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Sample records for fuel management final

  1. The final management of nuclear fuel. Legal and economic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villota, C. de

    2009-01-01

    This article gives a brief summary of the characteristics of spent fuel and the lines of action considered for its management. It describes the legal framework that supports the Radioactive Waste Management Plan (PGRR), which contains the lines applicable to Final Spent Fuel Management, as well as the evolution of this legal framework. The article contains the 2008 updated costs of the various items of the PGRR, with a more detailed description of those related to this type of fuel, as well the source and amount of the financial contributions to the fund for meeting these costs, including how they have evolved over time. finally, it provides some personal reflections on this issue. (Author)

  2. Monitoring instrumentation spent fuel management program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary monitoring system methodologies are identified as an input to the risk assessment of spent fuel management. Conceptual approaches to instrumentation for surveillance of canister position and orientation, vault deformation, spent fuel dissolution, temperature, and health physics conditions are presented. In future studies, the resolution, reliability, and uncertainty associated with these monitoring system methodologies will be evaluated

  3. The final management of nuclear fuel. Legal and economic aspects; La gestion final del combustible nuclear. Aspectos legales y economicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villota, C. de

    2009-07-01

    This article gives a brief summary of the characteristics of spent fuel and the lines of action considered for its management. It describes the legal framework that supports the Radioactive Waste Management Plan (PGRR), which contains the lines applicable to Final Spent Fuel Management, as well as the evolution of this legal framework. The article contains the 2008 updated costs of the various items of the PGRR, with a more detailed description of those related to this type of fuel, as well the source and amount of the financial contributions to the fund for meeting these costs, including how they have evolved over time. finally, it provides some personal reflections on this issue. (Author)

  4. Spent fuel management strategies in eight countries and applicability to Sweden. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The spent fuel management activities described in volume 1 are compared in three areas. The first section summarizes the spent fuel management options being followed in each country and compares those options with regard to cost, environmental impact and public acceptability. Next section reviews and compares national policies on nuclear power, spent fuel management and high-level waste disposal and assesses their impact on the development and licensing of nuclear power plants. The third section compares the regulatory requirements affecting spent fuel managementin terms of their overall spirit and characteristics and in terms of the responsibilities of the utilities and the regulatory authorities. Finally, the last section addresses the applicability to Sweden of the findings from these comparisons, focusing on cost efficiency, health and safety, environmental impact, public acceptance and licensing procedures

  5. Spent fuel management strategies in eight countries and applicability to Sweden. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    International Energy Associates Limited (IEAL) undertook this study on behalf of Sweden's National Board for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SKN) from June to October 1986. The purpose of the project was to compare the programs and regulations for the management of spent fuel from nuclear power plants and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in eight countries: Belgium, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Japan, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States. This final report includes revisions requested by SKN upon review of the draft report dated in September 26, 1986. The study is presented in three volumes. Volume I (Section 2.0 of the report) consists of detailed country-specific reports on the policies, regulations and strategies for spent fuel and high-level waste management in each of the eight countries. The information contained in these country-specific reports was used as the basis for comparing the options in each country in terms of cost, environmental impact, and public acceptability, and for comparing the policies and regulatory requirements affecting these activities in each country. These comparisons are provided in Volume II (Section 3.0 of the report). Section 3.0 also includes a discussion of the applicability to Sweden of the strategies and policies in the eight countries studied. Finally, Volume III of the report (Section 4.0) presents the laws, regulations and other documents pertinent to spent fuel and high-level waste management in these countries. Descriptive summaries of the documents are provided in Section 4.0, a comparison guide to the documents themselves (the great majority of them in English) which are provided in 15 volumes of appendices

  6. Closing the gap between spent fuel storage and final disposal in a multinational management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredell, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, a multinational spent fuel management concept is proposed. The management concept is based on a service agreement between countries, which intend participating in a common spent fuel (SNF) management venture. Accordingly, one of the participants in this venture would act as the hosting country, while the others fulfil the role of customer countries. The hosting country would agree to accept SNF from customer countries under specific conditions, as required by the service agreement. The service agreement should cover a sufficient number of options that customers can use, such as storage, reprocessing or disposal. The service offering should be flexible enough to accommodate diverse customer requirements. Typically, the first step in the multinational management process is the storage of the SNF delivered to the hosting country. The final step being the disposal of the material in a deep geologic repository. This paper explores the ways and means of closing the gap between the first and last steps in the management process. (author)

  7. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    DOE is responsible for the safe and efficient management of its sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel. This fuel contains metallic sodium, a highly reactive material; metallic uranium, which is also reactive; and in some cases, highly enriched uranium. The presence of reactive materials could complicate the process of qualifying and licensing DOE's sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel inventory for disposal in a geologic repository. Currently, more than 98 percent of this inventory is located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), near Idaho Falls, Idaho. In addition, in a 1995 agreement with the State of Idaho, DOE committed to remove all spent nuclear fuel from Idaho by 2035. This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with the treatment and management of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel in one or more facilities located at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) at INEEL and either the F-Canyon or Building 105-L at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE has identified and assessed six proposed action alternatives in this EIS. These are: (1) electrometallurgical treatment of all fuel at ANL-W, (2) direct disposal of blanket fuel in high-integrity cans with the sodium removed at ANL-W, (3) plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) processing of blanket fuel at SRS, (4) melt and dilute processing of blanket fuel at ANL-W, (5) melt and dilute processing of blanket fuel at SRS, and (6) melt and dilute processing of all fuel at ANL-W. In addition, Alternatives 2 through 5 include the electrometallurgical treatment of driver fuel at ANL-W. Under the No Action Alternative, the EIS evaluates both the continued storage of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel until the development of a new treatment technology or direct disposal without treatment. Under all of the alternatives, the affected environment is primarily within 80 kilometers (50 miles) of spent nuclear fuel treatment facilities. Analyses indicate

  8. Spent fuel management strategies in eight countries and applicability to Sweden. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    International Energy Associates Limited undertook this study on behalf of Sweden's National Board for Spent Nuclear Fuel. The purpose of the project was to compare the programs and regulations for the management of spent fuel from nuclear power plants in eight countries: Belgium, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Japan, Switzerland, The United Kingdom and the Uinted States. The study is presented in three volumes. Volume I consists of detailed country-specific reports on the policies, regulations, and strategies for spent fuel and high-level waste management in each of the eight countries

  9. Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-04-14

    The proposed DOE action considered in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to implement appropriate processes for the safe and efficient management of spent nuclear fuel and targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken County, South Carolina, including placing these materials in forms suitable for ultimate disposition. Options to treat, package, and store this material are discussed. The material included in this EIS consists of approximately 68 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of spent nuclear fuel 20 MTHM of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at SRS, as much as 28 MTHM of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel from foreign and domestic research reactors to be shipped to SRS through 2035, and 20 MTHM of stainless-steel or zirconium-clad spent nuclear fuel and some Americium/Curium Targets stored at SRS. Alternatives considered in this EIS encompass a range of new packaging, new processing, and conventional processing technologies, as well as the No Action Alternative. A preferred alternative is identified in which DOE would prepare about 97% by volume (about 60% by mass) of the aluminum-based fuel for disposition using a melt and dilute treatment process. The remaining 3% by volume (about 40% by mass) would be managed using chemical separation. Impacts are assessed primarily in the areas of water resources, air resources, public and worker health, waste management, socioeconomic, and cumulative impacts.

  10. Spent fuel management strategies in eight countries and applicability to Sweden. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents the texts of laws and regulations on the management of spent nuclear fuel in eight countries: Belgium, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Japan, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States. Reports and articles presented by the governments are also provided which in many cases offer useful descriptions of programs, regulations, and policies. Summary descriptions of each of the documents are presented in this volume. The scope of the materials provided covers policies and regulations on spent fuel storage (wet and dry, at-reactor and centralized), packaging, handling, transportation, reprocessing, and disposal. Types of documents include legislation, decrees and ordinances, regulations and regulatory guidance, statements of policy and important articles. All important nuclear legislation is included whether or not it deals with spent fuel management explicitly. This includes basic atomic energy laws and laws on financial liability, environmental protection, physical security etc. Similarly, regulations and ordinances having broad impact on nuclear activities are included, such as radiation protection, environmental protection and emergency planning requirements, as well as regulations dealing with spent fuel and waste management topics directly. All legal documents provided are currently in effect

  11. Department of the Navy final environmental impact statement for a container system for the management of naval spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) addresses six general alternative systems for the loading, storage, transport, and possible disposal of naval spent nuclear fuel following examination. This EIS describes environmental impacts of (1) producing and implementing the container systems (including those impacts resulting from the addition of the capability to load the containers covered in this EIS in dry fuel handling facilities at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)); (2) loading of naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility or at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant with subsequent storage at INEL; (3) construction of a storage facility (such as a paved area) at alternative locations at INEL; and (4) loading of containers and their shipment to a geologic repository or to a centralized interim storage site outside the State of Idaho once one becomes available. As indicated in the EIS, the systems and facilities might also be used for handling low-level radiological waste categorized as special case waste. The Navy's preferred alternative for a container system for the management of naval spent fuel is a dual-purpose canister system. The primary benefits of a dual-purpose canister system are efficiencies in container manufacturing and fuel reloading operations, and potential reductions in radiation exposure

  12. The Swedish Radiation Protection Institute's regulations concerning the final management of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste - with background and comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    This report presents and comments on the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute's Regulations concerning the Protection of Human Health and the Environment in connection with the Final Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel or Nuclear Waste, SSI FS 1998: 1

  13. Fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, E.R.

    1975-01-01

    Description of the operation of power plants and the respective procurement of fuel to fulfil the needs of the grid. The operation of the plants shall be optimised with respect to the fuel cost. (orig./RW) [de

  14. Final disposition of MTR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonnson, Erik B.

    1996-01-01

    The final disposition of power reactor fuel has been investigated for a long time and some promising solutions to the problem have been shown. The research reactor fuels are normally not compatible with the zirkonium clad power reactor fuel and can thus not rely on the same disposal methods. The MTR fuels are typically Al-clad UAl x or U 3 Si 2 , HEU resp. LEU with essentially higher remaining enrichment than the corresponding power reactor fuel after full utilization of the uranium. The problems arising when evaluating the conditions at the final repository are the high corrosion rate of aluminum and uranium metal and the risk for secondary criticality due to the high content on fissionable material in the fully burnt MTR fuel. The newly adopted US policy to take back Foreign Research Reactor Spent Fuel of US origin for a period of ten years have given the research reactor society a reasonable time to evaluate different possibilities to solve the back end of the fuel cycle. The problem is, however, complicated and requires a solid engagement from the research reactor community. The task would be a suitable continuation of the RERTR program as it involves both the development of new fuel types and collecting data for the safe long-term disposal of the spent MTR fuel. (author)

  15. Thorium fuel cycle management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajac, R.; Darilek, P.; Breza, J.; Necas, V.

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with the thorium fuel cycle management. Description of the thorium fuels and thorium fuel cycle benefits and challenges as well as thorium fuel calculations performed by the computer code HELIOS are presented.

  16. Optimised fuel cell operation management. Final report; Optimiertes Betriebsmanagement von Brennstoffzellen. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-11-05

    Investigations were carried out on two fuel cell systems of the type ONSI PC 25C (large fuel cells) and three fuel cell heaters of the type HXS 1000 PREMIERE by Sulzer HEXIS (small fuel cells) for long periods of time and in different modes of operation. Information was obtained on efficiencies and performance, pollutant emissions, degradation and availability. The status of the project is reported and compared with the goals stated initially. (orig.) [German] Das Hauptziel des Projektes bestand darin, Kriterien fuer den optimalen Betrieb (hohe Verfuegbarkeit, geringe Anzahl von Abschaltungen, hohe Energienutzung etc.) von Brennstoffzellen im Zusammenspiel mit den peripheren Komponenten der Gebaeudetechnik zu ermitteln. Hierzu wurden Untersuchungen an zwei Brennstoffzellen-Anlagen vom Typ ONSI PC 25C (grosse BZ) und an drei Brennstoffzellen-Heizgeraeten HXS 1000 PREMIERE von Sulzer HEXIS (kleine BZ) ueber laengere Zeitraeume und bei weitestgehend unterschiedlichen Betriebsweisen durchgefuehrt. In Auswertung dieser Messkomplexe wurden Aussagen zum Betriebsverhalten der Brennstoffzellen, wie z.B. zu Wirk- und Nutzungsgraden, Schadstoffemissionen, Verlauf der Degradation sowie zur Verfuegbarkeit getroffen. Im vorliegenden Bericht wird der erreichte Sachstand detailliert dargestellt und mit den Zielsetzungen des FuE-Antrages verglichen. (orig.)

  17. Spent fuel management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The spent fuel management strategy in Spain is presented. The strategy includes temporary solutions and plans for final disposal. The need for R and D including partitioning and transmutation, as well as the financial constraints are also addressed. (author)

  18. The Swedish Radiation Protection Institute's regulations concerning the final management of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste - with background and comments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-11-01

    This report presents and comments on the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute's Regulations concerning the Protection of Human Health and the Environment in connection with the Final Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel or Nuclear Waste, SSI FS 1998: 1.

  19. Fuel cycle management in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaeyrynen, H.; Mikkola, I.

    1987-01-01

    Both Finnish utilities producing nuclear power - Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima Oy (Industrial Power Co. Ltd, TVO) - have created efficient fuel cycle management systems. The systems however differ in almost all respects. The reason is that the principal supplier for IVO is the Soviet Union and for TVO is Sweden. A common feature of both systems at the front end of the cycle is the building of stockpiles in order to provide for interruptions in fuel deliveries. Quality assurance supervision at the fuel factory for IVO is regulated by the Soviet Chamber of Commerce and Industry and a final control is made in Finland. The in-core fuel management is done by IVO using codes developed in Finland. The whole IVO fuel cycle is basically a leasing arrangement. The spent fuel is returned to the USSR after five years cooling. TVO carries out the in-core fuel management using a computer code system supplied by Asea-Atom. TVO is responsable for the back end of the cycle and makes preparations for the final disposal of the spent fuel in Finland. 6 refs., 2 figs

  20. Fuel management and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendryes, G

    1972-11-01

    From international conference on nuclear solutions to world energy problems; Washington, District of Columbia, USA (12 Nov The low cost of the fuel cycle is the most attractive feature of the fast neutron breeder reactor. In order to achieve it a good fuel management is essential, with well balanced fixed investment and renewal fuel costs. In addition the designer can optimize the power station as a whole (fuel cycle and thermal characteristics). (auth)

  1. SRE fuel decladding. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennison, W.F.

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes the task of decladding the SRE fuel assemblies, and shipment of the fuel to Savannah River for eventual reprocessing. The disposition of 16 unidentified RMDF storage canisters is also covered

  2. Spent fuel management in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattantyus, P.

    1998-01-01

    The current status of the Canadian Spent Fuel Management is described. This includes wet and dry interim storage, transportation issues and future plans regarding final disposal based on deep underground emplacement in stable granite rock. Extension of wet interim storage facilities is not planned, as dry storage technologies have found wide acceptance. (author)

  3. Spent fuel management in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Pattantyus, P.

    1999-01-01

    The current status of the Canadian spent fuel storage is presented. This includes wet and dry interim storage. Extension of wet interim storage facilities is nor planned, as dry technologies have found wide acceptance. The Canadian nuclear program is sustained by commercial Ontario Hydro CANDU type reactors, since 1971, representing 13600 MW(e) of installed capacity, able to produce 9200 spent fuel bundles (1800 tU) every year, and Hydro Quebec and New Brunswick CANDU reactors each producing 685 MW(e) and about 100 tU of spent fuel annually. The implementation of various interim (wt and dry) storage technologies resulted in simple, dense and low cost systems. Economical factors determined that the open cycle option be adopted for the CANDU type reactors rather that recycling the spent fuel. Research and development activities for immobilization and final disposal of nuclear waste are being undertaken in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

  4. Fuel cycle management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbin, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    The fuel cycle management is more and more dependent on the management of the generation means among the power plants tied to the grid. This is due mainly because of the importance taken by the nuclear power plants within the power system. The main task of the fuel cycle management is to define the refuelling pattern of the new and irradiated fuel assemblies to load in the core as a function of: 1) the differences which exist between the actual conditions of the core and what was expected for the present cycle, 2) the operating constraints and the reactor availability, 3) the technical requirements in safety and the technological limits of the fuel, 4) the economics. Three levels of fuel cycle management can be considered: 1) a long term management: determination of enrichments and expected cycle lengths, 2) a mid term management whose aim corresponds to the evaluation of the batch to load within the core as a function of both: the next cycle length to achieve and the integrated power history of all the cycles up to the present one, 3) a short term management which deals with the updating of the loaded fuel utilisations to take into account the operation perturbations, or with the alteration of the loading pattern of the next batch to respect unexpected conditions. (orig.) [de

  5. Spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The production of nuclear electricity results in the generation of spent fuel that requires safe, secure and efficient management. Appropriate management of the resulting spent fuel is a key issue for the steady and sustainable growth of nuclear energy. Currently about 10,000 tonnes heavy metal (HM) of spent fuel are unloaded every year from nuclear power reactors worldwide, of which 8,500 t HM need to be stored (after accounting for reprocessed fuel). This is the largest continuous source of civil radioactive material generated, and needs to be managed appropriately. Member States have referred to storage periods of 100 years and even beyond, and as storage quantities and durations extend, new challenges arise in the institutional as well as in the technical area. The IAEA gives high priority to safe and effective spent fuel management. As an example of continuing efforts, the 2003 International Conference on Storage of Spent Fuel from Power Reactors gathered 125 participants from 35 member states to exchange information on this important subject. With its large number of Member States, the IAEA is well-positioned to gather and share information useful in addressing Member State priorities. IAEA activities on this topic include plans to produce technical documents as resources for a range of priority topics: spent fuel performance assessment and research, burnup credit applications, cask maintenance, cask loading optimization, long term storage requirements including records maintenance, economics, spent fuel treatment, remote technology, and influence of fuel design on spent fuel storage. In addition to broader topics, the IAEA supports coordinated research projects and technical cooperation projects focused on specific needs

  6. Fan Fuel Casting Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhoff, Seth D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    LANL was approached to provide material and design guidance for a fan-shaped fuel element. A total of at least three castings were planned. The first casting is a simple billet mold to be made from high carbon DU-10Mo charge material. The second and third castings are for optimization of the actual fuel plate mold. The experimental scope for optimization is only broad enough for a second iteration of the mold design. It is important to note that partway through FY17, this project was cancelled by the sponsor. This report is being written in order to capture the knowledge gained should this project resume at a later date.

  7. Spent fuel management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gago, J.A.; Gravalos, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    There are presently nine Light Water Reactors in operation, representing around a 34% of the overall electricity production. In the early years, a small amount of spent fuel was sent to be reprocessed, although this policy was cancelled in favor of the open cycle option. A state owned company, ENRESA, was created in 1984, which was given the mandate to manage all kinds of radioactive wastes generated in the country. Under the present scenario, a rough overall amount of 7000 tU of spent fuel will be produced during the lifetime of the plants, which will go into final disposal. (author)

  8. Strategy of fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guesdon, B.; Le Bars, M.; Mathonniere, G.

    1996-01-01

    The management of nuclear fuels in PWR type reactors has been adapted to improve the safety and the competitiveness of brackets. The economic optimum, at the park level, depends on many parameters, variable with time and in function of them, we favour the annual campaigns and the economy won on the cost of cycle, or long campaigns with benefit on availability. The reduction of the number of stopping improves the availability, limits the doses integrated by the personnel of intervention and reduces the number of incidents during the stopping. An other determining factor is connected to the policy of closed cycle with the the principle of equality between the reprocessing flux and the valorization of reprocessed fuels: plutonium and reprocessed uranium. The progress of fuel have allowed significant improvements in the managements of cores. With the safety, the aim is also to keep if not improve the competitiveness of the Nuclear park by valorizing the matter coming from reprocessing. (N.C.)

  9. Overview on spent fuel management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview on spent fuel management strategies which range from reprocessing to interim storage in a centralised facility followed by final disposal in a repository. In either case, more spent fuel storage capacity (wet or dry, at-reactor or away-from-reactor, national or regional) is required as spent fuel is continuously accumulated while most countries prefer to defer their decision to choose between these two strategies. (author)

  10. Final report of INFCE Working Group 6, (INFCE/WG.6/16). ''Spent fuel management'' and executive summary (INFCE/WG.6/17)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report analyses the technical and economic aspects of the current spent fuel storage and transport experiencing present and future requirements, and alternative spent fuel management concepts. Institutional and legal matters are discussed in relation to the present status, present and future requirements and alternative spent fuel management concepts. Special attention is paid to impact factors as there are technical aspects, environmental and physical protection, safeguards, costs, legal and institutional matters, non-proliferation and licensing aspects. Special needs of developing countries and industrialized countries with a limited nuclear power programme are analysed specifically

  11. INL Site Portion of the April 1995 Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Mamagement Programmatic Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2005-06-30

    In April 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of the Navy, as a cooperating agency, issued the Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement (1995 EIS). The 1995 EIS analyzed alternatives for managing The Department's existing and reasonably foreseeable inventories of spent nuclear fuel through the year 2035. It also included a detailed analysis of environmental restoration and waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The analysis supported facility-specific decisions regarding new, continued, or planned environmental restoration and waste management operations. The Record of Decision (ROD) was signed in June 1995 and amended in February 1996. It documented a number of projects or activities that would be implemented as a result of decisions regarding INL Site operations. In addition to the decisions that were made, decisions on a number of projects were deferred or projects have been canceled. DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing procedures (found in 10 CFR Part 1 021.330(d)) require that a Supplement Analysis of site-wide EISs be done every five years to determine whether the site-wide EIS remains adequate. While the 1995 EIS was not a true site-wide EIS in that several programs were not included, most notably reactor operations, this method was used to evaluate the adequacy of the 1995 EIS. The decision to perform a Supplement Analysis was supported by the multi-program aspect of the 1995 EIS in conjunction with the spirit of the requirement for periodic review. The purpose of the SA is to determine if there have been changes in the basis upon which an EIS was prepared. This provides input for an evaluation of the continued adequacy of the EIS in light of those changes (i.e., whether there are substantial changes in the proposed

  12. HEU to LEU fuel conversion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, R.U.

    1994-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a ruling, effective March 27, 1986, that all U.S. non-power reactors convert from HEU fuel to LEU fuel. A Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program was conducted by the Department of Energy at Argonne National Laboratory to coordinate the development of the high density LEU fuel and assist in the development of Safety Analysis Reports for the smaller non-power reactors. Several meetings were held at Argonne in 1987 with the non-power reactor community to discuss the conversion and to set up a conversion schedule for university reactors. EG&G at Idaho was assigned the coordination of the fuel element redesigns. The fuel elements were manufactured by the Babcock & Wilcox Company in Lynchburg, Virginia. The University of Virginia was awarded a grant by the DOE Idaho Operations Office in 1988 to perform safety analysis studies for the LEU conversion for its 2 MW UVAR and 100 Watt CAVALIER reactors. The University subsequently decided to shut down the CAVALIER reactor. A preliminary SAR on the UVAR, along with Technical Specification changes, was submitted to the NRC in November, 1990. An updated SAR was approved by the NRC in January, 1991. In September, 1992, representatives from the fuel manufacturer (B&W) and the fuel designer (EG&G, Idaho) came to the UVAR facility to observe trial fittings of new 22 plate LEU mock fuel elements. B&W fabricated two non-fuel bearing elements, a regular 22 plate element and a control rod element. The elements were checked against the drawings and test fitted in the UVAR grid plate. The dimensions were acceptable and the elements fit in the grid plate with no problems. The staff made several suggestions for minor construction changes to the end pieces on the elements, which were incorporated into the final design of the actual fuel elements. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. HEU to LEU fuel conversion. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, R.U.

    1994-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a ruling, effective March 27, 1986, that all U.S. non-power reactors convert from HEU fuel to LEU fuel. A Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program was conducted by the Department of Energy at Argonne National Laboratory to coordinate the development of the high density LEU fuel and assist in the development of Safety Analysis Reports for the smaller non-power reactors. Several meetings were held at Argonne in 1987 with the non-power reactor community to discuss the conversion and to set up a conversion schedule for university reactors. EG ampersand G at Idaho was assigned the coordination of the fuel element redesigns. The fuel elements were manufactured by the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Company in Lynchburg, Virginia. The University of Virginia was awarded a grant by the DOE Idaho Operations Office in 1988 to perform safety analysis studies for the LEU conversion for its 2 MW UVAR and 100 Watt CAVALIER reactors. The University subsequently decided to shut down the CAVALIER reactor. A preliminary SAR on the UVAR, along with Technical Specification changes, was submitted to the NRC in November, 1990. An updated SAR was approved by the NRC in January, 1991. In September, 1992, representatives from the fuel manufacturer (B ampersand W) and the fuel designer (EG ampersand G, Idaho) came to the UVAR facility to observe trial fittings of new 22 plate LEU mock fuel elements. B ampersand W fabricated two non-fuel bearing elements, a regular 22 plate element and a control rod element. The elements were checked against the drawings and test fitted in the UVAR grid plate. The dimensions were acceptable and the elements fit in the grid plate with no problems. The staff made several suggestions for minor construction changes to the end pieces on the elements, which were incorporated into the final design of the actual fuel elements. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology

  14. Safeguards aspects for future fuel management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.; Stein, G.; Gerstler, R.

    1987-01-01

    In the future, more flexible fuel management strategies will be realized in light-water reactor power stations. The incentives for this development are based on considerations related to safe and economic plant operation, e.g. improved fuel strategies can save fuel resources and waste management efforts. A further important aspect of the nuclear fuel cycle deals with recycling strategies. At the back-end of the fuel cycle, the direct final disposal of spent fuel will have to be assessed as an alternative to recycling strategies. These major development fields will also have consequences for international safeguards. In particular, reactor fuel strategies may involve higher burn-up, conditioning of spent fuel directly in the power plant, gadolinium-poisoned fuel and different levels of enrichment. These strategies will have an impact on inspection activities, especially on the applicability of NDA techniques. The inspection frequency could also be affected in recycling strategies using MOX fuel. There may be problems with NDA methods if reprocessed feed is used in enrichment plants. On the other hand, the direct final disposal of spent fuel will raise safeguards problems regarding design verification, long-term safeguarding and the very feasibility of inaccessible nuclear material

  15. Final report, Task 4: options for on-site management of Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. high level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Two on-site management options for handling the NFS high-level waste were analyzed: in-tank cement solidification and perpetual tank storage of the liquid waste. The cost of converting the 8D4 plus 8D2 waste to a cementitious solid, including mixing, grout preparation, and transfer to tank 8D1 would require $3,651,000; the cost of cooling the solidified solid for 15 years, plus the cost of filling the rest of the tank space and annulus with grout, plus the cost of minimum surveillance are $10,002,000. Modification of tank 8D2 would be required; prior to transfer of the waste, tank 8D1 would also be modified for cooling of the grout mass. Estimated costs of perpetual tank storage (replacing the existing neutralized waste tank after 10 years, then transferring contents at 50-y intervals for 1000 y, with replacement of ventilation system and auxiliaries at 30-y intervals) would require a sinking fund of $11,039,000. The acidic 8D4 waste would be transferred at 50-y intervals. The sinking fund requirements are sensitive to the difference between the interest rate and the escalation rate, and also to the time assumed from present to the first tank replacement

  16. GAT 3 - fuel cells and their management (PACoGES). Progress report; GAT 3 - piles a combustible et leur gestion (PACoGES). Rapport final (juillet 2002 a juin 2004)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamy, C.

    2005-07-01

    The Topic Analysis Group PACoGES ('Piles a Combustible et leur Gestion') has conducted thoughts on fuel cells and their management with all the searchers concern with researches and developments on fuel cells and in particular on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC, ITSOFC) running at high temperature (600 to 1000 C). This has concerned about 200 searchers working in about fifty laboratories (CNRS, CEA, EDF, GDF, INRETS, CNAM, Armines, and several industrial teams). Here is given the final report 2002-2004 concerning all the researches carried out by this Group. (O.M.)

  17. Practice and prospect of advanced fuel management and fuel technology application in PWR in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Min; Zhang Hong; Ma Cang; Bai Chengfei; Zhou Zhou; Wang Lei; Xiao Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Since Daya Bay nuclear power plant implemented 18-month refueling strategy in 2001, China has completed a series of innovative fuel management and fuel technology projects, including the Ling Ao Advanced Fuel Management (AFM) project (high-burnup quarter core refueling) and the Ningde 18-month refueling project with gadolinium-bearing fuel in initial core. First, this paper gives brief introduction to China's advanced fuel management and fuel technology experience. Second, it introduces practices of the advanced fuel management in China in detail, which mainly focuses on the implementation and progress of the Ningde 18-month refueling project with gadolinium-bearing fuel in initial core. Finally, the paper introduces the practices of advanced fuel technology in China and gives the outlook of the future advanced fuel management and fuel technology in this field. (author)

  18. Remote technology applications in spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    packaging for disposal, depending on the options chosen for spent fuel management. Because of the predominant amount of work required for spent fuel storage in the current and foreseeable future requirements for spent fuel management, more details are described on remote technology associated with storage of spent fuel. Some information on the application methodology of remote systems technology is provided with discussions on the basic principles that seem to be applicable in the development and application of remote technologies for all aspects of spent fuel handling. In addition, some practical guidance is provided on the selection of appropriate technology for implementation of a system. Finally, presented are some advanced technologies that would find applications in the longer term including the innovative fuel cycle concepts now in early stage of developments by some international initiatives like Gen IV of the USA and INPRO of the IAEA

  19. Fuel management of HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zongxin; Jing Xingqing

    2001-01-01

    The 10 MW high temperature cooled reactor (HTR-10) built in Tsinghua University is a pebble bed type of HTGR. The continuous recharge and multiple-pass of spherical fuel elements are used for fuel management. The initiative stage of core is composed of the mix of spherical fuel elements and graphite elements. The equilibrium stage of core is composed of identical spherical fuel elements. The fuel management during the transition from the initiative stage to the equilibrium stage is a key issue for HTR-10 physical design. A fuel management strategy is proposed based on self-adjustment of core reactivity. The neutron physical code is used to simulate the process of fuel management. The results show that the graphite elements, the recharging fuel elements below the burn-up allowance, and the discharging fuel elements over the burn-up allowance could be identified by burn-up measurement. The maximum of burn-up fuel elements could be controlled below the burn-up limit

  20. Development of advanced spent fuel management process. System analysis of advanced spent fuel management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, S.G.; Kang, D.S.; Seo, C.S.; Lee, H.H.; Shin, Y.J.; Park, S.W.

