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Sample records for fuel pellets manufacturing

  1. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, Masaomi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Hirai, Mutsumi; Tanabe, Isami; Yuda, Ryoichi.

    1989-01-01

    In a method of manufacturing nuclear fuel pellets by compression molding an oxide powder of nuclear fuel material followed by sintering, a metal nuclear material is mixed with an oxide powder of the nuclear fuel material. As the metal nuclear fuel material, whisker or wire-like fine wire or granules of metal uranium can be used effectively. As a result, a fuel pellet in which the metal nuclear fuel is disposed in a network-like manner can be obtained. The pellet shows a great effect of preventing thermal stress destruction of pellets upon increase of fuel rod power as compared with conventional pellets. Further, the metal nuclear fuel material acts as an oxygen getter to suppress the increase of O/M ratio of the pellets. Further, it is possible to reduce the swelling of pellet at high burn-up degree. (T.M.)

  2. Nuclear fuel pellet manufacturing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tetsushi.

    1995-01-01

    An uranium oxide powder is compression-molded to form a compressed powder product, and the compressed powder product is sintered to form a ceramic nuclear fuel pellet. In this case, the uranium oxide powder to be supplied to a press hole for compression molding is exposed to an atmosphere of one of vapors of benzene, hexane, acetone, acetic acid, ethanol or water, or an atmosphere of a vapor mixture of several kinds of them. Thereafter, uranium oxide powder is compression molded in the same vapor atmosphere. Since the vapor atmosphere is used as an aid for a molding adjuvant or a substitute thereof, lowering of pellet density due to residual molding adjuvant can be prevented. In addition, the vapor atmosphere is penetrated uniformly between the uranium oxide powder to suppress density fluctuation of the compressed powder material thereby enabling to unify the shrinking rate. (I.N.)

  3. Manufacturing method for nuclear fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komono, Akira

    1998-01-01

    Upon molding of nuclear fuel pellets, the supply of nuclear fuel powder to a dice is divided to a plurality of stages, and a nuclear fuel powder having higher moldability is supplied to a portion where the density of the powder in the molded product is lower. As a result, the density of the powder of the molded product after molding can be made substantially uniform even in a portion where the molding pressure is low and the density of the powder of the molded product is low. Accordingly, difference of the diameter caused depending on the portion of the pellet after sintering is prevented, so that pellets having substantially uniform diameter can be formed, and the specification of the design can be satisfied. If dice agreed with the aimed diameter is selected based on the degree of shrinkage, a grinding step for making the diameter uniform can be eliminated to attain cost down. (N.H.)

  4. Fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel pellet for insertion into a cladding tube in order to form a fuel element or a fuel rod. The fuel pellet has got a belt-like projection around its essentially cylindrical lateral circumferential surface. The upper and lower edges in vertical direction of this belt-like projection are wave-shaped. The projection is made of the same material as the bulk pellet. Both are made in one piece. (orig.) [de

  5. Cradle-to-Gate Life-Cycle Inventory and Impact Assessment of Wood Fuel Pellet Manufacturing from Hardwood Flooring Residues in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Reed; Richard Bergman; Jae-Woo Kim; Adam Tayler; David Harper; David Jones; Chris Knowles; Maureen E. Puettmann

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present cradle-to-gate life-cycle inventory (LCI) data for wood fuel pellets manufactured in the Southeast United States. We surveyed commercial pellet manufacturers in 2010, collecting annual production data for 2009. Weighted-average inputs to, and emissions from, the pelletization process were determined. The pellet making unit process was...

  6. Manufacture, delivery and marketing of wood pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huhtanen, T.

    2001-01-01

    Wood pellet is a cheap fuel, the use of which can easily bee automated. Pellet heating can be carried out with a stoker or a pellet burner, which can be mounted to oil and solid fuels boiler or to solid fuel boilers. Vapo Oy delivers wood pellet to farms and detached houses via Agrimarket stores. Vapo Oy delivers pellets to large real estates, municipalities, industry, greenhouses and power plants directly as bulk. The pellets are delivered either by trailers or lorries equipped with fan-operated unloaders. The use of wood pellets is a suitable fuel especially for real estates, the boiler output of which is 20 - 1000 kW. Vapo Oy manufactures wood pellets of cutter chips, grinding dust and sawdust. The raw material for Ilomantsi pellet plant is purchased from the province of North Karelia. The capacity of pelletizing plant is 45 000 t of pellets per year, half of which is exported mainly to Sweden and Denmark

  7. Fuel pellet loading apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for loading a predetermined amount of nuclear fuel pellets into nuclear fuel elements and particularly for the automatic loading of fuel pellets from within a sealed compartment. (author)

  8. Fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watarumi, Kazutoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve thermal stability particularly thermal shock resistance and at the same time, improve the holdback characteristics of fission products (FP) by coarsening the crystal particle size within a given range of dimensional density and submersion density. Constitution: For improvement of the holding characteristics of fission products (FP), it is generally required to enlarge the particle size, and for improvement of the thermal shock resistance, it is necessary to increase the number of open pores such as initial cracks or gaps. The dimensional density of a pellet (division of pallet weight by its volume) is set to 93 - 96 % of its theoretical density, and the submersion density (to be obtained from the effective volume calculated by using the Archimedes' principle under the condition where water invades in the pore section of the pallet) is set to 97 - 99 % of its theoretical density. The crystal particle size is given in the range of 60 - 150 μm. Voild forming agent is added to the pellet with matrices of small particle size and comparatively less number of open pores. The pallet is sintered for long hours at high temperatures or crystal particle growing agent is added to the pellet to cope with coarsening of the crystal particle size of matrices. (Seki, T.)

  9. Handbook for Small-Scale Densified Biomass Fuel (Pellets) Manufacturing for Local Markets.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folk, Richard L.; Govett, Robert L.

    1992-07-01

    Wood pellet manufacturing in the Intermountain West is a recently founded and rapidly expanding energy industry for small-scale producers. Within a three-year period, the total number of manufacturers in the region has increased from seven to twelve (Folk et al., 1988). Small-scale industry development is evolving because a supply of raw materials from small and some medium-sized primary and secondary wood processors that has been largely unused. For the residue producer considering pellet fuel manufacturing, the wastewood generated from primary products often carries a cost associated with residue disposal when methods at-e stockpiling, landfilling or incinerating. Regional processors use these methods for a variety of reasons, including the relatively small amounts of residue produced, residue form, mixed residue types, high transportation costs and lack of a local market, convenience and absence of regulation. Direct costs associated with residue disposal include the expenses required to own and operate residue handling equipment, costs for operating and maintaining a combustor and tipping fees charged to accept wood waste at public landfills. Economic and social costs related to environmental concerns may also be incurred to include local air and water quality degradation from open-air combustion and leachate movement into streams and drinking water.

  10. Manufacturing at industrial level of UO2 pellets for the fuel elements of the Atucha I Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyment, I.G.; Noguera Rojas, Francisco

    1982-01-01

    The interest to produce fuel elements within a policy of self sufficiency arose with the installation of Atucha I. The first steps towards this goal consisted in processing the uranium oxide, transforming it into fuel pellets of high density. The developments towards the fabrication of said pellets, performed by CNEA since 1968, first at a laboratory level and afterwards on an industrial scale, allowed CNEA to obtain its own technological capability to produce 400 kg of UO 2 per day. The fuel pellets manufacturing method developed by CNEA is a powder-metallurgical process, which, besides conventional equipment, involves the use of special equipment that required the performance of systematic testing programmes, as well as special training at operational level. The developed processes respond to a modern and advanced technology. A general scheme of the process, starting with a directly sinterable UO 2 powder, is described, including compacting of the powder into pellets, sintering, control of the temperature in the sintering and reduction zones and of the time of permanence in both zones, and cylindric rectifying of the pellets. During the whole process, specialized personnel controls the operations, after which the material is released by the Quality Control Department. The national contribution to the manufacturing technology of the pellets for fuel elements of power and research reactors was of 100%. (M.E.L.) [es

  11. Design and manufacturing of non-instrumented capsule for advanced PWR fuel pellet irradiation test in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Lee, C. B.; Song, K. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    This project is preparing to irradiation test of the developed large grain UO{sub 2} fuel pellet in HANARO for pursuit fuel safety and high burn-up in 'Advanced LWR Fuel Technology Development Project' as a part Nuclear Mid and Long-term R and D Program. On the basis test rod is performed the nuclei property and preliminary fuel performance analysis, test rod and non-instrumented capsule are designed and manufactured for irradiation test in HANARO. This non-instrumented irradiation capsule of Advanced PWR Fuel pellet was referred the non-instrumented capsule for an irradiation test of simulated DUPIC fuel in HANARO(DUPIC Rig-001) and 18-element HANARO fuel, was designed to ensure the integrity and the endurance of non-instrumented capsule during the long term(2.5 years) irradiation. To irradiate the UO{sub 2} pellets up to the burn-up 70 MWD/kgU, need the time about 60 months and ensure the integrity of non-instrumented capsule for 30 months until replace the new capsule. This non-instrumented irradiation capsule will be based to develope the non-instrumented capsule for the more long term irradiation in HANARO. 22 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  12. Review of pellet fueling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    Fusion reactors based on the Tokamak concept (possibly mirrors, too) will require a low energy method of fueling. Refueling by using solid pellets of hydrogen isotopes appears to be the most promising low energy technique. The main issue in assessing the feasibility of pellet fueling is the ability of the pellet to penetrate into the central region of the reactor. A review is presented of the various theories predicting the lifetime of the pellet and their regions of applicability. Among the phenomena considered are neutral ablation of the solid, ionized ablation of the solid, shielding of the pellet by neutral molecules and electrons and ions, flow of the ablation cloud, distortion of the magnetic field by the flow of an ionized ablation cloud, and charging and electrostatic shielding of the pellet. A brief summary of results of experiments done by the University of Illinois-Oak Ridge and Riso groups is presented. The results of these experiments indicate that, at least at the low temperatures and densities used, a neutral ablation-neutral shielding model is correct. Finally, since all indications are that in order for pellet fueling to be successful, high velocity pellets will be needed, a brief discussion of possible acceleration techniques is presented

  13. QC methods and means during pellets and fuel rods manufacturing at JSC 'MSZ'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouznetsov, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    The report contains the description of the main methods and devices used in fabrication of pellets and fuel rods to prove their conformity to the requirements of technical specifications. The basic principals, range and accuracy of methods and devices are considered in detail, as well as system of metrological support of measurements. The latter includes the metrological certification and periodical verification of the devices, metrological qualification of measurement procedures, standard samples provision and checking the correctness of the analyses performance. If one makes an overall review of testing methods used in different fuel production plants he will find that most part of methods and devices are very similar. There are still some variations in methods which could be a subject for interesting discussions among specialists. This report contains a brief review of testing methods and devices used at our plant. More detailed description is given to methods which differ from those commonly used. (author)

  14. Nuclear fuel pellet loading apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerkey, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    An automatic apparatus for loading a predetermined amount of nuclear fuel pellets into a nuclear fuel element to be used in a nuclear reactor is described. The apparatus consists of a vibratory bed capable of supporting corrugated trays containing rows of nuclear fuel pellets and arranged in alignment with the open ends of several nuclear fuel elements. A sweep mechanism is arranged above the trays and serves to sweep the rows of fuel pellets onto the vibratory bed and into the fuel element. A length detecting system, in conjunction with a pellet stopping mechanism, is also provided to assure that a predetermined amount of nuclear fuel pellets are loaded into each fuel element

  15. Wood pellets : a worldwide fuel commodity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melin, S.

    2005-01-01

    Aspects of the wood pellet industry were discussed in this PowerPoint presentation. Details of wood pellets specifications were presented, and the wood pellet manufacturing process was outlined. An overview of research and development activities for wood pellets was presented, and issues concerning quality control were discussed. A chart of the effective calorific value of various fuels was provided. Data for wood pellet mill production in Canada, the United States and the European Union were provided, and various markets for Canadian wood pellets were evaluated. Residential sales as well as Canadian overseas exports were reviewed. Production revenues for British Columbia and Alberta were provided. Wood pellet heat and electricity production were discussed with reference to prefabricated boilers, stoves and fireplaces. Consumption rates, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and fuel ratios for wood pellets and fossil fuels were compared. Price regulating policies for electricity and fossil fuels have prevented the domestic expansion of the wood pellet industry. There are currently no incentives for advanced biomass combustion to enter British Columbia markets, and this has led to the export of wood pellets. It was concluded that climate change mitigation policies will be a driving force behind market expansion for wood pellets. tabs., figs

  16. Present status of laser fusion fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Sadao; Mima, Kunioki; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Takagi, Masaru.

    1986-01-01

    Accompanying the advance of pellet implosion experiment, the data base required for fuel pellet design has been steadily accumulated. The clarification of the physics related to the process of absorbing laser beam, energy transport, the generation of ablative pressure, the hydrodynamic mechanism of implosion, the energy transmission to fuel core and so on progressed, and the design data supported by these results are prepared. Based on the data base like this, the design of fuel pellets taking the optimization of implosion in consideration is carried out. The various fuel pellets designed in this way are tested for their effectiveness by implosion experiment. For this purpose, the high performance measurement of implosion and the high accuracy manufacture of fuel pellets become very important. In this paper, the present state of the research on the method of laser implosion, the example of pellet design and the law of proportion, the manufacturing techniques of the fuel pellets having various structures, the techniques dealing with tritium and so on is summarized, and the direction of future research and development is ascertained. At present, implosion experiment is carried out mostly by hanging a pellet target with a fiber of several μm diameter, but the fiber impairs the symmetry of implosion. The levitation techniques without contact is required. (Kako, I.)

  17. Fuel rod pellet loading head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, T.E.

    1975-01-01

    An assembly for loading nuclear fuel pellets into a fuel rod comprising a loading head for feeding pellets into the open end of the rod is described. The pellets rest in a perforated substantially V-shaped seat through which air may be drawn for removal of chips and dust. The rod is held in place in an adjustable notched locator which permits alignment with the pellets

  18. Pellets - A fuel with a future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This special brochure presents a series of articles on the topic of wood pellets as a fuel of the future. Dr. Walter Steinmann, director of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) introduces the topic, stressing that the Swiss Confederation and the Cantons are supporting efforts to increase the sustainable use of wood fuels. Further articles take a closer look at pellets and their form. Pellets-fired heating units are introduced as a viable alternative to traditional oil-fired units. Tips are presented on the various ways of storing pellets. Quality-assurance aspects are examined and manufacturers and distributors of wood pellets are listed. A further article takes a closer look at a large Swiss manufacturer of pellets and describes the production process used as well as the logistics necessary for the transportation of raw materials and finished products. The brochure also presents a selection of pellet ovens and heating systems from various manufacturers. A further article illustrates the use of pellets as a means of heating apartment blocks built to the MINERGIE low-energy-consumption standard. In the example quoted, the classic combination of solar energy for the pre-heating of hot water and pellets for the central heating and hot water supply is used. The use of a buried spherical tank to store pellets - and thus the saving of space inside the building - is described in a further article that takes a look at the refurbishment of the heating system in a single-family home. Finally, various contributions presented at the Pellets Forum held in Berne in November 2003 are summarised in a short article

  19. Cradle-to-Gate Life Cycle Assessment of Switchgrass Fuel Pellets Manufactured in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. D. Bergman; D. L. Reed; A. M. Taylor; D. P. Harper; D. G. Hodges

    2015-01-01

    Developing renewable energy sources with low environmental impacts is becoming increasingly important as concerns about consuming fossil fuel sources grow. Cultivating, harvesting, drying, and densifying raw biomass feedstocks into pellets for easy handling and transport is one step forward in this endeavor. However, the corresponding environmental performances must be...

  20. Nuclear fuel pellet loading machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kee, R.W.; Denero, J.V.

    1975-01-01

    An apparatus for loading nuclear fuel pellets on trays for transfer in a system is described. A conveyor supplies pellets from a source to a loading station. When the pellets reach a predetermined position at the loading station, a manual or automatically operated arm pushes the pellets into slots on a tray and this process is repeated until pellet sensing switches detect that the tray is full. Thereupon, the tray is lowered onto a belt or other type conveyor and transferred to other apparatus in the system, such as a furnace for sintering, and in some cases, reduction of UO 2 . 2 to UO 2 . The pellets are retained on the tray and subsequently loaded directly into fuel rods to be used in the reactor core. (auth)

  1. Fuel pellets of various shapes- fabrication experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, R.; Nair, M.R.; Majumdar, S.; Purushotham, D.S.C.

    1996-10-01

    Sintered uranium oxide and mixed oxide pellets are extensively used as nuclear reactor fuel. The shape of the fuel-pellets influence greatly their in-reactor performance. Fuel pellets of various shapes were prepared in Radiometallurgy Division to study their fabricability and in-reactor performance. This paper presents the experience in fabricating these fuel pellets. (author)

  2. Pelletizing bagasse for fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvet, P.E.; Suzor, N.L.C.

    1980-08-01

    Prior to 1979, the Davies Hawakua Sugar Co. of Hawaii, burned its bagasse in bulk in large furnaces. Because of storage difficulties, however, the company decided to erect a bagasse - pelletizing plant adjacent to its Hawaii sugar factory. The plant, based on the Woodex process, has been very successful and the net energy gain has been calculated in the order of 41%.

  3. Pellet to Part Manufacturing System for CNCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roschli, Alex C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Love, Lonnie J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Post, Brian K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chesser, Phillip C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lloyd, Peter D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bandari, Yashwanth Kumar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jones, Jason [Hybrid Manufacturing Technologies, Swadlincote (United Kingdom); Gaul, Katherine T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2018-03-14

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility worked with Hybrid Manufacturing Technologies to develop a compact prototype composite additive manufacturing head that can effectively extrude injection molding pellets. The head interfaces with conventional CNC machine tools enabling rapid conversion of conventional machine tools to additive manufacturing tools. The intent was to enable wider adoption of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology and combine BAAM technology with conventional machining systems.

  4. Structure change of fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanaka, Tetsuji

    1980-01-01

    The investigation of the broken pieces of fuel rods in Mihama No. 1 reactor was carried out in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and unexpectedly led to the post-irradiation tests. The investigation group of the Kyoto University Research Institute considers that the pursuit of the causes of accident by the government was insufficient, and the countermeasures are problematical, as the result of having examined various reports. In this study, the white foreign phase and swelling of cladding tubes were investigated, because these are especially important in view of the soundness of the fuel. Besides, the possibility of the oxidation of UO 2 pellets by cooling water was examined. It was found by metallographic test that the featuring phase different from UO 2 structure existed in the central part of pellets remaining in two broken fuel rod pieces. The report of JAERI judged that it is the product of solid phase reaction above a certain threshold temperature. The change of pellet structure observed in the white foreign phase and the swell of a cladding tube was caused by the oxidation of UO 2 pellets by primary coolant. The result of observation of the white foreign phase showed that it had been liquid phase at the time of the formation. From the thermodynamic examination based on oxygen potential, UO 2 is oxidized above 1100 deg C in the atmosphere of primary coolant. The liquid phase of the oxidized phase of UO 2 is formed above 1600 deg C. (Kako, I.)

  5. Proceedings: pellet fuels conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-12-31

    The conference brought together professionals from the process- engineered-fuels (PEF), utility, paper, plastics, and boiler industries. Although the last two decades have produced technical breakthroughs, efforts to advance PEF must now focus on increasing commercial breakthroughs. Successful commercialization will depend on increasing supplier, consumer, and regulator confidence and support by demonstrating the performance and value of PEF products. Speakers provided updates on how PEF technology is evolving with respect to technical, economic, and regulatory challenges. Actions critical toward full commercialization of PEF were then considered. Discussion groups addressed materials sourcing, fuel processing and transportation, combustion, and ash handling.

  6. Intelligent Automated Nuclear Fuel Pellet Inspection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyvan, S.

    1999-01-01

    At the present time, nuclear pellet inspection is performed manually using naked eyes for judgment and decisionmaking on accepting or rejecting pellets. This current practice of pellet inspection is tedious and subject to inconsistencies and error. Furthermore, unnecessary re-fabrication of pellets is costly and the presence of low quality pellets in a fuel assembly is unacceptable. To improve the quality control in nuclear fuel fabrication plants, an automated pellet inspection system based on advanced techniques is needed. Such a system addresses the following concerns of the current manual inspection method: (1) the reliability of inspection due to typical human errors, (2) radiation exposure to the workers, and (3) speed of inspection and its economical impact. The goal of this research is to develop an automated nuclear fuel pellet inspection system which is based on pellet video (photographic) images and uses artificial intelligence techniques

  7. Steam-treated wood pellets: Environmental and financial implications relative to fossil fuels and conventional pellets for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKechnie, Jon; Saville, Brad; MacLean, Heather L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Steam-treated pellets can greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions relative to coal. • Cost advantage is seen relative to conventional pellets. • Higher pellet cost is more than balanced by reduced retrofit capital requirements. • Low capacity factors further favour steam-treated pellets over conventional pellets. - Abstract: Steam-treated pellets can help to address technical barriers that limit the uptake of pellets as a fuel for electricity generation, but there is limited understanding of the cost and environmental impacts of their production and use. This study investigates life cycle environmental (greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutant emissions) and financial implications of electricity generation from steam-treated pellets, including fuel cycle activities (biomass supply, pellet production, and combustion) and retrofit infrastructure to enable 100% pellet firing at a generating station that previously used coal. Models are informed by operating experience of pellet manufacturers and generating stations utilising coal, steam-treated and conventional pellets. Results are compared with conventional pellets and fossil fuels in a case study of electricity generation in northwestern Ontario, Canada. Steam-treated pellet production has similar GHG impacts to conventional pellets as their higher biomass feedstock requirement is balanced by reduced process electricity consumption. GHG reductions of more than 90% relative to coal and ∼85% relative to natural gas (excluding retrofit infrastructure) could be obtained with both pellet options. Pellets can also reduce fuel cycle air pollutant emissions relative to coal by 30% (NOx), 97% (SOx), and 75% (PM 10 ). Lesser retrofit requirements for steam-treated pellets more than compensate for marginally higher pellet production costs, resulting in lower electricity production cost compared to conventional pellets ($0.14/kW h vs. $0.16/kW h). Impacts of retrofit infrastructure become increasingly

  8. Fabrication of Sintered Annular Fuel Pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Dong Joo; Kim, Jong Hun; Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Keon Sik; Kang, Ki Won; Song, Kun Woo

    2010-01-01

    A dual cooled annular fuel has been seriously considered as a favorable option for uprating the power density of a Pressurized Water Reactor fuel assembly. An annular fuel has a geometrically inherent advantage such as an increased heat transfer area and a thin pellet thickness. It results in a lot of advantages from the point of a fuel safety and its economy. In order to actualize the dual cooled fuel, an essential element is the annular pellet with precisely controlled diametric tolerance. However, the unique shape of annular fuel pellet causes challenging difficulties to satisfy a diametric tolerance specification. Because of an inhomogeneous green density distribution along the compact height, an hour-glassing usually occurred in a sintered cylindrical PWR fuel pellet fabricated by a conventional doubleacting press. Thus, a sintered pellet usually undergoes a centerless grinding process in order to secure a pellet's specifications. In the case of an annular pellet fabrication using a conventional double-acting press, the same hour-glass shape would probably occur. The outer diameter tolerance of an annular pellet can be controlled easily similar to that of a conventional cylindrical PWR pellet through a centerless grinding. However, it appears not to be simple in the case of an inner surface grinding. It would be the best way to satisfy the specifications for the inner diameter in an as-fabricated pellet. In the present study, we are trying to find a way to minimize the diametric tolerance of the sintered annular pellet without inner surface grinding. This paper deals with a new approach that we have tried to reduce the diametric tolerance of the sintered annular pellet

  9. Inspecting fuel pellets for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilks, R.S.; Sternheim, E.; Breakey, G.A.; Sturges, R.H.; Taleff, A.; Castner, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    An improved method of controlling the inspection, sorting and classifying of nuclear reactor fuel pellets, including a mechanical handling system and a computer controlled data processing system, is described. Having investigated the diameter, length, surface flaws and weights of the pellets, they are sorted accordingly and the relevant data are stored. (U.K.)

  10. Manufacturing process for improved nuclear fuel tablets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flipot, A.J.; Smolders, A.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for manufacturing improved nuclear fuel pellets, including compacting ceramic powder in the compaction chamber of a pelletizing machine with only the lower punch moving on compaction, wherein the walls of the compaction chamber are widened on at least part of their height in the direction of a diameter increase toward the die-bearing table. 3 claims, 6 drawing figures

  11. A computerised automatic pellet inspection unit for FBTR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakumar, M.S.; Mahule, K.N.; Ghosh, J.K.; Venkatesh, D.

    1984-01-01

    Physical inspection and certification of nuclear reactor fuel element components is an activity demanding utmost imagination and skill in devising accurate measuring systems. There is also need for remote handling, automation, rapid processing and inspection data print out when dealing with reactor fuel material. This report deals with an automatic computerised fuel pellet inspection system that has been developed in Radiometallurgy Division, B.A.R.C. to carry out dimensional and weight measurements on fuel pellets for the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam near Madras. The system consists of several subsystems each developed especially for a specific purpose and as such items are not available off the shelf from manufacturers in India. If a general approach is adopted towards the report, there are many innovations and ideas that can be used in the automatic inspection of a variety of products in industry. As the system is fairly involved the report does not attempt to deal with detailed description of the equipment. The function of the system is to accept a certain quantity of fuel pellets in a bowl feeder, separate the pellets rejected owing to their exceeding dimensional and weight limits and form columns of accepted pellets. Dimensional and weight limits can be set as required and all inspection data are presented in a printed format. The system processes pellets at the rate of 15 per minute. The entire system can be run by operators with no special skills. The unit is currently in use for the inspection of mixed carbide fuel pellets for FBTR. (author)

  12. Development of annular pellet production techniques for PFBR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somayajulu, P.S.; Nehete, Y.G.; Shelke, B.K.; Kumar, Arun; Kamath, H.S.

    2000-01-01

    Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF) at Tarapur is an industrial scale plant for the fabrication of plutonium based ceramic nuclear fuels. Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel for TAPS is being regularly manufactured in this facility. Efforts are now on to fabricate MOX fuel for the proposed Prototype Fast Breeder Reactors (PFBR). Experimental studies were carried out using natural UO 2 for the fabrication of PFBR fuel pellets. These trials were carried out in glove box condition of the existing fuel pelletisation line, The PFBR fuel pellets are of annular cylindrical shape of around 5.5 mm diameter having internal hole diameter of around 1.7 mm. Apart from meeting physical integrity criteria, the linear mass should be between 2.25 -2.41 gm/cm. Fabrication of annular pellet meeting these specifications require special techniques to be developed. Further, equipment used in the process especially final compaction press should be capable of giving high rate of production. This paper discusses the preliminary work done to fabricate the annular pellets using the existing facilities and the results obtained. (author)

  13. Fuel Pellets Production from Biodiesel Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawalin Chaiyaomporn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This research palm fiber and palm shell were used as raw materials to produce pelletised fuel, and waste glycerol were used as adhesive to reduce biodiesel production waste. The aim of this research is to find optimum ratio of raw material (ratio of palm fiber and palm shell, raw material size distribution, adhesive temperature, and ratio of ingredients (ratio of raw material, waste glycerol, and water. The optimum ratio of pelletized fuel made only by palm fiber was 50:10:40; palm fiber, water, and waste glycerol respectively. In the best practice condition; particle size was smaller than 2 mm, adhesive glycerol was heated. From the explained optimum ratio and ingredient, pelletizing ratio was 62.6%, specific density was 982.2 kg/m3, heating value was 22.5 MJ/kg, moisture content was 5.9194%, volatile matter was 88.2573%, fix carbon content was 1.5894%, and ash content was 4.2339% which was higher than the standard. Mixing palm shell into palm fiber raw material reduced ash content of the pellets. The optimum raw material ratio, which minimizes ash content, was 80 to 20 palm fiber and palm shell respectively. Adding palm shell reduced ash content to be 2.5247% which was higher than pelletized fuel standard but followed cubed fuel standard. At this raw material ratio, pelletizing ratio was 70.5%, specific density was 774.8 kg/m3, heating value was 19.71 MJ/kg, moisture content was 9.8137%, volatile matter was 86.2259%, fix carbon content was 1.4356%, and compressive force was 4.83 N. Pelletized fuel cost at optimum condition was 1.14 baht/kg.

  14. Density control method for nuclear fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wataumi, Kazutoshi.

    1993-01-01

    In a density control for nuclear fuel pellets produced from a raw material powder containing dioxides of uranium or plutonium and oxides of rare earth elements, trimetal octoxides formed from dioxides or the raw material powder not undergoing thermal hysteresis at higher than 1,000degC are added to the raw material powder. Further, trimetal octoxides obtained by calcining a sintering product of the raw material powder is added in addition the trimetal octoxides of the elements. Furthermore, the density of the nuclear fuel pellet is controlled by two kinds of trimetal octoxides obtained by calcining the sintering products of the dioxides, the raw material powder or the nuclear fuel sintering materials at 350 to 800degC. Since trimetal octoxides powder derived from the raw material powder is used as a density increasing additive for the nuclear fuel pellets, it is advantageous in view of stable operation, different from a conventional method of controlling molding condition and sintering condition, and since the trimetal octoxides powder derived from the sintering product is also used, various kinds of density control for nuclear fuel pellets can be conducted. (N.H.)

  15. Effects of variations in fuel pellet composition and size on mixed-oxide fuel pin performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makenas, B.J.; Jensen, B.W.; Baker, R.B.

    1980-10-01

    Experiments have been conducted which assess the effects on fuel pin performance of specific minor variations from nominal in both fuel pellet size and pellet composition. Such pellets are generally referred to in the literature as rogue pellets. The effect of these rogue pellets on fuel pin and reactor performance is shown to be minimal

  16. Fluid pressure method for recovering fuel pellets from nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, C.D. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for removing fuel pellets from a nuclear fuel element without damaging the fuel pellets or fuel element sheath so that both may be reused. The method comprises holding the fuel element while a high pressure stream internally pressurizes the fuel element to expand the fuel element sheath away from the fuel pellets therein so that the fuel pellets may be easily removed

  17. UO2 pellet and manufacturing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komada, Kiichi; Nishinaka, Keiji; Adachi, Kazunori; Fujiwara, Shuji.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns an uranium dioxide pellet having a large crystal grain size. The grain size of the pellet is enlarged to increase the distance of an FP gas generated in the crystal grain to reach the grain boundary and, as a result, decrease the releasing speed of the FP gas. A UO 2 powder having a specific surface area of from 5 to 50m 2 /g is used as a starting powder in a step of forming a molding product, and chlorine or a chlorine compound is added in such an amount that the chlorine content in the UO 2 pellet is from 3 to 25ppm, in one of a production step, a molding step or a sintering step for UO 2 powder. With such procedures, a UO 2 pellet having a large crystal grain size can be prepared with good reproducibility. (T.M.)

  18. Computerized x-ray radiographic system for fuel pellet measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.R.; Karnesky, R.A.; Bromley, C.

    1977-01-01

    The development and operation of a computerized system for determination of fuel pellet diameters from x-ray radiography is described. Actual fuel pellet diameter measurements made with the system are compared to micrometer measurements on the same pellets, and statistically evaluated. The advantages and limitations of the system are discussed, and recommendations are made for further development

  19. Automatic failure identification of the nuclear power plant pellet fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Adriano Fortunato de

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposed the development of an automatic technique for evaluating defects to help in the stage of fabrication of fuel elements. Was produced an intelligent image analysis for automatic recognition of defects in uranium pellets. Therefore, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was trained using segments of histograms of pellets, containing examples of both normal (no fault) and of defectives pellets (with major defects normally found). The images of the pellets were segmented into 11 shares. Histograms were made of these segments and trained the ANN. Besides automating the process, the system was able to obtain this classification accuracy of 98.33%. Although this percentage represents a significant advance ever in the quality control process, the use of more advanced techniques of photography and lighting will reduce it to insignificant levels with low cost. Technologically, the method developed, should it ever be implemented, will add substantial value in terms of process quality control and production outages in relation to domestic manufacturing of nuclear fuel. (author)

  20. Dissolution test for homogeneity of mixed oxide fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerch, R.E.

    1979-08-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the relationship between fuel pellet homogeneity and pellet dissolubility. Although, in general, the amount of pellet residue decreased with increased homogeneity, as measured by the pellet figure of merit, the relationship was not absolute. Thus, all pellets with high figure of merit (excellent homogeneity) do not necessarily dissolve completely and all samples that dissolve completely do not necessarily have excellent homogeneity. It was therefore concluded that pellet dissolubility measurements could not be substituted for figure of merit determinations as a measurement of pellet homogeneity. 8 figures, 3 tables

  1. Particle fueling experiments with a series of pellets in LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldzuhn, J.; Damm, H.; Dinklage, A.; Sakamoto, R.; Motojima, G.; Yasuhara, R.; Ida, K.; Yamada, H.; LHD Experiment Group; Wendelstein 7-X Team

    2018-03-01

    Ice pellet injection is performed in the heliotron Large Helical Device (LHD). The pellets are injected in short series, with up to eight individual pellets. Parameter variations are performed for the pellet ice isotopes, the LHD magnetic configurations, the heating scenario, and some others. These experiments are performed in order to find out whether deeper fueling can be achieved with a series of pellets compared to single pellets. An increase of the fueling efficiency is expected since pre-cooling of the plasma by the first pellets within a series could aid deeper penetration of later pellets in the same series. In addition, these experiments show which boundary conditions must be fulfilled to optimize the technique. The high-field side injection of pellets, as proposed for deep fueling in a tokamak, will not be feasible with the same efficiency in a stellarator or heliotron because there the magnetic field gradient is smaller than in a tokamak of comparable size. Hence, too shallow pellet fueling, in particular in a large device or a fusion reactor, will be an issue that can be overcome only by extremely high pellet velocities, or other techniques that will have to be developed in the future. It turned out by our investigations that the fueling efficiency can be enhanced by the injection of a series of pellets to some extent. However, further investigations will be needed in order to optimize this approach for deep particle fueling.

  2. The Manufacturing Process of Bamboo Pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijia Liu; Zehui Jiang; Zhiyong Cai; Benhua Fei; Xing' e Liu

    2012-01-01

    Bamboo was a kind of biomass materials and had great potential as a bio-energy resource of the future in China. The physical and combustion properties of bamboo pellets were determined and the effects of moisture content (MC) and sizes of particle on these properties were investigated in this research. The results showed that MC and sizes of particle affected these...

  3. Study of secular equilibrium reinstatement on UO2 pellets manufactured by AUC route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnaval, João Paulo R.; Beltran, Dalton J.M.C.; Oliveira, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    The fuel assemblies manufactured by INB for Angra-1 power plant has axial blanket fuel rods which must be inspected due the columns formed by different enrichment pellets. The equipment used for inspection is built with a group of BGO scintillators detectors which measurement principle is based on the absorption of gamma rays emitted from Uranium decay. The commercial grade UF 6 used by INB is stored into cylinders type 30B. The uranium inside these cylinders is in secular equilibrium before the processing. It has been found that the AUC route causes the loss of that equilibrium because the UF 6 is volatilized from the cylinder and the uranium daughters remain in the container. As AUC is converted to powder and pellets, the secular equilibrium is restored through time. The purpose of this work is to present a study of the secular equilibrium reinstatement on UO 2 pellets manufactured by AUC route before being inspected on Rod Scanner. (author)

  4. Nuclear fuel manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.

    1980-09-01

    The technologies used to manufacture nuclear fuel from uranium ore are outlined, with particular reference to the light water reactor fuel cycle. Capital and operating cost estimates for the processing stages are given, and the relevance to a developing uranium industry in Australia is discussed

  5. Fuel pellets from lodge pole pine first thinnings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegqvist, Olof; Larsson, Sylvia H.; Samuelsson, Robert; Lestander, Torbjoern A. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Unit of Biomass Technology and Chemistry, Umeaa (Sweden)], e-mail: sylvia.larsson@slu.se

    2012-11-01

    Stemwood and whole trees of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia L.) were evaluated as raw materials for fuel pellets in a pilot scale pelletizing study. Pellet and pelletizing properties were measured and modeled in an experimental design where raw material moisture content (%), die channel length (mm), and storage time (days) were varied. Additionally, ash contents (%), extractive contents (%), and ash melting temperatures (deg C) were analyzed. For both assortments, raw material moisture content was positively correlated to pellet bulk density and durability (range 9-13%, wet base). Both assortments had ash contents below 0.7%, and thus, fulfilled the demands for class A1 pellets.

  6. Modeling of MOX Fuel Pellet-Clad Interaction Using ABAQUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosek, Richard G.; Pedersen, Robert C.; Maple, Amanda

    2002-01-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) has indicated an increase in the outer diameter of fuel pins being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) for the MOX irradiation program. The diameter increase is the largest in the region between fuel pellets. The fuel pellet was modeled using PATRAN and the model was evaluated using ABAQUS, version 6.2. The results from the analysis indicate the non-uniform clad diameter is caused by interaction between the fuel pellet and the clad. The results also demonstrate that the interaction is not uniform over the pellet axial length, with the largest interaction occurring in the region of the pellet-pellet interface. Results were obtained for an axisymmetric model and for a 1/8 pie shaped segment, using the coupled temperature-displacement solution technique. (authors)

  7. Study of production of fuel pellets for a reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Luiz F.F.; Conti, Thadeu N., E-mail: luiz.f.f.mendes@gmail.com, E-mail: tnconti@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays the electrical energy was been used much on society. A method for getting electricity is through nuclear power plants, this power plant uses fission that occurs inside the UO{sub 2} pellets to generate thermal energy that will be transform into electric. The pellets production was made from enriched UF{sub 6} uses some techniques of reprocessing UF{sub 6} gas to UO{sub 2} powder. This reprocessing process done by wet route (Ammonium Diuranate ADU or Ammonium Uranium Carbonate AUC) or by dry route (Fluidized bed or GECO). With getting of UO{sub 2} powder is forwarded to metallurgy where this powder is compacted in cylindrical matrix so that powder take the desired shape, this green pellets are full of the empty spaces (porosity) for this it is sent to the sintering. The sintering consists of a joint of these particles of powders by means of the heating of this green pellets, coming arrive the melting temperature, the UO{sub 2} molecules melting each other so decrease the porosity and increase the density. For the production of fuel pellets the process all most used is wed route by means the AUC ,this process arrive created for replace the ADU because the AUC is a process where less rework for the pore geometry is required compared to DUA. The fluidized bed process is more used in small samples however, for a large amount it becomes unfeasible, moreover the dry route process require more robust materials because of the generation of HF that is highly corrosive and cannot used the UNH (uranyl nitrate hexahydrate) used for recycle materials discarded in manufacturing. (author)

  8. Study of production of fuel pellets for a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Luiz F.F.; Conti, Thadeu N.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays the electrical energy was been used much on society. A method for getting electricity is through nuclear power plants, this power plant uses fission that occurs inside the UO 2 pellets to generate thermal energy that will be transform into electric. The pellets production was made from enriched UF 6 uses some techniques of reprocessing UF 6 gas to UO 2 powder. This reprocessing process done by wet route (Ammonium Diuranate ADU or Ammonium Uranium Carbonate AUC) or by dry route (Fluidized bed or GECO). With getting of UO 2 powder is forwarded to metallurgy where this powder is compacted in cylindrical matrix so that powder take the desired shape, this green pellets are full of the empty spaces (porosity) for this it is sent to the sintering. The sintering consists of a joint of these particles of powders by means of the heating of this green pellets, coming arrive the melting temperature, the UO 2 molecules melting each other so decrease the porosity and increase the density. For the production of fuel pellets the process all most used is wed route by means the AUC ,this process arrive created for replace the ADU because the AUC is a process where less rework for the pore geometry is required compared to DUA. The fluidized bed process is more used in small samples however, for a large amount it becomes unfeasible, moreover the dry route process require more robust materials because of the generation of HF that is highly corrosive and cannot used the UNH (uranyl nitrate hexahydrate) used for recycle materials discarded in manufacturing. (author)

  9. DUPIC nuclear fuel manufacturing and process technology development at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Sung Paal; Lee, Jung Won; Kim, Jong Ho; Kim, Soo Sung; Kim, Woong Ki; Yang, Myung Seung

    2000-01-01

    DUPIC fuel cycle development project in KAERI of Korea was initiated in 1991 and has advanced in relevant technologies for last 10 years. The project includes five different topics such as nuclear fuel manufacturing, compatibility evaluation, performance evaluation, manufacturing facility management, and safeguards. The contents and results of DUPIC R and D up to now are as follow: - the basic foundation was established for the critically required pelletizing technology and powder treatment technology for DUPIC. - development of DUPIC process line and deployment of 20 each process equipment and examination instruments in DFDF. - powder and pellet characterization study was done at PIEF based on the simfuel study results, and 30 DUPIC pellets were successfully produced. - the manufactured pellets were used for sample fuel rods irradiated in July,2000 in HANARO research reactor in KAERI and has been under post irradiation examination. (Hong, J. S.)

  10. Pellet fueling development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.; Milora, S.L.; Schuresko, D.D.; Combs, S.K.; Lunsford, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    A pellet injector development program has been under way at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1976 with the goals of developing D 2 , T 2 pellet fuel injectors capable of reliable repetitive fueling of reactors and of continued experimentation on contemporary plasma devices. The development has focused primarily on two types of injectors that show promise. One of these injectors is the centrifuge-type injector, which accelerates pellets in a high speed rotating track. The other is the gas or pneumatic gun, which accelerates pellets in a gun barrel using compressed helium of H 2 gas

  11. Manufacturing technology and process for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shigeru

    1996-01-01

    Following recent advanced technologies, processes and requests of the design changes of BWR fuel, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. (NFI) has upgraded the manufacturing technology and honed its own skills to complete its brand-new automated facility in Tokai in the latter half of 1980's. The plant uses various forms of automation throughout the manufacturing process: the acceptance of uranium dioxide powder, pelletizing, fuel rod assembling, fuel bundle assembling and shipment. All processes are well computerized and linked together to establish the integrated control system with three levels of Production and Quality Control, Process Control and Process Automation. This multi-level system plays an important role in the quality assurance system which generates the highest quality of fuels and other benefits. (author)

  12. Remote fabrication of pellet fuels for United States breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, R.E.; Nyman, D.H.; Yatabe, J.M.

    1979-04-01

    Goal of the program is to demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating breeder fuel in a remotely operated and maintained mode by 1985. Development for pellet fuel fabrication is in the engineering stage with much of the equipment for ceramic unit operations in final design or currently under testing. Results to date confirm that remote fabrication of pellet fuels is feasible. Several of the processes and equipment items are described in this report

  13. Apparatus for transferring nuclear fuel pellets to a plate loader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggins, T.B.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus is described for transferring nuclear fuel pellets from a grinding machine to a plate loader. It includes a frame, an endless belt fitted to the frame, a control system provided on it for actuating the belt at a preset speed, a V shaped vessel fitted directly above the belt and extending along its length to guide the pellets on the belt and a device to receive the pellets coming from the belt [fr

  14. Pellet-press-to-sintering-boat nuclear fuel pellet loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a system for loading nuclear fuel pellets into a sintering boat from a pellet press which ejects newly made the pellets from a pellet press die table surface. The system consists of: (a) a bowl having an inner surface, a longitudinal axis, an open and generally circular top of larger diameter, and an open and generally circular bottom of smaller diameter; (b) means for supporting the bowl in a generally upright position such that the bowl is rotatable about its longitudinal axis; (c) means for receiving the ejected pellets proximate the die table surface of the pellet press and for discharging the received pellets into the bowl at a location proximate the inner surface towards the top of the bowl with a pellet velocity having a horizontal component which is generally tangent to the inner surface of the bowl proximate the location; (d) means for rotating the bowl about the longitudinal axis such that the bowl proximate the location has a velocity generally equal, in magnitude and direction, to the horizontal component of the pellet velocity at the location; and (e) means for moving the sintering boat generally horizontally beneath and proximate the bottom of the bowl

  15. Pelletizing of rice straws: A potential solid fuel from agricultural residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puad, E.; Wan Asma, I; Shaharuddin, H.; Mahanim, S.; Rafidah, J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Rice straw is the dry stalks of rice plants, after the grain and chaff have been removed. More than 1 million tonnes of rice straw are produced in MADA in the northern region of Peninsular Malaysia annually. Burning in the open air is the common technique of disposal that contribute to air pollution. In this paper, a technique to convert these residues into solid fuel through pelletizing is presented. The pellets are manufactured from rice straw and sawdust in a disc pelletizer. The pellet properties are quite good with good resistance to mechanical disintegration. The pellets have densities between 1000 and 1200 kg/ m 3 . Overall, converting rice straw into pellets has increased its energy and reduced moisture content to a minimum of 8 % and 30 % respectively. The gross calorific value is about 15.6 MJ/ kg which is lower to sawdust pellet. The garnering of knowledge in the pelletization process provides a path to increase the use of this resource. Rice straw pellets can become an important renewable energy source in the future. (author)

  16. Fabrication of nano-structured UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kang, Ki Won; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Dong Joo; Kim, Jong Heon; Kim, Keon Sik; Song, Kun Woo

    2007-01-01

    Nano-structured materials have received much attention for their possibility for various functional materials. Ceramics with a nano-structured grain have some special properties such as super plasticity and a low sintering temperature. To reduce the fuel cycle costs and the total mass of spent LWR fuels, it is necessary to extend the fuel discharged burn-up. In order to increase the fuel burn-up, it is important to understand the fuel property of a highly irradiated fuel pellet. Especially, research has focused on the formation of a porous and small grained microstructure in the rim area of the fuel, called High Burn-up Structure (HBS). The average grain size of HBS is about 300nm. This paper deals with the feasibility study on the fabrication of nano-structured UO 2 pellets. The nano sized UO 2 particles are prepared by a combined process of a oxidation-reducing and a mechanical milling of UO 2 powder. Nano-structured UO 2 pellets (∼300nm) with a density of ∼93%TD can be obtained by sintering nano-sized UO 2 compacts. The SEM study reveals that the microstructure of the fabricated nano-structure UO 2 pellet is similar to that of HBS. Therefore, this bulk nano-structured UO 2 pellet can be used as a reference pellet for a measurement of the physical properties of HBS

  17. Automation of Nuclear Fuel Pellet Quality Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyvan, Shahla; Song, Xiaolong

    2001-01-01

    It would be highly desirable to automate the pellet inspection process, which at the present time is done by humans using the naked eye for inspection. A prototype of an automated inspection system was developed. The system examines photographic images of pellets using various artificial intelligence techniques for image analysis and defect classification. The steps in the process are described

  18. Pellet production methods for fueling fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedmueller, W.

    1980-10-01

    A review is given of the methods developed for producing and positioning hydrogen isotope pellets which are used for filling magnetic confinement machines. Composite pellets used in inertial confinement (i.e. laser fusion) experiments are not considered in this review. (orig.)

  19. Pellet-clad interaction in water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this seminar is was to draw up a comprehensive picture of the pellet clad interaction and its impact on the fuel rod. This document is a detailed abstract of the papers presented during the following five sessions: industrial goals, fuel material behaviour in PCI situation, cladding behaviour relevant to PCI, in pile rod behaviour and modelling of the mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding. (A.L.B.)

  20. Analysis of pellet cladding mechanical interaction margins in PWR fuel under power ramp condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jong Sung; Lee, Jin Seok; Kim, Hyeong Koo; Chung, Jing On [Korea Nuclear Fuel, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Mitchell, David; Aleshin, Yuriy [Westinghouse Electric Company, South Carolina (Colombia)

    2008-10-15

    Small flaws in PWR and BWR fuel such as a missing pellet surface (MPS), pellet fragmentation and cladding defects, play an important role during conditions when there is pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) under power ramp conditions. In order to confirm the margin against PWR fuel failure by PCMI with the pellet and cladding imperfections, first the separating hoop stress for cladding failure is determined using the ANSYS FEA model for failed and intact fuel rods under various power ramp conditions. Second, the idealized rod power history is developed to achieve the maximum uniform cladding stress during the normal operational transients. Finally, the stress multiplication factor is calculated with the FEA model to deal with the effect of various shapes and sizes of MPS, pellet fragmentation and cladding defects on the PCMI behavior. Then the stress multiplication factor with pellet imperfections and cladding defects allowed by manufacturing tolerances is applied to the fuel performance analysis code results using the idealized power history to confirm margin to PCMI under power ramp condition.

  1. Niobia-doped UO2 fuel manufacturing experience at British nuclear fuels Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.; Wood, G.A.; Perkins, C.P.

    1998-01-01

    BNFL Fuel Division has made niobia doped fuel for over twenty years in its Springfields Research and Development facilities. This paper reviews this experience together with feedback from successful in-reactor and laboratory tests. Recent experience in qualifying and manufacturing niobia doped fuel pellets for a European PWR will be described. (author)

  2. Study of secular equilibrium reinstatement on UO{sub 2} pellets manufactured by AUC route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnaval, João Paulo R.; Beltran, Dalton J.M.C.; Oliveira, Carlos A., E-mail: joaocarnaval@inb.gov.br, E-mail: daltonbeltran@inb.gov.br, E-mail: carlossilva@inb.gov.br [Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The fuel assemblies manufactured by INB for Angra-1 power plant has axial blanket fuel rods which must be inspected due the columns formed by different enrichment pellets. The equipment used for inspection is built with a group of BGO scintillators detectors which measurement principle is based on the absorption of gamma rays emitted from Uranium decay. The commercial grade UF{sub 6} used by INB is stored into cylinders type 30B. The uranium inside these cylinders is in secular equilibrium before the processing. It has been found that the AUC route causes the loss of that equilibrium because the UF{sub 6} is volatilized from the cylinder and the uranium daughters remain in the container. As AUC is converted to powder and pellets, the secular equilibrium is restored through time. The purpose of this work is to present a study of the secular equilibrium reinstatement on UO{sub 2} pellets manufactured by AUC route before being inspected on Rod Scanner. (author)

  3. Automatic surface flaw inspection of nuclear fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLemore, D.R.; Nyman, D.H.; Wilks, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, is developing automated equipment for fabrication and inspection of nuclear reactor fuels. One inspection process that has been evaluated is automatic surface flaw inspection of nuclear fuel pellets. The inspection technique involves projecting a well-defined spot of light onto the surface of a rotating pellet and collecting the light specularly reflected from the pellet's surface. The data form a binary description of the surface topography, which is then processed to identify and quantify flaw attributes before accept/reject decisions are made. The inspection apparatus is designed to operate at a rate of three pellets per second. A unique flaw interpretation algorithm is used to evaluate surface acceptability. The size and shape of a flaw is characterized by its area and by its area-to-perimeter ratio

  4. Fuel pellets from biomass - Processing, bonding, raw materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelte, W.

    2011-12-15

    . C resulted in severe degradation of biomass polymers, thus reducing the ability to form strong inter-particle bonds and resulting in poor mechanical properties of the manufactured pellets. The results can be used to give an indication for finding the right compromise of high energy density, improved grindability, and sufficient pellet stability. (Author)

  5. Fuel Pellets from Wheat Straw: The Effect of Lignin Glass Transition and Surface Waxes on Pelletizing Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang Stelte; Craig Clemons; Jens K. Holm; Jesper Ahrenfeldt; Ulrik B. Henriksen; Anand R. Sanadi

    2012-01-01

    The utilization of wheat straw as a renewable energy resource is limited due to its low bulk density. Pelletizing wheat straw into fuel pellets of high density increases its handling properties but is more challenging compared to pelletizing wood biomass. Straw has a lower lignin content and a high concentration of hydrophobic waxes on its outer surface that may limit...

  6. FBFC's gadolinium fuel assembly manufacturing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Eynde, M.; Belvegue, P.

    1999-01-01

    The burnable poison used by Framatome is gadolinium oxide integrated in the pellet by blending with UO 2 . This is the integrated poison which provides the largest experience feedback world-wide. Its main advantages are design flexibility and its well-known rod in reactor behaviour. FBFC's manufacturing experience with gadolinium is extensive. The first pellets were produced in 1986, present production averages 10 tons/year and cumulated experience reaches 47 tons. In parallel Framatome acquired gadolinium irradiation experience with more then 2 000 fuel assemblies in 33 reactors in 5 countries. Taking into account the increasing needs, a new gadolinium shop has been implemented in the FBFC Dessel plant. This shop, with a production capacity of 30 tU/yr is to be commissioned in the second quarter of 1999. It implements the most recent technological developments to achieve top product quality, safety and environment protection. (authors)

  7. Manufacturing experience of PHWR and LWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, C.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear power contributes ∼ 16% to global electricity. Presently, some 441 nuclear power reactors, with total installed capacity of ∼ 358 GWe, are in operation in 32 countries. Nuclear energy is an inevitable option for meeting the ever-increasing demand of electricity without degrading the environment. For judicious utilization of natural uranium and thorium resources, it would be essential to adapt a closed nuclear fuel cycle in coming years. Natural and enriched uranium oxide fuels are likely to be replaced by mixed uranium plutonium oxide or ThO 2 -based mixed oxide fuels containing 235 U, 239 Pu or 233 U fissile material. The current powder-pellet-route is associated with the problem of radiotoxic dust hazard and should be replaced by dust-free advanced routes like SGMP for remote and automated manufacturing of highly radiotoxic 233 U or Pu-bearing mixed oxide fuels. The combined SGMP-LTS process for fabrication of UO 2 and (U,Pu)O 2 fuel pellets not only minimizes radiotoxic dust hazard but leads to significant energy saving. The ever-expanding nuclear power programme in India should see massive expansion in zirconium, UO 2 and (U,Pu)O 2 production in coming years

  8. Evaluation of Large Grained UO{sub 2} Pellet's Manufacturability in a Commercial Plant and Development of its Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jae; Lee, J. N.; Lee, S. J. [Korea Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2007-02-15

    To apply the various methods for grain growth of the fuel pellet to the commercial manufacturing process, which have been developed through the 'Advanced Fuel Pellet Development Program' in KAERI, it is necessary to conduct the performance test on the mass product line of UO{sub 2} pellets. For this purpose there are two main areas to be evaluated: The first area is the manufacturability of the lab-developed methods on large volume equipment (kg-batch) and commercial manufacturing scale. As a second part the material characteristics should satisfy the specification requirements for the UO{sub 2} pellet design. Above all, the applicability tests for the 'Seed' and 'Micro-doping' technology respectively were performed in the KNFC UO{sub 2} pellet commercial product line. These tests focused on the manufacturability on mass production and acceptable properties of the developed samples on demands of UO{sub 2} pellet design criteria. The tests showed very positive results. Judging from all the test results, the Al micro-doping method is likely to be the best way to enhance the grain size of UO{sub 2} pellet in the KNFC commercial product line without installation of any additional equipment. Through a series of additional reproducibility tests and process optimization, the micro-doping technology will be good applied for X-gen fuel pellet in the near future.

  9. Comparison of film-coated retarded release pellets manufactured by layering technique or by bed rotor pelletization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priese, Florian; Frisch, Toni; Wolf, Bertram

    2015-06-01

    In order to investigate the influence of coatings for controlled active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) release, two types of pellets were used. Microcrystalline pellets were coated with a model API using the Wurster fluidized bed technique in laboratory scale (layered Cellets). Another type of pellets consisting of microcrystalline cellulose and model API was manufactured by fluidized bed rotor pelletization (matrix pellets (MP)). Both kinds of pellets were coated in a Wurster fluidized bed process with a polymer mixture of ethylcellulose to achieve retarded API release. With layered Cellets and an increased thickness of the ethylcellulose layer, the lag-time was increased and the release rate was decreased. In the case of MP, retardation was less pronounced probable due to inhomogeneous polymer film formation as a result of the porous particle surface. To reduce the surface roughness, the MP were coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as an intermediate smoothing layer, in a first trial step by step. In a second trial, pelletization and the coating steps were performed in an uninterrupted process. Intermediate PVP coating improved the ethylcellulose film formation and led to a more pronounced retardation of API release. The uninterrupted process of matrix pellet manufacturing and coating results in a product with only low retarded release.

  10. Improved nuclear fuel pellet design to eliminate the RIM effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulenko, J.S.; Wang, J.

    2007-01-01

    The University of Florida has proposed a new Pellet design which will eliminate the rim effect for light water reactor (LWR) fuel for both present and anticipated future burnup targets. The design implements a 200 micron rim of natural uranium in place of the normal enriched uranium. This rim is very similar to the Integral Fuel Burnable concept of Westinghouse. An analysis based on the Monteburn Monte-Carlo burnup code shows that the rim region of the new design is 116% of the average burnup compared to 151% for the current pellet designs. The proposed design can increase the burnup by 33% over current designs without encountering the rim effect phenomenon. (authors)

  11. Method and device for removing nuclear fuel pellets from a metal fuel can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, C.D. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    There are to be removed the pellets from a nuclear fuel rod without being destroyed by the process. For this purpose at one end of the fuel rod an opening is produced, through which a fluid is pressed at high pressure. Thereby the can is expanded and subsequently cut open by means of a cutting device. The pellets then may slip out. (TK) [de

  12. Summary of fueling by pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, L.D.

    1978-01-01

    Model-based studies were presented which indicated in all cases that shielding will occur, but there was not total agreement in these studies on the mechanism of the shielding. The data from the pellet ablation experiment on ORMAK was explained by considering the plasma electron flux, incident on the pellet surface, to create an ablated neutral cloud which self-consistently attenuates the incident electron flux. The lack of total agreement in the studies comes about when extending this to tokamak reactor plasmas. Various groups contended either that this mechanism would continue to dominate in reactor plasmas, or that it would be modified by a comparable heat flux from alphas, or that it would be modified somewhat by electrostatic shielding because of electron flux induced charge buildup on the pellet, or that it would be modified by ionization of the neutral cloud yielding a plasma cloud shield, or that this same plasma cloud would exclude magnetic field causing deflection of the incident electron flux and therefore additional shielding

  13. UO2 fuel pellet characterization: density and porosity measurement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopuz, B.; Bayram, Y.; Colak, L. and others

    1997-01-01

    The most commonly used fuel in nuclear power plants is UO 2 . UO 2 is a ceramic material and is produced by powder metallurgy techniques. The densities of the material produced can never reach the theoretical densities because of the production technology. The porosity allows the gas fission products, generated under power plant working conditions, to escape and therefor is required. Direct measurement of density which is an application of the Archimedes principle, is based on replacement of liquids. Replacement fluid is m-xylene. Density measurement are made by weighing the dry pellets in air, then weighing the m-xylene impregnated pellets in air and m-xylene impregnated pellets in air and m-xylene. UO 2 pellets densities, total porosities and open porosities can be calculated from the collection data

  14. Breeder fuel pellet fabrication from gel-sphere conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLemore, D.R.; Bennett, D.W.; Hart, P.E.; Norman, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    The development of automated nuclear fuel fabrication methods is the goal of the United States breeder reactor program and will form the technological basis for the future breeder reactor fuel supply. A major factor in achieving this goal is the development of remotely operated fuel fabrication equipment. The program schedule is to demonstrate the feasibility of automated pellet fuel fabrication and remote maintenance techniques by the mid-1980's. Development of major ceramic unit operations and the required computer control system is currently in the engineering testing stage. This report describes the planned program activities for evaluating the gel-sphere conversion process and demonstrating the fabrication of breeder fuel pellets from these gel-derived spheres

  15. DUPIC nuclear fuel manufacturing and process technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, J. J.; Lee, J. W. [and others

    2000-05-01

    In this study, DUPIC fuel fabrication technology and the active fuel laboratory were developed for the study of spent nuclear fuel. A new nuclear fuel using highly radioactive nuclear materials can be studied at the active fuel laboratory. Detailed DUPIC fuel fabrication process flow was developed considering the manufacturing flow, quality control process and material accountability. The equipment layout of about twenty DUPIC equipment at IMEF M6 hot cell was established for the minimization of the contamination during DUPIC processes. The characteristics of the SIMFUEL powder and pellets was studied in terms of milling conditions. The characteristics of DUPIC powder and pellet was studied by using 1 kg of spent PWR fuel at PIEF nr.9405 hot cell. The results were used as reference process conditions for following DUPIC fuel fabrication at IMEF M6. Based on the reference fabrication process conditions, the main DUPIC pellet fabrication campaign has been started at IMEF M6 using 2 kg of spent PWR fuel since 2000 January. As of March 2000, about thirty DUPIC pellets were successfully fabricated.

