications, experimental techniques have also emerged. The experimental procedures often rely upon a gas chromatograph or mass spectrometer analysis of the flame and exhaust to assess the combustion process as a fuel reformer and means of heat generation. The experimental techniques developed in these areas have been applied anew for the development of the micro-tubular flame-assisted fuel cell. The protocol discussed in this work builds on past techniques to specify a procedure for characterizing fuel-rich combustion exhaust and developing a model fuel-rich combustion exhaust for use in flame-assisted fuel cell testing. The development of the procedure and its applications and limitations are discussed.

  1. Fuel Aging in Storage and Transportation (FAST): Accelerated Characterization and Performance Assessment of the Used Nuclear Fuel Storage System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2016-08-02

    This Integrated Research Project (IRP) was established to characterize key limiting phenomena related to the performance of used nuclear fuel (UNF) storage systems. This was an applied engineering project with a specific application in view (i.e., UNF dry storage). The completed tasks made use of a mixture of basic science and engineering methods. The overall objective was to create, or enable the creation of, predictive tools in the form of observation methods, phenomenological models, and databases that will enable the design, installation, and licensing of dry UNF storage systems that will be capable of containing UNF for extended period of time.

  2. Fuel Aging in Storage and Transportation (FAST): Accelerated Characterization and Performance Assessment of the Used Nuclear Fuel Storage System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, Sean; M Univ., College Station, TX

    2016-01-01

    This Integrated Research Project (IRP) was established to characterize key limiting phenomena related to the performance of used nuclear fuel (UNF) storage systems. This was an applied engineering project with a specific application in view (i.e., UNF dry storage). The completed tasks made use of a mixture of basic science and engineering methods. The overall objective was to create, or enable the creation of, predictive tools in the form of observation methods, phenomenological models, and databases that will enable the design, installation, and licensing of dry UNF storage systems that will be capable of containing UNF for extended period of time.

  3. Static and dynamic modeling of a diesel fuel processing unit for polymer electrolyte fuel cell supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrenko, D.; Pera, M.C.; Hissel, D. [FCLAB, Femto-ST, UMR 6174, University of Franche-Comte, Techn' hom, Rue Thierry Mieg, 90010 Belfort (France); Coulie, J.; Lecoq, S. [N-GHY, Site Industriel Saint Antoine - ZI Montplaisir, 51 rue Isaac Newton, 81000 Albi (France)

    2009-02-15

    This article introduces the energetic macroscopic representation (EMR) as approach for the dynamic modeling of a diesel fuel processing unit. The EMR is the first step toward model-based control structure development. The autothermal fuel processing system containing: heat exchanger, reformer, desulfurization, water gas shift, preferential oxidation and condensation is divided into a multitude simple subblocks. Each subblock describes an elementary step of the fuel conversion, several of these blocks may occur in a single module. Calculations are carried out using two basic principles: mass and energy balances. For model-based control development, it is imperative that the model represents dynamic behavior, therefore temperature and pressure dynamics are taken into account in the model. It is shown that the model is capable to predict the stationary behavior of the entire fuel processing unit correctly by comparison with given data. Predictions regarding reformer heat up, temperature and pressure dynamics are also provided. (author)

  4. Irradiation performance of HTGR fuel in HFIR experiment HRB-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.

    1982-03-01

    Irradiation capsule HRB-13 tested High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) fuel under accelerated conditions in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL. The ORNL part of the capsule was designed to provide definitive results on how variously misshapen kernels affect the irradiation performance of weak-acid-resin (WAR)-derived fissile fuel particles. Two batches of WAR fissile fuel particles were Triso-coated and shape-separated into four different fractions according to their deviation from spericity, which ranged from 9.6 to 29.7%. The fissile particles were irradiated for 7721 h. Heavy-metal burnups ranged from 80 to 82.5% FIMA (fraction of initial heavy-metal atoms). Fast neutron fluences (>0.18 MeV) ranged from 4.9 x 10 25 neutrons/m 2 to 8.5 x 10 25 neutrons/m 2 . Postirradiation examination showed that the two batches of fissile particles contained chlorine, presumably introduced during deposition of the SiC coating

  5. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fengge; Miraoui, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    The fuel cell is a potential candidate for energy storage and conversion in our future energy mix. It is able to directly convert the chemical energy stored in fuel (e.g. hydrogen) into electricity, without undergoing different intermediary conversion steps. In the field of mobile and stationary applications, it is considered to be one of the future energy solutions.Among the different fuel cell types, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has shown great potential in mobile applications, due to its low operating temperature, solid-state electrolyte and compactness.This book pre

  6. Performance Impact Associated with Ni-Based SOFCs Fueled with Higher Hydrocarbon-Doped Coal Syngas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk; Chen, Yun; Song, Xueyan; Zondlo, John

    2015-03-01

    Energy generation strategies demonstrating high efficiency and fuel flexibility are desirable in the contemporary energy market. When integrated with a gasification process, a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) can produce electricity at efficiencies exceeding 50 pct by consuming fuels such as coal, biomass, municipal solid waste, or other opportunity wastes. The synthesis gas derived from such fuel may contain trace species (including arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury, phosphorus, sulfur, and tars) and low concentration organic species that adversely affect the SOFC performance. This work demonstrates the impact of exposure of the hydrocarbons ethylene, benzene, and naphthalene at various concentrations. The cell performance degradation rate is determined for tests exceeding 500 hours at 1073 K (800 °C). Cell performance is evaluated during operation with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and exposed samples are post-operationally analyzed by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The short-term performance is modeled to predict performances to the desired 40,000-hours operational lifetime for SOFCs. Possible hydrocarbon interactions with the nickel anode are postulated, and acceptable hydrocarbon exposure limits are discussed.

  7. Software Requirements Specification Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. E. Shropshire; W. H. West

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this Software Requirements Specification (SRS) is to define the top-level requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). This simulation model is intended to serve a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies

  8. Modeling chemistry in PWR fuel crud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PWR fuel crud arises from deposition of corrosion products in the coolant on clad surfaces in the core. These deposits form a porous layer through which water must pass to provide effective heat transfer from the clad surface. The usual heat transfer mechanism is by wick boiling in which water passing through the porous crud is converted to steam that escapes through steam chimneys in the deposit. This conversion of water into steam within the deposit means that dilute solutions in the bulk coolant become concentrated in the crud and this can lead to precipitation of species such as lithium borates, ZnO and Zn-silicates. Such precipitation processes may lead to problems such as crud induced power shifts (CIPS), formally known as axial off-set anomaly (AOA), or crud induced localised corrosion (CILC) of the clad, that has led to cladding failures. These precipitation processes also hinder heat transfer and can lead to hot spots on the clad surfaces that are potentially damaging. Questions such as what should be the plant limits on Zn, Si, B and Li to prevent such problems, and how should these be controlled during the cycle, are not easy to answer. With several new designs of PWR proposing high power density cores and therefore greater subcooled nucleate boiling, and with existing plants still up-rating their cores, these questions are likely to become more important in the future. It is therefore important to understand the relationship between coolant chemistry (Zn, Si, Li, B levels) and the chemistry within fuel crud. The bulk and crud chemistry are coupled along with the bulk and local heat transfer processes. This coupling of chemistry and heat transfer makes this a particularly difficult problem to investigate theoretically although the authors have previously achieved this using a number of one dimensional heat and mass transfer models. This paper discusses a new approach to this problem using finite element methods to solve the relevant coupled chemistry and

  9. Modeling of large-scale oxy-fuel combustion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2012-01-01

    Quite some studies have been conducted in order to implement oxy-fuel combustion with flue gas recycle in conventional utility boilers as an effective effort of carbon capture and storage. However, combustion under oxy-fuel conditions is significantly different from conventional air-fuel firing......, among which radiative heat transfer under oxy-fuel conditions is one of the fundamental issues. This paper demonstrates the nongray-gas effects in modeling of large-scale oxy-fuel combustion processes. Oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas in a 609MW utility boiler is numerically studied, in which...... calculation of the oxy-fuel WSGGM remarkably over-predicts the radiative heat transfer to the furnace walls and under-predicts the gas temperature at the furnace exit plane, which also result in a higher incomplete combustion in the gray calculation. Moreover, the gray and non-gray calculations of the same...

  10. Validation of the BISON 3D Fuel Performance Code: Temperature Comparisons for Concentrically and Eccentrically Located Fuel Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Hales; D. M. Perez; R. L. Williamson; S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer

    2013-03-01

    BISON is a modern finite-element based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (USA) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behaviour and is used to analyse either 2D axisymmetric or 3D geometries. BISON has been applied to a variety of fuel forms including LWR fuel rods, TRISO-coated fuel particles, and metallic fuel in both rod and plate geometries. Code validation is currently in progress, principally by comparison to instrumented LWR fuel rods. Halden IFA experiments constitute a large percentage of the current BISON validation base. The validation emphasis here is centreline temperatures at the beginning of fuel life, with comparisons made to seven rods from the IFA-431 and 432 assemblies. The principal focus is IFA-431 Rod 4, which included concentric and eccentrically located fuel pellets. This experiment provides an opportunity to explore 3D thermomechanical behaviour and assess the 3D simulation capabilities of BISON. Analysis results agree with experimental results showing lower fuel centreline temperatures for eccentric fuel with the peak temperature shifted from the centreline. The comparison confirms with modern 3D analysis tools that the measured temperature difference between concentric and eccentric pellets is not an artefact and provides a quantitative explanation for the difference.