    1999-03-01

    The system analysis of an advanced spent fuel management process to establish a non-proliferation model for the long-term spent fuel management is performed by comparing the several dry processes, such as a salt transport process, a lithium process, the IFR process developed in America, and DDP developed in Russia. In our system analysis, the non-proliferation concept is focused on the separation factor between uranium and plutonium and decontamination factors of products in each process, and the non-proliferation model for the long-term spent fuel management has finally been introduced. (Author). 29 refs., 17 tabs., 12 figs

  1. Management of cladding hulls and fuel hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent fuel from power reactors based on chop-leach technology produces a solid waste product of cladding hulls and other metallic residues. This report describes the current situation in the management of fuel cladding hulls and hardware. Information is presented on the material composition of such waste together with the heating effects due to neutron-induced activation products and fuel contamination. As no country has established a final disposal route and the corresponding repository, this report also discusses possible disposal routes and various disposal options under consideration at present

  2. Quality management of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Guide presents the quality management requirements to be complied with in the procurement, design, manufacture, transport, receipt, storage, handling and operation of nuclear fuel. The Guide also applies to control rods and shield elements to be placed in the reactor. The Guide is mainly aimed for the licensee responsible for the procurement and operation of fuel, for the fuel designer and manufacturer and for other organisations, whose activities affect fuel quality and the safety of fuel transport, storage and operation. General requirements for nuclear fuel are presented in Section 114 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Decree and in Section 15 of the Government Decision (395/1991). Regulatory control of the safety of fuel is described in Guides YVL6.1, YVL6.2 and YVL6.3. An overview of the regulatory control of nuclear power plants carried out by STUK (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Finland) is clarified in Guide YVL1.1

  3. Spent fuel management of NPPs in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, D.E.; Lee Gonzalez, H.M.

    2010-01-01

    There are two Nuclear Power Plants in operation in Argentina: 'Atucha I' (unique PHWR design) in operation since 1974, and 'Embalse' (typical Candu reactor) which started operation in 1984. Both NPPs are operated by 'Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A' which is responsible for the management and interim storage of spent fuel till the end of the operative life of the plants. A third NPP, 'Atucha II' is under construction, with a similar design of Atucha I. The legislative framework establishes that after final shutdown of a NPP the spent fuel will be transferred to the 'National Atomic Energy Commission', which is also responsible for the decommissioning of the Plants. In Atucha I, the spent fuel is stored underwater, until another option is implemented meanwhile in Embalse the spent fuel is stored during six years in pools and then it is moved to a dry storage. A decision about the fuel cycle back-end strategy will be taken before year 2030. (authors)

  4. Renewable Fuel Pathways II Final Rule to Identify Additional Fuel Pathways under Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    This final rule describes EPA’s evaluation of biofuels derived from biogas fuel pathways under the RFS program and other minor amendments related to survey requirements associated with ULSD program and misfueling mitigation regulations for E15.

  5. The final disposal facility of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prvakova, S.; Necas, V.

    2001-01-01

    Today the most serious problem in the area of nuclear power engineering is the management of spent nuclear fuel. Due to its very high radioactivity the nuclear waste must be isolated from the environment. The perspective solution of nuclear fuel cycle is the final disposal into geological formations. Today there is no disposal facility all over the world. There are only underground research laboratories in the well developed countries like the USA, France, Japan, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland and Belgium. From the economical point of view the most suitable appears to build a few international repositories. According to the political and social aspect each of the country prepare his own project of the deep repository. The status of those programmes in different countries is described. The development of methods for the long-term management of radioactive waste is necessity in all countries that have had nuclear programmes. (authors)

  6. AGR fuel management using PANTHER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddock, S.A.; Parks, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes recent improvements in the AGR fuel management methodology implemented within PANTHER and the use of the code both for stand-alone calculations and within an automatic optimisation procedure. (author)

  7. Final Disposal of Nuclear Waste. The Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste's Review of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co's (SKB's) RDandD Programme 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    and operation and providing guidelines for technology development and research. An important purpose of a systems analysis is to describe and explain which parameters can or should be kept open for modification and improvement, and when decisions must be made to finalize these parameters. The Council finds that systems analysis methodology is valuable as part of a learning process that is controlled by the stakeholders and that involves analysis from new angles and adjustment of the system boundary in a dialogue with the central actors. A coherent and clarifying account should be given of alternative methods for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. SKB should present such an account not later than in conjunction with the company's permit applications. The Council believes that SKB should in this account clearly explain its positions on the deep borehole concept. In this context, SKB should also explain its plans for KBS-3 with horizontal deposition. Regarding the Canister: The material and casting process for the nodular iron insert must be optimized so that specified requirements can be met. Otherwise some other type of material must be used. In order to guarantee reliability during canister fabrication and final disposal, quality requirements must be developed with respect to fabrication defects in all parts of the canister, including welds. Continued corrosion studies are required in different areas: accelerated long-term stress corrosion cracking experiments, general corrosion in -chloride- and sulphide-containing water with bentonite, and microbial corrosion, as well as possible corrosion in oxygen-free water. General studies should be conducted regarding what effect existing and altered rock stresses may have on hydraulic conductivity in fractures in different directions and the consequences for the detailed design of the repository. Additional RandD on grouting for sealing of fractures is necessary. A better account should be given of the extent and

  8. Spent fuel management in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineo, H.; Nomura, Y.; Sakamoto, K.

    1998-01-01

    In Japan 52 commercial nuclear power units are now operated, and the total power generation capacity is about 45 GWe. The cumulative amount of spent fuel arising is about 13,500 tU as of March 1997. Spent fuel is reprocessed, and recovered nuclear materials are to be recycled in LWRs and FBRs. In February 1997 short-term policy measures were announced by the Atomic Energy Commission, which addressed promotion of reprocessing programme in Rokkasho, plutonium utilization in LWRs, spent fuel management, backend measures and FBR development. With regard to the spent fuel management, the policy measures included expansion of spent fuel storage capacity at reactor sites and a study on spent fuel storage away from reactor sites, considering the increasing amount of spent fuel arising. Research and development on spent fuel storage has been carried out, particularly on dry storage technology. Fundamental studies are also conducted to implement the burnup credit into the criticality safety design of storage and transportation casks. Rokkasho reprocessing plant is being constructed towards its commencement in 2003, and Pu utilization in LWRs will be started in 1999. Research and development of future recycling technology are also continued for the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle based on FBRs and LWRs. (author)

  9. Fuel reprocessing and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippone, R.L.; Kaiser, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Because of different economic, social and political factors, there has been a tendency to compartmentalize the commercial nuclear power industry into separate power and fuel cycle operations to a greater degree in some countries compared to other countries. The purpose of this paper is to describe how actions in one part of the industry can affect the other parts and recommend an overall systems engineering approach which incorporates more cooperation and coordination between individual parts of the fuel cycle. Descriptions are given of the fuel cycle segments and examples are presented of how a systems engineering approach has benefitted the fuel cycle. Descriptions of fuel reprocessing methods and the waste forms generated are given. Illustrations are presented describing how reprocessing options affect waste management operations and how waste management decisions affect reprocessing

  10. Increased fuel economy in transportation systems by use of energy management. Third year's program. Final report, May 1, 1976--July 1, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachley, N.H.; Frank, A.A.

    1976-07-01

    A report is given of the results accomplished during the third year of a three-year research program, the overall goal of which has been to conceive and evaluate practical ways to increase automobile fuel economy by energy management within the engine-transmission-vehicle system. The third year was devoted primarily to the detailed design, construction, and preliminary evaluation of a Flywheel Energy Management Powerplant (FEMP) installed in a Pinto. The vehicle has been built to experimentally verify performance simulations and to allow the practical aspects of a real flywheel vehicle to be studied. The FEMP consists basically of an internal combustion engine, a high-speed energy-storage flywheel, and a hydrostatic power-split continuously-variable transmission (CVT) system. The flywheel drives the car, and the engine comes on to ''recharge'' it (with efficient wide-open throttle operation) only when the flywheel speed drops below a predetermined value. The concept also permits effective and efficient regenerative braking. Computer simulations have indicated an improvement in city fuel mileage of about 50%, with improvements of 100% appearing feasible with further research. Preliminary testing of the car shows favorable performance.

  11. MaxiFuels. Final report; Maxi-Fuels. Afslutningsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    The MaxiFuel pilot plant opened September 2006 with a view to testing and developing a competitive integrated concept for 2nd generation bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass such as straw. This makes the raw material cheaper than crops cultivated for energy production purposes only, and the bioethanol production will not compete with production of food. The MaxiFuels concept is a patented technology which has proven in lab-scale to have the potential of producing bioethanol from residual biomass for a lower price than other existing 2nd generation bioethanol concepts. Lately a suitable pre-treatment process, Wet Explosion, has been developed, and enzymes and C6 fermentation based on yeast have been tested and further developed on pre-treated straw. Furthermore a special micro organism has been isolated, genetically engineered and tested on the pre-treated biomass. The micro organism converts C5 sugars to ethanol. Finally an attempt has been made to produce biogas from the remaining organic material, which can't be fermented to ethanol. All the abovementioned processes have been developed in lab-scale. The operation of these processes at the same time in one concept in pilot scale makes it possible to evaluate the concept's productivity in full-scale. The data of the pilot plant operation have been used for the set-up of an economical model of the whole concept. Based on this model a full-scale plant has been designed and a business plan for the implementation of this step has been elaborated. (BA)

  12. Montana fuel tax refunds : draft final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    "The primary source of funding for transportation infrastructure is the taxes that are imposed on motor fuels. One aspect of fuel tax collections is the process that requires consumers to apply for refunds of taxes paid on fuels used for tax-exempt p...

  13. Spent fuel management overview: a global perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonne, A.; Crijns, M.J.; Dyck, P.H.; Fukuda, K.; Mourogov, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    The paper defines the main spent fuel management strategies and options, highlights the challenges for spent fuel storage and gives an overview of the regional balances of spent fuel storage capacity and spent fuel arising. The relevant IAEA activities in the area of spent fuel management are summarised. (author)

  14. Spent fuel management in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahashi, K.; Maeda, M.; Nakai, T.

    1996-01-01

    Japan has scarce energy resources and depends on foreign resources for 84% of its energy needs. Therefore, Japan has made efforts to utilize nuclear power as a key energy source since mid-1950's. Today, the nuclear energy produced from 49 nuclear power plants is responsible for about 31% of Japan's total electricity supply. The cumulative amount of spent fuel generated as of March 1995 was about 11,600 Mg U. Japan's policy of spent fuel management is to reprocess spent nuclear fuel and recycle recovered plutonium and uranium as nuclear fuel. The Tokai reprocessing plant continues stable operation keeping the annual treatment capacity or around 90 Mg U. A commercial reprocessing plant is under construction at Rokkasho, northern part of Japan. Although FBR is the principal reactor to use plutonium, LWR will be a major power source for some time and recycling of the fuel in LWRs will be prompted. (author). 3 figs

  15. Commercializing fuel cells: managing risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Peter B.

    Commercialization of fuel cells, like any other product, entails both financial and technical risks. Most of the fuel cell literature has focussed upon technical risks, however, the most significant risks during commercialization may well be associated with the financial funding requirements of this process. Successful commercialization requires an integrated management of these risks. Like any developing technology, fuel cells face the typical 'Catch-22' of commercialization: "to enter the market, the production costs must come down, however, to lower these costs, the cumulative production must be greatly increased, i.e. significant market penetration must occur". Unless explicit steps are taken to address this dilemma, fuel cell commercialization will remain slow and require large subsidies for market entry. To successfully address this commercialization dilemma, it is necessary to follow a market-driven commercialization strategy that identifies high-value entry markets while minimizing the financial and technical risks of market entry. The financial and technical risks of fuel cell commercialization are minimized, both for vendors and end-users, with the initial market entry of small-scale systems into high-value stationary applications. Small-scale systems, in the order of 1-40 kW, benefit from economies of production — as opposed to economies to scale — to attain rapid cost reductions from production learning and continuous technological innovation. These capital costs reductions will accelerate their commercialization through market pull as the fuel cell systems become progressively more viable, starting with various high-value stationary and, eventually, for high-volume mobile applications. To facilitate market penetration via market pull, fuel cell systems must meet market-derived economic and technical specifications and be compatible with existing market and fuels infrastructures. Compatibility with the fuels infrastructure is facilitated by a

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  17. CANDU-PHW fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frescura, G.M.; Wight, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    This report covers the material presented in a series of six lectures at the Winter College on Nuclear Physics and Reactors held at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy, Jan 22 - March 28, 1980. The report deals with fuel management in natural uranium fuelled CANDU-PHW reactors. Assuming that the reader has a basic knowledge of CANDU core physics, some of the reactor systems which are more closely related to fuelling are described. This is followed by a discussion of the methods used to calculate the power distribution and perform fuel management analyses for the equilibrium core. A brief description of some computer codes used in fuel management is given, together with an overview of the calculations required to provide parameters for core design and support the accident analysis. Fuel scheduling during approach to equilibrium and equilibrium is discussed. Fuel management during actual reactor operation is discussed with a review of the operating experience for some of the Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors. (author)

  18. Waste management in MOX fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, V.

    1982-01-01

    After a short description of a MOX fuel fabrication plant's activities the waste arisings in such a plant are discussed according to nature, composition, Pu-content. Experience has shown that proper recording leads to a reduction of waste arisings by waste awareness. Aspects of the treatment of α-waste are given and a number of treatment processes are reviewed. Finally, the current waste management practice and the α-waste treatment facility under construction at ALKEM are outlined. (orig./RW)

  19. Spent fuel management and closed nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtsev, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    Strategic objectives set by Rosatom Corporation in the field of spent fuel management are given. By 2030, Russia is to create technological infrastructure for innovative nuclear energy development, including complete closure of the nuclear fuel cycle. A target model of the spent NPP nuclear fuel management system until 2030 is analyzed. The schedule for key stages of putting in place the infrastructure for spent NPP fuel management is given. The financial aspect of the problem is also discussed [ru

  20. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  1. HFIR spent fuel management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begovich, J.M.; Green, V.M.; Shappert, L.B.; Lotts, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems' Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel to Savannah River Site (SRS) for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up in the February 1994 to February 1995 time frame. If a management altemative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented before the HFIR pools are full, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study investigated several alternatives for managing the HFIR spent fuel, attempting to identify options that could be implemented before the HFIR pools are full. The options investigated were: installing a dedicated dry cask storage facility at ORNL, increasing HFIR pool storage capacity by clearing the HFIR pools of debris and either close-packing or stacking the spent fuel elements, storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, and shipping the spent fuel offsite for reprocessing or storage elsewhere

  2. Alternative Fuel Vehicle Forecasts : Final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Federal and state fuel taxes account for the largest share of the Texas State Highway Fund at 48 percent and 29 percent, respectively, in Fiscal Year 2015. These taxes are levied on a per-gallon basis, meaning that as vehicles get more fuel efficient...

  3. The continual fuel management modification in Qinshan project II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Guodong; Pan Zefei; Zhang Xingtian

    2010-01-01

    The fuel management strategy is the basis of the nuclear power plants. The performance of the fuel management strategy affects the plants' safety and economy indicators directly. The paper summarizes all the modifications on the fuel management work in Qinshan Project II since the plant was established. It includes the surveillance system of physics tests, fetching in high performance fuel assemblies, reloading pattern optimization, and the modifications of the final safety analysis report. At the same time, it evaluates the benefit of the modifications in the few years. The experience in this paper is much helpful and could be implemented on the same type plants. (authors)

  4. Environmental management at Nuclear Fuel Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, S.; Kalidas, R.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) a unit of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is manufacturing and supplying fuel assemblies and structurals for Atomic Power Reactors, Seamless Stainless Steel/ Special Alloy Tubes and high purity/special materials for various industries including Atomic Energy, Space and Electronics. NFC is spread over about 200 acres area. It consists of various chemical, metallurgical, fabrication and assembly plants engaged in processing uranium from concentrate to final fuel assembly, processing zirconium from ore to metallic products and processing various special high purity materials from ore or intermediate level to the final product. The plants were commissioned in the early seventies and capacities of these plants have been periodically enhanced to cater to the growing demands of the Indian Nuclear Industry. In the two streams of plants processing Uranium and zirconium, various types and categories including low level radioactive wastes are generated. These require proper handling and disposal. The overall management of radioactive and other waste aims at minimizing the generation and release to the environment. In this presentation, the environment management methodologies as practiced in Nuclear Fuel Complex are discussed. (author)

  5. German Approach to Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jussofie, A.; Graf, R.; Filbert, W.

    2010-01-01

    The management of spent fuel was based on two powerful columns until 30 June 2005, i. e. reprocessing and direct disposal. After this date any delivery of spent fuel to reprocessing plants was prohibited so that the direct disposal of unreprocessed spent fuel is the only available option in Germany today. The main steps of the current concept are: (i) Intermediate storage of spent fuel, which is the only step in practice. After the first cooling period in spent fuel storage pools it continues into cask-receiving dry storage facilities. Identification of casks, 'freezing' of inventories in terms of continuity of knowledge, monitoring the access to spent fuel, verifying nuclear material movements in terms of cask transfers and ensurance against diversion of nuclear material belong to the fundamental safeguards goals which have been achieved in the intermediate storage facilities by containment and surveillance techniques in unattended mode. (ii) Conditioning of spent fuel assemblies by separating the fuel rods from structural elements. Since the pilot conditioning facility in Gorleben has not yet come into operation, the underlying safeguards approach which focuses on safeguarding the key measurement points - the spent fuel related way in and out of the facility - has not been applied yet. (iii) Disposal in deep geological formations, but no decision has been made so far neither regarding the location of a geological repository nor regarding the safeguards approach for the disposal concept of spent fuel. The situation was complicated by a moratorium which suspended the underground exploration of the Gorleben salt dome as potential geological repository for spent fuel. The moratorium expires in October 2010. Nevertheless, considerable progress has been made in the development of disposal concepts. According to the basic, so-called POLLUX (registered) -concept spent fuel assemblies are to be conditioned after dry storage and reloaded into the POLLUX (registered) -cask

  6. PWR fuel management optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, Michel.

    1981-10-01

    This report is aimed to the optimization of the refueling pattern of a nuclear reactor. At the beginning of a reactor cycle a batch of fuel assemblies is available: the physical properties of the assemblies are known: the mathematical problem is to determine the refueling pattern which maximizes the reactivity or which provides the flattest possible power distribution. The state of the core is mathematically characterized by a system of partial derivative equations, its smallest eigenvalue and the associated eigenvector. After a study of the convexity properties of the problem, two algorithms are proposed. The first one exhanges assemblies to improve the starting configurations. The enumeration of the exchanges is limited to the 2 by 2, 3 by 3, 4 by 4 permutations. The second one builds a solution in two steps: in the first step the discrete variables are replaced by continuous variables. The non linear optimization problem obtained is solved by ''the Method of Approximation Programming'' and in the second step, the refuelling pattern which provides the best approximation of the optimal power distribution is searched by a Branch an d Bound Method [fr

  7. Management of irradiated CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupien, Mario

    1985-01-01

    The nuclear industry, like any other industrial activity, generates waste and, since these radioactive products are known to be hazardous both to man and his natural environment, they are subject to stringent controls. The irradiated fuel is also highly radioactive and remains so for thousands of years. It is estimated that by the year 2000, nuclear reactors in Canada alone will have produced some 50 Gg of radioactive fuel which is stored at the nuclear plant site itself. The nuclear industry plays a leading role in the research and development effort to find suitable waste-management methods. Its R and D programs cover many scientific fields, including chemistry, and therefore demand a considerable amount of coordination. The knowledge acquired in this multidisciplinary context should form a basis for solving many of today's industrial-waste problems. This paper describes the various stages in the long management process. In the medium term, the irradiated fuel will be stored in surface installations but the long-term solution proposed is to emplace the used fuel or the fuel recycle waste deep underground in a stable geologic formation

  8. Carbon-based Fuel Cell. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steven S. C. Chuang

    2005-01-01

    The direct use of coal in the solid oxide fuel cell to generate electricity is an innovative concept for power generation. The C-fuel cell (carbon-based fuel cell) could offer significant advantages: (1) minimization of NOx emissions due to its operating temperature range of 700-1000 C, (2) high overall efficiency because of the direct conversion of coal to CO 2 , and (3) the production of a nearly pure CO 2 exhaust stream for the direct CO 2 sequestration. The objective of this project is to determine the technical feasibility of using a highly active anode catalyst in a solid oxide fuel for the direct electrochemical oxidation of coal to produce electricity. Results of this study showed that the electric power generation from Ohio No 5 coal (Lower Kittanning) Seam, Mahoning County, is higher than those of coal gas and pure methane on a solid oxide fuel cell assembly with a promoted metal anode catalyst at 950 C. Further study is needed to test the long term activity, selectivity, and stability of anode catalysts

  9. Research reactor spent fuel management in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audero, M.A.; Bevilacqua, A.M.; Mehlich, A.M.; Novara, O.

    2002-01-01

    The research reactor spent fuel (RRSF) management strategy will be presented as well as the interim storage experience. Currently, low-enriched uranium RRSF is in wet interim storage either at reactor site or away from reactor site in a centralized storage facility. High-enriched uranium RRSF from the centralized storage facility has been sent to the USA in the framework of the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The strategy for the management of the RRSF could implement the encapsulation for interim dry storage. As an alternative to encapsulation for dry storage some conditioning processes are being studied which include decladding, isotopic dilution, oxidation and immobilization. The immobilized material will be suitable for final disposal. (author)

  10. Handling of final storage of unreprocessed spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    In this report the various facilities incorporated in the proposed handling chain for spent fuel from the power stations to the final repository are discribed. Thus the geological conditions which are essential for a final repository is discussed as well as the buffer and canister materials and how they contribute towards a long-term isolation of the spent fuel. Furthermore one chapter deals with leaching of the deposited fuel in the event that the canister is penetrated as well as the transport mechanisms which determine the migration of the radioactive substances through the buffer material. The dispersal processes in the geosphere and the biosphere are also described together with the transfer mechanisms to the ecological systems as well as radiation doses. Finally a summary is given of the safety analysis of the proposed method for the handling and final storage of the spent fuel. (E.R.)

  11. Liquid fuels production from biomass. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, P. F.; Sanderson, J. E.; Ashare, E.; Wise, D. L.; Molyneaux, M. S.

    1980-06-30

    The current program to convert biomass into liquid hydrocarbon fuels is an extension of a previous program to ferment marine algae to acetic acid. In that study it was found that marine algae could be converted to higher aliphatic organic acids and that these acids could be readily removed from the fermentation broth by membrane or liquid-liquid extraction. It was then proposed to convert these higher organic acids via Kolbe electrolysis to aliphatic hydrocarbons, which may be used as a diesel fuel. The specific goals for the current porgram are: (1) establish conditions under which substrates other than marine algae may be converted in good yield to organic acids, here the primary task is methane suppression; (2) modify the current 300-liter fixed packed bed batch fermenter to operate in a continuous mode; (3) change from membrane extraction of organic acids to liquid-liquid extraction; (4) optimize the energy balance of the electrolytic oxidation process, the primary task is to reduce the working potential required for the electrolysis while maintaining an adequate current density; (5) scale the entire process up to match the output of the 300 liter fermenter; and (6) design pilot plant and commercial size plant (1000 tons/day) processes for converting biomass to liquid hydrocarbon fuels and perform an economic analysis for the 1000 ton/day design.

  12. Nuclear fuel management via fuel quality factor averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingle, J.O.

    1978-01-01

    The numerical procedure of prime number averaging is applied to the fuel quality factor distribution of once and twice-burned fuel in order to evolve a fuel management scheme. The resulting fuel shuffling arrangement produces a near optimal flat power profile both under beginning-of-life and end-of-life conditions. The procedure is easily applied requiring only the solution of linear algebraic equations. (author)

  13. Strategies of management of the nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, J.R.; Perez, A.; Filella, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The management of nuclear fuel is depending on several factors: - Regulatory commission. The enterprises owner of the NPPs.The enterprise owner of the energy distribution. These factors are considered for the management of nuclear fuel. The design of fuel elements, the planning of cycles, the design of core reactors and the costs are analyzed. (Author)

  14. Handling of spent nuclear fuel and final storage of vitrified high level reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The report gives a general summary of the Swedish KBS-project on management and disposal of vitrified reprocessed waste. Its final aim is to demostrate that the means of processing and managing power reactor waste in an absolutely safe way, as stipulated in the Swedish so called Conditions Act, already exist. Chapters on Storage facility for spent fuel, Intermidiate storage of reprocessed waste, Geology, Final repository, Transportation, Protection, and Siting. (L.E.)

  15. Prototypical consolidation demonstration project - Final fuel recommendation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piscitella, R.R.; Paskey, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration (PCD) Project will, in its final phase, conduct a demonstration of the equipment's ability to consolidate actual spent commercial fuel. Since budget and schedule limitations do not allow this demonstration to include all types of fuel assemblies, a selection process was utilized to identify the fuel types that would represent predominate fuel inventories and that would demonstrate the equipment's abilities. The Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies that were suggested for use in the PCD Project Hot Demonstration were Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) 15 x 15's, and Westinghouse (WE) 15 x 15's. The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel suggested was the General Electric (GE) 8 x 8

  16. Spent fuel management: reprocessing or storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Soares, M.L. de; Oliveira Lopes, M.J. de

    1986-01-01

    A review of the spent fuel management concepts generally adopted in several countries is presented, including an analysis of the brazilian situation. The alternatives are the reprocessing, the interim storage and the final disposal in a repository after appropriate conditioning. The commercial operating reprocessing facilities in the Western World are located in France and in the United Kingdom. In the USA the anti-reprocessing policy from 1977 changed in 1981, when the government supported the resumption of commercial reprocessing and designated the private sector as responsible for providing these services. Small scale facilities are operating in India, Italy, Japan and West Germany. Pilot plants for LWR fuel are being planned by Spain, Pakistan and Argentina. (Author) [pt

  17. Spent fuel management: reprocessing or storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Soares, M.L. de; Oliveira Lopes, M.J. de.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the spent fuel management concepts generally adopted in several countries is presented, including an analysis of the brazilian situation. The alternatives are the reprocessing, the interim storage and the final disposal in a repository after appropriate conditioning. The commercial operating reprocessing facilities in the Western World are located in France and in the United Kingdom. In the USA the anti-reprocessing policy from 1977 changed in 1981, when the Government supported the resumption of commercial reprocessing and designated the private sector as responsible for providing these services. Small scale facilities are operating in India, Italy, Japan and West Germany. Pilot plant for LWR fuel are being planned by Spain, Pakistan and Argentina. (Author) [pt

  18. Project management training : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In 2005 the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) went through a complete reorganization of its operations going from centralized to decentralized (District) management. This reorganization gave Districts autonomy to manage construction projec...

  19. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1996-02-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan describes the new nuclear facility regulatory requirements basis for the Spemt Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and establishes the plan to achieve compliance with this basis at the new SNF Project facilities

  20. Swedish spent fuel management systems, facilities and operating experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, J.

    1998-01-01

    About 50% of the electricity in Sweden is generated by means of nuclear power from 12 LWR reactors located at four sites and with a total capacity of 10,000 MW. The four utilities have jointly created SKB, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, which has been given the mandate to manage the spent fuel and radioactive waste from its origin at the reactors to the final disposal. SKB has developed a system for the safe handling of all kinds of radioactive waste from the Swedish nuclear power plants. The keystones now in operation of this system are a transport system, a central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (CLAB), a final repository for short-lived, low and intermediate level waste (SFR). The remaining, system components being planned are an encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel and a deep repository for encapsulated spent fuel and other long-lived radioactive wastes. (author)

  1. Overview of spent fuel management and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.; Ernst, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    Results compiled in the research reactor spent fuel database are used to assess the status of research reactor spent fuel worldwide. Fuel assemblies, their types, enrichment, origin of enrichment and geological distribution among the industrialized and developed countries of the world are discussed. Fuel management practices in wet and dry storage facilities and the concerns of reactor operators about long-term storage of their spent fuel are presented and some of the activities carried out by the International Atomic Energy Agency to address the issues associated with research reactor spent fuel are outlined. Some projections of spent fuel inventories to the year 2006 are presented and discussed. (author)

  2. Multinational approaches relevant to spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellaud, B.

    2007-01-01

    The storage of spent fuel is a suitable candidate for a multilateral approach, primarily at the regional level. Small countries with only a few nuclear power plants would benefit economically from large joint facilities. The storage of special nuclear materials in a few safe and secure facilities would also enhance safeguards and physical protection. However, the final disposal of spent fuel and high level radioactive waste is the best candidate for a multilateral approach. It would offer major economic benefits and substantial non-proliferation benefits in spite of the legal, political and public acceptance challenges to be expected in most countries. The transfer of nuclear waste from the exporting country to the host country of an interim storage facility or of a final repository would be done under bilateral or multilateral agreements at the commercial and governmental levels, in accordance with the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Bilateral or international oversight of joint facilities should be arranged, as needed, to achieve the confidence of the partners as to the safety and physical security of the proposed facility. Such monitoring should cover the adequacy of the technical design, its safety features, its environmental impact, the physical security of nuclear materials and possibly the financial management of the joint venture. After the initial choice of bilateral arrangements, some kind of international monitoring may become appropriate. Various organizations could fulfil such a function, in particular, the IAEA. Such monitoring would have nothing to do with nuclear safeguards; repository monitoring would be a parallel but independent activity of the IAEA. (author)

  3. Safety aspects in fuel reprocessing and radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, K.

    2018-01-01

    Nuclear energy is used for generation of electricity and for production of a wide range of radionuclides for use in research and development, healthcare and industry. Nuclear industry uses nuclear fission as source of energy so a large amount of energy is available from very small amount of fuel. As India has adopted c losed fuel cycle , spent nuclear fuel from nuclear reactor is considered as a material of resource and reprocessed to recovery valuable fuel elements. Main incentive of reprocessing is to use the uranium resources effectively by recovering/recycling Pu and U present in the spent fuel. This finally leads to a very small percentage of residual material present in spent nuclear fuel requiring their management as radioactive waste. Another special feature of the Indian Atomic Energy Program is the attention paid from the very beginning to the safe management of radioactive waste

  4. RTR spent fuel treatment and final waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomasson, J.

    2000-01-01

    A number of RTR operators have chosen in the past to send their spent fuel to the US in the framework of the US take back program. However, this possibility ends as of May 12th, 2006. 3 different strategies are left for managing RTR spent fuel: extended storage, direct disposal and treatment-conditioning through reprocessing. Whilst former strategies raise a number of uncertainties, the latter already offers a management solution. It features two advantages. It benefits from the long experience of existing flexible industrial facilities from countries like France. Secondly, it offers a dramatic volume reduction of the ultimate waste to be stored under well-characterized, stable and durable forms. RTR spent fuel management through reprocessing-conditioning offers a durable management solution that can be fully integrated in whatever global radioactive waste management policy, including ultimate disposal

  5. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoregren, U.