  16. DUPIC nuclear fuel manufacturing and process technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, J. J.; Lee, J. W.

    2000-05-01

    In this study, DUPIC fuel fabrication technology and the active fuel laboratory were developed for the study of spent nuclear fuel. A new nuclear fuel using highly radioactive nuclear materials can be studied at the active fuel laboratory. Detailed DUPIC fuel fabrication process flow was developed considering the manufacturing flow, quality control process and material accountability. The equipment layout of about twenty DUPIC equipment at IMEF M6 hot cell was established for the minimization of the contamination during DUPIC processes. The characteristics of the SIMFUEL powder and pellets was studied in terms of milling conditions. The characteristics of DUPIC powder and pellet was studied by using 1 kg of spent PWR fuel at PIEF nr.9405 hot cell. The results were used as reference process conditions for following DUPIC fuel fabrication at IMEF M6. Based on the reference fabrication process conditions, the main DUPIC pellet fabrication campaign has been started at IMEF M6 using 2 kg of spent PWR fuel since 2000 January. As of March 2000, about thirty DUPIC pellets were successfully fabricated

  17. Radial voidage variation in fixed beds of fuel wood pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, Stefan; Krumm, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Fixed beds of fuel wood are commonly found in numerous processes: storage and transportation, drying and thermal conversion such as combustion or gasification. Pellets in particular are mostly used as fuel for domestic heating boilers. The characterization of spatial voidage distribution is of great importance for flow and reactor modelling. The present study focuses on the radial porosity variations of cylindrical beds of commercially available wood pellets. The experimental procedure is based on the classical technique of consolidating packed beds with a resin. The radial voidage distribution of three different cylindrical beds is determined by image analysis of sections of the solidified packing. The results are discussed and summarized in a mathematical expression correlating the radial voidage distribution depending on packing core porosity and dimensionless distance from the tube wall. -- Highlights: ► Packing characteristics for commercially available wood pellets were investigated. ► Radial porosity variations of cylindrical pellets beds were investigated. ► Epoxy resin consolidated packings were investigated by image analysis. ► Mathematical term for radial voidage distribution of pellet packing was derived.

  18. Comparative analysis of thermal behavior in hollow nuclear fuel pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Beatriz M. dos; Alvim, Antonio C.M., E-mail: bmachado@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: aalvim@gmail.com [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    The increase in energy demand in Brazil and in the world is a real problem and several solutions are being considered to mitigate it. Maximization of energy generation, within the safety standards of fuel resources already known, is one of them. In this respect, nuclear energy is a crucial technology to sustain energy demand on several countries. Performances of a solid cylindrical and an annular rod have been verified and compared; where it has been proven that the annular rod can reach a higher nominal power in relation to the solid one. In this paper, the temperature profiles of two distinct nuclear fuel pellets, one of them annular and the other in the shape of a hollow biconcave disc (like the cross section of a red blood cell), were compared to analyze the efficiency and safety of both. The finite differences method allowed the evaluation of the thermal behavior of these pellets, where one specific physical condition was analyzed, regarding convection and conduction at the lateral edges. The results show that the temperature profile of the hollow biconcave disc pellet is lower, about 70 deg C below, when compared to the temperature profile of the annular pellet, considering the same simulation parameters for both pellets. (author)

  19. Advanced fuel pellet materials and designs for water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    This meeting was the second IAEA meeting on this subject. The first was held in 1996 in Tokyo, Japan. They are all part of a cooperative effort through the Technical Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (TWGFPT) of IAEA, with a series of three further meetings organized by CEA, France and co-sponsored by the IAEA and OECD/NEA. In the seven years since the first meeting took place, the demands on fuel duties have increased, with higher burnup, longer fuel cycles and higher temperatures. This places additional demands on fuel performance to comply with safety requirements. Criteria relative to fuel components, i.e. pellets and fuel rod column, require limiting of fission gas release and pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). This means that fuel components should maintain the composite of rather contradictory properties from the beginning until the end of its in-pile operation. Fabrication and design tools are available to influence, and to some extent, to ensure desirable in-pile fuel properties. Discussion of these tools was one of the objectives of the meeting. The second objective was the analysis of fuel characteristics at high burnup and the third and last objective was the discussion of specific feature of MOX and urania gadolinia fuels. Sixty specialists in the field of fuel fabrication technology attended the meeting from 18 countries. Twenty-five papers were presented in five sessions covering all relevant topics from the practices and modelling of fuel fabrication technology to its optimization. Eight papers were presented in session 'Optimization of fuel fabrication technology' which all were devoted to fuel fabrication technology. They mostly treated methods for optimizing fuel manufacturing processes, but gave also a good overview on nuclear fabrication needs and capabilities in different countries. During Session 'UO 2 , MOX and UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 pellets with additives', six papers were presented in this session, which dealt mainly

  20. Process for the fabrication of nuclear fuel oxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, Bernard; Paradis, Yves.

    1977-01-01

    Process for the fabrication of nuclear fuel oxide pellets of the type for which particles charged with an organic binder -selected from the group that includes polyvinyl alcohol, carboxymethyl cellulose, polyvinyl compounds and methyl cellulose- are prepared from a powder of such an oxide, for instance uranium dioxide. These particles are then compressed into pellets which are then sintered. Under this process the binder charged particles are prepared by stirring the powder with a gas, spraying on to the stirred powder a solution or a suspension in a liquid of this organic binder in order to obtain these particles and then drying the particles so obtained with this gas [fr

  1. Variations in the wood raw material for pellets manufacture and its influence on the quality of wood pellets; Variationer inom traeraavaran foer pelletstillverkning och deras paaverkan paa pelletskvaliteten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jirjis, Raida; Vinterbaeck, Johan; Engberg, Jessica [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Bioenergy; Oehman, Marcus [ETC Energitekniskt Centrum, Piteaa (Sweden)

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this project was to study the variations in properties of raw material and its effect on pellets quality. The project included three parts which together would help describe the relationship between material properties, process parameters and fuel quality. The first part dealt with a small-scale production of pellets using a well defined raw material. The objectives of this part were to study the effect of tree species, stem diameter and storage of raw material on pellets quality. In the second part of the project data concerning characteristics of raw material and product quality were collected from two pellet factories: SAABI AB, where spruce is the major raw material, and Bioenergi i Luleaa AB, which uses mainly sawdust from pine. The objectives of this part of the project were to analyse and evaluate the relationship between raw material properties/process parameters and fuel quality using multivariate data analysis. Part three of this project involved a questionnaire survey in which pellets producers were asked at four occasions during one year of production, to give information about variations in raw material properties during various seasons, characteristics of the material during pressing and to supply data related to process parameters. Data concerning variations in pellet quality during the whole year were also requested. The sawdust used in the first part of the project was originated from small diameter trees (14 cm in average) and large diameter stems (30-36 cm) of Scots pine and Norway spruce. One third of the material was dried at room temperature to a moisture content (MC) around 12 % (fresh weight basis), then frozen until needed. The rest of the material was stored in 32 plastic net bags in a large outdoor pile during the period end of May-January. The average dry matter loss in all assortments after eight months of storage was about 0.5 % per month. An attempt to produce pellets from the fresh and stored material from the various

  2. A model for radial cesium transport in a fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imoto, Shosuke

    1989-01-01

    In order to explain the radial redistribution of cesium in an irradiated pellet, a two-step release model is proposed. The first step involves the migration of cesium by atomic diffusion to some channels, such as grain boundaries and cracks, and the second step assumes a thermomigration down along the temperature gradient. Distribution profiles of cesium are obtained by numerical calculation with the present model assuming a constant and spatially uniform birth rate of cesium in the pellet. The result agrees well with the profile observed by micro-gamma scanning for the LWR fuel in the outer region of the pellet but diverges from it at the inner region. Discussion is made on the steady-state model hitherto generally utilized. (orig.)

  3. Study of an alternative method for inspection of rods with UO{sub 2} pellets early manufactured

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnaval, João Paulo R.; Oliveira, Carlos A.; Beltran, Dalton J.M.C., E-mail: joaocarnaval@inb.gov.br, E-mail: carlossilva@inb.gov.br, E-mail: daltonbeltran@inb.gov.br [Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Gerência de Engenharia do Produto e Gerência de Análise do Combustível

    2017-07-01

    The inspection of the fuel rods manufactured at INB, for production of fuel assemblies, is based on a group of scintillators detectors in series scanning the products. These detectors capture the gamma rays emitted on the decay of uranium isotopes (passive measurement) and determine the enrichment level ({sup 235}U weight percent) of the UO{sub 2} pellets inside the fuel rods. During the inspection of fuel rods for Angra-1 21{sup st} Reload, it was found that the 2.6% {sup 235}U and 4.15% {sup 235}U pellets stacks behave as 2.6% {sup 235}U only. The investigation of this event allowed to conclude that the measurement of enrichment may be affected by the loss of the secular equilibrium among uranium isotopes and their decay products caused by the AUC precipitation during the UO{sub 2} powder and pellet fabrication. Therefore, the spectrum background created by Compton scattering, inside Rod Scanner detectors, from high energies of {sup 238}U products decay affect the {sup 235}U% measurement. After continuous measurements, the 2.6% {sup 235}U and 4.15% {sup 235}U pellets stacks became distinguished and the results were used to calculate an 'equilibrium factor'. It was concluded that after 35 days the UO{sub 2} powder should reach approximately 60% of secular equilibrium reinstatement and the rods assembled with the pellets produced from this powder would be adequate for inspection on Rod Scanner. It was concluded that would be possible to achieve the equilibrium factor by blending a lot of UO{sub 2} powder manufactured a long time ago (old powder) with another lot early manufactured (young powder) resulting in a lot which would provide pellets and, consequently, rods adequate for inspection by Rod Scanner. This work presents a study of an alternative method to perform the inspection of fuel rods with UO{sub 2} pellets early manufactured aiming to provide quality assurance for the product. (author)

  4. Model for the behaviour of thorium and uranium fuels at pelletization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira Neto, Ricardo Alberto

    2000-11-01

    In this work, a model for the behaviour of thorium-uranium-mixed oxide microspheres in the pelletizing process is presented. This model was developed in a program whose objective was to demonstrate the viability of producing fissile material through the utilization of thorium in pressurized water reactors. This is important because it allows the saving of the strategic uranium reserves, and makes it possible the nuclear utilization of the large brazilian thorium reserves. The objective was to develop a model for optimizing physical properties of the microspheres, such as density, fracture strength and specific surface, so as to produce fuel pellets with microstructure, density, open porosity and impurity content, in accordance with the fuel specification. And, therefore, to adjust the sol-gel processing parameters in order to obtain these properties, and produce pellets with an optimized microstructure, adequate to a stable behaviour under irradiation. The model made it clear that to achieve this objective, it is necessary to produce microspheres with density and specific surface as small as possible. By changing the sol-gel processing parameters, microspheres with the desired properties were produced, and the model was experimentally verified by manufacturing fuel pellets with optimized microstructures, density, open porosity and impurity content, meeting the specifications for this new nuclear fuel for pressurized water reactors. Furthermore it was possible to obtain mathematical expressions that enables to calculate from the microspheres properties and the utilized compaction pressure, the sinter density that will be obtained in the sintered pellet and the necessary compaction pressure to reach the sintered density specified for the fuel. (author)

  5. Metrology for Fuel Cell Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocker, Michael [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Stanfield, Eric [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2015-02-04

    The project was divided into three subprojects. The first subproject is Fuel Cell Manufacturing Variability and Its Impact on Performance. The objective was to determine if flow field channel dimensional variability has an impact on fuel cell performance. The second subproject is Non-contact Sensor Evaluation for Bipolar Plate Manufacturing Process Control and Smart Assembly of Fuel Cell Stacks. The objective was to enable cost reduction in the manufacture of fuel cell plates by providing a rapid non-contact measurement system for in-line process control. The third subproject is Optical Scatterfield Metrology for Online Catalyst Coating Inspection of PEM Soft Goods. The objective was to evaluate the suitability of Optical Scatterfield Microscopy as a viable measurement tool for in situ process control of catalyst coatings.

  6. Nuclear fuel manufacture and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power accounts for approximately 17% of the world's total electrical energy production. Over 30 countries operate in excess of 430 nuclear power plants with a combined generating capacity of more than 340 000 MWe. BNFL is a leading force in the international nuclear industry, supplying products and services across the complete fuel cycle business spectrum. These services and products include fuel and intermediate products manufacture, reprocessing, transport, waste management and decommissioning. This paper describes the processes involved in taking uranium ore as a raw material through to the production of advanced fuels and focuses on the manufacture and technology for both uranium oxide (UO 2 ) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuels. As a light water reactor (LWR) fuel fabricator, BNFL is able to manufacture MOX or UO 2 fuel utilizing recycled uranium. This paper discusses the technology involved in the use of plutonium or uranium oxide recovered from reprocessing and other advanced fuel technical issues. Improved production methods and the application of advanced engineering permits the next generation of fuel fabrication plants to capitalize on advances in technology. The long-term research and development (R and D) commitments by BNFL are outlined in this paper, indicating the levels of investment needed in R and D to accommodate a high technology company in an international market. (author)

  7. Nuclear fuel rod with retainer for pellet stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloue, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The rod, usable in pressurized water reactors, comprises a stack of fuel pellets and means holding the stack against an end plug of the fuel can during handling operations. These means include a radially expansive element (retainer) of which the shape is so that when it is free at ambient temperature it is gripping the inside of the casing, and a temperature sensitive spacer which contracts the retainer to release it from the casing at a temperature between the ambient and the operating temperature of a reactor [fr

  8. Numerical analysis of the influence of the fuel pellet shape on the pellet-cladding contact condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marajofsky, Adolfo; Denis, Alicia C.; Soba, Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    One of the problems of greater concern in nuclear fuels operation is that of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), since it may be cause of fuel failure. In unfailed claddings, the occurrence of contact with the pellet is generally evidenced by a typical deformation pattern known as bamboo effect. In the present work different pellets' shapes are proposed, all of them with a chamfer next to the top and bottom surfaces. The performance of these pellets design is simulated with a numerical code, DIONISIO, previously developed in this working group, which makes use of the finite elements method. It provides the temperature, stress and strain distribution and the inventory of fission gases by analyzing phenomena like thermal expansion, elasticity, plasticity, creep, irradiation growth, PCI, swelling and densification. The pellets' design tested are grouped into two types: those with a straight chamfer running from the central pellet plane to both extremes (R-type pellets) and those with the chamfer occupying one quarter of the pellet's height leaving a central ring of the standard, cylindrical shape (M-type pellets). Different chamfer depths were numerically tested. It was found that the gap increase associated with the introduction of a deep chamfer is responsible for a significant temperature increment. But chamfers which leave a gap of 110 to 150 μm (assuming a normal fuel element with a gap 90 μm thick) gave place to pellets with an adequate thermal response and, moreover, the disappearance of the bamboo effect or even the appearance of an inverse effect, that is, pellets which make contact with the cladding in the region around its middle plane. (author) [es

  9. Method of manufacturing fuel cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oizumi, C.H.; Uesugi, J.N.

    1977-01-01

    The manufacture of fuel cores for coated nuclear fuels which are to be used in gas-cooled high temperature reactors is described. By addition of β-1.4-glucane to Th, U, or Pu cmpounds there is obtained a mixture, in the presence of a dispersion medium, is granulated to small spheres which are dried, heated and later provided with a coating. 16 examples illustrate details of the method. (UWI) [de

  10. Fuel rod with axial regions of annular and standard fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, T.R.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel rod for use in a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It comprises: an elongated hollow cladding tube; a pair of end plugs connected to and sealing the cladding tube at opposite ends of thereof; and an axial stack of fuel pellets contained in and extending between the end plugs at the opposite ends of the tube, all of the fuel pellets contained in the tube being composed of fissile material being enriched above the level of natural enrichment; the fuel pellets in the stack thereof being provided in an arrangement of axial regions. The arrangement of axial regions including a pair of first axial regions defined respectively at the opposite ends of the pellet stack adjacent to the respective end plugs. The pellets in the first axial regions being identical in number and having annular configurations with an annulus of a first void size. The arrangement of axial regions also including another axial region defined between the first axial regions, some of the pellets in the another axial region having solid configurations

  11. Method of manufacturing sintered nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watarumi, Kazutoshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain composite pellets with an improved strength. Method: A core mainly composed of fuel materials is previously prepared, embedded into the central portion of a pellet, silted therearound with cladding material, and then pressmolded and sintered. For instance, a rugby-ball like core body with the maximum outer diameter of 6 mm and the height of 6 mm is made by compressive molding with uranium dioxide powder, then coating material comprising the same powder incorporated with 0.1 % by weight of SiC fibers is filled around the core body, which is molded into a composite pellet by means of pressing and then sintered at 1600 0 C, to obtain a sintered pellet of 93.5 % theoretical density. As the result of the compression test for the pellet, it showed a strength greater by 15 % than that of the similar mono-layer pellet. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Fabrication of DUPIC fuel pellets using high burn-up spent PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Won; Park, Geun-Il; Choi, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Technology for the direct usage of a spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors (DUPIC) was developed in KAERI to reduce the amount of spent fuel. DUPIC fuel pellets were fabricated using a dry processing method to re-fabricate CANDU fuel from spent PWR fuel without any intentional separation of fissile materials or fission products. The DUPIC fuel element fabrication process satisfied a quality assurance program in accordance with the Canadian standard. For the DUPIC fuels with various fuel burn-ups between 27,300 and 65,000 MWd/tU, the sintered pellet density decreased with increasing fuel burn-ups. Fission gas releases and powder properties of the spent fuel also influenced the DUPIC fuel characteristics. Measurement of cesium content released from green pellets revealed that their sintered density significantly depended on sintering temperature history. It was useful to establish a DUPIC fuel fabrication technology in which a high-burn-up fuel with 65,000 MWd/tU was treated. (author)

  13. Compaction of AWBA fuel pellets without binders (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.G.R.

    1982-08-01

    Highly active oxide fuel powders, composed of UO 2 , UO 2 -ThO 2 , or ThO 2 , were compacted into ultra-high density pellets without the use of binders. The objective of the study was to select the optimum die lubricant for compacting these powders into pellets in preparation for sintering to densities in excess of 97% Theoretical Density. The results showed that sintered density was a function of both the lubricant bulk density and concentration with the lowest bulk density lubricant giving the highest sintered densities with a lubricant concentration of 0.1 weight percent. Five calcium and zinc stearates were evaluated with a calcium stearate with a 15 lb/ft 3 bulk density being the best lubricant

  14. DUPIC fuel irradiation test and performance evaluation; the performance analysis of pellet-cladding contact fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K. I.; Kim, H. M.; Yang, K. B.; Choi, S. J. [Suwon University, Whasung (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    Thermal and mechanical models were reviewed, and selected for the analysis of nuclear fuel performance in reactor. 2 dimensional FEM software was developed. Thermal models-gap conductances, thermal conductivity of pellets, fission gas release, temperature distribution-were set and packaged into a software. Both thermal and mechanical models were interrelated to each other, and the final results, fuel performance during irradiation is obtained by iteration calculation. Also, the contact phenomena between pellet and cladding was analysed by mechanical computer software which was developed during this work. dimensional FEM program was developed which estimate the mechanical behavior and the thermal behaviors of nuclear fuel during irradiation. Since there is a importance during the mechanical deformation analysis in describing pellet-cladding contact phenomena, simplified 2 dimensional calculation method is used after the contact. The estimation of thermal fuel behavior during irradiation was compared with the results of other. 8 refs., 17 figs. (Author)

  15. The current state of development works for manufacturing and methods of controlling the nuclear fuel for NPPs of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odeychuk, N.P.; Levenets, V.V.; Krasnorutsky, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results of NSC KIPT researches on manufacturing the fuel microspheres and pellets based on uranium dioxide. The data on fuel characteristics for different manufacturing stages are given. The problems of improving the fuel quality with changing the structure characteristics of pellets are considered. Demonstrated is the hardware for pellet controlling and presented are the new ways for developing the methods of controlling the nuclear fuel: X-ray fluorescent analysis; complex of nuclear-physical methods on the base of accelerators; laser-excitation energy-mass-spectrometer. (author)

  16. Development of manufacturing equipment and QC equipment for DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, J.J.; Lee, J.W.; Kim, S.S.; Yim, S.P.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, K.H.; Na, S.H.; Kim, W.K.; Shin, J.M.; Lee, D.Y.; Cho, K.H.; Lee, Y.S.; Sohn, J.S.; Kim, M.J.

    1999-05-01

    In this study, DUPIC powder and pellet fabrication equipment, welding system, QC equipment, and fission gas treatment are developed to fabricate DUPIC fuel at IMEF M6 hot cell. The systems are improved to be suitable for remote operation and maintenance with the manipulator at hot cell. Powder and pellet fabrication equipment have been recently developed. The systems are under performance test to check remote operation and maintenance. Welding chamber and jigs are designed and developed to remotely weld DUPIC fuel rod with manipulators at hot cell. Remote quality control equipment are being tested for analysis and inspection of DUPIC fuel characteristics at hot cell. And trapping characteristics is analyzed for cesium and ruthenium released under oxidation/reduction and sintering processes. The design criteria and process flow diagram of fission gas treatment system are prepared incorporating the experimental results. The fission gas treatment system has been successfully manufactured. (Author). 33 refs., 14 tabs., 91 figs

  17. Wood pellet seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarniala, M.; Puhakka, A.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the wood pellet seminar, arranged by OPET Finland and North Karelia Polytechnic, was to deliver information on wood pellets, pellet burners and boilers, heating systems and building, as well as on the activities of wood energy advisors. The first day of the seminar consisted of presentations of equipment and products, and of advisory desks for builders. The second day of the seminar consisted of presentations held by wood pellet experts. Pellet markets, the economy and production, the development of the pellet markets and their problems (in Austria), the economy of heating of real estates by different fuel alternatives, the production, delivery and marketing of wood pellets, the utilization of wood pellet in different utilization sites, the use of wood pellets in detached houses, pellet burners and fireplaces, and conversion of communal real estate houses to use wood pellets were discussed in the presentations. The presentations held in the third day discussed the utilization of wood pellets in power plants, the regional promotion of the production and the use of pellets. The seminar consisted also of visits to pellet manufacturing plant and two pellet burning heating plants

  18. Microencapsulation and fabrication of fuel pellets for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolen, R.L. Jr.; Kool, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    Various microencapsulation techniques were evaluated for fabrication of thermonuclear fuel pellets for use in existing experimental facilities studying inertial confinement fusion and in future fusion-power reactors. Coacervation, spray drying, in situ polymerization, and physical microencapsulation methods were employed. Highly spherical, hollow polymeric shells were fabricated ranging in size from 20 to 7000 micron. In situ polymerization microencapsulation with poly(methyl methacrylate) provided large shells, but problems with local wall defects still must be solved. Extension to other polymeric systems met with limited success. Requirements for inertial confinement fusion targets are described, as are the methods that were used

  19. Suitability of a flat die press for the manufacture of pharmaceutical pellets by extrusion/spheronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanam, Dima; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Flat die presses are commonly used for the compaction of food, wood, waste, feedstuff, and chemicals. Because of their large capacity, low price, and high production speed, flat die presses represent a promising alternative for conventional extruders used in the pharmaceutical industry. In this work the feasibility of using the flat die press 14-175 for the manufacture of pharmaceutical pellets by extrusion/spheronization was investigated. Pellet formulations containing different model drugs (theophylline, paracetamol, hydrochlorothiazide, or furosemide) and excipients (lactose, mannitol, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, or starch) with different solubility properties were produced using κ-carrageenan as pelletization aid. Pellets with high and low drug strength were tested. The prepared pellet formulations were assessed in terms of size, size distribution, shape, and release properties. All pellet formulations showed a high yield of the pelletization process and a narrow size distribution. The median aspect ratio was approximately 1.1 indicating acceptable roundness with exception of the pellets produced with high dose of furosemide because of the small-sized needle-shaped active ingredient. The dissolution profiles of the produced formulations showed fast drug release with low standard deviation thus suggesting good batch uniformity. The flat die press is a promising choice for the production of pellets by wet extrusion/spheronization with high formulation robustness.

  20. Pellet manufacturing by extrusion-spheronization using process analytical technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandler, Niklas; Rantanen, Jukka; Heinämäki, Jyrki

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phase transitions occurring in nitrofurantoin and theophylline formulations during pelletization by extrusion-spheronization. An at-line process analytical technology (PAT) approach was used to increase the understanding of the solid-state behavior of ...

  1. The manufacturing role in fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    Manufacturing companies have been involved in the CANDU fuel industry for more than 40 years. Early manufacturing contributions were the development of materials and processes used to fabricate the CANDU fuel bundle. As CANDU reactors were commissioned, the manufacturing contribution has been to produce economical, high quality fuel for the CANDU market. (author)

  2. Compactation pressure influence on the thermophysical properties of uranium dioxide fuel pellets produced with kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Andrade, Antonio Santos; Miranda, Odair; Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Migliorini, Fabricio Lima; Silva, Egonn Hendrigo Carvalho; Andrade, Roberto Marcio de

    2009-01-01

    Under compaction pressures ranging from 300 MPa up to 500 MPa, fuel pellets of uranium dioxide were manufactured by the pressing of kernels. These were produced by the sol-gel process developed in Germany by NUKEM for using in high temperature gas cooled reactors, which were absorbed, transferred and implanted at CDTN-Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear. The sintering was performed at 1700 deg C for two hours under argon with 4% hydrogen atmosphere, resulting sintered densities ranging from 9.33 g·cm -3 up to 10.08 g·cm -3 , determined by the xylol penetration-immersion method. Using the flash laser method, the thermophysical properties of the pellets were determined and thermal diffusivity ranging from 2.58 x 10 -6 m 2 ·s -1 up to 2.78 x 10 -6 m 2 ·s -1 and thermal conductivity from 6.22 m -1 ·K -1 up to 7.24 W·m -1 ·K -1 , corresponding to a decreasing of the porosity from 14.88% to 8.05%. The methodology is described and the influence of the compaction pressure on the pellet properties is also analyzed. The thermal conductivity results of this study will be very valuable to a project in development at CDTN, in which uranium dioxide pellets will be produced by the pressing of kernels, with beryllium oxide filling the voids between the kernels in order to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fuel and consequently, the thermal performance of the fuel rod, as required in extended burnup conditions. They will be used as reference to compare and calculate the favorable increase of the thermal conductivity, caused by the addition of beryllium oxide. (author)

  3. A study of bonding and failure mechanisms in fuel pellets from different biomass resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Holm, Jens K.; Sanadi, Anand R.

    2011-01-01

    Pelletization of biomass reduces its handling costs, and results in a fuel with a greater structural homogeneity. The aim of the present work was to study the strength and integrity of pellets and relate them to the quality and mechanisms of inter-particular adhesion bonding. The raw materials used...... were: beech, spruce and straw, representing the most common biomass types used for fuel pellet production, i.e. hardwoods, softwoods and grasses, respectively. The results showed that the compression strengths of the pellets were in general higher for pellets produced at higher temperatures, and much...

  4. CALCULATION OF STRESS AND DEFORMATION IN FUEL ROD CLADDING DURING PELLET-CLADDING INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dávid Halabuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The elementary parts of every fuel assembly, and thus of the reactor core, are fuel rods. The main function of cladding is hermetic separation of nuclear fuel from coolant. The fuel rod works in very specific and difficult conditions, so there are high requirements on its reliability and safety. During irradiation of fuel rods, a state may occur when fuel pellet and cladding interact. This state is followed by changes of stress and deformations in the fuel cladding. The article is focused on stress and deformation analysis of fuel cladding, where two fuels are compared: a fresh one and a spent one, which is in contact with cladding. The calculations are done for 4 different shapes of fuel pellets. It is possible to evaluate which shape of fuel pellet is the most appropriate in consideration of stress and deformation forming in fuel cladding, axial dilatation of fuel, and radial temperature distribution in the fuel rod, based on the obtained results.

  5. Characterization and property evaluation of (Th–3.75U)O{sub 2+x} fuel pellets fabricated by impregnated agglomerate pelletization (IAP) process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghra, C.; Sathe, D.B.; Prakash, A.; Mishra, A.K.; Afzal, Mohd [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC), Tarapur Complex 401502, Maharashtra (India); Panakkal, J.P., E-mail: panakkal@barctara.gov.in [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC), Tarapur Complex 401502, Maharashtra (India); Kamath, H.S. [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC), Tarapur Complex 401502, Maharashtra (India)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► Characterization of (Th–3.75%U)O{sub 2+x} pellet fabricated by a new technique i.e., impregnated agglomerate pelletization (IAP). ► Comparison with pellets fabricated by powder to pellet (POP) and coated agglomerate pelletization processes. ► Solid solution was more complete in POP and IAP pellets. ► Uranium distribution was less uniform in the pellets fabricated by the CAP route. -- Abstract: Impregnated agglomerate pelletization (IAP) process has been developed by Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Tarapur for the fabrication of (Th–3.75U)O{sub 2+x} mixed oxide fuel for Indian advanced heavy water reactors (AHWR). In this process, ThO{sub 2} spheroids were impregnated with uranyl nitrate solution and the resultant mixture was compacted to form green pellets which were sintered in the oxidizing atmosphere to obtain high density (Th–3.75%U)O{sub 2+x} pellets. An attempt has been made in this paper to characterize the pellets fabricated by IAP route. The characterization of the sintered IAP pellets was made by X-ray diffraction, EPMA, alpha autoradiography, chemical analysis, O/M ratio, immersion density and optical microscopy. The characteristics of (Th–U)O{sub 2} pellets fabricated by impregnated agglomerate pelletization (IAP) were also compared with those fabricated by coated agglomerate pelletization (CAP), and conventional powder pellet (POP) processes. In case of pellets fabricated by IAP route, XRD data showed the presence of single fluorite phase. The uranium concentration and grain size distribution were found to be uniform throughout the pellet. These phase characteristics were also found to be more uniform in pellets made by both IAP and POP processes as compared to pellets fabricated using the CAP process.

  6. Characterization and property evaluation of (Th–3.75U)O2+x fuel pellets fabricated by impregnated agglomerate pelletization (IAP) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baghra, C.; Sathe, D.B.; Prakash, A.; Mishra, A.K.; Afzal, Mohd; Panakkal, J.P.; Kamath, H.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Characterization of (Th–3.75%U)O 2+x pellet fabricated by a new technique i.e., impregnated agglomerate pelletization (IAP). ► Comparison with pellets fabricated by powder to pellet (POP) and coated agglomerate pelletization processes. ► Solid solution was more complete in POP and IAP pellets. ► Uranium distribution was less uniform in the pellets fabricated by the CAP route. -- Abstract: Impregnated agglomerate pelletization (IAP) process has been developed by Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Tarapur for the fabrication of (Th–3.75U)O 2+x mixed oxide fuel for Indian advanced heavy water reactors (AHWR). In this process, ThO 2 spheroids were impregnated with uranyl nitrate solution and the resultant mixture was compacted to form green pellets which were sintered in the oxidizing atmosphere to obtain high density (Th–3.75%U)O 2+x pellets. An attempt has been made in this paper to characterize the pellets fabricated by IAP route. The characterization of the sintered IAP pellets was made by X-ray diffraction, EPMA, alpha autoradiography, chemical analysis, O/M ratio, immersion density and optical microscopy. The characteristics of (Th–U)O 2 pellets fabricated by impregnated agglomerate pelletization (IAP) were also compared with those fabricated by coated agglomerate pelletization (CAP), and conventional powder pellet (POP) processes. In case of pellets fabricated by IAP route, XRD data showed the presence of single fluorite phase. The uranium concentration and grain size distribution were found to be uniform throughout the pellet. These phase characteristics were also found to be more uniform in pellets made by both IAP and POP processes as compared to pellets fabricated using the CAP process

  7. Development of recycling processes for clean rejected MOX fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khot, P.M.; Singh, G.; Shelke, B.K.; Surendra, B.; Yadav, M.K.; Mishra, A.K.; Afzal, Mohd.; Panakkal, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dry and wet (MWDD) methods were developed for 100% recycling of CRO (0.4–44% PuO 2 ). • Dry method showed higher productivity and comparable powder/product characteristics. • MWDD batches demonstrated improved powder/product characteristics to that of virgin. • Second/multiple recycling is possible with MWDD with better powder/product characteristics. • MWDD batches prepared by little milling showed better macroscopic homogeneity to that of virgin. - Abstract: The dry and wet recycling processes have been developed for 100% recycling of Clean Reject Oxide (CRO) generated during the fabrication of MOX fuel, as CRO contains significant amount of plutonium. Plutonium being strategic material need to be circumvented from its proliferation issues related to its storage for long period. It was difficult to recycle CRO containing higher Pu content even with multiple oxidation and reduction steps. The mechanical recycling comprising of jaw crushing and sieving has been coupled with thermal pulverization for recycling CRO with higher Pu content in dry recycling technique. In wet recycling, MicroWave Direct Denitration (MWDD) technique has been developed for 100% recycling of CRO. The powder prepared by dry and wet (MWDD) recycling techniques was characterized by XRD and BET techniques and their effects on the pellets were evaluated. (U,21%Pu)O 2 pellets fabricated from virgin powder and MWDD were characterized using optical microscopy and α-autoradiography and the results obtained were compared

  8. Five years of successful CANDU-6 fuel manufacturing in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeriu, A.C.; Pascu, A.; Andrei, G.; Bailescu, A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of CANDU-6 nuclear fuel manufacturing in Romania at FCN Pitesti, after the completion of the qualification in 1994. Commercial production was resumed early 1995 and fuel bundles produced were entirely delivered to Cernavoda Plant and charged in the reactor. More than 12,000 fuel bundles have been produced in the last five years and the fuel behaved very well. Defective bundles represents less than 0.06% from the total irradiated fuel, and the most defects are associated to the highest power positions. After qualification, FCN focused the effort to improve braze quality and also to maintain a low residual hydrogen content in graphite coated sheaths. The production capacity was increased especially for component manufacturing, appendages tack welding and brazing. A new graphite baking furnace with increased capacity, is under design. In the pelleting area, a rotating press will replace the older hydraulic presses used for pelleting. Plant development taken inter consideration the future demands for Cernavoda Unit 2. (author)

  9. Pellets standard on the way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laeng, H.-P.

    2001-01-01

    This short article introduces the Swiss standard that has been adapted from the German standard for heating pellets made of untreated wood. The various requirements placed on the materials used in the manufacture of the pellets and their influence on the pollution emissions produced by boilers and ovens using the pellets as a heating fuel are listed. Further points in the standard referring to declarations to be made by the manufacturer, size and specific weight of the pellets and instructions for the storage and burning of the pellets are discussed

  10. Nuclear fuel rod with burnable plate and pellet-clad interaction fix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear fuel rod comprising a metallic tubular cladding containing nuclear fuel pellets, the pellets containing enriched uranium-235. The improvement described here comprises: ceramic wafers, each wafter comprising a sintered mixture of gadolinium oxide and uranium dioxide, the uranium oxide having no more uranium-235 than is present in natural uranium dioxide. Each of the wafers is axially disposed between a major portion of adjacent the nuclear fuel pellets, whereby the wafers freeze out volatile fission products produced by the nuclear fuel and prevent interaction of the fission products with the metallic tubing cladding

  11. Vibratory-compacted (vipac/sphere-pac) nuclear fuels - a comparison with pelletized nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidester, K.; Rubin, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Thompson, M

    2001-07-01

    In order to achieve the packing densities required for nuclear fuel stability, economy and performance, the fuel material must be densified. This has traditionally been performed by high-temperature sintering. (At one time, fuel densification was investigated using cold/hot swaging. However, this fabrication method has become uncommon.) Alternatively, fuel can be densified by vibratory compaction (VIPAC). During the late 1950's and into the 1970's, in the U.S., vibratory compaction fuel was fabricated and test irradiated to evaluate its applicability compared to the more traditional pelletized fuel for nuclear reactors. These activities were primarily focused on light water reactors (LWR) but some work was performed for fast reactors. This paper attempts to summarize these evaluations and proposes to reconsider VIPAC fuel for future use. (author)

  12. Vibratory-compacted (vipac/sphere-pac) nuclear fuels - a comparison with pelletized nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidester, K.; Rubin, J.; Thompson, M.

    2001-01-01

    In order to achieve the packing densities required for nuclear fuel stability, economy and performance, the fuel material must be densified. This has traditionally been performed by high-temperature sintering. (At one time, fuel densification was investigated using cold/hot swaging. However, this fabrication method has become uncommon.) Alternatively, fuel can be densified by vibratory compaction (VIPAC). During the late 1950's and into the 1970's, in the U.S., vibratory compaction fuel was fabricated and test irradiated to evaluate its applicability compared to the more traditional pelletized fuel for nuclear reactors. These activities were primarily focused on light water reactors (LWR) but some work was performed for fast reactors. This paper attempts to summarize these evaluations and proposes to reconsider VIPAC fuel for future use. (author)

  13. Apparatus for checking the dimensions of nuclear fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmo, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    The description is given of an apparatus for checking the dimensions of pellets comprising a housing, a feeding device near this housing to move a pellet towards the latter and away from it, and a platform with a hole, this platform being fitted to the housing near the feeding system in order to hold the pellet [fr

  14. Development of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with addition of beryllium oxide for increasing of thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, Carolinne Mol; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto

    2011-01-01

    The CDTN - Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear presents a project named 'Beryllium Project' viewing to increasing the thermal conductivity of UO 2 fuel pellets, increasing the lifetime of those pellets in the reactor, generating a greater economy. This increase of conductivity is obtained by means of Be O addition to the UO 2 fuel pellets, which is very used for the production of nuclear energy. The UO 2 pellets however present a thermal conductivity relatively low, generating a high temperature gradient between the center and his side surface. The addition of beryllium oxide, with higher thermal conductivity gives pellets which will present lower temperature gradient and, consequently, more durability and better utilization of energy potential of the pellet in the reactor. (author)

  15. USE OF DISC SPRINGS IN A PELLET FUEL MACHINE FOR PRESSURE REGULATION AND PREVENTION OF DAMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmet Çelik

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of biomass fuel pellets is becoming widespread as a renewable and environment-friendly energy. Pellet fuels are produced in various pellet machine types. Pellet machines encounter problems such as pressure irregularities and choke at the initial start for different kinds of biomass feedstock. In this study, disc springs are integrated into a vertical axis pellet machine for a pressure regulation and design optimization. Force-deformation and stress-deformation relations of disc springs are investigated using analytical and finite element methods. Pelletizing pressures were calculated based on disc spring force values using the Hertzian stress formula. Utilized disc springs ensured the pressure regulation, production efficiency increase and damage prevention on the die-roller mechanism.

  16. Quality properties of fuel pellets from forest biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtikangas, P.

    1999-07-01

    Nine pellet assortments, made of fresh and stored sawdust, bark and logging residues (a mixture of Norway spruce and Scots pine) were tested directly after production and after 5 months of storage in large bags (volume about 1 m{sup 3} loose pellets) for moisture content, heating value and ash content. Dimensions, bulk density, density of individual pellets and durability were also determined. Moreover, sintering risk and contents of sulphur, chlorine, and lignin of fresh pellets were determined. It is concluded that bark and logging residues are suitable raw materials for pellets production, especially regarding durability and if the ash content is controlled. Pellets density had no effect on its durability, unlike lignin content which was positively correlated. The pellets had higher ash content and lower calorific heating value than the raw materials, probably due to loss of volatiles during drying. In general, the quality changes during storage were not large, but notable. The results showed that storage led to negative effects on durability, especially on pellets made of fresh materials. The average length of pellets was decreased due to breakage during storage. Microbial growth was noticed in some of the pellet assortments. Pellets made out of fresh logging residues were found to be weakest after storage. The tendency to reach the equilibrium with the ambient moisture content should be taken into consideration during production due to the risk of decreasing durability.

  17. A study on manufacturing and quality control technology of DUPIC fuel -A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myeong Seung; Park, Hyeon Soo; Lee, Yeong Uh; Na, Sang Ho; Lee, Jeong Won; Song, Keun Uh; Bae, Ki Kwang; Kim, Han Soo; Kim, Bong Goo; Kim, Shi Hyeong

    1994-07-01

    As the first year of the experimental research for the manufacturing and irradiation of prototypic DUPIC nuclear fuel, UO 2 pellets made from the natural uranium dioxide were used for the study of OREOX (oxidation/reduction of oxide fuel) process. The reference oxidation and reduction processes were established from the evaluation of the characteristics of produced powders and pellets. The manufacturing process and the layout of the manufacturing equipment were established in consideration of the high radioactivity of DUPIC process and the function of hot cells. The properties of materials to be used for DUPIC manufacturing were evaluated, and the punching machine for decladding was also developed. (Author)

  18. Manufacturing polycrystalline pellets of natural quartz for applications in thermoluminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho Junior, Alvaro Barbosa de; Khoury, Helen Jamil [Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Department of Nuclear Energy; Barros, Thiago Fernandes; Guzzo, Pedro Luiz [Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Department of Mining Engineering

    2012-07-15

    This paper describes the manufacturing process of quartz-pellets and shows their potential use as thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) for those applications where low-levels of ionising radiation are present. Two batches of cold-pressed pellets were produced and their resistance were evaluated by vibration tests and weight-loss measurements. The batch manufactured with 75 Multiplication-Sign 150 Micro-Sign m particles showed enough resistance to be employed as TLD. The dosimetric properties of the 310 Degree-Sign C peak appearing in the glow curves of these pellets were characterized together with commercial TLD-100 units using {gamma}- and X-ray beams with different energies. The uncertainties related to reproducibility and stability of the TL signal were better than 10%. The sensitivity and the linearity of the TL response of quartz-pellets were better than that measured for TLD-100 for doses ranging from 0.5 to 200mGy. The energy dependence of the quartz-pellets was higher than that of TLD-100 but it cannot be considered a restriction to their use in clinical procedures and industrial applications. (author)

  19. Advanced surface chemical analysis of continuously manufactured drug loaded composite pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Akter; Nandi, Uttom; Fule, Ritesh; Nokhodchi, Ali; Maniruzzaman, Mohammed

    2017-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to develop and characterise polymeric composite pellets by means of continuous melt extrusion techniques. Powder blends of a steroid hormone (SH) as a model drug and either ethyl cellulose (EC N10 and EC P7 grades) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC AS grade) as polymeric carrier were extruded using a Pharma 11mm twin screw extruder in a continuous mode of operation to manufacture extruded composite pellets of 1mm length. Molecular modelling study using commercial Gaussian 09 software outlined a possible drug-polymer interaction in the molecular level to develop solid dispersions of the drug in the pellets. Solid-state analysis conducted via a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), hot stage microscopy (HSM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analyses revealed the amorphous state of the drug in the polymer matrices. Surface analysis using SEM/energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) of the produced pellets arguably showed a homogenous distribution of the C and O atoms in the pellet matrices. Moreover, advanced chemical surface analysis conducted via atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed a homogenous phase system having the drug molecule dispersed onto the amorphous matrices while Raman mapping confirmed the homogenous single-phase drug distribution in the manufactured composite pellets. Such composite pellets are expected to deliver multidisciplinary applications in drug delivery and medical sciences by e.g. modifying drug solubility/dissolutions or stabilizing the unstable drug (e.g. hormone, protein) in the composite network. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Additive Manufacturing of Fuel Injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadek Tadros, Dr. Alber Alphonse [Edison Welding Institute, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States); Ritter, Dr. George W. [Edison Welding Institute, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States); Drews, Charles Donald [Edison Welding Institute, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States); Ryan, Daniel [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-10-24

    Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D-printing, has been shifting from a novelty prototyping paradigm to a legitimate manufacturing tool capable of creating components for highly complex engineered products. An emerging AM technology for producing metal parts is the laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) process; however, industry manufacturing specifications and component design practices for L-PBF have not yet been established. Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), an industrial gas turbine manufacturer, has been evaluating AM technology for development and production applications with the desire to enable accelerated product development cycle times, overall turbine efficiency improvements, and supply chain flexibility relative to conventional manufacturing processes (casting, brazing, welding). Accordingly, Solar teamed with EWI on a joint two-and-a-half-year project with the goal of developing a production L-PBF AM process capable of consistently producing high-nickel alloy material suitable for high temperature gas turbine engine fuel injector components. The project plan tasks were designed to understand the interaction of the process variables and their combined impact on the resultant AM material quality. The composition of the high-nickel alloy powders selected for this program met the conventional cast Hastelloy X compositional limits and were commercially available in different particle size distributions (PSD) from two suppliers. Solar produced all the test articles and both EWI and Solar shared responsibility for analyzing them. The effects of powder metal input stock, laser parameters, heat treatments, and post-finishing methods were evaluated. This process knowledge was then used to generate tensile, fatigue, and creep material properties data curves suitable for component design activities. The key process controls for ensuring consistent material properties were documented in AM powder and process specifications. The basic components of the project

  1. Effect of fuel zinc content on toxicological responses of particulate matter from pellet combustion in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uski, O., E-mail: oskari.uski@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701 Kuopio (Finland); Jalava, P.I., E-mail: pasi.jalava@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Happo, M.S., E-mail: mikko.happo@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Torvela, T., E-mail: tiina.torvela@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Leskinen, J., E-mail: jani.leskinen@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Mäki-Paakkanen, J., E-mail: jorma.maki-paakkanen@thl.fi [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701 Kuopio (Finland); Tissari, J., E-mail: jarkko.tissari@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Sippula, O., E-mail: olli.sippula@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Lamberg, H., E-mail: heikki.lamberg@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Jokiniemi, J., E-mail: jorma.jokiniemi@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); and others

    2015-04-01

    Significant amounts of transition metals such as zinc, cadmium and copper can become enriched in the fine particle fraction during biomass combustion with Zn being one of the most abundant transition metals in wood combustion. These metals may have an important role in the toxicological properties of particulate matter (PM). Indeed, many epidemiological studies have found associations between mortality and PM Zn content. The role of Zn toxicity on combustion PM was investigated. Pellets enriched with 170, 480 and 2300 mg Zn/kg of fuel were manufactured. Emission samples were generated using a pellet boiler and the four types of PM samples; native, Zn-low, Zn-medium and Zn-high were collected with an impactor from diluted flue gas. The RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line was exposed for 24 h to different doses (15, 50,150 and 300 μg ml{sup −1}) of the emission samples to investigate their ability to cause cytotoxicity, to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), to altering the cell cycle and to trigger genotoxicity as well as to promote inflammation. Zn enriched pellets combusted in a pellet boiler produced emission PM containing ZnO. Even the Zn-low sample caused extensive cell cycle arrest and there was massive cell death of RAW 264.7 macrophages at the two highest PM doses. Moreover, only the Zn-enriched emission samples induced a dose dependent ROS response in the exposed cells. Inflammatory responses were at a low level but macrophage inflammatory protein 2 reached a statistically significant level after exposure of RAW 264.7 macrophages to ZnO containing emission particles. ZnO content of the samples was associated with significant toxicity in almost all measured endpoints. Thus, ZnO may be a key component producing toxicological responses in the PM emissions from efficient wood combustion. Zn as well as the other transition metals, may contribute a significant amount to the ROS responses evoked by ambient PM. - Highlights: • Zinc powder was added into the

  2. Remote visual inspection of nuclear fuel pellets with fiber optics and video image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has designed and constructed a nuclear fuel fabrication process line for the U.S. Department of Energy. This process line includes a system that remotely inspects the cylindrical surface of nuclear fuel pellets for surface spots, flaws, or discoloration. The pellets are inspected on a 100% basis after pellet sintering. A feeder delivers the pellets directly to a fiber optic inspection head, which views one pellet surface at a time and images it to a closed-circuit color television camera (CCTV). The output signal of the CCTV is input to a digital imaging processor that stores approximately 25 pellet images at a time. A human operator visually examines the images of the pellet surfaces on a high resolution monitor and accepts or rejects the pellets based on visual standards. The operator uses a digitizing tablet to record the location of rejected pellets, which are then automatically removed from the product stream. The system is expandable to automated disposition of the pellet surface image

  3. The market for fuel pellets produced from biomass and waste in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppejan, J.; Meulman, P.D.M.

    2001-12-01

    Several initiatives are currently being developed in the Netherlands for the production of fuel pellets from waste and biomass. This report presents an overview of the current producers and (potential) users of these pellets in the Netherlands. It also outlines the Dutch and European policies and legislations concerned. Furthermore, important barriers to market development of fuel pellets are defined and future expectations are summarized. The study covers fuel pellets made from different feedstock, varying from clean biomass to waste with traces of contaminants. In each project, pellets are produced that are unique as to their product specifications, as they are usually designed for a single application. It is therefore impossible to generalize characteristics and end use. 27 refs

  4. Effect of additives in sintering UO2-7wt%Gd2O3 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, L.R.; Riella, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    Gadolinium has been used as burnable poison for reactivity control in modern PWRs. The incorporation of Gd 2 O 3 powder directly into the UO 2 powder enables longer fuel cycles and optimized fuel utilization. Nevertheless, processing by this method leads to difficulties while obtaining sintered pellets with the minimum required density. The process for manufacturing UO 2 - Gd 2 O 3 generates scraps that should be reused. The main scraps are green and sintered pellets, which must be calcined to U 3 O 8 to return to the fabrication process. Also, the incorporation of Gd 2 O 3 in UO 2 requires the use of an additive to improve the sintering process, in order to achieve the physical properties specified for the mixed fuel, mainly density and microstructure. This paper describes the effect of the addition of fabrication scraps on the properties of the UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel. Aluminum hydroxide Al(OH) 3 was also incorporated to the fuel as a sintering aid. The results shown that the use of 2000 ppm of Al(OH) 3 as additive allow to fabricate good pellets with up to 10 wt% of recycled scraps. (author)

  5. Thermal conductivity evaluation of high burnup mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Masaki; Nakamura, Jinichi; Nagase, Fumihisa; Fuketa, Toyoshi

    2011-07-01

    The thermal conductivity formula of fuel pellet which contains the effects of burnup and plutonium (Pu) addition was proposed based on the Klemens' theory and reported thermal conductivities of unirradiated (U, Pu) O 2 and irradiated UO 2 pellets. The thermal conductivity of high burnup MOX pellet was formulated by applying a summation rule between phonon scattering parameters which show the effects of plutonium addition and burnup. Temperature of high burnup MOX fuel was evaluated based on the thermal conductivity integral which was calculated from the above-mentioned thermal conductivity formula. Calculated fuel temperatures were plotted against the linear heat rates of the fuel rods, and were compared with the fuel temperatures measured in a test reactor. Since both values agreed well, it was confirmed that the proposed thermal conductivity formula of MOX pellets is adequate.

  6. Italian progress on LWR fuel design, manufacturing, testing and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcelli, G.; Bozzoni, T.; Coluccio, G.; Gatti, S.; Gerevini, T.; Testa, G.

    1977-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main activities carried out in Italy from the last Geneva Conference (1971) in the field of LWR fuel design, manufacturing, testing and management. In fuel design, large effort has been devoted both to the assimilation of the information resulting from the licensing agreement with the US suppliers and to the development of an independent know-how through adequate R and D programs as well as to fuel behavior modeling activities. Among these it is worthwhile to mention the studies carried out by CNEN on the in-pile behavior of gadolinia fuel rods, the critical heat flux (CHF) and void fraction experiments, the overpower ramp tests on pre-irradiated fuel rods, the measurements of the pellet-cladding thermal conductance vs. burn-up and the investigation on fission gas release kinetics. The experience acquired with the fuel of the two LWR ENEL power stations, Garigliano BWR and Trino PWR, and some fuel management problems are reviewed. In this framework mention is made to the effort devoted to the acquisition of a wider knowledge on fuel behavior through post irradiation examination (PIE) of power reactor fuel elements as well as of experimental rods. The Italian fuel manufacturing capabilities are illustrated: they consist of the FN (Fabbricazioni Nucleari) plant at Bosco Marengo, owned by AGIP Nucleare and AMN, which has produced up-to-now a reload for Garigliano BWR and the first core for Caorso BWR and of COREN (COmbustibili REattori Nucleari) at Saluggia, owned by Breda, FIAT and Westinghouse, which has fabricated reloads for Trino PWR, including 8 UO 2 -PuO 2 fuel bundles, while fuel loading for the Otto Hahn nuclear ship and fuel mechanical components for some PWRs have been fabricated by FIAT [fr

  7. Manufacturing method of nuclear fuel grains using insoluble tannin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiki, Wataru; Hasegawa, Shin-ichi.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear fuel materials such as uranium and thorium are brought into contact with insoluble tannin to adsorb the nuclear fuel materials to the insoluble tannin. If it is calcined, the insoluble tannin is eliminated by burning and only nuclear fuel materials are remained. In this case, the grain size of the insoluble tannin is determined to from 0.01 to 5mm, and the aqueous solution contains from 1 to 10% by weight of nuclear fuel materials. The insoluble tannin after adsorbing the nuclear fuel materials is dehydrated by compression, and then dried at a temperature of from a room temperature to 400degC, and the dried insoluble tannin is calcined in an oxidative atmosphere or an non-oxidative atmosphere of argon and nitrogen at a temperature of from 400 to 2,000degC. Since the grain size of the tannin is from 0.01 to 5mm, the nuclear fuels after the calcination are formed into grains with no worry of scattering of fine powders during manufacturing of pellets or packed-type nuclear fuels. In addition, since tannin is dried and calcined after dehydration by compression, the consumption of energy required for the manufacture can be reduced. (T.M.)

  8. proximate and ultimate analysis of fuel pellets from oil palm residues

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    This study carried out an investigation on the proximate and ultimate analysis of fuel pellets from oil palm residues such as palm kernel shell, PKS, palm fibre, PF and empty fruit bunch, EFB using the ASTM standards. The results obtained were compared. The percentage moisture content of the pellets, PKS, PF and EFB ...

  9. Effect of Granule Size on Diametric Tolerance of Annular Fuel Pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Dong Joo; Kim, Jong Hun; Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Keon Sik; Kang, Ki Won; Song, Kun Woo

    2008-01-01

    A dual cooled annular fuel has been seriously considered as a favorable option for an extended power uprate of a Pressurized Water Reactor fuel assembly. An annular fuel shows a lot of advantages from the point of a fuel safety and its economy due to its unique configurational merit such as an increased heat transfer area and a thin pellet thickness. From the viewpoint of the fuel pellet fabrication, however, the unique shape of annular fuel pellet causes challenging difficulties to satisfy a diametric tolerance. A sintered cylindrical PWR fuel pellet fabricated by a conventional double-acting press has an hour-glass shape due to an inhomogeneous green density distribution in a powder compact. Thus, a sintered pellet usually undergoes a centerless grinding process in order to secure diametric tolerance specifications. In the case of an annular pellet fabrication using a conventional double-acting press, the same hour-glass shape would probably occur. An inhomogeneous green density distribution in a powder compact is attributed to granule-granule frictions and granule to pressing mold wall frictions. Frictions result in an irregular pressing load distribution in a powder compact. In order to mitigate the frictions, a lot of process variables should be considered such as pre-compaction pressure, lubricant content, granule size and compaction pressure. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of a granule size on the amount of deformation after sintering, in other words, the amount of an hour-glassing. The granules with classified size ranges were made to green annular pellets with the same height and diameters. The hour-glassing amounts of the sintered annular pellets were measured and compared with that of the annular pellet made by unclassified granule

  10. Progress in researches on MOX fuel pellet producing technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiaodan

    2010-01-01

    Being the key section of nuclear-fuel cycle, the producing technology of MOX(UO 2 -PuO 2 ) fuel had driven to maturity in France, England, Russia, Belgium, etc. MOX fuel had been applied in FBR and LWR successfully in those countries. With the rapidly developing of nuclear-generated power, the MOX fuel for FBR and LWR was active demanded in China. However, the producing technology of MOX fuel developed slowly. During the period of 'the seventh five year's project', MOX fuel pellet was produced by mechanically mixed method and oxalate deposited method, respectively. Parts of cool performance of MOX fuel pellet produced by oxalate deposited method reached the qualification of fuel for FBR. During the period of 'the ninth five year's project' and 'the tenth five year's project', the technical route of producing MOX fuel was determined, and the test line of producing MOX fuel was built preliminarily. In the same time, the producing technology and analyzing technology of MOX fuel pellet by mechanically mixed was studied roundly, and the representative analogue pellet(UO 2 -CeO 2 ) was produced. That settled the supporting technology for the commercial process and research of MOX fuel rod and MOX fuel module. (authors)

  11. Technical Issues in the development of high burnup and long cycle fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Joo; Yang, Jae Ho; Oh, Jang Soo; Kim, Keon Sik; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Nam, Ik Hui

    2012-01-01

    Over the last half century, a nuclear fuel cycle, a fuel discharged burnup and a uranium enrichment of the LWR (Light Water Reactor) fuel have continuously increased. It was the efforts to reduce the LWR fuel cycle cost, and to make reactor operation more efficiently. Improved fuel and reactor performance contribute further to the reduction and management efficiency of spent fuels. The primary incentive for operating nuclear reactor fuel to higher burnup and longer cycle is the economic benefits. The fuel cycle costs could be reduced by extending fuel discharged burnup and fuel cycle length. The higher discharged burnup can increase the energy production per unit fuel mass or fuel assembly. The longer fuel cycle can increase reactor operation flexibility and reduce the fuel changing operation and the spent fuel management burden. The margin to storage capacity limits would be also increased because high burnup and long cycle fuel reduces the mass of spent fuels. However, increment of fuel burnup and cycle length might result in the acceleration of material aging consisting fuel assembly. Then, the safety and integrity of nuclear fuel will be degraded. Therefore, to simultaneously enhance the safety and economics of the LWR fuel through the fuel burnup and cycle extension, it is indispensable to develop the innovative nuclear fuel material concepts and technologies which can overcome degradation of fuel safety. New fuel research project to extend fuel discharged burnup and cycle length has been launched in KAERI. Main subject is to develop innovative LWR fuel pellets which can provide required fuel performance and safety at extended fuel burnup and cycle length. In order to achieve the mission, we need to know that what the impediments are and how to break through current limit of fuel pellet properties. In this study, the technical issues related to fuel pellets at high burnup were surveyed and summarized. We have collected the technical issues in the literatures

  12. Fabrication of 0.5-inch diameter FBR mixed oxide fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Benecke, M.W.; McCord, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    Large diameter (0.535 inch) mixed oxide fuel pellets for Fast Breeder Reactor application were successfully fabricated by the cold-press-and-sinter technique. Enriched UO 2 , PuO 2 -UO 2 , and PuO 2 -ThO 2 compositions were fabricated into nominally 90% theoretical density pellets for the UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 compositions, and 88% and 93% T.D. for the PuO 2 -ThO 2 compositions. Some processing adjustments were required to achieve satisfactory pellet quality and density. Furnace heating rate was reduced from 200 to 50 0 C/h for the organic binder burnout cycle for the large, 0.535-inch diameter pellets to eliminate pellet cracking during sintering. Additional preslugging steps and die wall lubrication during pressing were used to eliminate pressing cracks in the PuO 2 -ThO 2 pellets

  13. Procedure for the fabrication of ceramic fuel pellets with an adjustable structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henke, M.; Klemm, U.; Sobek, D.