  11. Atomic scale modelling of materials of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolus, M.

    2011-10-01

    This document written to obtain the French accreditation to supervise research presents the research I conducted at CEA Cadarache since 1999 on the atomic scale modelling of non-metallic materials involved in the nuclear fuel cycle: host materials for radionuclides from nuclear waste (apatites), fuel (in particular uranium dioxide) and ceramic cladding materials (silicon carbide). These are complex materials at the frontier of modelling capabilities since they contain heavy elements (rare earths or actinides), exhibit complex structures or chemical compositions and/or are subjected to irradiation effects: creation of point defects and fission products, amorphization. The objective of my studies is to bring further insight into the physics and chemistry of the elementary processes involved using atomic scale modelling and its coupling with higher scale models and experimental studies. This work is organised in two parts: on the one hand the development, adaptation and implementation of atomic scale modelling methods and validation of the approximations used; on the other hand the application of these methods to the investigation of nuclear materials under irradiation. This document contains a synthesis of the studies performed, orientations for future research, a detailed resume and a list of publications and communications. (author)

  12. Modeling of WWER-440 Fuel Pin Behavior at Extended Burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Koliel, M.S.; Abou-Zaid, A.A.; El-Kafas, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Currently, there is an ongoing effort to increase fuel discharge burn-up of all LWRs fuel including WWER's as much as possible in order to decrease power production cost. Therefore, burn-up is expected to be increased to 60 to 70 Mwd/kg U. The change in the fuel radial power distribution as a function of fuel burn up can affect the radial fuel temperature distribution as well as the fuel microstructure in the fuel pellet rim. In this paper, the radial burn-up and fissile products distributions of WWER-440 UO 2 fuel pin were evaluated using MCNP 4B and ORIGEN2 codes. The impact of the thermal conductivity on predicted fission gas release calculations is needed. For the analysis, a typical WWER-440 fuel pin and surrounding water moderator are considered in a hexagonal pin cell well. The thermal release and the athermal release from the pellet rim were modeled separately. The fraction of the rim structure and the excessive porosity in the rim structure in isothermal irradiation as a function of the fuel burn-up was predicted. a computer program; RIMSC-01, is developed to perform the required FGR calculations. Finally, the relevant phenomena and the corresponding models together with their validation are presented

  13. Experience in the manufacture and performance of CANDU fuel for KANUPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salim, M.; Ahmed, I.; Butt, P.

    1995-01-01

    Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP) a 137 MWe CANDU unit is In operation since 1971. Initially, it was fueled with Canadian fuel bundles. In July 1980 Pakistani manufactured fuel was introduced in the reactor core, irradiated to a burnup of about 7500 MWd-teU -1 and successfully discharged in May 1984. The core was progressively fuelled with Pakistani fuel and in August 1990 the reactor core contained all Pakistani made fuel. As of the present, 3 core equivalent Pakistani fuel bundles have been successfully discharged at an average bumup of 6500 MWd-teU -1 . with a maximum burnup of ∼ 10,200 MWd-teU -1 . No fuel failure of Pakistani bundles has been observed so far. This paper presents the indigenous efforts towards manufacture and operational aspects of KANUPP fuel and compares its behaviour with that of Canadian supplied fuel. The Pakistani fuel has performed well and is as good as the Canadian fuel. (author)

  14. Energy harvesting influences electrochemical performance of microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Wang, Xin; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2017-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can be effective power sources for remote sensing, wastewater treatment and environmental remediation, but their performance needs significant improvement. This study systematically analyzes how active harvesting using electrical circuits increased MFC system outputs as compared to passive resistors not only in the traditional maximal power point (MPP) but also in other desired operating points such as the maximum current point (MCP) and the maximum voltage point (MVP). Results show that active harvesting in MPP increased power output by 81-375% and active harvesting in MCP increased Coulombic efficiency by 207-805% compared with resisters operated at the same points. The cyclic voltammograms revealed redox potential shifts and supported the performance data. The findings demonstrate that active harvesting is a very effective approach to improve MFC performance across different operating points.

  15. A multiphase interfacial model for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerden, James L.; Frey, Kurt; Ebert, William

    2015-07-01

    The Fuel Matrix Dissolution Model (FMDM) is an electrochemical reaction/diffusion model for the dissolution of spent uranium oxide fuel. The model was developed to provide radionuclide source terms for use in performance assessment calculations for various types of geologic repositories. It is based on mixed potential theory and consists of a two-phase fuel surface made up of UO2 and a noble metal bearing fission product phase in contact with groundwater. The corrosion potential at the surface of the dissolving fuel is calculated by balancing cathodic and anodic reactions occurring at the solution interfaces with UO2 and NMP surfaces. Dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide generated by radiolysis of the groundwater are the major oxidizing agents that promote fuel dissolution. Several reactions occurring on noble metal alloy surfaces are electrically coupled to the UO2 and can catalyze or inhibit oxidative dissolution of the fuel. The most important of these is the oxidation of hydrogen, which counteracts the effects of oxidants (primarily H2O2 and O2). Inclusion of this reaction greatly decreases the oxidation of U(IV) and slows fuel dissolution significantly. In addition to radiolytic hydrogen, large quantities of hydrogen can be produced by the anoxic corrosion of steel structures within and near the fuel waste package. The model accurately predicts key experimental trends seen in literature data, the most important being the dramatic depression of the fuel dissolution rate by the presence of dissolved hydrogen at even relatively low concentrations (e.g., less than 1 mM). This hydrogen effect counteracts oxidation reactions and can limit fuel degradation to chemical dissolution, which results in radionuclide source term values that are four or five orders of magnitude lower than when oxidative dissolution processes are operative. This paper presents the scientific basis of the model, the approach for modeling used fuel in a disposal system, and preliminary

  16. State-of-the-Art Report on Multi-scale Modelling of Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, T.J.; Dingreville, R.; Littlewood, D.; Tikare, V.; Bertolus, M.; Blanc, V.; Bouineau, V.; Carlot, G.; Desgranges, C.; Dorado, B.; Dumas, J.C.; Freyss, M.; Garcia, P.; Gatt, J.M.; Gueneau, C.; Julien, J.; Maillard, S.; Martin, G.; Masson, R.; Michel, B.; Piron, J.P.; Sabathier, C.; Skorek, R.; Toffolon, C.; Valot, C.; Van Brutzel, L.; Besmann, Theodore M.; Chernatynskiy, A.; Clarno, K.; Gorti, S.B.; Radhakrishnan, B.; Devanathan, R.; Dumont, M.; Maugis, P.; El-Azab, A.; Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.; Krack, M.; Yun, Y.; Kurata, M.; Kurosaki, K.; Largenton, R.; Lebensohn, R.A.; Malerba, L.; Oh, J.Y.; Phillpot, S.R.; Tulenko, J. S.; Rachid, J.; Stan, M.; Sundman, B.; Tonks, M.R.; Williamson, R.; Van Uffelen, P.; Welland, M.J.; Valot, Carole; Stan, Marius; Massara, Simone; Tarsi, Reka

    2015-10-01

    The Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has undertaken an ambitious programme to document state-of-the-art of modelling for nuclear fuels and structural materials. The project is being performed under the Working Party on Multi-Scale Modelling of Fuels and Structural Material for Nuclear Systems (WPMM), which has been established to assess the scientific and engineering aspects of fuels and structural materials, describing multi-scale models and simulations as validated predictive tools for the design of nuclear systems, fuel fabrication and performance. The WPMM's objective is to promote the exchange of information on models and simulations of nuclear materials, theoretical and computational methods, experimental validation and related topics. It also provides member countries with up-to-date information, shared data, models, and expertise. The goal is also to assess needs for improvement and address them by initiating joint efforts. The WPMM reviews and evaluates multi-scale modelling and simulation techniques currently employed in the selection of materials used in nuclear systems. It serves to provide advice to the nuclear community on the developments needed to meet the requirements of modelling for the design of different nuclear systems. The original WPMM mandate had three components (Figure 1), with the first component currently completed, delivering a report on the state-of-the-art of modelling of structural materials. The work on modelling was performed by three expert groups, one each on Multi-Scale Modelling Methods (M3), Multi-Scale Modelling of Fuels (M2F) and Structural Materials Modelling (SMM). WPMM is now composed of three expert groups and two task forces providing contributions on multi-scale methods, modelling of fuels and modelling of structural materials. This structure will be retained, with the addition of task forces as new topics are developed. The mandate of the Expert Group on Multi-Scale Modelling of

  17. Irradiation performance of full-length metallic IFR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Neimark, L.A.

    1992-07-01

    An assembly irradiation of 169 full-length U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel pins was successfully completed in FFTF to a goal burnup of 10 at.%. All test fuel pins maintained their cladding integrity during the irradiation. Postirradiation examination showed minimal fuel/cladding mechanical interaction and excellent stability of the fuel column. Fission-gas release was normal and consistent with the existing data base from irradiation testing of shorter metallic fuel pins in EBR-II

  18. Evaluation model for PWR irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, I.C.

    1983-01-01

    The individual economic value of the plutonium isotopes for the recycle of the PWR reactor is investigated, assuming the existence of an market for this element. Two distinct market situations for the stages of the fuel cycle are analysed: one for the 1972 costs and the other for costs of 1982. Comparisons are made for each of the two market situations concerning enrichment of the U-235 in the uranium fuel that gives the minimum cost in the fuel cycle. The method adopted to establish the individual value of the plutonium isotopes consists on the economical analyses of the plutonium fuel cycle for four different isotopes mixtures refering to the uranium fuel cycle. (Author) [pt

  19. Fuel fragmentation model advances using TEXAS-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M.L.; El-Beshbeeshy, M.; Nilsuwankowsit, S.; Tang, J. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

    1998-01-01

    Because an energetic fuel-coolant interaction may be a safety hazard, experiments are being conducted to investigate the fuel-coolant mixing/quenching process (FARO) as well as the energetics of vapor explosion propagation for high temperature fuel melt simulants (KROTOS, WFCI, ZrEX). In both types of experiments, the dynamic breakup of the fuel is one of the key aspects that must be fundamentally understood to better estimate the magnitude of the mixing/quenching process or the explosion energetics. To aid our understanding the TEXAS fuel-coolant interaction computer model has been developed and is being used to analyze these experiments. Recently, the models for dynamic fuel fragmentation during the mixing and explosion phases of the FCI have been improved by further insights into these processes. The purpose of this paper is to describe these enhancements and to demonstrate their improvements by analysis of particular JRC FCI data. (author)

  20. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Charles A. Baldwin; Philip L. Winston; Jason M. Harp; Scott A. Ploger; Tyler Gerczak; Isabella J. van Rooyen; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva

    2014-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.5% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel–including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures–was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocrabon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1×10 4 to 5×10 4 for 154Eu and 8×10 7 to 3×10 5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs release from compacts was <3×10 6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98×105 experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs release in two capsules to approximately 10 5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that released cesium during irradiation, where SiC corrosion was found adjacent to IPyC cracks. Palladium, silver, and uranium were found in the SiC layer of irradiated particles, and characterization

  1. Modeling of terminal-area airplane fuel consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Accurate modeling of airplane fuel consumption is necessary for air transportation policy-makers to properly : adjudicate trades between competing environmental and economic demands. Existing public models used for : computing terminal-area airplane ...