    1983-04-01

    Like many other countries whith similar geological conditions, Sweden plans to dispose of its long-lived radioactive nuclear waste by depositing it in final repositories located deep down in the crystalline bedrock. In order to be able to demonstrate that a given rock formation is suited for waste storage, it is necessary to have knowledge concerning its properties, particularly those that determine groundwater conditions and chemistry within the area. Also of importance are data that shed light on rock mechanics in the area and the occurrence of valuable minerals. The SKBF/KBS programme includes plans to carry out geological studies of 10-15 areas in different parts of the country during the 1980s. A standard programme for these studies is described in the following. The standard programme is inteded to serve as a basis for planning of the work and revisions or modifications that may be found to be appropriate in view of local conditions or experience. (author)

  6. Spent fuel management in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balu, K.

    1998-01-01

    From Indian point of view, the spent fuel management by the reprocessing and plutonium recycle option is considered to be a superior and an inevitable option. The nuclear energy programme in Indian envisages three stages of implementation involving installation of thermal reactors in the first phase followed by recycling of plutonium from reprocessed fuel in fast breeder reactors and in the third phase utilization of its large thorium reserves in reactor system based on U-233-Th cycle. The Indian programme for Waste Management envisages disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste in near surface disposal facilities and deep geological disposal for high level and alpha bearing wastes. A Waste Immobilization Plant (WHIP), employing metallic melter for HLW vitrification is operational at Tarapur. Two more WIPs are being set up at Kalpakkam and Tarapur. A Solid waste Storage Surveillance Facility (SSSF) is also set up for interim storage of vitrified HLW. Site investigations are in progress for selecting site for ultimate disposal in igneous rock formations. R and D works is taken up on partitioning of HLW. Solvent extraction and extraction chromatographic studies are in progress. Presently emphasis is on separation of heat generating short lived nuclides like strontium and alpha emitters. (author)

  7. Areva solutions for management of defective fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morlaes, I.; Vo Van, V.

    2014-01-01

    Defective fuel management is a major challenge for nuclear operators when all fuel must be long-term managed. This paper describes AREVA solutions for managing defective fuel. Transport AREVA performs shipments of defective fuel in Europe and proposes casks that are licensed for that purpose in Europe and in the USA. The paper presents the transport experience and the new European licensing approach of defective fuel transport. Dry Interim Storage AREVA is implementing the defective fuel storage in the USA, compliant with the Safety Authority's requirements. In Europe, AREVA is developing a new, more long-term oriented storage solution for defective fuel, the best available technology regarding safety requirements. The paper describes these storage solutions. Treatment Various types of defective fuel coming from around the world have been treated in the AREVA La Hague plant. Specific treatment procedures were developed when needed. The paper presents operational elements related to this experience. (authors)

  8. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs. Final Environmental Impact Statement: Volume 1, Appendix L, Environmental Justice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    Appendix L provides an assessment of the areas surrounding the 10 sites under consideration for the management of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) under all programmatic alternatives considered in this volume. It is divided into two sections: (a) the five sites considered for the management of DOE naval SNF only (under the No Action and Decentralization alternatives, and (b) the five DOE sites being considered for the management of all types of DOE SNF under all alternatives. The five sites considered for the management of naval SNF only are the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia; Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Kittery, Maine; Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, Honolulu, Hawaii; Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington; and Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York. The five DOE sites considered for the management of some portion or all DOE SNF are the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho; Hanford Site, Richland, Washington; and Nevada Test Site, Mercury, Nevada. This assessment includes potential adverse impacts resulting from both onsite activities and associated transportation of materials. Based on this assessment, it is concluded that none of the alternatives analyzed results in disproportionately high and adverse effects on minority populations or low-income communities surrounding any of the sites under consideration for the management of SNF or associated offsite transportation routes

  9. Plutonium recycle. In-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, F.; Berthet, A.; Le Bars, M.

    1985-01-01

    Plutonium recycle in France will concern a dozen of PWR 900 MWe controlled in gray mode till 1995. This paper presents the main characteristics of fuel management with plutonium recycle. The organization of management studies will be copied from this developed for classical management studies. Up these studies, a ''feasibility report'' aims at establishing at each stage of the fuel cycle, the impact of the utilization of fuel containing plutonium [fr

  10. A discrete optimization method for nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argaud, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear fuel management can be seen as a large discrete optimization problem under constraints, and optimization methods on such problems are numerically costly. After an introduction of the main aspects of nuclear fuel management, this paper presents a new way to treat the combinatorial problem by using information included in the gradient of optimized cost function. A new search process idea is to choose, by direct observation of the gradient, the more interesting changes in fuel loading patterns. An example is then developed to illustrate an operating mode of the method. Finally, connections with classical simulated annealing and genetic algorithms are described as an attempt to improve search processes. 16 refs., 2 figs

  11. Encapsulation and handling of spent nuclear fuel for final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennerberg, B.; Larker, H.; Ageskog, L.

    1983-05-01

    The handling and embedding of those metal parts which arrive to the encapsulation station with the fuel is described. For the encapsulation of fuel two alternatives are presented, both with copper canisters but with filling of lead and copper powder respectively. The sealing method in the first case is electron beam welding, in the second case hot isostatic pressing. This has given the headline of the two chapters describing the methods: Welded copper canister and Pressed copper canister. Chapter 1, Welded copper canister, presents the handling of the fuel when it arrives to the encapsulation station, where it is first placed in a buffer pool. From this pool the fuel is transferred to the encapsulation process and thereby separated from fuel boxes and boron glass rod bundles, which are transported together with the fuel. The encapsulation process comprises charging into a copper canister, filling with molten lead, electron beam welding of the lid and final inspection. The transport to and handling in the final repository are described up to the deposition and sealing in the deposition hole. Handling of fuel residues is treated in one of the sections. In chapter 2, Pressed copper canister, only those parts of the handling, which differ from chapter 1 are described. The hot isostatic pressing process is given in the first sections. The handling includes drying, charging into the canister, filling with copper powder, seal lid application and hot isostatic pressing before the final inspection and deposition. In the third chapter, BWR boxes in concrete moulds, the handling of the metal parts, separated from the fuel, are dealt with. After being lifted from the buffer pool they are inserted in a concrete mould, the mould is filled with concrete, covered with a lid and after hardening transferred to its own repository. The deposition in this repository is described. (author)

  12. The Canadian fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, D.B.

    1986-04-01

    This report is the sixth in the series of annual reports on the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes progress in 1984 for the following activities: storage and transportation of used fuel, immobilization of nuclear fuel waste, geotechnical research, environmental research, and environmental and safety assessment. 186 refs

  13. Spent fuel management newsletter. No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This issue of the newsletter consists of two parts. The first part describes the IAEA Secretariat activities - work and programme of the Nuclear Materials and Fuel Cycle Technology Section of the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, recent and planned meetings and publications, Technical Co-operation projects, Co-ordinated Research programmes. The second part contains country reports - national programmes on spent fuel management: current and planned storage and reprocessing capacities, spent fuel arisings, safety, transportation, storage and treatment of spent fuel

  14. Spent fuel management newsletter. No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-04-01

    This issue of the newsletter consists of two parts. The first part describes the IAEA Secretariat activities - work and programme of the Nuclear Materials and Fuel Cycle Technology Section of the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, recent and planned meetings and publications, Technical Co-operation projects, Co-ordinated Research programmes. The second part contains country reports - national programmes on spent fuel management: current and planned storage and reprocessing capacities, spent fuel arisings, safety, transportation, storage and treatment of spent fuel.

  15. Final disposal of spent fuel in the Finnish bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) is preparing for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel from the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant (TVO-I and TVO-II reactors). According to present estimates, a total of 1840 tU of spent fuel will be accumulated during the 40-year lifetime of the power plant. An interim storage facility for spent fuel (TVO-KPA Store) has operated at Olkiluoto since 1987. The spent fuel will be held in storage for several decades before it is shipped to the repository site. Both train and road transportation are possible. The spent fuel will be encapsulated in composite copper and steel canisters (ACP Canister) in a facility that will be build above the ground on the site where the repository is located. The repository will be constructed at the depth of several hundreds of meters in the bedrock. In 1987 five areas were selected for preliminary site investigations. The safety analysis (TVO-92) that was carried out shows that the proposed safety criteria would be met at each of the candidate sites. In future expected conditions there would never be significant releases of radioactive substances to the biosphere. The site investigations will be continued in the period 1993 to 2000. In parallel, a R and D programme will be devoted to the safety and technology of final disposal. The site for final disposal will be selected in the year 2000 with the aim of having the capability to start the disposal operations in 2020

  16. Environmental Impact Statement. March 2011. Interim storage, encapsulation and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) shall be prepared and submitted along with applications for permissibility and a licence under the Environmental Code and a licence under the Nuclear Activities Act for new nuclear facilities. This Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared by Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, SKB) to be included in the licence applications for continued operation of Clab (central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel) in Simpevarp in Oskarshamn Municipality and construction and operation of facilities for encapsulation (integrated with Clab) and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark in Oesthammar Municipality

  17. Environmental Impact Statement. March 2011. Interim storage, encapsulation and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) shall be prepared and submitted along with applications for permissibility and a licence under the Environmental Code and a licence under the Nuclear Activities Act for new nuclear facilities. This Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared by Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, SKB) to be included in the licence applications for continued operation of Clab (central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel) in Simpevarp in Oskarshamn Municipality and construction and operation of facilities for encapsulation (integrated with Clab) and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark in Oesthammar Municipality

  18. Spent fuel management in France: Programme status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudat, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    France's programme is best characterized as a closed fuel cycle including reprocessing, Plutonium recycling in PWR and use of breeder reactors. The current installed nuclear capacity is 52.5 GWe from 55 units. The spent fuel management scheme chosen is reprocessing. This paper describes the national programme, spent nuclear fuel storage, reprocessing and contracts for reprocessing of spent fuel from various countries. (author). 5 figs, 2 tabs

  19. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1984-04-01

    This report, the fifth of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes activities over the past year in the following areas: public interaction; used fuel storage and transportation; immobilization of used fuel and fuel recycle waste; geoscience research related to deep underground disposal; environmental research; and environmental and safety assessment

  20. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsman, K.H.

    1996-03-01

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts

  1. Fuel management approach in IRIS Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, B.; Franceschini, F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of fuel management approach employed in IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure). It introduces the initial, rather ambitious, fuel management goals and discusses their evolution that reflected the fast pace of progress of the overall project. The updated objectives rely on using currently licensed fuel technology, thus enabling near-term deployment of IRIS, while still providing improved fuel utilization. The paper focuses on the reference core design and fuel management strategy that is considered in pre-application licensing, which enables extended cycle of three to four years. The extended cycle reduces maintenance outage time and increases capacity factor, thus reducing the cost of electricity. Approaches to achieving this goal are discussed, including use of different reloading strategies. Additional fuel management options, which are not part of the licensing process, but are pursued as long-term research for possible future implementation, are presented as well. (Author)

  2. Achilles tests finally nail PWR fuel clad ballooning fears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dore, P.; McMinn, K.

    1992-01-01

    A conclusive series of experiments carried out by AEA Reactor Services at its Achilles rig in the UK has finally allayed fears that fuel clad ballooning is a major safety problem for Sizewell B, Britain's first Pressurized Water Reactor. The experiments are described in this article. (author)

  3. Nuclear Spent Fuel Management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuloaga, P.

    2015-01-01

    The radioactive waste management policy is established by the Spanish Government through the Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Commerce. This policy is described in the Cabinet-approved General Radioactive Waste Plan. ENRESA is the Spanish organization in charge of radioactive waste and nuclear SFM and nuclear installations decommissioning. The priority goal in SFM is the construction of the centralized storage facility named Almacén Temporal Centralizado (ATC), whose generic design was approved by the safety authority, Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear. This facility is planned for some 6.700 tons of heavy metal. The ATC site selection process, based on a volunteer community’s scheme, has been launched by the Government in December 2009. After the selection of a site in a participative and transparent process, the site characterization and licensing activities will support the construction of the facility. Meanwhile, extension of the on-site storage capacity has been implemented at the seven nuclear power plants sites, including past reracking at all sites. More recent activities are: reracking performed at Cofrentes NPP; dual purpose casks re-licensing for higher burnup at Trillo NPP; transfer of the spent fuel inventory at Jose Cabrera NPP to a dry-storage system, to allow decommissioning operations; and licence application of a dry-storage installation at Ascó NPP, to provide the needed capacity until the ATC facility operation. For financing planning purposes, the long-term management of spent fuel is based on direct disposal. A final decision about major fuel management options is not made yet. To assist the decision makers a number of activities are under way, including basic designs of a geological disposal facility for clay and granite host rocks, together with associated performance assessment, and supported by a R&D programme, which also includes research projects in other options like advanced separation and transmutation. (author)

  4. Radioactive waste management of experimental DUPIC fuel fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. H.; Park, J. J.; Shin, J. M.; Yang, M. S.; Hong, K. P.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of DUPIC(Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) is a dry processing technology to manufacture CANDU compatible DUPIC fuel from spent PWR fuel material. Real spent PWR fuel was used in IMEF M6 hot cell to carry out DUPIC experiment. Afterwards, about 200 kg-U of spent PWR fuel is supposed to be used till 2006. This study has been conducted in some hot cells of PIEF and M6 cell of IMEF. There are various forms of nuclear material such as rod cut, powder, green pellet, sintered pellet, fabrication debris, fuel rod, fuel bundle, sample, and process waste produced from various manufacturing experiment of DUPIC fuel. After completing test, the above nuclear wastes and test equipment etc. will be classified as radioactive waste, transferred to storage facility and managed rigorously according to domestic and international laws until the final management policy is determined. It is desirable to review management options in advance for radioactive waste generated from manufacturing experiment of DUPIC nuclear fuel as well as residual nuclear material and dismantled equipment. This paper includes basic plan for DUPIC radwaste, arising source and estimated amount of radioactive waste, waste classification and packing, transport cask, transport procedures

  5. A comparative study of fuel management in PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, D.E.G.; Nair, R.P.K.; Vellozo, S.O.

    1981-01-01

    A study about fuel management in PWR reactors, where not only the conventional uranium cycle is considered, but also the thorium cycle as an alternative is presented. The final results are presented in terms of U 3 O 8 demand and SWU and the approximate costs of the principal stages of the fuel cycle, comparing with the stardand cycle without recycling. (E.G.) [pt

  6. In-core fuel management and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waeckel, N.

    2009-01-01

    The management of nuclear fuel inside the core has to take into account the necessity to stop the reactor periodically to renew the fuel partially and to perform maintenance operations. The fuel management strategy determines the cost of the fuel (through the number of assemblies that have been changed and their enrichment rate) and the duration of the campaign till next stop. Fuel management strategies have to conciliate different objectives: -) the safety of the reactor, -) the reliability of the fuel assemblies, -) the optimization of the fuel cost by increasing the discharge burnup. The necessity of spent fuel processing implies a maximal discharge burnup. During the 1990-2000 period, the discharge burnups have been progressively increased through the following fuel management strategies: Garance, Cyclades and Gemmes. During the years 2000-2009, the progressive absorption of the nuclear over-equipment, the opening of the European electricity markets favored power production through the MOX-parity, Alcade and Galice fuel management strategies. The perspective for next decade is to favor production to the prejudice of higher burnups. (A.C.)

  7. Ontario Select Committee on Alternative Fuel Sources : Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galt, D.

    2002-06-01

    On June 28, 2001, the Ontario Legislative Assembly appointed the Select Committee an Alternative Fuel Sources, comprised of representatives of all parties, with a broad mandate to investigate, report and offer recommendations with regard to the various options to support the development and application of environmentally sustainable alternatives to the fossil fuel sources already existing. The members of the Committee elected to conduct extensive public hearings, conduct site visits, attend relevant conferences, do some background research to examine a vast number of alternative fuel and energy sources that could be of relevance to the province of Ontario. A discussion paper (interim report) was issued by the Committee in November 2001, and the present document represents the final report, containing 141 recommendations touching 20 topics. The information contained in the report is expected to assist in the development and outline of policy and programs designed to specifically support alternative fuels and energy sources and applicable technologies. Policy issues were discussed in Part A of the report, along with the appropriate recommendations. The recommendations on specific alternative fuels and energy sources were included in Part B of the report. It is believed that the dependence of Ontario on traditional petroleum-based fuels and energy sources can be reduced through aggressive action on alternative fuels and energy. The benefits of such action would be felt in the area of air quality, with social, and economic benefits as well. 3 tabs

  8. Recent BWR fuel management reactor physics advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, R.L.; Congdon, S.P.; Crawford, B.W.; Kang, C.M.; Martin, C.L.; Reese, A.P.; Savoia, P.J.; Specker, S.R.; Welchly, R.

    1982-01-01

    Improvements in BWR fuel management have been under development to reduce uranium and separative work (SWU) requirements and reduce fuel cycle costs, while also maintaining maximal capacity factors and high fuel reliability. Improved reactor physics methods are playing an increasingly important role in making such advances feasible. The improved design, process computer and analysis methods both increase knowledge of the thermal margins which are available to implement fuel management advance, and improve the capability to reliably and efficiently analyze and design for fuel management advances. Gamma scan measurements of the power distributions of advanced fuel assembly and advanced reactor core designs, and improved in-core instruments also are important contributors to improving 3-d predictive methods and to increasing thermal margins. This paper is an overview of the recent advances in BWR reactor physics fuel management methods, coupled with fuel management and core design advances. The reactor physics measurements which are required to confirm the predictions of performance fo fuel management advances also are summarized

  9. Implementing adaptive phased management (APM) for Canada's used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of Adaptive Phased Management (APM) for Canada's used nuclear fuel. APM is a combination of technology and management system. The technology involves centralized containment and isolation in deep geological repository in a suitable rock formation, as well as shallow storage where used fuel remains retrievable. In both cases there is continuous monitoring. The management system consists of public engagement, phased decision-making, continuous learning and adaption, open and inclusive. Finally, it involves seeking an in formed willing host community

  10. Spent Fuel Management Newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This Newsletter has been prepared in accordance with the recommendations of the International Regular Advisory Group on Spent Fuel Management and the Agency's programme (GC XXXII/837, Table 76, item 14). The main purpose of the Newsletter is to provide Member States with new information about the state-of-the-art in one of the most important parts of the nuclear fuel cycle - Spent Fuel Management. The contents of this publication consists of two parts: (1) IAEA Secretariat contribution -work and programme of the Nuclear Materials and Fuel Cycle Technology Section of the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, recent and planned meetings and publications, Technical Co-operation projects, Co-ordinated Research programmes, etc. (2) Country reports - national programmes on spent fuel management: current and planned storage and reprocessing capacities, spent fuel arisings, safety, transportation, storage, treatment of spent fuel, some aspects of uranium and plutonium recycling, etc. The IAEA expects to publish the Newsletter once every two years between the publications of the Regular Advisory Group on Spent Fuel Management. Figs and tabs

  11. Special topics of inner fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuenschmann, A.

    1977-01-01

    Burnable Poison Rod Assemblies (BPRA) are currently used as lumped burnable poison only in the first cycles of many power reactors to insure a negative moderator coefficient at beginning of life and to help shape core power distribution (out-in shuffle scheme). BPRA's are also a valuable tool in later cycles where they can be used as an additional design parameter to improve fuel performance and fuel cycle economics, to shape fuel assembly power, and to increase fuel management flexibility (in-out shuffle scheme). This paper describes the two fuel shuffle schemes and compares the two shuffle strategies concerning economic and flexibility aspects. (orig.) [de

  12. Social science to improve fuels management: a synthesis of research on aesthetics and fuels management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Ryan

    2005-01-01

    A series of syntheses were commissioned by the USDA Forest Service to aid in fuels mitigation project planning. This synthesis focuses on research addressing aesthetic considerations of fuels management. A general finding is that fuels management activities can contribute to the visual quality of a landscape. Topics covered in the synthesis include research findings on...

  13. Nuclear fuel management in JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naka, Michihiro; Miyazawa, Masataka; Sato, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Fusao; Ito, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) is the largest scale materials (author)ted the fission gas release compared with the steady state opkW/l in Japan. JMTR as a multi-purpose reactor has been contributing to research and development on nuclear field with a wide variety of irradiation for performing engineering tests and safety research on fuel and component for light water reactor as well as fast breeder reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor etc., for research and development on blanket material for fusion reactor, for fundamental research, and for radio-isotope (RI) production. The driver nuclear fuel used in JMTR is aluminum based MTR type fuel. According to the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program, the JMTR fuel elements had been converted from 93% high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to 45% medium enriched uranium (MEU) fuel in 1986, and then to 20% low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in 1994. The cumulative operation cycles until March 1999 reached to 127 cycles since the first criticality in 1968. JMTR has used 1,628 HEU, 688 MEU and 308 LEU fuel elements for these operation cycles. After these spent fuel elements were cooled in the JMTR water canal more than one year after discharged from the JMTR core, they had been transported to reprocessing plants in Europe, and then to plants in USA in order to extract the uranium remaining in the spent fuel. The JMTR spent fuel transportation for reprocessing had been continued until the end of 1988. However, USA had ceased spent fuel reprocessing in 1989, while USDOE committed to prepare an environmental review of the impacts of accepting spent fuels from foreign research reactors. After that, USDOE decided to implement a new acceptance policy in 1996, the spent fuel transportation from JMTR to Savannah River Site was commenced in 1997. It was the first transportation not only in Japan but in Asia also. Until resuming the transportation, the spent fuel elements stored in JMTR

  14. Decision nearing on final disposal of spent fuel in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vira, J.

    2000-01-01

    The programme for final disposal of spent fuel from Finnish nuclear power plants is entering into important phase: in the year 2000 the Finnish Government is expected to decide whether the proposal made by Posiva Oy on the spent fuel disposal is in line with the overall good of society. Associated with the decision is also Posiva's proposal on siting the disposal facility at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki municipality on the western coast of Finland. An important document underlying Posiva's application for this principle decision is the report of the environmental impact assessment, which was completed in 1999. Safety considerations play an important role in the application. New assessments have, therefore, been made on both the operational and long-term safety as well as on safety of spent fuel transportation. (author)

  15. Impact of fuel fabrication and fuel management technologies on uranium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnsberger, P.L.; Stucker, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Uranium utilization in commercial pressurized water reactors is a complex function of original NSSS design, utility energy requirements, fuel assembly design, fuel fabrication materials and fuel fabrication materials and fuel management optimization. Fuel design and fabrication technologies have reacted to the resulting market forcing functions with a combination of design and material changes. The technologies employed have included ever-increasing fuel discharge burnup, non-parasitic structural materials, burnable absorbers, and fissile material core zoning schemes (both in the axial and radial direction). The result of these technological advances has improved uranium utilization by roughly sixty percent from the infancy days of nuclear power to present fuel management. Fuel management optimization technologies have also been developed in recent years which provide fuel utilization improvements due to core loading pattern optimization. This paper describes the development and impact of technology advances upon uranium utilization in modern pressurized water reactors. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs

  16. Regulations for the safe management of radioactive wastes and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voica, Anca

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the national, international and European regulations regarding radioactive waste management. ANDRAD is the national authority charged with nation wide coordination of safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste including their final disposal. ANDRAD's main objectives are the following: - establishing the National Strategy concerning the safety management of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel; - establishing the national repositories for the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste; - developing the technical procedures and establishing norms for all stages of management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste, including the disposal and the decommissioning of the nuclear and radiologic facilities

  17. A durable and dependable solution for RTR spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomasson, J.

    1999-01-01

    RTR Operators need efficient and cost-effective services for the management of their spent fuel and this, for the full lifetime of their facility. Thanks to the integration of transport, reprocessing and conditioning services, COGEMA provides a cogent solution, with the utmost respect for safety and preservation of the environment, for the short, medium and long terms. As demonstrated in this paper, this option offers the only durable and dependable solution for the RTR spent fuel management, leading to a conditioning for the final residues directly suitable for final disposal. The main advantage of such an option is obviously the significant reduction in terms of volume and radiotoxicity of the ultimate waste when compared to direct disposal of spent fuels. The efficiency of such a solution has been proven, some RTR operators having already trusted COGEMA for the management of their aluminide fuel. With its commitment in R and D activities for the development of a high performance and reprocessable LEU fuels, COGEMA will be able to propose a solution for all types of fuels, HEU and LEU

  18. Nuclear spent fuel management. Experience and options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel can be stored safely for long periods at relatively low cost, but some form of permanent disposal will eventually be necessary. This report examines the options for spent fuel management, explores the future prospects for each stage of the back-end of the fuel cycle and provides a thorough review of past experience and the technical status of the alternatives. Current policies and practices in twelve OECD countries are surveyed

  19. Waste management, final waste disposal, fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rengeling, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    Out of the legal poblems that are currently at issue, individual questions from four areas are dealt with: privatization of ultimate waste disposal; distribution of responsibilities for tasks in the field of waste disposal; harmonization and systematization of regulations; waste disposal - principles for making provisions for waste disposal - proof of having made provisions for waste disposal; financing and fees. A distinction has to be made between that which is legally and in particular constitutionally imperative or, as the case may be, permissible, and issues where there is room for political decision-making. Ultimately, the deliberations on the amendment are completely confined to the sphere of politics. (orig./HSCH) [de

  20. Recent developments in spent fuel management in Norway - 59260

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Peter J.; Oberlaender, Barbara C.

    2012-01-01

    Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) in Norway has arisen from irradiation of fuel in the NORA, Jeep I and Jeep II reactors at Kjeller, and in the Heavy Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) in Halden. In total there is some 16 tonnes of SNF, with 12 tons of aluminium-clad fuel, of which 10 tonnes is metallic uranium fuel and the remainder oxide (UO 2 ). The portion of this fuel that is similar to commercial fuel (UO 2 clad in Zircaloy) may be suitable for direct disposal on the Swedish model or in other repository designs. However, metallic uranium and/or fuels clad in aluminium are chemically reactive and there would be risks associated with direct disposal. Two committees were established by the Government of Norway in January 2009 to make recommendations for the interim storage and final disposal of spent fuel in Norway. The Technical Committee on Storage and Disposal of Metallic Uranium Fuel and Al-clad Fuels was formed with the mandate to recommend treatment (i.e. conditioning) options for metallic uranium fuel and aluminium-clad fuel to render them stable for long term storage and disposal. This committee, whose members were drawn from the nuclear industry, reported in January 2010, and recommended commercial reprocessing as the best option for these fuels. The Phase-2 committee, which in part based its work on the work of previous committees and on the report of the Technical Committee, had the mandate to find the most suitable technical solution and localisation for intermediate storage for spent nuclear fuel and long-lived waste. The membership of this committee was chosen to represent a broad cross section of stakeholders. The committee evaluated different solutions and their associated costs, and recommended one of the options. The committee's report published in early 2011. This paper summarises the conclusions of the two committees, and thereby illustrates the steps taken by one country to formulate a strategy for the long-term management of its SNF. (authors)

  1. System study of alternative waste management techniques: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the important results achieved in conjunction with the Research and Development Priority ''Alternative Waste Management Techniques'' sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology from 1981 to 1984. The subject of these studies was solely ''direct disposal'' of spent fuel elements. For this purpose a reference concept was selected from a variety of possible processes and engineered in detailed form by firms in the nuclear industry. Those who worked on the engineering concepts consider this waste management method technically feasible. Several disposal casks have been fabricated. The basic licensability of direct disposal can be evaluated on the basis of the documentation developed by the companies. The direct disposal method was compared with the ''integrated waste management concept'' using reference fuel cycles with respect to the following criteria: radiological safety and nuclear material safeguards and, in addition, economic and energy-policy aspects. It was found that with respect to radiological safety, including the long-term safety of the final repository, there are no significant differences between the two fuel cycles with and without reprocessing. With respect to the nuclear material safeguards of a final repository containing spent fuel elements, there are still a number of unanswered questions. From an economic standpoint, direct disposal will be more economical in the foreseeable future than integrated waste management. Quantification of the effects of one or the other waste management method on the national economy is not necessarily possible. Reprocessing is supported primarily by technological and energy-policy considerations. On the basis of the results, the conclusion is reached that reprocessing should be pursued further, but that at the same time direct disposal should be developed to the point of practical maturity

  2. Radwaste management and spent fuel management in JAVYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozik, M.; Strazovec, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work authors present radwaste management and spent fuel management in JAVYS, a.s. Processing of radioactive wastes (RAW) in the Bohunice Radioactive Waste Processing Center and surface storage of RAW in National RAW Repository as well as Interim Spent fuel storage in Jaslovske Bohunice are presented.