    1986-01-01

    The invention concerns a procedure for the fabrication of ceramic fuel pellets of UO 2 , PuO 2 , ThO 2 and their mixtures with an adjustable structure. Before or during the milling the particle shaped fuel pellets have been added polyethylenglycol in a 20 - 60 % aqueous solution with an amount of 0.5 - 2.0 % in weight. This additive has an effect on a controlled pore formation and grain growth advancement

  14. Pellet-clad interaction observations in boiling water reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, K.C.; Bahl, J.K.; Sivaramakrishnan, K.S.; Roy, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    Under a programme to assess the performance of fuel elements of Tarapur Atomic Power Station, post-irradiation examination has been carried out on 18 fuel elements in the first phase. Pellet-clad mechanical interaction behaviour in 14 elements with varying burnup and irradiation history has been studied using eddy current testing technique. The data has been analysed to evaluate the role of pellet-clad mechanical interaction in PCI/SCC failure in power reactor operating conditions. (author)

  15. Studies and manufacture of plutonium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussy, P.; Mustelier, J.P.; Pascard, R.

    1964-01-01

    The studies carried out at the C.E.A. on the properties of fast neutron reactor fuels, the manufacture of fuel elements and their behaviour under irradiation are broadly outlined. The metal fuels studied are the ternary alloys U Pu Mo, U Pu Nb, U Pa Ti, U Pa Zr, the ceramic fuels being mixed uranium and plutonium oxides, carbides and nitrides obtained by sintering. Results are given on the manufacture of uranium fuel elements containing a small proportion of plutonium, used in a critical experiment, and on the first experiments in the manufacture of fuel elements for the reactor Rapsodie. Finally the results of irradiation tests carried out on the prototype fuel pins for Rapsodie are described. (authors) [fr

  16. Fracture toughness of WWER Uranium dioxide fuel pellets with various grain size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivov, R.; Novikov, V.; Mikheev, E.; Fedotov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Uranium dioxide fuel pellets with grain sizes 13, 26, and 33 μm for WWER were investigated in the present work in order to determine crack formation and the fracture toughness.The investigation of crack formation in uranium oxide fuel pellets of the WWER-types showed that Young’s modulus and the microhardness of polycrystalline samples increase with increasing grain size, while the fracture toughness decreases. Characteristically, radial Palmqvist cracks form on the surface of uranium dioxide pellets for loads up to 1 kg. Transgranular propagation of cracks over distances several-fold larger than the length of the imprint diagonal is observed in pellets with large grains and small intragrain pores. Intergranular propagation of cracks along grain boundaries with branching occurs in pellets with small grains and low pore concentration on the grain boundaries. Blunting on large pores and at breaks in direction does not permit the cracks to reach a significant length

  17. Analysis of neutron flux depression across the pellet radius in CANDU fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, K.S.; Suk, H.C.

    1998-08-01

    The TUBRNP model, originally developed to perform the analysis of the flux depression across the pellet radius in LWR fuel elements, was improved for the application to CANDU fuel elements. The improved model was verified through comparison with existing CANDU model named FLUXDEP in prediction for various fuel conditions. A sensitivity study was also performed to investigate the effects on the flux depression of fuel initial enrichment and burnup, the contents of isotopes U-234 and U-236 and pellet diameter. (author). 9 refs., 8 figs

  18. Design and manufacturing of 05F-01K instrumented capsule for nuclear fuel irradiation in Hanaro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, J. M.; Shin, Y. T.; Park, S. J. (and others)

    2007-07-15

    An instrumented capsule was developed to be able to measure fuel characteristics, such as fuel temperature, internal pressure of fuel rod, fuel pellet elongation, and neutron flux, etc., during the irradiation test of nuclear fuel in Hanaro. The instrumented capsule(02F-11K) for measuring and monitoring and monitoring fuel centerline temperature and neutron flux was designed and manufactured. It was successfully irradiated in the test hole OR5 of Hanaro from March 14, 2003 to June 1, 2003 (53.84 full power days at 24 MW). In the year of 2004, 3 test fuel rods and the instrumented capsule(03F-05K) were designed and manufactured to measure fuel centerline temperature, internal pressure of fuel rod, and fuel axial deformation during irradiation test. This capsule was irradiated in the test hole OR5 of Hanaro reactor from April 26, 2004 to October 1, 2004 (59.5 EFPD at 24 {approx} 30 MW). The six typed dual instrumented fuel rods, which allow for two characteristics to be measured simultaneously in one fuel rod, have been designed and manufactured to enhance the efficiency of the irradiation test using the instrumented fuel capsule. The 05F-01K instrumented fuel capsule was designed and manufactured for a design verification test of the three dual instrumented fuel rods. The irradiation test of the 05F-01K instrumented fuel capsule will be carried out at the OR5 vertical experimental hole of Hanaro.

  19. Eight-shot pellet injector and fueling experiments at the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zhenggui; Li Bo; Li Li

    2001-01-01

    An Eight-shot Pellet Injection (EPI) system has been proposed and developed in collaboration between STU (St. Petersburg State Technical University) of Russia and SWIP. In the EPI, the I n-situ c ondensation technique was used to produce the pellets in eight gun barrels respectively. The nominal pellet size (diameter of 1.0 mm and of 1.4 mm or 1.2 mm) is limited by the gun barrel inner diameter. The pellet length is adjusted by changing the g radient temperature o n the gun barrels and the amounts of filling fuel gas. Pellets are fired at speed range of 200 - 1200 m/s by He propellant with pressure of 2 - 6 MPa and then transferred to HL-1M vessel through an injection line that consists of two set of differential vacuum pumped chambers and guide tube combined with fast valves. In addition, this unit is equipped with diagnostics for pellet velocity and shape measure. The EPI has installed on HL-1M since 1996 for the multi-shot pellet fueling experiments. The typical characteristics including the peaked density profile and improved confinement, the deep penetration and suppression of soft X-ray sawteeth, the variance of rotation and flow of plasma in edge region as well as the photographing of pellet ablation clouds are presented

  20. Recent advances in the theory and simulation of pellet ablation and fast fuel relocation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, P.B.; Baylor, L.R.; Ishizaki, R.; Jardin, S.C.; Samtaney, R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents new theory and simulation of pellet ablation, and the rapid cross-field redistribution of the ionized pellet mass following pellet injection in tokamaks. The first 2-D time-dependent simulations describing the expansion of pellet ablation flow against the magnetic field is presented here using the Eulerian code CAP. The early-time expansion is characterized by the formation of an ellipsoidal diamagnetic cavity surrounding the pellet, which diverts heat flux around the pellet, thereby reducing the ablation rate. Near-pellet cloud properties from CAP provide initial conditions for the subsequent ExB advection of the ionized clouds caused by polarization in the inhomogeneous toroidal magnetic field. The first complete set of time-dependent equations describing mass redistribution has been developed and solved for numerically using the PRL code. New effects identified, including curvature drive by near sonic field-aligned flows, rotational transform of the magnetic field lines and magnetic shear are considered from the viewpoint of the parallel vorticity equation. Close agreement between theory and experimental fuel deposition profiles are obtained for both inner and outer wall pellet injection on the DIII-D tokamak, providing improved predictive capability for ITER. A new 3-D MHD simulation code AMR was started, which provides the required fine-scale mesh size needed for accurate modeling of pellet clouds having sharp perpendicular-to-B gradients. (author)

  1. Thermal expansion of UO2-Gd2O3 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Une, Katsumi

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, more consideration has been given to the application of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 burnable poison fuel to LWRs in order to improve the core physics and to extend the burnup. It has been known that UO 2 forms a single phase cubic fluorite type solid solution with Gd 2 O 3 up to 20 - 30 wt.% above 1300 K. The addition of Gd 2 O 3 to UO 2 lattices changes the properties of the fuel pellets. The limited data on the thermal expansion of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel exist, but those are inconsistent. UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel pellets were fabricated, and the linear thermal expansion of UO 2 and UO 2 -(5, 8 and 10 wt.%)Gd 2 O 3 fuel pellets was measured with a differential dilatometer over the temperature range of 298 - 1973 K. A sapphire rod of 6 mm diameter and 15.5 mm length was used as the reference material. After the preheating cycle, the measurement was performed in argon atmosphere. The results for UO 2 pellets showed excellent agreement with the data in literatures. The linear thermal expansion of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel pellets showed the increase with increasing the Gd 2 O 3 content. Consideration must be given to this excessive expansion in the fuel design of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 pellets. The equations for the linear thermal expansion and density of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel pellets were derived by the method of least squares. (Kako, I.)

  2. Finite element method programs to analyze irradiation behavior of fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Rayji; Harayama, Yasuo; Ishibashi, Akihiro; Ono, Masao.

    1979-09-01

    For the safety assessment of reactor fuel, it is important to grasp local changes of fuel pins due to irradiation in a reactor. Such changes of fuel result mostly from irradiation of fuel pellets. Elasto-plastic analysis programs based on the finite element method were developed to analyze these local changes. In the programs, emphasis is placed on the analysis of cracks in pellets; the interaction between cracked-pellets and cladding is not taken into consideration. The two programs developed are FEMF3 based on a two-dimensional axially symmetric model (r-z system) and FREB4 on a two-dimensional plane model (r-theta system). It is discussed in this report how the occurrence and distribution of cracks depend on heat rate of the fuel pin. (author)

  3. Processing of surrogate nuclear fuel pellets for better dimensional control with dry bag isostatic pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoggan, Rita E., E-mail: Rita.hoggan@inl.gov; Zuck, Larry D., E-mail: Larry.zuck@inl.gov; Cannon, W. Roger, E-mail: cannon@rutgers.edu; Lessing, Paul A., E-mail: p.a.l.2@hotmail.com

    2016-12-15

    A study of improved methods of processing fuel pellets was undertaken using ceria and zirconia/yttria/alumina as surrogates. Through proper granulation, elimination of fines and vertical vibration (tapping) of the parts bag prior to dry bag isostatic pressing (DBIP), reproducibility of diameter profiles among multiple pellets of ceria was improved by almost an order of magnitude. Reproducibility of sintered pellets in these studies was sufficient to allow pellets to be introduced into the cladding with a gap between the pellet and cladding on the order of 50 μm to 100 μm but not a uniform gap with tolerance of ±12 μm as is currently required. Deviation from the mean diameter along the length of multiple pellets, and deviation from roundness, decreased after sintering. This is not generally observed with dry pressed pellets. Sintered shrinkage was uniform to ±0.05% and thus, as an alternative, pellets may be machined to tolerance before sintering, thus avoiding the waste associated with post-sinter grinding. - Highlights: • Three methods of granule preparation for two different powder sources were outlined and compared using tap density curves. • A dry bag isostatic press was used to fabricate pellets and longer rods. Thus longer pellets could be fabricated by this technique. • Vertical vibrations to pack granules decreased variation in dimensions from pellet to pellet by a factor of nine. • Sintering shrinkage varied by only 0.1% along the length of a rod. Thus green machining prior to sintering could result in tight tolerances.

  4. Manufacturing fuel-switching capability, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Historically, about one-third of all energy consumed in the United States has been used by manufacturers. About one-quarter of manufacturing energy is used as feedstocks and raw material inputs that are converted into nonenergy products; the remainder is used for its energy content. During 1988, the most recent year for which data are available, manufacturers consumed 15.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy to produce heat and power and to generate electricity. The manufacturing sector also has widespread capabilities to switch from one fuel to another for either economic or emergency reasons. There are numerous ways to define fuel switching. For the purposes of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), fuel switching is defined as the capability to substitute one energy source for another within 30 days with no significant modifications to the fuel-consuming equipment, while keeping production constant. Fuel-switching capability allows manufacturers substantial flexibility in choosing their mix of energy sources. The consumption of a given energy source can be maximized if all possible switching into that energy source takes place. The estimates in this report are based on data collected on the 1988 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), Forms 846 (A through C). The EIA conducts this national sample survey of manufacturing energy consumption on a triennial basis. The MECS is the only comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries. The MECS was first conducted in 1986 to collect data for 1985. This report presents information on the fuel-switching capabilities of manufacturers in 1988. This report is the second of a series based on the 1988 MECS. 8 figs., 31 tabs.

  5. Manufacturing fuel-switching capability, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    Historically, about one-third of all energy consumed in the United States has been used by manufacturers. About one-quarter of manufacturing energy is used as feedstocks and raw material inputs that are converted into nonenergy products; the remainder is used for its energy content. During 1988, the most recent year for which data are available, manufacturers consumed 15.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy to produce heat and power and to generate electricity. The manufacturing sector also has widespread capabilities to switch from one fuel to another for either economic or emergency reasons. There are numerous ways to define fuel switching. For the purposes of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), fuel switching is defined as the capability to substitute one energy source for another within 30 days with no significant modifications to the fuel-consuming equipment, while keeping production constant. Fuel-switching capability allows manufacturers substantial flexibility in choosing their mix of energy sources. The consumption of a given energy source can be maximized if all possible switching into that energy source takes place. The estimates in this report are based on data collected on the 1988 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), Forms 846 (A through C). The EIA conducts this national sample survey of manufacturing energy consumption on a triennial basis. The MECS is the only comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries. The MECS was first conducted in 1986 to collect data for 1985. This report presents information on the fuel-switching capabilities of manufacturers in 1988. This report is the second of a series based on the 1988 MECS. 8 figs., 31 tabs

  6. Hydraulic test for non-instrumented capsule of advanced PWR fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Hyung Gil; Yoon, Y. J.; Chun, S. Y.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, C. B.; Ryu, J.

    2001-04-01

    This report presents the results of pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test for Non-instrumented Capsule of Advanced PWR Fuel Pellet which were designed fabricated by KAERI. From the pressure drop test results, it is noted that the flow rate across the Non-instrumented Capsule of Advanced PWR Fuel Pellet corresponding to the pressure drop of 200 kPa is measured to be about 7.45 kg/sec. Vibration frequency for the Non-instrumented Capsule of Advanced PWR Fuel Pellet ranges from 13.0 to 32.3 Hz. RMS(Root Mean Square) displacement for the fuel rig is less than 11.6 μm, and the maximum displacement is less than 30.5 μm. The endurance test was carried out for 103 days and 17 hours

  7. Specification of PWR UO2 pellet design parameters with the fuel performance code FRAPCON-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.T.; Marra Neto, A.

    1988-08-01

    UO 2 pellet design parameters are analysed to verify their influence in the fuel basic properties and in its performance under irradiation in pressurized water reactors. Three groups of parameters are discussed: 1) content of fissionable and impurity materials; 2) stoichiometry; 3) density pore morpholoy, and microstructure. A methodology is applied with the fuel performance program FRAPCON-1 to specify these parameters. (author [pt

  8. Fabrication of (Th-Pu) MOX fuel pellets using CAP route for experimental irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehete, Y.G.; Shelke, B.K.; Shotriya, S.K.; Subbarayal, K.; Kumar, Neeraj; Khot, P.M.; Surendra, B.; Yadav, M.K.; Mishra, A.K.; Afzal, Mohd; Panakkal, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Tarapur is an industrial scale plant for the fabrication of MOX fuel for thermal and fast reactor. Mixed oxide fuels of different composition have been fabricated in this facility for both thermal and fast reactors. In order to simulate actual condition in Advanced Heavy Water Reactors (AHWR), (Th-Pu) MOX fuel pins of different % of PuO 2 were fabricated at AFFF, BARC Tarapur for irradiation in research reactor. ThO 2 -1% PuO 2 was fabricated by conventional powder pelletization (POP) as well as Coated agglomerate pelletization (CAP) route. Powder pelletization route involves co-milling of milled ThO 2 powder with calcined PuO 2 , precompaction, granulation, final compaction followed by sintering in reducing atmosphere at 1650 deg C. Coated Agglomerate Pelletization (CAP) route involves making spheroids of milled ThO 2 powder using extrusion and spherodization technique then coating of ThO 2 spheroids with desired amount of calcined PuO 2 powder followed by final compaction and sintering in reducing atmosphere. Necessary modifications in process parameters have been made and the tool design was so chosen to get sintered to sized pellet to avoid grinding. Pellets fabricated by CAP route meets all desired specification like POP route. It also has the advantages over POP route like small number of process steps and reduction of man-rem. This paper highlights feasibility of CAP route for fabrication of (Th-Pu)O 2 fuel and characterization of fuel pellets. (author)

  9. Thermal stability test of UO{sub 2}-doped pellet manufactured at INB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Diogo R., E-mail: diogoribeiro@inb.gov.br [Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (FCN/INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Fábrica de Combustível Nuclear; Freitas, Artur C., E-mail: artur.freitas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The thermal stability test of UO{sub 2}-doped pellet manufactured at INB was carried out in order to analyze the resintering behavior. This analysis is fundamental for predicting dimensional behavior during irradiation. INB commonly performs resintering test to qualify its production lots, and the same methodology was applied to UO{sub 2}-doped pellets. In this preliminary study, three sets of experiments have been made: 1) without any chemical additive (Z test, the standard UO{sub 2} pellets - undoped); 2) UO{sub 2} pellets doped with 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 wt% of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; and 3) 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 wt% of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The preliminary results showed an increase in sintered density in all resintering experiments. So as to obtain the percentage increase, the theoretical densities (g/cm{sup 3} and %TD) were calculated based on the undoped UO{sub 2} pellets. All samples increased in a range of 0.27 to 0.32 %TD the out-pile densification during the resintering process. However, the Z(Nb)3 test showed the lowest value of 0.08 %TD, which is not in agreement with the INB specification limits. The sintered density of this test (0.3 wt% niobia) was 96.15% TD. This fact might be related to the competitive mechanism between Kirkendall effect, forming porosity owing to niobium solubilization on UO{sub 2} matrix, and densification process as a result of uranium diffusivity. Thus, the densification was only 0.08 %TD in Z(Nb)3 sample. All the other samples were in agreement with INB specification. (author)

  10. Fabrication of ceramic fuel pellets for isotopic heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, D.T.; Congdon, J.W.; Duncan, N.D.; Livingston, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    A production process was developed to fabricate cylindrical pellets for the GPHS. The process consists of hot-pressing a blended mixture of sintered 238 PuO 2 granules prepared from calcined plutonium oxalate powder. The product is a pellet of nominally 84.5% total density which generates 62.5 watts (thermal). Hot pressing and granule sintering conditions require close control to minimize surface and internal cracking and to permit ejection of the pellet from the hot press die. Uniform density and distribution of large intergranule porosity in the microstructure appear to contribute to the dimensional stability required at elevated temperatures and the mechanical ruggedness required for routine handling during production operations

  11. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction for PWRs reactors fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The pellet-cladding interaction that can occur in a PWR fuel rod design is modelled with the computer codes FRAPCON-1 and ANSYS. The fuel performance code FRAPCON-1 analyzes the fuel rod irradiation behavior and generates the initial conditions for the localized fuel rod thermal and mechanical modelling in two and three-dimensional finite elements with ANSYS. In the mechanical modelling, a pellet fragment is placed in the fuel rod gap. Two types of fuel rod cladding materials are considered: Zircaloy and austenitic stainless steel. Linear and non-linear material behaviors are allowed. Elastic, plastic and creep behaviors are considered for the cladding materials. The modelling is applied to Angra-II fuel rod design. The results are analyzed and compared. (author)

  12. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction. Phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1979-03-01

    This program has as its ultimate objective the demonstration of an advanced fuel design that is resistant to the failure mechanism known as fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel, and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to protect the Zircaloy cladding tube from the harmful effects of localized stress, and reactive fission products during reactor service. This is the final report for PHASE 1 of this program. Support tests have shown that the barrier fuel resists PCI far better than does the conventional Zircaloy-clad fuel. Power ramp tests thus far have shown good PCI resistance for Cu-barrier fuel at burnup > 12 MWd/kg-U and for Zr-liner fuel > 16 MWd/kg-U. The program calls for continued testing to still higher burnup levels in PHASE 2

  13. Fuel pellet relocation behavior in fast reactor uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel pin at beginning-of-life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masaki; Ukai, Shigeharu; Asaga, Takeo

    1999-08-01

    The effects of fabrication parameters, irradiation conditions and fuel microstructural feature on fuel pellet relocation behavior in fast reactor fuel pins were investigated. This work focused only on beginning-of-life conditions, when fuel centerline temperature depends largely on the behavior. Fuel pellet relocation behavior in Joyo Mk-II driver could not be characterized because of the lack of data. And the behavior in FFTF driver and its larger diameter type fuel pins could not be characterized because of the extensive lot-by-lot scatters. The behavior both in Monju type and in Joyo power-to-melt type fuel pins were similar to each other, and depends largely on the as-fabricated gap width while the effects of linear heat rate and the extent of microstructural evolution were negligible. And fuel pellet centerline melting seems to affect slightly the behavior. The correlation, which describes the extent of relocation both in Monju type and in Joyo power-to-melt type fuel pins, were newly formulated and extrapolated for Joyo Mk-II driver, FFTF driver and its larger diameter type fuel pins. And the behavior in Joyo Mk-II driver seemed to be similar. On the contrary, the similarity with JNC fuel pins was observed case-by-case in FFTF driver and its larger diameter type fuel pins. (author)

  14. Release characteristics of cesium from green pellet fabricated with spent fuel under different sintering conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Geun Il; Lee, Dou Youn; Lee, Young Soon; Kim, Woong Ki; Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Jung Won; Yang, Myung Seung

    2005-01-01

    The dry process, known as DUPIC(Direct Use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactor), for fabricating fuel pellets from spent fuel as recycling technology has been well demonstrated by establishing an optimization process for fuel fabrication through a number of batch processes using typical PWR spent fuel. As considering a strategy for extending the burn-up in LWR fuel, experimental verification for analyzing the effect of spent fuel burn-up on fuel fabrication is necessary in some respects that one of key parameters influencing the fuel fabrication characteristic would amount of fission products contained as impurity elements in spent fuel. A high burn-up spent fuel has a higher amount of fission products compared with typical spent fuel irradiated in about 27,000 MWd/tU. A preliminary study showed that the sintered pellet density fabricated with a high burn-up fuel has a lower value than that of common fuel burn-ups of about 30,000 MWd/tU. To provide better understanding a remote fuel fabrication characteristic in an aspect of wide ranges of spent fuel generated from PWR reactor, the influence of fission products release on fabrication characteristics of the dry processed fuel with a high burn-up fuel of 65,000 MWd/tU were experimentally evaluated. It is expected that key fission product affecting fabrication characteristics in dry process is cesium isotope due to the boiling point of 670 .deg. C and the low dissociation temperature of its oxides(<700 .deg. C). This study focus to analyze the release characteristics of cesium from green pellets fabricated with a variation of compaction pressure under different sintering conditions using tubular furnace in IMEF M6 hot cell

  15. A mathematical model of an automatic assembler to stack fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, R.G.; Joynes, R.; Bretzlaff, C.I.

    1980-11-01

    Fuel elements for CANDU reactors are assembled from stacks of cylindrical UO 2 pellets, with close tolerances on lengths and diameters. Present stacking techniques involve extensive manual operations and they can be speeded up and reduced in cost by an automated device. If gamma-active fuel is handled such a device is essential. An automatic fuel pellet assembly process was modelled mathematically. The model indicated a suitable sequence of pellet manipulations to arrive at a stack length that was always within tolerance. This sequence was used as the inital input for the design of mechanical hardware. The mechanical design and the refinement of the mathematical model proceeded simultaneously. Mechanical constraints were allowed for in the model, and its optimized sequence of operations was incorporated in a microcomputer program to control the mechanical hardware. (auth)

  16. Modelling the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helfer, Th.

    2006-03-01

    This thesis aims to model the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod. Fuel cracking has two main consequences. It relieves the stress in the pellet, upon which the majority of the mechanical and physico-chemical phenomena are dependent. It also leads to pellet fragmentation. Taking fuel cracking into account is therefore necessary to adequately predict the mechanical loading of the cladding during the course of an irradiation. The local approach to fracture was chosen to describe fuel pellet cracking. Practical considerations brought us to favour a quasi-static description of fuel cracking by means of a local damage models. These models describe the appearance of cracks by a local loss of rigidity of the material. Such a description leads to numerical difficulties, such as mesh dependency of the results and abrupt changes in the equilibrium state of the mechanical structure during unstable crack propagations. A particular attention was paid to these difficulties because they condition the use of such models in engineering studies. This work was performed within the framework of the ALCYONE fuel performance package developed at CEA/DEC/SESC which relies on the PLEIADES software platform. ALCYONE provides users with various approaches for modelling nuclear fuel behaviour, which differ in terms of the type geometry considered for the fuel rod. A specific model was developed and implemented to describe fuel cracking for each of these approaches. The 2D axisymmetric fuel rod model is the most innovative and was particularly studied. We show that it is able to assess, thanks to an appropriate description of fuel cracking, the main geometrical changes of the fuel rod occurring under normal and off-normal operating conditions. (author)

  17. Removing method for powder deposited on nuclear fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajiri, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Kazuhito.

    1996-01-01

    A large number of pellets after completion of a dry-type polishing step are passed, while rolling, on a net plate. The net plate is electroconductive and formed by finely braiding fine metal wires into a lattice. Static electricity (charge) of powders such as a polishing powder deposited on the pellets is discharged on the net plate. The powder from which static electricity is removed are dropped below the net plate by the discharge. In this process, the powders can be dropped from the pellets and the net plate efficiently by vibrating the net plate by an vibration device and the like. A charging electrode is disposed below the net plate, and a dust collecting electrode and a suction blower are disposed therebelow. The powders dropped from the net plate are induced by the suction blower, to which charges are applied by corona discharge at the charging electrode. The charged powders are further induced by the suction blower and collected to the dust collecting device. (I.N.)

  18. The quality analyses of olive cake fuel pellets - mathematical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brlek Tea I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the effect of processing parameters (conditioning temperature and binder content, on final quality of produced agro-pellets for heat energy generation, obtained from four different olive cultivars using different technological parameters. Technological, physical and chemical properties of pellets (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulphur content, particle density, abrasion length, moisture, ash content, higher and lower heating values, fixed carbon and volatile matter content have been determined to assess their quality. The performance of Artificial Neural Network (ANN was compared with the performance of second order polynomial (SOP model, as well as with the obtained experimental data in order to develop rapid and accurate mathematical model for prediction of final quality parameters of agro-pellets. SOP model showed high coefficients of determination (r2, between 0.692 and 0.955, while ANN model showed high prediction accuracy with r2 between 0.544 and 0.994. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46005 i br. TR-31055

  19. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction. Second semiannual report, January--June 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1978-09-01

    This program has as its ultimate objective the demonstration of an advanced fuel concept that is resistant to the failure mechanism known as fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). Since currently used fuel in the nuclear power industry is subject to the PCI failure mechanism, reactor operators limit the rates of power increases and thus reduce their capacity factors in order to protect the fuel. Two concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as ''barrier fuels'') have special fuel cladding designed to protect the Zircaloy cladding tube from the harmful effects of localized stress and reactive fission products during reactor service. The demonstration of one of these concepts in a commercial power reactor is planned for PHASE 2 of this program. The current plans for the demonstration will involve approximately 132 bundles of PCI-resistant fuel

  20. Evaluation of Gas, Oil and Wood Pellet Fueled Residential Heating System Emissions Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.

    2009-12-01

    fine particulate per unit of energy, expressed as milligrams per Mega-Joule (mg/MJ) versus the different sulfur contents of four different heating fuels. These were tested in a conventional cast iron boiler equipped with a flame retention head burner. The fuels included a typical ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with sulfur below 0.5 percent (1520 average ppm S), an ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with very high sulfur content (5780 ppm S), low sulfur heating oil (322 ppm S) and an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (11 ppm S). Three additional oil-fired heating system types were also tested with normal heating fuel, low sulfur and ultralow sulfur fuel. They included an oil-fired warm air furnace of conventional design, a high efficiency condensing warm air furnace, a condensing hydronic boiler and the conventional hydronic boiler as discussed above. The linearity in the results was observed with all of the different oil-fired equipment types (as shown in the second figure on the next page). A linear regression of the data resulted in an Rsquared value of 0.99 indicating that a very good linear relationship exits. This means that as sulfur decreases the PM 2.5 emissions are reduced in a linear manner within the sulfur content range tested. At the ultra low sulfur level (15 ppm S) the amount of PM 2.5 had been reduced dramatically to an average of 0.043 mg/MJ. Three different gas-fired heating systems were tested. These included a conventional in-shot induced draft warm air furnace, an atmospheric fired hydronic boiler and a high efficiency hydronic boiler. The particulate (PM 2.5) measured ranged from 0.011 to 0.036 mg/MJ. depending on the raw material source used in their manufacture. All three stoves tested were fueled with premium (low ash) wood pellets obtained in a single batch to provide for uniformity in the test fuel. Unlike the oil and gas fired systems, the wood pellet stoves had measurable amounts of particulates sized above the 2.5-micron size that defines fine particulates (less than 2

  1. Completion of UO2 pellets production and fuel rods load for the RA-8 critical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marajofsky, Adolfo; Perez, Lidia E.; Thern, Gerardo G.; Altamirano, Jorge S.; Benitez, Ana M.; Cardenas, Hugo R.; Becerra, Fabian A.; Perez, Aldo E.; Fuente, Mariano de la

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Fuels Division produced fuel pellets of 235 U with 1.8% and 3.6% enrichment and Zry-4 cladding loads for the RA-8 reactor at Pilcaniyeu Technological Unit. For economical and availability reasons, the powder acquired was initially UO 2 with 3.4% enrichment in 235 U, therefore the 235 U powder with 1.8% enrichment was produced by mechanical mixture. The production of fuel pellets for both enrichments was carried out by cold pressing and sintering processes in reducing atmosphere. The load of Zry-4 claddings was performed manually. The production stages can be divided into setup, qualification and production. This production allows not only to fulfill satisfactorily the new fuel rods supply for the RA-8 reactor but also to count with a new equipment and skilled personnel as well as to meet quality and assurance control methods for future pilot-scale production and even new fuel elements production. (author)

  2. Computer-assisted nuclear fuel manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloney, J.P.; Schaumann, S.M.; Stone, E.

    1976-01-01

    At the ERDA Savannah River Plant, a process monitor, which incorporates an online digital computer, assists in manufacturing fuel elements used to produce nuclides such as plutonium, tritium, and californium in the plant's nuclear reactors. Also, inventory functions assist in safeguarding fissile material and protecting against accidental nuclear criticality. Terminals at strategic locations throughout the process area enable production operators to send and receive instructions and information on each manufacturing step

  3. High-speed repetitive pellet injector for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, S.K.; Baylor, L.R.; Foust, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    The projected fueling requirements of future magnetic confinement devices for controlled thermonuclear research [e.g., the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)] indicate that a flexible plasma fueling capability is required. This includes a mix of traditional gas puffing and low- and high-velocity deuterium-tritium pellets. Conventional pellet injectors (based on light gas guns or centrifugal accelerators) can reliably provide frozen hydrogen pellets (1- to 6-mm-diam sizes tested) up to ∼1.3-km/s velocity at the appropriate pellet fueling rates (1 to 10 Hz or greater). For long-pulse operation in a higher velocity regime (>2 km/s), an experiment in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ENEA Frascati is under way. This activity will be carried out in the framework of a collaborative agreement between the US Department of Energy and European Atomic Energy Community -- ENEA Association. In this experiment, an existing ORNL hydrogen extruder (equipped with a pellet chambering mechanism/gun barrel assembly) and a Frascati two-stage light gas gun driver have been combined on a test facility at ORNL. Initial testing has been carried out with single deuterium pellets accelerated up to 2.05 km/s with the two-stage driver; in addition, some preliminary repetitive testing (to commission the diagnostics) was performed at reduced speeds, including sequences at 0.5 to 1 Hz and 10 to 30 pellets. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate repetitive operation (up to ∼1 Hz) with speeds in the 2- to 3-km/s range. In addition, the strength of extruded hydrogen ice as opposed to that produced in situ by direct condensation in pipe guns can be investigated. The equipment and initial experimental results are described

  4. Theory of the frictional interaction between nuclear fuel cladding and a cracked ceramic pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1976-02-01

    A summary is presented of the outcome of theoretical work detailed in five publications, reproduced as appendices, which is concerned with the tendency for the cladding tube of nuclear fuel elements to fracture as the result of power cycling or after a sudden upward power excursion. The relationship is shown between the properties of the clad, those of UO 2 pellets, and the tendency of the clad to fail during upward power excursions. The role of interfacial friction is explored and the benefit to be obtained by reducing it is calculated for cases where a soft metal interlayer is present. It is shown that the experimentally-confirmed magnitude of the strain-concentration in the arc of cladding over a radial pellet crack could not arise if there were interfaceons present. Accordingly, these defects, although they do occur in some sliding situations, are thought to be absent from the pellet clas interface in fuel pins. (author)

  5. The pellet-cladding contact in a fuel rod and its simulation by finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanajura, C.A.S.

    1988-01-01

    A model to analyse the mechanical behavior of a fuel rod of a PWR is presented. We drew our attention to the phenomenon of pellet-pellet and pellet-cladding contact by taking advantage of a model which assumes the hypotheses of axisymmetry, elastic behavior with infinitesimal deformations and changes of the material properties with temperature. It also includes the effects of swelling and initial relocation. The problem of contact gives rise to a variational formulation which employs Lagrangian multipliers. With this approach an iterative scheme is constructed to obtain the solution. The finite element method is applied to space discretization. The model sensibility to some parameters and its performance concerning fuel rod behavior is discussed by means of numerical simulations. (author) [pt

  6. Zirconium carbonitride pellets by internal sol gel and spark plasma sintering as inert matrix fuel material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Marcus; Cologna, Marco; Cambriani, Andrea; Somers, Joseph; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Inert matrix fuel is a fuel type where the fissile material is blended with a solid diluent material. In this work zirconium carbonitride microspheres have been produced by internal sol gel technique, followed by carbothermal reduction. Material nitride purities in the produced materials ranged from Zr(N0.45C0.55) to Zr(N0.74C0.26) as determined by X-ray diffraction and application of Vegard's law. The zirconium carbonitride microspheres have been pelletized by spark plasma sintering (SPS) and by conventional cold pressing and sintering. In all SPS experiments cohesive pellets were formed. Maximum final density reached by SPS at 1700 °C was 87% theoretical density (TD) compared to 53% TD in conventional sintering at 1700 °C. Pore sizes in all the produced pellets were in the μm scale and no density gradients could be observed by computer tomography.

  7. Pellet fueling of JET plasmas during ohmic, ICRF and NBI heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondhalekar, A.; Cheetham, A.; Bures, M.

    1986-01-01

    Pellet fueling experiments have been performed on JET using a single-shot pneumatic injector giving 4.6mm (4.5 x 10 21 D atoms) and 3.6mm (2.2 x 10 21 D atoms) diameter cylindrical deuterium pellets with velocity 0.8 ≤ V(km.s -1 ) ≤ 1.2. Z/sub eff/ 20 m -3 and T/sub e/(0) ≅ 1keV. Separately, high value of n/sub D/(0)tau/sub E/T/sub i/(0) = 1.3 x 10 20 m -3 .s.keV at T/sub i/90) = 6.5keV has been obtained with pellet fueling followed by NBI heating

  8. The nuclear-fuel manufacturing adaptability study of UNH crystal-conversion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Chikazawa, Takahiro; Tamaki, Yoshihisa; Kikuchi, Toshiaki

    2003-12-01

    Crystallization procedure is considered to have an adaptability to new reprocessing process based on the PUREX process because it has an advantage in recovering rather pure uranium from contaminated uranium solution without reagent. Hydrated uranyl nitrate (UNH) crystal from crystallization procedure is fed to the conversion process into UO 2 for the fabrication of nuclear fuel. We have researched for denitration or conversion methods which is suited to UNH crystal and molten salt since. Due to the selection from some denitration or conversion methods, it is very important to research, an adaptability of the product from the denitration or conversion methods. In this study, we investigated some powder properties of the products, as important factors for nuclear-fuel-manufacturing, from the denitration or conversion methods. Next, we selected pelletizing process, viblo-packing fuel process and covered-particle fuel process as major manufacturing-process of nuclear fuel and research the conditions of uranyl oxide required from each processes. From the comparison between these conditions and the result from denitration or conversion methods, we estimated an adaptability of these methods to nuclear-fuel-manufacturing. As a result, we showed that freeze dry method, ADU and AUC method may be suited to pelletizing process. We also showed that electric reduction method, internal gelation method, and external gelation method may be suited to viblo-packing and covered-particle fuel process. (author)

  9. Evaluation of the in pile performance of boron containing fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Gwanyoon; Sohn, Dongseong

    2012-01-01

    The world rare earth resource are heavily concentrated in certain area and if these natural resources are weaponized by a country, we may confront serious difficulty because rare earth element gadolinium(Gd) is used as burnable poison material in some nuclear power plants (NPP) in Korea. Gd is used as a neutron absorbing material in Gd 2 O 3 form and mixed with UO 2 When boron is used as burnable poison in nuclear fuel, in fuel pellets. The burnable poison mixed in the fuel pellets is called integral burnable absorber (BA) design which differentiates it from the old separate BA design. In the old separate BA design, boron(B) was used in borosilicate glass (PYREX) form and placed in guide tubes. With the development of the concern over the availability of rare earth material Gd, B is considered as a candidate material replacing Gd for the case when the rare earth material is weaponized. However the idea for new boron BA design is integral type because the integral type BA design has several benefits over the separate BA design, such as reduction of radioactive waste, more positions for BA location, etc. 10 B absorbs a neutron and produces helium by the following reaction: 10 B + n → 7 Li + 4 He The helium produced by the nuclear reaction may cause the increase of rod internal pressure and change the gap conductivity if the significant amount of helium gas is released to the gap between the pellet and the cladding. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the in-pile behaviors of B containing pellet. However, few experiment have been carried out so far on the behavior of in-pile produced helium in UO 2 fuel pellets, especially for the cases boron compound is mixed with UO 2 In this paper, we will evaluate the production and the release of helium depending on fuel. 10 B concentration in the fuel

  10. Automatic classification process and device for nuclear fuel pellets; Procede et dispositif de tri automatique de pastilles de combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardin, M.; Bouvet, P.; Wache, C.

    1994-07-01

    The device arranges the fuel pellets in several parallel files. The end pellet of each file are then removed and aligned. These pellets are then simultaneously transferred on an optical inspection arrangement and are turned simultaneously for examination. The light signal is analysed to determine if each pellet is correct, acceptable or reject. The pellets are then held by individual grabs which displace to a separation system where the individual grabs are controlled to open in response to the result of the signal analysis. 13 figs.

  11. Westinghouse new advanced developed doped pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backmann, Karin; Valizadeh, Sima; Hallstadius, Lars; Wright, Jonathan; Widegren, Hans; Roennberg, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    Westinghouse has developed ADOPT (Advanced Doped Pellet Technology) UO 2 fuel containing additions of Cr 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 . Our paper presents results from the extensive investigation program which covered examinations of doped and reference standard pellets both in the manufactured and irradiated states. The additives facilitate pellet densification during sintering and enlarge the pellet grain size. The in-reactor performance of the ADOPT pellets has been investigated in pool-side and hot cell Post Irradiation Examinations (PIEs), as well as in the Studsvik R2 test reactor. The investigations have identified three areas of improved operational behavior: Reduced fission gas release, improved Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI) performance thanks to increased pellet plasticity, and higher resistance against post failure degradation. Fuel segments have been exposed to ramp tests and enhanced power steady-state operation in the Studsvik R2 reactor after base-irradiation to above 30 MWd/kgU in a commercial BWR. ADOPT reveals up to 30% lower fission gas release than standard UO 2 pellets. The fuel degradation in an erosion tests under irradiation, showed that ADOPT pellets have a reduced rate of fuel washout, as compared to standard UO 2 pellets. Fuel rods with ADOPT pellets have been irradiated in several LWRs since 1999, including two full SVEA Optima2 reloads in 2005. (orig.)

  12. Apparatus for dynamic monitoring of the size, shape, and density of fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domoratskii, E.P.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the structure, principle of operation, and technical characteristics of the KOMBI automated system for non-destructive monitoring of gas-cooled reactor fuel pellets. A detailed description of the apparatus was provided, and the technical characteristics were also presented

  13. Study of pellet clad interaction defects in Dresden-3 fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasupathi, V.; Perrin, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    During Cycle-3 operation of Dresden-3, fuel rod failures occurred following a transient power increase. Ten fuel rods from five of the leaking fuel assemblies were examined at Battelle's Columbus Laboratory and General Electric-Vallecitos Nuclear Center. Examinations consisted of nondestructive and destructive methods including metallography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed the cause of fuel rod failure to be pellet clad interaction involving stress corrosion cracking. Results of SEM studies of the cladding crack surfaces and deposits on clad inner surfaces were in agreement with those reported by other investigators

  14. Validation of the BISON 3D Fuel Performance Code: Temperature Comparisons for Concentrically and Eccentrically Located Fuel Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Hales; D. M. Perez; R. L. Williamson; S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer

    2013-03-01

    BISON is a modern finite-element based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (USA) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behaviour and is used to analyse either 2D axisymmetric or 3D geometries. BISON has been applied to a variety of fuel forms including LWR fuel rods, TRISO-coated fuel particles, and metallic fuel in both rod and plate geometries. Code validation is currently in progress, principally by comparison to instrumented LWR fuel rods. Halden IFA experiments constitute a large percentage of the current BISON validation base. The validation emphasis here is centreline temperatures at the beginning of fuel life, with comparisons made to seven rods from the IFA-431 and 432 assemblies. The principal focus is IFA-431 Rod 4, which included concentric and eccentrically located fuel pellets. This experiment provides an opportunity to explore 3D thermomechanical behaviour and assess the 3D simulation capabilities of BISON. Analysis results agree with experimental results showing lower fuel centreline temperatures for eccentric fuel with the peak temperature shifted from the centreline. The comparison confirms with modern 3D analysis tools that the measured temperature difference between concentric and eccentric pellets is not an artefact and provides a quantitative explanation for the difference.

  15. Fuel Pellets from Wheat Straw: The Effect of Lignin Glass Transition and Surface Waxes on Pelletizing Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Clemons, Craig; Holm, Jens K.

    2012-01-01

    and a high concentration of hydrophobic waxes on its outer surface that may limit the pellet strength. The present work studies the impact of the lignin glass transition on the pelletizing properties of wheat straw. Furthermore, the effect of surface waxes on the pelletizing process and pellet strength...... are investigated by comparing wheat straw before and after organic solvent extraction. The lignin glass transition temperature for wheat straw and extracted wheat straw is determined by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. At a moisture content of 8%, transitions are identified at 53°C and 63°C, respectively....... Pellets are pressed from wheat straw and straw where the waxes have been extracted from. Two pelletizing temperatures were chosen—one below and one above the glass transition temperature of lignin. The pellets compression strength, density, and fracture surface were compared to each other. Pellets pressed...

  16. MANUFACTURING AND PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A COMPATIBLE UNIT TO PRODUCE ANIMAL FEED PELLETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek FOUDA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was to manufacture and evaluate a compatible unit including mixing and pelleting to produce Rabbit feed pellets formula in one operation. The compatible was evaluated under operating parameters including four different retention time (2,3.5,4 and 5min and four L/D ratio (5:1 5.5:1, 6:1 and 6.5:1 were investigated under the above mentioned parameters. The optimum results compatible unit were die L/D ratio of 5.5:1, 3.5min of mixing retention time, and rollers teeth width of 10mm. 427.87kg/h production rate 37.96 kW.h/ton energy requirement.88.29% mixing efficiency, 0.671gm/cm3 bulk density, 93.21% durability, 49.01N hardiness, and 566.36 LE/ton using residues formulation including black seed meal.

  17. Preliminary study of cost benefits associated with duplex fuel pellets of the LOWI type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainscough, J.B.; Coucill, D.N.; Howl, D.A.; Jensen, A.; Misfeldt, I.

    1983-01-01

    Duplex UO 2 pellets, which consist of an outer enriched annulus and a depleted or natural core, can provide a solution to the problem of stress corrosion cracking failures, which have led to constraints being placed on ramp rates in power reactors. An analysis of the reactor physics and the performance of duplex pellets is presented in the context of a 17 X 17 pressurized water reactor fuel rod design. The study has been based on the particular type of duplex pellet in which the core and the annulus are physically separate; this is called ''LOWI'' after the Danish design. At low burnup, this fuel shows a significant improvement in power ramp performance compared with standard fuel. At higher burnup, the benefits are less certain but as the severity of the ramp will usually be less in high burnup fuel simply because of the reduced rating, the reduction in benefit may not be significant. If the gap between the core and annulus persists to high burnup, there will be no loss of benefit. Economic calculations and a cost-benefit analysis are presented to show the number of extra full-power hours of reactor operation that must be obtained in order to outweigh the additional fabrication costs associated with this fuel

  18. Increase of thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide nuclear fuel pellets with beryllium oxide addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarano, D.M.; Mansur, F.A.; Santos, A.M.M. dos; Ferraz, W.B.

    2016-01-01

    The UO 2 fuel is one of the most used nuclear fuel in thermal reactors and has many advantages such as high melting point, chemical compatibility with cladding, etc. However, its thermal conductivity is relatively low, which leads to a premature degradation of the fuel pellets due to a high radial temperature gradient during reactor operation. An alternative to avoid this problem is to increase the thermal conductivity of the fuel pellets, by adding beryllium oxide (BeO). Pellets of UO 2 and UO 2 -BeO were obtained from a homogenized mixture of powders of UO 2 and BeO, containing 2% and 3% by weight of BeO and sintering at 1750 °C for 3 h under H 2 atmosphere after uniaxial pressing at 400 MPa. The pellet densities were obtained by xylol penetration-immersion method and the thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity were determined according to ASTM E-1461 at room temperature (25 deg C) and 100 deg C. The thermal diffusivity measurements were carried out employing the laser flash method. The thermal conductivity obtained at 25 deg C showed an increase with the addition of 2% and 3% of BeO corresponding to 19% and 28%, respectively. As for the measurements carried out at 100 deg C, there was an increase in the thermal conductivity for the same BeO contents of 20% and 31%. These values as a percentage of increased conductivity were obtained in relation to the UO 2 pellets. (author)

  19. General features of conceptual design for the pilot plant to manufacture fuel rods from mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada, C.A.; Adelfang, P.; Esteban, A.; Aparicio, G.; Friedenthal, M.; Orlando, O.S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper conceptually describes: 1) the processes in the manufacturing lines; 2) the distribution of quality controls and glove boxes in manufacturing lines; 3) the Control and Radiological Safety Room; 4) the Dressing Room; 5) the requirements of the ventilation system. The plant will be located in the first floor of the Radiochemical Processes Laboratory building, occupying a surface of 600 m 2 . The necessary equipment for the following manufacturing lines will be provided: a) conversion from Pu(NO3)4 to PuO 2 (through Pu(III)oxalate); b) manufacture of homogeneous of mixed oxides of U and Pu; c) manufacture of (U,Pu)O 2 pellets; d) manufacture of fuel rods of mixed uranium and plutonium oxides. (Author)

  20. Fuel pellets from biomass: The importance of the pelletizing pressure and its dependency on the processing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Holm, Jens K.; Sanadi, Anand R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the key factors affecting the pelletizing pressure in biomass pelletization processes. The impact of raw material type, pellet length, temperature, moisture content and particle size on the pressure build up in the press channel of a pellet mill...... act as lubricants, lowering the friction between the biomass and the press channel walls. The effect of moisture content on the pelletizing pressure was dependent on the raw material species. Different particle size fractions, from below 0.5 mm up to 2.8 mm diameter, were tested, and it was shown...

  1. Quantification of the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal on the experimentally determined O/U ratio of a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimha Murty, B.; Bharati Misra, U.; Yadav, R.B.; Srivastava, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes quantitatively the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal (that could be formed due to the conducive manufacturing conditions) in a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet on the experimentally determined O/U ratio using analytical methods involving dissolution of the pellet material. To quantify the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal in the fuel pellet, a mathematical expression is derived for the actual O/U ratio in terms of the O/U ratio as determined by an experiment involving dissolution of the material and the quantity of uranium metal present in the uranium dioxide pellet. The utility of this derived mathematical expression is demonstrated by tabulating the calculated actual O/U ratios for varying amounts of uranium metal (from 5 to 95% in 5% intervals) and different O/U ratio values (from 2.001 to 2.015 in 0.001 intervals). This paper brings out the necessity of care to be exercised while interpreting the experimentally determined O/U ratio and emphasizes the fact that it is always safer to produce the nuclear fuel with oxygen to uranium ratios well below the specified maximum limit of 2.015. (author)

  2. Model for the behaviour of thorium and uranium fuels at pelletization; Modelo para o comportamento de microesferas combustiveis de torio e uranio na peletizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira Neto, Ricardo Alberto

    2000-11-15

    In this work, a model for the behaviour of thorium-uranium-mixed oxide microspheres in the pelletizing process is presented. This model was developed in a program whose objective was to demonstrate the viability of producing fissile material through the utilization of thorium in pressurized water reactors. This is important because it allows the saving of the strategic uranium reserves, and makes it possible the nuclear utilization of the large brazilian thorium reserves. The objective was to develop a model for optimizing physical properties of the microspheres, such as density, fracture strength and specific surface, so as to produce fuel pellets with microstructure, density, open porosity and impurity content, in accordance with the fuel specification. And, therefore, to adjust the sol-gel processing parameters in order to obtain these properties, and produce pellets with an optimized microstructure, adequate to a stable behaviour under irradiation. The model made it clear that to achieve this objective, it is necessary to produce microspheres with density and specific surface as small as possible. By changing the sol-gel processing parameters, microspheres with the desired properties were produced, and the model was experimentally verified by manufacturing fuel pellets with optimized microstructures, density, open porosity and impurity content, meeting the specifications for this new nuclear fuel for pressurized water reactors. Furthermore it was possible to obtain mathematical expressions that enables to calculate from the microspheres properties and the utilized compaction pressure, the sinter density that will be obtained in the sintered pellet and the necessary compaction pressure to reach the sintered density specified for the fuel. (author)

  3. Automatic inspection for remotely manufactured fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifman, J.; Vitela, J.E.; Gibbs, K.S.; Benedict, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Two classification techniques, standard control charts and artificial neural networks, are studied as a means for automating the visual inspection of the welding of end plugs onto the top of remotely manufactured reprocessed nuclear fuel element jackets. Classificatory data are obtained through measurements performed on pre- and post-weld images captured with a remote camera and processed by an off-the-shelf vision system. The two classification methods are applied in the classification of 167 dummy stainless steel (HT9) fuel jackets yielding comparable results

  4. CERCA'S experience in UMO fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarousse, Ch.; Lavastre, Y.; Grasse, M.

    2003-01-01

    Considered as a suitable solution for non-proliferation and reprocessing purposes, UMo fuel has been chosen and studied by the RERTR program since 1996. Involved in the RERTR fuel developments since 1978, with more than 20 years of U 3 SI 2 fuel production, and closely linked to the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, CERCA was able to define properly, from the beginning, the right R and D actions plan for UMo fuel development. CERCA has already demonstrated during the last 4 years its ability to manufacture plates and fuel elements with high density UMo fuel. UMo full size plates produced for 4 irradiation experiments in 3 European reactors afforded us a unique experience. In addition, as a main part of our R and D effort, we have always studied in depth a key part of the CERCA process outline which is the plate rolling stage. After some preliminary investigation in order to define the phenomenological model describing the behavior of the fuel core when rolling, we have developed a rolling digital simulator. (author)

  5. A study on the sinterability enhancement of dry recycling nuclear fuel pellets by using simulated spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woong Ki; Lee, Jae Won; Shin, Won Chul; Lee, Jung Won

    2004-01-01

    Burnup of nuclear fuel was continuously increased to enhance economy of nuclear power plants. In 1960's, burnup ranged 20,000∼30,000 MWd/tU. In 1990's, it reached 60,000 MWd/tU. A lot of high burnup spent PWR fuel will be discharged in the future. In this study, to study fabrication characteristics of dry recycling nuclear fuel from spent PWR fuel with high burnup of 60,000 MWd/tU, the fission products of spent PWR fuel was analyzed by ORIGEN-2 code. Simulated spent PWR fuel pellets were fabricated by using UO 2 powder added by the simulated fission products. The simulated dry-recycling-fuel pellets were fabricated by dry recycling fuel fabrication flow including 3 cycle treated OREOX(Oxidation and Reduction of Oxide fuel) process. A small amount of dopant such as TiO 2 , Nb 2 O 5 , Li 2 O are added to enhance sinterability of the powder

  6. Microgasification cookstoves and pellet fuels from waste biomass: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biochar production averaged 59 and 29% of total fuel in the ND and Philips, respectively. Interviews of 30 ND TLUD stove users showed that 60% abandoned use within one month, 80% stating that they produce too much smoke and 40% stating that controlling the air vent is too much trouble. Seventy five percent said that ...

  7. Fuel Pellets from Biomass. Processing, Bonding, Raw Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang

    The depletion of fossil fuels and the need to reduce green house gas emissions has resulted in a strong growth of biomass utilization for heat and power production. Attempts to overcome the poor handling properties of biomass, i.e. its low bulk density and inhomogeneous structure, have resulted...

  8. Nuclear fuel element with axially aligned fuel pellets and fuel microspheres therein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sease, J.D.; Harrington, F.E.

    1973-12-11

    Elongated single- and multi-region fuel elements are prepared by replacing within a cladding container a coarse fraction of fuel material which includes plutonium and uranium in the appropriate regions of the fuel element and then infiltrating with vibration a fine-sized fraction of uranium-containing microspheres throughout all interstices in the coarse material in a single loading. The fine, rigid material defines a thin annular layer between the coarse fraction and the cladding to reduce adverse mechanical and chemical interactions. (Official Gazette)

  9. Thermal conductivity thermal diffusivity of UO{sub 2}-BeO nuclear fuel pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansur, Fábio A.; Camarano, Denise M.; Santos, Ana M. M.; Ferraz, Wilmar B.; Silva, Mayra A.; Ferreira, Ricardo A.N., E-mail: fam@cdtn.br, E-mail: dmc@cdtn.br, E-mail: amms@cdtn.br, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.br, E-mail: mayra.silva@cdtn.br, E-mail: ricardoanf@yahoo.com.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The temperature distribution in nuclear fuel pellets is of vital importance for the performance of the reactor, as it affects the heat transfer, the mechanical behavior and the release of fission gas during irradiation, reducing safety margins in possible accident scenarios. One of the main limitation for the current uranium dioxide nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}) is its low thermal conductivity, responsible for the higher temperature of the pellet center and, consequently, for a higher radial temperature gradient. Thus, the addition of another material to increase the UO{sub 2} fuel thermal conductivity has been considered. Among the additives that are being investigated, beryllium oxide (BeO) has been chosen due to its high thermal conductivity, with potential to optimize power generation in pressurized light water reactors (PWR). In this work, UO{sub 2}-BeO pellets were obtained by the physical mixing of the powders with additions of 2wt% and 3wt% of BeO. The thermal diffusivity and conductivity of the pellets were determined from room temperature up to 500 °C. The results were normalized to 95% of the theoretical density (TD) of the pellets and varied according to the BeO content. The range of the values of thermal diffusivity and conductivity were 1.22 mm{sup 2}∙s{sup -1} to 3.69 mm{sup 2}∙s{sup -1} and 3.80 W∙m{sup -}'1∙K{sup -1} to 9.36 W∙m{sup -1}∙K{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  10. Fission gas release and pellet microstructure change of high burnup BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, N.; Ohira, K.; Tsuda, K.; Fischer, G.; Ota, T.

    1998-01-01

    UO 2 fuel, with and without Gadolinium, irradiated for three, five, and six irradiation cycles up to about 60 GWd/t pellet burnup in a commercial BWR were studied. The fission gas release and the rim effect were investigated by the puncture test and gas analysis method, OM (optical microscope), SEM (scanning electron microscope), and EPMA (electron probe microanalyzer). The fission gas release rate of the fuel rods irradiated up to six cycles was below a few percent; there was no tendency for the fission gas release to increase abruptly with burnup. On the other hand, microstructure changes were revealed by OM and SEM examination at the rim position with burnup increase. Fission gas was found depleted at both the rim position and the pellet center region using EPMA. There was no correlation between the fission gas release measured by the puncture test and the fission gas depletion at the rim position using EPMA. However, the depletion of fission gas in the center region had good correlation with the fission gas release rate determined by the puncture test. In addition, because the burnup is very large at the rim position of high burnup fuel and also due to the fission rate of the produced Pu, the Xe/Kr ratio at the rim position of high burnup fuel is close to the value of the fission yield of Pu. The Xe/Kr ratio determined by the gas analysis after the puncture test was equivalent to the fuel average but not to the pellet rim position. From the results, it was concluded that fission gas at the rim position was released from the UO 2 matrix in high burnup, however, most of this released fission gas was held in the porous structure and not released from the pellet to the free volume. (author)

  11. Recent improvements in the design and manufacture of LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurcevic, M.; Pevec, D.

    1998-01-01

    Strong competition among the nuclear fuel vendors on the LWR fuel market is the main driving force for improvements in the design and manufacture of the LWR fuel. Nuclear utilities are requesting more advanced fuel, which will increase the fuel availability and lower fuel cycle cost. The fuel vendors' answer to this request has been an introduction of several improvements in the design and manufacture of their fuel. In this article the current trends in advanced fuel designs and development of improved materials, which have improved the fuel utilization and availability, are discussed in more detail. Also, the impact of these improved features on the safety analyses has been evaluated.(author)

  12. Development and characteristics of the rim region in high burnup UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, M.E.; Freshley, M.D.; Lanning, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Research to define the behavior of Zircaloy-clad light-water reactor fuel irradiated to high burnup levels was conducted as part of the High Burnup Effects Program. One observed microstructural change related to irradiation to high burnup levels (up to 83 MWd/kg M pellet-average) is the development of a well-defined, unique microstructural region at the fuel pellet edge (rim). This rim region is characterized by the loss of optically-definable grain structure, increased porosity, and the depletion of matrix fission gas. The rim region holds the potential for significant localized increases in the athermal release of fission gases at high burnup levels, but the contribution of the rim release to the fractional release of the total fission gas produced in the rod is small. (orig.)