  2. Performance effects of coal-derived contaminants on the carbonate fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigeaud, A. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Wilemski, G. [Physical Sciences, Inc., Andover, MA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Coal-derived contaminant studies have been pursued at ERC since the early 1980`s when the pace of carbonate fuel cell development began to markedly increase. Initial work was concerned with performance effects on laboratory and bench-scale carbonate fuel cells primarily due to sulfur compounds. Results have now also been obtained with respect to nine additional coal-gas contaminants, including volatile trace metal species. Thermochemical calculations, out-of-cell experiments, and cell performance as well as endurance testshave recently been conducted which have involved the following species: NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S [COS], HCl, AsH{sub 3}[As{sub 2}(v)], Zn(v), Pb(v), Cd(v), H{sub 2} Se, Hg(v), Sn(v). Employing thermochemically calculated results, thermogravimetric (TGA) and pre-, and post-test analytical data as well as fuel cell performance observations, it has been shown that there are four main mechanisms of contaminant interaction with the carbonate fuel cell. These have been formulated into performance models for six significant contaminant species, thus providing long-term endurance estimations.

  3. Performance effects of coal-derived contaminants on the carbonate fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigeaud, A. (Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)); Wilemski, G. (Physical Sciences, Inc., Andover, MA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Coal-derived contaminant studies have been pursued at ERC since the early 1980's when the pace of carbonate fuel cell development began to markedly increase. Initial work was concerned with performance effects on laboratory and bench-scale carbonate fuel cells primarily due to sulfur compounds. Results have now also been obtained with respect to nine additional coal-gas contaminants, including volatile trace metal species. Thermochemical calculations, out-of-cell experiments, and cell performance as well as endurance testshave recently been conducted which have involved the following species: NH[sub 3], H[sub 2]S [COS], HCl, AsH[sub 3][As[sub 2](v)], Zn(v), Pb(v), Cd(v), H[sub 2] Se, Hg(v), Sn(v). Employing thermochemically calculated results, thermogravimetric (TGA) and pre-, and post-test analytical data as well as fuel cell performance observations, it has been shown that there are four main mechanisms of contaminant interaction with the carbonate fuel cell. These have been formulated into performance models for six significant contaminant species, thus providing long-term endurance estimations.

  4. Comparison of Core Performance with Various Oxide fuels on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jin Ha; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The system is called Prototype GenIV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR). Ultimate goal of PGSFR is test for capability of TRU transmutation. Purpose of this study is test for evaluation of in-core performance and TRU transmutation performance by applying various oxide fuel loaded TRU. Fuel type of reference core is changed to uranium-based oxide fuel. Oxide fuel has a lot of experience through fuel fabrication and reactor operation. This study performed by compared and analyzed a core performance of various oxide fuels. (U,Pu)O 2 and (U,TRU)O 2 which various oxide fuel types are selected as extreme case for comparison with core performance and transmutation capability of TRU isotopes. Thorium-based fuel is known that it has good performance for burner reactor due to low proliferation characteristic. To check the performance of TRU incineration for comparison with uranium-based fuel on prototype SFR, Thorium-based fuel, (Th,U)O 2 , (Th,Pu)O 2 and (Th,TRU)O 2 , is selected. Calculations of core performance for various oxide fuel are performed using the fast calculation tool, TRANSX / DANTSTS / REBUS-3. In this study, comparison of core performance and transmutation performance is conducted with various fuel types in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. Mixed oxide fuel with TRU can produce the energy with small amount of fissile material. However, the TRU fuel is confirmed to bring a potential decline of the safety parameters. In case of (Th,U)O2 fuel, the flux level in thermal neutron region becomes lower because of higher capture cross-section of Th-232 than U-238. However, Th-232 has difficulty in converting to TRU isotopes. Therefore, the TRU consumption mass is relatively high in mixed oxide fuel with thorium and TRU.

  5. Fossil Fuel Emission Verification Modeling at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Kosovic, B; Guilderson, T; Monache, L D; Bergmann, D

    2009-08-06

    We have an established project at LLNL to develop the tools needed to constrain fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions using measurements of the carbon-14 isotope in atmospheric samples. In Figure 1 we show the fossil fuel plumes from Los Angeles and San Francisco for two different weather patterns. Obviously, a measurement made at any given location is going to depend on the weather leading up to the measurement. Thus, in order to determine the GHG emissions from some region using in situ measurements of those GHGs, we use state-of-the-art global and regional atmospheric chemistry-transport codes to simulate the plumes: the LLNL-IMPACT model (Rotman et al., 2004) and the WRFCHEM community code (http://www.wrf-model.org/index.php). Both codes can use observed (aka assimilated) meteorology in order to recreate the actual transport that occurred. The measured concentration of each tracer at a particular spatio-temporal location is a linear combination of the plumes from each region at that location (for non-reactive species). The challenge is to calculate the emission strengths for each region that fit the observed concentrations. In general this is difficult because there are errors in the measurements and modeling of the plumes. We solve this inversion problem using the strategy illustrated in Figure 2. The Bayesian Inference step combines the a priori estimates of the emissions, and their uncertainty, for each region with the results of the observations, and their uncertainty, and an ensemble of model predicted plumes for each region, and their uncertainty. The result is the mathematical best estimate of the emissions and their errors. In the case of non-linearities, or if we are using a statistical sampling technique such as a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, then the process is iterated until it converges (ie reaches stationarity). For the Bayesian inference we can use both a direct inversion capability, which is fast but requires assumptions of linearity and

  6. Modeling and Analysis of FCM UN TRISO Fuel Using the PARFUME Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise Collin

    2013-09-01

    The PARFUME (PARticle Fuel ModEl) modeling code was used to assess the overall fuel performance of uranium nitride (UN) tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) ceramic fuel in the frame of the design and development of Fully Ceramic Matrix (FCM) fuel. A specific modeling of a TRISO particle with UN kernel was developed with PARFUME, and its behavior was assessed in irradiation conditions typical of a Light Water Reactor (LWR). The calculations were used to access the dimensional changes of the fuel particle layers and kernel, including the formation of an internal gap. The survivability of the UN TRISO particle was estimated depending on the strain behavior of the constituent materials at high fast fluence and burn-up. For nominal cases, internal gas pressure and representative thermal profiles across the kernel and layers were determined along with stress levels in the pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers. These parameters were then used to evaluate fuel particle failure probabilities. Results of the study show that the survivability of UN TRISO fuel under LWR irradiation conditions might only be guaranteed if the kernel and PyC swelling rates are limited at high fast fluence and burn-up. These material properties are unknown at the irradiation levels expected to be reached by UN TRISO fuel in LWRs. Therefore, more effort is needed to determine them and positively conclude on the applicability of FCM fuel to LWRs.

  7. Dynamic Modeling of a Reformed Methanol Fuel Cell System using Empirical Data and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Kristian Kjær; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    an empirical approach. Fin efficiency models for the cooling effect of the air are also developed using empirical methods. A fuel cell model is also implemented based on a standard model which is adapted to fit the measured performance of the H3-350 module. All the individual parts of the model are verified...

  8. Performance of fuel cell for energy supply of passive house

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, G.; Felseghi, R. A.; Rǎboacǎ, S. M.; Aşchilean, I.; Mureşan, D.; Naghiu, G.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen technology and passive house represent two concepts with a remarkable role for the efficiency and decarbonisation of energy systems in the residential buildings area. Through design and functionality, the passive house can make maximum use of all available energy resources. One of the solutions to supply energy of these types of buildings is the fuel cell, using this technology integrated into a system for generating electricity from renewable primary sources, which take the function of backup power (energy reserve) to cover peak load and meteorological intermittents. In this paper is presented the results of the case study that provide an analysis of the energy, environmental and financial performances regarding energy supply of passive house by power generation systems with fuel cell fed with electrolytic hydrogen produced by harnessing renewable energy sources available. Hybrid systems have been configured and operate in various conditions of use for five differentiated locations according to the main areas of solar irradiation from the Romanian map. Global performance of hybrid systems is directly influenced by the availability of renewable primary energy sources - particular geo-climatic characteristics of the building emplacement.

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell performance under severe operating conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Søren; Hendriksen, P.V.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2006-01-01

    The performance and degradation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) were studied under severe operating conditions. The cells studied were manufactured in a small series by ECN, in the framework of the EU funded CORE-SOFC project. The cells were of the anode-supported type with a double layer LSM...... cathode. They were operated at 750 °C or 850 °C in hydrogen with 5% or 50% water at current densities ranging from 0.25 A cm–2 to 1 A cm–2 for periods of 300 hours or more. The area specific cell resistance, corrected for fuel utilisation, ranged between 0.20 Ω cm2 and 0.34 Ω cm2 at 850 °C and 520 m......V, and between 0.51 Ω cm2 and 0.92 Ω cm2 at 750 °C and 520 mV. The degradation of cell performance was found to be low (ranging from 0 to 8%/1,000 hours) at regular operating conditions. Voltage degradation rates of 20 to 40%/1,000 hours were observed under severe operating conditions, depending on the test...