  3. Fuel isolation research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    This document is intended to give a broad outline of the Fuel Isolatikn program and to indicate how this program fits into the overall framework of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Similar activities in other countries are described, and the differences in philosophy behind these and the Canadian program are highlighted. A program plan is presented that outlines the development of research programs that contribute to the safety assessment of the disposal concept and the development of technology required for selection and optimization of a feasible fuel isolation system. Some indication of the work that might take place beyond concept assessment, at the end of the decade, is also given. The current program is described in some detail, with emphasis on what the prkgram has achieved to date and hopes to achieve in the future for the concept assessment phase of the waste management program. Finally, some major capital facilities associated with the fuel isolation program are described

  4. Demonstration of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Management Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian; Colozza, Anthony; Wynne, Robert; Miller, Michael; Meyer, Al; Smith, William

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA Exploration program. The passive thermal management system relies on heat conduction within highly thermally conductive cooling plates to move the heat from the central portion of the cell stack out to the edges of the fuel cell stack. Using the passive approach eliminates the need for a coolant pump and other cooling loop components within the fuel cell system which reduces mass and improves overall system reliability. Previous development demonstrated the performance of suitable highly thermally conductive cooling plates and integrated heat exchanger technology to collect the heat from the cooling plates (Ref. 1). The next step in the development of this passive thermal approach was the demonstration of the control of the heat removal process and the demonstration of the passive thermal control technology in actual fuel cell stacks. Tests were run with a simulated fuel cell stack passive thermal management system outfitted with passive cooling plates, an integrated heat exchanger and two types of cooling flow control valves. The tests were run to demonstrate the controllability of the passive thermal control approach. Finally, successful demonstrations of passive thermal control technology were conducted with fuel cell stacks from two fuel cell stack vendors.

  5. Reactivity management and burn-up management on JRR-3 silicide-fuel-core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tomoaki; Araki, Masaaki; Izumo, Hironobu; Kinase, Masami; Torii, Yoshiya; Murayama, Yoji

    2007-08-01

    On the conversion from uranium-aluminum-dispersion-type fuel (aluminide fuel) to uranium-silicon-aluminum-dispersion-type fuel (silicide fuel), uranium density was increased from 2.2 to 4.8 g/cm 3 with keeping uranium-235 enrichment of 20%. So, burnable absorbers (cadmium wire) were introduced for decreasing excess reactivity caused by the increasing of uranium density. The burnable absorbers influence reactivity during reactor operation. So, the burning of the burnable absorbers was studied and the influence on reactor operation was made cleared. Furthermore, necessary excess reactivity on beginning of operation cycle and the time limit for restart after unplanned reactor shutdown was calculated. On the conversion, limit of fuel burn-up was increased from 50% to 60%. And the fuel exchange procedure was changed from the six-batch dispersion procedure to the fuel burn-up management procedure. The previous estimation of fuel burn-up was required for the planning of fuel exchange, so that the estimation was carried out by means of past operation data. Finally, a new fuel exchange procedure was proposed for effective use of fuel elements. On the procedure, burn-up of spent fuel was defined for each loading position. The average length of fuel's staying in the core can be increased by two percent on the procedure. (author)

  6. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.

    1984-12-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program involves research into the storage and transportation of used nuclear fuel, immobilization of fuel waste, and deep geological disposal of the immobilized waste. The program is now in the fourth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the safety and environmental aspects of the deep underground disposal of immobilized fuel waste in plutonic rock. The objectives of the research for each component of the program and the progress made to the end of 1983 are described in this report

  7. Data requirements and maintenance of records for spent fuel management: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-11-01

    Data collection and maintenance are an essential part of activities required in the lifetime management of spent fuel. Key data on spent fuel are required from the earliest phase of any project. To allow informed decisions for spent fuel management to be made, the data need to be maintained throughout the lifetime of spent fuel management including storage, transport, reprocessing or disposal. This publication is intended to provide a state-of-the-art review of spent fuel data management, including what data need to be gathered for the relevant activities in spent fuel management and how to maintain them by the responsible bodies at various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. It provides some insights on a rational approach to spent fuel data management, considering the common requirements involved in spent fuel management for any Member State. In this regard, the information provided in these sections is mostly generic. After the introductory Section 1 and the Section 2 on data requirements for spent fuel management, Section 3 examines technical parameters that could specify spent fuel characteristics and associated conditions, followed by Section 4 on life cycle management of spent fuel data which includes the maintenance of records and other issues. Finally, some specific examples of the approaches already developed by a number of utilities and national organisations to characterise and track their spent-fuel data are presented in the Annex

  8. Fuel utilization improvements in a once-through PWR fuel cycle. Final report on Task 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabby, D.

    1979-06-01

    In studying the position of the United States Department of Energy, Non-proliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program, this report determines the uranium saving associated with various improvement concepts applicable to a once-through fuel cycle of a standard four-loop Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor. Increased discharged fuel burnup from 33,000 to 45,000 MWD/MTM could achieve a 12% U 3 O 8 saving by 1990. Improved fuel management schemes combined with coastdown to 60% power, could result in U 3 O 8 savings of 6%

  9. Fuel management at Washington State Ferries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodeur, P.; Olds, J.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation discussed Washington State Ferry (WSF) operations and provided details of a biodiesel research and demonstration project. Washington has the largest ferry system in the United States, with a total of 28 vessels that operate on 10 routes through 20 terminals. Routes vary by transit times, navigational challenges, and the proximity to population centres. WSF fuel and emissions management initiatives include exhaust emission studies, clean fuel initiatives, machinery upgrades, fuel conservation initiatives, and biodiesel testing. The organization is also using waste heat recovery and a positive restraint system. The WSF biodiesel pilot program was conducted using soy-derived fuels with a purifier disk stack. The program is in agreement with recent legislation requiring that 2 per cent of annual diesel fuel sales are from biodiesel fuels, and state legislation requiring that state agencies use a minimum of 20 per cent biodiesel blends in diesel-powered vessels and vehicles. Details of project partnerships were included. tabs., figs

  10. Final Scientific Report - "Improved Fuel Efficiency from Nanocomposite Tire Tread"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Andrew Myers

    2005-12-30

    Rolling resistance, a measure of the energy lost as a tire rotates while moving, is a significant source of power and fuel loss. Recently, low rolling resistant tires have been formulated by adding silica to tire tread. These "Green Tires" (so named from the environmental advantages of lower emissions and improved fuel economy) have seen some commercial success in Europe, where high fuel prices and performance drive tire selection. Unfortunately, the higher costs of the silica and a more complicated manufacturing process have prevented significant commercialization - and the resulting fuel savings - in the U.S. In this project, TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) prepared an inexpensive alternative to silica that leads to tire components with lower rolling resistance. These new tire composite materials were processed with traditional rubber processing equipment. We prepared specially designed nanoparticle additives, based on a high purity, inorganic mineral whose surface can be easily modified for compatibility with tire tread formulations. Our nanocomposites decreased energy losses to hysteresis, the loss of energy from the compression and relaxation of an elastic material, by nearly 20% compared to a blank SBR sample. We also demonstrated better performance than a leading silica product, with easier production of our final rubber nanocomposite.

  11. ORIGEN-based Nuclear Fuel Inventory Module for Fuel Cycle Assessment: Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skutnik, Steven E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-06-19

    The goal of this project, “ORIGEN-based Nuclear Fuel Depletion Module for Fuel Cycle Assessment" is to create a physics-based reactor depletion and decay module for the Cyclus nuclear fuel cycle simulator in order to assess nuclear fuel inventories over a broad space of reactor operating conditions. The overall goal of this approach is to facilitate evaluations of nuclear fuel inventories for a broad space of scenarios, including extended used nuclear fuel storage and cascading impacts on fuel cycle options such as actinide recovery in used nuclear fuel, particularly for multiple recycle scenarios. The advantages of a physics-based approach (compared to a recipe-based approach which has been typically employed for fuel cycle simulators) is in its inherent flexibility; such an approach can more readily accommodate the broad space of potential isotopic vectors that may be encountered under advanced fuel cycle options. In order to develop this flexible reactor analysis capability, we are leveraging the Origen nuclear fuel depletion and decay module from SCALE to produce a standalone “depletion engine” which will serve as the kernel of a Cyclus-based reactor analysis module. The ORIGEN depletion module is a rigorously benchmarked and extensively validated tool for nuclear fuel analysis and thus its incorporation into the Cyclus framework can bring these capabilities to bear on the problem of evaluating long-term impacts of fuel cycle option choices on relevant metrics of interest, including materials inventories and availability (for multiple recycle scenarios), long-term waste management and repository impacts, etc. Developing this Origen-based analysis capability for Cyclus requires the refinement of the Origen analysis sequence to the point where it can reasonably be compiled as a standalone sequence outside of SCALE; i.e., wherein all of the computational aspects of Origen (including reactor cross-section library processing and interpolation, input and output

  12. Final Report - MEA and Stack Durability for PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yandrasits, Michael A.

    2008-02-15

    the same. (6) Through the use of statistical lifetime analysis methods, it is possible to develop new MEAs with predicted durability approaching the DOE 2010 targets. (7) A segmented cell was developed that extend the resolution from ~ 40 to 121 segments for a 50cm2 active area single cell which allowed for more precise investigation of the local phenomena in a operating fuel cell. (8) The single cell concept was extended to a fuel size stack to allow the first of its kind monitoring and mapping of an operational fuel cell stack. An internal check used during this project involved evaluating the manufacturability of any new MEA component. If a more durable MEA component was developed in the lab, but could not be scaled-up to ‘high speed, high volume manufacturing’, then that component was not selected for the final MEA-fuel cell system demonstration. It is the intent of the team to commercialize new products developed under this project, but commercialization can not occur if the manufacture of said new components is difficult or if the price is significantly greater than existing products as to make the new components not cost competitive. Thus, the end result of this project is the creation of MEA and fuel cell system technology that is capable of meeting the DOEs 2010 target of 40,000 hours for stationary fuel cell systems (although this lifetime has not been demonstrated in laboratory or field testing yet) at a cost that is economically viable for the developing fuel cell industry. We have demonstrated over 2,000 hours of run time for the MEA and system developed under this project.

  13. Light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas emission standards and corporate average fuel economy standards : final rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    Final Rule to establish a National Program consisting of new standards for light-duty vehicles that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel economy. This joint : Final Rule is consistent with the National Fuel Efficiency Policy announce...

  14. Final environmental impact statement: US Spent Fuel Policy. Charge for spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    The United States Government policy relating to nuclear fuel reprocessing, which was announced by President Carter on April 7, 1977, provides for an indefinite deferral of reprocessing, and thus commits light water reactor (LWR) plants to a once-through fuel cycle during that indefinite period. In a subsequent action implementing that policy, the Department of Energy (DOE) on October 18, 1977 announced a spent fuel policy which would enable domestic, and on a selective basis, foreign utilities to deliver spent fuel to the US Government for interim storage and final geologic disposal, and pay the Government a fee for such services. This volume addresses itself to whether the fee charged for these services, by its level or its structure, would have any effect on the environmental impacts of implementing the Spent Fuel Policy itself. This volume thus analyzes the fee and various alternatives to determine the interaction between the fee and the degree of participation by domestic utilities and foreign countries in the proposed spent fuel program for implementing the Spent Fuel Policy. It also analyzes the effect, if any, of the fee on the growth of nuclear power

  15. Final disposal of spent fuels and high activity waste: status and trends in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herscovich de Pahissa, Marta

    2007-01-01

    Geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high level waste from reprocessing, properly conditioned, is described. This issue is a major challenge related to radioactive waste management. Several options are analyzed, such as application of separation and transmutation to high level waste before final disposal; need of multinational repositories; a phased approach to deep geological disposal and long term surface storage. Bearing in mind this information, a future article will report the state of art in the world. (author) [es

  16. Handling of spent nuclear fuel and final storage of vitrified high level reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    A summary of the planning of transportation and plant design in the Swedish KBS project on management and disposal reprocessed radioactive waste. It describes a transportation system, a central storage facility for used fuel elements, a plant for intermediate storage and encapsulation and a final repository for the vitrified waste. Accounts are given for the reprocessing and vitrification. The safety of the entire system is discussed

  17. Handling final storage of unreprocessed spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The present second report from KBS describes how the safe final storage of spent unreprocessed nuclear fuel can be implemented. According to the Swedish Stipulation Law, the owner must specify in which form the waste is to be stored, how final storage is to be effected, how the waste is to be transported and all other aspects of fuel handling and storage which must be taken into consideration in judging whether the proposed final storage method can be considered to be absolutely safe and feasible. Thus, the description must go beyond general plans and sketches. The description is therefore relatively detailed, even concerning those parts which are less essential for evaluating the safety of the waste storage method. For those parts of the handling chain which are the same for both alternatives of the Stipulation Law, the reader is referred in some cases to the first report. Both of the alternatives of the Stipulation Law may be used in the future. Handling equipment and facilities for the two storage methods are so designed that a combination in the desired proportions is practically feasible. In this first part of the report are presented: premises and data, a description of the various steps of the handling procedure, a summary of dispersal processes and a safety analysis. (author)

  18. Fuel Rod Consolidation Project: Phase 2, Final report: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This design report describes the NUS final design of the Prototype Spent Nuclear Fuel Rod Consolidation System. This summary presents the approach and the subsequent sections describe, in detail, the final design. Detailed data, drawings, and the design Basis Accident Report are provided in Volumes II thru V. The design as presented, represents one cell of a multicell facility for the dry consolidation of any type of PWR and BWR fuel used in the United States LWR industry that will exceed 1% of the fuel inventory at the year 2000. The system contains the automatically-controlled equipment required to consolidate 750MT (heavy metal)/year, at 75% availability. The equipment is designed as replaceable components using state-of-the-art tchnology. The control system utilizes the most advanced commercially available equipment on the market today. Two state-of-the-art advanced servo manipulators are provided for system maintenance. In general the equipment is designed utilizing fabricated and commercial components. For example, the main drive systems use commercially available roller screws. These rollers screws have 60,000 hours of operation in nuclear power plants and have been used extensively in other applications. The motors selected represent the most advanced designed servo motors on the market today for the precision control of machinery. In areas where precise positioning was not required, less expensive TRW Globe motors were selected. These are small compact motors with a long history of operations in radiation environments. The Robotic Bridge Transporters are modified versions of existing bridge cranes for remote automatic operations. Other equipment such as the welder for fuel canister closure operations is a commercially available product with an operating history applicable to this process. In general, this approach was followed throughout the design of all the equipment and will enable the system to be developed without costly development programs

  19. Technical considerations associated with spent fuel acceptance. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supko, E.M.

    1996-06-01

    This study was initiated by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to identify technical considerations associated with spent fuel acceptance and implementation of a waste management system that includes the use of transportable storage systems, and to serve as an opening dialogue among Standard Contract Holders and the department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste management (OCRWM) prior to the development of waste acceptance criteria or issuance of a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking by OCRWM to amend the Standard Contract. The original purpose of the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking was to address changes to the Standard Contract to implement a multi-purpose canister based system and to address other issues that were not adequately addressed in the standard contract. Even if DOE does not develop a multi-purpose canister based system for waste acceptance, it will still be necessary to develop waste acceptance criteria in order to accept spent fuel in transportable storage systems that are being deployed for at-reactor storage. In this study, technical issues associated with spent fuel acceptance will be defined and potential options and alternatives for resolution of technical considerations will be explored

  20. Uranium enrichment management review. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellett, J.D.; Rieke, W.B.; Simpson, J.W.; Sullivan, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    The uranium enrichment enterprise of the US Department of Energy (DOE) provides enriched nuclear fuel for private and government utilities domestically and abroad. The enterprise, in effect, provides a commercial service and represents a signficant business operation within the US government: more than $1 billion in revenues annually and future capital expenditures estimated at several billions of dollars. As a result, in May 1980, the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications within DOE requested that a group of experienced business executives be assembled to review the operation, financing, and management of the uranium enrichment enterprise as a basis for advising the Secretary of Energy. The review group was specifically asked to focus on the management activities to which sound business practices could be applied. The group developed findings and recommendations in six areas: management of operations and construction; long-range planning; marketing of enrichment services; financial management; research and development; and general management. The chapters of this report present first the management review group's recommendations in the six areas evaluated and then the findings and issues in each area. An appendix provides the group's calendar of meetings. A list of major reference sources used in the course of the study is also included. 12 references

  1. Comparison of spent nuclear fuel management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, C.L.; Caldwell, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the process an results of a trade study of spent nuclear fuel (SNF)management alternatives. The purpose of the trade study was to provide: (1) a summary of various SNF management alternatives, (2) an objective comparison of the various alternatives to facilitate the decision making process, and (3) documentation of trade study rational and the basis for decisions

  2. Spent fuel management: Current status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The main objective of the Advisory Group on Spent Fuel Management is to review the world-wide situation in Spent Fuel Management, to define the most important directions of national efforts and international cooperation in this area, to exchange information on the present status and progress in performing the back-end of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to elaborate the general recommendations for future Agency programmes in the field of spent fuel management. This report which is a result of the third IAEA Advisory Group Meeting (the first and second were held in 1984 and 1986) is intended to provide the reader with an overview of the status of spent fuel management programmes in a number of leading countries, with a description of the past and present IAEA activities in this field of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and with the Agency's plans for the next years, based on the proposals and recommendations of Member States. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 14 papers presented at the advisory group meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Growing dimensions. Spent fuel management at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.

    1998-01-01

    More than 550 nuclear research reactors are operating or shout down around the world. At many of these reactors, spent fuel from their operations is stored, pending decisions on its final disposition. In recent years, problems associated with this spent fuel storage have loomed larger in the international nuclear community. In efforts to determine the overall scope of problems and to develop a database on the subject, the IAEA has surveyed research reactor operators in its Member States. Information for the Research Reactor Spent Fuel Database (RRSFDB) so far has been obtained from a limited but representative number of research reactors. It supplements data already on hand in the Agency's more established Research Reactor Database (RRDB). Drawing upon these database resources, this article presents an overall picture of spent fuel management and storage at the world's research reactors, in the context of associated national and international programmes in the field

  4. Waste management and the holistic fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, R.G.G.; Robbins, R.A.; Eilbeck, A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper outlines a holistic approach to the nuclear fuel cycle and the impact that waste management can have on the holistic approach. The philosophy includes regarding irradiated fuel as a resource rather than a waste that can be used as a source of fissile material to be recycled, either Uranium returned to fuel or Plutonium in mixed oxide fuels (MOX) for fast and impact of those compounds that leave the cycle (solid waste, liquid effluent and gaseous effluent) are minimized. This can only be achieved by applying a full life cycle analysis of process benefits. The paper describes some of the work in waste management but notes that waste and its generation must be seen as an integral part of any developed strategy. (authors)

  5. Final disposal of spent fuels and high activity waste: status and trends in the world. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herscovich de Pahissa, Marta

    2008-01-01

    The proper management of spent fuel arising from nuclear power production is a key issue for the sustainable development of nuclear energy. Some countries have adopted reprocessing of spent fuel and part of them has continued to develop and improve closed fuel cycle technologies; some other countries have adopted a direct final disposal. The objective in this article is to provide an update on the latest development in the world related with the geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high level wastes. (author) [es

  6. Direct fuel cell power plants: the final steps to commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Donald R.

    Since the last paper presented at the Second Grove Fuel Cell Symposium, the Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has established two commercial subsidiaries, become a publically-held firm, expanded its facilities and has moved the direct fuel cell (DFC) technology and systems significantly closer to commercial readiness. The subsidiaries, the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) and Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) are perfecting their respective roles in the company's strategy to commercialize its DFC technology. FCE is the prime contractor for the Santa Clara Demonstration and is establishing the needed marketing, sales, engineering, and servicing functions. FCMC in addition to producing the stacks and stack modules for the Santa Clara demonstration plant is now upgrading its production capability and product yields, and retooling for the final stack scale-up for the commercial unit. ERC has built and operated the tallest and largest capacities-to-date carbonate fuel cell stacks as well as numerous short stacks. While most of these units were tested at ERC's Danbury, Connecticut (USA) R&D Center, others have been evaluated at other domestic and overseas facilities using a variety of fuels. ERC has supplied stacks to Elkraft and MTU for tests with natural gas, and RWE in Germany where coal-derived gas were used. Additional stack test activities have been performed by MELCO and Sanyo in Japan. Information from some of these activities is protected by ERC's license arrangements with these firms. However, permission for limited data releases will be requested to provide the Grove Conference with up-to-date results. Arguably the most dramatic demonstration of carbonate fuel cells in the utility-scale, 2 MW power plant demonstration unit, located in the City of Santa Clara, California. Construction of the unit's balance-of-plant (BOP) has been completed and the installed equipment has been operationally checked. Two of the four DFC stack sub-modules, each

  7. Perturbation theory in nuclear fuel management optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear in-core fuel management involves all the physical aspects which allow optimal operation of the nuclear fuel within the reactor core. In most nuclear power reactors, fuel loading patterns which have a minimum power peak are economically desirable to allow the reactors to operate at the highest power density and to minimize the possibility of fuel failure. In this study, perturbation theory along with a binary fuel shuffling technique is applied to predict the effects of various core configurations, and hence, the optimization of in-core fuel management. The computer code FULMNT has been developed to shuffle the fuel assemblies in search of the lowest possible power peaking factor. An iteration approach is used in the search routine. A two-group diffusion theory method is used to obtain the power distribution for the iterations. A comparison of the results of this method with other methods shows that this approach can save computer time. The code also has a burnup capability which can be used to check power peaking throughout the core life

  8. Fuel management codes for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicard, B.; Coulon, P.; Mougniot, J.C.; Gouriou, A.; Pontier, M.; Skok, J.; Carnoy, M.; Martin, J.

    The CAPHE code is used for managing and following up fuel subassemblies in the Phenix fast neutron reactor; the principal experimental results obtained since this reactor was commissioned are analyzed with this code. They are mainly concerned with following up fuel subassembly powers and core reactivity variations observed up to the beginning of the fifth Phenix working cycle (3/75). Characteristics of Phenix irradiated fuel subassemblies calculated by the CAPHE code are detailed as at April 1, 1975 (burn-up steel damage)

  9. Fuel management study on quarter core refueling for Ling Ao NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong; Li Jinggang

    2012-01-01

    The fuel management study on quarter core refueling is introduced for Ling Ao NPP. Starting from the selection of the objective of fuel management for quarter core refueling, the code and method used and the analysis carried out are explained in details to reach the final loading pattern chosen. The start-up physics test results are listed to demonstrate the realized quarter core fuel management. In the end, the advantage and disadvantage after turning to quarter core refueling has been given for the power plant from the fuel management point of view. (authors)

  10. A discrete optimization method for nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argaud, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    Nuclear loading pattern elaboration can be seen as a combinational optimization problem of tremendous size and with non-linear cost-functions, and search are always numerically expensive. After a brief introduction of the main aspects of nuclear fuel management, this paper presents a new idea to treat the combinational problem by using informations included in the gradient of a cost function. The method is to choose, by direct observation of the gradient, the more interesting changes in fuel loading patterns. An example is then developed to illustrate an operating mode of the method, and finally, connections with simulated annealing and genetic algorithms are described as an attempt to improve search processes

  11. Development of advanced spent fuel management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Won; Shin, Y. J.; Cho, S. H.

    2004-03-01

    The research on spent fuel management focuses on the maximization of the disposal efficiency by a volume reduction, the improvement of the environmental friendliness by the partitioning and transmutation of the long lived nuclides, and the recycling of the spent fuel for an efficient utilization of the uranium source. In the second phase which started in 2001, the performance test of the advanced spent fuel management process consisting of voloxidation, reduction of spent fuel and the lithium recovery process has been completed successfully on a laboratory scale. The world-premier spent fuel reduction hot test of a 5 kgHM/batch has been performed successfully by joint research with Russia and the valuable data on the actinides and FPs material balance and the characteristics of the metal product were obtained with experience to help design an engineering scale reduction system. The electrolytic reduction technology which integrates uranium oxide reduction in a molten LiCl-Li 2 O system and Li 2 O electrolysis is developed and a unique reaction system is also devised. Design data such as the treatment capacity, current density and mass transfer behavior obtained from the performance test of a 5 kgU/batch electrolytic reduction system pave the way for the third phase of the hot cell demonstration of the advanced spent fuel management technology

  12. EPRI fuel performance data base: user's manual. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.; Lee, S.; Rumble, E.

    1980-10-01

    This user's manual provides instructions for accessing the data in the EPRI fuel performance data base (FPDB) and manipulating that data to solve specific problems that the user wishes to specify. The user interacts with the FPDB through the Relational Information Management System (RIMS) computer program. The structure and format of the FPDB and the general syntax of the data base commands are described. Instructions follow for the use of each command. Appendixes provide more detailed information about the FPDB and its software. The FPDB currently resides on a PRIME-750 computer

  13. Accelerated fuel depreciation as an economic incentive for low-leakage fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis is presented which evaluates the tax depreciation advantage which results from the increased rate of fuel depletion achieved in the current low-leakage fuel-management LWR core reload designs. An analytical fuel-cycle cost model is used to examine the important cost parameters which are then validated using the fuel-cycle cost code CINCAS and data from the Maine Yankee PWR. Results show that low-leakage fuel management, through the tax depreciation advantage from accelerated fuel depletion, provides an improvement of several percent in fuel-cycle costs compared to traditional out-in fuel management and a constant fuel depletion rate. (author)

  14. Waste management and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinari, J.

    1982-01-01

    The present lecture deals with energy needs and nuclear power, the importance of waste and its relative place in the fuel cycle, the games of controversies over nuclear waste in the strategies of energy and finally with missions and functions of the IAEA for privileging the rational approach and facilitating the transfer of technology. (RW)

  15. Burnup credit demands for spent fuel management in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medun, V.

    2001-01-01

    In fact, till now, burnup credit has not be applied in Ukrainian nuclear power for spent fuel management systems (storage and transport). However, application of advanced fuel at VVER reactors, arising spent fuel amounts, represent burnup credit as an important resource to decrease spent fuel management costs. The paper describes spent fuel management status in Ukraine from viewpoint of subcriticality assurance under spent fuel storage and transport. It also considers: 1. Regulation basis concerning subcriticality assurance, 2. Basic spent fuel and transport casks characteristics, 3. Possibilities and demands for burnup credit application at spent fuel management systems in Ukraine. (author)

  16. An overview on the nuclear spent fuel management in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, M.

    2001-01-01

    The sources of radioactive waste in Romania are users of radiation and radioactive materials in industry (including nuclear electricity generation), medicine, agriculture and research and also the processing of materials that are naturally radioactive, such as uranium ores. The different types of radioactive waste are classified into four categories of waste: excepted waste, low level waste, medium level waste and high level waste. A spent fuel management sub-programme as a part of the Radioactive Waste Management programme was initiated by the former Romanian Electricity Company (RENEL) in 1992. Within the frame of R and D of the Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme, the topics cover investigations, studies and research to identify the sites and the conceptual designs for a Spent Fuel Interim Storage Facility (SFISF) and also a Spent Fuel Disposal Facility (SFDF). Changes in the organization of the nuclear activities of RENEL, involving both responsibilities and financing aspects, led to interruption of the programme. The programme includes study of the main methods and the existing technologies for the design, operation and safety of an interim storage facility (including transport aspects). It also includes analysis of details on the site selection for this facility and for a spent fuel final disposal facility. The achievement of the spent fuel interim storage facility is proceeding. The results from the studies performed in the last years will permit us to prepare the feasibility study next year and the documentation required by our regulatory body for starting the process to obtain a license for a SFISF at Cernavoda. A second phase is the assessment of a long term strategy to select and adopt a proven disposal technology for spent fuel, corresponding with a selected site. The status of the work performed in the frame of this programme and also the situation of the spent fuel from research reactors are presented. (author)

  17. A new coupled system for BWR nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, A.; Ortiz-Servin, J.J.; Montes-Tadeo, J.L.; Perusquia, R.; Rizos, R.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a system to solve four stages of the fuel management problem is showed.The system uses different heuristic techniques to solve each stage of that area, and this problem is solved in a coupled way. Considered problems correspond to the following designs: fuel lattice, fuel assembly, fuel reload and control rod patterns. Even though, each stage of the problem can have its own objective function, the complete problem was solved using a multi-objective function. The solution strategy is to solve each stage of design in an iterative process, taking into account previous results for the next stage, until to achieve a complete solution. The solution strategy to solve the coupled problem is the following: the first solved stage is the fuel lattice design, the second one is fuel assembly design, finally an internal loop between both fuel reload design and control rod pattern design is carried out.For this internal loop, a seed reload using Haling principle is generated. The obtained results showed the advantage to solve the whole problem in a coupled way. (author)