  13. Hot impact densification (HID) - a new method of producing ceramic nuclear fuel pellets with tight dimensional tolerances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrovat, M.; Rachor, L. (Nuklear-EEhemie und -Metallurgie G.m.b.H. (NUKEM), Hanau (Germany, F.R.)); Muehling, G. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Projekt Schneller Brueter); Vollath, D.; Zimmermann, H. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Material- und Festkoerperforschung)

    1984-05-01

    The hot impact densification (HID) is a new powerful method for producing ceramic fuel pellets for nuclear reactors. Green ceramic bodies are directly processed to pellets by high speed shaping in the plastic temperature region of ceramic material. Opposed to the well established press sintering procedure it can be heated, densified, and cooled by orders of magnitude faster. Therefore, at high throughputs, small equipment dimensions become possible. The fuel pellets produced meet all requirements, particular the dimensional tolerances achieved are very close, consequently circular grinding is omitted. Furthermore, the relatively high temperature level of the impact pressing favors the mixed crystal formation of uranium and plutonium oxide. This improves the solubility of the fuel in nitric acid, an essential point at reprocessing. A prototype facility is designed so that automatic fabrication in continuous operation will be possible. The target working cycle for a fuel pellet is in the range of some seconds.

  14. General-purpose heat source: Research and development program. Process evaluation, fuel pellet GF-47

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, M.A.H.; George, T.G.

    1995-12-01

    The general-purpose heat source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive credible accident environments. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions has documented the response of the GPHS heat source to a variety of fragment-impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and Earth-impact conditions. Although heat sources for previous missions were fabricated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), GPHS fueled-clads required for the Cassini mission to Saturn will be fabricated by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This evaluation is part of an ongoing program to determine the similarity of GPHS fueled clads and fuel pellets fabricated at LANL to those fabricated at WSRC. Pellet GF-47, which was fabricated at LANL in late 1994, was submitted for chemical and ceramographic analysis. The results indicated that the pellet had a chemical makeup and microstructure within the range of material fabricated at WSRC in the early 1980s.

  15. Non destructive examination of UN / U-Si fuel pellets using neutrons (preliminary assessment)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourke, Mark Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogel, Sven C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Voit, Stewart Lancaster [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Losko, Adrian S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tremsin, Anton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Tomographic imaging and diffraction measurements were performed on nine pellets; four UN/ U Si composite formulations (two enrichment levels), three pure U3Si5 reference formulations (two enrichment levels) and two reject pellets with visible flaws (to qualify the technique). The U-235 enrichments ranged from 0.2 to 8.8 wt.%. The nitride/silicide composites are candidate compositions for use as Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF). The monophase U3Si5 material was included as a reference. Pellets from the same fabrication batches will be inserted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho during 2016. The goal of the Advanced Non-destructive Fuel Examination work package is the development and application of non-destructive neutron imaging and scattering techniques to ceramic and metallic nuclear fuels. Data reported in this report were collected in the LANSCE run cycle that started in September 2015 and ended in March 2016. Data analysis is ongoing; thus, this report provides a preliminary review of the measurements and provides an overview of the characterized samples.

  16. UO2 fuel pellets fabrication via Spark Plasma Sintering using non-standard molybdenum die

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papynov, E. K.; Shichalin, O. O.; Mironenko, A. Yu; Tananaev, I. G.; Avramenko, V. A.; Sergienko, V. I.

    2018-02-01

    The article investigates spark plasma sintering (SPS) of commercial uranium dioxide (UO2) powder of ceramic origin into highly dense fuel pellets using non-standard die instead of usual graphite die. An alternative and formerly unknown method has been suggested to fabricate UO2 fuel pellets by SPS for excluding of typical problems related to undesirable carbon diffusion. Influence of SPS parameters on chemical composition and quality of UO2 pellets has been studied. Also main advantages and drawbacks have been revealed for SPS consolidation of UO2 in non-standard molybdenum die. The method is very promising due to high quality of the final product (density 97.5-98.4% from theoretical, absence of carbon traces, mean grain size below 3 μm) and mild sintering conditions (temperature 1100 ºC, pressure 141.5 MPa, sintering time 25 min). The results are interesting for development and probable application of SPS in large-scale production of nuclear ceramic fuel.

  17. Advanced Fuel Pellet Materials and Fuel Rod Design for Water Cooled Reactors. Proceedings of a Technical Committee Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-10-01

    The economics of current nuclear power plants have improved through increased fuel burnup and longer fuel cycles, i.e. increasing the effective time that fuel remains in the reactor core and the amount of energy it generates. Efficient consumption of fissile material in the fuel element before it is discharged from the reactor means that less fuel is required over the reactor's life cycle, which results in lower amounts of fresh fuel, lower spent fuel storage costs, and less waste for ultimate disposal. Better utilization of fissile nuclear materials, as well as more flexible power manoeuvring, place challenging operational demands on materials used in reactor components, and first of all, on fuel and cladding materials. It entails increased attention to measures ensuring desired in-pile fuel performance parameters that require adequate improvements in fuel material properties and fuel rod designs. These are the main reasons that motivated the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (TWG-FPT) to recommend the organization of a Technical Committee Meeting on Advanced Fuel Pellet Materials and Fuel Rod Designs for Power Reactors. The proposal was supported by the IAEA TWGs on Advanced Technologies for Light and Heavy Water-Cooled Reactors (TWG-LWR and TWG-HWR), and the meeting was held at the invitation of the Government of Switzerland at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, from 23 to 26 November 2009. This was the third IAEA meeting on these subjects (the first was held in 1996 in Tokyo, Japan, and the second in 2003 in Brussels, Belgium), which reflects the continuous interest in the above issues among Member States. The purpose of the meeting was to review the current status in the development of fuel pellet materials and to explore recent improvements in fuel rod designs for light and heavy water cooled power reactors. The meeting was attended by 45 specialists representing fuel vendors, nuclear utilities, research and development

  18. Optimal rate of power increase in nuclear fuel. Pellet behaviour under dynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, B.G.

    1976-05-01

    A mathematical model has been worked out for the determination of the optium power escalation rate for nuclear power plants from the view-pint of fuel integrity. The model calculates the stress and strain transients in the pellet-cladding system with rapid power increase. No burnup effects are included due to the short time scale involved. An elastic solution has been transposed to a linear viscoelastic one using the correspondence principle. The cladding has however been treated under the programme assumptions as purely elastic. The fuel material has been assumed to be completely relaxed prior to the power transient. Radial cracking is included. The UO 2 -material distortion has been assumed to be linear viscoelastic, while the dilation is assumed as elastic. The system has been treated assuming plane strain since friction between the pellet and the cladding is large with practical burnsups, and the pellet column can be regarded as infinitely long, compared to the diameter of the pellet. The results of the calculations made show that under the above assumptions the clad stress is independent of the rate of power increase in the pellet. Scince this result is in opposition to general opinion an experimental programme was performed in order to test the results of the model. These results were confirmed. The occurance of clad failures in practice is not determined purely by clad straining. Current thought pays attention to the influence of e.g. stress-corrosion phenomena as significant. The programme reported here pays no attention such-like effects, or the effects of clad creep which could be of considerable significance with local deformations. These later effects are receiving attention in work now being initiated at the Department.(author)

  19. Wood pellets : is it a reliable, sustainable, green energy option?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaan, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Wood Pellet Association of Canada was formerly called the BC Pellet Fuel Manufacturers Association, and was renamed and re-organized in January 2006. The association serves as an advocate for the wood pellet industry in addition to conducting research projects. This power point presentation presented an overview of the wood pellet industry in North America and Europe. Canada's 23 pellet plants currently produce just over 1,000,000 tons of wood pellets annually. Pellet producers in the United States produce approximately 800,000 tons annually for the residential bagged market. There are currently 240 pellet plants in Europe, and district heating is the largest growth market for wood pellets in Europe. British Columbia (BC) pellet producers will ship 450,000 tons to European power plants in 2005. Wood pellet specifications were presented, with details of calorific values, moisture and ash contents. An outline of wood pellet production processes was provided. New pellet plants currently under construction were reviewed. Domestic, North American and overseas exports were discussed, along with production estimates for BC for the next 5 years. A chart of world production and consumption of wood pellets between 2000 to 2010 was presented. North American wood pellet technologies were described. The impact of the pine beetle infestation in BC on the wood pellet industry was evaluated, and a worldwide wood pellet production growth forecast was presented. Issues concerning off-gassing, emissions, and torrifracation were also discussed. tabs., figs

  20. Numerical solution of the elastic non-axial contact between pellet and cladding of fuel rod in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zymak, J.

    1987-08-01

    Elastic non-axial contacts between the pellet and the cladding of a fuel rod in a pressurized water reactor were calculated. The existence and the uniqueness of the solution were proved. The problem was approximated by the finite element method and quadratic programming was used for the solution. The results will be used in the solution of the probabilistic model of a fuel rod with non-axial pellets in a PWR. (author). 10 figs., 4 tabs., 10 refs

  1. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction. First semiannual report, July-December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, H.S. (comp.)

    1978-02-01

    Objective is the demonstration od advanced fuel concepts that are resistant to the failure mechanism known as fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). Since currently used fuel in the nuclear power industry is subject to the PCI failure mechanism, reactor operators limit the rates of power increases and thus reduce their capacity factors in order to protect the fuel. Two barrier concepts are being prepared for demonstration: (a) Cu-Barrier fuel and (b) Zr-Liner fuel. The large-scale demonstration of the PCI-resistant fuel is being designed generically to show feasibility of such a demonstration in a commercial power reactor of type BWR/3 having a steady-state core. Using the core of Quad Cities-1 reactor at the beginning of Cycle 6, the insertion of the demonstration PCI-resistant fuel and the reactor operational plan are being designed. Support laboratory tests to date for the Demonstration have shown that these barrier fuels (both the Cu-Barrier and the Zr-Liner types) are resistant to PCI. Four lead test assemblies (LTA) of the advanced PCI-resistant fuel are being fabricated for insertion into the Quad Cities-1 Boiling Water Reactor at the beginning of Cycle 5 (January 1979).

  2. WHIST transport analysis of high neutron production, ICRH heated, pellet fueled jet plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.; Tolliver, J.S.; Phillips, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    The WHIST 1-1/2-D predictive transport code is used to model the particle and energy transport of JET pellet-fueled, ICRH-heated plasmas. Pellet injection during the current rise phase was used to produce strong central peaking of the particle density followed by central ICRH heating and led to transient period of enhanced confinement. The evolution of the density profile as well as the electron and ion temperature profiles and strong ICRH heating conditions are examined during this period of enhanced confinement in the context of models for particle and energy transport. Because WHIST is a predictive transport code, it requires models for particle and energy sources and transport coefficients. The analysis procedure thus consists of modeling the particle source terms (pellets, gas, and recycled neutrals), energy source terms (ohmic and ICRH heating), and energy loss terms (primarily radiation), and varying the transport models until the best qualitative and quantitative agreement is obtained between calculated and observed quantities. We find that plasma behavior is well described during the first second of ICRH heating following pellet injection by the same transport coefficients that describe the ohmic plasma. The distinction between electron and ion thermal losses depends on the relative heating rates of electrons and ions as determined by the ICRH model, as well as the radiation losses. 10 refs., 4 figs

  3. Manufacturing and characterization of molybdenum pellets used as targets for 99mTc production in cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieszykowska, Izabela; Janiak, Tomasz; Barcikowski, Tadeusz; Mielcarski, Mieczysław; Mikołajczak, Renata; Choiński, Jarosław; Barlak, Marek; Kurpaska, Łukasz

    2017-01-01

    The method of 100 Mo metallic target preparation for production of 99m Tc by proton irradiation in 100 Mo(p,2 n) 99m Tc reaction was demonstrated. For this purpose, pressing of molybdenum powder into pellets and their subsequent sintering in reductive atmosphere were applied. The influence of parameters such as molybdenum mass and time of both pressing and sintering on the 100 Mo target durability was investigated. Under the optimized conditions, 100 Mo metallic pellet targets with density of 9.95±0.06 g/cm 3 were obtained. Morphology and structure of pressed pellets before and after sintering were studied by using standard optical microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Nanoindentation technique was used to investigate the mechanical properties such as nanohardness and Young modulus. Prepared 100 Mo pellets were successfully irradiated with protons and 99m Tc was efficiently isolated. - Highlights: • Pressing and sintering of 100 Mo powder into pellets. • Optimization of 100 Mo target manufacture process. • Determination of nanohardness of prepared 100 Mo targets. • Irradiation of self-supporting 100 Mo target in cyclotron.

  4. Measurement of nuclear reaction rates and spectral indices along the radius of fuel pellets from IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mura, Luis Felipe Liambos

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the measurements of the nuclear reaction rates along the radial direction of the fuel pellet by irradiation and posterior gamma spectrometry of a thin slice of fuel pellet of UO 2 with 4,3% enrichment. From its irradiation the rate of radioactive capture and fission have been measured as a function of the radius of the pellet disk using a HPGe detector. Lead collimators has been used for this purpose. Simulating the fuel pellet in the pin fuel of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, a thin UO 2 disk is used. This disk is inserted in the interior of a dismountable fuel rod. This fuel rod is then placed in the central position of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor core and irradiated during 1 hour under a neutron flux of around 9 x 10 8 n/cm 2 s. For gamma spectrometry 10 collimators with different diameters have been used, consequently, the nuclear reactions of radioactive capture that occurs in atoms of 238 U and fissions that occur on both 235 U and 238 U are measured in function of 10 different region (diameter of collimator) of the fuel pellet disk. Corrections in the geometric efficiency due to introduction of collimators on HPGe detection system were estimated using photon transport of MCNP-4C code. Some calculated values of nuclear reaction rate of radioactive capture and fission along of the radial direction of the fuel pellet obtained by Monte Carlo methodology, using the MCNP-4C code, are presented and compared to the experimental data showing very good agreement. Besides nuclear reaction rates, the spectral indices 28 ρ and 25 δ have been obtained at each different radius of the fuel pellet disk. (author)

  5. Technical meeting on advanced fuel pellet materials and fuel rod designs for water cooled reactors. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The economics of current nuclear power plants have improved through increasing fuel burnups and fuel cycles, i.e. the effective time that fuel remains in the reactor core and the amount of energy it generates. Increasing the consumption of fissile material in the fuel element before it is discharged from the reactor means less fuel is required over the reactor's life cycle, which results in lower amounts of fresh fuel, lower spent fuel storage costs, and less waste for ultimate disposal. There has been a continuous historical increase in fuel burnup from 20-25 GWd/tU in Generation I reactors to 50-60 GWd/tU in today's light water reactors and this tendency continues in as much as technological and operational improvements make it possible. In parallel, higher enrichments are discussed, leading to a higher energy yield. For heavy water reactors slight enrichment of fuels and correspondingly growing burnups in CANDU/PHWR are driven by the same economical incentives. Higher burnups and better utilization of fissile nuclear materials (including use of MOX fuel and burnable neutron absorbers), as well as more flexible power manoeuvring, place challenging operational demands on materials used in reactor components, and first of all on fuel and cladding materials. It defines a need for increased attention to measures ensuring compliance to safety criteria related to fission gas release (to limit the internal rod pressure), pellet-cladding interaction (to avoid clad cracking combined with stress and aggressive chemical environment) and pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (to avoid clad mechanical fracture). These measures that secure desired in-pile fuel performance parameters include adequate improvements in fuel material properties and fuel rod designs. That is why the subject Technical Meeting was recommended to the IAEA in 2007 by the Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (TWGFPT), and the recommendation was supported by the TWG on Light and

  6. Pelletizing of fuel blends mixed with lignin for energetic use in small scale combustion units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Döhling

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available As part of future bio-economy concepts technical lignin, by-products derived from the pulp- and paper industry, may be recycled for further utilization. Via a specially developed process the liquid lignin lye can be converted into a solid state. The lignin granules were mixed with a blend of canola straw and peeled oat bran in different proportions (1–2 wt.-% to adjust the characteristics of the mixtures for pelletizing. Combustion tests with the produced pellets were carried out in a small scale combustion unit (25 kW showing that depending on the amount and kind of lignin CO-, SO2- and particulate matter emissions are affected. Through further optimization of fuel mixtures and by means of secondary measures existing emission limits could be complied.

  7. Calculations on the effect of pellet filling on the rewetting of overheated nuclear reactor fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, K.G.; Loveless, J.

    1977-03-01

    Numerical solutions of the rewetting equations are presented which show the effect of filler material and gas gap on the rate of rewetting of an overheated fuel pin. It is shown that taking the presence of the fuel into account can lead to a large reduction in the calculated rewetting speed compared with a calculation which neglects the presence of fuel. The effect is most marked in conditions where rewetting speeds tend to be already low, such as at high pin temperatures and low ambient pressure. A comparison is made between the predictions of the present method and experimental data obtained on zircaloy and stainless steel pins filled with magnesia and with boron nitride. In all cases filling the pins produced a large reduction in rewetting speed and the agreement between the calculated and measured effect was encouraging. It is concluded that the presence of the UO 2 pellet filling should be taken into account when calculating rewetting speeds in safety assessments. (author)

  8. Feasibility study of forest residue use as fuel through co-firing with pellet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granada, E.; Lareo, G.; Miguez, J.L.; Moran, J.; Porteiro, J. [E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, Vigo University, Lagoas-Marcosende s/n, 36200-Vigo (Spain); Ortiz, L. [E.U. Ingenieria Tecnica Forestal, Campus A Xunqueira s/n, 36005-Pontevedra (Spain)

    2006-03-15

    Co-firing is a useful technology for reclaiming waste biomass as fuel. This article studies the use of three different forest residues (Eucalyptus, pine and pine bark) with pellet based on a mixture of fuels prior to combustion. Several combustion configurations, such as the basic configuration (only preheated primary air supply) and other especially developed configurations, such as secondary air and gas recirculation, are studied and optimized. Due to feeding problems, a co-firing feeding hopper was specially developed and honed in order to assure a precise feeding rate of different fuel materials. The experimental results suggest that the pine bark has the best feed performance. Overall, a lower efficiency was achieved compared with pellet-only combustion. Co-firing of these blends is financially viable due to the lower price of the treated pine bark. High percentages of pine bark (50%) reduce efficiency significantly. This is improved with secondary air and recirculation. Pine bark of around 25% is the most suitable configuration. (author)

  9. Note: Application of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors for quality assurance of mixed oxide fuel pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaira, S.; Kurano, M.; Hosogane, T.; Ishikawa, F.; Kageyama, T.; Sato, M.; Kayano, M.; Yasuda, N.

    2015-05-01

    A CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector was used for quality assurance of mixed oxide fuel pellets for next-generation nuclear power plants. Plutonium (Pu) spot sizes and concentrations in the pellets are significant parameters for safe use in the plants. We developed an automatic Pu detection system based on dense α-radiation tracks in the CR-39 detectors. This system would greatly improve image processing time and measurement accuracy, and will be a powerful tool for rapid pellet quality assurance screening.

  10. Effect of Al(OH)3 on the sintering of UO2-Gd2O3 fuel pellets with addition of U3O8 from recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Lauro Roberto; Durazzo, Michelangelo; Urano de Carvalho, Elita Fontenele; Riella, Humberto Gracher

    2017-09-01

    The incorporation of gadolinium as burnable poison directly into nuclear fuel is important for reactivity compensation, which enables longer fuel cycles. The function of the burnable poison fuel is to control the neutron population in the reactor core during its startup and the beginning of the fuel burning cycle to extend the use of the fuel. The implementation of UO2-Gd2O3 poisoned fuel in Brazil has been proposed according to the future requirements established for the Angra-2 nuclear power plant. The UO2 powder used is produced from the Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC). The incorporation of Gd2O3 powder directly into the AUC-derived UO2 powder by dry mechanical blending is the most attractive process, because of its simplicity. Nevertheless, processing by this method leads to difficulties while obtaining sintered pellets with the minimum required density. The cause of the low densities is the bad sintering behavior of the UO2-Gd2O3 mixed fuel, which shows a blockage in the sintering process that hinders the densification. This effect has been overcome by microdoping of the fuel with small quantities of aluminum. The process for manufacturing the fuel inevitably generates uranium-rich scraps from various sources. This residue is reincorporated into the production process in the form of U3O8 powder additions. The addition of U3O8 also hinders densification in sintering. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of both aluminum and U3O8 additives on the density of fuel pellets after sintering. As the effects of these additives are counterposed, this work studied the combined effect thereof, seeking to find an applicable composition for the production process. The experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of aluminum, in the form of Al(OH)3, as an additive to promote increase in the densification of the (U,Gd)O2 pellets during sintering, even with high additions of U3O8 recycled from the manufacturing process.

  11. Establishing a LEU MTR fuel manufacturing facility in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamie, R.W.; Kocher, A.

    2010-01-01

    The South African MTR Fuel Manufacturing Facility was established in the 1970's to supply SAFARI-1 with Fuel Elements and Control Rods. South African capability was developed in parallel with the uranium enrichment program to meet the needs of the Reactor. Further to the July 2005 decision by the South African Governmnent to convert both SAFARI-1 and the Fuel Plant to LEU, the SAFARI-1 phase has been successfully completed and Necsa has commenced with the conversion of the MTR Fuel Manufacturing Facility. In order to establish, validate and qualify the facility, Necsa has entered into a co-operation and technology transfer agreement with AREVA CERCA, the French manufacturer of Research Reactor fuel elements. Past experiences, conversion challenges and the status of the MTR Fuel Facility Project are discussed. On-going co-operation with AREVA CERCA to implement the local manufacture of LEU fuel is explained and elaborated on. (author)

  12. Evaluation of micro-homogeneity in plutonium based nuclear reactor fuel pellets by alpha-autoradiography technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghra, Chetan, E-mail: chetanbaghra.barc@gmail.com [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Tarapur Complex, Maharashtra, 401502 (India); Sathe, D.B.; Sharma, Jitender; Walinjkar, Nilima; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, Mohd [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Tarapur Complex, Maharashtra, 401502 (India); Kumar, Arun [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Maharashtra, 400094 (India)

    2015-12-15

    Alpha-autoradiography is a fast and non-destructive technique which is used at Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (India) to evaluate micro-homogeneity of plutonium in uranium and plutonium mixed oxide (U–Pu)O{sub 2} fuel pellets fabricated for both thermal and fast breeder reactors. In this study, various theoretical calculations to understand effect of alpha autoradiography process parameters and limiting conditions for measuring micro-homogeneity of plutonium in the pellets having different concentrations of plutonium were reported. Experiments were carried out to establish the procedure to evaluate micro-homogeneity of plutonium in (U-x%Pu)O{sub 2} pellets where x varies from 0.4 to 44% and to measure the size of agglomerates, if any, present in the pellet. An attempt had been made to measure plutonium content in the agglomerate using alpha-autoradiography. This study can also be useful for carrying out alpha-autoradiography of spent fuel pellets during post-irradiation examination. - Highlights: • Alpha-Autoradiography of (U–Pu)O{sub 2} oxide pellet having 0.4–44% PuO{sub 2} was done. • Exposure and etching time required for alpha-autoradiography was optimized. • Size of Pu agglomerate was measured using micro-homogeneity profiling.

  13. Bauxite residue (Red mud) as a pulverised fuel ash substitute in the manufacture of lightweight aggregate

    OpenAIRE

    Molineux, Chloe J.; Newport, Darryl J.; Ayati, Bamdad; Wang, Chuang; Connop, Stuart; Green, Jon E.

    2015-01-01

    This study looked at the potential of bauxite residue or red mud to be used in the manufacture of lightweight aggregate in replacement of pulverised fuel ash (PFA), commonly used as a way of recycling problematic wastes. The percentage replacements of red mud with PFA were as follows: 25, 31, 38, 44 and 50%. These were blended in a mix with waste excavated clay and sewage sludge – all from the Chongqing municipality in China. Lightweight pellets were produced using a Trefoil rotary kiln and w...

  14. Pu-rich MOX agglomerate-by-agglomerate model for fuel pellet burnup analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, G.S.

    2004-01-01

    In support of potential licensing of the mixed oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium and depleted uranium for use in United States reactors, an experiment containing WG-MOX fuel is being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The WG-MOX comprises five percent PuO 2 and 95% depleted UO 2 . Based on the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) observation, the volume fraction (VF) of MOX agglomerates in the fuel pellet is about 16.67%, and PuO 2 concentration of 30.0 = (5 / 16.67 x 100) wt% in the agglomerate. A pressurized water reactor (PWR) unit WG-MOX lattice with Agglomerate-by-Agglomerate Fuel (AbAF) modeling has been developed. The effect of the irregular agglomerate distribution can be addressed through the use of the Monte Carlo AbAF model. The AbAF-calculated cumulative ratio of Agglomerate burnup to U-MAtrix burnup (AG/MA) is 9.17 at the beginning of life, and decreases to 2.88 at 50 GWd/t. The MCNP-AbAF-calculated results can be used to adjust the parameters in the MOX fuel fission gas release modeling. (author)

  15. Simulating Dynamic Fracture in Oxide Fuel Pellets Using Cohesive Zone Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Williamson

    2009-08-01

    It is well known that oxide fuels crack during the first rise to power, with continued fracture occurring during steady operation and especially during power ramps or accidental transients. Fractures have a very strong influence on the stress state in the fuel which, in turn, drives critical phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel creep, and eventual fuel/clad mechanical interaction. Recently, interest has been expressed in discrete fracture methods, such as the cohesive zone approach. Such models are attractive from a mechanistic and physical standpoint, since they reflect the localized nature of cracking. The precise locations where fractures initiate, as well as the crack evolution characteristics, are determined as part of the solution. This paper explores the use of finite element cohesive zone concepts to predict dynamic crack behavior in oxide fuel pellets during power-up, steady operation, and power ramping. The aim of this work is first to provide an assessment of cohesive zone models for application to fuel cracking and explore important numerical issues associated with this fracture approach. A further objective is to provide basic insight into where and when cracks form, how they interact, and how cracking effects the stress field in a fuel pellet. The ABAQUS commercial finite element code, which includes powerful cohesive zone capabilities, was used for this study. Fully-coupled thermo-mechanical behavior is employed, including the effects of thermal expansion, swelling due to solid and gaseous fission products, and thermal creep. Crack initiation is determined by a temperature-dependent maximum stress criterion, based on measured fracture strengths for UO2. Damage evolution is governed by a traction-separation relation, calibrated to data from temperature and burn-up dependent fracture toughness measurements. Numerical models are first developed in 2D based on both axisymmetric (to explore axial cracking) and plane strain (to explore radial

  16. Recent advances in fuel product and manufacturing process development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slember, R.J.; Doshi, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses advancements in commercial nuclear fuel products and manufacturing made by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation in response to the commercial nuclear fuel industry's demand for high reliability, increased plant availability and improved operating flexibility. The features and benefits of Westinghouse's most advanced fuel products--VANTAGE 5 for PWR plants and QUAD+ for BWR plants--are described, as well as 'high performance' fuel concepts now under development for delivery in the late 1980s. The paper also disusses the importance of in-process quality control throughout manufacturing towards reducing product variability and improving fuel reliability. (author)

  17. Effects of two types of dryer on ADU and UO2 pellet manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhiming; He Zhengjie

    1995-05-01

    The concepts of spray drying process and pebble-bed fluidized drying process for ADU slurry is presented. And the effects of ADU powder and UO 2 powder/pellet by these processes using the statistic results from series production are discussed. It is believed that these drying methods have no influence on structure and shape of ADU particle, and thereby no difference will be made to the properties of UO 2 powder and pellet. Thus, spray drying process can really be replaced by pebble-bed fluidized drying process. (10 figs., 6 tabs.)

  18. Nuclear fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocher, Roy W.

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

  19. Advances in fuel pellet technology for improved performance at high burnup. Proceedings of a Technical Committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    The IAEA has recently completed two co-ordinated Research Programmes (CRPs) on The Development of Computer Models for Fuel Element Behaviour in Water Reactors, and on Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup. Through these CRPs it became evident that there was a need to obtain data on fuel behaviour at high burnup. Data related o thermal behaviour, fission gas release and pellet to clad mechanical interaction were obtained and presented at the Technical Committee Meeting on Advances in Fuel Pellet Technology for Improved Performance at High Burnup which was recommended by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT). The 34 papers from 10 countries are published in this proceedings and presented by a separate abstract. The papers were grouped in 6 sessions. First two sessions covered the fabrication of both UO 2 fuel and additives and MOX fuel. Sessions 3 and 4 covered the thermal behaviour of both types of fuel. The remaining two sessions dealt with fission gas release and the mechanical aspects of pellet to clad interaction

  20. Study of the feasibility of mixing Refuse Derived Fuels with wood pellets through the grey and Fuzzy theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J.C.; Miguez, J.L.; Porteiro, J.; Patino, D.; Granada, E.; Collazo, J. [Universidad de Vigo E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende, s/n. Dpto. Ing. Mecanica Maquinas y Motores Termicos, 36200 Vigo (Pontevedra) (Spain)

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents a combined grey relational and fuzzy analysis for the evaluation of the environmental feasibility of burning mixtures of pellet and RDF (Refuse Derived Fuel) in a small pellet boiler-stove. RDF is obtained from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) and contains a biomass fraction and a non-organic fraction (plastic). As a first step, both fuels are characterized to define their properties. A special feeding system is also used to improve the stove plant and to facilitate pellet distribution, which maintains a constant rate between the two fuels. Small scale energy converters, such as chimneys, boilers, stoves, etc., which produce heat and/or hot water by burning biomass (wood, pellets, briquettes, etc.), are especially suited to domestic purposes. However, in common commercial combustion conditions, this kind of use still has some disadvantages: some emissions (volatile organic carbons, carbon monoxide or NO{sub x}) may still be high, and it is difficult to compare the quality and performance of equipment working in very different combustion conditions. The grey relational analysis of different energy and emission variables leads to the definition of a new single variable called the grey relational grade (GRG). Thus, evaluation and optimisation of complicated multiple responses can be converted into the optimisation of a standardised single variable. The aim of the work is to research the most feasible mixture of pellets according to a grey relational analysis, taking into consideration energy-related, financial and environmental aspects. (author)

  1. Determination Of Simulated Pellet To Pellet Gap Using Neutron Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusnowo, A.

    1996-01-01

    The defect on the irradiated fuel element could be detected using neutron radiography. The defect could occurred in pellet to pellet gap, cladding, or even cladding to pellet gap. An investigations has been performed to detect pellet to pellet gap defect that might occur in an irradiated fuel element. An Al foil of 0,1; 0,2; 0,3; und 0,4 mm was inserted between pellets to simulate various pellet to pellet gap. The neutron radiography used had power of 700 kW. The result showed that this simulation represented well enough problems that irradiated fuel element may experience

  2. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction: Phase 2. Second semiannual report, July-December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1980-03-01

    This program has as its ultimate objective the demonstration of an advanced fuel design that is resistant to the failure mechanism known as fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. In the current report period the nuclear design of the demonstration was begun. The design calls for 132 bundles of barrier fuel to be inserted into the core of Quad Cities Unit 2 at the beginning of Cycle 6. Laboratory and in-reactor tests were started to evaluate the stability of Zr-liner fuel which remains in service after a defect has occurred which allows water to enter the rod. Results to date on intentionally defected fuel indicate that the Zr-liner fuel is not rapidly degraded despite ingress of water

  3. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction. Phase 2. First semiannual report, January-June 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1979-08-01

    This program has as its ultimate objective the demonstration of an advanced fuel design that is resistant to the failure mechanism known as fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to protect the Zircaloy cladding tube from the harmful effects of localized stress and reactive fission products during reactor service. This is the first semiannual progress report for Phase 2 of this program (January-June 1979). Progress in the irradiation testing of barrier fuel and of unfueled barrier cladding specimens is reported

  4. CANDU RU fuel manufacturing basic technology development and advanced fuel verification tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chang Hwan; Chang, S.K.; Hong, S.D.

    1999-04-01

    A PHWR advanced fuel named the CANFLEX fuel has been developed through a KAERI/AECL joint Program. The KAERI made fuel bundle was tested at the KAERI Hot Test Loop for the performance verification of the bundle design. The major test activities were the fuel bundle cross-flow test, the endurance fretting/vibration test, the freon CHF test, and the fuel bundle heat-up test. KAERI also has developing a more advanced PHWR fuel, the CANFLEX-RU fuel, using recovered uranium to extend fuel burn-up in the CANDU reactors. For the purpose of proving safety of the RU handling techniques and appraising feasibility of the CANFLEX-RU fuel fabrication in near future, a physical, chemical and radiological characterization of the RU powder and pellets was performed. (author). 54 refs., 46 tabs., 62 figs

  5. CANDU RU fuel manufacturing basic technology development and advanced fuel verification tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chang Hwan; Chang, S.K.; Hong, S.D. [and others

    1999-04-01

    A PHWR advanced fuel named the CANFLEX fuel has been developed through a KAERI/AECL joint Program. The KAERI made fuel bundle was tested at the KAERI Hot Test Loop for the performance verification of the bundle design. The major test activities were the fuel bundle cross-flow test, the endurance fretting/vibration test, the freon CHF test, and the fuel bundle heat-up test. KAERI also has developing a more advanced PHWR fuel, the CANFLEX-RU fuel, using recovered uranium to extend fuel burn-up in the CANDU reactors. For the purpose of proving safety of the RU handling techniques and appraising feasibility of the CANFLEX-RU fuel fabrication in near future, a physical, chemical and radiological characterization of the RU powder and pellets was performed. (author). 54 refs., 46 tabs., 62 figs.

  6. Device of measuring hydrogen in U-H-Zr fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Guo Qiaoru; Xu Xiuqing

    1992-01-01

    A device used for the determination of hydrogen content in U-H-Zr fuel pellet and its precision determination are introduced. The influence of different flow of carry gas, extracting temperature and collecting time on the determination of hydrogen content is researched separately. While the flow of carry gas is 85-100 mL/min and extracting temperature increasing to 1550 deg C, the best collecting time may be reduced to 18 min from 30 min, the determination of zirconium hydrogenate reference standard sample shows that the precision of six time determination is smaller than ±2%, determination error is 2%. The rate of recovery of hydrogen is 99.3%. The test shows that the device and its determination method are stable and operation is simple

  7. Argentina-LLNL-LANL Comparative Sample Analysis on UO2 fuel pellet CRM-125A for Nuclear Forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kips, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The recent workshop on analytical plan development provided context and background for the next step in this engagement, i.e. a comparative sample analysis on CRM 125-A. This is a commercially available certified low-enriched uranium oxide fuel pellet material from New Brunswick National Laboratory (NBL) (see certificate in Annex 1).

  8. Monolithic fuel injector and related manufacturing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve [Greenville, SC; Johnson, Thomas Edward [Greenville, SC; Lacy, Benjamin [Greenville, SC; York, William David [Greenville, SC; Stevenson, Christian Xavier [Greenville, SC

    2012-05-22

    A monolithic fuel injection head for a fuel nozzle includes a substantially hollow vesicle body formed with an upstream end face, a downstream end face and a peripheral wall extending therebetween, an internal baffle plate extending radially outwardly from a downstream end of the bore, terminating short of the peripheral wall, thereby defining upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body, in fluid communication by way of a radial gap between the baffle plate and the peripheral wall. A plurality of integral pre-mix tubes extend axially through the upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body and through the baffle plate, with at least one fuel injection hole extending between each of the pre-mix tubes and the upstream fuel plenum, thereby enabling fuel in the upstream plenum to be injected into the plurality of pre-mix tubes. The fuel injection head is formed by direct metal laser sintering.

  9. The effects of off-center pellets on the temperature distribution and the heat flux distribution of fuel rods in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Muzhang; Xing Jianhua

    1986-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of off-center pellets on the steady state temperature distribution and heat flux distribution of fuel rods in the nuclear reactors, and derives the dimensionless temperature distribution relationships and the dimensionless heat flux distribution relationship from the fuel rods with off-center pellets. The calculated results show that the effects of off-center will result in not only deviations of the highest temperature placement in the fuel pellets, but also the circumferentially nonuniform distributions of the temperatures and heat fluxes of the fuel rod surfaces

  10. Beryllium Project: developing in CDTN of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with addition of beryllium oxide to increase the thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Miranda, Odair; Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Andrade, Antonio Santos; Queiroz, Carolinne Mol; Gonzaga, Mariana de Carvalho Leal

    2013-01-01

    Although the nuclear fuel currently based on pellets of uranium dioxide be very safe and stable, the biggest problem is that this material is not a good conductor of heat. This results in an elevated temperature gradient between the center and its lateral surface, which leads to a premature degradation of the fuel, which restricts the performance of the reactor, being necessary to change the fuel before its full utilization. An increase of only 5 to 10 percent in its thermal conductivity, would be a significant increase. An increase of 50 percent would be a great improvement. A project entitled 'Beryllium Project' was developed in CDTN - Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, which aimed to develop fuel pellets made from a mixture of uranium dioxide microspheres and beryllium oxide powder to obtain a better heat conductor phase, filling the voids between the microspheres to increase the thermal conductivity of the pellet. Increases in the thermal conductivity in the range of 8.6% to 125%, depending on the level of addition employed in the range of 1% to 14% by weight of beryllium oxide, were obtained. This type of fuel promises to be safer than current fuels, improving the performance of the reactor, in addition to last longer, resulting in great savings. (author)

  11. Durability of pellets made from different wood fuel assortments - The effect of moisture content, particle size and temperature development during storage. A laboratory-scale study; Haallfasthet hos braenslepellets tillverkade av olika traedbraenslesortiment - betydelsen av fukthalt, fraktionsstorlek och temperaturutveckling under lagringen. En laboratoriestudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtikangas, Paeivi [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Management and Products

    2001-02-01

    Durability of fuel pellets is one of the most important quality variables. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effect of moisture content and particle size distribution on the durability of pellets made out of sawdust, logging residues and bark from Norway spruce and Scots pine. Moreover, the durability of pellets made out of logging residues which were exposed to high temperature development was investigated. Pellets were manufactured using a laboratory press CPM Europe. The determined quality parameters were moisture content, percentage of accept-pellets (percentage of pellets of the total amount of raw material), temperature and density of individual pellets. The pelleting process was controlled by monitoring the raw material input to the press, vibration and power consumption. From the results of this study the following preliminary conclusions can be drawn: * Increase moisture content and temperature during pelleting had a positive correlation with the percentage of the accept-pellets, especially concerning the bark assortments, and * Pellets made out of particles smaller than 1 mm resulted in a significantly (Student's t-test) higher percentage of accept-pellets than pellets made out of particles of 1-2 mm. Moreover, the process temperature was probably too low (max. 86 deg C) to activate softening of the lignin. A lower press temperature was sufficient to produce the same percentage of accept-pellets of fresh bark than with other raw materials. A possible reason for that is the presence of high amounts of extractives in bark, which could develop an adhesive nature during thermal treatment.

  12. Evaluation of the potential of pelletized biomass from different municipal solid wastes for use as solid fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Li, Yuening; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Yan; Sun, Luna; Liu, Boyang; Mao, Hongjun; Lin, Yingchao; Li, Weizun; Ju, Meiting; Zhu, Fudong

    2018-04-01

    Four different municipal solid wastes (dog manure, horse manure, apple pomace waste and tea waste) and an industrial by-product (NovoGro) were used to produce solid fuel pellets. The mixtures followed a raw material to NovoGro ratio of 50:1. The pellets diameters varied between 4 and 5 mm, and the average length was 20 mm. The dog manure, horse manure, apple pomace waste and tea waste pellets were denoted as DN, HN, AN and TN, respectively. The combustion characteristics of the pelletized fuels were investigated, such as total moisture, ash content, calorific value and ash fusion point, etc. The physicochemical properties were analyzed by using a number of analytical techniques including X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), X-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results of the mechanical, thermal and morphological properties show that the raw materials were effectively combined with the NovoGro binder; furthermore, the DN, HN and TN pellets exhibited excellent mechanical and thermal properties, including high calorific values (>16.30 MJ/kg), high resistance to mechanical shock (>99%), high volatile matter contents, optimal softening temperatures and optimal ash contents. However, the high K, Ca, and Si contents of the AN can form low-melting-point eutectics, which can cause slagging. Moreover, the AN materials had large particle sizes, and high cellulose and hemicellulose contents led to high total moistures, low softening temperatures and low calorific values. The AN was not suitable for use as a fuel. The results suggested that NG is an effective binder for pelletization of biomass and showed the feasibility of using municipal solid wastes for energy production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spent fuel UO2 matrix corrosion behaviour studies through alpha-doped UO2 pellets leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzeau, B.; Jegou, C.; Broudic, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The option of direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geological formation raises the need to investigate the long-term behaviour of the UO 2 matrix in aqueous media subjected to α-β-γ radiations. The β-γ emitters account for the most of the activity of spent fuel at the moment it is removed from the reactor, but diminish within a millennial time frame by over three orders of magnitude to less than the long-term activity. The latter persist over much longer time periods and must therefore be taken into account over geological disposal scale. In the present investigation the UO 2 matrix corrosion under alpha radiation is studied as a function of different parameters such as: the alpha activity, the carbonates and hydrogen concentrations,.. In order to study the effect of alpha radiolysis of water on the UO 2 matrix, 238/239 Pu doped UO 2 pellets (0.22 %wt. Pu total) were fabricated with different 238 Pu/ 239 Pu ratio to reproduce the alpha activity of a 47 GWd.t HMi -1 UOX spent fuel at different milestones in time (15, 50, 1500, 10000 and 40000 years). Undoped UO 2 pellets were also available as reference sample. Leaching experiments were conducted in deionized or carbonated water (NaHCO 3 1 mM), under Argon (O 2 2 30% gas mixture. Previous experiments conducted in deionized water under argon atmosphere, have shown a good correlation between alpha activity and uranium release for the 15-, 1500- and 40000-years alpha doped UO 2 batches. Besides, uranium release in the leachate is controlled either by the kinetics, or by the thermodynamics. Provided the solubility limit of uranium is not achieved, uranium concentration increases and is only limited by the kinetics, unless precipitation occurs and the uranium concentration remains constant over time. These controls are highly dependant on the solution chemistry (HCO 3 - , pH, Eh,..), the atmosphere (Ar, Ar/H 2 ,..), and the radiolysis strength. The experimental matrix

  14. The effect of the volumetric heat source distribution of the fuel pellet on the minimum DNBR ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hordosy, G.; Kereszturi, A.; Maroti, L.; Trosztel, I.

    1995-01-01

    The radial power distribution in a VVER-440 type fuel assembly is strongly non-uniform as a result of the water-gap between the shrouds and the moderator filled central tube. Consequently, it can be expected that the power density inside a single fuel rod is inhomogeneous, as well. In the paper the methodology and the results of coupled thermohydraulic and neutronic calculations are presented. The objective of the analysis was the investigation of the heat source distribution and the determination of the possible extent of the power non-uniformity in a corner rod which has always the highest peaking factor in a VVER-440 type assembly. The results of the analysis revealed that there can be a strong non-uniformity of power distribution inside a fuel pellet, and the effect depends first of all on the general assembly conditions, while the local subchannel parameters have only a slight influence on the pellet heat source distribution. (author)

  15. Some tooling for manufacturing research reactor fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper will discuss some of the tooling necessary to manufacture aluminum-based research reactor fuel plates. Most of this tooling is intended for use in a high-production facility. Some of the tools shown have manufactured more than 150,000 pieces. The only maintenance has been sharpening. With careful design, tools can be made to accommodate the manufacture of several different fuel elements, thus, reducing tooling costs and maintaining tools that the operators are trained to use. An important feature is to design the tools using materials with good lasting quality. Good tools can increase return on investment. (author)

  16. Some Tooling for Manufacturing Research Reactor Fuel Plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper will discuss some of the tooling necessary to manufacture aluminum-based research reactor fuel plates. Most of this tooling is intended for use in a high-production facility. Some of the tools shown have manufactured more than 150,000 pieces. The only maintenance has been sharpening. With careful design, tools can be made to accommodate the manufacture of several different fuel elements, thus, reducing tooling costs and maintaining tools that the operators are trained to use. An important feature is to design the tools using materials with good lasting quality. Good tools can increase return on investment

  17. The Effect of Mg Addition and Manufacturing Conditions on the Interfacial Reactions between Al and CNT in Al-CNT Pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jung-Kyu; Choi, Soon-Yool; Choe, Kyong-Hwan; Cho, Gue-Serb; Kim, Sang-Sub

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, Al-CNT pellets were investigated to understand the effect of Mg addition and manufacturing conditions on the interfacial reactions between Al and CNTs in Al-CNT pellets. The pellets were heated and held at 700 °C and 800 °C for 2 hours under nitrogen (N 2 ) atmosphere. To confirm the reactions between Al and CNT in the pellets under different manufacturing conditions, the microstructures were observed by optical microscopy (OM) and field emission scanning electro microscopy (FESEM). And, the composition and reaction phases were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscory (EDXS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The presence of oxidation products and Mg on the surface of Al powder in the pellets appeared to prevent the formation of Al 4 C 3 . But, Al 4 C 3 reaction products were increased due to the high temperature of 800 °C, which produced a high amount of reduced aluminium and increased the reaction areas between Al and CNT. The Al-CNT pellets compacted under air atmosphere prohibited the reaction between Al and CNT because of the high amount of oxidation products, such as MgO and MgAl 2 O 4 .

  18. MULTIPLE UNIT DOSAGE FORM - PELLET AND PELLETIZATION TECHNIQUES: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Vikash; Mishra Santosh Kumar; Lather Amit; Vikas; Singh Ranjit

    2011-01-01

    Pellets have been used in the pharmaceutical industry for more than four decades, with the advent of controlled release technology, that the full impact of the inherent advantages of pellets over single unit dosage forms have been realized, not only has focused on refining and optimizing existing pelletization techniques, but also focused on the development of novel approaches and procedures for manufacturing of pellets. The present review outlines the manufacturing and evaluation of pellets....

  19. Fracture of Zircaloy cladding by interactions with uranium dioxide pellets in LWR fuel rods. Technical report 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.; Ranjan, G.V.; Cipolla, R.C.

    1976-11-01

    Power reactor fuel rod failures can be caused by uranium dioxide fuel pellet-Zircaloy cladding interactions. The report summarizes the current position attained in a detailed theoretical study of Zircaloy cladding fracture caused by the growth of stress corrosion cracks which form near fuel pellet cracks as a consequence of a power increase after a sufficiently high burn-up. It is shown that stress corrosion crack growth in irradiated Zircaloy must be able to proceed at very low stress intensifications if uniform friction effects are operative at the fuel-cladding interface, when the interfacial friction coefficient is less than unity, when a symmetric distribution of fuel cracks exists, and when symmetric interfacial slippage occurs (i.e., ''uniform'' conditions). Otherwise, the observed fuel rod failures must be due to departures from ''uniform'' conditions, and a very high interfacial friction coefficient and particularly fuel-cladding bonding, are means of providing sufficient stess intensification at a cladding crack tip to explain the occurrence of cladding fractures. The results of the investigation focus attention on the necessity for reliable experimental data on the stress corrosion crack growth behavior of irradiated Zircaloy, and for further investigations on the correlation between local fuel-cladding bonding and stress corrosion cracking

  20. Advances in the manufacture of clad tubes and components for PHWR fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, N.; Jha, S.K.; Chandrasekha, B.; Tonpe, S.; Jayaraj, R.N.

    2010-01-01

    Fuel bundles for Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) consists of Uranium di-oxide pellets encapsulated into thin wall Zircaloy clad tubes. Other components such as end caps, bearing pads and spacer pads are the integral elements of the fuel bundle. As the fuel assembly is subjected to severe operating conditions of high temperature and pressure in addition to continual irradiation exposure, all the components are manufactured conforming to stringent specifications with respect to chemical composition, mechanical & metallurgical properties and dimensional tolerances. The integrity of each component is ensured by NDE at different stages of manufacture. The manufacturing route for fuel tubes and components comprise of a combination of thermomechanical processing and each process step has marked effect on the final properties. The fuel tubes are manufactured by processing the extruded blanks in four stage cold pilgering with intermediate annealing and final stress relieving operation. The bar material is produced by hot extrusion followed by multi-pass swaging and intermediate annealing. Spacer pads and bearing pads are manufactured by blanking and coining of Zircaloy sheet which is made by a combination of hot and cold rolling operations. Due to the small size and stringent dimensional requirements of these appendages, selection of production route and optimization of process parameters are important. This paper discusses about various measures taken for improving the recoveries and mechanical and corrosion properties of the tube, sheet and bar materials being manufactured at Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad For the production of clad tubes, modifications at extrusion stage to reduce the wall thickness variation, introduction of ultrasonic testing of extruded blanks, optimization of cold working and heat treatment parameters at various stages of production etc. were done. The finished bar material is subjected to 100% Ultrasonic and eddy current testing to ensure

  1. Advances in the manufacture of clad tubes and components for PHWR fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saibaba, N.; Jha, S.K.; Chandrasekha, B.; Tonpe, S.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad (India)

    2010-07-01

    Fuel bundles for Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) consists of Uranium di-oxide pellets encapsulated into thin wall Zircaloy clad tubes. Other components such as end caps, bearing pads and spacer pads are the integral elements of the fuel bundle. As the fuel assembly is subjected to severe operating conditions of high temperature and pressure in addition to continual irradiation exposure, all the components are manufactured conforming to stringent specifications with respect to chemical composition, mechanical & metallurgical properties and dimensional tolerances. The integrity of each component is ensured by NDE at different stages of manufacture. The manufacturing route for fuel tubes and components comprise of a combination of thermomechanical processing and each process step has marked effect on the final properties. The fuel tubes are manufactured by processing the extruded blanks in four stage cold pilgering with intermediate annealing and final stress relieving operation. The bar material is produced by hot extrusion followed by multi-pass swaging and intermediate annealing. Spacer pads and bearing pads are manufactured by blanking and coining of Zircaloy sheet which is made by a combination of hot and cold rolling operations. Due to the small size and stringent dimensional requirements of these appendages, selection of production route and optimization of process parameters are important. This paper discusses about various measures taken for improving the recoveries and mechanical and corrosion properties of the tube, sheet and bar materials being manufactured at Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad For the production of clad tubes, modifications at extrusion stage to reduce the wall thickness variation, introduction of ultrasonic testing of extruded blanks, optimization of cold working and heat treatment parameters at various stages of production etc. were done. The finished bar material is subjected to 100% Ultrasonic and eddy current testing to ensure

  2. UO2 Fuel pellet impurities, pellet surface roughness and n(18O)/n(16O) ratios, applied to nuclear forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajo, L.

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade, law enforcement has faced the problem of illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. Nuclear forensic science is a new branch of science that enables the identification of seized nuclear material. The identification is not based on a fixed scheme, but further identification parameters are decided based on previous identification results. The analysis is carried out by using traditional analysis methods and applying modern measurement technology. The parameters are generally not unambiguous and not self-explanatory. In order to have a full picture about the origin of seized samples, several identification parameters should be used together and the measured data should be compared to corresponding data from known sources. A nuclear material database containing data from several fabrication plants is installed for the purpose. In this thesis the use of UO 2 fabrication plant specific parameters, fuel impurities, fuel pellet surface roughness and oxygen isotopic ratio in UO 2 were investigated for identification purposes in nuclear forensic science. The potential use of these parameters as 'fingerprints' is discussed for identification purposes of seized nuclear materials. Impurities of the fuel material vary slightly according to the fabrication method employed and a plant environment. Here the impurities of the seized UO 2 were used in order to have some clues about the origin of the fuel material by comparing a measured data to nuclear database information. More certainty in the identification was gained by surface roughness of the UO 2 fuel pellets, measured by mechanical surface profilometry. Categories in surface roughness between a different fuel element type and a producer were observed. For the time oxygen isotopic ratios were determined by Thermal Ionisation Mass Speckometry (TIMS). Thus a TIMS measurement method, using U 16 O + and U 18 0 + ions, was developed and optimised to achieve precise oxygen isotope ratio measurements for the

  3. Metal fuel manufacturing and irradiation performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, D.R.; Walters, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    The advances in metal fuel by the Integral Fast Reactor Program at Argonne National Laboratory are the subject of this paper. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The advances stressed in the paper include fuel irradiation performance, and improved passive safety. The goals and the safety philosophy of the Integral Fast Reactor Program are stressed

  4. Pelletizing of NaF granules as adsorbent for fluorides of nuclear fuel materials, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Syojiro; Tsutsui, Tenson; Kanagawa, Akira.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental studies on compressibility of NaF granules are investigated. Brittleness and porosity of a tableted pellet depend on compressive power applied to the granules. Relation of the compressive power and distortion of NaF granules agree with Kawakita's formula. About the brittleness of NaF pellet tableted with optional pressure, the follow experimental formula is formed between axial destructive power and compressive power. Dsub(p)=f.psup(n) Then, relation of the axial destructive power and porosity of NaF pellet is given from the above mentioned experimental formula and Kawakita's formula. At the lower value of the porosity than 0.4, the axial destructive power varies steeply as compared with variation of the porosity. At optional porosity, the brittleness of the tableted NaF pellet are lower than Harshow Chem. Co. NaF.HF pellet. So it requires some process raising the brittleness of the pellet after the compression. (auth.)

  5. Implications of manufacturing deviations on fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chellapandi, P.; Clement Ravi Chandar, S.; Chetal, S.C.; Baldev Raj

    2009-01-01

    Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) core consists of 181 Fuel subassembly (FSA), 120 blanket SA and shielding SA of steel and B 4 C besides 9 Control Safety Rod SA and 3 Diverse Safety Rod SA. All the subassemblies (SA) stand vertically on the grid plate. PFBR FSA consists of 217 fuel pins of 2540 mm length arranged in a triangular pitch standing vertically on the rails inside a hexagonal duct. The bottom of the hexagon is screwed and welded to a cylindrical foot of length 600 mm. The SA foot has radial slots that provide an entry to the coolant sodium and also houses flow control devices. While the foot of the A handling head is welded to the top of hexagon, provides an aid for fuel handling machine to insert and withdraw the FSA from the grid plate. The length of the FSA is 4500 mm.

  6. Advanced doped UO2 pellets in LWR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arborelius, Jakob; Backman, Karin; Hallstadius, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear industry strives to reduce the fuel cycle cost, enhance flexibility and improve the reliability of operation. This can be done by both increasing the fuel weight and optimizing rod internal properties that affect operational margins. Further, there is focus on reducing the consequences of fuel failures. To meet these demands Westinghouse has developed ADOPT (Advanced Doped Pellet Technology) UO 2 fuel containing additions of chromium and aluminium oxides. This paper presents results from the extensive investigation program which covered examinations of doped and reference standard pellets both in the manufactured and irradiated states. The additives facilitate pellet densification during sintering and enlarge the pellet grain size. The final manufactured doped pellets reach about 0.5% higher density within a shorter sintering time and a five fold larger grain size compared with standard UO 2 fuel pellets. The physical properties of the pellets, including heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient, melting temperature, thermal diffusivity, have been investigated and differences between the doped and standard UO 2 pellets are small. The in-reactor performance of the ADOPT pellets has been investigated in pool-side and hotcell Post Irradiation Examinations (PIEs), as well as in the Studsvik R2 test reactor. The investigations have identified three areas of improved operational behaviour: Reduced fission gas release, improved PCI performance thanks to increased pellet plasticity and higher resistance against post-failure degradation. Fuel segments have been exposed to ramp tests and enhanced power steady-state operation in the Studsvik R2 reactor after base-irradiation to above 30MWd/kgU in a commercial BWR. ADOPT reveals up to 50% lower fission gas release than standard UO 2 pellets. The fuel degradation behaviour has been studied in two oxidizing tests, a thermal-microbalance test and an erosion test under irradiation. The tests show that ADOPT pellets

  7. Fission distribution measurements of Atucha's fuel pellets with solid state track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricabarra, M.D. Bovisio de; Waisman, Dina.

    1979-08-01

    Distribution of fissions in a UO 2 rod has been measured by means of solid state detectors. Mica muscovite and Makrofol-N detectors were used in the experiment. The merits of mica muscovite relative to the Makrofol-N for the detection of fission fragments have been verified. However both fission track detectors closely agree (0,5%) in the final fission distribution of the UO 2 rod. Sensitivity of the detectors shows to be linear in the range between 50.000and 360.000 fission tracks per square centimeter. Due to the high spatial resolution this method is better than any other technique. Determination were made in UO 2 pellets similar to the fuel element of the Atucha reactor. The average fission rate in the rod has been measured within 0,8% error, and provides an accurate determination for the distribution of fissions in the rod wich is needed for the determination of energy liberated per fission in the natural uranium rod.(author) [es

  8. Electrochemical reduction of CerMet fuels for transmutation using surrogate CeO2-Mo pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claux, B.; Souček, P.; Malmbeck, R.; Rodrigues, A.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2017-08-01

    One of the concepts chosen for the transmutation of minor actinides in Accelerator Driven Systems or fast reactors proposes the use of fuels and targets containing minor actinides oxides embedded in an inert matrix either composed of molybdenum metal (CerMet fuel) or of ceramic magnesium oxide (CerCer fuel). Since the sufficient transmutation cannot be achieved in a single step, it requires multi-recycling of the fuel including recovery of the not transmuted minor actinides. In the present work, a pyrochemical process for treatment of Mo metal inert matrix based CerMet fuels is studied, particularly the electroreduction in molten chloride salt as a head-end step required prior the main separation process. At the initial stage, different inactive pellets simulating the fuel containing CeO2 as minor actinide surrogates were examined. The main studied parameters of the process efficiency were the porosity and composition of the pellets and the process parameters as current density and passed charge. The results indicated the feasibility of the process, gave insight into its limiting parameters and defined the parameters for the future experiment on minor actinide containing material.

  9. Development of Innovative Accident Tolerant High Thermal Conductivity UO2-Diamond Composite Fuel Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulenko, James [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Subhash, Ghatu [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The University of Florida (UF) evaluated a composite fuel consisting of UO2 powder mixed with diamond micro particles as a candidate as an accident-tolerant fuel (ATF). The research group had previous extensive experience researching with diamond micro particles as an addition to reactor coolant for improved plant thermal performance. The purpose of this research work was to utilize diamond micro particles to develop UO2-Diamond composite fuel pellets with significantly enhanced thermal properties, beyond that already being measured in the previous UF research projects of UO2 – SiC and UO2 – Carbon Nanotube fuel pins. UF is proving with the current research results that the addition of diamond micro particles to UO2 may greatly enhanced the thermal conductivity of the UO2 pellets producing an accident-tolerant fuel. The Beginning of life benefits have been proven and fuel samples are being irradiated in the ATR reactor to confirm that the thermal conductivity improvements are still present under irradiation.

  10. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor fueling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.; Zhang, J.