  10. Dynamic Thermal Model And Control Of A Pem Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2013-01-01

    A lumped parameter dynamic model is developed for predicting the stack performance, temperatures of the exit reactant gases and coolant liquid outlet in a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system. The air compressor, humidifier and cooling heat exchanger models are integrated to study...... the performance of the thermal system, especially when investigating applications that have highly dynamic operating conditions....

  11. Irradiation performance updates on Korean advanced fuels for PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Y.K.; Jeon, K.L.; Kim, Y.H.; Yoo, J.S.; Kim, J.I.; Shin, J.C.; Chung, J.G.; Park, J.R.; Chung, S.K.; Kim, T.W.; Yoon, Y.B.; Park, K.M.; Yoo, M.J.; Kim, M.S.; Lee, T.H.

    2010-01-01

    The developments of advanced nuclear fuels for PWRs were started in 1999 and in 2001, respectively: PLUS7 TM for eight operating optimized power reactors of 1000 MWe class (OPR1000) and four advanced power reactors of 1400 MWe class (APR1400) under construction, and 16ACE7 TM and 17ACE7 TM for an operating 16x16 Westinghouse type plant and six operating 17x17 Westinghouse type plants. The design targets were as follows: batch average burnup up to 55 GWD/MTU, over 10% thermal margin increase, improvement of the mechanical integrity of higher seismic capability, higher debris or grid fretting wear performance, higher control rod insertion capability, increase of neutron economy, improvement of manufacturability, solving incomplete rod insertion (IRI) issue and top nozzle screw failure issue, etc. in comparison of the existing nuclear fuels. The irradiation tests using each four LTAs (Lead Test Assemblies) during 3 cycles were completed in three Korean nuclear reactors until 2009. The eight irradiation performance items which are assembly growth, rod growth, grid width growth, assembly bow, rod bow, assembly twist, rod diameter and cladding oxidation were examined in pool-side after each cycle and evaluated. The irradiation tests could be continued by expecting the good performances for next cycle from the previous cycle. After 2 cycle irradiations, the region implementation could be started in 15 nuclear power plants. Even though the verifications using the LTAs were completed, each surveillance program was launched and the irradiation performance data were being updated during region implementation. In addition to pool-side examinations (PSEs) by assembly-wise during irradiation tests, six rod-wise performance items were also examined in pool-side using each LTA after discharge. All performance items met their design criteria as a result of the evaluation. Even though the interesting ones among the irradiation performance parameters were assembly and grid growths

  12. Proceedings of American Nuclear Society topical meeting on light water reactor fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Separate abstracts are included for 32 of the 39 papers presented concerning fuel performance; fuel performance under transient and off-normal operations; fuel-cladding interactions; and fission product release. Seven papers have previously been input into the data base

  13. Tritium fuel cycle modeling and tritium breeding analysis for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hongli; Pan, Lei; Lv, Zhongliang; Li, Wei; Zeng, Qin, E-mail: zengqin@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • A modified tritium fuel cycle model with more detailed subsystems was developed. • The mean residence time method applied to tritium fuel cycle calculation was updated. • Tritium fuel cycle analysis for CFETR was carried out. - Abstract: Attaining tritium self-sufficiency is a critical goal for fusion reactor operated on the D–T fuel cycle. The tritium fuel cycle models were developed to describe the characteristic parameters of the various elements of the tritium cycle as a tool for evaluating the tritium breeding requirements. In this paper, a modified tritium fuel cycle model with more detailed subsystems and an updated mean residence time calculation method was developed based on ITER tritium model. The tritium inventory in fueling system and in plasma, supposed to be important for part of the initial startup tritium inventory, was considered in the updated mean residence time method. Based on the model, the tritium fuel cycle analysis of CFETR (Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor) was carried out. The most important two parameters, the minimum initial startup tritium inventory (I{sub m}) and the minimum tritium breeding ratio (TBR{sub req}) were calculated. The tritium inventories in steady state and tritium release of subsystems were obtained.

  14. Tailored model abstraction in performance assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs) are likely to be one of the most significant parts of making safety cases for the continued development and licensing of geologic repositories for the disposal of spent fuel and HLW. Thus, it is critical that the TSPA model capture the 'essence' of the physical processes relevant to demonstrating the appropriate regulation is met. But how much detail about the physical processes must be modeled and understood before there is enough confidence that the appropriate essence has been captured? In this summary the level of model abstraction that is required is discussed. Approaches for subsystem and total system performance analyses are outlined, and the role of best estimate models is examined. It is concluded that a conservative approach for repository performance, based on limited amount of field and laboratory data, can provide sufficient confidence for a regulatory decision

  15. Proceedings of the NETL Workshop on Fuel Cell Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall S. Gemmen; J. R. Selman

    2000-04-18

    This workshop was the first U.S. DOE sponsored meeting devoted to fuel cell modeling. The workshop was attended by over 45 people from industry, universities, and the government. The goals of the meeting were to assess the status of fuel cell modeling, and determine how new developments in fuel cell modeling can improve cell design, stack design, and power system design. The primary focus was on cell and stack modeling. Following a review of DOE/NETL fuel cell related programs and activities, Professor Robert Selman (Illinois Institute of Technology) kicked off the technical portion of the workshop by presenting an overview of fuel cell phenomena and the status of fuel cell modeling. This overview provided the necessary background for establishing a common framework for discussing fuel cell modeling. A distinction was made between micro modeling, electrode modeling, cell modeling, stack modeling, and system modeling. It was proposed that all modeling levels be supported for further development. In addition, due to significant advances being made outside the U.S., it was proposed that dialog/exchange with other international researchers be established. Following the Overview Session, eight leading researchers in modeling gave individual presentations. These presentations provided additional information on the status and present direction of model developments. All these presentations can be found in Attachment A. Before the workshop, a survey was sent out requesting comments from the attendees. Results from this survey can be found in Attachment B. This survey was then used as initial talking points at the individual breakout sessions on the afternoon of the workshop. Breakouts were organized by microfundamental modeling, cell modeling, stack modeling, and systems modeling.

  16. Modeling of Flow in Nuclear Reactor Fuel Cell Outlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František URBAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Safe and effective load of nuclear reactor fuel cells demands qualitative and quantitative analysis of relations between coolant temperature in fuel cell outlet temperature measured by thermocouple and middle temperature of coolant in thermocouple plane position. In laboratory at Insitute of thermal power engineering of the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava was installed an experimental physical fuel cell model of VVER 440 nuclear power plant with V 213 nuclear reactors. Objective of measurements on physical model was temperature and velocity profiles analysis in the fuel cell outlet. In this paper the measured temperature and velocity profiles are compared with the results of CFD simulation of fuel cell physical model coolant flow.

  17. Lumped-parameter fuel rod model for rapid thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, K.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1975-07-01

    The thermal behavior of fuel rods during simulated accident conditions is extremely sensitive to the heat transfer coefficient which is, in turn, very sensitive to the cladding surface temperature and the fluid conditions. The development of a semianalytical, lumped-parameter fuel rod model which is intended to provide accurate calculations, in a minimum amount of computer time, of the thermal response of fuel rods during a simulated loss-of-coolant accident is described. The results show good agreement with calculations from a comprehensive fuel-rod code (FRAP-T) currently in use at Aerojet Nuclear Company

  18. Model support for an out-reactor-instrumented-defected-fuel-experiment to validate the RMC fuel oxidation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quastel, A.D.; Corcoran, E.C.; Lewis, B.J. [Royal Military College of Canada, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Dept., Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Thiriet, C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Hadaller, G. [Stern Laboratories Inc., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    An out-reactor fuel oxidation experiment with controlled parameters is being planned to provide data for validation of the Royal Military College (RMC) mechanistic fuel oxidation model. In support of this work, fuel oxidation 2D r-θ and 3D models are presented. The 2D r-θ model with radial cracks provides the radial temperature distribution in the test fuel element and also provides heating power information. The 3D model with radial cracks and a pellet-pellet gap under a defected sheath indicate that an oxygen stoichiometry deviation of 0.057 could result within one week of heating a defected UO{sub 2} fuel element with a 5-mm{sup 2} sheath defect. (author)

  19. Dynamic Model of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2007-01-01

    The present work involves the development of a model for predicting the dynamic temperature of a high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. The model is developed to test different thermal control strategies before implementing them in the actual system. The test system consists of a prototype...... parts, where also the temperatures are measured. The heat balance of the system involves a fuel cell model to describe the heat added by the fuel cells when a current is drawn. Furthermore the model also predicts the temperatures, when heating the stack with external heating elements for start-up, heat...... the stack at a high stoichiometric air flow. This is possible because of the PBI fuel cell membranes used, and the very low pressure drop in the stack. The model consists of a discrete thermal model dividing the stack into three parts: inlet, middle and end and predicting the temperatures in these three...