  18. Management of spent fuel from research and prototype power reactors and residues from post-irradiation examination of fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    The safe and economic management of spent fuel is important for all countries which have nuclear research or power reactors. It involves all aspects of the handling, transportation, storage, conditioning and reprocessing or final disposal of the spent fuel. In the case of spent fuel management from power reactors the shortage of available reprocessing capacity and the rising economic interest in the direct disposal of spent fuel have led to an increasing interest in the long term storage and management of spent fuel. The IAEA has played a major role in coordinating the national activities of the Member States in this area. It was against this background that the Technical Committee Meeting on ''Safe Management of Spent Fuel From Research Reactors, Prototype Power Reactors and Fuel From Commercial Power Reactors That Has Been Subjected to PIE (Post Irradiated Examination)'' (28th November - 1st December 1988) was organised. The aims of the current meeting have been to: 1. Review the state-of-the-art in the field of management of spent fuel from research and prototype power reactors, as well as the residues from post irradiation examination of commercial power reactor fuel. The emphasis was to be on the safe handling, conditioning, transportation, storage and/or disposal of the spent fuel during operation and final decommissioning of the reactors. Information was sought on design details, including shielding, criticality and radionuclide release prevention, heat removal, automation and remote control, planning and staff training; licensing and operational practices during each of the phases of spent fuel management. 2. Identify areas where additional research and development are needed. 3. Recommend areas for future international cooperation in this field. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Fuel Retrieval and Management of Fuel Element Debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chande, Shridhar; Lachaume, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear accidents involving core meltdown have not been so rare. While the first occurred in early fifties, it is reported that about 20 have occurred worldwide in military and commercial reactors. The more recent and major accidents are 1. Three Mile Island, USA in 1979: Approximately half the core was melted, and flowed to the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel however the pressure vessel remained intact and contained the damaged fuel. 2. Chernobyl, former USSR in 1984: Explosive release of radioactive material occurred. About 6 tons of fuel was dispersed as air-borne particles. Most of the core was damaged or melted. 3. Fukushima, Japan 2011: Three units suffered melt down. In unit 1 almost all the fuel assemblies melted and accumulated at the bottom of the vessel. It is reported that the vessel failed and the molten corium has penetrated the concrete. In the units 2 and 3, partial melting of cores has occurred. In several of these cases, fuel retrieval and management activities have been carried out. The experience and insights gained from these activities will be extremely useful for planning and execution of similar activities in future if ever they are needed. The purpose of this session was to exchange this experience and also to share the lessons learned. This is of particularly important, at this juncture, when planning and preparation for retrieval of damaged cores in Fukushima NPP is in progress. (author)

  20. Solid oxide fuel cells towards real life applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells offer a clean and efficient way of producing electricity and heat from a wide selection of fuels. The project addressed three major challenges to be overcome by the technology to make commercialisation possible. (1) At the cell level, increased efficiency combined with production cost reduction has been achieved through an optimization of the manufacturing processes, b) by using alternative raw materials with a lower purchase price and c) by introducing a new generation of fuel cells with reduced loss and higher efficiency. (2) At the stack level, production cost reduction is reduced and manufacturing capacity is increased through an optimization of the stack production. (3) At the system level, development of integrated hotbox concepts for the market segments distributed generation (DG), micro combined heat and power (mCHP), and auxiliary power units (APU) have been developed. In the mCHP segment, two concepts have been developed and validated with regards to market requirements and scalability. In the APU-segment, different types of reformers have been tested and it has been proven that diesel can be reformed through appropriate reformers. Finally, operation experience and feedback has been gained by deployment of stacks in the test facility at the H.C. OErsted Power Plant (HCV). This demonstration has been carried out in collaboration between TOFC and DONG Energy Power A/S (DONG), who has participated as a subcontractor to TOFC. The demonstration has given valuable knowledge and experience with design, start-up and operation of small power units connected to the grid and future development within especially the mCHP segment will benefit from this. In this report, the project results are described for each of the work packages in the project. (Author)

  1. Geophysical borehole logging. Final disposal of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouhiainen, P.

    1984-01-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (Industrial Power Company Ltd.) will take precautions for final disposal of spent fuel in the Finnish bedrock. The first stage of the site selection studies includes drilling of a deep borehole down to approximately 1000 meters in the year 1984. The report deals with geophysical borehole logging methods, which could be used for the studies. The aim of geophysical borehole logging methods is to descripe specially hydrogeological and structural features. Only the most essential methods are dealt with in this report. Attention is paid to the information produced with the methods, derscription of the methods, interpretation and limitations. The feasibility and possibilities for the aims are evaluated. The evaluations are based mainly on the results from Sweden, England, Canada and USA as well as experiencies gained in Finland

  2. From waste to traffic fuel -projects. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasi, S; Lehtonen, E; Aro-Heinilae, E [and others

    2012-11-01

    The main objective of the project was to promote biogas production and its use as traffic fuel. The aims in the four Finnish and two Estonian case regions were to reduce the amount and improve the sustainable use of waste and sludge, to promote biogas production, to start biogas use as traffic fuel and to provide tools for implementing the aims. The results of this study show that achieving the food waste prevention target will decrease greenhouse gas emissions by 415 000 CO{sub 2}-eq tons and result in monetary savings for the waste generators amounting to almost 300 euro/ capita on average in all case regions in 2020. The results show that waste prevention should be the first priority in waste management and the use of waste materials as feedstock for energy production the second priority. In total 3 TWh energy could be produced from available biomass in the studied case regions. This corresponds to the fuel consumption of about 300 000 passenger cars. When a Geographical Information System (GIS) was used to identify suitable biogas plant site locations with particular respect to the spatial distribution of available biomass, it was found that a total of 50 biogas plants with capacity varying from 2.1 to 14.5 MW could be built in the case regions. This corresponds to 2.2 TWh energy and covers from 5 to 40% of the passenger car fuel consumption in these regions. Using all produced biogas (2.2 TWh energy) for vehicle fuel GHG emissions would lead to a 450 000 t CO{sub 2}-eq reduction. The same effect on emissions would be gained if more than 100 000 passenger cars were to be taken off the roads. On average, the energy consumed by biogas plants represents approximately 20% of the produced energy. The results also show that biomethane production from waste materials is profitable. In some cases the biomethane production costs can be covered with the gained gate fees. The cost of biomethane production from agricultural materials is less than 96 euro/MWh{sub th

  3. In-core fuel management: New challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolmayer, A.; Vallee, A.; Mondot, J.

    1992-01-01

    Experience accumulated by pressurized water reactor (PWR) utilities allows them to improve their strategies in the use of eventual margins to core design limits. They are used for nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) power upgrading, to improve operating margins, or to adapt fuel management to specific objectives. As a result, in-core fuel management strategies have become very diverse: UO 2 or mixed-oxide loading, out-in or in-out fuel loading patterns, extended or annual cycle lengths with margins on design limits such as moderator temperature coefficients, boron concentrations, or peaking factors. Perspectives also appear concerning use of existing plutonium stocks or actinide incineration. Burnable poisons are most often needed to satisfactorily achieve these goals. Among them, gadolinia are now largely used, owing to their excellent performance. More than 24 Framatome first cores and reloads, representing more than 3000 gadolinia-bearing rods, have been irradiated since 1983

  4. Accelerators and alternative nuclear fuel management options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The development of special accelerators suggests the po tential for new directions in nuclear energy systems evolution. Such directions point towards a more acceptable form of nuclear energy by reason of the consequent accessibility of enhanced fuel management choices. Essential and specifically directed research and development activity needs to be under taken in order to clarify and resolve a number of technical issues

  5. Residents' values and fuels management approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwo-Bao Liou; Christine Vogt; Greg Winter; Sarah McCaffrey

    2008-01-01

    The research utilizes the Forest Value and Salient Value Similarity Scales to examine homeowners' value orientations and relate them to attitudes toward and support for fuels management approaches. Data were collected from homeowners living in the wildland-urban interface of the Huron- Manistee National Forest at two time periods, in 2002 and 2006. The panel data...

  6. Fact sheet on spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The IAEA gives high priority to safe and effective spent fuel management. As an example of continuing efforts, the 2003 International Conference on Storage of Spent Fuel from Power Reactors gathered 125 participants from 35 member states to exchange information on this important subject. With its large number of Member States, the IAEA is well-positioned to gather and share information useful in addressing Member State priorities. IAEA activities on this topic include plans to produce technical documents as resources for a range of priority topics: spent fuel performance assessment and research, burnup credit applications, cask maintenance, cask loading optimization, long term storage requirements including records maintenance, economics, spent fuel treatment, remote technology, and influence of fuel design on spent fuel storage. In addition to broader topics, the IAEA supports coordinated research projects and technical cooperation projects focused on specific needs. The proceedings of the 2003 IAEA conference on storage of spent fuel from power reactors has been ranked in the top twenty most accessed IAEA publications. These proceedings are available for free downloads at http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PubDetails.asp?pubId=6924]. The IAEA organized and held a 2004 meeting focused on long term spent fuel storage provisions in Central and Eastern Europe, using technical cooperation funds to support participation by these Member States. Over ninety percent of the participants in this meeting rated its value as good or excellent, with participants noting that the IAEA is having a positive effect in stimulating communication, cooperation, and information dissemination on this important topic. The IAEA was advised in 2004 that results from a recent coordinated research project (IAEA-TECDOC-1343) were used by one Member State to justify higher clad temperatures for spent fuel in dry storage, leading to more efficient storage and reduced costs. Long term

  7. Past and future IAEA spent fuel management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, A.

    1993-01-01

    The main objectives and strategies of the Agency's activities in the area of spent fuel management are to promote the exchange of information between Member States on technical, safety, environmental and economic aspects of spent fuel management technology, including storage, transport and treatment of spent fuel, and to provide assistance to Member States in the planning, implementation and operation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This paper give a list of the meetings held since the last issue of the Spent Fuel Management Newsletter

  8. Final Report on the Fuel Saving Effectiveness of Various Driver Feedback Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonder, J.; Earleywine, M.; Sparks, W.

    2011-03-01

    This final report quantifies the fuel-savings opportunities from specific driving behavior changes, identifies factors that influence drivers' receptiveness to adopting fuel-saving behaviors, and assesses various driver feedback approaches.

  9. Final disposal of high levels waste and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelin, R.

    1984-05-01

    Foreign and international activities on the final disposal of high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel have been reviewed. A considerable research effort is devoted to development of acceptable disposal options. The different technical concepts presently under study are described in the report. Numerous studies have been made in many countries of the potential risks to future generations from radioactive wastes in underground disposal repositories. In the report the safety assessment studies and existing performance criteria for geological disposal are briefly discussed. The studies that are being made in Canada, the United States, France and Switzerland are the most interesting for Sweden as these countries also are considering disposal into crystalline rocks. The overall time-tables in different countries for realisation of the final disposal are rather similar. Normally actual large-scale disposal operations for high-level wastes are not foreseen until after year 2000. In the United States the Congress recently passed the important Nuclear Waste Policy Act. It gives a rather firm timetable for site-selection and construction of nuclear waste disposal facilities. According to this act the first repository for disposal of commercial high-level waste must be in operation not later than in January 1998. (Author)

  10. Fuel cycle and waste management: A perspective from British nuclear fuels plc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, R.G.G.; Fairhall, G.A.; Robbins, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The phrase fuel cycle and waste management implies two separate and distinct activities. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) has adopted a holistic approach to the fuel cycle that integrates the traditional fuel cycle activities of conversion to uranium hexafluoride, fuel fabrication, power generation, and reprocessing with waste arisings, its subsequent treatment, and disposal

  11. Final report on LDRD project ''proliferation-resistant fuel cycles''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, N W; Hassberger, J A.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides a summary of LDRD work completed during 1997 and 1998 to develop the ideas and concepts that lead to the Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactor (STAR) program proposals to the DOE Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI). The STAR program consists of a team of three national laboratories (LLNL, ANL, and LANL), three universities, (UC Berkeley, TAMU, and MIT) and the Westinghouse Research Center. Based on the LLNL work and their own efforts on related work this team prepared and integrated a package of twelve proposals that will carry the LDRD work outlined here into the next phase of development. We are proposing to develop a new nuclear system that meets stringent requirements for a high degree of safety and proliferation resistance, and also deals directly with the related nuclear waste and spent fuel management issues

  12. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction. Phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1979-03-01

    This program has as its ultimate objective the demonstration of an advanced fuel design that is resistant to the failure mechanism known as fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel, and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to protect the Zircaloy cladding tube from the harmful effects of localized stress, and reactive fission products during reactor service. This is the final report for PHASE 1 of this program. Support tests have shown that the barrier fuel resists PCI far better than does the conventional Zircaloy-clad fuel. Power ramp tests thus far have shown good PCI resistance for Cu-barrier fuel at burnup > 12 MWd/kg-U and for Zr-liner fuel > 16 MWd/kg-U. The program calls for continued testing to still higher burnup levels in PHASE 2

  13. Nuclear-fuel-cycle education: Module 5. In-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.H.

    1980-07-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a series of educational modules for use in nuclear-fuel-cycle education. These modules are designed for use in a traditional classroom setting by lectures or in a self-paced, personalized system of instruction. This module on in-core fuel management contains information on computational methods and theory; in-core fuel management using the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University computer modules; pressurized water reactor in-core fuel management; boiling water reactor in-core fuel management; and in-core fuel management for gas-cooled and fast reactors

  14. Used Fuel Management System Interface Analyses - 13578

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Robert; Busch, Ingrid [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Bldg. 5700, MS-6170, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Nutt, Mark; Morris, Edgar; Puig, Francesc [Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Carter, Joe; Delley, Alexcia; Rodwell, Phillip [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Hardin, Ernest; Kalinina, Elena [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Clark, Robert [U.S. Department of Energy (United States); Cotton, Thomas [Complex Systems Group (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Preliminary system-level analyses of the interfaces between at-reactor used fuel management, consolidated storage facilities, and disposal facilities, along with the development of supporting logistics simulation tools, have been initiated to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other stakeholders with information regarding the various alternatives for managing used nuclear fuel (UNF) generated by the current fleet of light water reactors operating in the United States. An important UNF management system interface consideration is the need for ultimate disposal of UNF assemblies contained in waste packages that are sized to be compatible with different geologic media. Thermal analyses indicate that waste package sizes for the geologic media under consideration by the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign may be significantly smaller than the canisters being used for on-site dry storage by the nuclear utilities. Therefore, at some point along the UNF disposition pathway, there could be a need to repackage fuel assemblies already loaded and being loaded into the dry storage canisters currently in use. The implications of where and when the packaging or repackaging of commercial UNF will occur are key questions being addressed in this evaluation. The analysis demonstrated that thermal considerations will have a major impact on the operation of the system and that acceptance priority, rates, and facility start dates have significant system implications. (authors)

  15. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummery, T.E.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1983-05-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is now well established. This report outlines the generic research and technological development underway in this program to assess the concept of immobilization and subsequent disposal of nuclear fuel waste deep in a stable plutonic rock in the Canadian Shield. The program participants, funding, schedule and associated external review processes are briefly outlined. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely, immobilization studies, geoscience research and environmental and safety assessment, are described in more detail

  16. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummery, T.E.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1984-12-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is in the fourth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the basic safety and environmental aspects of the concept of isolating immobilized fuel waste by deep underground disposal in plutonic rock. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely immobilization studies, geoscience research, and environmental and safety assessment, are described. Program funding, scheduling and associated external review processes are briefly outlined

  17. Development of a computer program for the cost analysis of spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, Jong Youl; Choi, Jong Won; Cha, Jeong Hun; Whang, Joo Ho

    2009-01-01

    So far, a substantial amount of spent fuels have been generated from the PWR and CANDU reactors. They are being temporarily stored at the nuclear power plant sites. It is expected that the temporary storage facility will be full of spent fuels by around 2016. The government plans to solve the problem by constructing an interim storage facility soon. The radioactive management act was enacted in 2008 to manage the spent fuels safety in Korea. According to the act, the radioactive waste management fund which will be used for the transportation, interim storage, and the final disposal of spent fuels has been established. The cost for the management of spent fuels is surprisingly high and could include a lot of uncertainty. KAERI and Kyunghee University have developed cost estimation tools to evaluate the cost for a spent fuel management based on an engineering design and calculation. It is not easy to develop a tool for a cost estimation under the situation that the national policy on a spent fuel management has not yet been fixed at all. Thus, the current version of the computer program is based on the current conceptual design of each management system. The main purpose of this paper is to introduce the computer program developed for the cost analysis of a spent fuel management. In order to show the application of the program, a spent fuel management scenario is prepared, and the cost for the scenario is estimated

  18. Status and prospects for spent fuel management in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, P.

    1998-01-01

    The 70's oil crisis has shown that the energy resource dependence of France was too high. The decision was made by the French government to accelerate the implementation of an ambitious nuclear power programme, based on Light Water Reactors, and to do the utmost to reuse the energy bearing material included in the spent fuel. The French nuclear policy has not changed since then. This paper is aimed at describing the present status of implementation of this policy, and the associated prospects. It will first sum up the presentation made in 1995 to the Regular Advisory Group of IAEA on Spent Fuel Management. Then, it will update the situation of the main actors of the spent fuel management policy in France: EDF, the national utility; COGEMA, world leader on almost all the steps of the fuel cycle; CEA, the national research body in the field of nuclear science and its applications; ANDRA, national body in charge of the management of the waste arising from the nuclear activities in France, final disposal included. (author)

  19. The Spent Fuel Management in Finland and Modifications of Spent Fuel Storages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maaranen, Paeivi

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to share the Finnish regulator's (STUK) experiences on regulatory oversight of the enlargement of a spent fuel interim storage. An overview of the current situation of spent fuel management in Finland will also be given. In addition, the planned modifications and requirements set for spent fuel storages due to the Fukushima accident are discussed. In Finland, there are four operating reactors, one under construction and two reactors that have a Council of State's Decision-in-Principle to proceed with the planning and licensing of a new reactor. In Olkiluoto, the two operating ASEA-Atom BWR units and the Areva EPR under construction have a shared interim storage for the spent fuel. The storage was designed and constructed in 1980's. The option for enlarging the storage was foreseen in the original design. Considering three operating units to produce their spent fuel and the final disposal to begin in 2022, extra space in the spent fuel storage is estimated to be needed in around 2014. The operator decided to double the number of the spent fuel pools of the storage and the construction began in 2010. The capacity of the enlarged spent fuel storage is considered to be sufficient for the three Olkiluoto units. The enlargement of the interim storage was included in Olkiluoto NPP 1 and 2 operating license. The licensing of the enlargement was conducted as a major plant modification. The operator needed the approval from STUK to conduct the enlargement. Prior to the construction of this modification, the operator was required to submit the similar documentation as needed for applying for the construction license of a nuclear facility. When conducting changes in an old nuclear facility, the new safety requirements have to be followed. The major challenge in the designing the enlargement of the spent fuel storage was to modify it to withstand a large airplane crash. The operator chose to cover the pools with protecting slabs and also to

  20. Perturbation theory in nuclear fuel management optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, L.W.; Rohach, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Perturbation theory along with a binary fuel shuffling technique is applied to predict the effects of various core configurations and, hence, the optimization of in-core fuel management. The computer code FULMNT has been developed to shuffle the fuel assemblies in search of the lowest possible power peaking factor. An iteration approach is used in the search routine. A two-group diffusion theory method is used to obtain the power distribution for the iterations. A comparison of the results of this method with other methods shows that this approach can save computer time and obtain better power peaking factors. The code also has a burnup capability that can be used to check power peaking throughout the core life

  1. Development of advanced spent fuel management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Shin, Y. J.; Do, J. B.; You, G. S.; Seo, J. S.; Lee, H. G.

    1998-03-01

    This study is to develop an advanced spent fuel management process for countries which have not yet decided a back-end nuclear fuel cycle policy. The aims of this process development based on the pyroreduction technology of PWR spent fuels with molten lithium, are to reduce the storage volume by a quarter and to reduce the storage cooling load in half by the preferential removal of highly radioactive decay-heat elements such as Cs-137 and Sr-90 only. From the experimental results which confirm the feasibility of metallization technology, it is concluded that there are no problems in aspects of reaction kinetics and equilibrium. However, the operating performance test of each equipment on an engineering scale still remain and will be conducted in 1999. (author). 21 refs., 45 tabs., 119 figs

  2. Core design and fuel management studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Byung Joo; Chan, P.

    1997-06-01

    The design target for the CANDU 9 requires a 20% increase in electrical power output from an existing 480-channel CANDU core. Assuming a net electrical output of 861 MW(e) for a natural uranium fuelled Bruce-B/Darlington reactor in a warm water site, the net electrical output of the reference CANDU 9 reactor would be 1033 MW(e). This report documents the result of the physics studies for the design of the CANDU 9 480/SEU core. The results of the core design and fuel management studies of the CANDU 9 480/SEU reactor indicated that up to 1033 MW(e) output can be achieved in a 480-channel CANDU core by using SEU core can easily be maintained indefinitely using an automated refuelling program. Fuel performance evaluation based on the data of the 500 FPDs refuelling simulation concluded that SEU fuel failure is not expected. (author). 2 tabs., 38 figs., 5 refs

  3. Energy management in fuel cell power trains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbo, P.; Corcione, F.E.; Migliardini, F.; Veneri, O.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, experimental results obtained on a small size fuel cell power train (1.8 kW) based on a 500 W proton exchange membrane (PEM) stack are reported and discussed with specific regard to energy management issues to be faced for attainment of the maximum propulsion system efficiency. The fuel cell system (FCS) was realized and characterized via investigating the effects of the main operative variables on efficiency. This resulted in an efficiency higher than 30% in a wide power range with a maximum of 38% at medium load. The efficiency of the overall fuel cell power train measured during both steady state and dynamic conditions (European R40 driving cycle) was about 30%. A discussion about the control strategy to direct the power flows is reported with reference to two different test procedures used in dynamic experiments, i.e., load levelled and load following

  4. Fuel mechanical design as a boundary condition for fuel management optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, F.; Aisch, F.W.; Heins, L.

    1988-01-01

    The incentive to reduce fuel cycle costs as well as the amount of active waste requires, among others, measures to optimize fuel management. Improved fuel management in this sense calls, e.g., for reduction of parasitic neutron absorption, for reduction of neutron leakage, and particularly for burnup extension. Such measures result in increased demands for fuel mechanical design. In the first part of this paper their impact on fuel mechanical behaviour is described. In the second part, some examples of practical importance for the interaction between fuel management optimization and fuel mechanical design are discussed. (orig.) [de

  5. Hawaii alternative fuels utilization program. Phase 3, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, C.M.; Staackmann, M.

    1996-08-01

    The Hawaii Alternative Fuels Utilization Program originated as a five-year grant awarded by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) to the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The overall program included research and demonstration efforts aimed at encouraging and sustaining the use of alternative (i.e., substitutes for gasoline and diesel) ground transportation fuels in Hawaii. Originally, research aimed at overcoming technical impediments to the widespread adoption of alternative fuels was an important facet of this program. Demonstration activities centered on the use of methanol-based fuels in alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). In the present phase, operations were expanded to include flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) which can operate on M85 or regular unleaded gasoline or any combination of these two fuels. Additional demonstration work was accomplished in attempting to involve other elements of Hawaii in the promotion and use of alcohol fuels for ground transportation in Hawaii.

  6. Automated and interactive fuel management tools: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.G.; Casadei, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The past, present and future status of automated and interactive fuel management tools are reviewed. Issues such as who are the customers for these products and what are their needs are addressed. The nature of the fuel management problem is reviewed. The Westinghouse fuel management tools and methods are presented as an example of how the technology has evolved

  7. Using climate information for fuels management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolden, Crystal A.; Brown, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Climate has come to the forefront of wildfire discussions in recent years as research contributes to the general understanding of how climate influences fuels availability to burn, the occurrence of severe fire weather conditions and other wildfire parameters. This understanding has crossed over into wildfire management applications through the creation of tools like climate forecasts for wildfire and drought indices, which are now widely used in wildfire suppression and mitigation planning. The overall question is how can climate information help fire managers meet management objectives? Climate underlies weather. For example, a number of days could be generally wet, but that may occur in the context of a two-year overall drought. Knowing the baseline climate is not only critical to preventing escaped prescribed fires, but also how it may affect fire behavior, fire effects and whether or not fire managers will meet their fuels management objectives. Thus, for fire managers to use prescribed and WFU fire safely and effectively, and to minimize the number of escaped fires and conversions to suppression, they need to understand how current climate conditions will impact the use of fire. One example is the need to use prescribed fire under set “burn windows”. Since meteorological conditions vary considerably from year to year for a given day, fire managers will be more successful in utilizing burn windows effectively if they understand those climate thresholds conducive to an increased number of safe burn windows, and are able to predict and take advantage of those burn windows. While climate and wildfire has been studied extensively, climate and fire use has not. The initial goal of this project was to assess how climate impacts prescribed fire use in a more general sense. After a preliminary informal survey in the spring of 2003, we determined that 1) there is insufficient data (less than 10 years) to conduct empirical correlative studies similar to those of

  8. Site-selection studies for final disposal of spent fuel in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorela, P.; Aeikaes, T.

    1984-02-01

    In the management of waste by the Industrial Power Company Ltd. (TVO) preparations are being made for the final disposal of unprocessed spent fuel into the Finnish bedrock. The site selection program will advance in three phases. The final disposal site must be made at the latest by the end of the year 2000, in accordance with a decision laid down by the Finnish Government. In the first phase, 1983-85, the main object is to find homogeneous stable bedrock blocks surrounded by fracture zones located at a safe distance from the planned disposal area. The work usually starts with a regional structural analysis of mosaics of Landsat-1 winter and summer imagery. Next an assortment of different maps, which cover the whole country, is used. Technical methods for geological and hydrogeological site investigations are being developed during the very first phase of the studies, and a borehole 1000 meters deep will be made in southwestern Finland. Studies for the final disposal of spent fuel or high-level reprocessing waste have been made since 1974 in Finland. General suitability studies of the bedrock have been going on since 1977. The present results indicate that suitable investigation areas for the final disposal of highly active waste can be found in Finland

  9. Status of work on the final repository concept concerning direct disposal of spent fuel rods in fuel rod casks (BSK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filbert, W.; Wehrmann, J.; Bollingerfehr, W.; Graf, R.; Fopp, S.

    2008-01-01

    The reference concept in Germany on direct final storage of spent fuel rods is the burial of POLLUX containers in the final repository salt dome. The POLLUX container is self-shielded. The final storage concept also includes un-shielded borehole storage of high-level waste and packages of compacted waste. GNS has developed a spent fuel container (BSK-3) for unshielded borehole storage with a mass of 5.2 tons that can carry the fuel rods of three PWR reactors of 9 BWR reactors. The advantages of BSK storage include space saving, faster storage processes, less requirements concerning technical barriers, cost savings for self-shielded casks.

  10. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel - basis for site selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anttila, P.

    1995-05-01

    International organizations, e.g. IAEA, have published several recommendations and guides for the safe disposal of radioactive waste. There are three major groups of issues affecting the site selection process, i.e. geological, environmental and socioeconomic. The first step of the site selection process is an inventory of potential host rock formations. After that, potential study areas are screened to identify sites for detailed investigations, prior to geological conditions and overall suitability for the safe disposal. This kind of stepwise site selection procedure has been used in Finland and in Sweden. A similar approach has been proposed in Canada, too. In accordance with the amendment to the Nuclear Energy Act, that entered into force in the beginning of 1995, Imatran Voima Oy has to make preparations for the final disposal of spent fuel in the Finnish bedrock. Relating to the possible site selection, the following geological factors, as internationally recommended and used in the Nordic countries, should be taken into account: topography, stability of bedrock, brokenness and fracturing of bedrock, size of bedrock block, rock type, predictability and natural resources. The bedrock of the Loviisa NPP site is a part of the Vyborg rapakivi massif. As a whole the rapakivi granite area forms a potential target area, although other rock types or areas cannot be excluded from possible site selection studies. (25 refs., 7 figs.)

  11. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in the Finnish bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) studies Finnish bedrock for the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel from the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant. The study is in accordance with the decision in principle by Finnish government in 1983. The report is the summary of the preliminary site investigations carried out during the years 1987-1992. On the basis of these investigations a few areas will be selected for detailed site investigation. The characterization comprises five areas selected from the shortlist of potential candidate areas resulted in the earlier study during 1983-1985. Areas are located in different parts of Finland and they represent the main formations of the Finnish bedrock. Romuvaara area in Kuhmo and Veitsivaara area in Hyrynsalmi represent the Archean basement. Kivetty area in Konginkangas consists of mainly younger granitic rocks. Syyry in Sievi is located in transition area of Svecofennidic rocks and granitic rocks. Olkiluoto in Eurajoki represents migmatites in southern Finland. For the field investigations area-specific programs were planned and executed. The field investigations have comprised airborne survey by helicopter, geophysical surveys, geological mappings and samplings, deep and shallow core drillings, geophysical and hydrological borehole measurements and groundwater samplings

  12. Spent fuel management in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredell, P.J.; Stott, A.K.

    1998-01-01

    Eskom, the South African utility, operates one of the largest electricity networks in the world. However, only 6% of the South African generating capacity is nuclear; the remainder is coal fired and hydroelectric. The nuclear component consists of the Koeberg Nuclear Power Plant, comprising two French supplied PWRs of 920 MWe each, situated approximately 45 kilometres from cape Town. Construction started in 1976 and the two reactors reached criticality in 1984 and 1985 respectively. South Africa also has an Oak Ridge type research reactor, called SAFARI, operated by the South African Atomic Energy Corporation (AEC) at their Pelindaba site near Pretoria. This research reactor was commissioned in 1965, and has been in operation ever since. South Africa has a National Radioactive Waste Disposal facility called Vaalputs, some 600 km north of Cape Town. The facility, operated by AEC, is presently licensed only for the disposal of low and intermediate radioactive level wastes. Vaalputs offers unique features as a potential interim spent fuel storage and final disposal site, such as favorable geology (granite), low seismicity, low population density, remoteness from industrial centres and and conditions. Therefore, this site has been investigated by the AEC as a potential interim spent fuel storage site, but has not yet been licensed for this purpose. Hence, all spent fuel is currently stored on the two sites at Koeberg and Pelindaba respectively. The spent fuel storage pools at Koeberg have recently been enlarged to accommodate the lifetime spent fuel arisings of the plant. Since late 1997, the Safari spent fuel is stored in a pipe storage facility, constructed away from the reactor on the Pelindaba site. (author)

  13. Spent fuel management options for research reactors in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    Research reactors (RRs) have been operated in Latin America since the late 1950s, and a total of 23 RRs have been built in the region. At the time of writing (November 2005), 18 RRs are in operation, 4 have been shut down and 1 has been decommissioned. The number of operating RRs in Latin America represents around 6% of the existing operational RRs worldwide and around 21% of the RRs operating in developing countries. Common to all RRs in the region is a consistent record of safe and successful operation. With the purpose of carrying out a collaborative study of different aspects of the management of spent fuel from RRs, some countries from the region proposed to the IAEA in 2000 the organization of a Regional Project. The project (IAEA TC Regional Project RLA/4/018) that was approved for the biennium 2001-2002 and extended for 2003-2004 included the participation of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico and Peru. The main objectives of this project were: (a) to define the basic conditions for a regional strategy for managing spent fuel that will provide solutions compatible with the economic and technological realities of the countries involved; and (b) to determine what is needed for the temporary wet and dry storage of spent fuel from the research reactors in the countries of the Latin American region that participated in the project. This TECDOC is based on the results of TC Regional Project RLA/4/018. This project was successful in identifying and assessing a number of viable alternatives for RRSF management in the Latin American region. Options for operational and interim storage, spent fuel conditioning and final disposal have been carefully considered. This report presents the views of Latin American experts on RR spent fuel management and will be useful as reference material for the Latin American RR community, decision making authorities in the region and the public in general

  14. Final report of fuel dynamics Test E7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerner, R.C.; Murphy, W.F.; Stanford, G.S.; Froehle, P.H.