    1992-01-01

    Three separate papers are included which report research progress during this period: (1) A new railgun configuration with perforated sidewalls, (2) development of a fuseless small-bore railgun for injection of high-speed hydrogen pellets into magnetically confined plasmas, and (3) controls and diagnostics on a fuseless railgun for solid hydrogen pellet injection

  11. Digital image processing: Cylindrical surface plane development of CAREM fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caccavelli, J; Cativa Tolosa, S; Gommes, C

    2012-01-01

    As part of the development of fuel pellets (FPs) for nuclear reactor CAREM-25, is necessary to systematize the analysis of the mechanical integrity of the FPs that is now done manually by a human operator. Following specifications and standards of reference for this purpose, the FPs should be inspected visually for detecting material discontinuities in the FPs surfaces to minimize any deterioration, loss of material and excessive breakage during operation and load of fuel bars. The material discontinuities are classified into two defects: surface cracks and chips. For each of these surface defects exist acceptance criteria that determine if the fuel pellet (FP) as a whole is accepted or rejected. One criteria for surface cracks is that they do not exceed one third (1/3) of the circumferential surface of the FP. The FP has cylindrical shape, so some of these acceptance criteria make difficult to analyze the FP in a single photographic image. Depending on the axial rotation of the FP, the crack could not be entirely visualized on the picture frame. Even a single crack that appears in different parts of the FP rotated images may appear to be different cracks in the FP when it is actually one. For this reason it is necessary, for the automatic detection and measurement of surface defects, obtain the circumferential surface of the FP into a single image in order to decide the acceptance or reject of the FP. As the FP shape is cylindrical, it is possible to obtain the flat development of the cylindrical surface (surface unrolling) of the FPs into a single image combining the image set of the axial rotation of the FP. In this work, we expose the procedure to implement the flat development of the cylindrical surface (surface unrolling). Starting from a photographic image of the FP surface, which represents the projection of a cylinder in the plane, we obtain three-dimensional information of each point on the cylindrical surface of the FP (3D-mapping). Then, we can

  12. A study on the manufacturing and processing technologies of DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, J.J.; Lee, J.W.; Kim, S.S.; Yim, S.P.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, K.H.; Na, S.H.; Kim, W.K.; Kang, K.H.; Shin, J.M.; Lee, D.Y.; Cho, K.H.; Lee, Y.S.; Sohn, J.S.; Kim, M.J.

    1999-06-01

    In this study, DUPIC fuel fabrication technologies are developed, characteristics of fuel materials are studied, and characterization experiments for DUPIC powder and pellets are performed at PIEF. SIMFUEL powder and pellets are made of UO 2 mixed with the simulated fission products of spent fuel. Both characteristics of SIMFUEL powder and micro-structure of pellets are analyzed. End cap of DUPIC fuel rod is sealed with laser welding technique. Optimum welding condition is analyzed with results of Micro-hardness, mechanical and metallographic tests. Micro-focus x-ray inspection technique is studied to fine fine defects. DUPIC processes are improved by making OREOX process be multi-functional and by adopting rol compacting process. At PIEF, characterization experiments for DUPIC powder and pellet are performed. The equipment for experiments have been installed at PIEF no. 9405 hot cell, and its process parameters are established. (author). 7 refs., 7 tabs., 37 figs

  13. A fast-acting hydrogen gas source for staged pneumatic high-speed acceleration of fusion plasma fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, S.A.; Baekmark, L.

    1990-02-01

    This report describes a possible design of a fast, high-temperature, arc-driven hydrogen gas source module, to be used in a scheme for multistage high-speed pneumatic acceleration of fusion plasma fuel pellets. The potential of this scheme for operating with a moderate driving pressure at long acceleration path lengths is particular attractive for accelerating fragile hydrogen isotope ice pellets. From experiments with an ethanol-based arc unit, design parameters for a propeller module were assessed, and with a barrel-mounted ethanol module staged pneumatic acceleration of a plastic dummy pellet was demonstrated. In experiments with a hydrogenbased, cryogenic arc unit in which 200 joules of electrical energy were dissipated with a power level approaching 5 MW within 30 mus, the velocity of a 23-mg plastic pellet was increased from 1.7 to 2.4 km/s. Results in terms of barrel pressure transients and arc characteristics are described. (author) 20 ills., 8 refs

  14. LEU fuel element produced by the Egyptian fuel manufacturing pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, W.I.

    2000-01-01

    The Egyptian Fuel Manufacturing Pilot Plant, FMPP, is a Material Testing Reactor type (MTR) fuel element facility, for producing the specified fuel elements required for the Egyptian Second Research Reactor, ETRR-2. The plant uses uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 , 19.75% U 235 by wt) as a raw material which is processed through a series of the manufacturing, inspection and test plan to produce the final specified fuel elements. Radiological safety aspects during design, construction, operation, and all reasonably accepted steps should be taken to prevent or reduce the chance of accidents occurrence. (author)

  15. IMHEX fuel cell repeat component manufacturing continuous improvement accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakaitis, L.A.; Petraglia, V.J.; Bryson, E.S. [M-C Power Corp., Burr Ridge, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power is taking a power generation technology that has been proven in the laboratory and is making it a commercially competitive product. There are many areas in which this technology required scale up and refinement to reach the market entry goals for the IMHEX{reg_sign} molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. One of the primary areas that needed to be addressed was the manufacturing of the fuel cell stack. Up to this point, the fuel cell stack and associated components were virtually hand made for each system to be tested. M-C Power has now continuously manufactured the repeat components for three 250 kW stacks. M-C Power`s manufacturing strategy integrated both evolutionary and revolutionary improvements into its comprehensive commercialization effort. M-C Power`s objectives were to analyze and continuously improve stack component manufacturing and assembly techniques consistent with established specifications and commercial scale production requirements. Evolutionary improvements are those which naturally occur as the production rates are increased and experience is gained. Examples of evolutionary (learning curve) improvements included reducing scrap rates and decreasing raw material costs by buying in large quantities. Revolutionary improvements result in significant design and process changes to meet cost and performance requirements of the market entry system. Revolutionary changes often involve identifying new methods and developing designs to accommodate the new process. Based upon our accomplishments, M-C Power was able to reduce the cost of continuously manufactured fuel cell repeat components from the first to third 250 kW stack by 63%. This paper documents the continuous improvement accomplishments realized by M-C Power during IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell repeat component manufacturing.

  16. BEVE, Isotope Buildup in LWR Fuel Pin with Self-Shielding in Pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistella, F.

    1987-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The BEVE code calculates the isotopic evolution of a LWR fuel pin taking into account inter- related space and energy self-shielding effects within the pellet. The code is in particular devoted to calculate Gadolinium depletion in burnable poison cells. BEVE is part of the BURNY-BEVE code system for fuel/poison depletion. 2 - Method of solution: Multigroup integral transport theory has been chosen as the best tool to handle the evaluation of Gd behaviour in LWRs. Use is made of a modified version of the THERMOS code to obtain all the necessary spectral and geometrical detail, taking into account also the radial dependence of the poison concentration due to the radial dependence of spectrum and flux level within the pin (a different spectrum is evaluated in each mesh point). At each ir- radiation step, the space and energy neutron distribution is calculated, the burnup of the isotopes in the fuel is consequently calculated and the procedure is automatically repeated for the following time step and so on. The computer time is reduced since at each irradiation step the neutron distribution of the previous step is used as a guess for the convergence procedure. In the transport calculations at each irradiation step the convergence is checked with respect to the mesh where the absorption rate as evaluated at the previous irradiation step is maximum; while at beginning of life this mesh is obviously the outermost one; as irradiation proceeds this most significant mesh moves toward the center. The main output of the BEVE routine consists of the thermal macro- scopic cross sections of the poisoned cell versus burnup to be used for the computation of the fuel element in x,y geometry. One BEVE run must be performed for each type of poisoned cell in the element. Each BEVE run supplies for each irradiation step the following information: - The value of the fluence in the coupling region. - The equivalent natural Gd concentration. - The

  17. Performance of candu-6 fuel bundles manufactured in romania nuclear fuel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailescu, A.; Barbu, A.; Din, F.; Dinuta, G.; Dumitru, I.; Musetoiu, A.; Serban, G.; Tomescu, A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the performance of nuclear fuel produced by Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti during 1995 - 2012 and irradiated in units U1 and U2 from Nuclear Power Plant (N.P.P.) Cernavoda and also present the Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti concern for providing technology to prevent the failure causes of fuel bundles in the reactor. This article presents Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti experience on tracking performance of nuclear fuel in reactor and strategy investigation of fuel bundles notified as suspicious and / or defectives both as fuel element and fuel bundle, it analyzes the possible defects that can occur at fuel bundle or fuel element and can lead to their failure in the reactor. Implementation of modern technologies has enabled optimization of manufacturing processes and hence better quality stability of achieving components (end caps, chamfered sheath), better verification of end cap - sheath welding. These technologies were qualified by Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti on automatic and Computer Numerical Control (C.N.C.) programming machines. A post-irradiation conclusive analysis which will take place later this year (2013) in Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (the action was initiated earlier this year by bringing a fuel bundle which has been reported defective by pool visual inspection) will provide additional information concerning potential damage causes of fuel bundles due to manufacturing processes. (authors)

  18. Six sigma quality for fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbani, M.D.; Onderwater, T.

    1997-01-01

    It is widely recognized that operational performance in product manufacturing is largely determined by understanding and maintaining process capability. By definition, Six Sigma is a statistical unit of measure reflecting process capability that yields less' than 6.8 defects per million product produced. Statistically, this translates into obtaining a long term manufacturing process capability of ± 4.5 standard deviations about the mean within specification limits. The heart of the Six Sigma program developed by the Six Sigma Academy is what we refer to as the Breakthrough Strategy. This rigorous analytical methodology is the driving force in obtaining world class performance of Six Sigma. The methodology applies statistical and practical tools in resolving a problem or improving a product or process. The application of Six Sigma focuses on attacking process input variables (independent) rather than the output variables. Focusing on these independent variables (temperature, power, force, etc.) and the variation in the end product they create, enables us to get to the root of the problem rather than react to the symptoms of the problem. In this manner we prevent defects from occurring rather than inspecting and monitoring the product. Why the need for such an ambitious program? It is estimated that the cost of failure (rework, scrap, warranties, etc.) can be as high as 15% of sales for companies typically operating at 3-4 sigma. In achieving Six Sigma, costs of failure are typically less than 5%. The thought of reducing business costs while achieving the recognition of being our customer's premier choice provides enormous incentive to reach such status. (author)

  19. Furnace for the continuous sintering of pellets of ceramic nuclear fuel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyraud, J.

    1977-01-01

    The furnace comprises a hearth for the longitudinal displacement of pellet containers, means for injecting gas at both ends of the furnace, for sucking gas between preheating and sintering zones and for condensing the binder, means for displacing the containers from an introduction lock-chamber to an extraction lock-chamber, a conveyor belt which passes through a glove box and provides a leak-tight connection between the lock-chambers. A station for loading containers with pellet sub-containers prior to sintering and a station for unloading the pellet sub-containers after sintering are juxtaposed within the glove box. 3 claims, 1 drawing figure

  20. Rapid prototyping methods for the manufacture of fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudek Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The potential for the application of this method for the manufacture of metallic bipolar plates (BPP for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs is presented and discussed. Special attention is paid to the fabrication of light elements for the construction of PEMFC stacks designed for mobile applications such as aviation technology and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs.

  1. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction: Phase 2. Fourth semiannual report, July-December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1981-03-01

    This program has as its ultimate objective the demonstration of an advanced fuel design that is resistant to the failure mechanism known as fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). Two fuel concepts have been developed for possible demonstration: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to avoid the harmful effects of localized stress and reactive fission products during reactor service. Within the scope of this program one of these concepts had to be selected for a large-scale demonstration in a commercial power reactor. The selection was made to demonstrate Zr-liner fuel and to include bundles which have liners prepared from either low oxygen sponge zirconium or of crystal bar zirconium. The demonstration is intended to include a total of 132 barrier bundles in the reload for Quad Cities Unit 2, Cycle 6. In the current report period changes in the nuclear design were made to respond to changes in the Energy Utilization Plan for Quad Cities Unit 2. Bundle designs were completed, and were licensed for use in a BWR/3. The core specific licensing will be done as part of the reload license for Quad Cities Unit 2, Cycle 6

  2. Development of a two-stage light gas gun to accelerate hydrogen pellets to high speeds for plasma fueling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Fehling, D.T.; Sparks, D.O.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a two-stage light gas gun to accelerate hydrogen isotope pellets to high speeds is under way at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. High velocities (>2 km/s) are desirable for plasma fueling applications, since the faster pellets can penetrate more deeply into large, hot plasmas and deposit atoms of fuel directly in a larger fraction of the plasma volume. In the initial configuration of the two-stage device, a 2.2-l volume (/ 3 for frozen hydrogen isotopes). However, the use of sabots to encase and protect the cryogenic pellets from the high peak pressures will probably be required to realize speeds of ∼3 km/s or greater. The experimental plan includes acceleration of hydrogen isotopes as soon as the gun geometry and operating parameters are optimized; theoretical models are being used to aid in this process. The hardware is being designed to accommodate repetitive operation, which is the objective of this research and is required for future applications. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  3. Technology and distribution of pellets. Experience about the European network on wood pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    Wood pellets might become the most important alternative to fossil fuels in the near future. As a bio-fuel it has the following characteristics: heat value, min 4.7 kWh/kg; ash fraction less than 1.0 vol. %; humidity less than 10 vol. %; diameter (rod shaped) min 6 mm and volumetric weight about 650 kg/m 3 . About 2.1 t pellets substitute 1000 l fuel oil. Sweden and Austria have more than 15 year experience in using wood pellets, followed by Germany. They are an environmentally friendly alternative for private houses, for district heating plants and especially suitable for densely built-up and inhabited areas. Having high energy density they can be transported to the areas with high energy requirements. Among their advantages are: low humidity, easy transport and storage, can be produced by renewable raw materials and provide new local jobs, fit for renewable energy systems with closed cycle. Disadvantages include: relatively more expensive for private houses compared to oil and gas and necessity of two times larger storage space than oil. Wood pellets are produced by all kind of paper waste and wood wastes from industry. They are especially suitable for small boiler plants and the oil burner can be replaced by a pellet burner in the same boiler. The leading producer of wood pellets is Sweden, of pellet stoves - USA. Pellet stoves, pellet burners and pellet boilers both for private houses and for heating plants are manufactured also in Sweden, Denmark,Finland, Germany, Austria and Ireland

  4. Grain growth in thoria and thoria-base fuel pellets (LWBR development program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smid, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of grain growth in ThO/sub 2/-base sintered compacts were investigated to determine the cause of a nonuniform microstructural cross section. It was concluded that trace impurities which inhibit continuous grain growth at the pellet interior were removed by vaporization at the pellet exterior. This resulted in relatively normal grain growth at the pellet surface and discontinuous grain growth at the pellet interior. Calcining the starting ThO/sub 2/ powder to a slightly higher temperature removed inhibiting impurities but also decreased the driving force for grain growth by reducing the surface area of the powder. Mixing high and low temperature calcined ThO/sub 2/ resulted in improved grain growth. Increased oxygen partial pressure and temperature during sintering increased grain boundary mobility in spite of the inhibiting impurity. The specific inhibiting impurity was not isolated during this investigation.

  5. Grain growth in thoria and thoria-base fuel pellets (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of grain growth in ThO 2 -base sintered compacts were investigated to determine the cause of a nonuniform microstructural cross section. It was concluded that trace impurities which inhibit continuous grain growth at the pellet interior were removed by vaporization at the pellet exterior. This resulted in relatively normal grain growth at the pellet surface and discontinuous grain growth at the pellet interior. Calcining the starting ThO 2 powder to a slightly higher temperature removed inhibiting impurities but also decreased the driving force for grain growth by reducing the surface area of the powder. Mixing high and low temperature calcined ThO 2 resulted in improved grain growth. Increased oxygen partial pressure and temperature during sintering increased grain boundary mobility in spite of the inhibiting impurity. The specific inhibiting impurity was not isolated during this investigation

  6. The US pellet market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, S.

    2007-01-01

    Bear Mountain is the largest producer of pellets, firelogs, animal beddings, and barbecue pellets in Western United States. The company's branded products are sold directly to more than 400 retail dealers. This presentation included a series of graphs depicting Bear Mountain's USA pellet sales in tons from 2002 to 2007; truckloads to various distribution areas; pellet stoves and insert units shipped from 1998 to 2006; and hearth appliance shipments from 1998 to 2006. It was noted that in the United States, 98 per cent of the pellets sold come in 40 pound bags and are delivered to retailers by truck. Space is needed for inventory purposes, as each customer may use 2 to 4 tons. The pellets are used in small ash capacity room heaters. The pellet producers buy sawdust from area mills. It was noted that the soft housing market combined with competition for pulp and paper has pinched the supply of pellets. Pellets were in short supply in the west coast during the winter of 2006-2007 and in eastern United States during the winters of 2004-2005 and 2005-2006, indicating that summer production of pellets is required in order to meet winter demand. The key demand factors for pellets include stove sales; pellet pricing; pricing of other fuels; and, weather. The key supply factors for pellets include availability of sawdust; logistics; competition; and cost. The greatest challenge facing pellet producers is the high cost of freight. It was concluded that 2008 will be another year of uncertainty for pellet producers, due to the abundant supply of pellets in the east and midwest, and stabilized alternative fuel pricing. tabs., figs

  7. Quality assurance in CANDU-type fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afifi, Y.K.; El-Hakim, E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is concerned with fabrication of UO 2 pellets from UO 2 powder by powder metallurgical methods (pelletizing and sintering). The effect of ejection to molding force ratio on the fired pellets properties was studied. It is observed that pellets cold-pressed at ratio less than 75% is cracked to two parts. The effect of the sintering temperature on the fired pellets properties was studied. It was found that the sintering of UO 2 pellets at 1650 deg C leads to production of pellets within the qualification requirements. The data and information available in the ASTM for each step in UO 2 pellets fabrication process and the technical experience (gained or published) are transformed into a group of logic flow charts (LFC'S). These logic flow charts are collected to form a module of a software to qualify the sintered pellets and also gives a technical assistance according to the ASTM for each step in the fabrication process. (author)

  8. Stability of zinc stearate under alpha irradiation in the manufacturing process of SFR nuclear fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, J.; Vermeulen, J.; Baux, D.; Sauvage, T.; Venault, L.; Audubert, F.; Colin, X.

    2018-03-01

    The manufacture of new fuels for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) will involve powders derived from recycling existing fuels in order to keep on producing electricity while saving natural resources and reducing the amount of waste produced by spent MOX fuels. Using recycled plutonium in this way will significantly increase the amount of 238Pu, a high energy alpha emitter, in the powders. The process of shaping powders by pressing requires the use of a solid lubricant, zinc stearate, to produce pellets with no defects compliant with the standards. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of alpha radiolysis on this additive and its lubrication properties. Experiments were conducted on samples in contact with PuO2, as well as under external helium ion beam irradiation, in order to define the kinetics of radiolytic gas generation. The yield results relating to the formation of these gases (G0) show that the alpha radiation of plutonium can be simulated using external helium ion beam irradiation. The isotopic composition of plutonium has little impact on the yield. However, an increased yield was globally observed with increasing the mean linear energy transfer (LET). A radiolytic degradation process is proposed.

  9. Technique of manufacturing specimen of irradiated fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Duck Seok; Seo, Hang Seok; Min, Duck Kee; Koo, Dae Seo; Lee, Eun Pyo; Yang, Song Yeol

    1999-04-01

    Technique of manufacturing specimen of irradiated fuel rods to perform efficient PIE is developed by analyzing the relation between requiring time of manufacturing specimen and manufacturing method in irradiated fuel rods. It takes within an hour to grind 1 mm of specimen thickness under 150 rpm in speed of grinding, 600 g gravity in force using no.120, no.240, no.320 of grinding paper. In case of no.400 of grinding paper, it takes more an hour to grind the same thickness as above. It takes up to a quarter to grind 80-130 μm in specimen thickness using no.400 of grinding paper. When grinding time goes beyond 15 minutes, the grinding thickness of specimen does not exist. The polishing of specimen with 150 Rpms in speed of grinding machine, 600 g gravity in force, 10 minutes in polishing time using diamond paste 15 μm on polishing cloths amounts to 50 μm in specimen thickness. In case of diamond paste 9 μm on polishing cloth, the polishing of specimen amounts to 20 μm. The polishing thickness of specimen with 15 minutes in polishing time using 6 μm, 3 μm, 1 μm, 1/4 μm does not exist. Technique of manufacturing specimen of irradiated fuel rods will have application to the destructive examination of PIE. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs

  10. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing high uranium concentration dispersion fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jose Antonio Batista de

    2011-01-01

    IPEN-CNEN/SP developed the technology to produce the dispersion type fuel elements for research reactors and made it available for routine production. Today, the fuel produced in IPEN-CNEN/SP is limited to the uranium concentration of 3.0 gU/cm 3 for U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion-based and 2.3 gU/cm 3 for U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion. The increase of uranium concentration in fuel plates enables the reactivity of the reactor core reactivity to be higher and extends the fuel life. Concerning technology, it is possible to increase the uranium concentration in the fuel meat up to the limit of 4.8 gU/cm 3 in U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion and 3.2 gU/cm 3 U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion. These dispersions are well qualified worldwide. This work aims to develop the manufacturing process of both fuel meats with high uranium concentrations, by redefining the manufacturing procedures currently adopted in the Nuclear Fuel Center of IPEN-CNEN/SP. Based on the results, it was concluded that to achieve the desired concentration, it is necessary to make some changes in the established procedures, such as in the particle size of the fuel powder and in the feeding process inside the matrix, before briquette pressing. These studies have also shown that the fuel plates, with a high concentration of U 3 Si 2 -Al, met the used specifications. On the other hand, the appearance of the microstructure obtained from U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion fuel plates with 3.2 gU/cm 3 showed to be unsatisfactory, due to the considerably significant porosity observed. The developed fabrication procedure was applied to U 3 Si 2 production at 4.8 gU/cm 3 , with enriched uranium. The produced plates were used to assemble the fuel element IEA-228, which was irradiated in order to check its performance in the IEA-R1 reactor at IPEN-CNEN/SP. These new fuels have potential to be used in the new Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB. (author)

  11. Potential of duplex fuel in prebreeder, breeder, and power reactor designs: tests and analyses (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, T.L.; Brennan, J.J.; Duncombe, E.; Schneider, M.J.; Johnson, R.G.R.

    1982-09-01

    Dual region fuel pellets, called duplex pellets, are comprised of an outer annular region of relatively high uranium fuel enrichment and a center pellet of fertile material with no enrichment. UO 2 and ThO 2 are the fissile and fertile materials of interest. Both prebreeders and breeders are discussed as are the performance advantages of duplex pellets over solid pellets in these two pressurized water reactor types. Advantages of duplex pellets for commercial reactor fuel rods are also discussed. Both irradiation test data and analytical results are used in comparisons. Manufacturing of duplex fuel is discussed

  12. Development of Impregnated Agglomerate Pelletization (IAP) process for fabrication of (Th,U)O 2 mixed oxide pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khot, P. M.; Nehete, Y. G.; Fulzele, A. K.; Baghra, Chetan; Mishra, A. K.; Afzal, Mohd.; Panakkal, J. P.; Kamath, H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Impregnated Agglomerate Pelletization (IAP) technique has been developed at Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), BARC, Tarapur, for manufacturing (Th, 233U)O 2 mixed oxide fuel pellets, which are remotely fabricated in hot cell or shielded glove box facilities to reduce man-rem problem associated with 232U daughter radionuclides. This technique is being investigated to fabricate the fuel for Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). In the IAP process, ThO 2 is converted to free flowing spheroids by powder extrusion route in an unshielded facility which are then coated with uranyl nitrate solution in a shielded facility. The dried coated agglomerate is finally compacted and then sintered in oxidizing/reducing atmosphere to obtain high density (Th,U)O 2 pellets. In this study, fabrication of (Th,U)O 2 mixed oxide pellets containing 3-5 wt.% UO 2 was carried out by IAP process. The pellets obtained were characterized using optical microscopy, XRD and alpha autoradiography. The results obtained were compared with the results for the pellets fabricated by other routes such as Coated Agglomerate Pelletization (CAP) and Powder Oxide Pelletization (POP) route.

  13. Analysis of pellet cladding interaction and creep of U 3SIi2 fuel for use in light water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Kathryn E.

    Following the accident at the Fukushima plant, enhancing the accident tolerance of the light water reactor (LWR) fleet became a topic of serious discussion. Under the direction of congress, the DOE office of Nuclear Energy added accident tolerant fuel development as a primary component to the existing Advanced Fuels Program. The DOE defines accident tolerant fuels as fuels that "in comparison with the standard UO2- Zircaloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events." To be economically viable, proposed accident tolerant fuels and claddings should be backward compatible with LWR designs, provide significant operating cost improvements such as power uprates, increased fuel burnup, or increased cycle length. In terms of safety, an alternative fuel pellet must have resistance to water corrosion comparable to UO2, thermal conductivity equal to or larger than that of UO2, and a melting temperature that allows the material to remain solid under power reactor conditions. Among the candidates, U3Si2 has a number of advantageous thermophysical properties, including; high density, high thermal conductivity at room temperature, and a high melting temperature. These properties support its use as an accident tolerant fuel while its high uranium density is capable of supporting uprates to the LWR fleet. This research characterizes U3Si2 pellets and analyzes U3Si2 under light water reactor conditions using the fuel performance code BISON. While some thermophysical properties for U3Si2 have been found in the literature, the irradiation behavior is sparse and limited to experience with dispersion fuels. Accordingly, the creep behavior for U3Si2 has been unknown, making it

  14. Experiences and Trends of Manufacturing Technology of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-08-01

    The 'Atoms for Peace' mission initiated in the mid-1950s paved the way for the development and deployment of nuclear fission reactors as a source of heat energy for electricity generation in nuclear power reactors and as a source of neutrons in non-power reactors for research, materials irradiation, and testing and production of radioisotopes. The fuels for nuclear reactors are manufactured from natural uranium (∼99.3% 238 U + ∼0.7% 235 U) and natural thorium (∼100% 232 Th) resources. Currently, most power and research reactors use 235 U, the only fissile isotope found in nature, as fuel. The fertile isotopes 238 U and 232 Th are transmuted in the reactor to human-made 239 Pu and 233 U fissile isotopes, respectively. Likewise, minor actinides (MA) (Np, Am and Cm) and other plutonium isotopes are also formed by a series of neutron capture reactions with 238 U and 235 U. Long term sustainability of nuclear power will depend to a great extent on the efficient, safe and secure utilization of fissile and fertile materials. Light water reactors (LWRs) account for more than 82% of the operating reactors, followed by pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), which constitute ∼10% of reactors. LWRs will continue to dominate the nuclear power market for several decades, as long as economically viable natural uranium resources are available. Currently, the plutonium obtained from spent nuclear fuel is subjected to mono recycling in LWRs as uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX), containing up to 12% PuO 2 , in a very limited way. The reprocessed uranium (RepU) is also re-enriched and recycled in LWRs in a few countries. Unfortunately, the utilization of natural uranium resources in thermal neutron reactors is 2 and MOX fuel technology has matured during the past five decades. These fuels are now being manufactured, used and reprocessed on an industrial scale. Mixed uranium- plutonium monocarbide (MC), mononitride (MN) and U-Pu-Zr alloys are recognized as advanced fuels

  15. Dry recovery test of plutonium-uranium mixed oxide fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinugasa, Manabu; Kawamata, Kazuhiko; Kashima, Sadamitsu

    1981-01-01

    The oxidation conditions for pulverizing directly Pu-U mixed oxide pellets without mechanical crushing were examined to simplify the process and to reduce radiation exposure during the dry recovery of highly enriched Pu pellets. The specimens used were the Pusub(0.3) Usub(0.7) Osub(2-x) pellets with different density, which were sintered at 1650 deg C for 2 hours under an atmosphere of 5 % H 2 - N 2 . The oxidation experiment was carried out under several conditions. The oxidation products were examined by weight gain, X-ray diffraction, appearance pictures, SEM photographs and so on. From these studies, it can be concluded that the oxidation in NO 2 diluted with air was very powerful, but if only the coarse spalling of Pusub(0.3) Usub(0.7) O 2 sintered pellets is required, it is sufficient to oxidize them in air for 1 hr in a temperature range from 400 to 600 deg C. (Asami, T.)

  16. Important properties of bamboo pellets to be used as commercial solid fuel in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijia Liu; Benhua Fei; Zehui Jiang; Zhiyong Cai; Xing' e Liu

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo is a type of biomass material and has great potential as a bioenergy resource of the future in China. Some properties of bamboo pellets, length, diameter, moisture content (MC), particle density, bulk density, durability, fine content, ash, gross calorific value, combustion rate and heat release rate, were determined and the effects of MC and particle size (PS)...

  17. Analysis of trends in fuel rod depressurization and determination of 'gas leak' and 'pellet-water interaction' type failures using radiation monitoring techniques of fuel rod leak tightness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, E.A.; Shestakov, Yu.M.; Miglo, V.N.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of fuel rod failures in the Light Water Reactor operation is presented. Analysis includes the mechanism of formation and development of fuel rod cladding failure until through-wall defects appear (welding defects; inner hydriding defects; pellet-cladding interaction; crud deposit - intensified corrosion) as well as factors that determine defects propagation after fuel rod depressurization (metal condition in the vicinity of defect determined by the mechanism of formation and propagation defect; operational transients; degree of core cooldown after depressurization during preventive maintenance). Possibilities of in-service monitoring of fuel rod through-wall crack propagation using normal tools of cladding back-tightness monitoring are addressed and used in the course of analysis. Characteristics and values are presented for radiation parameters for fuel assemblies during propagation of defects with different degrees of rod depressurization, including ''gas leak'', cladding crack and ''open pellet-water interaction'' with potential particulate fission product release from the damaged rods as well as after formation of recurring defects. Based on experimental data on specific activity of different iodine isotopes in the primary coolant, a mathematical model to analyse defect propagation trends has been developed. The model describes the rate of radionuclide release from depressurized rods and the rate of nuclear fuel fission processes in the vicinity of defects. The model and results of analysis are illustrated by experimental and statistical data on depressurization of WWER (PWR) and RBMK (BWR) reactor fuel rods. Possibility to solve the problem of predicting defect propagation is considered. (author). 5 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs

  18. Measurements of the nuclear reaction rates and spectral indices along the radius of the fuel pellets of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitelli, Ulysses d'Utra; Mura, Luis Felipe L.; Fanaro, Leda C.C.B.

    2009-01-01

    This work presents the measures of the nuclear reaction rates along of the radial direction of the fuel pellet by irradiation and posterior gamma spectrometry of a thin slice of fuel pellet of UO 2 at 4.3% enrichment. From its irradiation the rate of radioactive capture and fission are measures as a function of the radius of the pellet disk using a HPGe detector. Diverse lead collimators of changeable diameters have been used for this purpose. Simulating the fuel pellet in the pin fuel of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, a thin disk is used, being inserted in the interior of a dismountable fuel rod. This fuel rod is then placed in the central position of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor core and irradiated during 1 hour under a neutron flux of 5.10 8 n/cm 2 s. The nuclear reaction of radioactive capture occurs in the atoms of U- 238 that when absorbs a neutron transmutes into U- 239 of half-life of only 23 minutes. Thus, it is opted for the detection of the Np- 239 , radionuclide derivative of the radioactive decay of the U- 239 and that has a measurable half-life (2.335 days). In gamma spectrometry 11 collimators with different diameters have been used, consequently, the gamma spectrometry is made in function of the diameter (radius) of the irradiated UO 2 fuel pellet disk, thus is possible to get the average value of the counting for each collimator in function of the specific pellet radius. These values are directly proportional to the radioactive capture nuclear reaction rates. The same way the nuclear fission rate occurs in the atoms of the U- 235 that produce different fission products such as Ce- 143 with a yield fission of 5.9% and applying the same procedure the fission nuclear reaction rate is obtained. This work presents some calculated values of nuclear reaction rate of radioactive capture and fission along of the radial direction of the fuel pellet obtained by Monte Carlo methodology using the MCNP-4C code. The relative values obtained are compared with experimental

  19. Optimization of backfill pellet properties AASKAR DP2 - Laboratory tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Linus; Sanden, Torbjoern [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-12-15

    Bentonite pellets are planned to be used as a part of the backfill in the Swedish spent nuclear fuel deep repository concept KBS-3. This report describes testing and evaluation of different backfill pellet candidates. The work completed included testing of both pellet material and pellet type. The materials tested were sourced from India (ASHA), Greece (IBECO, 2 products) and Wyoming USA (MX-80 clay). The majority of the tests were completed on the ASHA clay as well as the IBECO-RWC-BF products, with only limited testing of the others. The pellets tested were manufactured using both extrusion and roller compaction techniques and had different sizes and geometries. The following tests have been performed and are presented in this report: 1. General tests. Water content, bulk density and dry density have been determined for both the pellet filling and the individual pellets. The compressibility of the pellet filling was tested with CRS-tests and the strength of the individual pellets was tested with a special compression test. The water content varied from 11.3% to 18.7% and was highest for the extruded pellets. The dry density was somewhat higher for the roller-compacted pellets and their compressibility was lower. The strength of the individual pellets was generally higher for the extruded pellets. 2. Erosion. The pellet filling will be exposed to groundwater inflow when installed in the tunnel. This flow could possibly cause significant erosion on the pellet filling. Erosion tests have been performed with comparisons in erosion resistance made on the various material- and pellet-types. The influence of variations in water salinity and flow rates was also tested. The IBECO extruded 6- and 10- mm diameter rods and the compacted Posiva spec.-A pellet filling seem to have the lowest tendency to erode. It is also the IBECO extruded pellet filling that withstands variations in water salinity and flow rates best. 3. Water storing capacity. The pellet filling

  20. Optimization of backfill pellet properties AASKAR DP2-Laboratory tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Linus; Sanden, Torbjoern

    2012-12-01

    Bentonite pellets are planned to be used as a part of the backfill in the Swedish spent nuclear fuel deep repository concept KBS-3. This report describes testing and evaluation of different backfill pellet candidates. The work completed included testing of both pellet material and pellet type. The materials tested were sourced from India (ASHA), Greece (IBECO, 2 products) and Wyoming USA (MX-80 clay). The majority of the tests were completed on the ASHA clay as well as the IBECO-RWC-BF products, with only limited testing of the others. The pellets tested were manufactured using both extrusion and roller compaction techniques and had different sizes and geometries. The following tests have been performed and are presented in this report: 1. General tests. Water content, bulk density and dry density have been determined for both the pellet filling and the individual pellets. The compressibility of the pellet filling was tested with CRS-tests and the strength of the individual pellets was tested with a special compression test. The water content varied from 11.3% to 18.7% and was highest for the extruded pellets. The dry density was somewhat higher for the roller-compacted pellets and their compressibility was lower. The strength of the individual pellets was generally higher for the extruded pellets. 2. Erosion. The pellet filling will be exposed to groundwater inflow when installed in the tunnel. This flow could possibly cause significant erosion on the pellet filling. Erosion tests have been performed with comparisons in erosion resistance made on the various material- and pellet-types. The influence of variations in water salinity and flow rates was also tested. The IBECO extruded 6- and 10- mm diameter rods and the compacted Posiva spec.-A pellet filling seem to have the lowest tendency to erode. It is also the IBECO extruded pellet filling that withstands variations in water salinity and flow rates best. 3. Water storing capacity. The pellet filling's ability to

  1. U.S. Department Of Energy's nuclear engineering education research: highlights of recent and current research-II. 5. Automation of Nuclear Fuel Pellet Quality Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyvan, Shahla; Song, Xiaolong

    2001-01-01

    At the present time, nuclear fuel pellet inspection is performed by humans using the naked eye for judgment and decision making as to whether to accept or reject the pellet. Unnecessary re-fabrication of pellets will be costly, and having too many low-quality pellets in a fuel assembly is unacceptable. The current practice of pellet inspection by humans is tedious and subject to inconsistencies and error. In addition, manual inspection is cumbersome since the inspector must keep the pellet at arm's length and must wear glasses to protect the lenses of his or her eyes. The pellets are taken from a pellet sizing machine, dumped onto a rack, and shaken into rows; they are then viewed as a group. The entire group is rotated 90 deg four times to provide the inspector with a 360-deg view of each pellet. The pellets are examined for certain types of cracks, chips, and unusual markings, i.e., water stains and machine banding. These defects appear at any location on the pellet surface image with different intensity, size, shape, and background noise. Figure 1 shows typical defective fuel pellets with chip, banded, and end defects. The goal of this work is to automate the pellet inspection process. A prototype of such an inspection system is developed. The system examines photographic images of pellets using various artificial intelligence techniques for image analysis and defect classification. Figure 2 shows the user interface of this inspection system, which is built using Java programming language. A total of 252 pellets with various defects was available for this research. Each pellet was photographed four times at rotations of 90 deg. The resultant black-and-white negatives were scanned into the computer in 256 gray scale mode. The inspection of a fuel pellet by image analysis involves several steps, as described in Fig. 3 and as follows: Step 1-On-line image conversion: This process involves on-line digitization of the input image. Step 2-Reference model: The second

  2. Use of Cement Kiln Dust, Blast Furnace Slag and Marble Sludge in the Manufacture of Sustainable Artificial Aggregates by Means of Cold Bonding Pelletization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cioffi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, three different samples of solid industrial wastes cement kiln dust (CKD, granulated blast furnace slag and marble sludge were employed in a cold bonding pelletization process for the sustainable production of artificial aggregates. The activating action of CKD components on the hydraulic behavior of the slag was explored by evaluating the neo-formed phases present in several hydrated pastes. Particularly, the influence of free CaO and sulfates amount in the two CKD samples on slag reactivity was evaluated. Cold bonded artificial aggregates were characterized by determining physical and mechanical properties of two selected size fractions of the granules for each studied mixture. Eighteen types of granules were employed in C28/35 concrete manufacture where coarser natural aggregate were substituted with the artificial ones. Finally, lightweight concretes were obtained, proving the suitability of the cold bonding pelletization process in artificial aggregate sustainable production.

  3. Best Available Techniques (BAT) in solid biomass fuel processing, handling, storage and production of pellets from biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, J.P.; Tana, J. [AaF-Industri Ab, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-09-15

    With the increasing use of biomass fuels the varieties of sources for biomass have expanded to almost all possible combustible matter with biological origin. The increasing scale in solid biomass fuel production and utilization at the combustion plants of the wide variety of biomass fuels have contributed to littering, dust, odor and noise emissions of the production chain. The report aims to provide information for operators, environmental consultants and competent environmental authorities on what is considered BAT, as defined in the IPPC directive (2008/1/EC), in biomass processing and handling as well as the production of pellets from biomass. The project gives a brief description of commonly used solid biomass fuels and the processes, handling and storage of these biomasses in the Nordic countries covering processes from production site to the point of use. Environmental emissions, sources of waste and other relevant environmental aspects from commonly used processes, included raw material and energy use, chemical use and emissions to soil are also included in the report. (Author)

  4. Tritium pellet injector results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, P.W.; Bauer, M.L.; Baylor, L.R.; Deleanu, L.E.; Fehling, D.T.; Milora, S.L.; Whitson, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Injection of solid tritium pellets is considered to be the most promising way of fueling fusion reactors. The Tritium Proof-of- Principle (TPOP) experiment has demonstrated the feasibility of forming and accelerating tritium pellets. This injector is based on the pneumatic pipe-gun concept, in which pellets are formed in situ in the barrel and accelerated with high-pressure gas. This injector is ideal for tritium service because there are no moving parts inside the gun and because no excess tritium is required in the pellet production process. Removal of 3 He from tritium to prevent blocking of the cryopumping action by the noncondensible gas has been demonstrated with a cryogenic separator. Pellet velocities of 1280 m/s have been achieved for 4-mm-diam by 4-mm-long cylindrical tritium pellets with hydrogen propellant at 6.96 MPa (1000 psi). 10 refs., 10 figs

  5. Pelletizing properties of torrefied spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Clemons, Craig; Holm, Jens K.

    2011-01-01

    Torrefaction is a thermo-chemical conversion process improving the handling, storage and combustion properties of wood. To save storage space and transportation costs, it can be compressed into fuel pellets of high physical and energetic density. The resulting pellets are relatively resistant......, with hemicelluloses being most sensitive to thermal degradation. The chemical changes had a negative impact, both on the pelletizing process and the pellet properties. Torrefaction resulted in higher friction in the press channel of the pellet press and low compression strength of the pellets. Fracture surface...

  6. ThO2-based pellet fuels - their properties, methods of fabrication, and irradiation performance: a critical assessment of the state of the technology and recommendations for further work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, P.E.; Griffin, C.W.; Hsieh, K.A.; Matthews, R.B.; White, G.D.

    1979-09-01

    This critical assessment of the ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ pellet fuel technology was conducted in support of the Fuels Refabrication and Development Program (FRAD). Included in this critical review are the following areas: powder preparation; pellet fabrication; fuel chemical, physical, and mechanical properties; and fuel irradiation performance. The authors identify (1) areas where data are either deficient or lacking and (2) requirements for additional development and experimental work.

  7. ThO2-based pellet fuels - their properties, methods of fabrication, and irradiation performance: a critical assessment of the state of the technology and recommendations for further work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, P.E.; Griffin, C.W.; Hsieh, K.A.; Matthews, R.B.; White, G.D.

    1979-09-01

    This critical assessment of the ThO 2 -UO 2 pellet fuel technology was conducted in support of the Fuels Refabrication and Development Program (FRAD). Included in this critical review are the following areas: powder preparation; pellet fabrication; fuel chemical, physical, and mechanical properties; and fuel irradiation performance. The authors identify (1) areas where data are either deficient or lacking and (2) requirements for additional development and experimental work

  8. Quality assurance in CANDU-type fuel manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afifi, Y.K.; El-Hakim, E. [Atomic Energy Authority, Metallurgy Dept., Nuclear Research Center, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-07-01

    This paper is concerned with fabrication of UO{sub 2} pellets from UO{sub 2} powder by powder metallurgical methods (pelletizing and sintering). The effect of ejection to molding force ratio on the fired pellets properties was studied. It is observed that pellets cold-pressed at ratio less than 75% is cracked to two parts. The effect of the sintering temperature on the fired pellets properties was studied. It was found that the sintering of UO{sub 2} pellets at 1650 deg C leads to production of pelletswithin the qualification requirements. The data and information available in the ASTM for each step in UO{sub 2} pellets fabrication process and the technical experience (gained or published) are transformed into a group of logic flow charts (LFC'S). These logic flow charts are collected to form a module of a software to qualify the sintered pellets and also gives a technical assistance according to the ASTM for each step in the fabrication process. (author)

  9. Method of improving the green strength of nuclear fuel pellets, and products thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, R.I.; Brassfield, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    This invention provides a method of preparing an admixture comprising a particulate material and a fugitive binder for producing green pellets free of flaws and having improved strength, comprising the steps of: a) fluidizing and agitating a mass of particulate material with a fluidized bed system; b) adding a fugitive binder to the fluidizing and agitating mass of particulate material and blending the binder with the particulate material, said fugitive binder being comprised of ammonium bicarbonate, ammonium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate, and mixtures thereof; c) aging the blended binder and particulate material for a period of greater than 48 hours; and d) forming the resulting aged blend by pressing into a green body

  10. Alternative bipolar plates design and manufacturing for PEM fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Chang Chuan; Norhamidi Muhamad; Jaafar Sahari

    2006-01-01

    Bipolar plates is one of the important components in fuel cell stack, it comprise up to 80% of the stack volume. Traditionally, these plates have been fabricated from graphite, owing to its chemical nobility, and high electrical and thermal conductivity; but these plates are brittle and relatively thick. Therefore increasing the stack volume and size. Alternatives to graphite are carbon-carbon composite, carbon-polymer composite and metal (aluminum, stainless steel, titanium and nickel based alloy). The use of coated and uncoated metal bipolar plates has received attention recently due to the simplicity of plate manufacturing. The thin nature of the metal substrate allows for smaller stack design with reduced weight. Lightweight coated metals as alternative to graphite plate is being developed. Beside the traditional method of machining and slurry molding, metal foam for bipolar plates fabrication seems to be a good alternative. The plates will be produced with titanium powder by Powder Metallurgy method using space holders technique to produce the meal foam flow-field. This work intends to facilitate the materials and manufacturing process requirements to produce cost effective foamed bipolar plates for fuel cell

  11. quality assurance systems in nuclear fuel procurement and manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, S.

    1997-01-01

    Quality is the totality of features and characteristics of a product or service that bear on its ability to satisfy stated or implied needs. Quality control is activities and techniques used to fulfill the requirements of quality. Quality assurance is a system and its main components are requirements. QA program, organization and responsibilities, design and verification, material and its control, manufacturing and process control, inspections, audits and documents: manuals, specifications, instructions. Quality assurance systems are largely based on ISO 9000 series of the International Standards Organization. ISO 9000 series has been adopted and published by Turkish Standards Institute as TS-ISO 9000. International Atomic Energy Agency also published a guide (50-SG-QA11) ''Quality Assurance in the Procurement, Design and Manufacture of Nuclear Fuel Assemblies'' in the safety guide series. In this study the role of quality control in quality assurance systems, inspection and test plans and acceptance and nonconformance quality levels will be explained in relation to nuclear fuel production. Examples of applications in quality assurance systems based on ISO 9000 will be given

  12. Fabrication of fuel elements interplay between typical SNR Mark Ia specifications and the fuel element fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biermann, W.K.; Heuvel, H.J.; Pilate, S.; Vanderborck, Y.; Pelckmans, E.; Vanhellemont, G.; Roepenack, H.; Stoll, W.

    1987-01-01

    The core and fuel were designed for the SNR-300 first core by Interatom GmbH and Belgonucleaire. The fuel was fabricated by Alkem/RBU and Belgonucleaire. Based on the preparation of drawings and specifications and on the results of the prerun fabrication, an extensive interplay took place between design requirements, specifications, and fabrication processes at both fuel plants. During start-up of pellet and pin fabrication, this solved such technical questions as /sup 239/Pu equivalent linear weight, pellet density, stoichiometry of the pellets, and impurity content. Close cooperation of designers and manufacturers has allowed manufacture of 205 fuel assemblies without major problems

  13. Effects of fuel particle size and fission-fragment-enhanced irradiation creep on the in-pile behavior in CERCER composite pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yunmei [Institute of Mechanics and Computational Engineering, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ding, Shurong, E-mail: dsr1971@163.com [Institute of Mechanics and Computational Engineering, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang, Xunchao; Wang, Canglong; Yang, Lei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-12-15

    The micro-scale finite element models for CERCER pellets with different-sized fuel particles are developed. With consideration of a grain-scale mechanistic irradiation swelling model in the fuel particles and the irradiation creep in the matrix, numerical simulations are performed to explore the effects of the particle size and the fission-fragment-enhanced irradiation creep on the thermo-mechanical behavior of CERCER pellets. The enhanced irradiation creep effect is applied in the 10 μm-thick fission fragment damage matrix layer surrounding the fuel particles. The obtained results indicate that (1) lower maximum temperature occurs in the cases with smaller-sized particles, and the effects of particle size on the mechanical behavior in pellets are intricate; (2) the first principal stress and radial axial stress remain compressive in the fission fragment damage layer at higher burnup, thus the mechanism of radial cracking found in the experiment can be better explained. - Highlights: • A grain-scale gas swelling model considering the development of recrystallization and resolution is adopted for particles. • The influence of fission-gas-induced porosity is considered in the constitutive relations for particles. • A simulation method is developed for the multi-scale thermo-mechanical behavior. • The effects of fuel particle size and fission-fragment-enhanced irradiation creep are investigated in pellets.

  14. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong

    2012-01-01

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced

  15. The study on the methods for improving the gredibility of NDT equipment for the gap of pellets of nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Liu Ming; Wang Changhong; Ma Jinbo

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the credibility of the new generation of automatic online non-destructive testing equipment for the gap of the pellets of nuclear fuel rods the researchers have done a lot of work in the development of the device. Such measures as multi-thread synchronization, precise timing, upper and lower computer communication control, antijamming processing are adopted such that the detecting device can accurately detecte the size of the gap between pellets, the position and length of the spring cavity at the front end of the nuclear fuel rods at a detection rate of 8 m/min. The detection credibility for the 0.5 mm gap is over 95%, reaching the international advanced level. At present, the device is put into use in the nuclear fuel element production line. (authors)

  16. Simulation of the irradiation-induced micro-thermo-mechanical behaviors evolution in ADS nuclear fuel pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shurong; Zhao, Yunmei; Wan, Jibo; Gong, Xin; Wang, Canglong; Yang, Lei; Huo, Yongzhong

    2013-11-01

    An Accelerator Driven System (ADS) is dedicated to Minor Actinides (MA) transmutation. The fuels for ADS are highly innovative, which are composite fuel pellets with the fuel particles containing MA phases dispersed in a MgO or Mo matrix. Assuming that the fuel particles are distributed periodically in the MgO matrix, a three-dimensional finite element model is developed. The three-dimensional incremental large-deformation constitutive relations for the fuel particles and matrix are separately built, and a method is accordingly constructed to implement simulation of the micro-thermo-mechanical behaviors evolution. Evolutions of the temperature and mechanical fields are given and discussed. With irradiation creep included in the MgO matrix constitutive relation, the conclusions can be drawn as that (1) irradiation creep has a remarkable effect on the mechanical behaviors evolution in the matrix; (2) irradiation creep plays an important role in the damage mechanism interpretation of ceramic matrix fuel pellets. Thermal conductivity The thermal conductivity model is adopted as KUO2 = K0·FD·FP·FM·FR, which was proposed by Lucuta et al. [10] to adapt to the high burnup conditions with consideration of the effects of temperature, burnup, porosity and fission products. K0 is the thermal conductivity of fully dense un-irradiated UO2, as Eq. (1) in W/m K; FD, FP are the adjust factors reflecting the effects of dissolved and precipitated fission products; FM and FR are factors due to porosity and irradiation effects. The adopted thermal conductivity varies with temperature and burnup, which expresses its degradation with burnup, with the terms as k0={1}/{0.0375+2.165×10-4T}+{4.715×109}/{T2}exp-{16361}/{T} FD={1.09}/{B3.265}+{0.0643}/{√{B}}√{T}artan{1}/{1.09/B3.265}+{0.0643}/{√{B}}√{T} FP=1+0.019B/3-0.019B{1}/{1+exp(1200-T100)} FM={1-P}/{1+(s-1)P} FR=1-{0.2}/{1+expT-90080} Thermal expansion The engineering strain of thermal expansion [11] is given as {ΔL}/{L0

  17. A statistical analysis of pellet-clad interaction failures in water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, S.G.; Fardo, R.D.; Sipush, P.J.; Kaiser, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    The primary objective of the statistical analysis was to develop a mathematical function that would predict PCI fuel rod failures as a function of the imposed operating conditions. Linear discriminant analysis of data from both test and commercial reactors was performed. The initial data base used encompassed 713 data points (117 failures and 596 non-failures) representing a wide variety of water cooled reactor fuel (PWR, BWR, CANDU, and SGHWR). When applied on a best-estimate basis, the resulting function simultaneously predicts approximately 80 percent of both the failure and non-failure data correctly. One of the most significant predictions of the analysis is that relatively large changes in power can be tolerated when the pre-ramp irradiation power is low, but that only small changes in power can be tolerated when the pre-ramp irradiation power is high. However, it is also predicted that fuel rods irradiated at low power will fail at lower final powers than those irradiated at high powers. Other results of the analysis are that fuel rods with high clad operating temperatures can withstand larger power increases that fuel rods with low clad operating temperatures, and that burnup has only a minimal effect on PCI performance after levels of approximately 10000 MWD/MTU have been exceeded. These trends in PCI performance and the operating parameters selected are believed to be consistent with mechanistic considerations. Published PCI data indicate that BWR fuel usually operates at higher local powers and changes in power, lower clad temperatures, and higher local ramp rates than PWR fuel

  18. Determination of Gd concentration profile in UO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuel pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobia, D., E-mail: dina.tobia@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Laboratorio de Resonancias Magnéticas, Centro Atómico Bariloche – CNEA and CONICET, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Winkler, E.L.; Milano, J.; Butera, A. [Laboratorio de Resonancias Magnéticas, Centro Atómico Bariloche – CNEA and CONICET, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Kempf, R. [División Caracterización de Combustibles Avanzados, Gerencia Ciclo Combustible Nuclear, Centro Atómico Constituyentes – CNEA, 1650 San Martín, Pcia. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bianchi, L.; Kaufmann, F. [Departamento de Combustibles Avanzados, Gerencia Ciclo Combustible Nuclear, Centro Atómico Constituyentes – CNEA, 1650 San Martín, Pcia. de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-08-01

    A transversal mapping of the Gd concentration was measured in UO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nuclear fuel pellets by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). The quantification was made from the comparison with a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} reference sample. The nominal concentration in the pellets is UO{sub 2}: 7.5% Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A concentration gradient was found, which indicates that the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} amount diminishes towards the edges of the pellets. The concentration varies from (9.3 ± 0.5)% in the center to (5.8 ± 0.3)% in one of the edges. The method was found to be particularly suitable for the precise mapping of the distribution of Gd{sup 3+} ions in the UO{sub 2} matrix.

  19. Experience in the manufacture and performance of CANDU fuel for KANUPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salim, M.; Ahmed, I.; Butt, P.

    1995-01-01

    Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP) a 137 MWe CANDU unit is In operation since 1971. Initially, it was fueled with Canadian fuel bundles. In July 1980 Pakistani manufactured fuel was introduced in the reactor core, irradiated to a burnup of about 7500 MWd-teU -1 and successfully discharged in May 1984. The core was progressively fuelled with Pakistani fuel and in August 1990 the reactor core contained all Pakistani made fuel. As of the present, 3 core equivalent Pakistani fuel bundles have been successfully discharged at an average bumup of 6500 MWd-teU -1 . with a maximum burnup of ∼ 10,200 MWd-teU -1 . No fuel failure of Pakistani bundles has been observed so far. This paper presents the indigenous efforts towards manufacture and operational aspects of KANUPP fuel and compares its behaviour with that of Canadian supplied fuel. The Pakistani fuel has performed well and is as good as the Canadian fuel. (author)

  20. Remote nuclear green pellet processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellier, Francis.

    1980-01-01

    An automated system for manufacturing nuclear fuel pellets for use in nuclear fuel elements of nuclear power reactors is described. The system comprises process components arranged vertically but not directly under each other within a single enclosure. The vertical-lateral arrangement provides for gravity flow of the product from one component to the next and for removal of each component without interference with the other components. The single enclosure eliminates time consuming transfer between separate enclosures of each component while providing three-sided access to the component through glove ports. (auth)

  1. Reduction of cost of poor quality in nuclear fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmqvist, B.

    2000-01-01

    Within ABB reduction of Cost of Poor Quality (COPQ) has become an important process to focus quality improvement initiatives on bottom-line results. The process leads to improved bottom-line results, through cost savings, but it also leads to quality improvements in our processes, products and services. The traditional way of measuring and controlling COPQ in the production workshops is not enough. It is of vital importance to include other non-value creating costs as well, both internally, e.g. in the engineering work, and externally, in delivered products and purchased goods. ABB Atom has since a number of years used the COPQ process in the various steps of nuclear fuel manufacturing. The definition has been expanded to cover, for instance: Scrap, rework and deviations; Margin slippage; Warranty costs; Lack of supplier performance; Excess and obsolete inventory. Each of the COPQ elements has a responsible 'owner' within the management of the Nuclear Fuel Division. The owners form a COPQ task force, which is responsible for analyzing results, setting goals and initiating improvement actions. The COPQ result is updated each month and is presented to all employees in several ways, such as Intranet. For the various COPQ elements improvement initiatives have been implemented. The presentation will describe some of them, such as reduction of: Scrap, rework and deviations through a process with zero defect meetings, high level of process automation, statistical methods; Margin slippage through business process re-engineering; Warranty costs through an improved design review process and expanded testing of new products; Costs for lack in supplier performance through a new concept for supplier QA/QC. It is our strong belief that both ABB Atom and our Customers will benefit from the COPQ process since it leads to a higher quality for nuclear fuel and control rods and facilitates lower product prices. (author)

  2. Hardened over-coating fuel particle and manufacture of nuclear fuel using its fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimuda, Hideharu.

    1990-01-01

    Coated-fuel particles comprise a coating layer formed by coating ceramics such as silicon carbide or zirconium carbide and carbons, etc. to a fuel core made of nuclear fuel materials. The fuel core generally includes oxide particles such as uranium, thorium and plutonium, having 400 to 600 μm of average grain size. The average grain size of the coated-fuel particle is usually from 800 to 900 μm. The thickness of the coating layer is usually from 150 to 250 μm. Matrix material comprising a powdery graphite and a thermosetting resin such as phenol resin, etc. is overcoated to the surface of the coated-fuel particle and hardened under heating to form a hardened overcoating layer to the coated-fuel particle. If such coated-fuel particles are used, cracks, etc. are less caused to the coating layer of the coated-fuel particles upon production, thereby enabling to prevent the damages to the coating layer. (T.M.)

  3. Pellet inspection apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Robert S.; Taleff, Alexander; Sturges, Jr., Robert H.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for inspecting nuclear fuel pellets in a sealed container for diameter, flaws, length and weight. The apparatus includes, in an array, a pellet pick-up station, four pellet inspection stations and a pellet sorting station. The pellets are delivered one at a time to the pick-up station by a vibrating bowl through a vibrating linear conveyor. Grippers each associated with a successive pair of the stations are reciprocable together to pick up a pellet at the upstream station of each pair and to deposit the pellet at the corresponding downstream station. The gripper jaws are opened selectively depending on the state of the pellets at the stations and the particular cycle in which the apparatus is operating. Inspection for diameter, flaws and length is effected in each case by a laser beam projected on the pellets by a precise optical system while each pellet is rotated by rollers. Each laser and its optical system are mounted in a container which is free standing on a precise surface and is provided with locating buttons which engage locating holes in the surface so that each laser and its optical system is precisely set. The roller stands are likewise free standing and are similarly precisely positioned. The diameter optical system projects a thin beam of light which scans across the top of each pellet and is projected on a diode array. The fl GOVERNMENT CONTRACT CLAUSE The invention herein described was made in the course of or under a contract or subcontract thereunder with the Department of Energy bearing No. EY-67-14-C-2170.

  4. Pneumatic pellet injector for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andelfinger, C.; Buechl, K.; Jacobi, D.; Sandmann, W.; Schiedeck, J.; Schilling, H.B.; Weber, G.

    1983-07-01

    Pellet injection is a useful tool for plasma diagnostics of tokamaks. Pellets can be applied for investigation of particle, energy and impurity transport, fueling efficiency and magnetic surfaces. Design, operation and control of a single shot pneumatic pellet gun is described in detail including all supplies, the vacuum system and the diagnostics of the pellet. The arrangement of this injector in the torus hall and the interfaces to the JET system and CODAS are considered. A guide tube system for pellet injection is discussed but it will not be recommended for JET. (orig.)