  20. Advances in fuel pellet technology for improved performance at high burnup. Proceedings of a Technical Committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    The IAEA has recently completed two co-ordinated Research Programmes (CRPs) on The Development of Computer Models for Fuel Element Behaviour in Water Reactors, and on Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup. Through these CRPs it became evident that there was a need to obtain data on fuel behaviour at high burnup. Data related o thermal behaviour, fission gas release and pellet to clad mechanical interaction were obtained and presented at the Technical Committee Meeting on Advances in Fuel Pellet Technology for Improved Performance at High Burnup which was recommended by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT). The 34 papers from 10 countries are published in this proceedings and presented by a separate abstract. The papers were grouped in 6 sessions. First two sessions covered the fabrication of both UO 2 fuel and additives and MOX fuel. Sessions 3 and 4 covered the thermal behaviour of both types of fuel. The remaining two sessions dealt with fission gas release and the mechanical aspects of pellet to clad interaction

  1. Integrated modeling for optimized regional transportation with compressed natural gas fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam A. Gabbar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transportation represents major energy consumption where fuel is considered as a primary energy source. Recent development in the vehicle technology revealed possible economical improvements when using natural gas as a fuel source instead of traditional gasoline. There are several fuel alternatives such as electricity, which showed potential for future long-term transportation. However, the move from current situation where gasoline vehicle is dominating shows high cost compared to compressed natural gas vehicle. This paper presents modeling and simulation methodology to optimize performance of transportation based on quantitative study of the risk-based performance of regional transportation. Emission estimation method is demonstrated and used to optimize transportation strategies based on life cycle costing. Different fuel supply scenarios are synthesized and evaluated, which showed strategic use of natural gas as a fuel supply.

  2. Modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cell with variable distance gas flow in anode and cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Shahbudin Masdar; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Jaafar Sahari

    2006-01-01

    A number of fundamental studies have been directed towards increasing our understanding of PEM fuel cell and their performance. Mathematical modeling is one of the way and very essential component in the development of this fuel cell. Model validation is presented, the validated model is then used to investigate the behavior of mole fraction of gases, current density, and the performances of stack using polarization curve depending on distance gases flow in channel. The model incorporates a complete cell with both the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and the serpentine gas distributor channel. Finally, the parametric studies in single stack design are illustrated

  3. H2-O2 fuel cell and advanced battery power systems for autonomous underwater vehicles: performance envelope comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubak, G.E.; Scott, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles have traditionally been powered by low energy density lead-acid batteries. Recently, advanced battery technologies and H 2 -O 2 fuel cells have become available, offering significant improvements in performance. This paper compares the solid polymer fuel cell to the lithium-thionyl chloride primary battery, sodium-sulfur battery, and lead acid battery for a variety of missions. The power system performance is simulated using computer modelling techniques. Performance envelopes are constructed, indicating domains of preference for competing power system technologies. For most mission scenarios, the solid polymer fuel cell using liquid reactant storage is the preferred system. Nevertheless, the advanced battery systems are competitive with the fuel cell systems using gaseous hydrogen storage, and they illustrate preferred performance for missions requiring high power density. 11 figs., 4 tabs., 15 refs

  4. Performance Analyses of Renewable and Fuel Power Supply Systems for Different Base Station Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Lorincz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Base station sites (BSSs powered with renewable energy sources have gained the attention of cellular operators during the last few years. This is because such “green” BSSs impose significant reductions in the operational expenditures (OPEX of telecom operators due to the possibility of on-site renewable energy harvesting. In this paper, the green BSSs power supply system parameters detected through remote and centralized real time sensing are presented. An implemented sensing system based on a wireless sensor network enables reliable collection and post-processing analyses of many parameters, such as: total charging/discharging current of power supply system, battery voltage and temperature, wind speed, etc. As an example, yearly sensing results for three different BSS configurations powered by solar and/or wind energy are discussed in terms of renewable energy supply (RES system performance. In the case of powering those BSS with standalone systems based on a fuel generator, the fuel consumption models expressing interdependence among the generator load and fuel consumption are proposed. This has allowed energy-efficiency comparison of the fuel powered and RES systems, which is presented in terms of the OPEX and carbon dioxide (CO2 reductions. Additionally, approaches based on different BSS air-conditioning systems and the on/off regulation of a daily fuel generator activity are proposed and validated in terms of energy and capital expenditure (CAPEX savings.

  5. Verification and Validation of the BISON Fuel Performance Code for PCMI Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Gardner, Russell James [Idaho National Laboratory; Perez, Danielle Marie [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-06-01

    BISON is a modern finite element-based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behavior and has been used to analyze a variety of fuel forms in 1D spherical, 2D axisymmetric, or 3D geometries. A brief overview of BISON’s computational framework, governing equations, and general material and behavioral models is provided. BISON code and solution verification procedures are described. Validation for application to light water reactor (LWR) PCMI problems is assessed by comparing predicted and measured rod diameter following base irradiation and power ramps. Results indicate a tendency to overpredict clad diameter reduction early in life, when clad creepdown dominates, and more significantly overpredict the diameter increase late in life, when fuel expansion controls the mechanical response. Initial rod diameter comparisons have led to consideration of additional separate effects experiments to better understand and predict clad and fuel mechanical behavior. Results from this study are being used to define priorities for ongoing code development and validation activities.

  6. Spatial proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance under bromomethane poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetenko, Tatyana V.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; St-Pierre, Jean

    2017-02-01

    The poisoning effects of 5 ppm CH3Br in the air on the spatial performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) were studied using a segmented cell system. The presence of CH3Br caused performance loss from 0.650 to 0.335 V at 1 A cm-2 accompanied by local current density redistribution. The observed behavior was explained by possible bromomethane hydrolysis with the formation of Br-. Bromide and bromomethane negatively affected the oxygen reduction efficiency over a wide range of potentials because of their adsorption on Pt, which was confirmed by XPS. Moreover, the PEMFC exposure to CH3Br led to a decrease in the anode and cathode electrochemical surface area (∼52-57%) due to the growth of Pt particles through agglomeration and Ostwald ripening. The PEMFC did not restore its performance after stopping bromomethane introduction to the air stream. However, the H2/N2 purge of the anode/cathode and CV scans almost completely recovered the cell performance. The observed final loss of ∼50 mV was due to an increased activation overpotential. PEMFC exposure to CH3Br should be limited to concentrations much less than 5 ppm due to serious performance loss and lack of self-recovery.

  7. Performance study of a solid oxide fuel cell and gas turbine hybrid system designed for methane operating with non-designed fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Weng, Yiwu

    This paper presents an analysis of the fuel flexibility of a methane-based solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine (SOFC-GT) hybrid system. The simulation models of the system are mathematically defined. Special attention is paid to the development of an SOFC thermodynamic model that allows for the calculation of radial temperature gradients. Based on the simulation model, the new design point of system for new fuels is defined first; the steady-state performance of the system fed by different fuels is then discussed. When the hybrid system operates with hydrogen, the net power output at the new design point will decrease to 70% of the methane, while the design net efficiency will decrease to 55%. Similar to hydrogen, the net output power of the ethanol-fueled system will decrease to 88% of the methane value due to the lower cooling effect of steam reforming. However, the net efficiency can remain at 61% at high level due to increased heat recuperation from exhaust gas. To increase the power output of the hybrid system operating with non-design fuels without changing the system configuration, three different measures are introduced and investigated in this paper. The introduced measures can increase the system net power output operating with hydrogen to 94% of the original value at the cost of a lower efficiency of 45%.

  8. Reduced enrichment fuels for Canadian research reactors - Fabrication and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.C.; Foo, M.T.; Berthiaume, L.C.; Herbert, L.N.; Schaefer, J.D.; Hawley, D.

    1985-01-01

    Our facilities have been upgraded to manufacture fuel rods comprising dispersions of U 3 Si in aluminum, to complement the dispersions of U 3 Si alloyed with 1.5 and 3.0 wt% Al fabricated and tested previously. Further advances have been made in process optimization particularly in core extrusion where production rate has been doubled while maintaining high quality standards. Our mini-element irradiations of Al-61.5 wt% (U,3.5 wt% Si, 1.5 wt% Al) and Al-62.4 wt% (U,3.2 wt% Si, 30 wt% Al) have been completed successfully up to the terminal burnup of 93 atomic percent. Fuel core swelling remained marginally below 1% per 10 atomic percent burnup over the whole irradiation. Also mini-elements containing Al-72.4 wt% USiAl and Al-73.4 wt% USi*Al have been irradiated to 82 atomic percent burnup, their swelling rate marginally exceeding 1% per 10 atomic percent burnup. Three full-size 12-element NRU assemblies containing Al-62.4 wt% USi*Al have been fabricated and installed in the NRU reactor where they have performed normally without problems. The cores for four more full-size 12-element NRU assemblies containing Al-61.0 wt% U 3 Si have been manufactured. (author)

  9. Final Report for NFE-07-00912: Development of Model Fuels Experimental Engine Data Base & Kinetic Modeling Parameter Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

    2012-10-01

    The automotive and engine industries are in a period of very rapid change being driven by new emission standards, new types of after treatment, new combustion strategies, the introduction of new fuels, and drive for increased fuel economy and efficiency. The rapid pace of these changes has put more pressure on the need for modeling of engine combustion and performance, in order to shorten product design and introduction cycles. New combustion strategies include homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), partial-premixed combustion compression ignition (PCCI), and dilute low temperature combustion which are being developed for lower emissions and improved fuel economy. New fuels include bio-fuels such as ethanol or bio-diesel, drop-in bio-derived fuels and those derived from new crude oil sources such as gas-to-liquids, coal-to-liquids, oil sands, oil shale, and wet natural gas. Kinetic modeling of the combustion process for these new combustion regimes and fuels is necessary in order to allow modeling and performance assessment for engine design purposes. In this research covered by this CRADA, ORNL developed and supplied experimental data related to engine performance with new fuels and new combustion strategies along with interpretation and analysis of such data and consulting to Reaction Design, Inc. (RD). RD performed additional analysis of this data in order to extract important parameters and to confirm engine and kinetic models. The data generated was generally published to make it available to the engine and automotive design communities and also to the Reaction Design Model Fuels Consortium (MFC).

  10. High performance solid acid fuel cells through humidity stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Boysen, Dane A.; Uda, Tetsuya; Chisholm, Calum R. I.; Haile, Sossina M.