    1977-04-01

    Test data from an in-pile failure experiment of high-power LMFBR-type fuel pins in a simulated $3/s transient-overpower (TOP) accident are reported and analyzed. Major conclusions are that (1) a series of cladding ruptures during the 100-ms period preceding fuel release injected small bursts of fission gas into the flow stream; (2) gas release influenced subsequent cladding melting and fuel release [there were no measurable FCI's (fuel-coolant interactions), and all fuel motion observed by the hodoscope was very slow]; (3) the predominant postfailure fuel motion appears to be radial swelling that left a spongy fuel crust on the holder wall; (4) less than 4 to 6 percent of the fuel moved axially out of the original fuel zone, and most of this froze within a 10-cm region above the original top of the fuel zone to form the outlet blockage. An inlet blockage approximately 1 cm long was formed and consisted of large interconnected void regions. Both blockages began just beyond the ends of the fuel pellets

  15. Supercritical water-cooled reactor fuel management and economic comparison and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Guangming; Ruan Liangcheng; Liu Xuechun

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is expected to have an excellent fuel economical efficiency because of its high thermal efficiency. This article compares CSR1OOO with the current mainstream PWR and ABWR on the aspect of the economical efficiency of fuel management, and finally makes an unexpected conclusion that the SCWR has worse fuel economy than others. And it remains to be deliberated whether the SCWR will be the fourth generation of nuclear system. (authors)

  16. Management reporting in gas and fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.L.; Foot, B.G.

    1997-01-01

    Gas and Fuel is the sole supplier of reticulated natural gas to 1.3 m customers in the State of Victoria, Australia. Reporting is performed monthly and is tailored to satisfy the requirements of the Board, executive management and business units. The reports include profit and cash statements, gas sales data, capital expenditure, benchmarks, operational data and human resources information. The reports are a mixture of written commentary, accounting statements and graphical presentations. The reports are used at monthly Board and executive meetings to review performance and manage the business. (au)

  17. The management of nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    A Select Committee of the Legislature of Ontario was established to examine the affairs of Ontario Hydro, the provincial electrical utility. The Committee's terms of reference included examination of the waste management program being carried out jointly by the Ontario provincial government and the Canadian federal government. Public hearings were held which included private citizens as well as officials of organizations in the nuclear field and independent experts. Recommendations were made concerning the future direction of the Canadian fuel waste management program. (O.T.)

  18. Final environmental impact statement: US Spent Fuel Policy. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    The analysis of the environmental impacts for storage of domestic fuel shows that the impacts for the full range of alternatives considered are relatively small compared with available resources or background exposure of the population from natural radiation sources. The differences in impacts of storage of domestic fuel are attributed to the amount of fuel stored in Independent Spent Fuel Storage (ISFS) facilities, the storage time, and, to a lesser degree, the differences in spent fuel transportation. The differences between comparable alternatives of implementing the policy or not implementing the policy are small. The difference in impacts of storage of foreign fuel are attributed to the amount of fuel received under the policy and to the disposition mode analyzed. The impact of storage of foreign fuel (a small fraction of the amount of domestic fuel considered) is also small. As a result of the small differences in environmental impacts of all cases considered for foreign fuel, environmental impacts probably will not strongly influence the selection of the case that best meets US nonproliferation goals. Proliferation benefits of the various cases analyzed vary significantly. The structure and level of fee charged for storage of spent fuel will affect the degree of participation in the spent fuel storage program by utilities. However, the range of participation is within the range of alternatives analyzed in the draft EISs on storage of US and foreign fuels, for which the environmental effects were found to be relatively small. The fee computed on the basis of full recovery of government costs should not significantly affect the cost of generating nuclear power

  19. Instrumentation of cars for fuel economy. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J E

    1982-04-01

    The development of an electronic system to control the air-fuel ratio (A/F) and ignition timing of an internal combustion engine to optimize fuel economy is described. Dynamometer and drive cycle testing of the system was performed. The results showed that a significant improvement in fuel economy can be achieved by a control system of the type developed. It is clear, however, that considerably more work needs to be done. One area mentioned is the need for more systematic fuel economy testing against speed and load as control parameters are varied for optimization, and a more economic air bypass system must be developed. (LCL)

  20. Stainless steel clad for light water reactor fuels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, J.E.; Meyer, J.E.

    1980-07-01

    Proper reactor operation and design guidelines are necessary to assure fuel integrity. The occurrence of fuel rod failures for operation in compliance with existing guidelines suggests the need for more adequate or applicable operation/design criteria. The intent of this study is to develop such criteria for light water reactor fuel rods with stainless steel clad and to indicate the nature of uncertainties in its development. The performance areas investigated herein are: long term creepdown and fuel swelling effects on clad dimensional changes and on proximity to clad failure; and short term clad failure possibilities during up-power ramps

  1. The transportation of PuO2 and MOX fuel and management of irradiated MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, H.P.; Rawl, R.; Durpel, L. van den

    2000-01-01

    Information is given on the transportation of PuO 2 and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, the regulatory requirements for transportation, the packages used and the security provisions for transports. The experience with and management of irradiated MOX fuel and the reprocessing of MOX fuel are described. Information on the amount of MOX fuel irradiated is provided. (author)

  2. Main attributes influencing spent nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreescu, N.; Ohai, D.

    1997-01-01

    All activities regarding nuclear fuel, following its discharge from the NPP, constitute the spent fuel management and are grouped in two possible back end variants, namely reprocessing (including HLW vitrification and geological disposal) and direct disposal of spent fuel. In order to select the appropriate variant it is necessary to analyse the aggregate fulfillment of the imposed requirements, particularly of the derived attributes, defined as distinguishing characteristics of the factors used in the decision making process. The main identified attributes are the following: - environmental impact, - availability of suitable sites, - non-proliferation degree, -strategy of energy, - technological complexity and technical maturity, -possible further technical improvements, - size of nuclear programme, - total costs, - public acceptance, - peculiarity of CANDU fuel. The significance of the attributes in the Romanian case, taking into consideration the present situation, as a low scenario and a high scenario corresponding to an important development of the nuclear power, after the year 2010, is presented. According to their importance the ranking of attributes is proposed . Subsequently, the ranking could be used for adequate weighing of attributes in order to realize a multi-criteria analysis and a relevant comparison of back end variants. (authors)

  3. Final safety analysis report for the irradiated fuels storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, G.E.; Evans, T.K.

    1976-01-01

    A fuel storage facility has been constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to provide safe storage for spent fuel from two commercial HTGR's, Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom, and from the Rover nuclear rocket program. The new facility was built as an addition to the existing fuel storage basin building to make maximum use of existing facilities and equipment. The completed facility provides dry storage for one core of Peach Bottom fuel (804 elements), 1 1 / 2 cores of Fort St. Vrain fuel (2200 elements), and the irradiated fuel from the 20 reactors in the Rover program. The facility is designed to permit future expansion at a minimum cost should additional storage space for graphite-type fuels be required. A thorough study of the potential hazards associated with the Irradiated Fuels Storage Facility has been completed, indicating that the facility is capable of withstanding all credible combinations of internal accidents and pertinent natural forces, including design basis natural phenomena of a 10,000 year flood, a 175-mph tornado, or an earthquake having a bedrock acceleration of 0.33 g and an amplification factor of 1.3, without a loss of integrity or a significant release of radioactive materials. The design basis accident (DBA) postulated for the facility is a complete loss of cooling air, even though the occurrence of this situation is extremely remote, considering the availability of backup and spare fans and emergency power. The occurrence of the DBA presents neither a radiation nor an activity release hazard. A loss of coolant has no effect upon the fuel or the facility other than resulting in a gradual and constant temperature increase of the stored fuel. The temperature increase is gradual enough that ample time (28 hours minimum) is available for corrective action before an arbitrarily imposed maximum fuel centerline temperature of 1100 0 F is reached

  4. In-core fuel management practice in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Hark Rho; Lee Choong Sung; Lee Jo Bok

    1997-01-01

    KAERI (KOREA Atomic Energy Research Institute) completed the system performance tests for the HANARO (Hi-flux Advanced Neutron Application Research Reactor) on December 1994. Its initial criticality was achieved on February 8, 1995. A variety of the reactor physics experiments were performed in parallel with configuring the first cycle core and now HANARO is in the third cycle operation. The in-core fuel management in HANARO is performed on the following strategy: 1) the cycle length of the equilibrium core is at least 4 week FPDs, 2) the maximum linear heat generation rate should be within the design limit, 3) the reactor should have shutdown margin of 1% Δk/k at minimum, 4) the available thermal flux should satisfy the users' requirements. This paper presents the fuel management practice in HANARO. Section II briefly describes the design feature of the HANARO and the method of analysis follows in section III and section IV describes In-core fuel management practice and the conclusion is remarked in the final section. (author)

  5. Viewpoint of utilities regarding fuel management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, C.; Moraw, G.; Schneeberger, M.; Szeless, A.

    1977-01-01

    The engagement of utilities in nuclear power requires them to engage in an increasing amount of fuel management activities in order to carry out all the tasks involved. Essentially, these activities involve two main areas: The procurement of all steps of the fuel cycle from the head to the back end; and in-core fuel management. A general survey of the different steps of the nuclear fuel cycle is presented together with the related activities and responsibilities which have to be borne by the utilities. Today's increasing utility involvement in the nuclear fuel management is shown, as well as future fuel management trends. The fuel management activities of the utilities are analysed with respect to organizational, technical, safeguarding, and financial aspects. The active participation of the utilities in fuel management helps to achieve high availability and flexibility of the nuclear power plant during its whole life as well as safe waste isolation. This can be ensured by continuous optimization of all fuel management aspects of the power plant or, on a larger scale, of a power plant system, i.e. activities by utilities to minimize fuel-cycle effects on the environment, which include optimization of fuel behaviour, and radiation exposure to the public and personnel; and technical and economic evaluations by utilities of out- and in-core fuel management. (author)

  6. Final Report - Low Temperature Combustion Chemistry And Fuel Component Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, Margaret [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-02-24

    Recent research into combustion chemistry has shown that reactions at “low temperatures” (700 – 1100 K) have a dramatic influence on ignition and combustion of fuels in virtually every practical combustion system. A powerful class of laboratory-scale experimental facilities that can focus on fuel chemistry in this temperature range is the rapid compression facility (RCF), which has proven to be a versatile tool to examine the details of fuel chemistry in this important regime. An RCF was used in this project to advance our understanding of low temperature chemistry of important fuel compounds. We show how factors including fuel molecular structure, the presence of unsaturated C=C bonds, and the presence of alkyl ester groups influence fuel auto-ignition and produce variable amounts of negative temperature coefficient behavior of fuel ignition. We report new discoveries of synergistic ignition interactions between alkane and alcohol fuels, with both experimental and kinetic modeling studies of these complex interactions. The results of this project quantify the effects of molecular structure on combustion chemistry including carbon bond saturation, through low temperature experimental studies of esters, alkanes, alkenes, and alcohols.

  7. Case histories of West Valley spent fuel shipments: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, NRC/FC initiated a study on institutional issues related to spent fuel shipments originating at the former spent fuel processing facility in West Valley, New York. FC staff viewed the shipment campaigns as a one-time opportunity to document the institutional issues that may arise with a substantial increase in spent fuel shipping activity. NRC subsequently contracted with the Aerospace Corporation for the West Valley Study. This report contains a detailed description of the events which took place prior to and during the spent fuel shipments. The report also contains a discussion of the shipment issues that arose, and presents general findings. Most of the institutional issues discussed in the report do not fall under NRC's transportation authority. The case histories provide a reference to agencies and other institutions that may be involved in future spent fuel shipping campaigns. 130 refs., 7 figs., 19 tabs.

  8. Case histories of West Valley spent fuel shipments: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, NRC/FC initiated a study on institutional issues related to spent fuel shipments originating at the former spent fuel processing facility in West Valley, New York. FC staff viewed the shipment campaigns as a one-time opportunity to document the institutional issues that may arise with a substantial increase in spent fuel shipping activity. NRC subsequently contracted with the Aerospace Corporation for the West Valley Study. This report contains a detailed description of the events which took place prior to and during the spent fuel shipments. The report also contains a discussion of the shipment issues that arose, and presents general findings. Most of the institutional issues discussed in the report do not fall under NRC's transportation authority. The case histories provide a reference to agencies and other institutions that may be involved in future spent fuel shipping campaigns. 130 refs., 7 figs., 19 tabs

  9. CORD, PWR Core Design and Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, Andrej

    1996-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CORD-2 is intended for core design applications of pressurised water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refuelling). 2 - Method of solution: The calculations are performed at the cell level with a lattice code in the supercell approximation to generate the single cell cross sections. Fuel assembly cross section homogenization is done in the diffusion approximation. Global core calculations can be done in the full three-dimensional cartesian geometry. Thermohydraulic feedbacks can be accounted for. The Effective Diffusion Homogenization method is used for generating the homogenized cross sections. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The complexity of the problem is selected by the user, depending on the capacity of his computer

  10. Potential Interface Issues in Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-10-01

    This publication is an output of a series of meetings to identify and evaluate issues and opportunities associated with interfaces in the back end of the fuel cycle (BEFC) and to describe effective management approaches based on the experience of Member States. During the meetings, participants from Member States and other international organizations shared and evaluated the main interfaces and potential interface issues among the spent fuel storage, transport, reprocessing and disposal of the BEFC, and also reviewed the national approaches to addressing these issues. The aim of this publication is to provide an approach to identify the interfaces in the BEFC as well as the potential issues that should be addressed. It also aims at responding to the solutions Member States most often find to be effective and, in some cases, were adjusted or revisited to reach the fixed target. Most of the interfaces and issues are country specific, as evidenced by the variety and diversity of examples provided in this publication

  11. Interface agreement for the management of 308 Building Spent Nuclear Fuel. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danko, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Hanford Site Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project was formed to manage the SNF at Hanford. Specifically, the mission of the SNF Project on the Hanford Site is to ''provide safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Hanford SNF in a manner which stages it for final disposition.'' The current mission of the Fuel Fabrication Facilities Transition Project (FFFTP) is to transition the 308 Building for turn over to the Environmental Restoration Contractor for decontamination and decommissioning

  12. A discrete optimization method for nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argaud, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    Nuclear loading pattern elaboration can be seen as a combinational optimization problem, of tremendous size and with non-linear cost-functions, and search are always numerically expensive. After a brief introduction of the main aspects of nuclear fuel management, this note presents a new idea to treat the combinational problem by using informations included in the gradient of a cost function. The method is to choose, by direct observation of the gradient, the more interesting changes in fuel loading patterns. An example is then developed to illustrate an operating mode of the method, and finally, connections with simulated annealing and genetic algorithms are described as an attempt to improve search processes. (author). 1 fig., 16 refs

  13. Guidance for the application of an assessment methodology for innovative nuclear energy systems. INPRO manual - Waste management. Vol. 4 of the final report of phase 1 of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was initiated in the year 2000, based on a resolution of the IAEA General Conference (GC(44)/RES/21). The main objectives of INPRO are (1) to help to ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute in fulfilling energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner, (2) to bring together both technology holders and technology users to consider jointly the international and national actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles; and (3) to create a forum to involve all relevant stakeholders that will have an impact on, draw from, and complement the activities of existing institutions, as well as ongoing initiatives at the national and international level. The INPRO manual is comprised of an overview volume (No. 1), and eight additional volumes covering the areas of economics (Volume 2), infrastructure (Volume 3), waste management (Volume 4), proliferation resistance (laid out in this report) (Volume 5), physical protection (Volume 6), environment (Volume 7), safety of nuclear reactors (Volume 8), and safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities (Volume 9). This volume of the INPRO manual is based on the results of an INPRO study on proliferation resistance of the DUPIC fuel cycle performed by the Republic of Korea during 2005 and 2006, recommendations from IAEA consultancy meetings, and on a special service agreement with G. Pshakin (Russian Federation). The INPRO Manual starts with an introduction in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, the necessary information is described to perform an INPRO assessment in the area of proliferation resistance. Explanatory notes on the INPRO basic principles (BP) and user requirements (UR) in the area of proliferation resistance, are reproduced in Chapter 3 to provide context for the assessor; additionally, background of each criterion (CR) and a corresponding procedure is described how to perform an INPRO assessment. The

  14. TRIGA high wt -% LEU fuel development program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, G.B.

    1980-07-01

    The principal purpose of this work was to investigate the characteristics of TRIGA fuel where the contained U-235 was in a relatively high weight percent (wt %) of LEU (low enriched uranium - enrichment of less than 20%) rather than a relatively low weight percent of HEU (high enriched uranium). Fuel with up to 45 wt % U was fabricated and found to be acceptable after metallurgical examinations, fission product retention tests and physical property examinations. Design and safety analysis studies also indicated acceptable prompt negative temperature coefficient and core lifetime characteristics for these fuels

  15. Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel before Final Disposal in Germany - Regulator's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arens, G.; Goetz, Ch.; Geupel, Sandra; Gmal, B.; Mester, W.

    2014-01-01

    For spent nuclear fuel management in Germany the concept of dry interim storage in dual purpose casks before direct disposal is applied. The Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) is the competent authority for licensing of interim storage facilities. The competent authority for surveillance of operation is the responsible authority of the respective federal state (Land). Currently operation licenses for storage facilities have been granted for a storage time of 40 years and are based on safety demonstrations for all safety issues as safe enclosure, shielding, sub-criticality and decay heat removal under consideration of operation conditions. In addition, transportability of the casks for the whole storage period has to be provided. Due to current delay in site selection and exploration of a disposal site, an extension of the storage time beyond 40 years could be needed. This will cause appropriate actions by the licensee and the competent authorities as well. A brief description of the regulatory base of licensing and surveillance of interim storage is given from the regulators view. Furthermore the current planning for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high level waste and its interconnections between storage and disposal concepts are shortly explained. Finally the relevant aspects for licensing of extended storage time beyond 40 years will be discussed. Current activities on this issue, which have been initiated by the Federal Government, will be addressed. On the regulatory side a review and amendment of the safety guideline for interim storage of spent fuel has been performed and the procedure of periodic safety review is being implemented. A guideline for implementing an ageing management programme is available in a draft version. Regarding safety of long term storage a study focussing on the identification and evaluation of long term effects as well as gaps of knowledge has been finished in 2010. A continuation and update is currently underway

  16. Fuel-management simulations for once-through thorium fuel cycle in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, P.S.W.; Boczar, P.G.; Ellis, R.J.; Ardeshiri, F.

    1999-01-01

    High neutron economy, on-power refuelling and a simple fuel bundle design result in unsurpassed fuel cycle flexibility for CANDU reactors. These features facilitate the introduction and exploitation of thorium fuel cycles in existing CANDU reactors in an evolutionary fashion. Detailed full-core fuel-management simulations concluded that a once-through thorium fuel cycle can be successfully implemented in an existing CANDU reactor without requiring major modifications. (author)

  17. Ciclon: A neutronic fuel management program for PWR's consecutive cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragones, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The program description and user's manual of a new computer code is given. Ciclon performs the neutronic calculation of consecutive reload cycles for PWR's fuel management optimization. Fuel characteristics and burnup data, region or batch sizes, loading schemes and state of previously irradiated fuel are input to the code. Cycle lengths or feed enrichments and burnup sharing for each region or batch are calculate using different core neutronic models and printed or punched in standard fuel management format. (author) [es

  18. Low enrichment fuel conversion for Iowa State University. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullen, D.B.; Wendt, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    The UTR-10 research and teaching reactor at Iowa State University (ISU) has been converted from high-enriched fuel (HEU) to low- enriched fuel (LEU) under Grant No. DE-FG702-87ER75360 from the Department of Energy (DOE). The original contract period was August 1, 1987 to July 31, 1989. The contract was extended to February 28, 1991 without additional funding. Because of delays in receiving the LEU fuel and the requirement for disassembly of the HEU assemblies, the contract was renewed first through May 31, 1992, then through May 31, 1993 with additional funding, and then again through July 31, 1994 with no additional funding. In mid-August the BMI cask was delivered to Iowa State. Preparations are underway to ship the HEU fuel when NRC license amendments for the cask are approved

  19. Ongoing evaluation of alternatively fueled buses : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this project is to continue collecting and reporting data on the performance and costs of alternatively fueled public transit vehicles in Florida in a consistent manner. Over the course of this project, researchers sent repeated data requ...

  20. Price transparency on the market for automotive fuels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meindert, L.; Van Schijndel, M.; Volkerink, B.

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study is to answer the main question: which bottlenecks may obstruct the road to up-to-date, reliable and fully market covering price comparison services for the Dutch market for automotive fuels. [nl

  1. OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-05-01

    It is important for nuclear power plant designers, operators and regulators to effectively use lessons learned from events occurring at nuclear power plants since, in general, it is impossible to reproduce the event using experimental facilities. In particular, evaluation of the event using accident analysis codes is expected to contribute to improving understanding of phenomena during the events and to facilitate the validation of computer codes through simulation analyses. The information presented in this publication will be of use in future revisions of safety guides on accident analysis. During a fuel crud removal operation on the Paks-2 unit of the Paks nuclear power plant, Hungary on 10 April 2003, several fuel assemblies were severely damaged. The assemblies were being cleaned in a special tank under deep water in a service pit connected to the spent fuel storage pool. The first sign of fuel failures was the detection of some fission gases released from the cleaning tank. Later, visual inspection revealed that most of the 30 fuel assemblies suffered heavy oxidation and fragmentation. The first evaluation of the event showed that the severe fuel damage had been caused by inadequate cooling. The Paks-2 event was discussed in various committees of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) and of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Recommendations were made to undertake actions to improve the understanding of the incident sequence and of the consequence this had on the fuel. It was considered that the Paks-2 event may constitute a useful case for a comparative exercise on safety codes, in particular for models devised to predict fuel damage and potential releases under abnormal cooling conditions and the analyses of the Paks-2 event may provide information which is relevant for in-reactor and spent fuel storage safety evaluations. The OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project was established in 2005 as a joint project between the IAEA and the OECD/NEA. The IAEA

  2. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative University Fellowship Program. Final Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    2004-2011 Final Report for AFCI University Fellowship Program. The goal of this effort was to be supportive of university students and university programs - particularly those students and programs that will help to strengthen the development of nuclear-related fields. The program also supported the stability of the nuclear infrastructure and developed research partnerships that are helping to enlarge the national nuclear science technology base. In this fellowship program, the U.S. Department of Energy sought master's degree students in nuclear, mechanical, or chemical engineering, engineering/applied physics, physics, chemistry, radiochemistry, or fields of science and engineering applicable to the AFCI/Gen IV/GNEP missions in order to meet future U.S. nuclear program needs. The fellowship program identified candidates and selected full time students of high-caliber who were taking nuclear courses as part of their degree programs. The DOE Academic Program Managers encouraged fellows to pursue summer internships at national laboratories and supported the students with appropriate information so that both the fellows and the nation's nuclear energy objectives were successful.

  3. Management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The National Board for Spent Nuclear Fuel, in submitting its statement of comment to the Government on the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company's (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, SKB) research programme, R and D Programme 86, has also put forward recommendations on the decision-making procedure and on the question of public information during the site selection process. In summary the Board proposes: * that the Government instruct the National Board for Spent Nuclear Fuel to issue certain directives concerning additions to and changes in R and D Programme 86, * that the Board's views on the decision-making procedure in the site selection process be taken into account in the Government's review of the so-called municipal veto in accordance with Chapter 4, Section 3 of the Act (1987:12) on the conservation of natural resources etc., NRL, * that the Board's views on the decision-making procedure and information questions during the site selection process serve as a basis for the continued work. Three appendices are added to the report: 1. Swedish review statements (SV), 2. International Reviews, 3. Report from the site selection group (SV)

  4. Nuclear fuel management optimization for LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turinsky, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    LWR in core nuclear fuel management involves the placement of fuel and control materials so that a specified objective is achieved within constraints. Specifically, one is interested in determining the core loading pattern (LP of fuel assemblies and burnable poisons and for BWR, also control rod insertion versus cycle exposure. Possible objectives include minimization of feed enrichment and maximization of cycle energy production, discharge burnup or thermal margin. Constraints imposed relate to physical constraints, e.g. no discrete burnable poisons in control rod locations, and operational and safety constraints, e.g. maximum power peaking limit. The LP optimization problem is a large scale, nonlinear, mixed-integer decision variables problem with active constraints. Even with quarter core symmetry imposed, there are above 10 100 possible LPs. The implication is that deterministic optimization methods are not suitable, so in this work we have pursued using the stochastic Simulated Annealing optimization method. Adaptive penalty functions are used to impose certain constraints, allowing unfeasible regions of the search space to be transverse. Since ten of thousands of LPs must be examined to achieve high computational efficiency, higher-order Generalized Perturbation Theory is utilized to solve the Nodal Expansion Method for of the two-group neutron diffusion. These methods have been incorporated into the FORMOSA series of codes and used to optimize PWR and BWR reload cores. (author). 9 refs., 3 tabs

  5. Aspects regarding the fuel management for PHWR nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragusin, O.; Bobolea, A.; Voicu, A.

    2001-01-01

    Fuel management for PHWR nuclear reactors is completely different from the PWR reactors fuel management. PHWR reactor fuel loading procedures are repeated after an interval of time, as defined and specified in the project documentation, using a fuel machine that can be attached to the terminal fittings of horizontal pressure tubes while the reactor is a full power. Another aspect of fuel management policy is related to the possibility of bi-directional loading of the reactor, with the primary advantage of uniform and symmetrical characteristics. (authors)

  6. Irradiated Fuel Management Advisory Programme (IFMAP). An interregional technical co-operation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    Delays in the implementation of the fuel reprocessing option in some countries, the complete abandonment of this option in other countries, and delays in the availability of final spent fuel disposal in almost all countries, has led to increasingly long periods of 'interim' spent fuel storage. The problem of the management of irradiated fuels has therefore increased in importance for many Member States. For power reactors or research reactors, irradiated fuel management includes all of the procedures involving irradiated fuel from the time that it is discharged from the reactor core until it is either reprocessed or placed in a permanent disposal site. Although the IAEA has had programmes in this area in the past and has ongoing activities at present, there is a clear need to provide support to individual Member States which require advice and/or assistance in the resolution of particular questions and concerns

  7. Air quality effects of alternative fuels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, P.; Ligocki, M.; Looker, R.; Cohen, J.

    1997-11-01

    To support the Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, a comparison of potential air quality effects of alternative transportation fuels is being performed. This report presents the results of Phase 1 of this program, focusing on reformulated gasoline (RFG), methanol blended with 15 percent gasoline (M85), and compressed natural gas (CNG). The fuels are compared in terms of effects on simulated future concentrations of ozone and mobile source air toxics in a photochemical grid model. The fuel comparisons were carried out for the future year 2020 and assumed complete replacement of gasoline in the projected light-duty gasoline fleet by each of the candidate fuels. The model simulations were carried out for the areas surrounding Los Angeles and Baltimore/DC, and other (non-mobile) sources of atmospheric emissions were projected according to published estimates of economic and population growth, and planned emission control measures specific to each modeling domain. The future-year results are compared to a future-year run with all gasoline vehicle emissions removed. The results of the comparison indicate that the use of M85 is likely to produce similar ozone and air toxics levels as those projected from the use of RFG. Substitution of CNG is projected to produce significantly lower levels of ozone and the mobile source air toxics than those projected for RFG or M85. The relative benefits of CNG substitution are consistent in both modeling domains. The projection methodologies used for the comparison are subject to a large uncertainty, and modeled concentration distributions depend on meteorological conditions. The quantitative comparison of fuel effects is thus likely to be sensitive to alternative assumptions. The consistency of the results for two very different modeling domains, using very different base assumptions, lends credibility to the qualitative differentiation among these fuels. 32 refs., 42 figs., 47 tabs.

  8. Integrated data management system for radioactive waste and spent fuel in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Ho

    2001-03-01

    An integrated data management system for the safe management of radioactive waste and spent fuel in Korea is developed to collect basic information, provide the framework for national regulation, and improve national competition and efficiency in the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel. This system can also provide public access to information such as a statistical graphs and integrated data from various waste generators to meet increased public needs and interests. So through the system, the five principles (independence, openness, clearance, efficiency and reliance) of safety regulation can be realized, and public understanding and reliance on the safety of spent fuel and radioactive waste management can be promoted by providing reliable information, it can ensure an openness within the international nuclear community and efficiently support international agreements among contracting parties by operating safe and efficient management of spent fuel and radioactive waste (IAEA joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management), the system can compensate for the imperfections in safe regulation of radioactive waste and spent fuel management related to waste generation, storage and disposal, and make it possible to holistic control and finally re-organize the basic framework of KINS's intermediate and long term research organization and trends, regarding waste management policy is to integrate safe management and unit safe disposal. For this objectives, benchmark study was performed on similar data base system worldwide and data specification with major input/output data during the first phase of this project

  9. Traffic Management Systems Performance Measurement: Final Report

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, James H.; Kelly, Gregory

    1997-01-01

    This report documents a study of performance measurement for Transportation Management Centers (TMCs). Performance measurement requirements were analyzed, data collection and management techniques were investigated, and case study traffic data system improvement plans were prepared for two Caltrans districts.