  5. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL MANUFACTURING COST MODEL: SIMULATING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PERFORMANCE, MANUFACTURING, AND COST OF PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric J. Carlson; Yong Yang; Chandler Fulton

    2004-04-20

    The successful commercialization of fuel cells will depend on the achievement of competitive system costs and efficiencies. System cost directly impacts the capital equipment component of cost of electricity (COE) and is a major contributor to the O and M component. The replacement costs for equipment (also heavily influenced by stack life) is generally a major contributor to O and M costs. In this project, they worked with the SECA industrial teams to estimate the impact of general manufacturing issues of interest on stack cost using an activities-based cost model for anode-supported planar SOFC stacks with metallic interconnects. An earlier model developed for NETL for anode supported planar SOFCs was enhanced by a linkage to a performance/thermal/mechanical model, by addition of Quality Control steps to the process flow with specific characterization methods, and by assessment of economies of scale. The 3-dimensional adiabatic performance model was used to calculate the average power density for the assumed geometry and operating conditions (i.e., inlet and exhaust temperatures, utilization, and fuel composition) based on publicly available polarizations curves. The SECA team provided guidance on what manufacturing and design issues should be assessed in this Phase I demonstration of cost modeling capabilities. They considered the impact of the following parameters on yield and cost: layer thickness (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) on cost and stress levels, statistical nature of ceramic material failure on yield, and Quality Control steps and strategies. In this demonstration of the capabilities of the linked model, only the active stack (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) and interconnect materials were included in the analysis. Factory costs are presented on an area and kilowatt basis to allow developers to extrapolate to their level of performance, stack design, materials, seal and system configurations, and internal corporate overheads and margin

  6. Mox pellet reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perolat, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    A first batch of MOX pellets certified in plutonium and uranium has been prepared and characterised in France to meet the needs of laboratories which are engaged upon destructive analysis for safeguards purposes especially in fuel fabrication plants. The pellets sintering has been obtained in a special fabrication to achieve an homogeneity better than 0.1%. The plutonium and uranium characterisation by chemical analysis has been carried out by two laboratories using at least two different methods. 1 fig., 5 refs

  7. Manufacture of the first fuel charge for the SUPER-PHENIX 1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajot, J.; Beche, M.; Heyraud, J.

    1988-01-01

    After summarizing same general points on the Super Phenix core, the performances of fuel essemblies, the remainder of this discussion will deal with the manufacture by the CFCa of the first charge of fuel assemblies. The following aspects are considered in sequence - contract - production facilities - manufacturing procedures finally a few assessments will be presented

  8. The logistics and the supply chain in the Juzbado Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The paper describe the logistics and the supply chain in the Juzbado Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant, located in Juzbado in the province of Salamanca. In the the article are described the principal elements in the supply chain and the difficulties of its management derived from the short period for the manufacturing of the nuclear fuel. It's also given a view in relation to the transportation by land sea of the nuclear components, uranium oxide powder and the manufactured fuel. The characteristics of the supply chain are determined by the plant production forecast, by the origin and high technology of the raw materials and by nuclear fuel delivery site locations. (Author)

  9. Pellet cladding interaction (PCI) fuel duty during normal operation of ASEA-ATOM BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaernild, O.; Olsson, S.

    1983-01-01

    Local power changes may under special conditions cause PCI fuel failures in a power reactor. By restricting the local power increase rate in certain situations it is possible to prevent PCI failures. Fine motion control rod drives, large operating range of the main recirculation pumps and an advanced burnable absorber design have minimized the impact of the PCI restrictions. With current ICFM schemes the power of an assembly is due to the burnup of the gadolinia gradually increasing during the first cycle of operation. After this the power is essentially decreasing monotonously during the remaining life of the assembly. Some assemblies are for short burnup intervals operated at very low power in control cells. The control rods in these cells may however be withdrawn without restrictions leading to energy production losses. Base load operation would in the normal case lead to very minor PCI loads on the fuel regardless of any PCI related operating restrictions. At the return to full power after a short shutdown or in connection with load follow operation, the xenon transient may cause PCI loads on the fuel. To avoid this a few hoursholdtime before going back to full power is recommended. (author)

  10. The fabrication of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amore, Mead

    1987-01-01

    The chronology of fuel product and core management development over the past 25 years in the USA is explained. Nuclear fuel for Westinghouse reactors is made by converting enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) into uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder. The powder is pressed into pellets which are loaded into zircalloy fuel tubes (typically over 14 million pellets in 50,952 rods). The fuel rods are arranged in fuel assemblies which are shipped to the reactor site (typically 193 fuel assemblies are needed for one 1000MWe reactor). Each stage of the fuel fabrication cycle (cladding manufacture, chemical conversion UF 6 - UO 2 , pellet production, fuel rod fabrication, grid assembly, skeleton assembly, fuel assembly) is described, with particular reference to the Westinghouse process and plant. (UK)

  11. The obtainment of highly concentrated uranium pellets for plate type (MTR) fuel by dispersion of uranium aluminides in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morando, R.A.; Raffaeli, H.A.; Balzaretti, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of the intermetallic UAl 3 for manufacturing plate type MTR fuel with 20% U 235 enriched uranium and a density of about 20 kg/m 3 is analyzed. The technique used is the dispersion of UAl 3 particles in aluminium powder. The obtainment of the UAl 3 intermetallic was performed by fusion in an induction furnace in an atmosphere of argon at a pressure of 0.7 BAR (400 mm) using an alumina melting pot. To make the aluminide powder and attain the wished granulometry a cutting and a rotating crusher were used. Aluminide powders of different granulometries and different pressures of compactation were analyzed. In each case the densities were measured. The compacts were colaminated with the 'Picture Frame' technique at temperatures of 490 and 0 deg C with excellent results from the manufacturing view point. (M.E.L.) [es

  12. The Development of Finite Element Model for Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Yoo, Jong-Sung; Kim, Hyeong-Koo; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Chong-Chul; Mitchell, D.; Aleshin, Y.

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies a FEA(Finite Element Analysis) model to describe PCMI under a power ramp and pressure loading conditions. From this PCMI model, the stress fields of pellet and cladding are evaluated. In order to compute the stress and strain fields in the cladding which were failed under the power ramp, this model might be extended to include the missing chip shape which occurred in the process of assembling or manufacturing of fuel rod. This missing chip of pellet has an affects on the temperature and the stress of the cladding in the vicinity of the chip edge so that the possibility of fuel failure is increased during the power ramp. The pellet fragmentation can be also accounted because the fuel cracking occurs immediately after reactor start-up and plays an important role in relaxing stresses in pellet but escalating the stress in cladding

  13. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing High Flux Isotope Reactor fuel elements - 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.W.; Morin, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The original fabrication procedures written in 1968 delineated the manufacturing procedures at that time. Since 1968, there have been a number of procedural changes. This rewrite of the fabrication procedures incorporates these changes. The entire fuel core of this reactor is made up of two fuel elements. Each element consists of one annular array of fuel plates. These annuli are identified as the inner and outer fuel elements, since one fits inside the other. The inner element consists of 171 identical fuel plates, and the outer element contains 369 identical fuel plates differing slightly from those in the inner element. Both sets of fuel plates contain U 3 O 8 powder as the fuel, dispersed in an aluminum powder matrix and clad with aluminum. Procedures for manufacturing and inspection of the fuel elements are described and illustrated

  14. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing High Flux Isotope Reactor fuel elements - 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, R.W.; Morin, R.A.

    1999-12-01

    The original fabrication procedures written in 1968 delineated the manufacturing procedures at that time. Since 1968, there have been a number of procedural changes. This rewrite of the fabrication procedures incorporates these changes. The entire fuel core of this reactor is made up of two fuel elements. Each element consists of one annular array of fuel plates. These annuli are identified as the inner and outer fuel elements, since one fits inside the other. The inner element consists of 171 identical fuel plates, and the outer element contains 369 identical fuel plates differing slightly from those in the inner element. Both sets of fuel plates contain U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder as the fuel, dispersed in an aluminum powder matrix and clad with aluminum. Procedures for manufacturing and inspection of the fuel elements are described and illustrated.

  15. Modelling of thermal mechanical behaviour of high burn-Up VVER fuel at power transients with special emphasis on the impact of fission gas induced swelling of fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, V.; Medvedev, A.; Khvostov, G.; Bogatyr, S.; Kuzetsov, V.; Korystin, L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the modelling of unsteady state mechanical and thermo-physical behaviour of high burn-up VVER fuel at a power ramp. The contribution of the processes related to the kinetics of fission gas to the consequences of pellet-clad mechanical interaction is analysed by the example of integral VVER-440 rod 9 from the R7 experimental series, with a pellet burn-up in the active part at around 60 MWd/kgU. This fuel rod incurred ramp testing with a ramp value ΔW 1 ∼ 250 W/cm in the MIR research reactor. The experimentally revealed residual deformation of the clad by 30-40 microns in the 'hottest' portion of the rod, reaching a maximum linear power of up to 430 W/cm, is numerically justified on the basis of accounting for the unsteady state swelling and additional degradation of fuel thermal conductivity due to temperature-induced formation and development of gaseous porosity within the grains and on the grain boundaries. The good prediction capability of the START-3 code, coupled with the advanced model of fission gas related processes, with regard to the important mechanical (residual deformation of clad, pellet-clad gap size, central hole filling), thermal physical (fission gas release) and micro-structural (profiles of intra-granular concentration of the retained fission gas and fuel porosity across a pellet) consequences of the R7 test is shown. (authors)

  16. Reduction of environmental pollution from fuel and target manufacturing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardt, H.A.

    1976-10-01

    Nuclear fuel and target manufacturing processes in the 300 Area generate potential environmental pollutants. Efforts to eliminate or reduce their harmful effects have been pursued for many years by the Raw Materials and Raw Materials Technology departments with assistance from other groups, primarily the Project and Health Physics departments. This report documents: methods adopted to reduce pollution; cost of these methods; amount of pollution reduction achieved; and other benefits in cost savings or quality improvement for January 1968 through December 1975. Capital funds totaling $915,000 were spent on these programs. Annual cost savings of $65,000 were realized, and incidental but significant improvements in product quality were obtained. In no case was product quality degraded. Reductions in releases of pollutants are summarized for water pollution, air pollution, and land pollution. In addition to these reductions, intangible benefits were realized including reduced corrosion of structures and equipment; improved working conditions for personnel; energy savings, both on and offplant; improved utilization of natural resources; and reduced impact to environment, both on and offplant

  17. Environmentally adapted energy production and working environment. Manufacture of wood pellets; Miljoeanpassad energiproduktion och arbetsmiljoe. Tillverkning av traepellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez de Davila, Eliana

    2002-04-01

    The working environment at three wood pellet production plants was studied. Measurements were made of dust, microorganisms (bacteria and molds) and terpenes. Both stationary and personal sampling equipment were used. Dust sources and dust diffusion were mapped. Work in the raw material storage rooms and at the semi-automatic sack-filling stations can give high exposure to wood dusts (max. 4.7 mg/m{sup 3}). These high levels might cause irritations in the respiratory tract. Relatively high levels of terpenes were detected in the plant that did not dry wood shavings or sawdust. Pressing of non-dried shavings probably leads to emission of terpenes and other gaseous substances in the plant. Recommendations for improvements of the working conditions are given in the report.

  18. Effect of technological parameters and microstructure on mechanical strength of UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, K.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of various peculiarities of tablet microstructure namely, sammury porosity (tablet density), grain size and pore distribution over sizes on technological parameters, is studied. It is shown that density decrease leads to a fast reduction of UO 2 tablet strength. The maximum effect on strength is produced by pore distribution over sizes, characterized by a median size, and not by the grain size, though a combined effect of those two factors is also observed. The important role of the technology of tablet production manifests itself in the fact that all operations bringing about the increase of pore or grain sizes leads to a reduction of strength. Such factors as powder origin, granule sizes, U 3 O 8 content and the amount of additions do not cause any considerable changes in the strength of tablets. Bend tests under conditions of biaxial loading should be considered as an ideal method of determining fuel tablets strength [ru

  19. Premium Fuel Production From Mining and Timber Waste Using Advanced Separation and Pelletizing Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honaker, R. Q.; Taulbee, D.; Parekh, B. K.; Tao, D.

    2005-12-05

    The Commonwealth of Kentucky is one of the leading states in the production of both coal and timber. As a result of mining and processing coal, an estimated 3 million tons of fine coal are disposed annually to waste-slurry impoundments with an additional 500 million tons stored at a number of disposal sites around the state due to past practices. Likewise, the Kentucky timber industry discards nearly 35,000 tons of sawdust on the production site due to unfavorable economics of transporting the material to industrial boilers for use as a fuel. With an average heating value of 6,700 Btu/lb, the monetary value of the energy disposed in the form of sawdust is approximately $490,000 annually. Since the two industries are typically in close proximity, one promising avenue is to selectively recover and dewater the fine-coal particles and then briquette them with sawdust to produce a high-value fuel. The benefits are i) a premium fuel product that is low in moisture and can be handled, transported, and utilized in existing infrastructure, thereby avoiding significant additional capital investment and ii) a reduction in the amount of fine-waste material produced by the two industries that must now be disposed at a significant financial and environmental price. As such, the goal of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of producing a premium fuel with a heating value greater than 10,000 Btu/lb from waste materials generated by the coal and timber industries. Laboratory and pilot-scale testing of the briquetting process indicated that the goal was successfully achieved. Low-ash briquettes containing 5% to 10% sawdust were produced with energy values that were well in excess of 12,000 Btu/lb. A major economic hurdle associated with commercially briquetting coal is binder cost. Approximately fifty binder formulations, both with and without lime, were subjected to an extensive laboratory evaluation to assess their relative technical and economical effectiveness as binding

  20. Effect of densification additive (Al (OH)3) and U3O8 recycle in sintering UO2-7wt% Gd2O3 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, L.R.; Riella, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear fuels are the consumable parts of nuclear reactors, and this has several consequences. From an economic point of view, it is important to keep the fuel into reactor for long time. In this context the use of burnable poison, as advanced fuel based in gadolinium oxide dispersed in a uranium oxide matrix, is a technological solution adopted worldwide. The function of the burnable poison fuels is to control the neutrons population in the nuclear reactors cores during its start up and the beginning of the fuel burning cycle to extending their use. In consequence of the use of this advanced fuel, the nuclear reactors can operate with higher rate of power, optimizing the use of the nuclear fuels. The objective of the present work is to show the development of UO 2 -7wt% Gd 2 O 3 burnable absorber containing pellets by using mechanical blending of (Al(OH) 3 ) densification additive and U 3 O 8 of the recycling of nuclear fuel scrap. In the procedures, the gadolinium content of 7 wt% was established as a consequence of the P and D Cooperation Programmer firmed by the CTMSP and the INB, looking for the nationalization of this type of nuclear fuel used in the Nuclear Facility of Angra 2. The experimental results permit to observe the effectiveness action of the compound Al(OH) 3 as a additive to promote the increasing in the densification of the (U-Gd)O 2 pellets during its sintering, when amounts of recycle are recycled to the production processing up to 10 wt%, and when 0,20 wt% of Al(OH) 3 is used as additive. (author)

  1. Screening lactic acid bacteria to manufacture two-stage fermented feed and pelleting to investigate the feeding effect on broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ruei Han; Hsieh, Chia Wen; Chen, Kuo Lung

    2018-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis var. natto N21 (BS) and different lactic acid bacteria were applied to produce two-stage fermented feeds. Broilers were fed these feeds to select the best fermented feed. The selected fermented feed was pelleted and investigated for its effects on growth performance, carcass traits, intestinal microflora, serum biochemical constituents, and apparent ileal nutrient digestibility. Trial 1 involved three hundred thirty-six 1-d-old broilers with equal numbers of each sex, randomly assigned into control, BS + Bacillus coagulans L12 (BBC), BS + Lactobacillus casei (BLC), BS + Lactobacillus acidophilus (BLA), BS + Lactobacillus acidophilus L15 (BLA15), BS + Lactobacillus delbruekckii (BLD), and BS + Lactobacillus reuteri P24 (BLR24) groups with 3 replicates per group. Trial 2 involved two hundred forty 1-d-old broilers with equal numbers of each sex, randomly assigned into control, BBC, and pelleted BS + Bacillus coagulans L12 fermented feed (PBBC) groups with 4 replicates per group. Trial 3 involved sixteen 21-d-old male broilers randomly assigned into control and PBBC groups with 4 replicates per group for a nutrient digestibility trial. The feed conversion ratio (FCR) in the BBC group was better than the control (P < 0.05), and the production efficiency factor (PEF) was the best. However, weight gain (WG), feed intake (FI), and PEF were the lowest in the BLD group (P < 0.05). The WG during 0 to 21 d and 0 to 35 d in the PBBC groups were higher than the control (P < 0.05). The relative weight of the proventriculus + gizzard in the BBC and PBBC groups were higher than the control (P < 0.05). The digestible amino acid content in the PBBC group increased significantly (P < 0.05). Bacillus coagulans L12 is the best lactic acid bacteria for second stage fermentation. PBBC improved broiler growth performance, which may be due to the higher digestible amino acid content, it has the potential to become a commercial feed. © The Author 2017. Published by

  2. A feasible approach to implement a commercial scale CANDU fuel manufacturing plant in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shehawy, I.; El-Sharaky, M.; Yasso, K.; Selim, I.; Graham, N.; Newington, D.

    1995-01-01

    Many planning scenarios have been examined to assess and evaluate the economic estimates for implementing a commercial scale CANDU fuel manufacturing plant in Egypt. The cost estimates indicated strong influence of the annual capital costs on total fuel manufacturing cost; this is particularly evident in a small initial plant where the proposed design output is only sufficient to supply reload fuel for a single CANDU-6 reactor. A modular approach is investigated as a possible way, to reduce the capital costs for a small initial fuel plant. In this approach the plant would do fuel assembly operations only and the remainder of a plant would be constructed and equipped in the stages when high production volumes can justify the capital expenses. Such approach seems economically feasible for implementing a small scale CANDU fuel manufacturing plant in developing countries such as Egypt and further improvement could be achieved over the years of operation. (author)

  3. Pelletizing properties of torrefied spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang Stelte; Craig Clemons; Jens K. Holm; Anand R. Sanadi; Jesper Ahrenfeldt; Lei Shang; Ulrik B. Henriksen

    2011-01-01

    Torrefaction is a thermo-chemical conversion process improving the handling, storage and combustion properties of wood. To save storage space and transportation costs, it can be compressed into fuel pellets of high physical and energetic density. The resulting pellets are relatively resistant to moisture uptake, microbiological decay and easy to comminute into small...

  4. The process qualification on the home-made manufacturing process of CE type fuel components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kee Nam; Suh, Jung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    In 1995, some structural components of CE type fuel assembly which had previously imported from ABB-CE, have been manufactured at home as test products in course of procedure qualification test on the manufacturing processes of the components. Holddown plate, flow plate and LEF are manufactured by casting process and holddown spring is manufactured by coiling process. Tensile test for the casted tensile specimen and structural load test for the test products of holddown plate and LEF and characteristic tests of holddown spring are performed to verify the integrity of those components under supervision of KAERI which are responsible for the mechanical design of fuel assembly. It is found that the test results meets the design requirements and that these components can be used for the manufacturing of fuel assemblies in the future project. 12 figs., 5 tabs., 15 refs. (Author) .new.

  5. How the user can influence particulate emissions from residential wood and pellet stoves: Emission factors for different fuels and burning conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fachinger, Friederike; Drewnick, Frank; Gieré, Reto; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    For a common household wood stove and a pellet stove we investigated the dependence of emission factors for various gaseous and particulate pollutants on burning phase, burning condition, and fuel. Ideal and non-ideal burning conditions (dried wood, under- and overload, small logs, logs with bark, excess air) were used. We tested 11 hardwood species (apple, ash, bangkirai, birch, beech, cherry, hickory, oak, olive, plum, sugar maple), 4 softwood species (Douglas fir, pine, spruce, spruce/fir), treated softwood, beech and oak wood briquettes, paper briquettes, brown coal, wood chips, and herbaceous species (miscanthus, Chinese silver grass) as fuel. Particle composition (black carbon, non-refractory, and some semi-refractory species) was measured continuously. Repeatability was shown to be better for the pellet stove than for the wood stove. It was shown that the user has a strong influence on wood stove emission behavior both by selection of the fuel and of the burning conditions: Combustion efficiency was found to be low at both very low and very high burn rates, and influenced particle properties such as particle number, mass, and organic content in a complex way. No marked differences were found for the emissions from different wood species. For non-woody fuels, much higher emission factors could be observed (up to five-fold increase). Strongest enhancement of emission factors was found for burning of small or dried logs (up to six-fold), and usage of excess air (two- to three-fold). Real world pellet stove emissions can be expected to be much closer to laboratory-derived emission factors than wood stove emissions, due to lower dependence on user operation.

  6. Fuel additive experts discuss successful strategy for meeting the specialized needs of fuel marketers and engine manufacturers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alder, K. [ed.; Ondercin, G.; Flavin, P.; Giunta, R.

    1996-01-01

    As the petroleum and original equipment manufacturers around the world struggle with tough new emissions regulations, they have come to rely more and more heavily on fuel and lubricant additives to enable them to meet and maintain top performance. At Lubrizol, the world`s largest additive supplier, an ongoing, three-way dialogue with refiners/oil and fuel marketers, and engine manufacturers continues to provide creative solutions to industry`s needs. Fuel Technology & Management (FTM) spoke recently with three key managers of Lubrizol`s fuel products segment about the marketplace and regulatory demands throughout the world. Greg Ondercin, worldwide segment manager; Paul Flavin, marketing manager; and Robert Giunta, North American commercial manager, are creating partnerships with fuel marketers around the would to meet their specialized needs and, as is so important today, add value for them.

  7. Freeze-casting as a Novel Manufacturing Process for Fast Reactor Fuels. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegst, Ulrike G.K. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States). Thayer School of Engineering; Allen, Todd [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-04-07

    Advanced burner reactors are designed to reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive isotopes that need to be disposed of as waste. The input feedstock for creating advanced fuel forms comes from either recycle of used light water reactor fuel or recycle of fuel from a fast burner reactor. Fuel for burner reactors requires novel fuel types based on new materials and designs that can achieve higher performance requirements (higher burn up, higher power, and greater margins to fuel melting) then yet achieved. One promising strategy to improved fuel performance is the manufacture of metal or ceramic scaffolds which are designed to allow for a well-defined placement of the fuel into the host, and this in a manner that permits greater control than that possible in the production of typical CERMET fuels.

  8. Nuclear fuel manufacture at PJSC NCCP. Technology development and quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, Yu.; Enin, A.; Kustov, L.; Mokshin, I.; Pluzhnikov, D.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the PJSC NCCP fuel performance results and measures for improvement of FA and component manufacturing technique. Also it is demonstrated the process capacities, starting from UF6 procurement, its processing, and actual production of finished fuel assemblies as well as FA mounting and modifications of TVSA design

  9. The design and performance of a twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector for Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbahn, J.A.

    1994-05-01

    A twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector has been designed, built and tested both in the laboratory and on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak at MIT. The injector functions by firing pellets of frozen hydrogen or deuterium deep into the plasma discharge for the purpose of fueling the plasma, modifying the density profile and increasing the global energy confinement time. The design goals of the injector are: (1) Operational flexibility, (2) High reliability, (3) Remote operation with minimal maintenance. These requirements have lead to a single stage, pipe gun design with twenty barrels. Pellets are formed by in- situ condensation of the fuel gas, thus avoiding moving parts at cryogenic temperatures. The injector is the first to dispense with the need for cryogenic fluids and instead uses a closed cycle refrigerator to cool the thermal system components. The twenty barrels of the injector produce pellets of four different size groups and allow for a high degree of flexibility in fueling experiments. Operation of the injector is under PLC control allowing for remote operation, interlocked safety features and automated pellet manufacturing. The injector has been extrusively tested and shown to produce pellets reliably with velocities up to 1400 m/sec. During the period from September to November of 1993, the injector was successfully used to fire pellets into over fifty plasma discharges. Experimental results include data on the pellet penetration into the plasma using an advanced pellet tracking diagnostic with improved time and spatial response. Data from the tracker indicates pellet penetrations were between 30 and 86 percent of the plasma minor radius

  10. Fuel injection nozzle and method of manufacturing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, James Christopher; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2017-02-21

    A fuel injection head for use in a fuel injection nozzle comprises a monolithic body portion comprising an upstream face, an opposite downstream face, and a peripheral wall extending therebetween. A plurality of pre-mix tubes are integrally formed with and extend axially through the body portion. Each of the pre-mix tubes comprises an inlet adjacent the upstream face, an outlet adjacent the downstream face, and a channel extending between the inlet and the outlet. Each pre-mix tube also includes at least one fuel injector that at least partially extends outward from an exterior surface of the pre-mix tube, wherein the fuel injector is integrally formed with the pre-mix tube and is configured to facilitate fuel flow between the body portion and the channel.

  11. Continuous improvement in manufacturing and inspection of fuel; Mejora continua en fabricacion e inspeccion de combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingon, A.; Ruiz, R.

    2015-07-01

    The manufacturing and inspection process of fuel assemblies in ENUSA is characterized by its robustness acquired over the last thirty years of experience in manufacturing. The reliability of these processes is based on a qualified processes and continuous improvement in the design and upgrading of equipment and optimization of software and manufacturing processes. Additionally, management and quality control systems have been improved in both software and measuring business objectives. this article emphasizes the improvements made over the past five years in management, production and inspection of fuel assemblies. (Author)

  12. CERCA's 25 years experience in U3Si2 fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, JP.; Duban, B.; Lavastre, Y.; Perthuis, S. de

    2003-01-01

    This paper documents the experience gained at CERCA in manufacturing, testing, and inspecting U 3 Si 2 fuel elements for various Material Test Reactors (MTR) since the beginning of the RERTR Program in 1978, up to now. It emphasises how the company controls the product to insure compliance with the fuel-related safety parameters. Finally, those statements are considered in the UMo fuel production perspective. (author)

  13. Bio-inspired solutions in design for manufacturing of micro fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omidvarnia, Farzaneh; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the application of biomimetic principles in design for micro manufacturing is investigated. A micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) for power generation in hearing aid devices is considered as the case study in which the bioinspired functions are replicated. The focus in design of μ......DMFC is mainly on solving the problem of fuel delivery to the anode in the fuel chamber. Two different biological phenomena are suggested, and based on them different bioinspired solutions are proposed and modeled in CAD software. Considering the manufacturing constraints and design specifications...

  14. Pelleting properties and pellet quality of apple pomace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maslovarić Marijana D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apple pomace (AP is the main by-product of apple juice production. It is a residue after pressing of apples for juice extraction. AP is an organic material, with high moisture and sugar content, therefore its direct disposal on landfills or land spreading causes serious environmental pollution. One of the solutions for further exploitation of AP could be its utilization as animal feed. However, fresh AP is quite perishable, and it must be preserved in order to be stored and used over a long period of time. The aim of this research was to investigate the possibility to transform AP to a stabile form which would be acceptable for feed manufacturers in terms of stability, storage and handling. For this purpose, pelleting process was used and pelleting properties of AP were evaluated. Before pelleting, dried AP was divided into three batches, which were conditioned only by water addition in order to achieve different moisture contents of the material: 10% of moisture for the first batch, 13% for the second batch and 16% for the third batch. According to the obtained values for Pellet Durability Index (PDI and pellet hardness, pellet quality for all examined AP batches was very high. Increased moisture content of AP led to the reduction in energy consumption of the pellet press, thus providing energy saving in the pelleting process. Pelleting process also caused strong increase of AP bulk density which is positive in terms of transportation and storage.

  15. Materials in Sweden for future production of fuel pellets. A review of possible materials in short- and medium long-term; Raavaror foer framtida tillverkning av braenslepellets i Sverige. En kartlaeggning av taenkbara alternativa raavaror paa kort och medellaang sikt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsson, Lars [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    The use of fuel pellets, mainly produced from sawdust and shavings from the Swedish sawmill industry, has increased during the 1990s among small-scale users such as private houses as well as large-scale users such as thermal power stations. During the last years this increase has continued for small-scale use. Due to a significant increase of the pellet prices the last couple of years the increase for the large-scale users seems to have stopped. It is reasonable to believe that these higher prices depend mostly on lack of raw materials for the fuel pellet production. The greater part of sawdust from Swedish saw mills is used in the pellet industry, the board industry or as an internal fuel. It is reasonable to assume a small increase of present raw material available for pellet production without a further decrease in the use for the board industry. Another sawmill by-product, dry chips, may increase in importance as a fuel pellet raw material and give a small contribution while the green chips should be for use in the pulp industry only. If the use of fuel pellets should increase there is a need for new raw materials. In the short-term, thinning material and cull tree could be alternatives that could give pellets with similar characteristics as present fuel pellets. For large-scale consumers with greater ability to handle problems concerning ash, such as sintering and fouling, as well as particle and gaseous emissions a further choice of raw materials could be possible, such as bark, peat and logging residues. In the longer term energy crops could be used as well as lignin, derived from energy effective pulp industry and from possible large-scale production of ethanol from woody biomass. Nearly all of the different raw materials studied in this review have higher amounts of substances not desirable in combustion such as potassium, chlorine and nitrogen. However, pelletizing gives an unique opportunity to mix different raw materials and possible additives in order

  16. Study of transverse crack formation on surface area of UO{sub 2} pellet circumference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Dionisia S.; Paneto, Lelia F.P.C.; Souza, Patricia O. de, E-mail: dionisia@inb.gov.br, E-mail: lelia@inb.gov.br, E-mail: patriciasouza@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Analise Tecnica do Combustivel Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Microstructure of a polycrystalline material has a considerable influence on particular properties, such as mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, optical transmission and magnetic susceptibility. The uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) is used in water-cooled nuclear reactors, due to its desirable ceramics characteristics as a nuclear fuel. The UO{sub 2} is used in the form of pellets manufactured by wet route by INB, where they are loaded into fuel rods to build the fuel assemblies used in pressurized water reactors of Angra 1, Angra 2 and future Angra 3 nuclear power plants, for electric energy generated from nuclear power in Brazil. The geometric and structural integrity of these pellets cause direct influence on their performance during the reactor core operating cycle, so pellets presenting surface cracks leading to the phenomenon of pellet cladding interaction-PCI, resulting in failures in the fuel rod and subsequently release of fission products in the reactor coolant. Transverse cracks on surface area of pellet circumference are detected by visual inspection during the manufacturing process. This paper presents the study of these cracks formation by content analysis conducted with the support of electron microscopy. These results here are analyzed from the point of view of materials science through observation of the microstructure, and the pressing process where the defect was probably generated. (author)

  17. Energy wood. Part 2b: Wood pellets and pellet space-heating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaumer, T.

    2002-01-01

    The paper gives an overview on pellet utilization including all relevant process steps: Potential and properties of saw dust as raw material, pellet production with drying and pelletizing, standardization of wood pellets, storage and handling of pellets, combustion of wood pellets in stoves and boilers and applications for residential heating. In comparison to other wood fuels, wood pellets show several advantages: Low water content and high heating value, high energy density, and homogeneous properties thus enabling stationary combustion conditions. However, quality control is needed to ensure constant properties of the pellets and to avoid the utilization of contaminated raw materials for the pellet production. Typical data of efficiencies and emissions of pellet stoves and boilers are given and a life cycle analysis (LCA) of wood pellets in comparison to log wood and wood chips is described. The LCA shows that wood pellets are advantageous thanks to relatively low emissions. Hence, the utilization of wood pellet is proposed as a complementary technology to the combustion of wood chips and log wood. Finally, typical fuel cost of wood pellets in Switzerland are given and compared with light fuel oil. (author)

  18. Production of zinc pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    1996-01-01

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries.

  19. Fire and blast safety manual for fuel element manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensinger, U.; Koehler, B.; Mester, W.; Riotte, H.G.; Sehrbrock, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    The manual aims to enable people involved in the planning, operation, supervision, licensing or appraisal of fuel element factories to make a quick and accurate assessment of blast safety. In Part A, technical plant principles are shown, and a summary lists the flammable materials and ignition sources to be found in fuel element factories, together with theoretical details of what happens during a fire or a blast. Part B comprises a list of possible fires and explosions in fuel element factories and ways of preventing them. Typical fire and explosion scenarios are analysed more closely on the basis of experiments. Part B also contains a list and an assessment of actual fires and explosions which have occurred in fuel element factories. Part C contains safety measures to protect against fire and explosion, in-built fire safety, fire safety in plant design, explosion protection and measures to protect people from radiation and other hazards when fighting fires. A distinction is drawn between UO 2 , MOX and HTR fuel elements. (orig./DG) [de

  20. Producing bio-pellets from sunflower oil cake for use as an energy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yuichi; Kato, Hitoshi; Kanai, Genta; Togashi, Tatsushi [National Agricultural Research Center (Japan)], E-mail: kobay@affrc.go.jp

    2008-07-01

    Pellet fuels were produced from ground sunflower oil cake using a pelletizer. The length, hardness, and powder characteristics of dried pellets depend on the initial water content of the oil cake. The appropriate values of water contents were 19.9 - 21.0% w.b. Oil cake pellets were found to contain 6.07% ash and 20.99 MJ/kg caloric value, which are within the standard range of wood pellets. Combustion experiments using a commercial pellet stove demonstrate that oil cake pellets burn as well as wood pellets. Oil cake pellets are useful as a fuel alternative to wood pellets. (author)

  1. Reclamation and reuse of LEU silicide fuel from manufacturing scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, G.R.; Pace, B.W.; Evans, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide an understanding of the organization which is the sole supplier of United States plate type research and test reactor fuel and LEU core conversions, a brief description of the structure and history is presented. Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) is a part of McDermott International, Inc. which is a large diversified corporation employing over 20,000 people primarily in engineering and construction for the off-shore oil and power generation industries throughout the world. B and W provides many energy related products requiring precision machining and high quality systems. This is accomplished by using state-of-the-art equipment, technology and highly skilled people. The RTRFE group within B and W has the ability to produce various complexly shaped fuel elements with a wide variety of fuels and enrichments. B and W RTRFE has fabricated over 200,000 plates since 1981 and gained the diversified experience necessary to satisfy many customer requirements. This accomplishment was possible with the support of McDermott International and all of its resources. B and W has always had a commitment to high quality and integrity. This is apparent by the success and longevity (125 years) of the company. A lower cost to convert cores to LEU provides direct support to RERTR and demonstrates Babcock and Wilcox's commitment to the program. As a supporter of RERTR reactor conversion from HEU to LEU, B and W has contributed a significant amount of R and D money to improve the silicide fuel process which ultimately lowers the LEU core costs. In the most recent R and D project, B and W is constructing a LEU silicide reclamation facility to re-use the unirradiated fuel scrap generated from the production process. Remanufacturing use of this fuel completes the fuel cycle and provides a contribution to LEU cores by reducing scrap inventory and handling costs, lowering initial purchase of fuel due to increasing the process yields, and lowering the replacement costs. This

  2. Development of base technology for high burnup PWR fuel improvement Volume 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yang Eun; Lee, Sang Hee; Bae, Seong Man [Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Research Center; Chung, Jin Gon; Chung, Sun Kyo; Kim, Sun Du [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Won; Chung, Sun Kyo; Kim, Sun Du [Korea Nuclear Fuel Development Inst., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-31

    Development of base technology for high burnup nuclear fuel -Development of UO{sub 2} pellet manufacturing technology -Improvement of fuel rod performance code -Improvement of plenum spring design -Study on the mechanical characteristics of fuel cladding -Organization of fuel failure mechanism Establishment of next stage R and D program (author). 226 refs., 100 figs.

  3. Comparative Properties of Bamboo and Rice Straw Pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianmiao Liu; Zhijia Liu; Benhua Fei; Zhiyong Cai; Zehui Jiang; Xing' e Liu

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo is a potential major bio-energy resource. Tests were carried out to compare and evaluate the property of bamboo and rice straw pellets, rice straw being the other main source of biomass solid fuel in China. All physical properties of untreated bamboo pellets (UBP), untreated rice straw pellets (URP), carbonized bamboo pellets (CBP), and carbonized rice straw...

  4. Non mechanical process for manufacturing containers - containers for irradiated fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerjean, J.

    1983-01-01

    These containers, for the transportation or storage of irradiated fuels, are formed of a central tube and an external ring which leave an annular space between them that is filled with a thermal binder appropriate to the conditions of use [fr

  5. Quality assurance and control in the manufacture of metalclad UO2 reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has carried out a programme since its earliest days that includes the collection and dissemination of information on nuclear fuels. Since the 1960 symposium on Fuel Element Fabrication with Special Emphasis on Cladding Materials there has been an average of one meeting a year reviewing some aspect of fuel fabrication technology. A recent meeting dealing with the fabrication of UO 2 fuels was the Study Group on the Facilities and Technology needed for Nuclear Fuel Manufacture, held in Grenoble in 1972 (Rep. IAEA-158). After that meeting it became apparent that the quality of fuel production was an important aspect that had received inadequate coverage so far, and the Panel on Quality Assurance and Control in Nuclear Fuel Manufacture was convened by the Agency in Vienna in November 1974. In the working papers and discussions at the Panel meeting the viewpoints of different countries and of various interested parties, such as manufacturers, reactor operators and government authorities, were presented

  6. Nuclear Fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakawa, Hiromasa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the stress gradient resulted in the fuel can in fuel rods adapted to control the axial power distribution by the combination of fuel pellets having different linear power densities. Constitution: In a fuel rod comprising a first fuel pellet of a relatively low linear power density and a second fuel pellet of a relatively high linear power density, the second fuel pellet is cut at its both end faces by an amount corresponding to the heat expansion of the pellet due to the difference in the linear power density to the adjacent first fuel pellet. Thus, the second fuel pellet takes a smaller space than the first fuel pellet in the fuel can. This can reduce the stress produced in the portion of the fuel can corresponding to the boundary between the adjacent fuel pellets. (Kawakami, Y.)

  7. Direct coal liquefaction: general characteristics and comparison with other methods of manufacturing synthetic fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legarreta, J.A.; Arias, P.L.; Cambra, J.F.; Gutierrez-Canas, C.

    1985-01-01

    Direct liquefaction has considerable advantages over other methods available for coal beneficiation by the manufacture of liquid fuels, namely: it requires a lower chemical reaction and is therefore a more efficient method which consumes less energy; it requires less stringent operating conditions which reduces equipment costs; synthetic liquid fuel is a much more concentrated form of energy than gas which makes it easier to store and transport; and liquefaction plants require less water and produce less liquid and gaseous effluents. 10 references.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-COST MANUFACTURING PROCESSES FOR PLANAR, MULTILAYER SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Harlan Anderson; Tim Armstrong; Michael Cobb; Kirby Meacham; James Stephan; Russell Bennett; Bob Remick; Chuck Sishtla; Scott Barnett; John Lannutti

    2004-06-12

    This report summarizes the results of a four-year project, entitled, ''Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'', jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the State of Ohio, and by project participants. The project was led by NexTech Materials, Ltd., with subcontracting support provided by University of Missouri-Rolla, Michael A. Cobb & Co., Advanced Materials Technologies, Inc., Edison Materials Technology Center, Gas Technology Institute, Northwestern University, and The Ohio State University. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, though not formally a subcontractor on the program, supported the effort with separate DOE funding. The objective of the program was to develop advanced manufacturing technologies for making solid oxide fuel cell components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. The program was carried out in three phases. In the Phase I effort, several manufacturing approaches were considered and subjected to detailed assessments of manufacturability and development risk. Estimated manufacturing costs for 5-kW stacks were in the range of $139/kW to $179/kW. The risk assessment identified a number of technical issues that would need to be considered during development. Phase II development work focused on development of planar solid oxide fuel cell elements, using a number of ceramic manufacturing methods, including tape casting, colloidal-spray deposition, screen printing, spin-coating, and sintering. Several processes were successfully established for fabrication of anode-supported, thin-film electrolyte cells, with performance levels at or near the state-of-the-art. The work in Phase III involved scale-up of cell manufacturing methods, development of non-destructive evaluation methods, and comprehensive electrical and electrochemical testing of solid oxide fuel cell materials and components.

  9. Design, Manufacturing and Irradiation Behaviour of Fast Reactor Fuel. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    Fast reactors are vital for ensuring the sustainability of nuclear energy in the long term. They offer vastly more efficient use of uranium resources and the ability to burn actinides, which are otherwise the long-lived component of high level nuclear waste. These reactors require development, qualification, testing and deployment of improved and innovative nuclear fuel and structural materials having very high radiation resistance, corrosion/erosion and other key operational properties. Several IAEA Member States have made efforts to advance the design and manufacture of technologies of fast reactor fuels, as well as to investigate their irradiation behaviour. Due to the acute shortage of fast neutron testing and post-irradiation examination facilities and the insufficient understanding of high dose radiation effects, there is a need for international exchange of knowledge and experience, generation of currently missing basic data, identification of relevant mechanisms of materials degradation and development of appropriate models. Considering the important role of nuclear fuels in fast reactor operation, the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (TWGFPT) proposed a Technical Meeting (TM) on 'Design, Manufacturing and Irradiation Behaviour of Fast Reactors Fuels', which was hosted by the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) in Obninsk, Russian Federation, from 30 May to 3 June 2011. The TM included a technical visit to the fuel production plant MSZ in Elektrostal. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum to share knowledge, practical experience and information on the improvement and innovation of fuels for fast reactors through scientific presentations and brainstorming discussions. The meeting brought together 34 specialists from national nuclear agencies, R and D and design institutes, fuel vendors and utilities from 10 countries. The presentations were structured into four sections: R and D Programmes on FR Fuel

  10. The continuous improvement in quality management for nuclear fuel manufacturing in CNNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoling

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear fuel plant has been keeping good records in quality. Only one pot failure has been found in the fuels loaded in the reactors at more than ten years. The paper describes quality management in nuclear fuel manufacturing and focuses on the continuous improvement on quality system and process by running the quality management system, process by quality control group, and data analyze, the requirements and the improvements for the quality system, the measurement system and the standardization system, the importance of clearance system. It also describes the future plans in quality management

  11. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction: Phase 2. Third semiannual report, January-June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1980-09-01

    Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to avoid the harmful effects of localized stress and reactive fission products during reactor service. Within the work scope of this program one of these concepts is to be selected for demonstration in a commercial power reactor. It was decided to demonstrate Zr-liner in 132 bundles which have liners of either crystal-bar zirconium or of low-oxygen sponge zirconium in the reload for Quad Cities Unit 2, Cycle 6. Irradiation testing or barrier fuel was continued, and the superior PCI resistance of Zr-liner fuel was further substantiated in the current report period. Furthermore, an irradiation experiment in which Zr-liner fuel, having a deliberately fabricated cladding perforation, was operated at a linear heat generation rate of 35 kW/m to a burnup of approx. 3 MWd/kg U showed no unusual signs of degradation compared with a similarly defected reference fuel rod. Four lead test assemblies of barrier fuel (two of Zr-liner and two of Cu-barrier), presently under irradiation in Quad Cities Unit 1, have achieved a burnup of 11 MWd/kg U

  12. A review on manufacturing technology for long-lived radionuclide fuel compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Doo Seong; Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Eung Ho; Chung, Won Myung; Lee, Kui Ill; Woo, Moon Sik; Kim, Yeon Ku; Yoo, Jae Hyung

    1998-03-01

    Thermal neutron reactor (LWR), fast neutron reactor (FBR), accelerator-driven subcritical system have been studied as the potential transmutation devices. The fuel types can be classified according to the concept of each reactor. Oxide fuel is considered in LWR and metal, oxide, and nitride fuels are studied in FBR. In accelerator-driven subcritical system molten salt, metal, and oxide fuels are considered. This review focused on characteristics according to transmutation system, and manufacturing technologies of each fuels. Accelerator-driven system is being proposed as the most reasonable concept in recent, since it has merits in terms of stability and free control of nuclides composition rate in charge of long-lived nuclides. Fluorides molten salt fuel is better chemically stable and corrosion resistant, and lower vapor pressure than chloride molten salt and metal in the fuel type of accelerator-driven system. And then the detail manufacturing technology of fluorides molten salt were reviewed. (author). 62 refs., 23 tabs., 37 figs

  13. Standard specification for sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This specification is for finished sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets for use in light-water reactors. It applies to gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets containing uranium of any 235U concentration and any concentration of gadolinium oxide. 1.2 This specification recognizes the presence of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle and consequently defines isotopic limits for gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets made from commercial grade UO2. Such commercial grade UO2 is defined so that, regarding fuel design and manufacture, the product is essentially equivalent to that made from unirradiated uranium. UO2 falling outside these limits cannot necessarily be regarded as equivalent and may thus need special provisions at the fuel fabrication plant or in the fuel design. 1.3 This specification does not include (1) provisions for preventing criticality accidents or (2) requirements for health and safety. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aw...

  14. Efficient catalytic processes for the manufacturing of high-quality transportation fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de

    1996-01-01

    Manufacturing of transportation fuels incorporates a number of generations of technology, viz. (1) refining processes to arrive at the desired product quality, (2) conversion processes to balance the feedstock supply with the product demand, (3) processes to steer product composition and (4)

  15. Utility view on QA/QC of WWER-440 fuel design and manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, P.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture the legislation implements in the Czech Republic, QA/QC system at CEZ, demonstration and development program (purchaser point of view), audit of QA/QC system for fuel design and manufacturing as well as QA/QC records are discussed

  16. Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pocoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2010-02-23

    Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's). Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, a thin coating of nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made, for example, of reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  17. Tritium pellet injector for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Cole, M.J.; Combs, S.K.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foust, C.R.; Langley, R.A.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Wilgen, J.B.; Schmidt, G.L.; Barnes, G.W.; Persing, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) phase. The existing TFTR deuterium pellet injector (DPI) has been modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed to provide pellets ranging from 3.3 to 4.5 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller. The new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed, and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellet. Results of the limited testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI is being installed on TFTR to support the D-D run period in 1992. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and secondary tritium containment systems and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability

  18. PEM fuel cell cost minimization using ``Design For Manufacture and Assembly`` techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomax, F.D. Jr.; James, B.D. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Mooradian, R.P. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells fueled with direct hydrogen have demonstrated substantial technical potential to replace Internal Combustion Engines (ICE`s) in light duty vehicles. Such a transition to a hydrogen economy offers the potential of substantial benefits from reduced criteria and greenhouse emissions as well as reduced foreign fuel dependence. Research conducted for the Ford Motor Co. under a US Department of Energy contract suggests that hydrogen fuel, when used in a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), can achieve a cost per vehicle mile less than or equal to the gasoline cost per mile when used in an ICE vehicle. However, fuel cost parity is not sufficient to ensure overall economic success: the PEM fuel cell power system itself must be of comparable cost to the ICE. To ascertain if low cost production of PEM fuel cells is feasible, a powerful set of mechanical engineering tools collectively referred to as Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) has been applied to several representative PEM fuel cell designs. The preliminary results of this work are encouraging, as presented.

  19. Method of manufacturing gadolinium oxide-incorporated nuclear fuel sintering products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komono, Akira; Seki, Makoto; Omori, Sadayuki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To manufacture nuclear fuel sintering products excellent in burning property and mechanical property. Constitution: In the manufacturing step for nuclear fuel sintering products, specific metal oxides are added for promoting the growth of crystal grains in the sintering. Those metal oxides melted at a temperature lower than the sintering temperature of a mixture of nuclear fuel oxide powder and oxide power, or those metal oxides causing eutectic reaction are used as the metal oxide. Particularly, those compounds having oxygen atom - metal atom ratio (O/M) of not less than 2 are preferably used. As such metal oxides usable herein transition metal oxides, e.g., Nb 2 O 5 , TiO 2 , MoO 3 and WO 3 are preferred, with Nb 2 O 3 and TiO 2 being preferred particularly. (Seki, T.)

  20. General description and production lines of the Egyptian fuel manufacturing pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, W.I.; Elseaidy, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Egyptian Fuel Manufacturing Pilot Plant, FMPP, is a new facility, producing an MTR-type fuel elements required for the Egyptian Second Research Reactor, ETRR-2, as well as other plates or elements for an external clients with the same type and enrichment percent or lower, (LEU). General description is presented. The production lines in FMPP, which begin from uranium hexaflouride (UF 6 , 19.7±0.2 % U 235 by wt), aluminum powder, and nuclear grade 6061 aluminium alloy in sheets, bars, and rods with the different heat treatments and dimensions as a raw materials, are processed through a series of the manufacturing, inspection, and quality control plan to produce the final specified MTR-type fuel elements. All these processes and the product control in each step are presented. The specifications of the final product are presented. (author)

  1. Manufacturing process of electrode catalyst layer for fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomoto, Hideyuki; Sakurai, Masahiro

    1988-10-17

    In order to make the electrochemical reaction of the fuel cell efficient, it is necessary that fine catalyst particles in the electrode catalyst layer and fine fluororesin particles are well dispersed and mixed uniformly and the three phase interface is big. In order to achieve this, there is a method to make an aggregate by applying a water soluble organic solvent to the dispersed system of these particles, but it has problems including a high danger of fire due to inflamation of the organic solvent. In view of this, this invention offers a method to remove the solvent of the dispersed system without using the aggregation method. In other words, this invention is composed of a process to disperse fine catalyst particles and fluororesin dispersion by adding them to the aqueous solution including a predetermined amount of interfacial active agent, a process to obtain the viscous mixed concentrate of fine catalyst particles and fine fluororesin particles by concentrating or drying the above dispersed system and then adding the water, a process to make the fine fluororesin particles fibrous and paste by kneading the above mixed concentrate, and a process to form electrode catalyst layers by rolling the above paste. 3 figures.

  2. Fish pelleting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    lion tonnes (Punch 2014). The increasing growth in .... CAS = critical stress (Pa) particulate density ..... Design and fabrication of fish meal pellet processing machine ... 59. T a b le 1. : W eig h t, efficien cy a n d d ry n ess o. f p ro cessed fish m ea. l p ellets. S a m p le. Tested. W eig h. t o f. In g red ien ts. (K g. ) W eig h. t o.

  3. Pelletizing properties of torrefied wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Nielsen, Niels Peter; Hansen, Hans Ove

    2013-01-01

    Combined torrefaction and pelletization are used to increase the fuel value of biomass by increasing its energy density and improving its handling and combustion properties. However, pelletization of torrefied biomass can be challenging and in this study the torrefaction and pelletizing properties...... of wheat straw have been analyzed. Laboratory equipment has been used to investigate the pelletizing properties of wheat straw torrefied at temperatures between 150 and 300 °C. IR spectroscopy and chemical analyses have shown that high torrefaction temperatures change the chemical properties of the wheat...... straw significantly, and the pelletizing analyses have shown that these changes correlate to changes in the pelletizing properties. Torrefaction increase the friction in the press channel and pellet strength and density decrease with an increase in torrefaction temperature....

  4. Onsite 40-kilowatt fuel cell power plant manufacturing and field test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    A joint Gas Research Institute and U.S. Department of Energy Program was initiated in 1982 to evaluate the use of fuel cell power systems for on-site energy service. Forty-six 40 kW fuel cell power plants were manufactured at the United Technologies Corporation facility in South Windsor, Connecticut, and are being delivered to host utilities and other program participants in the United States and Japan for field testing. The construction of the 46 fully-integrated power plants was completed in January 1985 within the constraints of the contract plan. The program has provided significant experience in the manufacture, acceptance testing, deployment, and support of on-site fuel cell systems. Initial field test results also show that these experimental power plants meet the performance and environmental requirements of a commercial specification. This Interim Report encompasses the design and manufacturing phases of the 40 kW Power Plant Manufacturing and Field Test program. The contract between UTC and NASA also provides UTC field engineering support to the host utilities, training programs and associated manuals for utility operating and maintenance personnel, spare parts support for a defined test period, and testing at UTC of a power plant made available from a preceding program phase. These activities are ongoing and will be reported subsequently.

  5. Fuel cycle cost, reactor physics and fuel manufacturing considerations for Erbia-bearing PWR fuel with > 5 wt% U-235 content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, F.; Lahoda, E. J.; Kucukboyaci, V. N. [Westinghouse Electric Co. LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The efforts to reduce fuel cycle cost have driven LWR fuel close to the licensed limit in fuel fissile content, 5.0 wt% U-235 enrichment, and the acceptable duty on current Zr-based cladding. An increase in the fuel enrichment beyond the 5 wt% limit, while certainly possible, entails costly investment in infrastructure and licensing. As a possible way to offset some of these costs, the addition of small amounts of Erbia to the UO{sub 2} powder with >5 wt% U-235 has been proposed, so that its initial reactivity is reduced to that of licensed fuel and most modifications to the existing facilities and equipment could be avoided. This paper discusses the potentialities of such a fuel on the US market from a vendor's perspective. An analysis of the in-core behavior and fuel cycle performance of a typical 4-loop PWR with 18 and 24-month operating cycles has been conducted, with the aim of quantifying the potential economic advantage and other operational benefits of this concept. Subsequently, the implications on fuel manufacturing and storage are discussed. While this concept has certainly good potential, a compelling case for its short-term introduction as PWR fuel for the US market could not be determined. (authors)

  6. TAPE CALENDERING MANUFACTURING PROCESS FOR MULTILAYER THIN-FILM SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Minh; Kurt Montgomery

    2004-10-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC during the Phases I and II under Contract DE-AC26-00NT40705 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Tape Calendering Manufacturing Process For Multilayer Thin-Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cells''. The main objective of this project was to develop the manufacturing process based on tape calendering for multilayer solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC's) using the unitized cell design concept and to demonstrate cell performance under specified operating conditions. Summarized in this report is the development and improvements to multilayer SOFC cells and the unitized cell design. Improvements to the multilayer SOFC cell were made in electrochemical performance, in both the anode and cathode, with cells demonstrating power densities of nearly 0.9 W/cm{sup 2} for 650 C operation and other cell configurations showing greater than 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 75% fuel utilization and 800 C. The unitized cell design was matured through design, analysis and development testing to a point that cell operation at greater than 70% fuel utilization was demonstrated at 800 C. The manufacturing process for both the multilayer cell and unitized cell design were assessed and refined, process maps were developed, forming approaches explored, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques examined.

  7. Experimental determination of nuclear reaction rates in 238U and 235U along of the radius of fuel pellets of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mura, Luis Felipe Liambos

    2015-01-01

    This research presents and consolidates an alternative methodology for determining nuclear reaction rates along the radial direction of the fuel pellets which does not require high neutron flux. This technique is based on irradiating a thin UO 2 disk inserted into a removable fuel rod at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor core. Several gamma spectrometry are performed after irradiation using a HPGe detector. Six lead collimators with different diameters are sequentially alternated during this process, thus, the nuclear radioactive capture which occurs in 238 U and the fissions which occur in both 235 U and 238 U are measured according to six different radial regions of the fuel disk. Geometric efficiency corrections due to the introduction of collimators in HPGe detection system are determined by MCNP-5 code. The fission rate measurements are performed using the 99 Mo. This radionuclide was studied and proved ideal for these measurements because it is formed in linear behavior in the reactor core, have a high yield fission and emits low-energy photons. Measurements were performed irradiating UO 2 disks (with 4.3% enrichment) in the central position of the IPEN/MB-01 core at 100 watts power level during one hour. Some measurements were performed using a cadmium glove wrapped in the fuel rod to determine the nuclear reaction rates in the epithermal energy range. The experimental results obtained are compared with nuclear reaction rate calculations by means of MCNP-5 with ENDF/B-VII.0 data library showing discrepancies of up to 9% in 238 U capture rates and 14% for U fission rates for epithermal energies. Uncertainties regarding the nuclear capture rates have maximum values of 4.5% and the fission rates has maximum values of 11.3%. (author)

  8. High performance fuel technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koon, Yang Hyun; Kim, Keon Sik; Park, Jeong Yong; Yang, Yong Sik; In, Wang Kee; Kim, Hyung Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    {omicron} Development of High Plasticity and Annular Pellet - Development of strong candidates of ultra high burn-up fuel pellets for a PCI remedy - Development of fabrication technology of annular fuel pellet {omicron} Development of High Performance Cladding Materials - Irradiation test of HANA claddings in Halden research reactor and the evaluation of the in-pile performance - Development of the final candidates for the next generation cladding materials. - Development of the manufacturing technology for the dual-cooled fuel cladding tubes. {omicron} Irradiated Fuel Performance Evaluation Technology Development - Development of performance analysis code system for the dual-cooled fuel - Development of fuel performance-proving technology {omicron} Feasibility Studies on Dual-Cooled Annular Fuel Core - Analysis on the property of a reactor core with dual-cooled fuel - Feasibility evaluation on the dual-cooled fuel core {omicron} Development of Design Technology for Dual-Cooled Fuel Structure - Definition of technical issues and invention of concept for dual-cooled fuel structure - Basic design and development of main structure components for dual- cooled fuel - Basic design of a dual-cooled fuel rod.

  9. Improvements in quality of as-manufactured fuels for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Tobita, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Kousaku; Kaneko, Mitsunobu; Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Yoshimuta, Shigeharu; Tomimoto, Hiroshi.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms of coating failure of the fuel particles for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors during coating and compaction processes of the fuel fabrication were studied to determine a way to reduce the defective particle fraction of the as-manufactured fuels. Through the observation of the defective particles, it was found that the coating failure during the coating process was mainly caused by the strong mechanical shocks to the particles given by violent particle fluidization in the coater and by unloading and loading of the particles. The coating failure during the compaction process was probably related to the direct contact with neighboring particles in the fuel compacts. The coating process was improved by optimizing the mode of the particle fluidization and by developing the process without unloading and loading of the particles at intermediate coating process. The compaction process was improved by optimizing the combination of the pressing temperature and the pressing speed of the overcoated particles. Through these modifications of the fabrication process, the quality of the as-manufactured fuel compacts was improved outstandingly. (author)

  10. Work carried out in France on the design, manufacture, handling and development of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.C.; Joly, G.; Gloaguen, A.; Delafosse, J.

    1977-01-01

    Although the ordinary water reactors to be found in France all belong to the PWR type, the fuel used covers a broad range: box assemblies with steel canning at the SENA plant, 15x15 at TIHANGE, 17x17 for 900 MW phases, slug and plate fuel developed by the Atomic Energy Commission and extra-long 17x17 for 1300 MW phases, also being developed. A description of what France is undertaking today with respect to: 1) design; 2) manufacture; 3) management; and 4) development of full assemblies is presented [fr

  11. Ultrasonic vibration-assisted (UV-A) pelleting of wheat straw: a constitutive model for pellet density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Meng; Pei, Z J; Wang, Donghai

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic vibration-assisted (UV-A) pelleting can increase cellulosic biomass density and reduce biomass handling and transportation costs in cellulosic biofuel manufacturing. Effects of input variables on pellet density in UV-A pelleting have been studied experimentally. However, there are no reports on modeling of pellet density in UV-A pelleting. Furthermore, in the literature, most reported density models in other pelleting methods of biomass are empirical. This paper presents a constitutive model to predict pellet density in UV-A pelleting. With the predictive model, relations between input variables (ultrasonic power and pelleting pressure) and pellet density are predicted. The predicted relations are compared with those determined experimentally in the literature. Model predictions agree well with reported experimental results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Considerations for the transition from fuel cell R ampersand D to manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    There are a growing number of contractors within the present fuel cell community who have the potential of becoming high volume manufacturers of fuel cell power plants or components. Many are transitioning from basic research operations to manufacturing for the first time. Moving a product from the R ampersand D stage to a viable commercial product depends upon many factors. Some companies are more successful at it than others. We believe there is an underlying transition process from invention to market that is much the same for large, well established firms, as it is for start-ups. How well the process is understood and executed often determines the winners and losers in product commercialization. This paper presents a viewpoint on considerations for transitioning a new technology into commercial production and discusses some affects on organizational development

  13. 18 years experience on UF{sub 6} handling at Japanese nuclear fuel manufacturer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujinaga, H.; Yamazaki, N.; Takebe, N. [Japan Nucelar Fuel Conversion Co., Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1991-12-31

    In the spring of 1991, a leading nuclear fuel manufacturing company in Japan, celebrated its 18th anniversary. Since 1973, the company has produced over 5000 metric ton of ceramic grade UO{sub 2} powder to supply to Japanese fabricators, without major accident/incident and especially with a successful safety record on UF{sub 6} handling. The company`s 18 years experience on nuclear fuel manufacturing reveals that key factors for the safe handling of UF{sub 6} are (1) installing adequate facilities, equipped with safety devices, (2) providing UF{sub 6} handling manuals and executing them strictly, and (3) repeating on and off the job training for operators. In this paper, equipment and the operation mode for UF{sub 6} processing at their facility are discussed.