    2004-01-01

    Although they hold the promise of clean energy, state-of-the-art fuel cells based on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are inoperable above 100°C, require cumbersome humidification systems, and suffer from fuel permeation. These difficulties all arise from the hydrated nature of the electrolyte. In contrast, “solid acids” exhibit anhydrous proton transport and high-temperature stability. We demonstrate continuous, stable power generation for both H_2/O_2 and direct methanol fuel cells o...

  11. FEMAXI-III, a computer code for fuel rod performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, K.; Iwano, Y.; Ichikawa, M.; Okubo, T.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a method of fuel rod thermal-mechanical performance analysis used in the FEMAXI-III code. The code incorporates the models describing thermal-mechanical processes such as pellet-cladding thermal expansion, pellet irradiation swelling, densification, relocation and fission gas release as they affect pellet-cladding gap thermal conductance. The code performs the thermal behavior analysis of a full-length fuel rod within the framework of one-dimensional multi-zone modeling. The mechanical effects including ridge deformation is rigorously analyzed by applying the axisymmetric finite element method. The finite element geometrical model is confined to a half-pellet-height region with the assumption that pellet-pellet interaction is symmetrical. The 8-node quadratic isoparametric ring elements are adopted for obtaining accurate finite element solutions. The Newton-Raphson iteration with an implicit algorithm is applied to perform the analysis of non-linear material behaviors accurately and stably. The pellet-cladding interaction mechanism is exactly treated using the nodal continuity conditions. The code is applicable to the thermal-mechanical analysis of water reactor fuel rods experiencing variable power histories. (orig.)

  12. Performance Evaluation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell by Computer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The search for sustainable energy source that can compete with the existing one led to the discovery and acceptance of fuel cell technologies as a perfect replacement for fossil fuel. The ability of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to capture the heat generation during the process of energy generation from electrochemical ...

  13. Integrating repositories with fuel cycles: The airport authority model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.

    2012-01-01

    The organization of the fuel cycle is a legacy of World War II and the cold war. Fuel cycle facilities were developed and deployed without consideration of the waste management implications. This led to the fuel cycle model of a geological repository site with a single owner, a single function (disposal), and no other facilities on site. Recent studies indicate large economic, safety, repository performance, nonproliferation, and institutional incentives to collocate and integrate all back-end facilities. Site functions could include geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with the option for future retrievability, disposal of other wastes, reprocessing with fuel fabrication, radioisotope production, other facilities that generate significant radioactive wastes, SNF inspection (navy and commercial), and related services such as SNF safeguards equipment testing and training. This implies a site with multiple facilities with different owners sharing some facilities and using common facilities - the repository and SNF receiving. This requires a different repository site institutional structure. We propose development of repository site authorities modeled after airport authorities. Airport authorities manage airports with government-owned runways, collocated or shared public and private airline terminals, commercial and federal military facilities, aircraft maintenance bases, and related operations - all enabled and benefiting the high-value runway asset and access to it via taxi ways. With a repository site authority the high value asset is the repository. The SNF and HLW receiving and storage facilities (equivalent to the airport terminal) serve the repository, any future reprocessing plants, and others with needs for access to SNF and other wastes. Non-public special-built roadways and on-site rail lines (equivalent to taxi ways) connect facilities. Airport authorities are typically chartered by state governments and managed by commissions with members

  14. BWR fuel assembly with improved spacer and fuel bundle design for enhanced thermal-hydraulic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mildrum, C.M.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    In a fuel assembly having a bundle of elongated fuel rods disposed in side-by-side relationship so as to form an array of spaced fuel rods, an outer tubular flow channel surrounding the fuel rods so as to direct flow of coolant/moderator fluid along the fuel rods, a hollow water cross extending centrally through and interconnected with the outer flow channel so as to divide the channel into separate compartments and the bundle of fuelrods into a plurality of mini-bundles thereof being disposed in the compartments, and spacers axially displaced along the fuel rods in each of the mini-bundles thereof. Each spacer is composed of inner and outer means which together define spacer cells at corner, side and interior locations of the spacer and have respective protrusions formed thereon which extend into cells so as to maintain the fuel rods received through the spacer cells in laterally spaced relationships. The improvement is described which comprises: (a) a generally uniform poison coating within at least a majority of the fuel rods; (b) a predetermined pattern of fuel enrichment with respect to the fuel rods of each mini-bundle thereof which together with the uniform poison coating within the fuel rods ensures that the packing powers of the fuel rods in the corner and side cells of the spacers are less than the peaking power of a leading one of the fuel rods in the interior cells of the spacers; and (c) each of the fuel rods being received through the cells of each spacer having a diametric size smaller than that of each of the fuel rods received through the side and interior cells of each spacer, the diametric sizes of each of the fuel rods received through the side and interior cells of each spacer being generally equal

  15. Fuel Performance Improvement Program. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1977. [BWR, PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, D.S. (comp.)

    1977-07-01

    The Fuel Performance Improvement Program has as its objective the identification and demonstration of fuel concepts with improved power ramp performance. Improved fuels are being sought to allow reduction or elimination of fuel related operating guidelines on nuclear power plants such that the fuel may be power maneuvered within the rates allowed by the system technical specifications. The program contains a combination of out-of-reactor studies, in-reactor experiments and in-reactor demonstrations. Fuel concepts initially being considered include annular-pellets, cladding internally coated with graphite and packed-particle fuels. The performance capability of each concept is being compared to a reference fuel of contemporary pellet design through test reactor experiments.

  16. A comparison of thermal algorithms of fuel rod performance code systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C. J.; Park, J. H.; Kang, K. H.; Ryu, H. J.; Moon, J. S.; Jeong, I. H.; Lee, C. Y.; Song, K. C.

    2003-11-01

    The goal of the fuel rod performance is to identify the robustness of a fuel rod with cladding material. Computer simulation of the fuel rod performance becomes one of important parts to designed and evaluate new nuclear fuels and claddings. To construct a computing code system for the fuel rod performance, several algorithms of the existing fuel rod performance code systems are compared and are summarized as a preliminary work. Among several code systems, FRAPCON, and FEMAXI for LWR, ELESTRES for CANDU reactor, and LIFE for fast reactor are reviewed. Thermal algorithms of the above codes are investigated including methodologies and subroutines. This work will be utilized to construct a computing code system for dry process fuel rod performance

  17. Artificial Intelligence Techniques for the Estimation of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasiloglu, Abdulsamet; Aras, Ömür; Bayramoglu, Mahmut

    2016-04-01

    Artificial neural networks and neuro-fuzzy inference systems are well known artificial intelligence techniques used for black-box modelling of complex systems. In this study, Feed-forward artificial neural networks (ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) are used for modelling the performance of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Current density (I), fuel cell temperature (T), methanol concentration (C), liquid flow-rate (q) and air flow-rate (Q) are selected as input variables to predict the cell voltage. Polarization curves are obtained for 35 different operating conditions according to a statistically designed experimental plan. In modelling study, various subsets of input variables and various types of membership function are considered. A feed -forward architecture with one hidden layer is used in ANN modelling. The optimum performance is obtained with the input set (I, T, C, q) using twelve hidden neurons and sigmoidal activation function. On the other hand, first order Sugeno inference system is applied in ANFIS modelling and the optimum performance is obtained with the input set (I, T, C, q) using sixteen fuzzy rules and triangular membership function. The test results show that ANN model estimates the polarization curve of DMFC more accurately than ANFIS model.

  18. An experimental assessment on the influence of high octane fuels on biofuel based dual fuel engine performance, emission, and combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masimalai Senthilkumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study on the effect of different high octane fuels (such as eucalyptus oil, ethanol, and methanol on engine’s performance behaviour of a biofuel based dual fuel engine. A single cylinder Diesel engine was modified and tested under dual fuel mode of operation. Initially the engine was run using neat diesel, neat mahua oil as fuels. In the second phase, the engine was operated in dual fuel mode by using a specially designed variable jet carburettor to supply the high octane fuels. Engine trials were made at 100% and 40% loads (power outputs with varying amounts of high octane fuels up-to the maximum possible limit. The performance and emission characteristics of the engine were obtained and analysed. Results indicated significant improvement in brake thermal efficiency simultaneous reduction in smoke and NO emissions in dual fuel operation with all the inducted fuels. At 100% load the brake thermal efficiency increased from 25.6% to a maximum of 32.3, 30.5, and 28.4%, respectively, with eucalyptus oil, ethanol, and methanol as primary fuels. Smoke was reduced drastically from 78% with neat mahua oil a minimum of 41, 48, and 53%, respectively, with eucalyptus oil, ethanol, and methanol at the maximum efficiency point. The optimal energy share for the best engine behaviour was found to be 44.6, 27.3, and 23.2%, respectively, for eucalyptus oil, ethanol, and methanol at 100% load. Among the primary fuels tested, eucalyptus oil showed the maximum brake thermal efficiency, minimum smoke and NO emissions and maximum energy replacement for the optimal operation of the engine.

  19. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior

  20. Performance of denitrifying microbial fuel cell with biocathode over nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao eHuimin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cell (MFC with nitrite as an electron acceptor in cathode provided a new technology for nitrogen removal and electricity production simultaneously. The influences of influent nitrite concentration and external resistance on the performance of denitrifying MFC were investigated. The optimal effectiveness were obtained with the maximum total nitrogen (TN removal rate of 54.80±0.01 g m-3 d-1. It would be rather desirable for the TN removal than electricity generation at lower external resistance. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis suggested that Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum, accounting for 35.72%. Thiobacillus and Afipia might benefit to nitrite removal. The presence of nitrifying Devosia indicated that nitrite was oxidized to nitrate via a biochemical mechanism in the cathode. Ignavibacterium and Anaerolineaceae was found in the cathode as a heterotrophic bacterium with sodium acetate as substrate, which illustrated that sodium acetate in anode was likely permeated through proton exchange membrane to the cathode .