  10. Accelerating Acceptance of Fuel Cell Backup Power Systems - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrecky, James; Ashley, Christopher

    2014-07-21

    Since 2001, Plug Power has installed more than 800 stationary fuel cell systems worldwide. Plug Power’s prime power systems have produced approximately 6.5 million kilowatt hours of electricity and have accumulated more than 2.5 million operating hours. Intermittent, or backup, power products have been deployed with telecommunications carriers and government and utility customers in North and South America, Europe, the United Kingdom, Japan and South Africa. Some of the largest material handling operations in North America are currently using the company’s motive power units in fuel cell-powered forklifts for their warehouses, distribution centers and manufacturing facilities. The low-temperature GenSys fuel cell system provides remote, off-grid and primary power where grid power is unreliable or nonexistent. Built reliable and designed rugged, low- temperature GenSys delivers continuous or backup power through even the most extreme conditions. Coupled with high-efficiency ratings, low-temperature GenSys reduces operating costs making it an economical solution for prime power requirements. Currently, field trials at telecommunication and industrial sites across the globe are proving the advantages of fuel cells—lower maintenance, fuel costs and emissions, as well as longer life—compared with traditional internal combustion engines.

  11. Conditioning of spent fuel for interim and final storage in the pilot conditioning plant (PKA) at Gorleben

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahr, H.; Willax, H.O.; Spilker, H.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994, due to the change of the nuclear law in Germany, the concept of direct final disposal for spent fuel was developed as an equivalent alternative to the waste management with reprocessing. Since 1979, tests for the direct final disposal of spent fuel have been conducted in Germany. In 1985, the State and the utilities came to an agreement to develop this concept of waste management to technical maturity. Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service (GNS) was commissioned by the utilities with the following tasks: to develop and test components with regard to conditioning technology, to construct and operate the pilot conditioning plant (PKA), and to develop casks suitable for final disposal. Since 1990, the construction of the PKA has taken place at the Brennelementlager Gorleben site. The PKA has been designed as a multipurpose facility and can thus fulfil various tasks within the framework of the conditioning and management of spent fuel assemblies and radioactive waste. The pilot character of the plant allows for development and testing in the field of spent fuel assembly conditioning. The objectives of the PKA may be summarized as follows: to condition spent fuel assemblies, to reload spent fuel assemblies and waste packages, to condition radioactive waste, and to do maintenance work on transport and storage casks as well as on waste packages. Currently, the buildings of the PKA are constructed and the technical facilities are installed. The plant will be ready for service in the middle of 1999. It is the first plant of its kind in the world. (author)

  12. Fuel cycle strategies and plutonium management in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, D.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: An overview will first be drawn on the present nuclear power production in Europe, and on the fuel cycle strategies followed in various countries. Indeed, for most countries in Europe, spent fuel is presently stored at reactor site, either for further conditioning and final deep geological storage, or in the expectation on a further decision on one of these options. Other countries have opted for spent fuel reprocessing as basic fuel cycle strategy. This option presents amongst other the merit of leading to a reduction of the final high level waste volume that will need in any case a geological disposal. It also allows the recovery from the spent fuel of energetic elements, principally the plutonium (Pu). The intention at the origin was to use this Pu in a fleet of fast breeder reactors, with the aim to make the best use of the uranium ore. However, fore reasons mainly linked to the low price of uranium (but also due to technical difficulties and political opposition), the project failed to develop. Now, the countries having followed the reprocessing option have to cope with an increasing amount of separated Pu. One industrial path, namely Pu recycling as MOX is presently operational in several European countries. It allows to reduce the increase in Pu stocks, but not to reduce it. Moreover, the quality of recycled Pu (in terms of its energetic value and of its radiotoxicity) decreases at each potential step of re-irradiation. Therefore, optimised or new ways of managing the Pu stocks in the medium and long term are required. The paper will present a status of the options considered today: - optimised Pu recycling as MOX in advanced LWR reactors (100 % MOX), as well as related optimised core designs; - utilisation of non-uranium matrices instead of uranium to prevent further Pu and minor actinides creation; - once-through Pu burning (up to high rates of destruction) in HTR fuel kernels; - multi-recycling of Pu in fast reactors of

  13. Final Technical Report for the MIT Annular Fuel Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-01-01

    MIT-NFC-PR-082 (January 2006) Abstract This summary provides an overview of the results of the U.S. DOE funded NERI (Nuclear Research Energy Initiative) program on development of the internally and externally cooled annular fuel for high power density PWRs. This new fuel was proposed by MIT to allow a substantial increase in power density (on the order of 30% or higher) while maintaining or improving safety margins. A comprehensive study was performed by a team consisting of MIT (lead organization), Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Gamma Engineering Corporation, Framatome ANP(formerly Duke Engineering) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

  14. In-core fuel management benchmarks for PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    Under its in-core fuel management activities, the IAEA set up two co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) on complete in-core fuel management code packages. At a consultant meeting in November 1988 the outline of the CRP on in-core fuel management benchmars for PHWRs was prepared, three benchmarks were specified and the corresponding parameters were defined. At the first research co-ordination meeting in December 1990, seven more benchmarks were specified. The objective of this TECDOC is to provide reference cases for the verification of code packages used for reactor physics and fuel management of PHWRs. 91 refs, figs, tabs

  15. Utilities' view on the fuel management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, C.; Moraw, G.; Schneeberger, M.; Szeless, A.

    1977-01-01

    Utilities engagement in nuclear power requires an increasing amount of fuel management activities by the utilities in order to meet all tasks involved. These activities comprise essentially two main areas: - activities to secure the procurement of all steps of the fuel cycle from the head to the back end; - activities related to the incore fuel managment. A general survey of the different steps of the nuclear fuel cycle is presented together with the related activities and responsibilities which have to be realized by the utilities. Starting in the past, today's increasing utility involvement in the nuclear fuel management is shown, as well as future fuel management trends. The scope of utilities' fuel management activities is analyzed with respect to organizational aspects, technical aspects, safeguarding aspects, and financial aspects. Utilities taking active part in the fuel management serves to achieve high availability and flexibility of the nuclear power plant during the whole plant life as well as safe waste isolation. This can be assured by continuous optimization of all fuel management aspects of the power plant or on a larger scale of a power plant system, i.e., utility activities to minimize the effects of fuel cycle on the environment, which includes optimization of fuel behaviour, radiation exposure to public and personnel, and utility technical and economic evaluations of out- and incore fuel management. These activities of nuclear power producing utilities in the field of nuclear fuel cycle are together with a close cooperation with fuel industry as well as national and international authorities a necessary basis for the further utilization of nuclear power

  16. Management and Handling of Rejected Fuel of MTR Type and Process Effluents Contained Uranium at FEPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaib Widodo; Bambang Herutomo

    2007-01-01

    Research Reactor Fuel Element Production Installation (FEPI) - Serpong has performed management and handling of all kinds of rejected fuel material during production (solids, liquids, and gases) and process effluents contained uranium. The methods that has been implemented are precipitation, absorption, evaporation, electrolysis, and electrodialysis. By these methods will finally be obtained forms of product which can be used directly as fuel material feed and solid/liquid radioactive waste that fulfil the requirements (uranium contents < 50 ppm) to be send to Radioactive Waste Management Installation. (author)

  17. Experimental study of defect power reactor fuel. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, R.S.; Jonsson, T.

    1982-01-01

    Two BWR fuel rods, one intact and one defect, with the same manufacturing and irradiation data have been examined in a comparative study. The defect rod has been irradiated in a defect condition during approximately one reactor cycle and has consequently some secondary defects. The defect rod has two penetrating defects at a distance of about 1.5 meters from each other. Comparison with the intact rod shows a large Cs loss from the defect rod, especially between the cladding defects, where the loss is measured to about 30 %. The leachibility in deionized water is higher for Cs, U and Cm for fuel from the defect rod. The leaching results are more complex for Sr-90, Pu and Am. The fuel in the defect rod has undergone a change of structure with gain growth and formation of oriented fuel structure. The cladding of the defect rod is hydrided locally in some parts of the lower part of the rod and furthermore over a more extended region near the end of the rod. (Authors)

  18. Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.

    1996-02-15

    A feasibility study to develop a requirements analysis and functional specification for a data management system for large-scale DNA sequencing laboratories resulted in a functional specification for a Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). This document reports the results of this feasibility study, and includes a functional specification for a SIMS relational schema. The SIMS is an integrated information management system that supports data acquisition, management, analysis, and distribution for DNA sequencing laboratories. The SIMS provides ad hoc query access to information on the sequencing process and its results, and partially automates the transfer of data between laboratory instruments, analysis programs, technical personnel, and managers. The SIMS user interfaces are designed for use by laboratory technicians, laboratory managers, and scientists. The SIMS is designed to run in a heterogeneous, multiplatform environment in a client/server mode. The SIMS communicates with external computational and data resources via the internet.

  19. Providing flexibility in spent fuel and vitrified waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, N.; O'Tallamhain, C.; Brown, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The UK Central Electricity Generating Board is pondering a decision to build a dry vault store as a buffer in its overall AGR spent fuel management programme. The application of the dry vault is not limited to fuel from gas cooled reactors, it can be used for spent LWR fuel and vitrified waste. A cutaway diagram of such a vault is presented. (UK)

  20. DE-NE0000735 - FINAL REPORT ON THORIUM FUEL CYCLE NEUP PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krahn, Steven [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Ault, Timothy [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-30

    The report is broken into six chapters, including this executive summary chapter. Following an introduction, this report discusses each of the project’s three major components (Fuel Cycle Data Package (FCDP) Development, Thorium Fuel Cycle Literature Analysis and Database Development, and the Thorium Fuel Cycle Technical Track and Proceedings). A final chapter is devoted to summarization. Various outcomes, publications, etc. originating from this project can be found in the Appendices at the end of the document.

  1. 1st Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference: Fuels Management-How to Measure Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews

    2006-01-01

    The 1st Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference: Fuels Management -- How to Measure Success was held in Portland, Oregon, March 28-30, 2006. The International Association of Wildland Fire (IAWF) initiated a conference on this timely topic primarily in response to the needs of the U.S. National Interagency Fuels Coordinating Group (http://www.nifc.gov/).

  2. Hydropyrolysis of biomass to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Final report. Biomass Alternative-Fuels Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, R K; Bodle, W W; Yuen, P C

    1982-10-01

    The ojective of the study is to provide a process design and cost estimates for a biomass hydropyrolysis plant and to establish its economic viability for commercial applications. A plant site, size, product slate, and the most probable feedstock or combination of feedstocks were determined. A base case design was made by adapting IGT's HYFLEX process to Hawaiian biomass feedstocks. The HYFLEX process was developed by IGT to produce liquid and/or gaseous fuels from carbonaceous materials. The essence of the process is the simultaneous extraction of valuable oil and gaseous products from cellulosic biomass feedstocks without forming a heavy hard-to-handle tar. By controlling rection time and temperature, the product slate can be varied according to feedstock and market demand. An optimum design and a final assessment of the applicability of the HYFLEX process to the conversion of Hawaiian biomass was made. In order to determine what feedstocks could be available in Hawaii to meet the demands of the proposed hydropyrolysis plant, various biomass sources were studied. These included sugarcane and pineapple wastes, indigenous and cultivated trees and indigenous and cultivated shrubs and grasses.

  3. Alternative Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel Transition Program for Alaska Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    This final rule will implement the requirements for sulfur, cetane and aromatics for highway, nonroad, locomotive and marine diesel fuel produced in, imported into, and distributed or used in the rural areas of Alaska.

  4. Scope and procedures of fuel management for PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zenghua

    1997-01-01

    The fuel management scope of PWR nuclear power plant includes nuclear fuel purchase and spent fuel disposal, ex-core fuel management, in-core fuel management, core management and fuel assembly behavior follow up. A suit of complete and efficient fuel management procedures have to be created to ensure the quality and efficiency of fuel management work. The hierarchy of fuel management procedure is divided into four levels: main procedure, administration procedure, implement procedure and technic procedure. A brief introduction to the fuel management scope and procedures of PWR nuclear power plant are given

  5. NEW SOLID FUELS FROM COAL AND BIOMASS WASTE; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid Farzan

    2001-01-01

    Under DOE sponsorship, McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI), Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W), and Minergy Corporation developed and evaluated a sludge derived fuel (SDF) made from sewage sludge. Our approach is to dry and agglomerate the sludge, combine it with a fluxing agent, if necessary, and co-fire the resulting fuel with coal in a cyclone boiler to recover the energy and to vitrify mineral matter into a non-leachable product. This product can then be used in the construction industry. A literature search showed that there is significant variability of the sludge fuel properties from a given wastewater plant (seasonal and/or day-to-day changes) or from different wastewater plants. A large sewage sludge sample (30 tons) from a municipal wastewater treatment facility was collected, dried, pelletized and successfully co-fired with coal in a cyclone-equipped pilot. Several sludge particle size distributions were tested. Finer sludge particle size distributions, similar to the standard B and W size distribution for sub-bituminous coal, showed the best combustion and slagging performance. Up to 74.6% and 78.9% sludge was successfully co-fired with pulverized coal and with natural gas, respectively. An economic evaluation on a 25-MW power plant showed the viability of co-firing the optimum SDF in a power generation application. The return on equity was 22 to 31%, adequate to attract investors and allow a full-scale project to proceed. Additional market research and engineering will be required to verify the economic assumptions. Areas to focus on are: plant detail design and detail capital cost estimates, market research into possible project locations, sludge availability at the proposed project locations, market research into electric energy sales and renewable energy sales opportunities at the proposed project location. As a result of this program, wastes that are currently not being used and considered an environmental problem will be processed into a renewable

  6. A study on the safety of spent fuel management. A scenario study on spent fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo; Ahn, Jin Soo; Hwang, Joo Ho; Choi, Jong Won; Kim, Yeon Soo; Park, Ju Hwan; Chung, Choong Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-01

    In order to produce data applicable for the long-term policy making of spent fuel management and to suggest a basic scenario suitable to domestic situation, the pre-conceptual design of reference disposal facilities for the spent fuel and the vitrified high level radioactive waste from its reprocessing, has been performed. From the results of the pre-conceptual study, further research and development areas to accumulate the disposal technology are suggested. In addition, the physico-chemical properties and functional characteristics of domestic bentonite are analyzed to assess its applicability as a buffer material which would play a major role for the safe disposal of highly active waste including spent fuels. (Author).

  7. Core fuel management using TVS-2M fuel assembly and economic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Min; Wang Hongxia; Li Youyi

    2014-01-01

    To improve the economic efficiency, TVS-2M fuel assembly was considered to apply in Tianwan Nuclear Power Plant units 3, 4. Using KASKAD program package, a preliminary research and design was carried out for the Tianwan Nuclear Power Plant loading TVS-2M fuel assembly from the first cycle to equilibrium cycle. An improved fuel management program was obtained, and the economic analysis of the two fuel management programs with or without TVS-2M assembly was studied. The analysis results show that TVS-2M fuel assembly can improve the economic efficiency of the plant remarkably. (authors)

  8. Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zummo, Michael M; Munson, J; Derr, A; Zemple, T; Bray, S; Studer, B; Miller, J; Beckler, J; Hahn, A; Martinez, P; Herndon, B; Lee, T; Newswanger, T; Wassall, M

    2012-03-30

    Many obvious and significant concerns arise when considering the concept of small-scale biodiesel production. Does the fuel produced meet the stringent requirements set by the commercial biodiesel industry? Is the process safe? How are small-scale producers collecting and transporting waste vegetable oil? How is waste from the biodiesel production process handled by small-scale producers? These concerns and many others were the focus of the research preformed in the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation project over the last three years. This project was a unique research program in which undergraduate engineering students at Messiah College set out to research the feasibility of small-biodiesel production for application on a campus of approximately 3000 students. This Department of Energy (DOE) funded research program developed out of almost a decade of small-scale biodiesel research and development work performed by students at Messiah College. Over the course of the last three years the research team focused on four key areas related to small-scale biodiesel production: Quality Testing and Assurance, Process and Processor Research, Process and Processor Development, and Community Education. The objectives for the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project included the following: 1. Preparing a laboratory facility for the development and optimization of processors and processes, ASTM quality assurance, and performance testing of biodiesel fuels. 2. Developing scalable processor and process designs suitable for ASTM certifiable small-scale biodiesel production, with the goals of cost reduction and increased quality. 3. Conduct research into biodiesel process improvement and cost optimization using various biodiesel feedstocks and production ingredients.

  9. Growth rates of breeder reactor fuel. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, K.O.

    1979-01-01

    During the contract period, a consistent formalism for the definition of the growth rates (and thus the doubling time) of breeder reactor fuel has been developed. This formalism was then extended to symbiotic operation of breeder and converter reactors. Further, an estimation prescription for the growth rate has been developed which is based upon the breeding worth factors. The characteristics of this definition have been investigated, which led to an additional integral concept, the breeding bonus

  10. HLW Tank Space Management, Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessions, J.

    1999-01-01

    The HLW Tank Space Management Team (SM Team) was chartered to select and recommend an HLW Tank Space Management Strategy (Strategy) for the HLW Management Division of Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC) until an alternative salt disposition process is operational. Because the alternative salt disposition process will not be available to remove soluble radionuclides in HLW until 2009, the selected Strategy must assure that it safely receives and stores HLW at least until 2009 while continuing to supply sludge slurry to the DWPF vitrification process

  11. Regional environmental impacts of methanol-fueled vehicles. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belian, T.; Morris, R.E.; Ligocki, M.P.; Whitten, G.Z.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to obtain, through simulation modeling, preliminary estimates of the regional environmental impacts methanol-fueled vehicles and to estimate the sensitivity of the model to important parameters and assumptions that affect the calculation of the impacts. The regional environmental effects of the use of M85 fuel (85 percent methanol and 15 percent gasoline) and M100 (neat methanol) relative to gasoline (an indoline blend) were estimated using a Lagrangian (trajectory) acid deposition model. The Comprehensive Chemistry Acid Deposition Model (CCADM), contains a detailed treatment of gas-phase and aqueous-phase chemistry and associated mass transfer, but provides for a less comprehensive representation of advection and diffusion. Two different meteorological regimes were analyzed: clear sky conditions and cloudy skies with a rain event. The study also included a review of gas- and aqueous-phase chemistry, with particular emphasis on methanol. The CCADM chemical mechanism was updated to include state-of-the-science (as of 1990) gas- and aqueous-phase chemistry including methanol chemistry. The CCADM was then used to analyze the regional environmental impacts from the use of methanol fuels. In performing such an analysis it was necessary to make several assumptions. The sensitivity of the analysis was examined through a series of simulations that varied key input parameters within their ranges of uncertainty

  12. Safety criteria for spent-fuel transport. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldmann, K.; Gekler, W.C.

    1986-10-01

    The focus of this study is on the question, ''Do current regulations provide reasonable assurance of safety for a transport scenario of spent fuel, as presently anticipated by the Department of Energy, under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act.'' This question has been addressed by developing a methodology for identifying the expected frequency of Accidents Which Exceed Regulatory Conditions in Severity (AWERCS) for spent fuel transport casks and then assessing the health effects resulting from that frequency. By applying the methodology to an illustrative case of road transports, it was found that the accidental release of radioactive material from impact AWERCS would make negligible contributions to health effects associated with spent fuel transports by road. It is also concluded that the current regulatory drop test requirements in 10 CFR 71.51 which form the basis for cask design and were used to establish AWERCS screening criteria for this study are adequate, and that no basis was found to conclude that cask performance under expected road accident conditions represents an undue risk to the public

  13. Final environmental statement: US Spent Fuel Policy. Storage of foreign spent power reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    In October 1977, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced a Spent Fuel Storage Policy for nuclear power reactors. Under this policy, as approved by the President, US utilities will be given the opportunity to deliver spent fuel to US Government custody in exchange for payment of a fee. The US Government will also be prepared to accept a limited amount of spent fuel from foreign sources when such action would contribute to meeting nonproliferation goals. Under the new policy, spent fuel transferred to the US Government will be delivered - at user expense - to a US Government-approved site. Foreign spent fuel would be stored in Interim Spent Fuel Storage (ISFS) facilities with domestic fuel. This volume of the environmental impact statement includes effects associated with implementing or not implementing the Spent Fuel Storage Policy for the foreign fuels. The analyses show that there are no substantial radiological health impacts whether the policy is implemented or not. In no case considered does the population dose commitment exceed 0.000006% of the world population dose commitment from natural radiation sources over the period analyzed. Full implementation of the US offer to accept a limited amount of foreign spent fuel for storage provides the greatest benefits for US nonproliferation policy. Acceptance of lesser quantities of foreign spent fuel in the US or less US support of foreign spent fuel storage abroad provides some nonproliferation benefits, but at a significantly lower level than full implementation of the offer. Not implementing the policy in regard to foreign spent fuel will be least productive in the context of US nonproliferation objectives. The remainder of the summary provides a brief description of the options that are evaluated, the facilities involved in these options, and the environmental impacts, including nonproliferation considerations, associated with each option

  14. Advanced Fuel Cell System Thermal Management for NASA Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA exploration program. An analysis of a state-of-the-art fuel cell cooling systems was done to benchmark the portion of a fuel cell system s mass that is dedicated to thermal management. Additional analysis was done to determine the key performance targets of the advanced passive thermal management technology that would substantially reduce fuel cell system mass.

  15. 75 FR 4451 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Final Rule-Management of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Final Rule--Management of Federal Agency Disbursements. AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and Request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial Management...

  16. Spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.R.; Meeuwsen, P.V.

    1997-09-01

    Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project, a subtask of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The FRS will be used to retrieve and repackage K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) currently stored in old K-Plant storage basins. The FRS is required to retrieve full fuel canisters from the basin, clean the fuel elements inside the canister to remove excessive uranium corrosion products (or sludge), remove the contents from the canisters and sort the resulting debris, scrap, and fuel for repackaging. The fuel elements and scrap will be collected in fuel storage and scrap baskets in preparation for loading into a multi canister overpack (MCO), while the debris is loaded into a debris bin and disposed of as solid waste. This report describes fuel handling development testing performed from May 1, 1997 through the end of August 1997. Testing during this period was mainly focused on performance of a Schilling Robotic Systems' Conan manipulator used to simulate a custom designed version, labeled Konan, being fabricated for K-Basin deployment. In addition to the manipulator, the camera viewing system, process table layout, and fuel handling processes were evaluated. The Conan test manipulator was installed and fully functional for testing in early 1997. Formal testing began May 1. The purposes of fuel handling development testing were to provide proof of concept and criteria, optimize equipment layout, initialize the process definition, and identify special needs/tools and required design changes to support development of the performance specification. The test program was set up to accomplish these objectives through cold (non-radiological) development testing using simulated and prototype equipment

  17. Qinshan NPP in-core fuel management improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Deping; Liao Zejun; Wu Xifeng; Wei Wenbin; Wang Yongming; Li Hua

    2006-01-01

    In the 10-year operation of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, the initial designed reloading strategy has been improved step by step based on the operation experiences and the advanced domestic and international fuel management methods. Higher burnup has been achieved and more economic operation gained through the loading pattern improvement and the fuel enrichment increased. The article introduces the in-core fuel management strategy improvement of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant in its 10-year operation. (authors)

  18. Development of information management system on LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. D.; Lee, S. H.; Song, D. Y.; Jeon, I.; Park, S. J.; Seo, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    LWRs in Korea should manage all the information of spent fuel to implement the obligations under Korea-IAEA safeguards agreement and to perform the nuclear material accountancy work at the facility level. The information management system on LWR spent fuel was developed to manage all movement records from receipt to shipment of LWR fuels, and to get the necessary information such as nuclear fuel inventory lists and status, maps of fresh fuel storage, reactor and spent fuel pool, receipt and shipment records and so on. This information management system has a function to setup the system environments to cover the various kinds of storage types for all LWRs ; reactor, spent fuel pool and fresh fuel storage. The movements of nuclear fuel between the storages can be easily done by double click of the mouse to the destination. It also has a several error checking routines for maintaining the correct accounting data. Using this information management system of LWR spent fuel, facility operators can perform efficiently and effectively the safeguards related works including nuclear material accountancy at each facility

  19. PORTABLE PEM FUEL CELL SYSTEM: WATER AND HEAT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SITI NAJIBAH ABD RAHMAN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Portable polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM fuel cell power generator is a PEM fuel cell application that is used as an external charger to supply the demand for high energy. Different environments at various ambient temperatures and humidity levels affect the performance of PEM fuel cell power generators. Thermal and water management in portable PEM fuel cells are a critical technical barrier for the commercialization of this technology. The size and weight of the portable PEM fuel cells used for thermal and water management systems that determine the performance of portable PEM fuel cells also need to be considered. The main objective of this paper review was to determine the importance of water and thermal management systems in portable PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this review investigated heat transfer and water transport in PEM fuel cells. Given that portable PEM fuel cells with different powers require different thermal and water management systems, this review also discussed and compared management systems for low-, medium-, and high-power portable PEM fuel cells.

  20. Development of information management system on LWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. D.; Lee, S. H.; Song, D. Y.; Jeon, I.; Park, S. J.; Seo, D. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    LWRs in Korea should manage all the information of spent fuel to implement the obligations under Korea-IAEA safeguards agreement and to perform the nuclear material accountancy work at the facility level. The information management system on LWR spent fuel was developed to manage all movement records from receipt to shipment of LWR fuels, and to get the necessary information such as nuclear fuel inventory lists and status, maps of fresh fuel storage, reactor and spent fuel pool, receipt and shipment records and so on. This information management system has a function to setup the system environments to cover the various kinds of storage types for all LWRs ; reactor, spent fuel pool and fresh fuel storage. The movements of nuclear fuel between the storages can be easily done by double click of the mouse to the destination. It also has a several error checking routines for maintaining the correct accounting data. Using this information management system of LWR spent fuel, facility operators can perform efficiently and effectively the safeguards related works including nuclear material accountancy at each facility.

  1. Practical constraints on fuel management a utility perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grier, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    The practical and potential constraints of performing fuel management at a large utility are reviewed. Based on approximately six years of experience in performing fuel management the constraints due to commercial, technical, utility system, design methods, and personnel and computer resources are discussed in detail

  2. Fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon. Phase I final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, E.B.; Zondlo, J.W.; Cessna, T.J.

    1999-06-30

    This project involves the simultaneous production of clean fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon and sulfur, along with value-added carbon nanofibers. This can be accomplished because the nanofiber production process removes carbon via a catalyzed pyrolysis reaction, which also has the effect of removing 99.9% of the sulfur, which is trapped in the nanofibers. The reaction is mildly endothermic, meaning that net energy production with real reductions in greenhouse emissions are possible. In Phase I research, the feasibility of generating clean fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon was demonstrated by the successful design, construction and operation of a facility capable of utilizing coal as well as natural gas as an inlet feedstock. In the case of coal, for example, reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions can be as much as 70% (normalized according to kilowatts produced), with the majority of carbon safely sequestered in the form of carbon nanofibers or coke. Both of these products are value-added commodities, indicating that low-emission coal fuel can be done at a profit rather than a loss as is the case with most clean-up schemes. The main results of this project were as follows: (1) It was shown that the nanofiber production process produces hydrogen as a byproduct. (2) The hydrogen, or hydrogen-rich hydrocarbon mixture can be consumed with net release of enthalpy. (3) The greenhouse gas emissions from both coal and natural gas are significantly reduced. Because coal consumption also creates coke, the carbon emission can be reduced by 75% per kilowatt-hour of power produced.