  14. Use of alternative fuels in cement manufacture. Effect on clinker and cement characteristics and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puertas, F.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares industrial clinker and cement produced using conventional and alternative fuels (animal meal, tyres or a mixture of the two. The results show no relevant differences in terms of mineralogical composition between the clinker manufactured with alternative fuels and the product obtained using conventional fuel. Clinker produced with alternative fuels at any one factory have a very similar or even lower content in heavy metals than the product manufactured with conventional fuel in the same plant (with the sole exception of Zn when the alternative fuel used is shredded tyres. Mineralogical and morphological analyses reveal no significant differences between the two types of products that can be attributed to the type of fuel used in their manufacture. All six types of cement studied are compliant with the existing legislation as regards both physical and chemical properties. Cement compressive strength is found to be to legal standards regardless of the type of fuel used. Finally, the rheological properties of the cement paste are observed to be unaffected by the type of fuel.

    Se han estudiado clínkeres y cementos obtenidos en procesos industriales que han utilizado combustibles convencionales y combustibles alternativos (harinas cárnicas, neumáticos usados y mezclas de ambos. Los resultados obtenidos han demostrado que los clínkeres fabricados con los combustibles alternativos no presentan diferencias significativas en la composición mineralógica respecto a los obtenidos con combustibles convencionales. Los contenidos de metales pesados en los clínkeres procedentes de la misma fábrica (a excepción de los contenidos en Zn en aquéllos que utilizan neumáticos son muy similares o incluso inferiores a los fabricados con combustibles convencionales. Los análisis mineralógico y morfológico de los clínkeres no evidencian diferencias asignables al tipo de combustible utilizado. Todos los cementos estudiados cumplen

  15. The manufacture of MTR fuel elements and Mo99 production targets at Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium/aluminium alloy elements have been produced at Dounreay for nearly 40 years. In April 1990 the two DIDO-type reactors operated by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) at Harwell were closed, with the result that a large portion of the then current customer base disappeared and, to satisfy the needs of the evolving market, the decision was taken to invest over 1m pounds in new equipment for the manufacture of dispersed fuels and molybdenum production targets. (author)

  16. Manufacture of tube billets for fuel cans by vacuum centrifugal casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskij, V.F.; Neklyudov, I.M.; Chernyj, B.P.

    1989-01-01

    Vacuum device for induction melting with centrifugal casting in the ingot mold with rotation vertical or horisontal axis is presented. Removing and grinding of nonmetallic inclusions are realized by selection of casting conditions and of chemically active reducer, sound metal with high ductility is obtained. Data on micro- and macrostructure of casted tube billets made of 08Kh18N10T and 06Kh16H15M3B stainless steels, designed for manufacture of fuel cans are presented

  17. Quality assurance in the procurement, design and manufacture of nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides requirements and recommendations for quality assurance programmes that are relevant for the unique features of the procurement, design, manufacture, inspection, testing, packaging, shipping, storage, and receiving inspection of fuel assemblies for nuclear power plants. The generic quality assurance requirements of the Code and related Safety Guides are referred to where applicable, and are duplicated in this document where increased emphasis is desirable

  18. Study of radiation effects on zircaloy 4 microstructure (Impact on susceptibility to fuel pellet-cladding interaction in PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, F.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR the fast neutron flux is an important parameter for fuel can aging by modification of zircaloy-4 microstructure: amorphisation and dissolution of intermetallic precipitates. These phenomena are both analysed and their influence on fuel-cladding interaction is discussed. Irradiations by 1 MeV electrons, Ar ions, Kr ions and fast neutrons are realized for comparison of damages with different defect creation kinetics. Amorphisation is explained as the crystal amorphous state transformation allowing precipitate dissolution by creation of a chemical potential gradient between matrix and amorphous phase. Progressive dissolution of precipitates produced by irradiation decrease the number of potential sites for stress corrosion cracking, improving rupture resistance of the alloy by fuel-cladding interaction [fr

  19. Flexible manufacturing systems and their relevance in nuclear fuel fabrication in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakumar, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Fabrication of nuclear reactor fuel bundle involves several materials and a number of complicated technologies and the process of manufacture has to conform to stringent standards. The Indian Nuclear Programme relies heavily on indigeneous capability of manufacture of nuclear fuels as well as automation of the related facilities. Automation of the existing nuclear facilities is a challenge in view of the characteristic plant environments and process demands as well as the various mechanical and metallurgical steps involved. This paper discusses their requirements and the measures initiated for achieving a high order of automation in Indian nuclear facilities. As a first step, specific automation steps are being incorporated in the existing plants. Such interface automation will enhance productivity and avoid the need for building new totally automated palnts. Flexible manufacturing system as applied here, has a different connotation vis-a-vis conventional manufacturing industry. Robotic devices, even for stacking jobs, have not been used on a large scale the world over. (author). 6 figs

  20. Development and problems of pellet markets in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemestothy, K.P.; Rakos, C.

    2001-01-01

    Wood pellets became into Austrian markets in 1994. Up to then the Austrian industry had manufactured pellet fireplaces for export, but none was sold into Austria, because there were not pellets available in the Austrian markets. In spite of significant problems in the beginning and unfavourable economic conditions (decrease of oil prices) the pellet markets in Austria have increased since 1996 dynamically. Annual pellet deliveries have increased from 15 000 t/a to present 45 000 t/a. Customers and Austrian industry are interested in pellets and they believe in the future. The pellet manufacturing capacity increases continuously. In 1999 the capacity of 12 companies was 120 000 t. In 2003 the annual pellet consumption is estimated to over 100 000 tons and in 2010 about 200 000 tons. Main portion of the pellet manufactures in Austria is also used in the country by detached houses and small real estate houses. The pellet markets for large real estates are developing after the boiler manufacturers have started to produce pellet-fired equipment. The number of pellet-fired devices in 1997, sold to detached houses was 425, and in 2000 the number was 3500

  1. Effects of carbonization conditions on properties of bamboo pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijia Liu; Zehui Jiang; Zhiyong Cai; Benhua Fei; Yan Yu; Xing' e Liu

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo is a biomass material and has great potential as a bio-energy resource of the future in China. Bamboo pellets were successfully manufactured using a laboratory pellet mill in preliminary work. This study was therefore carried out to investigate the effect of carbonization conditions (temperature and time) on properties of bamboo pellets and to evaluate product...

  2. Modelling the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod; Etude de l'impact de la fissuration des combustibles nucleaires oxyde sur le comportement normal et incidentel des crayons combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfer, Th

    2006-03-15

    This thesis aims to model the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod. Fuel cracking has two main consequences. It relieves the stress in the pellet, upon which the majority of the mechanical and physico-chemical phenomena are dependent. It also leads to pellet fragmentation. Taking fuel cracking into account is therefore necessary to adequately predict the mechanical loading of the cladding during the course of an irradiation. The local approach to fracture was chosen to describe fuel pellet cracking. Practical considerations brought us to favour a quasi-static description of fuel cracking by means of a local damage models. These models describe the appearance of cracks by a local loss of rigidity of the material. Such a description leads to numerical difficulties, such as mesh dependency of the results and abrupt changes in the equilibrium state of the mechanical structure during unstable crack propagations. A particular attention was paid to these difficulties because they condition the use of such models in engineering studies. This work was performed within the framework of the ALCYONE fuel performance package developed at CEA/DEC/SESC which relies on the PLEIADES software platform. ALCYONE provides users with various approaches for modelling nuclear fuel behaviour, which differ in terms of the type geometry considered for the fuel rod. A specific model was developed and implemented to describe fuel cracking for each of these approaches. The 2D axisymmetric fuel rod model is the most innovative and was particularly studied. We show that it is able to assess, thanks to an appropriate description of fuel cracking, the main geometrical changes of the fuel rod occurring under normal and off-normal operating conditions. (author)

  3. Technology for manufacturing dispersion nuclear fuel at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durazzo, Michelangelo; Souza, Jose Antonio Batista de; Carvalho, Elita Fontenele Urano de; Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Riella, Humberto Gracher

    2011-01-01

    IPEN/CNEN-SP has been working for increasing radioisotope production in order to supply the expanding demand for radiopharmaceutical medicines requested by the Brazilian welfare. To reach this objective, the IPEN's IEA-R1 research reactor power capacity has been continuously increased starting from 2 MW aiming to reach 5 MW. In addition, another research reactor with power substantially greater than that of the IEA-R1 will be constructed in Brazil, the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB. Since 1988, IPEN has been manufacturing its own fuel element, initially based on U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion fuel plates with 2.3 g U/cm 3 . To support the reactor power increase and the new research reactor, higher uranium density into the fuel had to be achieved for better irradiation flux and also to minimize the irradiated fuel elements to be stored. Uranium silicide was the first chosen option. The U-Mo alloy is considered for future use. This paper describes the results of this program and the current status of silicide fuel fabrication and qualification, as well as the status of U Mo-Al dispersion fuel development. (author)

  4. Cost Study for Manufacturing of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weimar, Mark R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chick, Lawrence A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gotthold, David W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Whyatt, Greg A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems can be designed to produce electricity from fossil fuels at extremely high net efficiencies, approaching 70%. However, in order to penetrate commercial markets to an extent that significantly impacts world fuel consumption, their cost will need to be competitive with alternative generating systems, such as gas turbines. This report discusses a cost model developed at PNNL to estimate the manufacturing cost of SOFC power systems sized for ground-based distributed generation. The power system design was developed at PNNL in a study on the feasibility of using SOFC power systems on more electric aircraft to replace the main engine-mounted electrical generators [Whyatt and Chick, 2012]. We chose to study that design because the projected efficiency was high (70%) and the generating capacity was suitable for ground-based distributed generation (270 kW).

  5. A study using the MABEL-2C code of the effects of pellet and cladding asymmetries on PWR fuel rod deformation under conditions relevant to the NRU MT-3 ballooning experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haste, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    The presence of asymmetries in the positions of the fuel pellet stack with respect to the cladding, and of the rods with respect to each other, in PWR fuel bundles has a dominant effect in reducing the amount of strain and hence channel blockage under loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The relative importance of heat source asymmetry and thermal hydraulic effects has been investigated with the MABEL-2C code, using a transient appropriate to the MT-3 ballooning experiment. Calculations involving an initially offset pellet stack, with no relocation, predicted strains similar to the minimum observed (about 30%) - provided that the hot side of the cladding remained in contact with the pellets. Strains of over 60% were predicted if the cladding centre remained fixed relative to the pellet stack centre line. Intermediate strains could not be produced by varying the initial offset; however, if the eccentricity were assumed to be fixed during the transient, i.e. the ratio of minimum to maximum gap remained constant, the observed range of strains could be reproduced. All possible gap ratios (i.e. between 0 and 1) are required to be present

  6. Solid deuterium centrifuge pellet injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Pellet injectors are needed to fuel long pulse tokamak plasmas and other magnetic confinement devices. For this purpose, an apparatus has been developed that forms 1.3-mm-diam pellets of frozen deuterium at a rate of 40 pellets per second and accelerates them to a speed of 1 km/s. Pellets are formed by extruding a billet of solidified deuterium through a 1.3-mm-diam nozzle at a speed of 5 cm/s. The extruding deuterium is chopped with a razor knife, forming 1.3-mm right circular cylinders of solid deuterium. The pellets are accelerated by synchronously injecting them into a high speed rotating arbor containing a guide track, which carries them from a point near the center of rotation to the periphery. The pellets leave the wheel after 150 0 of rotation at double the tip speed. The centrifuge is formed in the shape of a centrifugal catenary and is constructed of high strength KEVLAR/epoxy composite. This arbon has been spin-tested to a tip speed of 1 km/s

  7. Complementary effects of torrefaction and co-pelletization: Energy consumption and characteristics of pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liang; Yuan, Xingzhong; Li, Hui; Li, Changzhu; Xiao, Zhihua; Jiang, Longbo; Huang, Binbin; Xiao, Zhihong; Chen, Xiaohong; Wang, Hou; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-06-01

    In this study, complementary of torrefaction and co-pelletization for biomass pellets production was investigated. Two kinds of biomass materials were torrefied and mixed with oil cake for co-pelletization. The energy consumption during pelletization and pellet characteristics including moisture absorption, pellet density, pellet strength and combustion characteristic, were evaluated. It was shown that torrefaction improved the characteristics of pellets with high heating values, low moisture absorption and well combustion characteristic. Furthermore, co-pelletization between torrefied biomass and cater bean cake can reduce several negative effects of torrefaction such as high energy consumption, low pellet density and strength. The optimal conditions for energy consumption and pellet strength were torrefied at 270°C and a blending with 15% castor bean cake for both biomass materials. The present study indicated that compelmentary performances of the torrefaction and co-pelletization with castor bean cake provide a promising alternative for fuel production from biomass and oil cake. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Development of the centrifugal pellet injector for JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizu, Kaname; Hiratsuka, Hajime; Ichige, Hisashi

    2001-03-01

    For core fueling of JT-60U plasmas, a repetitive pellet injector which centrifugally accelerates D 2 cubic pellets using a straight rod has been developed. This centrifugal pellet injector can eject trains of up to 40 cubic pellets at frequencies of 1-10 Hz and velocities of 0.3-1.0 km/s. The average pellet mass is 3.6x10 20 atoms/pellet below 0.7 m/s. Key techniques for the development were a mesh structured acceleration component for removing gas sublimated from the pellet and a funnel with an appropriate angle connected just behind the acceleration chamber for introducing the pellet to plasma without destruction. Using the mesh structured components, the horizontal angular distribution of pellets ejected became narrow, because irregular pellet motion caused by sublimated gas was reduced. To investigate the performance of the injector, pellet injection experiments from the low magnetic field side (LFS) were conducted using ohmic heating plasmas. Central fueling and enhanced fueling rate have been observed. Dα intensity around the divertor region was reduced in a pellet injection plasma compared to gas puffing, indicating low recycling rate was maintained with the pellet injection. (author)

  9. Pellet fuelling in Tore Supra long discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géraud, A.; Bucalossi, J.; Loarer, T.; Pégourié, B.; Grisolia, C.; Gros, G.; Gunn, J.

    2005-03-01

    A new pellet injector, able to inject continuously hydrogen or deuterium pellets, was installed on Tore Supra in 2003 and preliminary experiments aiming to fuel long discharges were performed. In combination with Lower Hybrid (LH) Current Drive, pure pellet fuelled discharges lasting up to 2 min were achieved. The LH power was switched off just before each pellet injection (LH notching) to maintain a relatively deep pellet penetration by reducing the energy of the super-thermal electrons driven by the LH wave. A comparison, based on a particle balance study, between two comparable pellet fuelled and gas fuelled discharges has been done. In the two cases, the volume average density is the same and the analysis shows that the particle source, the pumped flux and the wall retention are similar and appear to be independent of the fuelling method for the low plasma current and density conditions considered ( Ip = 0.6 MA, = 1.5 × 10 19 m -3).

  10. Methods of modification and investigations of properties of fuel UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurina, I.; Popov, V.; Rogov, S.; Dvoryashin, A.; Serebrennikova, O.

    2009-01-01

    In the SSC RF-IPPE the researches are carried out directed towards the uranium dioxide fuel pellets modification with the purpose of improvement of their performance parameters (increase of thermal conductivity, growth of grain for decrease gas release, decrease of interaction with coolant). The following technological methods of manufacturing of modified pellets UO 2 were used: 1) The water method including precipitation of Ammonium Polyuranate (APU) with manufacturing of simultaneously coarse and super dispersed particles, and also coprecipitation APU with additives (Cr, Ti, etc.), with the after calcination of powders, reduction to UO 2 pressing and sintering of pellets; 2) A method including addition of chemical reagent containing ammonia to the powder UO 2 manufactured under the dry or water technology; mechanical mixture; pressing and sintering of pellets. Application of the specified up methods makes manufacturing the UO 2 fuel pellets having the properties differing from pellets manufactured by industrial technology. Conclusions: 1) Properties of powders and the pellets manufactured by different technologies considerably differ; 2) Precipitate manufactured by water industrial technology, consists of phase NH 3 ·3UO 3 ·5H 2 O whereas the precipitate manufactured by nanotechnology contains in addition phase NH 3 ·2UO 3 ·3H 2 O; 3) Powders of U 3 O 8 manufactured by water nanotechnology have particles size 300-500 nm and ultra dispersive particles size ∼70-75 nm; 4) Powder UO 2 obtained by water nanotechnology differs by greater activity because all phase changes under oxidation result at lower temperatures; 5) Basic differences of properties of modified UO 2 pellets was established: decreasing of defects inside and on grains boundaries, minor porosity (pore size 0,05-0,5 μm), presence of pore of spherical form, presence of additional chemical bond U-U (presence of metal clusters), polyvalence of U; 6) Methods including addition of Cr and Ti under

  11. Large area quantitative X-ray mapping of (U,Pu)O2 nuclear fuel pellets using wavelength dispersive electron probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremier, S.; Haas, D.; Somers, J.; Walker, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    The work presented is an example of how large area compositional mapping (≥1 mm 2 ) can be used to provide quantitative information on element distribution and specimen homogeneity. High-resolution was accomplished by producing a collage of X-ray maps acquired using classical conditions; magnification x400, spatial resolution 256x256 pixels. The individual images, each measuring roughly 250x250 μm, were converted to quantitative maps using the HIMAX reg software package and the XMAS reg matrix correction from SAMx. The quantitative gray-level large area X-ray picture was pieced together using the 'Multiple Image Alignment' function of the ANALYSIS reg image processing software. This software was also used to convert the gray-level pictures to false color images. The specimens investigated were transverse sections of MOX fuel pellets. Results are presented for the distribution of Pu by area fraction and cumulative area fraction, the size distribution of regions of high Pu concentration and average separation of these regions

  12. Parameter study for manufacturing an inner and outer cladding tube used in dual-cooled annular fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Il-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Park, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Man-Su

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dual-cooled annular fuel demands two claddings for inner and outer sides. ► Cladding performance has to similar between inner and outer cladding. ► Detailed manufacturing parameter to control the performance in both claddings was suggested. - Abstract: The design concept of dual-cooled annular fuel is focused on an advanced cooling geometry by applying inner and outer coolant channels in the fuel rod to increase power plant economy. Since dual-cooled annular fuel is contacted with the coolant in both inner and outer sides, two cladding tubes are needed for the inner and outer sides in the fuel, compared to a solid fuel. Thus, the properties in both the inner and outer claddings will be considered to meet the criteria of a dual-cooled annular fuel design. Regarding the design factor affecting fuel integrity and safety, the balance of creep deformation and irradiation growth between inner and outer claddings is a very important design factor. The microstructural factors such as recrystallization fraction and texture development must be coordinated to control the creep deformation and irradiation growth of zirconium alloy as a fuel cladding by controlling the manufacturing parameters. In order to setup the manufacturing parameters of the inner and outer claddings used for dual-cooled fuel, various samples are manufactured and tested. The manufacturing parameters contain the Q-value and annealing conditions, and the test items consist of a mechanical test, texture analysis, and corrosion test to evaluate the performance of the manufacturing processes. From this, the essential element factors to separately control the performance of the inner and outer claddings can be suggested.

  13. Temperature distribution on fuel rods: a study on the effect of eccentricity in the position of UO2 pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar Junior, Joao Carlos Aguiar

    2010-01-01

    This work proposes the development of a method of solving equations of heat transfer applied in fuel rods using the finite element method, in order to evaluate the performance and safety of the nuclear system. Was prepared in a Fortran program to evaluate the equations governing the problem, the boundary conditions and apply the properties of materials on a steady state. This program uses the mesh generation input and graphical output generated by the program GID. The method was validated against the analytical solution found in the book Todreas and Kazimi with error less than 0.2% and with respect to the improved analytical solution of Nijsing for axisymmetry rod and eccentricity rod with error less than a 3.6%. Applications have been developed with the use of correlations for properties with the temperature dependence of resolution axisymmetry rod and the resolution of a rod with eccentricity. The method developed, should it be implemented, would allow the assessment of fuel rods in the given situations and other scenarios, as well as adding a tool of substantial value in the analysis of rods. (author)

  14. Optical device and process for automatic classification of nuclear fuel pellets; Procede et dispositif optiques de classification automatique de pastilles cylindriques de combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardin, M.; Bouvet, P.; Wache, C.

    1994-07-01

    The pellets are turned about their axes and a flat beam is focused onto a generator line of the cylinder. The uniformly reflected light, along an extended zone, of a perfect pellet is received. Surface defects are determined by the variation of reflected light and size or nature of any fault can be determined. 7 figs.

  15. The Design and Performance of a Twenty Barrel Hydrogen Pellet Injector for Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbahn, John A.

    A twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector has been designed, built and tested both in the laboratory and on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak at MIT. The injector functions by firing pellets of frozen hydrogen or deuterium deep into the plasma discharge for the purpose of fueling the plasma, modifying the density profile and increasing the global energy confinement time. The design goals of the injector are: (1) Operational flexibility, (2) High reliability, (3) Remote operation with minimal maintenance. These requirements have led to a single stage, pipe gun design with twenty barrels. Pellets are formed by in-situ condensation of the fuel gas, thus avoiding moving parts at cryogenic temperatures. The injector is the first to dispense with the need for cryogenic fluids and instead uses a closed cycle refrigerator to cool the thermal system components. The twenty barrels of the injector produce pellets of four different size groups and allow for a high degree of flexibility in fueling experiments. Operation of the injector is under PLC control allowing for remote operation, interlocked safety features and automated pellet manufacturing. The injector has been extensively tested and shown to produce pellets reliably with velocities up to 1400 m/sec. During the period from September to November of 1993, the injector was successfully used to fire pellets into over fifty plasma discharges. Experimental results include data on the pellet penetration into the plasma using an advanced pellet tracking diagnostic with improved time and spatial response. Data from the tracker indicates pellet penetrations were between 30 and 86 percent of the plasma minor radius. Line averaged density increases of up to 300 percent were recorded with peak densities of just under 1 times 10^ {21} / m^3, the highest achieved on C-Mod to date. A comparison is made between the ablation source function derived from tracker data with that predicted by four different variations of the neutral shield model

  16. The development of a commercial MOX fuel manufacturing capability in the U.K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macphee, D.S.; Young, M.P.

    1995-01-01

    BNFL is implementing a strategy to establish a commercial MOX manufacturing capability within the UK. The design and provision of the fabrication plants is incorporating the considerable experience within the Company of MOX technology, fuel fabrication and nuclear plant design. The first phase of the strategy is complete with the successful operation of the Demonstration Facility. The development programmes supporting the increased scale of operation for a commercial scale facility are substantially complete. Design and construction of a 120t HM/year plant is well advanced supported by a substantial in-house design and project management team. (author)

  17. Hot Isostatic Press Manufacturing Process Development for Fabrication of RERTR Monolithic Fuel Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crapps, Justin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clarke, Kester D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Katz, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexander, David J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aikin, Beverly [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vargas, Victor D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montalvo, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dombrowski, David E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mihaila, Bogdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-06

    We use experimentation and finite element modeling to study a Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) manufacturing process for U-10Mo Monolithic Fuel Plates. Finite element simulations are used to identify the material properties affecting the process and improve the process geometry. Accounting for the high temperature material properties and plasticity is important to obtain qualitative agreement between model and experimental results. The model allows us to improve the process geometry and provide guidance on selection of material and finish conditions for the process strongbacks. We conclude that the HIP can must be fully filled to provide uniform normal stress across the bonding interface.

  18. Control of criticality risk in the manufacture of fuel elements for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedenthal, M.; Cardenas Yucra, H.R.; Marajofsky, A.; La Gamma de Batistoni, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The control of criticality risk in a chemical plant adopts different forms according to the quantities of fissile material and the type of compounds used. This work presents the treatment of the critical excursion risk adopted in production plants of U 3 O 8 and manufacturing plants of fuel elements for research reactors, located in Constituyentes Atomic Center. The possible events and accidents related to the fissile material control are analyzed, and the systems of administrative control and intrinsic safety through engineering are described. (Author)

  19. Casting technology for manufacturing metal rods from simulated metallic spent fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeand, Y. S.; Lee, D. B.; Kim, C. K.; Shin, Y. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2000-09-01

    A uranium metal rod 13.5 mm in diameter and 1,150 mm long was produced from simulated metallic spent fuels with advanced casting equipment using the directional-solidification method. A vacuum casting furnace equipped with a four-zone heater to prevent surface oxidation and the formation of surface shrinkage holes was designed. By controlling the axial temperature gradient of the casting furnace, deformation by the surface shrinkage phenomena was diminished, and a sound rod was manufactured. The cooling behavior of the molten uranium was analyzed using the computer software package MAGMAsoft.

  20. Safety aspects of the FMPP (Fuel Manufacturing Pilot Plant) setup constructed by INVAP in the Arabic Republic of Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinat, Enrique; Boero, Norma L.

    1999-01-01

    The FMPP is a fuel plates manufacturing plant for test reactors. This facility was designed, constructed in El Cairo and turned-key handled by INVAP SE to the Arabian Republic of Egypt. In this project, CNEA participated in the transference of technology, elaboration of documents, training of Egyptian personnel and technical services during the setup of the facility in El Cairo. These tasks were undertaken by UPMP (Uranium Powder Manufacturing Plant) and ECRI (Research Reactors Fuel Elements Plant) personnel. Both plants in CNEA served as a FMPP design basis. During the setup of the facility a fuel element with natural uranium was firstly manufactured and then another one using uranium with 20% enrichment. In this paper the responses of the system regarding safety, after finishing the first two stages of manufacturing, are analyzed and evaluated. (author)

  1. Manufacture of hypoeutectic Al-Si metal powders for dispersion matriz in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffaeli, H A; Harri, S; Acosta, M; Castillo Guerra, R; Rossi, G; Fabro, J O; Rubiolo, G H

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of the development of low enriched nuclear fuels for research reactors, U.Mo/Al is the most promising option that has however to be optimized. Indeed at the U.Mo/Al interfaces between U.Mo particles and the Al matrix, an interaction layer grows under irradiation inducing an unacceptable fuel swelling. Adding silicon in limited content into the Al matrix has clearly improved the in-pile fuel behaviour. This breakthrough is attributed to an U.Mo/Al.Si protective layer around U.Mo particles appeared during fuel manufacturing. The present work deals with three techniques applied to produce metal powders of hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys: ball milling, centrifugal atomization and gas atomization. Size and microstructure of the particles are analyzed in the three techniques. The best result is found with the gas atomization system, flakes and rods morphology predominates in the produced powders, with particle sizes below 150 microns and the greater mass population (65%) is between 150 and 125 microns. The particle surface is smooth and the high solidification rate provides a good distribution of the α-Al primary and eutectic phase within each particle (author)

  2. Effect of densification additive (Al (OH){sub 3}) and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} recycle in sintering UO{sub 2}-7wt% Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuel pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, L.R. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: lauro@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, e-mail: lrsantos@ipen.br; Riella, H.G. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica e Alimentos], e-mail: riella@enq.ufsc.br

    2009-07-01

    The nuclear fuels are the consumable parts of nuclear reactors, and this has several consequences. From an economic point of view, it is important to keep the fuel into reactor for long time. In this context the use of burnable poison, as advanced fuel based in gadolinium oxide dispersed in a uranium oxide matrix, is a technological solution adopted worldwide. The function of the burnable poison fuels is to control the neutrons population in the nuclear reactors cores during its start up and the beginning of the fuel burning cycle to extending their use. In consequence of the use of this advanced fuel, the nuclear reactors can operate with higher rate of power, optimizing the use of the nuclear fuels. The objective of the present work is to show the development of UO{sub 2}-7wt% Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} burnable absorber containing pellets by using mechanical blending of (Al(OH){sub 3}) densification additive and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} of the recycling of nuclear fuel scrap. In the procedures, the gadolinium content of 7 wt% was established as a consequence of the P and D Cooperation Programmer firmed by the CTMSP and the INB, looking for the nationalization of this type of nuclear fuel used in the Nuclear Facility of Angra 2. The experimental results permit to observe the effectiveness action of the compound Al(OH){sub 3} as a additive to promote the increasing in the densification of the (U-Gd)O{sub 2} pellets during its sintering, when amounts of recycle are recycled to the production processing up to 10 wt%, and when 0,20 wt% of Al(OH){sub 3} is used as additive. (author)

  3. Pellet injectors for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andelfinger, C.; Buechl, K.; Lang, R.S.; Schilling, H.B.; Ulrich, M.

    1981-09-01

    Pellet injection for the purpose of refuelling and diagnostic of fusion experiments is considered for the parameters of JET. The feasibility of injectors for single pellets and for quasistationary refuelling is discussed. Model calculations on pellet ablation with JET parameters show the required pellet velocity ( 3 ). For single pellet injection a light gas gun, for refuelling a centrifuge accelerator is proposed. For the latter the mechanical stress problems are discussed. Control and data acquisition systems are outlined. (orig.)

  4. Preliminary pellet injection experiment in the Gamma 10 tandem mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Tamano, Teruo; Nakashima, Yousuke; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Shinji; Cho, Teruji; Ishii, Kameo; Yatsu, Kiyoshi [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Mase, Atsushi [Advanced Sceince and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    In the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror, pellet injection experiments have been started as a solution for the density limit problem. This is the first pellet injection experiment in open systems. We describe the possibilities of confinement of pellet fueled particles. For that, we measure the number of end loss particles and compare them with pellet fueled ones in various conditions of confining potentials. The deterioration of confining potential with the pellet injection is a fundamental issue. The results show that the ion confining potential recover faster than central electron temperature due to thermal barrier. We also consider the operating space for fueling method. It is demonstrated that the operating space for pellet injection exceeds gas fueled one on hot ion mode plasmas. (author)

  5. Simulations of JET pellet fuelled ITB plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzotti, L.; Garbet, X.; Thyagaraja, A.; de Baar, M. R.; Frigione, D.; Mantica, P.; Parail, V.; Pégourié, B.; Zabeo, L.; EFDA contributors, JET

    2006-01-01

    Experiments were performed on JET where high-density plasmas with an internal transport barrier (ITB) were created by means of combined use of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and pellet injection before the barrier formation. Attempts were also made to use pellets to fuel the plasma and to sustain the density during the ITB phase. It was found that shallow pellets ablating in the region r/a >= 0.8 and far from the foot of the barrier did not destroy the ITB, whereas deeper pellets penetrating up to 0.6 CUTIE, a global electromagnetic fluid turbulence code. The results show that for the shallow pellet case all codes reproduce the general features of the experiment, whereas for the deep pellet case, there are differences in the degree of agreement between the different codes and the experiment. Runs performed varying the pellet penetration depth indicate that not only the pellet penetration, but also the barrier strength plays a key role in the dynamics of the pellet-ITB interaction.

  6. Measurement of nuclear reaction rates and spectral indices along the radius of fuel pellets from IPEN/MB-01 reactor; Medidas de taxas de reacao nuclear e de indices espectrais ao longo do raio das pastilhas combustiveis do reator IPEN/MB-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mura, Luis Felipe Liambos

    2010-07-01

    This work presents the measurements of the nuclear reaction rates along the radial direction of the fuel pellet by irradiation and posterior gamma spectrometry of a thin slice of fuel pellet of UO{sub 2} with 4,3% enrichment. From its irradiation the rate of radioactive capture and fission have been measured as a function of the radius of the pellet disk using a HPGe detector. Lead collimators has been used for this purpose. Simulating the fuel pellet in the pin fuel of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, a thin UO{sub 2} disk is used. This disk is inserted in the interior of a dismountable fuel rod. This fuel rod is then placed in the central position of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor core and irradiated during 1 hour under a neutron flux of around 9 x 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}s. For gamma spectrometry 10 collimators with different diameters have been used, consequently, the nuclear reactions of radioactive capture that occurs in atoms of {sup 238}U and fissions that occur on both {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U are measured in function of 10 different region (diameter of collimator) of the fuel pellet disk. Corrections in the geometric efficiency due to introduction of collimators on HPGe detection system were estimated using photon transport of MCNP-4C code. Some calculated values of nuclear reaction rate of radioactive capture and fission along of the radial direction of the fuel pellet obtained by Monte Carlo methodology, using the MCNP-4C code, are presented and compared to the experimental data showing very good agreement. Besides nuclear reaction rates, the spectral indices {sup 28{rho}} and {sup 25{delta}} have been obtained at each different radius of the fuel pellet disk. (author)

  7. Evaluating the manufacturability and combustion behaviors of sludge-derived fuel briquettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Ing-Jia; Wu, I-Tsung

    2014-10-01

    Based on the physical and chemical properties as well as calorific values of pulp sludge and textile sludge, this study investigates the differences between manufacturability, relationship between extrusion pressure and formability, as well as stability and combustion behaviors of extruded sludge-derived fuel briquettes (ESBB) and cemented sludge-derived fuel blocks (CSBB). The optimum proportion and relevant usage ESBB policies are proposed as well. Experimental results indicate that a large amount of water can be saved during the ESBB manufacturing process. Additionally, energy consumption decreases during the drying process. ESBB also has a more compact structure than that of CSBB, and its mean penetration loading is approximately 18.7 times higher as well. Moreover, the flame temperature of ESBB (624-968°C) is significantly higher than that of CSBB (393-517°C). Also, the dry bulk density and moisture regain of ESBB is significantly related to the penetration loading. Furthermore, the optimum mix proportion of ESBB is co-determined by the formability of pulp sludge and the calorific values of textile sludge. While considering the specific conditions (including formability, stability and calorific values), the recommended mix proportion for ESBB is PS50TS50. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Techno-Economic Basis for Coproduct Manufacturing To Enable Hydrocarbon Fuel Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Humbird, David; Tao, Ling; Dowe, Nancy; Guarnieri, Michael T.; Linger, Jeffrey G.; Karp, Eric M.; Salvachua, Davinia; Vardon, Derek R.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-06-06

    coproducts, recovery and purification of fuels and coproducts, and coproduct selection and price. Overall, this analysis documents potential economics for both a hydrocarbon fuel and bioproduct process pathway and highlights prioritized research directions beyond the current benchmark to enable hydrocarbon fuel production via an oleaginous microbial platform with simultaneous coproduct manufacturing from lignocellulosic biomass.

  9. Development of high burnup nuclear fuel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, Ho Chun; Kang, Young Hwan; Jung, Jin Gone; Hwang, Won; Park, Zoo Hwan; Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, Bong Goo; Kim, Il Gone

    1987-04-01

    The objectives of the project are mainly to develope both design and manufacturing technologies for 600 MWe-CANDU-PHWR-type high burnup nuclear fuel, and secondly to build up the foundation of PWR high burnup nuclear fuel technology on the basis of KAERI technology localized upon the standard 600 MWe-CANDU- PHWR nuclear fuel. So, as in the first stage, the goal of the program in the last one year was set up mainly to establish the concept of the nuclear fuel pellet design and manufacturing. The economic incentives for high burnup nuclear fuel technology development are improvement of fuel utilization, backend costs plant operation, etc. Forming the most important incentives of fuel cycle costs reduction and improvement of power operation, etc., the development of high burnup nuclear fuel technology and also the research on the incore fuel management and safety and technologies are necessary in this country

  10. The pellet handbook: the production and thermal utilisation of pellets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Obernberger, Ingwald; Thek, Gerold

    2010-01-01

    ...: - International overview of standards for pellets - Evaluation of raw materials and raw material potentials - Quality and properties of pellets - Technical evaluation of the pellet production process...

  11. Integration of process-oriented control with systematic inspection in FRAMATOME-FBFC fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopff, G.

    2000-01-01

    The classical approach to quality control is essentially based on final inspection of the product conducted through a qualified process. The main drawback of this approach lies in the separation and , therefore, in the low feedback between manufacturing and quality control, leading to a very static quality system. As a remedy, the modern approach to quality management focuses on the need for continuous improvement through process-oriented quality control. In the classical approach, high reliability of nuclear fuel and high quality level of the main characteristics are assumed to be attained, at the manufacturing step, through 100% inspection of the product, generally with automated inspection equipment. Such a 100% final inspection is not appropriate to obtain a homogeneous product with minimum variability, and cannot be a substitute for the SPC tools (Statistical Process Control) which are rightly designed with this aim. On the other hand, SPC methods, which detect process changes and are used to keep the process u nder control , leading to the optimal distribution of the quality characteristics, do not protect against non systematic or local disturbances, at low frequency. Only systematic control is capable of detecting local quality troubles. In fact, both approaches, SPC and systematic inspection, are complementary , because they are remedies for distinct causes of process and product changes. The term 'statistical' in the expression 'SPC' refers less to the sampling techniques than to the control of global distribution parameters of product or process variables (generally location and dispersion parameters). The successive integration levels of process control methods with systematic inspection are described and illustrated by examples from FRAMATOME-FBFC fuel manufacturing, from the simple control chart for checking the performance stability of automated inspection equipment to the global process control system including systematic inspection. This kind of

  12. Improvements by employee motivation in the manufacture of nuclear fuel assemblies for LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osseforth, E.; Engel, H.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear fuel assemblies are manufactured on a very high technical level and automation. However there is still a need for more improvement. One of the most important ways is employees motivation, because improvements lives of the ideas, impulses, initiatives and commitments of its employees. It can be realized by the employee himself or a group. Three ways of improvement by employees are mainly implemented at ANF: (i) ANF's 3i - program, based on the standard implementation within Siemens, is the first and an important strategy to improve processes, products and costs. It is to involve all employees and make use of the full potential for improvement The individual employee or a group make a suggestion and receive a commendation depending on the benefits. (ii) Work groups with a high level of responsibility are the second part. The groups mainly organize their work, working time and improvements by themselves. They help each other in job training, are very flexible and able to do also most of the maintenance work. (iii) CIP - groups (Continuous Improvement Process), based on the philosophy of KAMEN is the third strategy. These groups come together to improve all processes in the manufacturing area, also the administration or logistical processes at ANF. CIP - groups are implemented as so called long-term groups, the members are from different levels and departments. By comparing the different ways in order to achieve manufacturing improvements, employees motivation is one of the most important and cheapest part and will increase in significance in future. (author)

  13. Enusa, Internationalized Enterprise in Nuclear Fuel Manufacture and Associated Engineering Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Calderon, G.

    2000-01-01

    Since the beginning of its activities, in 1972, ENUSA has been providing an important contribution to Spanish nuclear energy development, performing activities in the first part of the nuclear fuel cycle. Few years after starting the production at the juzbado manufacturing plant, ENUSA realised that, in order to be competitive, needed to expand its activities beyond the Spanish border and took the decision of being present in the Nuclear fuel market in Europe internationalizing its activities. ENUSA reached Strategic Alliance with of the most important technology owners, General Electric and Westinghouse. These alliances have allowed the Company to be one of the players in the very competitive European fuel market, and have also been, important to position ENUSA in an industry in process of consolidation. In parallel to these activities, ENUSA has been present in different international R and D projects, being member of the NFIR of EPRI and Halden projects, and promoting other international R and D programs with companies from USA, Japan, etc. This R and D efforts, together with those Alliance, will allow ENUSA to have an advanced product in this new deregulated market, creating value to the service of our customers. (Author)

  14. Manufacturing of zirconia microspheres doped with erbia, yttria and ceria by internal gelation process as a part of a cermet fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idemitsu, K.; Arima, T.; Inagaki, Y.; Torikai, S.; Pouchon, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Zirconium oxide is an inert matrix candidate for the transmutation of plutonium in light water reactor (LWR). The thermal conductivity of cubic zirconia is however lower than the conductivities of UO 2 and MOX. Special designs are therefore necessary to avoid high peaking temperatures close to the melting point in the zirconia pellet. Cermet would be a favorable design to improve the thermal conductivity. The suggested cermet fuel consists of fine plutonium doped stabilized zirconia particles dispersed in a metallic inert matrix. Manufacturing tests on cubic zirconia microspheres were carried out by using the internal gelation process developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Gelation was conducted successfully and the sintered spheres had a homogeneous single cubic structure. The lattice parameter of the cubic zirconia was estimated as a function of the Er, Y and Ce atomic fraction using a simplified semi-quantitative formula. On the experimental side, it is necessary to further investigate the ideal fabrication conditions, because some gel spheres were opaque and fragile and most of the sintered spheres were cracked, nicked and porous

  15. Pelletization process of postproduction plant waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obidziński, S.

    2012-07-01

    The results of investigations on the influence of material, process, and construction parameters on the densification process and density of pellets received from different mixtures of tobacco and fine-grained waste of lemon balm are presented. The conducted research makes it possible to conclude that postproduction waste eg tobacco and lemon balm wastes can be successfully pelletized and used as an ecological, solid fuels.

  16. Irradiation Test of Dual Instrumented Fuel Rods by using an Instrumented Fuel Capsule(05F-01K) at HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Jaemin; Park, Sungjae; Shin, Yoontaeg; Lee, Choongsung; Choo, Keenam; Cho, Mansoon; Oh, Jongmyung; Kim, Bonggoo; Kim, Harkrho

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to verify the performance of dual instrumented fuel rods. The dual instrumented fuel rods, which allow for two characteristics to be measured simultaneously in one fuel rod, have been designed to enhance the efficiency of an irradiation test using an instrumented capsule for the nuclear fuel irradiation test(hereinafter referred to as 'instrumented fuel capsule') in HANARO(High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor). Six types of dual instrumented fuel rods have been designed. The types of dual instrumented fuel rods are summarized as follows; 1) to measure the center temperature of the nuclear fuel and the internal pressure of the fuel rod, 2) to measure the center temperature of the nuclear fuel and the elongation of the fuel pellets, 3) to measure the surface temperature of the nuclear fuel and the internal pressure of the fuel rod, 4) to measure the surface temperature of the nuclear fuel and the elongation of the fuel pellets, 5) to measure the center and surface temperature of the nuclear fuel, and 6) to measure the center temperature of the nuclear fuel of the upper and lower part. And 05F-01K instrumented fuel capsule has been designed for an irradiation test of three dual instrumented fuel rods. This paper presents the manufacturing of the dual instrumented fuel rods and 05F-01K instrumented fuel capsule, and the results of the irradiation test

  17. Preliminary design and manufacturing feasibility study for a machined Zircaloy triangular pitch fuel rod support system (grids) (AWBA development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwood, W.A.

    1981-07-01

    General design features and manufacturing operations for a high precision machined Zircaloy fuel rod support grid intended for use in advanced light water prebreeder or breeder reactor designs are described. The grid system consists of a Zircaloy main body with fuel rod and guide tube cells machined using wire EDM, a separate AM-350 stainless steel insert spring which fits into a full length T-slot in each fuel rod cell, and a thin (0.025'' or 0.040'' thick) wire EDM machined Zircaloy coverplate laser welded to each side of the grid body to retain the insert springs. The fuel rods are placed in a triangular pitch array with a tight rod-to-rod spacing of 0.063 inch nominal. Two dimples are positioned at the mid-thickness of the grid (single level) with a 90 0 included angle. Data is provided on the effectiveness of the manufacturing operations chosen for grid machining and assembly

  18. Estimation of cumulative exposures to naphtha at an automobile fuel-injector manufacturing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocskay, A Z; Robins, T G; Echeverria, D; Schork, M A; Seixas, N S; White, R F; Proctor, S P

    1993-09-01

    As part of an epidemiologic study of neuropsychological and renal effects of occupational exposure to organic solvents, estimates of cumulative exposure to naphtha were derived for workers at an automobile fuel-injector manufacturing plant. The approach to exposure estimation was relatively unusual in three respects: (1) a marked association between indoor naphtha air concentration and outdoor temperature was modeled and applied to detailed historical temperature data to calculate cumulative exposure estimates; (2) the large number of investigator-generated air samples allowed the use of analyses of variance to compare alternative job-grouping schemes; and (3) the young age of the plant and few process changes allowed for historical exposure estimates with a high degree of confidence. The derived estimates of cumulative exposure appear to offer a firm basis for epidemiologic analyses of exposure-health outcome relationships.

  19. Recent Progress in Development and Manufacturing of SOFC at Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S and Risø DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Niels; Holm-Larsen, Helge; Primdahl, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The SOFC development at Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S (TOFC) and Risø DTU is based on a R&D consortium which includes material development and manufacturing of materials, cells and stacks with metallic interconnects focussing on high electrochemical performance, durability and robustness. A significant....... TOFC is engaged in development and demonstration of stack assemblies, multi-stack modules and PowerCore units that integrate stack modules with hot fuel processing units....

  20. Wood pellet research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohkansanj, S.; Bi, T.

    2006-01-01

    Wood pellets are composed of waste wood materials such as sawmill residue, municipal landfill waste and grain crops. Due to the high temperature combustion used to form the waste materials into the pellet, no additives or glues are necessary to bind them. The pellets are typically used for home heating; heat and power production; poultry bedding; and in biorefineries. This presentation provided an outline of the University of British Columbia wood pellet research and development program. Research at the university is being conducted to develop new types of pellets. Researchers at the program also analyze the physical and chemical properties of pellets in order to optimize pellet density and heating values. Wood pellet modelling and simulation studies are carried out, and various training and education programs are also offered. Research is currently being conducted to develop a reactor for off-gassing experiments. This presentation also provided details of a study investigating the economics of wood pellet production and transport. Pellet production costs and feedstock costs were compared. A summary of the costs and energy inputs of pellet production included details of product storage; transportation and transfer; handling; and transportation to energy plants. It was concluded that more than 35 per cent of the energy content of biomass is used up in the processing and transport of Canadian wood pellets to Europe. refs., tabs., figs

  1. Gas Diffusion Electrodes Manufactured by Casting Evaluation as Air Cathodes for Microbial Fuel Cells (MFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandipam Srikanth

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most intriguing renewable energy production methods being explored currently is electrical power generation by microbial fuel cells (MFCs. However, to make MFC technology economically feasible, cost efficient electrode manufacturing processes need to be proposed and demonstrated. In this context, VITO has developed an innovative electrode manufacturing process based on film casting and phase inversion. The screening and selection process of electrode compositions was done based on physicochemical properties of the active layer, which in turn maintained a close relation with their composition A dual hydrophilic-hydrophobic character in the active layer was achieved with values of εhydrophilic up to 10% while εTOTAL remained in the range 65 wt % to 75 wt %. Eventually, selected electrodes were tested as air cathodes for MFC in half cell and full cell modes. Reduction currents, up to −0.14 mA·cm2− at −100 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl were reached in long term experiments in the cathode half-cell. In full MFC, a maximum power density of 380 mW·m−2 was observed at 100 Ω external load.

  2. Design and development of an automated uranium pellet stacking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, B.S.; Nokleby, S.B.

    2010-01-01

    A novel design for an automated uranium pellet stacking system is presented. This system is designed as a drop-in solution to the current production line to enhance the fuel pellet stacking process. The three main goals of this system are to reduce worker exposure to radiation to as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA), improve product quality, and increase productivity. The proposed system will reduce the potential for human error. This single automated system will replace the two existing pellet stacking stations while increasing the total output, eliminating pellet stacking as a bottleneck in the fuel bundle assembly process. (author)

  3. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hajime.

    1995-01-01

    In a fuel assembly having fuel rods of different length, fuel pellets of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium are loaded to a short fuel rod. The volume ratio of a pellet-loaded portion to a plenum portion of the short fuel rod is made greater than the volume ratio of a fuel rod to which uranium fuel pellets are loaded. In addition, the volume of the plenum portion of the short fuel rod is set greater depending on the plutonium content in the loaded fuel pellets. MOX fuel pellets are loaded on the short fuel rods having a greater degree of freedom relevant to the setting for the volume of the plenum portion compared with that of a long rod fuel, and the volume of the plenum portion is ensured greater depending on the plutonium content. Even if a large amount of FP gas and He gas are discharged from the MOX fuels compared with that from the uranium fuels, the internal pressure of the MOX fuel rod during operation is maintained substantially identical with that of the uranium fuel rod, so that a risk of generating excess stresses applied to the fuel cladding tubes and rupture of fuels are greatly reduced. (N.H.)

  4. Process for manufacturing cladding tubes for nuclear fuel elements and tubes so produced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.; Davies, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    A process is described for manufacturing a composite elongated cladding tube for containing a nuclear fuel and forming a reactor fuel element. In a method recommended by the invention, the composite cladding tube includes a zirconium alloy tube and a shield-coat of metal zirconium metallurgically bonded to the internal surface of the tube. Among the zirconium alloys suitable for the tube are Zircaloy-2 or Zircaloy-4. Zircaloy-2 contains by weight around 1.5% tin, 0.12% iron, 0.09% chromium, 0.05% nickel, the balance being zirconium. Zircaloy-4 contains less nickel than Zircaloy-2 but slightly more iron. In either case, the alloy contains other ingredients than zirconium in a quantity above 5000 parts per million. The shield-coat which can represent around 1 to 30% of the composite cladding thickness, is made of metal zirconium, with a limited level of impurities from a highly pure or practically pure zirconium containing under 500 ppm impurities to an impurity level of up to 5000 ppm but preferably with an impurity level under around 4200 ppm [fr

  5. Tube in zirconium base alloy for nuclear fuel assembly and manufacturing process of such a tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardon, J.P.; Senevat, J.; Charquet, D.

    1996-01-01

    This patent concerns the description and manufacturing guidelines of a zirconium alloy tube for fuel cladding or fuel assembly guiding. The alloy contains (in weight) 0.4 to 0.6% of tin, 0.5 to 0.8% of iron, 0.35 to 0.50% of vanadium and 0.1 to 0.18% of oxygen. The carbon and silicon tenors range from 100 to 180 ppm and from 80 to 120 ppm, respectively. The alloy contains only zirconium, plus inevitable impurities, and is completely recrystallized. Corrosion resistance tests were performed on tubes made of this alloy and compared to corrosion tests performed on zircaloy 4 tubes. These tests show a better corrosion resistance and a lower corrosion kinetics for the new alloy, even in presence of lithium and iodine, and a lower hydridation rate. The mechanical resistance of this alloy is slightly lower than the one of zircaloy 4 but becomes equivalent or slightly better after two irradiation cycles. The ductility remains always equal or better than for zircaloy 4. (J.S.)

  6. Development of challengeable reprocessing and fuel fabrication technologies for advanced fast reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, S.; Aoshima, T.; Myochin, M. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai Works (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    R and D in the next five years in Feasibility Study Phase-2 are focused on selected key technologies for the advanced fuel cycle. These are the reference technology of simplified aqueous extraction and fuel pellet short process based on the oxide fuel and the innovative technology of oxide-electrowinning and metal- electrorefining process and their direct particle/metal fuel fabrication methods in a hot cell. Automatic and remote handling system operation in both reprocessing and fuel manufacturing can handle MA and LLFP concurrently with Pu and U attaining the highest recovery and an accurate accountability of these materials. (author)

  7. Development of challengeable reprocessing and fuel fabrication technologies for advanced fast reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, S.; Aoshima, T.; Myochin, M.

    2001-01-01

    R and D in the next five years in Feasibility Study Phase-2 are focused on selected key technologies for the advanced fuel cycle. These are the reference technology of simplified aqueous extraction and fuel pellet short process based on the oxide fuel and the innovative technology of oxide-electrowinning and metal- electrorefining process and their direct particle/metal fuel fabrication methods in a hot cell. Automatic and remote handling system operation in both reprocessing and fuel manufacturing can handle MA and LLFP concurrently with Pu and U attaining the highest recovery and an accurate accountability of these materials. (author)

  8. A MULTIDIMENSIONAL AND MULTIPHYSICS APPROACH TO NUCLEAR FUEL BEHAVIOR SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; S. R. Novascone; M. R. Tonks; D. R. Gaston; C. J. Permann; D. Andrs; R. C. Martineau

    2012-04-01

    Important aspects of fuel rod behavior, for example pellet-clad mechanical interaction (PCMI), fuel fracture, oxide formation, non-axisymmetric cooling, and response to fuel manufacturing defects, are inherently multidimensional in addition to being complicated multiphysics problems. Many current modeling tools are strictly 2D axisymmetric or even 1.5D. This paper outlines the capabilities of a new fuel modeling tool able to analyze either 2D axisymmetric or fully 3D models. These capabilities include temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of fuel; swelling and densification; fuel creep; pellet fracture; fission gas release; cladding creep; irradiation growth; and gap mechanics (contact and gap heat transfer). The need for multiphysics, multidimensional modeling is then demonstrated through a discussion of results for a set of example problems. The first, a 10-pellet rodlet, demonstrates the viability of the solution method employed. This example highlights the effect of our smeared cracking model and also shows the multidimensional nature of discrete fuel pellet modeling. The second example relies on our the multidimensional, multiphysics approach to analyze a missing pellet surface problem. As a final example, we show a lower-length-scale simulation coupled to a continuum-scale simulation.

  9. Development of pellet injection systems for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, S.K.; Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing innovative pellet injection systems for plasma fueling experiments on magnetic fusion confinement devices for about 20 years. Recently, the ORNL development has focused on meeting the complex fueling needs of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). In this paper, we describe the ongoing research and development activities that will lead to a ITER prototype pellet injector test stand. The present effort addresses three main areas: (1) an improved pellet feed and delivery system for centrifuge injectors, (2) a long-pulse (up to steady-state) hydrogen extruder system, and (3) tritium extruder technology. The final prototype system must be fully tritium compatible and will be used to demonstrate the operating parameters and the reliability required for the ITER fueling application

  10. Injection of Deuterium Pellets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.; Andersen, P.; Andersen, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    A pellet injection system made for the TFR tokamak at Fontenay-aux-Roses, Paris is described. 0.12-mg pellets are injected with velocities of around 600-700 m/s through a 5-m long guide tube. Some details of a new light gas gun are given; with this gun, hydrogen pellets are accelerated...... to velocities above 1400 m/s, deuterium pellets to velocities above 1300 m/s and neon pellets to velocities above 500 m/s. Finally, a new acceleration method where a pellet should be accelerated by means of a magnetically stabilised electrical discharge is discussed, and a set up for measuring of the pellet...

  11. Modernization of the design and optimization of the manufacturing technology of RBMK fuel rods and fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panushkin, A.K.; Tsiboulia, V.A.; Bek, E.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes design and experience in fabrication of fuel and fuel channels for RBMK reactors (RBMK-1000 and RBMK-1500) at the JSC ''Mashinostroitelny Zavod'', Electrostal, Russia. The most important measures developed and undertaken since Chernobyl accident to increase operational safety of RBMK reactors are presented. Emphasis is given to modifications in fuel design and technology including U-Er fuel, rods with a new plug and fuel assemblies with Zr spacer grids. (author)

  12. Advanced methods of process/quality control in nuclear reactor fuel manufacture. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    Nuclear fuel plays an essential role in ensuring the competitiveness of nuclear energy and its acceptance by the public. The economic and market situation is not favorable at present for nuclear fuel designers and suppliers. The reduction in fuel prices (mainly to compete with fossil fuels) and in the number of fuel assemblies to be delivered to customers (mainly due to burnup increase) has been offset by the rising number of safety and other requirements, e.g. the choice of fuel and structural materials and the qualification of equipment. In this respect, higher burnup and thermal rates, longer fuel cycles and the use of MOX fuels are the real means to improve the economics of the nuclear fuel cycle as a whole. Therefore, utilities and fuel vendors have recently initiated new research and development programmes aimed at improving fuel quality, design and materials to produce robust and reliable fuel for safe and reliable reactor operation more demanding conditions. In this connection, improvement of fuel quality occupies an important place and this requires continuous effort on the part of fuel researchers, designers and producers. In the early years of commercial fuel fabrication, emphasis was given to advancements in quality control/quality assurance related mainly to the product itself. Now, the emphasis is transferred to improvements in process control and to implementation of overall total quality management (TQM) programmes. In the area of fuel quality control, statistical methods are now widely implemented, replacing 100% inspection. The IAEA, recognizing the importance of obtaining and maintaining high standards in fuel fabrication, has paid particular attention to this subject. In response to the rapid progress in development and implementation of advanced methods of process/quality control in nuclear fuel manufacture and on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology, the IAEA conducted a

  13. The industrial tool of Areva NP fuel cycle: capacity, methods and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrot, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Areva is the world leader for the production of zirconium, it owns a fully integrated business from the processing of zirconium ore to the production of tubes and fuel assemblies. As for fuel manufacturing business, Areva owns plants in France (Romans-sur-Isere, Pierrelatte), Belgium (Dessel), Germany (Lingen, Karlstein) and Usa (Richland, Lynchburg). The Romans plant produces UO 2 powder, pellets, fuel rods and assemblies for PWRs. The Pierrelatte plant is specialized in the manufacturing of grids for PWR fuel assemblies and control rod clusters. The Dessel plant fabricates PWR fuel assemblies and Mox assemblies. The Lingen plant produces UO 2 powder, pellets, fuel rods and fuel assemblies for both PWRs and BWRs. The Karlstein plant produces components for fuel assemblies: grids, top and bottom nozzles destined to PWRs and BWRs and water boxes for BWRs. The Richland plant produces UO 2 powder, pellets and fuel rods and is specialized in the production of assemblies for BWR. The Lynchburg plant produces fuel assemblies for PWR. B 4 C pellets, control rod clusters, burnable poison assemblies, flux detectors are also fabricated in this plant. The global production capacity of all these plants is 3000 tU/year (2/3 in Europe and 1/3 in Usa). Areva maintains a policy of high investment for instance, more than 100*10 6 euros have been invested in the upgrading of the Romans plant. (A.C.)

  14. Performance characterization of pneumatic single pellet injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuresko, D.D.; Milora, S.L.; Hogan, J.T.; Foster, C.A.; Combs, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory single-shot pellet injector, which has been used in plasma fueling experiments on ISX and PDX, has been upgraded and extensively instrumented in order to study the gas dynamics of pneumatic pellet injection. An improved pellet transport line was developed which utilizes a 0.3-cm-diam by 100-cm-long guide tube. Pellet gun performance was characterized by measurements of breech and muzzle dynamic pressures and by pellet velocity and mass determinations. Velocities up to 1.4 km/s were achieved for intact hydrogen pellets using hydrogen propellant at 5-MPa breech pressure. These data have been compared with new pellet acceleration calculations which include the effects of propellant friction, heat transfer, time-dependent boundary conditions, and finite gun geometry. These results provide a basis for the extrapolation of present-day pneumatic injection system performance to velocities in excess of 2 km/s

  15. Reprint of: Pelletizing properties of torrefied wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Nielsen, Niels Peter K.; Hansen, Hans Ove

    2013-01-01

    Combined torrefaction and pelletization are used to increase the fuel value of biomass by increasing its energy density and improving its handling and combustion properties. However, pelletization of torrefied biomass can be challenging and in this study the torrefaction and pelletizing properties...... of wheat straw have been analyzed. Laboratory equipment has been used to investigate the pelletizing properties of wheat straw torrefied at temperatures between 150 and 300 °C. IR spectroscopy and chemical analyses have shown that high torrefaction temperatures change the chemical properties of the wheat...... straw significantly, and the pelletizing analyses have shown that these changes correlate to changes in the pelletizing properties. Torrefaction increase the friction in the press channel and pellet strength and density decrease with an increase in torrefaction temperature....