  1. Progress performance report of clean uses of fossil fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    A one-year USDOE/EPSCOR Traineeship Grant, entitled ``Clean Uses of Fossil Fuels.`` was awarded to the Kentucky EPSCoR Committee in September 1991 and administered through the the DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee. Ten Traineeships were awarded to doctoral students who are enrolled or accepted into Graduate Programs at either the University of Kentucky or the University of Louisville. The disciplines of these students include Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Geological Sciences, and Physics. The methods used for a statewide proposal solicitation and to award the Traineeships are presented. The review panel and Kentucky DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee involved in awarding the Traineeships are described. A summary of the proposed research to be performed within these awards is presented, along with a description of the qualifications of the faculty and students who proposed projects. Future efforts to increase participation in Traineeship proposals for the succeeding funding period are outlined.

  2. Progress performance report of clean uses of fossil fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, Jr., Lee T.; Boggess, Ronald J.; Carson, Ronald J.; Falkenberg, Virginia P.; Flanagan, Patrick; Hettinger, Jr., William P.; Kimel, Kris; Kupchella, Charles E.; Magid, Lee J.; McLaughlin, Barbara; Royster, Wimberly C.; Streepey, Judi L.; Wells, James H.; Stencel, John; Derbyshire, Frank J.; Hanley, Thomas R.; Magid, Lee J.; McEllistrem, Marc T.; Riley, John T.; Steffen, Joseph M.

    1992-01-01

    A one-year USDOE/EPSCOR Traineeship Grant, entitled Clean Uses of Fossil Fuels.'' was awarded to the Kentucky EPSCoR Committee in September 1991 and administered through the the DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee. Ten Traineeships were awarded to doctoral students who are enrolled or accepted into Graduate Programs at either the University of Kentucky or the University of Louisville. The disciplines of these students include Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Geological Sciences, and Physics. The methods used for a statewide proposal solicitation and to award the Traineeships are presented. The review panel and Kentucky DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee involved in awarding the Traineeships are described. A summary of the proposed research to be performed within these awards is presented, along with a description of the qualifications of the faculty and students who proposed projects. Future efforts to increase participation in Traineeship proposals for the succeeding funding period are outlined.

  3. Mathematical Description of Wafer-1, a Three-Dimensional Code for LWR Fuel Performance Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær-Pedersen, Niels

    1975-01-01

    This article describes in detail the mathematical formulation used in the WAFER-1 code, which is presently used for three-dimensional analysis of LWR fuel pin performance. The code aims at a prediction of the local stress-strain history in the cladding, especially with regard to the ridging...... phenomenon. To achieve this, a clad model based on shell theory has been developed. This model interacts with a detailed finite difference pellet model which treats radial and transversal cracking in the pellet in a deterministic way, based on certain assumptions with respect to the cracking pattern. Pellet...

  4. Effects of chemical equilibrium on turbine engine performance for various fuels and combustor temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Donald H.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1992-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the differences in turbine engine performance with and without the chemical dissociation effects for various fuel types over a range of combustor temperatures. Both turbojet and turbofan engines were studied with hydrocarbon fuels and cryogenic, nonhydrocarbon fuels. Results of the study indicate that accuracy of engine performance decreases when nonhydrocarbon fuels are used, especially at high temperatures where chemical dissociation becomes more significant. For instance, the deviation in net thrust for liquid hydrogen fuel can become as high as 20 percent at 4160 R. This study reveals that computer central processing unit (CPU) time increases significantly when dissociation effects are included in the cycle analysis.

  5. Nuclear reactor fuel rod behavior modelling and current trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, Ue.

    2001-01-01

    Safety assessment of nuclear reactors is carried out by simulating the events to taking place in nuclear reactors by realistic computer codes. Such codes are developed in a way that each event is represented by differential equations derived based on physical laws. Nuclear fuel is an important barrier against radioactive fission gas release. The release of radioactivity to environment is the main concern and this can be avoided by preserving the integrity of fuel rod. Therefore, safety analyses should cover an assessment of fuel rod behavior with certain extent. In this study, common approaches for fuel behavior modeling are discussed. Methods utilized by widely accepted computer codes are reviewed. Shortcomings of these methods are explained. Current research topics to improve code reliability and problems encountered in fuel rod behavior modeling are presented

  6. Macroscopic Modeling of Transport Phenomena in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian

    An increasing need for energy efficiency and high energy density has sparked a growing interest in direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications. This type of fuel cell directly generates electricity from a fuel mixture consisting of methanol and water. Although this technology...... for studying their transport. In this PhD dissertation the macroscopic transport phenomena governing direct methanol fuel cell operation are analyzed, discussed and modeled using the two-fluid approach in the computational fluid dynamics framework of CFX 14. The overall objective of this work is to extend...... the present fundamental understanding of direct methanol fuel cell operation by developing a three-dimensional, two-phase, multi-component, non-isotherm mathematical model including detailed non-ideal thermodynamics, non-equilibrium phase change and non-equilibrium sorption-desorption of methanol and water...

  7. VISION User Guide - VISION (Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation) Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Robert F. Jeffers; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; Benjamin A. Baker; Joseph Grimm

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a guide for using the current version of the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) model. This is a complex model with many parameters; the user is strongly encouraged to read this user guide before attempting to run the model. This model is an R&D work in progress and may contain errors and omissions. It is based upon numerous assumptions. This model is intended to assist in evaluating “what if” scenarios and in comparing fuel, reactor, and fuel processing alternatives at a systems level for U.S. nuclear power. The model is not intended as a tool for process flow and design modeling of specific facilities nor for tracking individual units of fuel or other material through the system. The model is intended to examine the interactions among the components of a fuel system as a function of time varying system parameters; this model represents a dynamic rather than steady-state approximation of the nuclear fuel system. VISION models the nuclear cycle at the system level, not individual facilities, e.g., “reactor types” not individual reactors and “separation types” not individual separation plants. Natural uranium can be enriched, which produces enriched uranium, which goes into fuel fabrication, and depleted uranium (DU), which goes into storage. Fuel is transformed (transmuted) in reactors and then goes into a storage buffer. Used fuel can be pulled from storage into either separation of disposal. If sent to separations, fuel is transformed (partitioned) into fuel products, recovered uranium, and various categories of waste. Recycled material is stored until used by its assigned reactor type. Note that recovered uranium is itself often partitioned: some RU flows with recycled transuranic elements, some flows with wastes, and the rest is designated RU. RU comes out of storage if needed to correct the U/TRU ratio in new recycled fuel. Neither RU nor DU are designated as wastes. VISION is comprised of several

  8. VISION User Guide - VISION (Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation) Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, Jacob J.; Jeffers, Robert F.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Piet, Steven J.; Baker, Benjamin A.; Grimm, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a guide for using the current version of the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) model. This is a complex model with many parameters; the user is strongly encouraged to read this user guide before attempting to run the model. This model is an R and D work in progress and may contain errors and omissions. It is based upon numerous assumptions. This model is intended to assist in evaluating 'what if' scenarios and in comparing fuel, reactor, and fuel processing alternatives at a systems level for U.S. nuclear power. The model is not intended as a tool for process flow and design modeling of specific facilities nor for tracking individual units of fuel or other material through the system. The model is intended to examine the interactions among the components of a fuel system as a function of time varying system parameters; this model represents a dynamic rather than steady-state approximation of the nuclear fuel system. VISION models the nuclear cycle at the system level, not individual facilities, e.g., 'reactor types' not individual reactors and 'separation types' not individual separation plants. Natural uranium can be enriched, which produces enriched uranium, which goes into fuel fabrication, and depleted uranium (DU), which goes into storage. Fuel is transformed (transmuted) in reactors and then goes into a storage buffer. Used fuel can be pulled from storage into either separation of disposal. If sent to separations, fuel is transformed (partitioned) into fuel products, recovered uranium, and various categories of waste. Recycled material is stored until used by its assigned reactor type. Note that recovered uranium is itself often partitioned: some RU flows with recycled transuranic elements, some flows with wastes, and the rest is designated RU. RU comes out of storage if needed to correct the U/TRU ratio in new recycled fuel. Neither RU nor DU are designated as wastes. VISION is comprised of several Microsoft

  9. Finite element analysis model development and static strength analysis for CANDU-6 reactor fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Moon Sung; Suk, Ho Chun

    2000-12-01

    A static and finite-element (FE) analysis model was developed to simulate out-reactor fuel string strength tests with use of the structural analysis computer code ABAQUS. The FE model takes into account the deflection of fuel elements and stress and displacement in end-plates subjected to hydraulic drag loads. It was adapted to the strength tests performed for CANFLEX 43-element bundles and the existing 37-element bundles. The FE model was found to be in good agreement with the experiment results. With use of the FE model, the static behavior of the fuel bundle strings, such as load transfer between ring elements, end-plate rib effects, hydraulic drag load incurring plastic deformation in fuel string and hydraulic flow rate effects were investigated.