  16. Particle density determination of pellets and briquettes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabier, Fabienne; Temmerman, Michaeel [Centre wallon de Recherches agronomiques, Departement de Genie rural, CRA-W, Chaussee de Namur, 146, B 5030 Gembloux (Belgium); Boehm, Thorsten; Hartmann, Hans [Technologie und Foerderzentrum fuer Nachwachsende Rohstoffe, TFZ, Schulgasse 18, D 94315 Straubing (Germany); Daugbjerg Jensen, Peter [Forest and Landscape, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Rolighedsvej 23, DK 1958 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Rathbauer, Josef [Bundesanstalt fuer Landtechnik, BLT, Rottenhauer Strasse,1 A 3250 Wieselburg (Austria); Carrasco, Juan; Fernandez, Miguel [Centro de investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense, 22 E 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-11-15

    Several methods and procedures for the determination of particle density of pellets and briquettes were tested and evaluated. Round robin trials were organized involving five European laboratories, which measured the particle densities of 15 pellet and five briquette types. The test included stereometric methods, methods based on liquid displacement (hydrostatic and buoyancy) applying different procedures and one method based on solid displacement. From the results for both pellets and briquettes, it became clear that the application of a method based on either liquid or solid displacement (only tested on pellet samples) leads to an improved reproducibility compared to a stereometric method. For both, pellets and briquettes, the variability of measurements strongly depends on the fuel type itself. For briquettes, the three methods tested based on liquid displacement lead to similar results. A coating of the samples with paraffin did not improve the repeatability and the reproducibility. Determinations with pellets proved to be most reliable when the buoyancy method was applied using a wetting agent to reduce surface tensions without sample coating. This method gave the best values for repeatability and reproducibility, thus less replications are required to reach a given accuracy level. For wood pellets, the method based on solid displacement gave better values of repeatability, however, this instrument was tested at only one laboratory. (author)

  17. Pellet injector research and development at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, S.K.; Argo, B.E.; Baylor, L.R.; Cole, M.J.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Jernigan, T.C.; Langley, R.A.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Schechter, E.; Sparks, D.O.; Tsai, C.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Whealton, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of pellet injector designs have been developed at ORNL including single-shot guns that inject one pellet, multiple-shot guns that inject four and eight pellets, machine gun-types (single- and multiple-barrel) that can inject up to >100 pellets, and centrifugal accelerators (mechanical devices that are inherently capable of high repetition rates and long-pulse operation). With these devices, macroscopic pellets (1--6 mm in diameter) composed of hydrogen isotopes are typically accelerated to speeds of ∼1.0 to 2.0 km/s for injection into plasmas of experimental fusion devices. In the past few years, steady progress has been made at ORNL in the development and application of pellet injectors for fueling present-day and future fusion devices. In this paper, we briefly describe some research and development activities at ORNL, including: (1) two recent applications and a new one on large experimental fusion devices, (2) high-velocity pellet injector development, and (3) tritium injector research

  18. Pelletization of fine coals. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1995-12-31

    Coal is one of the most abundant energy resources in the US with nearly 800 million tons of it being mined annually. Process and environmental demands for low-ash, low-sulfur coals and economic constraints for high productivity are leading the coal industry to use such modern mining methods as longwall mining and such newer coal processing techniques as froth flotation, oil agglomeration, chemical cleaning and synthetic fuel production. All these processes are faced with one common problem area--fine coals. Dealing effectively with these fine coals during handling, storage, transportation, and/or processing continues to be a challenge facing the industry. Agglomeration by the unit operation of pelletization consists of tumbling moist fines in drums or discs. Past experimental work and limited commercial practice have shown that pelletization can alleviate the problems associated with fine coals. However, it was recognized that there exists a serious need for delineating the fundamental principles of fine coal pelletization. Accordingly, a research program has been carried involving four specific topics: (i) experimental investigation of coal pelletization kinetics, (ii) understanding the surface principles of coal pelletization, (iii) modeling of coal pelletization processes, and (iv) simulation of fine coal pelletization circuits. This report summarizes the major findings and provides relevant details of the research effort.

  19. The logistics and the supply chain in the Juzbado Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant; Cadena logistica en la fabrica de elementos combustibles de Juzbado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The paper describe the logistics and the supply chain in the Juzbado Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant, located in Juzbado in the province of Salamanca. In the the article are described the principal elements in the supply chain and the difficulties of its management derived from the short period for the manufacturing of the nuclear fuel. It's also given a view in relation to the transportation by land sea of the nuclear components, uranium oxide powder and the manufactured fuel. The characteristics of the supply chain are determined by the plant production forecast, by the origin and high technology of the raw materials and by nuclear fuel delivery site locations. (Author)

  20. New pellet production and acceleration technologies for high speed pellet injection system 'HIPEL' in large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viniar, I.; Sudo, S.

    1994-12-01

    New technologies of pellet production and acceleration for fueling and diagnostics purposes in large thermonuclear reactors are proposed. The technologies are intended to apply to the multiple-pellet injection system 'HIPEL' for Large Helical Device of NIFS in Japan. The pellet production technology has already been tested in a pipe-gun type pellet injector. It will realize the repeating pellet injection by means of decreasing of the pellet formation time into the pipe-gun barrel. The acceleration technology is based upon a new pump tube operation in two-stage gas gun and also upon a new conception of the allowable pressure acting on a pellet into a barrel. Some preliminary estimations have been made, and principles of a pump tube construction providing for a reliable long term operation in the repeating mode without any troubles from a piston are proposed. (author)

  1. Conceptual Process for the Manufacture of Low-Enriched Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, J.D.; Primm, R.T. III; Miller, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. nonproliferation policy 'to minimize, and to the extent possible, eliminate the use of HEU in civil nuclear programs throughout the world' has resulted in the conversion (or scheduled conversion) of many of the U.S. research reactors from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). A foil fuel appears to offer the best option for using a LEU fuel in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) without degrading the performance of the reactor. The purpose of this document is to outline a proposed conceptual fabrication process flow sheet for a new, foil-type, 19.75%-enriched fuel for HFIR. The preparation of the flow sheet allows a better understanding of the costs of infrastructure modifications, operating costs, and implementation schedule issues associated with the fabrication of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preparation of a reference flow sheet is one of the first planning steps needed in the development of a new manufacturing capacity for low enriched fuels for U.S. research and test reactors. The flow sheet can be used to develop a work breakdown structure (WBS), a critical path schedule, and identify development needs. The reference flow sheet presented in this report is specifically for production of LEU foil fuel for the HFIR. The need for an overall reference flow sheet for production of fuel for all High Performance Research Reactors (HPRR) has been identified by the national program office. This report could provide a starting point for the development of such a reference flow sheet for a foil-based fuel for all HPRRs. The reference flow sheet presented is based on processes currently being developed by the national program for the LEU foil fuel when available, processes used historically in the manufacture of other nuclear fuels and materials, and processes used in other manufacturing industries producing a product configuration similar to the form required in manufacturing a foil fuel. The processes in the reference flow sheet are within the

  2. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, A.M.; Silva, A.T. e.

    1992-01-01

    The pellet-cladding interaction that can occur in a PWR fuel rod design is modelled with the computer codes FRAPCON-1 and ANSYS. The fuel performance code FRAPCON-1 analyses the fuel rod irradiation behavior and generates the initial conditions for the localized fuel rod thermal and mechanical modelling in two and three-dimensional finite elements with ANSYS. In the mechanical modelling, a pellet fragment is placed in the fuel rod gap. Two types of fuel rod cladding materials are considered: Zircaloy and austenitic stainless steel. (author)

  3. Characterization of uranium corrosion products involved in the March 13, 1998 fuel manufacturing facility pyrophoric event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T.C.

    1999-01-01

    Uranium metal corrosion products from ZPPR fuel plates involved in the March 13, 1998 pyrophoric event in the Fuel Manufacturing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West were characterized using thermo-gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and BET gas sorption techniques. Characterization was performed on corrosion products in several different conditions: immediately after separation from the source metal, after low-temperature passivation, after passivation and extended vault storage, and after burning in the pyrophoric event. The ignition temperatures and hydride fractions of the corrosion product were strongly dependent on corrosion extent. Corrosion products from plates with corrosion extents less than 0.7% did not ignite in TGA testing, while products from plates with corrosion extents greater than 1.2% consistently ignited. Corrosion extent is defined as mass of corrosion products divided by the total mass of uranium. The hydride fraction increased with corrosion extent. There was little change in corrosion product properties after low-temperature passivation or vault storage. The burned products were not reactive and contained no hydride; the principal constituents were UO 2 and U 3 O 7 . The source of the event was a considerable quantity of reactive hydride present in the corrosion products. No specific ignition mechanism could be conclusively identified. The most likely initiator was a static discharge in the corrosion product from the 14th can as it was poured into the consolidation can. The available evidence does not support scenarios in which the powder in the consolidation can slowly self-heated to the ignition point, or in which the powder in the 14th can was improperly passivated

  4. Characterization of uranium corrosion products involved in the March 13, 1998 fuel manufacturing facility pyrophoric event.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totemeier, T.C.

    1999-04-26

    Uranium metal corrosion products from ZPPR fuel plates involved in the March 13, 1998 pyrophoric event in the Fuel Manufacturing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West were characterized using thermo-gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and BET gas sorption techniques. Characterization was performed on corrosion products in several different conditions: immediately after separation from the source metal, after low-temperature passivation, after passivation and extended vault storage, and after burning in the pyrophoric event. The ignition temperatures and hydride fractions of the corrosion product were strongly dependent on corrosion extent. Corrosion products from plates with corrosion extents less than 0.7% did not ignite in TGA testing, while products from plates with corrosion extents greater than 1.2% consistently ignited. Corrosion extent is defined as mass of corrosion products divided by the total mass of uranium. The hydride fraction increased with corrosion extent. There was little change in corrosion product properties after low-temperature passivation or vault storage. The burned products were not reactive and contained no hydride; the principal constituents were UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 7}. The source of the event was a considerable quantity of reactive hydride present in the corrosion products. No specific ignition mechanism could be conclusively identified. The most likely initiator was a static discharge in the corrosion product from the 14th can as it was poured into the consolidation can. The available evidence does not support scenarios in which the powder in the consolidation can slowly self-heated to the ignition point, or in which the powder in the 14th can was improperly passivated.

  5. Tritium proof-of-principle pellet injector - phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, P.W.; Gouge, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) plasma fueling development program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has fabricated a pellet injection system to test the mechanical and thermal properties of extruded tritium. This repeating, single-stage, pneumatic injector, called the Tritium-Proof-of-Principle Phase II (TPOP-II) Pellet Injector, has a piston-driven mechanical extruder and is designed to extrude hydrogenic pellets sized for the ITER device. The TPOP-II program has the following development goals: evaluate the feasibility of extruding tritium and DT mixtures for use in future pellet injection systems; determine the mechanical and thermal properties of tritium and DT extrusions; integrate, test and evaluate the extruder in a repeating, single-stage light gas gun sized for the ITER application (pellet diameter ∼ 7-8 mm); evaluate options for recycling propellant and extruder exhaust gas; evaluate operability and reliability of ITER prototypical fueling systems in an environment of significant tritium inventory requiring secondary and room containment systems. In initial tests with deuterium feed at ORNL, up to thirteen pellets have been extruded at rates up to 1 Hz and accelerated to speeds of order 1.0-1.1 km/s using hydrogen propellant gas at a supply pressure of 65 bar. The pellets are typically 7.4 mm in diameter and up to 11 mm in length and are the largest cryogenic pellets produced by the fusion program to date. These pellets represent about a 11% density perturbation to ITER. Hydrogenic pellets will be used in ITER to sustain the fusion power in the plasma core and may be crucial in reducing first wall tritium inventories by a process called isotopic fueling where tritium-rich pellets fuel the burning plasma core and deuterium gas fuels the edge

  6. Assessment of the Current Level of Automation in the Manufacture of Fuel Cell Systems for Combined Heat and Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulsh, M.; Wheeler, D.; Protopappas, P.

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is interested in supporting manufacturing research and development (R&D) for fuel cell systems in the 10-1,000 kilowatt (kW) power range relevant to stationary and distributed combined heat and power applications, with the intent to reduce manufacturing costs and increase production throughput. To assist in future decision-making, DOE requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide a baseline understanding of the current levels of adoption of automation in manufacturing processes and flow, as well as of continuous processes. NREL identified and visited or interviewed key manufacturers, universities, and laboratories relevant to the study using a standard questionnaire. The questionnaire covered the current level of vertical integration, the importance of quality control developments for automation, the current level of automation and source of automation design, critical balance of plant issues, potential for continuous cell manufacturing, key manufacturing steps or processes that would benefit from DOE support for manufacturing R&D, the potential for cell or stack design changes to support automation, and the relationship between production volume and decisions on automation.

  7. Technology for manufacturing dispersion nuclear fuel at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durazzo, M.; Carvalho, E.F. Urano de; Saliba-Silva, A.M.; Souza, J.A.B.; Riella, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    IPEN has been working for increasing radioisotope production in order to supply the expanding demand for radiopharmaceutical medicines requested by the Brazilian welfare. To reach this objective, the IEA-R1 research reactor power capacity was recently increased from 2 MW to 3.5 MW. Since 1988 IPEN has been manufacturing its own fuel element, initially based on U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion fuel plates with 2.3 g U/cm 3 . To support the reactor power increase, higher uranium density had to be achieved for better irradiation flux and also to minimize the irradiated fuel elements to be stored. Uranium silicide was the chosen option. This paper describes the results of this program and the current status of silicide fuel fabrication and qualification. (author)

  8. CEA and AREVA R and D on V/HTR fuel fabrication with the CAPRI experimental manufacturing line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charollais, Francois; Fonquernie, Sophie; Perrais, Christophe; Perez, Marc; Cellier, Francois; Vitali, Marie-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of the French V/HTR fuel development and qualification program, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and AREVA through its program called ANTARES (Areva New Technology for Advanced Reactor Energy Supply) conduct R and D projects covering the mastering of UO 2 coated particle and fuel compact fabrication technology. To fulfill this task, a review of past knowledge, of existing technologies and a preliminary laboratory scale work program have been conducted with the aim of retrieving the know-how on HTR coated particle and compact manufacture: - The different stages of UO 2 kernel fabrication GSP Sol-Gel process have been reviewed, reproduced and improved; - The experimental conditions for the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of coatings have been defined on dummy kernels and development of innovative characterization methods has been carried out; - Former CERCA compacting process has been reviewed and updated. In parallel, an experimental manufacturing line for coated particles, named GAIA, and a compacting line based on former CERCA compacting experience have been designed, constructed and are in operation since early 2005 at CEA Cadarache and CERCA Romans, respectively. These two facilities constitute the CAPRI line (CEA and AREVA PRoduction Integrated line). The major objectives of the CAPRI line are: - to recover and validate past knowledge; - to permit the optimisation of reference fabrication processes for kernels and coatings and the investigation of alternative and innovative fuel design (UCO kernel, ZrC coating); - to test alternative compact process options; - to fabricate and characterize fuel required for irradiation and qualification purpose; - to specify needs for the fabrication of representative V/HTR TRISO fuel meeting industrial standards. This paper presents the progress status of the R and D conducted on V/HTR fuel particle and compact manufacture by mid 2005. (authors)

  9. Review of best available techniques for the control of pollution from the combustion of fuels manufactured from or including waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report is a technical review of the techniques available for controlling pollution from combustion processes burning fuels (over 3 MW thermal input) manufactured from or including the following: Waste and recovered oil; Refuse derived fuel; Rubber tyres and other rubber waste; Poultry litter; Wood and straw. This review forms the basis for the revision of the Chief Inspector's Guidance Notes referring to the prescribed processes listed with special emphasis on recommending achievable releases to all environmental media. In formulating achievable releases account is taken of technologies in operation in the UK and overseas. (UK)

  10. Gap's dimensions in fuel elements from neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notea, A.; Segal, Y.; Trichter, F.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative Nondestructive evaluation (QNDE) is of upmost importance in the design and manufacture of nuclear fuel elements. Accurate non-destructive measurements of gaps, cracks, displacements, etc. supply vital information for optimizing fuel manufacturing. Neutron radiography is a powerful NDT method for examining spent fuel elements. However, it turned out that the extraction of dimensions, especially in the submillimetric range is questionable. In this paper neutron radiography of pellet-to-pellet gaps in fuel elements is modelled and two procedures for dimension extraction are presented. It is shown that for a wide gap the dimension is preferable, extracted from the width of the film profile, while for narrow gaps it is preferable to extract it from the maximum of the density profile

  11. The beginning of the LEU fuel elements manufacturing in the Chilean Commission of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, H.; Chavez, J.C.; Marin, J.; Lisboa, J.; Olivares, L.; Jimenez, O.

    1998-01-01

    The U 3 Si 2 LEU fuel fabrication program at CCHEN has started with the assembly of four leaders fuel elements for the RECH-1 reactor. This activity has involved a stage of fuel plates qualification, to evaluate fabrication procedures and quality controls and quality assurance. The qualification extent was 50% of the fuel plates, equivalent to the number of plates required for the assembly of two fuel elements. (author)

  12. Sensitivity assessment of fuel performance codes for LOCA accident scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Alfredo; Gomes, Daniel; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    FRAPCON code predicts fuel rod performance in LWR (Light Water Reactor) by modeling fuel responses under normal operating conditions and anticipated operational occurrences; FRAPTRAN code is applied for fuel transient under fast transient and accident conditions. The codes are well known and applied for different purposes and one of the use is to address sensitivity analysis considering fuel design parameters associated to fabrication, moreover can address the effect of physical models bias. The objective of this work was to perform an assessment of fuel manufacturing parameters tolerances and fuel models bias using FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN codes for Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario. The preliminary analysis considered direct approach taken into account most relevant manufacturing tolerances (lower and upper bounds) related to design parameters and physical models bias without considering their statistical distribution. The simulations were carried out using the data available in the open literature related to the series of LOCA experiment performed at the Halden reactor (specifically IFA-650.5). The manufacturing tolerances associated to design parameters considered in this paper were: enrichment, cladding thickness, pellet diameter, pellet density, and filling gas pressure. The physical models considered were: fuel thermal expansion, fission gas release, fuel swelling, irradiation creep, cladding thermal expansion, cladding corrosion, and cladding hydrogen pickup. The results obtained from sensitivity analysis addressed the impact of manufacturing tolerances and physical models in the fuel cladding burst time observed for the IFA-650.5 experiment. (author)

  13. Sensitivity assessment of fuel performance codes for LOCA accident scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Alfredo; Gomes, Daniel; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Muniz, Rafael O.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo, E-mail: ayabe@ipen.br, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (LABRISCO/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Análise, Avaliação e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2017-07-01

    FRAPCON code predicts fuel rod performance in LWR (Light Water Reactor) by modeling fuel responses under normal operating conditions and anticipated operational occurrences; FRAPTRAN code is applied for fuel transient under fast transient and accident conditions. The codes are well known and applied for different purposes and one of the use is to address sensitivity analysis considering fuel design parameters associated to fabrication, moreover can address the effect of physical models bias. The objective of this work was to perform an assessment of fuel manufacturing parameters tolerances and fuel models bias using FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN codes for Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario. The preliminary analysis considered direct approach taken into account most relevant manufacturing tolerances (lower and upper bounds) related to design parameters and physical models bias without considering their statistical distribution. The simulations were carried out using the data available in the open literature related to the series of LOCA experiment performed at the Halden reactor (specifically IFA-650.5). The manufacturing tolerances associated to design parameters considered in this paper were: enrichment, cladding thickness, pellet diameter, pellet density, and filling gas pressure. The physical models considered were: fuel thermal expansion, fission gas release, fuel swelling, irradiation creep, cladding thermal expansion, cladding corrosion, and cladding hydrogen pickup. The results obtained from sensitivity analysis addressed the impact of manufacturing tolerances and physical models in the fuel cladding burst time observed for the IFA-650.5 experiment. (author)

  14. Benchmarking the expected stack manufacturing cost of next generation, intermediate-temperature protonic ceramic fuel cells with solid oxide fuel cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Alexis; Ricote, Sandrine; Braun, Robert J.

    2017-11-01

    Recent progress in the performance of intermediate temperature (500-600 °C) protonic ceramic fuel cells (PCFCs) has demonstrated both fuel flexibility and increasing power density that approach commercial application requirements. These developments may eventually position the technology as a viable alternative to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). The PCFCs investigated in this work are based on a BaZr0.8Y0.2O3-δ (BZY20) thin electrolyte supported by BZY20/Ni porous anodes, and a triple conducting cathode material comprised of BaCo0.4Fe0.4Zr0.1Y0.1O3-δ (BCFZY0.1). These cells are prepared using a low-cost solid-state reactive sintering (SSRS) process, and are capable of power densities of 0.156 W cm-2 at 500 °C operating directly from methane fuel. We develop a manufacturing cost model to estimate the Nth generation production costs of PCFC stack technology using high volume manufacturing processes and compare them to the state-of-the-art in SOFC technology. The low-cost cell manufacturing enabled by the SSRS technique compensates for the lower PCFC power density and the trade-off between operating temperature and efficiency enables the use of lower-cost stainless steel materials. PCFC stack production cost estimates are found to be as much as 27-37% lower at 550 °C than SOFCs operating at 800 °C.

  15. Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Steve

    2013-09-11

    Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: • 2016 CAFÉ standards. • Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. • Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. • U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: • Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. • Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. • Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industry’s future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: • Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. • Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. • Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. • Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

  16. Safety of operations in the manufacture of driver fuel for the first charge of the Dragon Reactor and modifications to the safety document for the Dragon Fuel Element Production Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutler, H.; Cross, J.; Flamm, J.

    1965-01-01

    The manufacture of the zirconium containing 'driver' fuel and fuel elements for the First Charge of the Dragon Reactor Experiment has been completed without incident. This is a report on the safety of operations in the Dragon Fuel Element Production Building during an approximately six month period when the 'driver' fuel was manufactured and 25 elements containing this fuel were assembled and exported to the Reactor Building. The opportunity is taken to bring the Safety Document up-to-date and to report on any significant operational failures of equipment. (author)

  17. Standard specification for nuclear-grade aluminum oxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This specification applies to pellets of aluminum oxide that may be ultimately used in a reactor core, for example, as filler or spacers within fuel, burnable poison, or control rods. In order to distinguish between the subject pellets and “burnable poison” pellets, it is established that the subject pellets are not intended to be used as neutron-absorbing material. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard.

  18. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Schechter, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    An electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator has been designed, built, assembled, and tested as a proof-of-principle (POP) apparatus. The main goal of accelerators based on this concept is to use intense electron-beam heating and ablation of a hydrogen propellant stick to accelerate deuterium and/or tritium pellets to ultrahigh speeds (10 to 20 km/s) for plasma fueling of next-generation fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER). The POP apparatus is described and initial results of pellet acceleration experiments are presented. Conceptual ultrahigh-speed pellet accelerators are discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs

  19. Wood pellets in a power plant - mixed combustion of coal and wood pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nupponen, M.

    2001-01-01

    The author reviews in his presentation the development of Turku Energia, the organization of the company, the key figures of the company in 2000, as well as the purchase of energy in 2000. He also presents the purchase of basic heat load, the energy production plants of the company, the sales of heat in 2000, the emissions of the plants, and the fuel consumption of the plants in 2000. The operating experiences of the plants are also presented. The experiences gained in Turku Energia on mixed combustion of coal and wood pellets show that the mixing ratios, used at the plants, have no effect on the burning properties of the boiler, and the use of wood pellets with coal reduce the SO 2 and NO x emissions slightly. Simultaneously the CO 2 share of the wood pellets is removed from the emissions calculations. Several positive effects were observed, including the disappearance of the coal smell of the bunker, positive publicity of the utilization of wood pellets, and the subsidies for utilization of indigenous fuels in power generation. The problems seen include the tendency of wood pellets to arc the silos, especially when the pellets include high quantities of dust, and the loading of the trucks and the pneumatic unloading of the trucks break the pellets. Additionally the wood pellets bounce on the conveyor so they drop easily from the conveyor, the screw conveyors designed for conveying grain are too weak and they get stuck easily, and static electricity is easily generated in the plastic pipe used as the discharge pipe for wood pellet (sparkling tendency). This disadvantage has been overcome by using metal net and grounding

  20. Radiological surveillance in the nuclear fuel fabrication in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia A, J.; Reynoso V, R.; Delgado A, G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present the obtained results related to the application of the radiological safety programme established at the Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Pilot Plant (NFFPF) in Mexico, such as: surveillance methods, radiological protection criteria and regulations, radiation control and records and the application of ALARA recommendation. During the starting period from April 1994 to April 1995, at the NFFPF were made two nuclear fuel bundles a Dummy and other to be burned up in a BWR the mainly process activities are: UO 2 powder receiving, powder pressing for the pellets formation, pellets grinding, cleaning and drying, loading into a rod, Quality Control testing, nuclear fuel bundles assembly. The NFFPF is divided into an unsealed source area (pellets manufacturing plant) and into a sealed source area (rods fabrication plant). The control followed have helped to detect failures and to improve the safety programme and operation. (authors). 1 ref., 3 figs

  1. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    Sintered uranium dioxide pellets composed of particles of size > 50 microns suitable for power reactor use are made by incorporating a small amount of sulphur into the uranium dioxide before sintering. The increase in grain size achieved results in an improvement in overall efficiency when such pellets are used in a power reactor. (author)

  2. Investigation for the quality factors on the tablets containing medicated pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Tan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sustained and controlled pellets are considered as one of the ideal dosage forms. Due to the large coverage area of pellets, loaded drugs can be absorbed completely in the body and bioavailability is improved correspondingly. Coated pellets-containing tablet is a special oral formulation consisting of various pellets with different release rate. Desired rate of drug release rate can be achieved by adjusting the proportion of pellets. However, this formulation faces strict requirements in the process of preparation. Several factors will influence release behavior of tablets, including pellet cores, coating, and tabletting. Therefore, these factors will be investigated sufficiently in this review to provide valuable information for manufacturing process.

  3. Tritium proof-of-principle pellet injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, P.W.

    1991-07-01

    The tritium proof-of-principle (TPOP) experiment was designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the formation and acceleration of the world's first tritium pellets for fueling of future fusion reactors. The experiment was first used to produce hydrogen and deuterium pellets at ORNL. It was then moved to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the production of tritium pellets. The injector used in situ condensation to produce cylindrical pellets in a 1-m-long, 4-mm-ID barrel. A cryogenic 3 He separator, which was an integral part of the gun assembly, was capable of lowering 3 He levels in the feed gas to <0.005%. The experiment was housed to a glovebox for tritium containment. Nearly 1500 pellets were produced during the course of the experiment, and about a third of these were pure tritium or mixtures of deuterium and tritium. Over 100 kCi of tritium was processed through the experiment without incident. Tritium pellet velocities of 1400 m/s were achieved with high-pressure hydrogen propellant. The design, operation, and results of this experiment are summarized. 34 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Study on manufacturing technology of fuel guide tube using HANA alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyungil; Jung, Yangil; Park, Dongjun; Park, Jeongyong; Kim, Ilhyun; Choi, Byungkwon; Jeong, Yonghwan; Park, Sangyoon

    2013-04-01

    This research was focused on the study for the manufacturing technology of HANA alloys to crease the corrosion resistance of 30% as well as the to improve the strength of 10% when compared to the commercial zirconium alloys. The new manufacturing concept having higher corrosion resistance and strength than commercial alloy performance can be obtained in this research. This result was transferred to the KNF and, that will be commercialized. This research result can be summarized like this; Ο Parameter study to increase formability of HANA alloy tube - Study on alloy element and heat-treatment effect - Study on texture development mechanism - Study on final annealing effect Ο Out-of-pile performance evaluation of HANA alloy tube - Corrosion performance evaluation of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF - Mechanical performance evaluation of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF - Recrystallization behavior evaluation of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF - Texture characterization of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF - Microstructure characterization of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF Ο Manufacturing guideline setup to increase formability of HANA alloy tube - Manufacturing guideline setup to decrease surface defect - Manufacturing guideline setup to increase strength and corrosion resistance - Manufacturing guideline setup to control texture

  5. Manufacturing process optimization of nuclear fuel guide tube using HANA alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Choi, B. K.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, H. G.; Jeong, Y. I.; Park, D. J.; Lim, J. K. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    From this project, the advanced manufacturing parameters which were contained of heat-treatment, reduction rate, and new process (2 step) were considered to increase the guide tube performance of HANA material. It was obtained that the strength and corrosion resistance of HANA material were improved by applying the improve manufacturing parameters when compared to the commercial guide tube material. {center_dot} Manufacturing parameter study to increase mechanical property -Tensile strength increase of 30% by manufacturing parameter setup when compared to the guide tube specification {center_dot} Manufacturing parameter study to decrease irradiation growth -Theoretical study of the texture effect on sample specimens related to the irradiation growth {center_dot} Manufacturing parameter study to increase corrosion resistance -Corrosion resistance increase of 30% by manufacturing parameter setup when compared to the commercial guide tube

  6. Present and future trends in pellet markets, raw materials, and supply logistics in Sweden and Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selkimaeki, Mari; Mola-Yudego, Blas; Roeser, Dominik; Prinz, Robert; Sikanen, Lauri

    2010-01-01

    Wood pellets have become an important fuel in heat and power production, and pellet markets are currently undergoing rapid development. In this paper, the pellet markets, raw materials and supply structures are analyzed for Sweden and Finland, based on a database of the current location and production capacity of the pellet producers, complemented with existing reports and literature. In Sweden, a total of 94 pellet plants/producers were identified, producing 1.4 million tonnes of pellets, while the domestic consumption was 1.7 million tonnes, and about 400,000 t of pellets were imported to fulfil the demand in 2007. In Finland, 24 pellet plants/producers were identified and the production was around 330,000 t while the domestic consumption was 117,000 t in 2007. In Finland, pellet market has been long time export oriented, whereas domestic consumption has been growing mainly in the small scale consumer sector, estimated 15,000 households had pellet heating systems in 2008. In the future, the increasing number of pellet users will require a reliable delivery network and good equipment for bulk pellet deliveries. Provision of new raw materials and ensuring the good quality of pellets through the whole production, delivery and handling chain will be fundamental in order to increase the use of pellets and sustain the ability to compete with other fuels. (author)

  7. Radiolysis and corrosion of Pu-doped UO2 pellets in chloride brine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    processes of aged spent fuel. 238Pu doped UO2 pellets were frequently used in the past9–11 for experiments in dilute or aerated solutions. This work describes corrosion experiments with 238Pu doped UO2 pellets in deaerated 5 M NaCl solution and compares them with experiments using undoped UO2 pellets in ...

  8. Post-irradiation examination of U3SIX-AL fuel element manufactured and irradiated in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggirello, Gabriel; Calabroni, Hector; Sanchez, Miguel; Hofman, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    As a part of CNEA's qualification program as a supplier of low enriched Al-U 3 Si 2 dispersion fuel elements for research reactors, a post irradiation examination (PIE) of the first prototype of this kind, called P-04, manufactured and irradiated in Argentina, was carried out. The main purpose of this work was to set up various standard PIE techniques in the hot cell, looking forward to the next steps of the qualification program, as well as to acquire experience on the behaviour of this nuclear material and on the control of the manufacturing process. After an appropriate cooling period, on May 2000 the P-04 was transported to the hot cell in Ezeiza Atomic Centre. Non destructive and destructive tests were performed following the PIE procedures developed in Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), this mainly included dimensional measurement, microstructural observations and chemical burn-up analyses. The methodology and results of which are outlined in this report. The results obtained show a behaviour consistent with that of other fuel elements of the same kind, tested previously. On the other hand the results of this PIE, specially those concerning burn-up analysis and stability and corrosion behaviour of the fuel plates, will be of use for the IAEA Regional Program on the characterization of MTR spent fuel. (author)

  9. Inherent hazards, poor reporting and limited learning in the solid biomass energy sector: A case study of a wheel loader igniting wood dust, leading to fatal explosion at wood pellet manufacturer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess; Astad, John; Nichols, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Large loaders are commonly used when handling solid biomass fuels. A preventable accident took place in 2010, where the malfunction of a front-end wheel loader led to a dust explosion which killed the driver and destroyed the building. The case offers an opportunity to examine the hazards of solid biomass, the accident investigation and any learning that subsequently took place. The paper argues that learning opportunities were missed repeatedly. Significant root causes were not identified; principles of inherent safety in design were ignored; the hazardous area classification was based on flawed reasoning; the ATEX assessment was inadequate as it dealt only with electrical installations, ignoring work operations; and powered industrial trucks had not been recognized as a source of ignition. Perhaps most importantly, guidelines for hazardous area classification for combustible dust are insufficiently developed and give ample room for potentially erroneous subjective individual judgment. It is a contributing factor that combustible dust, although with great hazard potential, is not classified as a dangerous substance. Accidents therefore fall outside the scope of systems designed to disseminate lessons learned and prevent future accidents. More attention to safety is needed for the renewable energy and environmentally friendly biomass pellet industry also to become sustainable from a worker safety perspective. - Highlights: • Wheel loader ignited wood dust, leading to flash fire and explosion. • ATEX assessment inadequate, dealing only with electrical installations. • Guidelines for ATEX zones for combustible dusts are insufficiently developed. • Facility exploded 2002, 2010, root causes not identified, no evidence of learning. • Future repeat explosion likely had facility not been closed down

  10. Pellets for fusion reactor refueling. Annual progress report, January 1, 1976--December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, R.J.; Kim, K.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the feasibility of refueling fusion reactors using solid pellets composed of fuel elements. A solid hydrogen pellet generator has been constructed and experiments have been done to inject the pellets into the ORMAK Tokamak. A theory has been developed to describe the pellet ablation in the plasma, and an excellent agreement has been found between the theory and the experiment. Techniques for charging the pellets have been developed in order to accelerate and control them. Other works currently under way include the development of techniques for accelerating the pellets for refueling purpose. Evaluation of electrostatic acceleration has also been performed

  11. Pellet plant energy simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeasu, D.; Vasquez Pulido, T.; Nielsen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Pellet Plant energy simulator is a software based on advanced algorithms which has the main purpose to see the response of a pellet plant regarding certain location conditions. It combines energy provided by a combined heat and power, and/or by a combustion chamber with the energy consumption of the pellet factory and information regarding weather conditions in order to predict the biomass consumption of the pellet factory together with the combined heat and power, and/or with the biomass consumption of the combustion chamber. The user of the software will not only be able to plan smart the biomass acquisition and estimate its cost, but also to plan smart the preventive maintenance (charcoal cleaning in case of a gasification plant) and use the pellet plant at the maximum output regarding weather conditions and biomass moisture. The software can also be used in order to execute a more precise feasibility study for a pellet plant in a certain location. The paper outlines the algorithm that supports the Pellet Plant Energy Simulator idea and presents preliminary tests results that supports the discussion and implementation of the system

  12. Fire and fire extinguishment in silos. An experimental study[Storage of wood fuel pellets]; Brand och brandslaeckning i siloanlaeggningar. En experimentell studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Henry; Blomqvist, Per; Zhenghua Yan

    2007-01-15

    A series of four tests have been conducted with wood pellets stored in a reduced size silo. The tests were conducted in order to increase the knowledge on fire development, detection and extinction technique in silo fires. The project originated from a pre-study on the extinction of silo fires made for the Swedish Rescue Service Agency (SRV). The test silo was built of concrete rings, had a diameter of 1 m, and a height of almost 6 m, which gave a volume of 4.4 m{sup 3}. The silo was filled with wood pellets up to a height of 5 m. A local auto ignition was imitated by a coiled heating wire placed in the pellet bulk centrally in the silo and a self sustaining pyrolysis zone was established within one hour. The silo was instrumented with almost 100 thermocouples as a mean to follow the development of the pyrolysis zone and later the efficiency of the extinguishment. Gas analyses were further made, both in the top of the silo, and at four different levels in the pellet bulk. After 30 hours the extinguishment was initiated using nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), respectively. The gas was injected into the bottom of the silo. Two tests were also conducted where gas injection was combined foam application in the top of the silo. The tests showed that the pyrolysis zone preferably spreads downwards in the silo, while moisture and pyrolysis gases form a wave that slowly spreads upwards. It was difficult to detect the fire before the main 'gas wave' reached the pellet surface in the silo top, and detection time was about 20 hours in these tests. The spread of the pyrolysis zone, downward, was even slower. The slow development is probably an explanation of why real silo fires often are rather extensive once discovered. Inerting the silo with either nitrogen or carbon dioxide worked out well in the tests. The gas must be in gas phase and slowly introduced into the silo, as close to the bottom as possible. An efficient extinction implies an air

  13. THE ANALYSIS OF THE MANUFACTURING AND USING ALTERNATIVE FUEL – A MIXTURE OF RAPESEED OIL AND ALCOHOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kardasz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The following article is an analysis of designed process of manufacturing a mixture of 50% rapeseed oil and 50% alcohol and using it as a fuel. The analyzed eco-fuel is completely based on renewable sources, and can be a good alternative to diesel fuel.The analysis was made according to the assumptions of Life Cycle Assessment, which is a method that divides the whole life cycle of the product into the unit processes. It is used especially for measuring the environmental impact of the product. The life cycle of fuel mixture in an amount of 10 000 l was divided into six unit processes: the production of oilseed and biomass on the farm, transport of rapeseed to oil extraction works, oil production, the production of alcohol from biomass, the transport of mixture into a transport company and the use of total fuel delivered by the company. The use of energy and the amount of pollutants emitted were particularly important in the analysis. Fuel mixture, the same as the analyzed, was used during the whole designed process. In the production of rape on a farm the tractor and the harvester were used, and caused highest emissions of pollutants during all steps involved in the production of fuel. Alcohol, the component of the mixture, was produced through the fermentation of biomass that cames from waste from rapeseed processing, which caused no energy consumption or emissions. The analysis shows that total emissions of harmful gases is lower than that of conventional diesel, which proves that the tested fuel mixture is more environmentally friendly.

  14. Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Mason

    2009-04-16

    This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

  15. Comparison of HTGR fuel design, manufacture and quality control methods between Japan and China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xioming; Takahashi, Masashi; Ueta, Shouhei; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2002-05-01

    The first-loading fuel for the HTTR was started to fabricate at Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) in 1995 and the HTTR reached criticality in 1998. Meanwhile, 10 MW high temperature reactor (HTR-10) was constructed in Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University, and the first-loading fuel was fabricated concurrently. The HTR-10 reached criticality in December 2000. Though fuel type is different, i.e., pin-in-block type for the HTTR and pebble bed type for the HTR-10, the fabrication method of TRISO coated fuel particles is similar to each other. This report describes comparison of fuel design, fabrication process and quality inspection between them. (author)

  16. Proceedings of the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting - WRFPM / Top Fuel 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-15

    SFEN, ENS, SNR, ANS, AESJ, CNS KNS, IAEA and NEA are jointly organizing the 2009 International Water Reactor Fuel Performance / TopFuel 2009 Meeting following the 2008 KNS Water Reactor Performance Meeting held during October 19-23, 2008 in Seoul, Korea. This meeting is held annually on a tri-annual rotational basis in Europe, USA and Asia. In 2009, this meeting will be held in Paris, September 6-10, 2009 in coordination with the Global 2009 Conference at the same date and place. That would lead to a common opening session, some common technical presentations, a common exhibition and common social events. The technical scope of the meeting includes all aspects of nuclear fuel from fuel rod to core design as well as manufacturing, performance in commercial and test reactors or on-going and future developments and trends. Emphasis will be placed on fuel reliability in the general context of nuclear 'Renaissance' and recycling perspective. The meeting includes selectively front and/or back end issues that impact fuel designs and performance. In this frame, the conference track devoted to 'Concepts for transportation and interim storage of spent fuels and conditioned waste' will be shared with 'GLOBAL' conference. Technical Tracks: - 1. Fuel Performance, Reliability and Operational Experience: Fuel operating experience and performance; experience with high burn-up fuels; water side corrosion; stress corrosion cracking; MOX fuel performance; post irradiation data on lead fuel assemblies; radiation effects; water chemistry and corrosion counter-measures. - 2. Transient Fuel Behaviour and Safety Related Issues: Transient fuel behavior and criteria (RIA, LOCA, ATWS, Ramp tests..). Fuel safety-related issues such as PCI (pellet cladding interaction), transient fission gas releases and cladding bursting/ballooning during transient events - Advances in fuel performance modeling and core reload methodology, small and large-scale fuel testing

  17. ELM mitigation with pellet ELM triggering and implications for PFCs and plasma performance in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baylor, L.R.; Lang, P.T.; Allen, S.L.; Combs, S.K.; Commaux, N.; Evans, T.E.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Huijsmans, G.; Jernigan, T.C.; Lasnier, C.J.; Leonard, A.W.; Loarte, A.; Maingi, R.; Maruyama, S.; Meitner, S.J.; Moyer, R.A.; Osborne, T.H.

    2015-01-01

    The triggering of rapid small edge localized modes (ELMs) by high frequency pellet injection has been proposed as a method to prevent large naturally occurring ELMs that can erode the ITER plasma facing components (PFCs). Deuterium pellet injection has been used to successfully demonstrate the on-demand triggering of edge localized modes (ELMs) at much higher rates and with much smaller intensity than natural ELMs. The proposed hypothesis for the triggering mechanism of ELMs by pellets is the local pressure perturbation resulting from reheating of the pellet cloud that can exceed the local high-n ballooning mode threshold where the pellet is injected. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the pellet ELM triggering show destabilization of high-n ballooning modes by such a local pressure perturbation. A review of the recent pellet ELM triggering results from ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), DIII-D, and JET reveals that a number of uncertainties about this ELM mitigation technique still remain. These include the heat flux impact pattern on the divertor and wall from pellet triggered and natural ELMs, the necessary pellet size and injection location to reliably trigger ELMs, and the level of fueling to be expected from ELM triggering pellets and synergy with larger fueling pellets. The implications of these issues for pellet ELM mitigation in ITER and its impact on the PFCs are presented along with the design features of the pellet injection system for ITER

  18. ELM mitigation with pellet ELM triggering and implications for PFCs and plasma performance in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylor, L. R.; Lang, P. T.; Allen, S. L.; Combs, S. K.; Commaux, N.; Evans, T. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Huijsmans, G.; Jernigan, T. C.; Lasnier, C. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Loarte, A.; Maingi, R.; Maruyama, S.; Meitner, S. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Osborne, T. H.

    2015-08-01

    The triggering of rapid small edge localized modes (ELMs) by high frequency pellet injection has been proposed as a method to prevent large naturally occurring ELMs that can erode the ITER plasma facing components (PFCs). Deuterium pellet injection has been used to successfully demonstrate the on-demand triggering of edge localized modes (ELMs) at much higher rates and with much smaller intensity than natural ELMs. The proposed hypothesis for the triggering mechanism of ELMs by pellets is the local pressure perturbation resulting from reheating of the pellet cloud that can exceed the local high-n ballooning mode threshold where the pellet is injected. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the pellet ELM triggering show destabilization of high-n ballooning modes by such a local pressure perturbation. A review of the recent pellet ELM triggering results from ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), DIII-D, and JET reveals that a number of uncertainties about this ELM mitigation technique still remain. These include the heat flux impact pattern on the divertor and wall from pellet triggered and natural ELMs, the necessary pellet size and injection location to reliably trigger ELMs, and the level of fueling to be expected from ELM triggering pellets and synergy with larger fueling pellets. The implications of these issues for pellet ELM mitigation in ITER and its impact on the PFCs are presented along with the design features of the pellet injection system for ITER.

  19. Optimization of UO{sub 2} Granule Characteristics for UO{sub 2}-Mo Pellet Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongjoo; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Keon Sik; Oh, Jang Soo; Yang, Jae Ho; Koo, Yanghyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The in-reactor performance, integrity, safety and accident tolerance of the nuclear fuel can be significantly affected by the thermal conductivity of the UO{sub 2} fuel pellet. The improvement in the thermal conductivity of the UO{sub 2} fuel pellet can enhance the fuel performance in various ways. Typically, the FGR (Fission Gas Release) can be reduced by the application of a large-grain fuel pellet because the moving path of the fission gas to the grain boundary is much longer. In addition, the mobility of the fission gases is reduced by the lower temperature gradient in the UO{sub 2} fuel pellet. That is to say, the capacity of the fission gas retention of the fuel pellet can increase. In addition, the lower centerline temperature of the fuel pellet affects the accident tolerance for nuclear fuel as well as the enhancement of fuel safety and fuel pellet integrity under normal operation conditions. In addition, the nuclear reactor power can be uprated owing to the higher safety margin. Thus, many researches on enhancing the thermal conductivity of a nuclear fuel pellet for LWRs have been performed in various ways. From the viewpoint of the development of fuel pellet fabrication technology, an enhancement of the thermal conductivity of a pellet can be obtained by the addition of a higher thermal conductive material in the UO{sub 2} pellet. It is known that a UO{sub 2}-metal composite pellet is one of the most effective concepts. However, to maximize the effect of the metallic phase for thermal conductivity enhancement, a continuous channel of the metallic phase in the UO{sub 2} matrix must be formed. Additionally, if the fabrication process of a UO{sub 2}-metal composite pellet is compatible with a conventional sintering process, the developed technology will be favorable. To enhance the thermal conductivity of a UO{sub 2} pellet, there are the various methods for an appropriate arrangement of the high thermal conductive material in a UO{sub 2} matrix. In this

  20. Design of pellet surface grooves for fission gas plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, T.J.; Jones, L.R.; Macici, N.; Miller, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    In the Canada deuterium uranium pressurized heavy water reactor, short (50-cm) Zircaloy-4 clad bundles are fueled on-power. Although internal void volume within the fuel rods is adequate for the present once-through natural uranium cycle, the authors have investigated methods for increasing the internal gas storage volume needed in high-power, high-burnup, experimental ceramic fuels. This present work sought to prove the methodology for design of gas storage volume within the fuel pellets - specifically the use of grooves pressed or machined into the relatively cool pellet/cladding interface. Preanalysis and design of pellet groove shape and volume was accomplished using the TRUMP heat transfer code. Postirradiation examination (PIE) was used to check the initial design and heat transfer assumptions. Fission gas release was found to be higher for the grooved pellet rods than for the comparison rods with hollow or unmodified pellets. This had been expected from the initial TRUMP thermal analyses. The ELESIM fuel modeling code was used to check in-reactor performance, but some modifications were necessary to accommodate the loss of heat transfer surface to the grooves. It was concluded that for plenum design purposes, circumferential pellet grooves could be adequately modeled by the codes TRUMP and ELESIM

  1. Optimization of a multi-parameter model for biomass pelletization to investigate temperature dependence and to facilitate fast testing of pelletization behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens Kai; Stelte, Wolfgang; Posselt, Dorthe

    2011-01-01

    Pelletization of biomass residues increases the energy density, reduces storage and transportation costs and results in a homogeneous product with well-defined physical properties. However, raw materials for fuel pellet production consist of ligno-cellulosic biomass from various resources...... the pelletizing behavior of new types of biomass in a large scale pellet mill. This enables a fast estimation of key process parameters such as optimal press channel length and moisture content. Secondly, the study addresses the question of the origin of the observed relationship between pelletizing pressure...

  2. The Asian Wood Pellet Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph A. Roos; Allen Brackley

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the three major wood pellet markets in Asia: China, Japan, and South Korea. In contrast to the United States, where most wood pellets are used for residential heating with pellet stoves, a majority of the wood pellets in Asia are used for co-firing at coal-fired power plants. Our analysis indicated that Japan is the largest importer of wood pellets...

  3. Fuel rod for a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, Yoshiaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To accurately and simply measure gas pressure within a cladding tube of a fuel rod. Structure: The fuel rod is closed by an end plug with pellets made of uranium dioxide and a pressure detector element sealed into the cladding tube. When the fuel rod is manufactured, helium gases are introduced under pressure into the cladding tube, and the pressure detector element is contracted proportionally by the aforesaid pressure and therefore the amount of contract may be measured to thereby measure the inside pressure of the cladding tube. The amount of contract of the pressure detector element may be measured exteriorly of the fuel rod by arranging a fluorescent screen or film for X-rays or other radiations on one side of the fuel rod. (Yoshino, Y.)

  4. Analysis of pellet cladding mechanical interaction using computational simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berretta, José R.; Suman, Ricardo B.; Faria, Danilo P.; Rodi, Paulo A.; Giovedi, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    During the operation of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), specifically under power transients, the fuel pellet experiences many phenomena, such as swelling and thermal expansion. These dimensional changes in the fuel pellet can enable occurrence of contact it and the cladding along the fuel rod. Thus, pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI), due this contact, induces stress increase at the contact points during a period, until the accommodation of the cladding to the stress increases. This accommodation occurs by means of the cladding strain, which can produce failure, if the fuel rod deformation is permanent or the burst limit of the cladding is reached. Therefore, the mechanical behavior of the cladding during the occurrence of PCMI under power transients shall be investigated during the fuel rod design. Considering the Accident Tolerant Fuel program which aims to develop new materials to be used as cladding in PWR, one important design condition to be evaluated is the cladding behavior under PCMI. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of the PCMI on a typical PWR fuel rod geometry with stainless steel cladding under normal power transients using computational simulation (ANSYS code). The PCMI was analyzed considering four geometric situations at the region of interaction between pellet and cladding. The first case, called “perfect fuel model” was used as reference for comparison. In the second case, it was considered the occurrence of a pellet crack with the loss of a chip. The goal for the next two cases was that a pellet chip was positioned into the gap of pellet-cladding, in the situations described in the first two cases. (author)

  5. Analysis of pellet cladding mechanical interaction using computational simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berretta, José R.; Suman, Ricardo B.; Faria, Danilo P.; Rodi, Paulo A., E-mail: jose.berretta@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (LabRisco/USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Laboratório de Análise, Avaliação e Gerenciamento de Riscos

    2017-07-01

    During the operation of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), specifically under power transients, the fuel pellet experiences many phenomena, such as swelling and thermal expansion. These dimensional changes in the fuel pellet can enable occurrence of contact it and the cladding along the fuel rod. Thus, pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI), due this contact, induces stress increase at the contact points during a period, until the accommodation of the cladding to the stress increases. This accommodation occurs by means of the cladding strain, which can produce failure, if the fuel rod deformation is permanent or the burst limit of the cladding is reached. Therefore, the mechanical behavior of the cladding during the occurrence of PCMI under power transients shall be investigated during the fuel rod design. Considering the Accident Tolerant Fuel program which aims to develop new materials to be used as cladding in PWR, one important design condition to be evaluated is the cladding behavior under PCMI. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of the PCMI on a typical PWR fuel rod geometry with stainless steel cladding under normal power transients using computational simulation (ANSYS code). The PCMI was analyzed considering four geometric situations at the region of interaction between pellet and cladding. The first case, called “perfect fuel model” was used as reference for comparison. In the second case, it was considered the occurrence of a pellet crack with the loss of a chip. The goal for the next two cases was that a pellet chip was positioned into the gap of pellet-cladding, in the situations described in the first two cases. (author)

  6. Fabrication, irradiation and post-irradiation examinations of MO2 and UO2 sphere-pac and UO2 pellet fuel pins irradiated in a PWR loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, A. van der; Lucas Luijckx, H.J.B.; Verheugen, J.H.N.

    1981-04-01

    Three fuel pin bundles, R-109/1, 2 and 3, were irradiated in a PWR loop in the HFR at Petten during respectively 131, 57 and 57 effective full power days at average powers of approximately 39 kW.m -1 and at peak powers of approximately 60 kW.m -1 . The results of the post-irradiation examinations of these fuel bundles are presented. (Auth.)

  7. Quality management and quality assurance in the manufacture of nuclear fuel elements: new trends and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, K.

    1998-01-01

    Modern instruments for quality assurance are applied with increasing success also in the area of fuel element supply. This new philosophy of quality management is characterized by a clear focus on processes and a commitment to continuous quality improvement. How can these new quality concepts, the application of which is desired by the companies operating nuclear power plants, be implemented and find acceptance? Is it possible that error prevention in place of error correction can increase the quality of fuel elements and at the same time reduce costs? What instruments are available to solve problems specific to fuel element technology? Efforts currently under way to answer these questions are described, particularly with regard to cooperation with fuel element suppliers. Within this context, a new guideline 'Quality System for Fuel Elements' has been developed. (orig.) [de

  8. Manufacturing and investigation of U-Mo LEU fuel granules by hydride-dehydride processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stetskiy, Y.A.; Trifonov, Y.I.; Mitrofanov, A.V.; Samarin, V.I.

    2002-01-01

    Investigations of hydride-dehydride processing for comminution of U-Mo alloys with Mo content in the range 1.9/9.2% have been performed. Some regularities of the process as a function of Mo content have been determined as well as some parameters elaborated. Hydride-dehydride processing has been shown to provide necessary phase and chemical compositions of U-Mo fuel granules to be used in disperse fuel elements for research reactors. Pin type disperse mini-fuel elements for irradiation tests in the loop of 'MIR' reactor (Dmitrovgrad) have been fabricated using U-Mo LEU fuel granules obtained by hydride-dehydride processing. Irradiation tests of these mini-fuel elements loaded to 4 g U tot /cm 3 are planned to start by the end of this year. (author)

  9. Pellet injector research and development at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, S.K.; Barber, G.C.; Baylor, L.R.

    1994-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been developing pellet injectors for plasma fueling experiments on magnetic confinement devices for more than 15 years. Recent major applications of the ORNL development program include (1) a tritium-compatible four-shot pneumatic injector for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, (2) a centrifuge pellet injector for the Tore Supra tokamak, and most recently (3) a three-barrel repeating pneumatic injector for the DIII-D tokamak. In addition to applications, ORNL is developing advanced technologies, including high-speed pellet injectors, tritium injectors, and long-pulse pellet feed systems. The high-speed research involves a collaboration between ORNL and ENEA-Frascati in the development of a repeating two-stage light gas gun based on an extrusion-type pellet feed system. Construction of a new tritium-compatible, extruder-based repeating pneumatic injector (8-mm-diam) is complete and will replace the pipe gun in the original tritium proof-of-principle experiment. The development of a steady-state feed system in which three standard extruders operate in tandem is under way. These research and development activities are relevant to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and are briefly described in this paper

  10. Monitoring and data acquisition of the high speed hydrogen pellet in SPINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Samiran Shanti, E-mail: samiran@ipr.res.in; Mishra, Jyotishankar; Gangradey, Ranjana; Dutta, Pramit; Rastogi, Naveen; Panchal, Paresh; Nayak, Pratik; Agarwal, Jyoti; Bairagi, Pawan; Patel, Haresh; Sharma, Hardik

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Pellet INjector System with monitoring and data acquisition is described. • A high speed camera was used to view pellet size, and its flight trajectory. • PXI based high speed control system is used data acquisition. • Pellets of length 2–4.8 mm and speed 250–750 m/s were obtained. - Abstract: Injection of solid hydrogen pellets is an efficient way of replenishing the spent fuel in high temperature plasmas. Aiming that, a Single Pellet INjector System (SPINS) is developed at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India, to initiate pellet injection related research in SST-1. The pellet injector is controlled by a PXI system based data acquisition and control (DAC) system for pellet formation, precise firing control, data collection and diagnostics. The velocity of high speed moving pellets is estimated by using two sets of light gate diagnostic. Apart from light gate, a fast framing camera is used to measure the pellet size and its speed. The pellet images are captured at a frame rate of ∼200,000 frames per second at (128 × 64) pixel resolution with an exposure time of 1 μs. Using these diagnostic, various cylindrical pellets of length ranging from 2 to 4.8 mm and speed 250–750 m/s were successfully obtained. This paper describes the control and data acquisition system of SPINS, the techniques for measurement of pellet velocity and capturing images of high speed moving pellet.

  11. Monitoring and data acquisition of the high speed hydrogen pellet in SPINS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Samiran Shanti; Mishra, Jyotishankar; Gangradey, Ranjana; Dutta, Pramit; Rastogi, Naveen; Panchal, Paresh; Nayak, Pratik; Agarwal, Jyoti; Bairagi, Pawan; Patel, Haresh; Sharma, Hardik

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pellet INjector System with monitoring and data acquisition is described. • A high speed camera was used to view pellet size, and its flight trajectory. • PXI based high speed control system is used data acquisition. • Pellets of length 2–4.8 mm and speed 250–750 m/s were obtained. - Abstract: Injection of solid hydrogen pellets is an efficient way of replenishing the spent fuel in high temperature plasmas. Aiming that, a Single Pellet INjector System (SPINS) is developed at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India, to initiate pellet injection related research in SST-1. The pellet injector is controlled by a PXI system based data acquisition and control (DAC) system for pellet formation, precise firing control, data collection and diagnostics. The velocity of high speed moving pellets is estimated by using two sets of light gate diagnostic. Apart from light gate, a fast framing camera is used to measure the pellet size and its speed. The pellet images are captured at a frame rate of ∼200,000 frames per second at (128 × 64) pixel resolution with an exposure time of 1 μs. Using these diagnostic, various cylindrical pellets of length ranging from 2 to 4.8 mm and speed 250–750 m/s were successfully obtained. This paper describes the control and data acquisition system of SPINS, the techniques for measurement of pellet velocity and capturing images of high speed moving pellet.

  12. From a single pellet press to a bench scale pellet mill - Pelletizing six different biomass feedstocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puig Arnavat, Maria; Shang, Lei; Sárossy, Zsuzsa

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for biomass pellets requires the investigation of alternative raw materials for pelletizetion. In the present paper, the pelletization process of fescue, alfalfa, sorghum, triticale, miscanthus and willow is studied to determine if results obtained in a single pellet press...... (SPP) can be extrapolated to larger scale pellet mills. The single pellet press was used to find the optimum moisture content and die operating temperature for pellet production. Then, these results were compared with those obtained from a bench-scale pellet mill. A moisture content of around 10 wt...

  13. Fuel cycles of WWER-1000 based on assemblies with increased fuel mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosourov, E.; Pavlovichev, A.; Shcherenko, A.

    2011-01-01

    Modern WWER-1000 fuel cycles are based on FAs with the fuel column height of 3680 mm, diameters of the fuel pellet and its central hole of 7.6 and 1.2 mm respectively. The highest possible fuel enrichment has reached its license limit that is 4.95 %. Research in the field of modernization, safety justification and licensing of equipment for fuel manufacture, storage and transportation are required for further fuel enrichment increase (above 5 %). So in the nearest future an improvement of technical and economic characteristics of fuel cycles is possible if assembly fuel mass is increased. The available technology of the cladding thinning makes it possible. If the fuel rod outer diameter is constant and the clad inner diameter is increased to 7.93 mm, the diameter of the fuel pellet can be increased to 7.8 mm. So the suppression of the pellet central hole allows increasing assembly fuel weight by about 8 %. In this paper we analyze how technical and economic characteristics of WWER-1000 fuel cycle change when an advanced FA is applied instead of standard one. Comparison is made between FAs with equal time interval between refueling. This method of comparison makes it possible to eliminate the parameters that constitute the operation component of electricity generation cost, taking into account only the following technical and economic characteristics: 1)cycle length; 2) average burnup of spent FAs; 3) specific natural uranium consumption; 4)specific quantity of separative work units; 5) specific enriched uranium consumption; 6) specific assembly consumption. Collected data allow estimating the efficiency of assembly fuel weight increase and verifying