  10. Activities promoting the achievement of high nuclear fuel performance indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naev, I.; Tomov, A.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation begins with brief general information about Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant and organization activities about fresh fuel delivery assurance. The TVSA implementation, fuel cycle, fresh fuel standard entrance inspection and additional fresh fuel inspection are briefly described. Activities concerning core refueling, radiochemistry analysis, control rods drop time, measurement of the distance between the reactor flange and PTU flange, specific items for core unloading and a comparison between the two variants for operations scope with full and without full core unloading are presented. The core unloading - results and next steps, final core design (Unit 6, 2010), preparing for core loading (Unit 6, 2010) , core loading (Unit 6, 2010), after loading core inspection (Unit 6, 2010), core inspection, reactor assembling (Unit 6, 2010), fuel control during reactor startup, fuel control during operation period and fuel assembly data base are also discussed

  11. A nuclear fuel cycle system dynamic model for spent fuel storage options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinton, Samuel; Kazimi, Mujid

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Used nuclear fuel management requires a dynamic system analysis study due to its socio-technical complexity. • Economic comparison of local, regional, and national storage options is limited due to the public financial information. • Local and regional options of used nuclear fuel management are found to be the most economic means of storage. - Abstract: The options for used nuclear fuel storage location and affected parameters such as economic liabilities are currently a focus of several high level studies. A variety of nuclear fuel cycle system analysis models are available for such a task. The application of nuclear fuel cycle system dynamics models for waste management options is important to life-cycle impact assessment. The recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Committee on America’s Nuclear Future led to increased focus on long periods of spent fuel storage [1]. This motivated further investigation of the location dependency of used nuclear fuel in the parameters of economics, environmental impact, and proliferation risk. Through a review of available literature and interactions with each of the programs available, comparisons of post-reactor fuel storage and handling options will be evaluated based on the aforementioned parameters and a consensus of preferred system metrics and boundary conditions will be provided. Specifically, three options of local, regional, and national storage were studied. The preliminary product of this research is the creation of a system dynamics tool known as the Waste Management Module (WMM) which provides an easy to use interface for education on fuel cycle waste management economic impacts. Initial results of baseline cases point to positive benefits of regional storage locations with local regional storage options continuing to offer the lowest cost

  12. Business cycles and the financial performance of fuel cell companies. Paper no. IGEC-1-074

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, I.; Sadorsky, P.

    2005-01-01

    While most business owners are likely to admit that the economic performance of the economy has some impact on their business, there has been relatively little statistical work done to measure just how sensitive the financial performance of fuel cell firms is to changes in macroeconomic activity. In this paper, a four variable vector autoregression model is developed and estimated in order to investigate the empirical relationship between stock prices, oil prices and interest rates. Our results show the stock prices of fuel cell companies to be impacted by shocks to technology stock prices and oil prices. Technology stock price shocks have a longer lasting and greater (in terms of magnitude) impact on the stock prices of fuel cell companies then oil price shocks. These results add to a small but growing literature showing that oil price movements are not as important as once thought because investors view fuel cell companies as similar to other high technology companies. These results should be of use to investors, managers and policy makers. (author)

  13. Performance evaluation and comparison of fuel processors integrated with PEM fuel cell based on steam or autothermal reforming and on CO preferential oxidation or selective methanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ercolino, Giuliana; Ashraf, Muhammad A.; Specchia, Vito; Specchia, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Modeling of different fuel processors integrated with PEM fuel cell stack. • Steam or autothermal reforming + CO selective methanation or preferential oxidation. • Reforming of different hydrocarbons: gasoline, light diesel oil, natural gas. • 5 kW e net systems comparison via energy efficiency and primary fuel rate consumed. • Highest net efficiency: steam reformer + CO selective methanation based system. - Abstract: The performances of four different auxiliary power unit (APU) schemes, based on a 5 kW e net proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM-FC) stack, are evaluated and compared. The fuel processor section of each APU is characterized by a reformer (autothermal ATR or steam SR), a non-isothermal water gas shift (NI-WGS) reactor and a final syngas catalytic clean-up step: the CO preferential oxidation (PROX) reactor or the CO selective methanation (SMET) one. Furthermore, three hydrocarbon fuels, the most commonly found in service stations (gasoline, light diesel oil and natural gas) are considered as primary fuels. The comparison is carried out examining the results obtained by a series of steady-state system simulations in Aspen Plus® of the four different APU schemes by varying the fed fuel. From the calculated data, the performance of CO-PROX is not very different compared to that of the CO-SMET, but the performance of the SR based APUs is higher than the scheme of the ATR based APUs. The most promising APU scheme with respect to an overall performance target is the scheme fed with natural gas and characterized by a fuel processor chain consisting of SR, NI-WGS and CO-SMET reactors. This processing reactors scheme together with the fuel cell section, notwithstanding having practically the same energy efficiency of the scheme with SR, NI-WGS and CO-PROX reactors, ensures a less complex scheme, higher hydrogen concentration in the syngas, lower air mass rate consumption, the absence of nitrogen in the syngas and higher potential

  14. Performance of U-Pu-Zr fuel cast into zirconium molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, D.C.; Lahm, C.E.; Tsai, H.

    1992-01-01

    Current fabrication techniques for the integral fast reactor (IFR) fuel utilize injection casting into quartz molds after reprocessing in the IFR fuel cycle facility. The quartz molds are destroyed during the fuel demolding process, and the quartz residue must therefore be treated as contaminated waste. Alternatively, if the fuel can be cast into molds that remain as part of the fuel slugs (i.e., if the fuel can be left inside the molds for irradiation), then the quartz mold contribution to the waste stream can be eliminated. This possibility is being addresssed in an ongoing effort to evaluate the irradiation performance of fuel cast into zirconium sheaths rather than quartz molds. Zirconium was chosen as the sheath material because it is the component of the U-Pu-Zr fuel alloy that raises the alloy solidus temperatures and provides resistance to fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI)

  15. Simulating the market for automotive fuel efficiency: The SHRSIM model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, D.L.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes a computer model for simulating the effects of uncertainty about future fuel prices and competitors' behavior on the market shares of an automobile manufacturer who is considering introducing technology to increase fuel efficiency. Starting with an initial sales distribution, a pivot-point multinomial logit technique is used to adjust market shares based on changes in the present value of the added fuel efficiency. These shifts are random because the model generates random fuel price projections using parameters supplied by the user. The user also controls the timing of introduction and obsolescence of technology. While the model was designed with automobiles in mind, it has more general applicability to energy using durable goods. The model is written in IBM BASIC for an IBM PC and compiled using the Microsoft QuickBASIC (trademark of the Microsoft corporation) compiler.

  16. Modelling of the Gadolinium Fuel Test IFA-681 using the BISON Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    In this work, application of Idaho National Laboratory’s fuel performance code BISON to modelling of fuel rods from the Halden IFA-681 gadolinium fuel test is presented. First, an overview is given of BISON models, focusing on UO2/UO2-Gd2O3 fuel and Zircaloy cladding. Then, BISON analyses of selected fuel rods from the IFA-681 test are performed. For the first time in a BISON application to integral fuel rod simulations, the analysis is informed by detailed neutronics calculations in order to accurately capture the radial power profile throughout the fuel, which is strongly affected by the complex evolution of absorber Gd isotopes. In particular, radial power profiles calculated at IFE–Halden Reactor Project with the HELIOS code are used. The work has been carried out in the frame of the collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and Halden Reactor Project. Some slide have been added as an Appendix to present the newly developed PolyPole-1 algorithm for modeling of intra-granular fission gas release.

  17. Fuel performance improvement program. Quarterly/annual progress report, April--September 1977. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouthamel, C.E. (comp.)

    1977-11-01

    The Fuel Performance Improvement Program has as its objective the identification and demonstration of fuel concepts with improved power ramp performance. The program contains a combination of out-of-reactor studies, in-reactor experiments and in-reactor demonstrations. Fuel concepts initially being considered include annular pellets, cladding internally coated with graphite and packed-particle fuels. The performance capability of each concept will be compared to a reference fuel of contemporary pellet design by irradiations in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor. Fuel design and process development is being completed and fuel rod fabrication will begin for the Halden test rods and for the first series of in-reactor demonstrations. The in-reactor demonstrations are being performed in the Big Rock Point reactor to show that the concepts pose no undue risk to commercial operation.

  18. 76 FR 3517 - Standards of Performance for Fossil-Fuel-Fired, Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... Standards of Performance for Fossil-Fuel-Fired, Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial-Institutional, and... following: Category NAICS \\1\\ Examples of regulated entities Industry 221112 Fossil fuel-fired electric utility steam generating units. Federal Government 22112 Fossil fuel-fired electric utility steam...

  19. Early-in-life thermal performance of UO2--PuO2 fast reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.B.; Leggett, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    Results from the combined analyses of two thermal performance tests, HEDL P-19 and HEDL P-20 are described. The tests were designed to provide data on the power required to cause incipient fuel melting early in life under conditions prototypic of FFTF driver fuel pins and similar FBR fuel systems

  20. Operational requirements of spherical HTR fuel elements and their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roellig, K.; Theymann, W.

    1985-01-01

    The German development of spherical fuel elements with coated fuel particles led to a product design which fulfils the operational requirements for all HTR applications with mean gas exit temperatures from 700 deg C (electricity and steam generation) up to 950 deg C (supply of nuclear process heat). In spite of this relatively wide span for a parameter with strong impact on fuel element behaviour, almost identical fuel specifications can be used for the different reactor purposes. For pebble bed reactors with relatively low gas exit temperatures of 700 deg C, the ample design margins of the fuel elements offer the possibility to enlarge the scope of their in-service duties and, simultaneously, to improve fuel cycle economics. This is demonstrated for the HTR-500, an electricity and steam generating 500 MWel eq plant presently proposed as follow-up project to the THTR-300. Due to the low operating temperatures of the HTR-500 core, the fuel can be concentrated in about 70% of the pebbles of the core thus saving fuel cycle costs. Under all design accident conditions fuel temperatures are maintained below 1250 deg C. This allows a significant reduction in the engineered activity barriers outside the primary circuit, in particular for the loss of coolant accident. Furthermore, access to major primary circuit components and the reuse of the fuel elements after any design accident are possible. (author)

  1. The Model of Temperature Dynamics of Pulsed Fuel Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarchenko, E A; Popov, A K

    2002-01-01

    Heat exchange process differential equations are considered for a subcritical fuel assembly with an injector. The equations are obtained by means of the use of the Hermit polynomial. The model is created for modelling of temperature transitional processes. The parameters and dynamics are estimated for hypothetical fuel assembly consisting of real mountings: the powerful proton accelerator and the reactor IBR-2