  3. Impact of advanced fuel cycle options on waste management policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordelier, Stan; Cavedon, Jean-Marc

    2006-01-01

    OECD/NEA has performed a study on the impact of advanced fuel cycle options on waste management policies with 33 experts from 12 member countries, 1 non-member country and 2 international organizations. The study extends a series of previous ones on partitioning and transmutation (P and T) issues, focusing on the performance assessments for repositories of high-level waste (HLW) arising from advanced fuel cycles. This study covers a broader spectrum than previous studies, from present industrial practice to fully closed cycles via partially closed cycles (in terms of transuranic elements); 9 fuel cycle schemes and 4 variants. Elements of fuel cycles are considered primarily as sources of waste, the internal mass flows of each scheme being kept for the sake of mass conservation. The compositions, activities and heat loads of all waste flows are also tracked. Their impact is finally assessed on the waste repository concepts. The study result confirms the findings from the previous NEA studies on P and T on maximal reduction of the waste source term and maximal use of uranium resources. In advanced fuel cycle schemes the activity of the waste is reduced by burning first plutonium and then minor actinides and also the uranium consumption is reduced, as the fraction of fast reactors in the park is increased to 100%. The result of the repository performance assessments, analysing the effect of different HLW isotopic composition on repository performance and on repository capacity, shows that the maximum dose released to biosphere at any time in normal conditions remains, for all schemes and for all the repository concepts examined, well below accepted radiation protection thresholds. The major impact is on the detailed concept of the repositories, through heat load and waste volume. Advanced fuel cycles could allow a repository to cover waste produced from 5 to 20 times more electricity generation than PWR once-through cycle. Given the flexibility of the advanced fuel

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell systems development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-12-15

    The main objective in this project has been to develop a generic and dynamic tool for SOFC systems simulation and development. Developing integrated fuel cell systems is very expensive and therefore having the right tools to reduce the development cost and time to market for products becomes an important feature. The tools developed in this project cover a wide range of needs in Dantherm Power, R and D, and can be divided into 3 categories: 1. Component selection modeling; to define component specification requirements and selection of suppliers. 2. Application simulation model built from scratch, which can simulate the interface between customer demand and system output and show operation behavior for different control settings. 3. System operation strategy optimization with respect to operation cost and customer benefits. a. Allows to see how system size, in terms of electricity and heat output, and operation strategy influences a specific business case. b. Gives a clear overview of how a different property, in the system, affects the economics (e.g. lifetime, electrical and thermal efficiency, fuel cost sensitivity, country of deployment etc.). The main idea behind the structure of the tool being separated into 3 layers is to be able to service different requirements, from changing stakeholders. One of the major findings in this project has been related to thermal integration between the existing installation in a private household and the fuel cell system. For a normal family requiring 4500 kWh of electricity a year, along with the possibility of only running the system during the heating season (winter), the heat storage demand is only 210kWh of heat with an approximate value of Dkr 160,- in extra gas consumption. In this case, it would be much more cost effective to dump the heat, in the house, and save the expense of adding heat storage to the system. This operation strategy is only valid in Denmark for the time being, since the feed-In-Tariff allows for a

  5. China's spent nuclear fuel management: Current practices and future strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yun

    2011-01-01

    Although China's nuclear power industry is relatively young and the management of its spent nuclear fuel is not yet a concern, China's commitment to nuclear energy and its rapid pace of development require detailed analyses of its future spent fuel management policies. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of China's fuel cycle program and its reprocessing policy, and to suggest strategies for managing its future fuel cycle program. The study is broken into four sections. The first reviews China's current nuclear fuel cycle program and facilities. The second discusses China's current spent fuel management methods and the storage capability of China's 13 operational nuclear power plants. The third estimates China's total accumulated spent fuel, its required spent fuel storage from present day until 2035, when China expects its first commercialized fast neutron reactors to be operational, and its likely demand for uranium resources. The fourth examines several spent fuel management scenarios for the present period up until 2035; the financial cost and proliferation risk of each scenario is evaluated. The study concludes that China can and should maintain a reprocessing operation to meet its R and D activities before its fast reactor program is further developed. - Highlights: → This study provides an overview of China's fuel cycle program and its reprocessing policy.→ This study suggests strategies for managing its future fuel cycle program.→ China will experience no pressure to lessen the burden of spent fuel storage in the next 30 years.→ China should maintain sufficient reprocessing operations to meet its demands for R and D activities.→ China should actively invest on R and D activities of both fuel cycling and fast reactor programs.

  6. In-core fuel management activities in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan Keqiang; Chen Renji; Hu Chuanwen

    1990-01-01

    The development of nuclear power in China has reached such a stage that PWR in-core fuel management becomes an urgent problem. At present the main effort is concentrated on solving the Qinshan nuclear power plant and Daya Bay nuclear power plant fuel management problems. For the Qinshan PWR (300 MWe) two packages of in-core fuel management code were developed, one with simplified nodal diffusion method and the other uses advanced Green's function nodal method. Both were used in the PWR core design. With the help of the two code packages first two cycles of the Qinshan PWR core burn-up were calculated. Besides, several research works are under way in the following areas: improvement of the nodal diffusion method and other coarse mesh method in terms of computing speed and accuracy; backward diffusion technique for fuel management application; optimization technique in the fuel loading pattern searching. As for the Daya Bay PWR plant (twin 900 MWe unit), the problem about using what kind of code package for in-core fuel management is still under discussion. In principle the above mentioned code packages are also applicable to it. Besides PWR, in-core fuel management research works are also under way for research reactors, for example, heavy water research reactor and high flux research reactor in some institutes in China. China also takes active participation in international in-core fuel management activities. (author). 19 refs

  7. Development of advanced mixed oxide fuels for plutonium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, S.; Beard, C.; Buksa, J.; Butt, D.; Chidester, K.; Havrilla, G.; Ramsey, K.

    1997-06-01

    A number of advanced Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel forms are currently being investigated at Los Alamos National Laboratory that have the potential to be effective plutonium management tools. Evolutionary Mixed Oxide (EMOX) fuel is a slight perturbation on standard MOX fuel, but achieves greater plutonium destruction rates by employing a fractional nonfertile component. A pure nonfertile fuel is also being studied. Initial calculations show that the fuel can be utilized in existing light water reactors and tailored to address different plutonium management goals (i.e., stabilization or reduction of plutonium inventories residing in spent nuclear fuel). In parallel, experiments are being performed to determine the feasibility of fabrication of such fuels. Initial EMOX pellets have successfully been fabricated using weapons-grade plutonium

  8. Development of advanced mixed oxide fuels for plutonium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, S.; Beard, C.; Buksa, J.; Butt, D.; Chidester, K.; Havrilla, G.; Ramsey, K.

    1997-01-01

    A number of advanced Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel forms are currently being investigated at Los Alamos National Laboratory that have the potential to be effective plutonium management tools. Evolutionary Mixed Oxide (EMOX) fuel is a slight perturbation on standard MOX fuel, but achieves greater plutonium destruction rates by employing a fractional nonfertile component. A pure nonfertile fuel is also being studied. Initial calculations show that the fuel can be utilized in existing light water reactors and tailored to address different plutonium management goals (i.e., stabilization or reduction of plutonium inventories residing in spent nuclear fuel). In parallel, experiments are being performed to determine the feasibility of fabrication of such fuels. Initial EMOX pellets have successfully been fabricated using weapons-grade plutonium. (author)

  9. PEM fuel cells thermal and water management fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yun; Cho, Sung Chan

    2014-01-01

    Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells convert chemical energy in hydrogen into electrical energy with water as the only by-product. Thus, PEM fuel cells hold great promise to reduce both pollutant emissions and dependency on fossil fuels, especially for transportation-passenger cars, utility vehicles, and buses-and small-scale stationary and portable power generators. But one of the greatest challenges to realizing the high efficiency and zero emissions potential of PEM fuel cells technology is heat and water management. This book provides an introduction to the essential concepts for effective thermal and water management in PEM fuel cells and an assessment on the current status of fundamental research in this field. The book offers you: An overview of current energy and environmental challenges and their imperatives for the development of renewable energy resources, including discussion of the role of PEM fuel cells in addressing these issues; Reviews of basic principles pertaining to PEM fuel cel...

  10. Advanced nuclear fuel cycles and radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This study analyses a range of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options from the perspective of their effect on radioactive waste management policies. It presents various fuel cycle options which illustrate differences between alternative technologies, but does not purport to cover all foreseeable future fuel cycles. The analysis extends the work carried out in previous studies, assesses the fuel cycles as a whole, including all radioactive waste generated at each step of the cycles, and covers high-level waste repository performance for the different fuel cycles considered. The estimates of quantities and types of waste arising from advanced fuel cycles are based on best available data and experts' judgement. The effects of various advanced fuel cycles on the management of radioactive waste are assessed relative to current technologies and options, using tools such as repository performance analysis and cost studies. (author)

  11. LMFBR fuel analysis. Task A: Oxide fuel dynamics. Final report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, V.K.; Doshi, J.; Frank, M.; Hauss, B.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Wong, K.

    1977-10-01

    The study presented deals with several areas of uncertainty in the analysis of the unprotected overpower transient for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor. These areas of uncertainty include the time, place, and mode of fuel pin failure; pre-failure fuel motion; fuel freezing, plugging, and plate-out following pin failure; and the potential for re-criticality. Internal molten fuel motion prior to pin failure was found to be sensitive to ramp rate and burnup. The strain-limit fuel failure criterion was found to be inappropriate for analysis based on existing data. The coupling of pre-transient- and transient-induced stresses tended to force the failure location towards the core midplane

  12. Social science to improve fuels management: a synthesis of research relevant to communicating with homeowners about fuels management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha C. Monroe; Lisa Pennisi; Sarah McCaffrey; Dennis Mileti

    2006-01-01

    A series of syntheses were commissioned by the USDA Forest Service to aid in fuels mitigation project planning. This synthesis focuses on how managers can most effectively communicate with the public about fuels management efforts. It summarizes what is known about the techniques of persuasive communication programs and provides an outline of the characteristics of...

  13. Fuel reprocessing and waste management in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heafield, W.; Griffin, N.L.

    1994-01-01

    The currently preferred route for the management of irradiated fuel in the UK is reprocessing. This paper, therefore, concentrates on outlining the policies, practices and achievement of British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) associated with the management of its irradiated fuel facilities at Sellafield. The paper covers reprocessing and how the safe management of each of the major waste categories is achieved. BNFL's overall waste management policy is to develop, in close consultation with the regulatory authorities, a strategy to minimize effluent discharges and provide a safe, cost effective method of treating and preparing for disposal all wastes arising on the site

  14. Technical assistance contractor Management Plan. Final [report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project comprises Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (JEG) and its major teaming partners [Roy F. Weston, Inc. (RFW), Sergent, Hauskins & Beckwith Agra, Inc. (SHB Agra), and Geraghty & Miller, Inc. (G&M)]. The first three companies have worked together effectively on the UMTRA Project for more than 10 years. With the initiation of the UMTRA Groundwater Project in April 1991, a need arose to increase the TAC`s groundwater technical breadth and depth, so G&M was brought in to augment the team`s capabilities. The TAC contract`s scope is to provide technical, analytical, environmental, engineering, design, inspection, and management support services to the US Department of Energy (DOE) for both surface and groundwater projects. The TAC team continues to support the DOE in completing surface remedial actions and initiating groundwater remediation work for start-up, characterization, design, construction oversight, and remedial operations. A key feature of the TAC`s management approach is the extensive set of communication systems implemented for the UMTRA Project. These systems assist all functional disciplines in performing UMTRA Project tasks associated with management, technical support, administrative support, and financial/project controls.

  15. Conceptual development of a test facility for spent fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.W.; Lee, H.H.; Lee, J.Y.; Lee, J.S.; Ro, S.G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Spent fuel management is an important issue for nuclear power program, requiring careful planning and implementation. With the wait-and-see policy on spent fuel management in Korea, research efforts are directed at KAERI to develop advanced technologies for safer and more efficient management of the accumulating spent fuels. In support of these research perspectives, a test facility of pilot scale is being developed with provisions for integral demonstration of a multitude of technical functions required for spent fuel management. The facility, baptized SMART (Spent fuel MAnagement technology Research and Test facility), is to be capable of handling full size assembly of spent PWR fuel (as well as CANDU fuel) with a maximum capacity of 10 MTU/y (about 24 assemblies of PWR type). Major functions of the facility are consolidation of spent PWR fuel assembly into a half-volume package and optionally transformation of the fuel rod into a fuel of CANDU type (called DUPIC). Objectives of these functions are to demonstrate volume reduction of spent fuel (for either longer-term dry storage or direct disposal ) in the former case and direct refabrication of the spent PWR fuel into CANDU-type DUPIC fuel for reuse in CANDU reactors in the latter case, respectively. In addition to these major functions, there are other associated technologies to be demonstrated : such as waste treatment, remote maintenance, safeguards, etc. As the facility is to demonstrate not only the functional processes but also the safety and efficiency of the test operations, engineering criteria equivalent to industrial standards are incorporated in the design concept. The hot cell structure enclosing the radioactive materials is configured in such way to maximize costs within the given functional and operational requirements. (author). 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  16. Conceptual development of a test facility for spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.W.; Lee, H.H.; Lee, J.Y.; Lee, J.S.; Ro, S.G.

    1997-01-01

    Spent fuel management is an important issue for nuclear power program, requiring careful planning and implementation. With the wait-and-see policy on spent fuel management in Korea, research efforts are directed at KAERI to develop advanced technologies for safer and more efficient management of the accumulating spent fuels. In support of these research perspectives, a test facility of pilot scale is being developed with provisions for integral demonstration of a multitude of technical functions required for spent fuel management. The facility, baptized SMART (Spent fuel MAnagement technology Research and Test facility), is to be capable of handling full size assembly of spent PWR fuel (as well as CANDU fuel) with a maximum capacity of 10 MTU/y (about 24 assemblies of PWR type). Major functions of the facility are consolidation of spent PWR fuel assembly into a half-volume package and optionally transformation of the fuel rod into a fuel of CANDU type (called DUPIC). Objectives of these functions are to demonstrate volume reduction of spent fuel (for either longer-term dry storage or direct disposal ) in the former case and direct refabrication of the spent PWR fuel into CANDU-type DUPIC fuel for reuse in CANDU reactors in the latter case, respectively. In addition to these major functions, there are other associated technologies to be demonstrated : such as waste treatment, remote maintenance, safeguards, etc. As the facility is to demonstrate not only the functional processes but also the safety and efficiency of the test operations, engineering criteria equivalent to industrial standards are incorporated in the design concept. The hot cell structure enclosing the radioactive materials is configured in such way to maximize costs within the given functional and operational requirements. (author). 3 tabs., 4 figs

  17. Spent nuclear fuel management. Moving toward a century of spent fuel management: A view from the halfway mark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shephard, L.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A half-century ago, President Eisenhower in his 1953 'Atoms for Peace' speech, offered nuclear technology to other nations as part of a broad nuclear arms control initiative. In the years that followed, the nuclear power generation capabilities of many nations has helped economic development and contributed to the prosperity of the modern world. The growth of nuclear power, while providing many benefits, has also contributed to an increasing global challenge over safe and secure spent fuel management. Over 40 countries have invested in nuclear energy, developing over 400 nuclear power reactors. Nuclear power supplies approximately 16% of the global electricity needs. With the finite resources and challenges of fossil fuels, nuclear power will undoubtedly become more prevalent in the future, both in the U.S. and abroad. We must address this inevitability with new paradigms for managing a global nuclear future. Over the past fifty years, the world has come to better understand the strong interplay between all elements of the nuclear fuel cycle, global economics, and global security. In the modern world, the nuclear fuel cycle can no longer be managed as a simple sequence of technological, economic and political challenges. Rather it must be seen, and managed, as a system of strongly interrelated challenges. Spent fuel management, as one element of the nuclear fuel system, cannot be relegated to the back-end of the fuel cycle as only a disposal or storage issue. There exists a wealth of success and experience with spent fuel management over the past fifty years. We must forge this experience with a global systems perspective, to reshape the governing of all aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle, including spent fuel management. This session will examine the collective experience of spent fuel management enterprises, seeking to shape the development of new management paradigms for the next fifty years. (author)

  18. ClearFuels-Rentech Integrated Biorefinery Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Joshua [Project Director

    2014-02-26

    The project Final Report describes the validation of the performance of the integration of two technologies that were proven individually on a pilot scale and were demonstrated as a pilot scale integrated biorefinery. The integrated technologies were a larger scale ClearFuels’ (CF) advanced flexible biomass to syngas thermochemical high efficiency hydrothermal reformer (HEHTR) technology with Rentech’s (RTK) existing synthetic gas to liquids (GTL) technology.

  19. The Dust Management Project: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Straka, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    A return to the Moon to extend human presence, pursue scientific activities, use the Moon to prepare for future human missions to Mars, and expand Earth s economic sphere, will require investment in developing new technologies and capabilities to achieve affordable and sustainable human exploration. From the operational experience gained and lessons learned during the Apollo missions, conducting longterm operations in the lunar environment will be a particular challenge, given the difficulties presented by the unique physical properties and other characteristics of lunar regolith, including dust. The Apollo missions and other lunar explorations have identified significant lunar dust-related problems that will challenge future mission success. Comprised of regolith particles ranging in size from tens of nanometers to microns, lunar dust is a manifestation of the complex interaction of the lunar soil with multiple mechanical, electrical, and gravitational effects. The environmental and anthropogenic factors effecting the perturbation, transport, and deposition of lunar dust must be studied in order to mitigate it s potentially harmful effects on exploration systems and human explorers. The Dust Management Project (DMP) is tasked with the evaluation of lunar dust effects, assessment of the resulting risks, and development of mitigation and management strategies and technologies related to Exploration Systems architectures. To this end, the DMP supports the overall goal of the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) of addressing the relevant high priority technology needs of multiple elements within the Constellation Program (CxP) and sister ETDP projects. Project scope, approach, accomplishments, summary of deliverables, and lessons learned are presented.

  20. 78 FR 20625 - Spent Nuclear Fuel Management at the Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact... generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and approximately 1,000 bundles of aluminum-clad SNF... processing is a chemical separations process that involves dissolving spent fuel in nitric acid and...

  1. Acceptance of failed SNF [spent nuclear fuel] assemblies by the Federal Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E. R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high level waste will be accepted in the following categories: failed fuel; consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; non-fuel-assembly hardware; fuel in metal storage casks; fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; inspection and testing requirements for wastes; canister criteria; spent fuel selection for delivery; and defense and commercial high-level waste packages. This document discusses acceptance of failed spent fuel assemblies by the Federal Waste Management System. 18 refs., 7 figs., 25 tabs

  2. [Research and workshop on alternative fuels for aviation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) at Baylor University was granted U. S. Department of Energy (US DOE) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) funds for research and development to improve the efficiency in ethanol powered aircraft, measure performance and compare emissions of ethanol, Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE) and 100 LL aviation gasoline. The premise of the initial proposal was to use a test stand owned by Engine Components Inc. (ECI) based in San Antonio, Texas. After the grant was awarded, ECI decided to close down its test stand facility. Since there were no other test stands available at that time, RAFDC was forced to find additional support to build its own test stand. Baylor University provided initial funds for the test stand building. Other obstacles had to be overcome in order to initiate the program. The price of the emission testing equipment had increased substantially beyond the initial quote. Rosemount Analytical Inc. gave RAFDC an estimate of $120,000.00 for a basic emission testing package. RAFDC had to find additional funding to purchase this equipment. The electronic ignition unit also presented a series of time consuming problems. Since at that time there were no off-the-shelf units of this type available, one had to be specially ordered and developed. FAA funds were used to purchase a Super Flow dynamometer. Due to the many unforeseen obstacles, much more time and effort than originally anticipated had to be dedicated to the project, with much of the work done on a volunteer basis. Many people contributed their time to the program. One person, mainly responsible for the initial design of the test stand, was a retired engineer from Allison with extensive aircraft engine test stand experience. Also, many Baylor students volunteered to assemble the. test stand and continue to be involved in the current test program. Although the program presented many challenges, which resulted in delays, the RAFDC's test

  3. LMFBR fuel analysis. Task A: oxide fuel dynamics. Final report, October 1977--September 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, V.K.; Frank, M.; Kastenberg, W.E.; McKone, T.E.

    1979-03-01

    Three aspects of LMFBR safety are discussed. The first concerns the potential reactivity effects of whole core fuel motion prior to pin failure in low ramp rate transient overpower accidents. The second concerns the effects of flow blockages following pin failure on the coolability of a core following an unprotected overpower transient. The third aspect concerns the safety related implications of using thorium based fuels in LMFBR's

  4. Cost analysis of spent nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.L.M.; Ford, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) is chartered to develop a waste management system for the safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the 131 nuclear power reactors in the United States and a certain amount of high level waste (HLW) from reprocessing operations. The current schedule is to begin accepting SNF in 1998 for storage at a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. Subsequently, beginning in 2010, the system is scheduled to begin accepting SNF at a permanent geologic repository in 2010 and HLW in 2015. At this time, a MRS site has not been selected. Yucca Mountain, Nevada is currently being evaluated as the candidate site for the repository for permanent geologic disposal of SNF. All SNF, with the possible exception of the SNF from the western reactors, is currently planned to be shipped to or through the MRS site en route to the repository. The repository will operate in an acceptance and performance confirmation phase for a 50 year period beginning in 2010 with an additional nine year closure and five year decontamination and decommissioning period. The MRS has a statutory maximum capacity of 15,000 Metric Tons Uranium (MTU), with a further restriction that it may not store more than 10,000 MTU until the repository begins accepting waste. The repository is currently scheduled to store 63,000 MTU of SNF and an additional 7,000 MTU equivalent of HLW for a total capacity of 70,000 MTU. The amended act specified the MRS storage limits and identified Yucca Mountain as the only site to be characterized. Also, an Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator was established to secure a voluntary host site for the MRS. The MRS, the repository, and all waste containers/casks will go through a Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing process much like the licensing process for a nuclear power plant. Environmental assessments and impact statements will be prepared for both the MRS and repository

  5. Development of Advanced Spent Fuel Management Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chung Seok; Choi, I. K.; Kwon, S. G. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    As a part of research efforts to develop an advanced spent fuel management process, this project focused on the electrochemical reduction technology which can replace the original Li reduction technology of ANL, and we have successfully built a 20 kgHM/batch scale demonstration system. The performance tests of the system in the ACPF hot cell showed more than a 99% reduction yield of SIMFUEL, a current density of 100 mA/cm{sup 2} and a current efficiency of 80%. For an optimization of the process, the prevention of a voltage drop in an integrated cathode, a minimization of the anodic effect and an improvement of the hot cell operability by a modulation and simplization of the unit apparatuses were achieved. Basic research using a bench-scale system was also carried out by focusing on a measurement of the electrochemical reduction rate of the surrogates, an elucidation of the reaction mechanism, collecting data on the partition coefficients of the major nuclides, quantitative measurement of mass transfer rates and diffusion coefficients of oxygen and metal ions in molten salts. When compared to the PYROX process of INL, the electrochemical reduction system developed in this project has comparative advantages in its application of a flexible reaction mechanism, relatively short reaction times and increased process yields.

  6. Development of Advanced Spent Fuel Management Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Chung Seok; Choi, I. K.; Kwon, S. G.

    2007-06-01

    As a part of research efforts to develop an advanced spent fuel management process, this project focused on the electrochemical reduction technology which can replace the original Li reduction technology of ANL, and we have successfully built a 20 kgHM/batch scale demonstration system. The performance tests of the system in the ACPF hot cell showed more than a 99% reduction yield of SIMFUEL, a current density of 100 mA/cm 2 and a current efficiency of 80%. For an optimization of the process, the prevention of a voltage drop in an integrated cathode, a minimization of the anodic effect and an improvement of the hot cell operability by a modulation and simplization of the unit apparatuses were achieved. Basic research using a bench-scale system was also carried out by focusing on a measurement of the electrochemical reduction rate of the surrogates, an elucidation of the reaction mechanism, collecting data on the partition coefficients of the major nuclides, quantitative measurement of mass transfer rates and diffusion coefficients of oxygen and metal ions in molten salts. When compared to the PYROX process of INL, the electrochemical reduction system developed in this project has comparative advantages in its application of a flexible reaction mechanism, relatively short reaction times and increased process yields

  7. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 13: Strategies for managing fuels and visual quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Esposito

    2006-01-01

    The public's acceptance of forest management practices, including fuels reduction, is heavily based on how forests look. Fuels managers can improve their chances of success by considering aesthetics when making management decisions. This fact sheet reviews a three-part general strategy for managing fuels and visual quality: planning, implementation, and monitoring...

  8. Environmental Assessment : Squawfish Management Program : Final.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-05-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to decrease the number of northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in reservoirs in the Columbia River system. The goal of the Squawfish Management Program is to reduce losses of outmigrating juvenile salmon and steelhead (salmonids) to northern squawfish predation. The objective is to reduce the number of northern squawfish that feed on juvenile salmonids (smolts) by 10 to 20 percent to alter the age and size structure of the northern squawfish population. The hypothesis, based on computer modeling, indicates that sustained northern squawfish harvest (5 to 10 years) and the resultant population restructuring may reduce losses of juvenile salmonids to predation by up to 50 percent or more within 10 years. The proposed action would target northern squawfish 11 inches and longer, the size in which northern squawfish being preying significantly on juvenile salmonids. BPA proposes to fund three types of fisheries to harvest northern squawfish. BPA also proposes to fund monitoring activities of these fisheries to determine whether desired or other results occur. The three fisheries methods proposed are: (1) commercial Tribal fishing; (2) sport reward fishing; and (3) fishing from restricted areas of each dam ( dam angling''). These fisheries were tested in 1990 and 1991.

  9. Management of super-grade plutonium in spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, H. F.; Benedict, R. W.

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the security and safeguards implications of potential management options for DOE's sodium-bonded blanket fuel from the EBR-II and the Fermi-1 fast reactors. The EBR-II fuel appears to be unsuitable for the packaging alternative because of DOE's current safeguards requirements for plutonium. Emerging DOE requirements, National Academy of Sciences recommendations, draft waste acceptance requirements for Yucca Mountain and IAEA requirements for similar fuel also emphasize the importance of safeguards in spent fuel management. Electrometallurgical treatment would be acceptable for both fuel types. Meeting the known requirements for safeguards and security could potentially add more than $200M in cost to the packaging option for the EBR-II fuel

  10. Spent fuel management fee methodology and computer code user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, R.L.; White, M.K.

    1982-01-01

    The methodology and computer model described here were developed to analyze the cash flows for the federal government taking title to and managing spent nuclear fuel. The methodology has been used by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate the spent fuel disposal fee that will provide full cost recovery. Although the methodology was designed to analyze interim storage followed by spent fuel disposal, it could be used to calculate a fee for reprocessing spent fuel and disposing of the waste. The methodology consists of two phases. The first phase estimates government expenditures for spent fuel management. The second phase determines the fees that will result in revenues such that the government attains full cost recovery assuming various revenue collection philosophies. These two phases are discussed in detail in subsequent sections of this report. Each of the two phases constitute a computer module, called SPADE (SPent fuel Analysis and Disposal Economics) and FEAN (FEe ANalysis), respectively

  11. Application of fuel management calculation codes for CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Haitao; Wu Hongchun

    2003-01-01

    Qinshan Phase III Nuclear Power Plant adopts CANDU-6 reactors. It is the first time for China to introduce this heavy water pressure tube reactor. In order to meet the demands of the fuel management calculation, DRAGON/DONJON code is developed in this paper. Some initial fuel management calculations about CANDU-6 reactor of Qinshan Phase III are carried out using DRAGON/DONJON code. The results indicate that DRAGON/DONJON can be used for the fuel management calculation for Qinshan Phase III

  12. SP-100 coated-particle fuel development. Phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This document is the final report of Phase I of the SP-100 Coated-Particle Fuel Development Program conducted by GA Technologies Inc. for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AT03-82SF11690. The general objective of the study conducted between September and December 1982 was to evaluate coated-particle type fuel as an alternate or backup fuel to the UO 2 tile-and-fin arrangement currently incorporated into the reference design of the SP-100 reactor core. This report presents and discusses the following topics in the order listed: the need for an alternative fuel for the SP-100 nuclear reactor; an abbreviated description of the reference and coated-particle fuel module concepts; the bases and results of the study and analysis leading to the preliminary design of a coated particle suitable for the SP-100 space power reactor; incorporation of the fuel particles into compacts and heat-pipe-cooled modules; initial efforts and plans to fabricate coated-particle fuel and fuel compacts; the design and performance of the proposed alternative core relative that of the reference fuel; and a summary of critical issues and conclusions consistent with the level of effort and duration of the study

  13. Final summary report of fuel-dynamics tests H2 and E4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerner, R.C.; Rothman, A.B.; De Volpi, A.; Dickerman, C.E.; Deitrich, L.W; Stahl, D.; Murphy, W.F.

    1976-02-01

    Results of two failure experiments using LMFBR-type fuel during simulated unprotected transient overpower accidents are reported and analyzed. In both experiments, a single fresh fuel pin in a Mark-IIA loop was subjected to a temperature-limited, step-reactivity irradiation in the TREAT reactor. Total energy was 490 MJ in Test H2 and 690 MJ in Test E4. Except for their timing, the sequence of events in the failure scenario was the same for both tests. Local coolant boiling began 25-50 msec before failure. Significant upward fuel flow in the center of the pin started as early as 100 msec before cladding failure. Cladding failure was due to melting after contact with molten fuel and occurred at the top of the fuel column. Formation of an outlet flow-channel blockage began about 10 msec after failure and was complete by 50 msec. Inlet blockage began later and was less extensive. No significant amount of fuel sweepout was observed. Fuel remains separated into a small group of 50-1000-μm fragments and a macroscopic group of chunks and clinkers. The final distribution of fuel remains may have resulted from a delayed fuel/steel interaction in the inlet region

  14. A cost-benefit analysis of spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamorlette, G.

    2001-01-01

    The back end of the fuel cycle is an area of economic risk for utilities having nuclear power plants to generate electricity. A cost-benefit analysis is a method by which utilities can evaluate advantages and drawbacks of alternative back end fuel cycle strategies. The present paper analyzes how spent fuel management can influence the risks and costs incurred by a utility over the lifetime of its power plants and recommends a recycling strategy. (author)

  15. Modular approach to LWR in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urli, N.; Pevec, D.; Coffou, E.; Petrovic, B.

    1980-01-01

    The most important methods in the LWR in-core fuel management are reviewed. A modular approach and optimization by use of infinite multiplication factor and power form-factor are favoured. A computer program for rotation of fuel assemblies at reloads has been developed which improves further fuel economy and reliability of nuclear power plants. The program has been tested on the PWR core and showed to decrease the power form-factors and flatten the radial power distribution. (author)

  16. The verification of PWR-fuel code for PWR in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surian Pinem; Tagor M Sembiring; Tukiran

    2015-01-01

    In-core fuel management for PWR is not easy because of the number of fuel assemblies in the core as much as 192 assemblies so many possibilities for placement of the fuel in the core. Configuration of fuel assemblies in the core must be precise and accurate so that the reactor operates safely and economically. It is necessary for verification of PWR-FUEL code that will be used in-core fuel management for PWR. PWR-FUEL code based on neutron transport theory and solved with the approach of multi-dimensional nodal diffusion method many groups and diffusion finite difference method (FDM). The goal is to check whether the program works fine, especially for the design and in-core fuel management for PWR. Verification is done with equilibrium core search model at three conditions that boron free, 1000 ppm boron concentration and critical boron concentration. The result of the average burn up fuel assemblies distribution and power distribution at BOC and EOC showed a consistent trend where the fuel with high power at BOC will produce a high burn up in the EOC. On the core without boron is obtained a high multiplication factor because absence of boron in the core and the effect of fission products on the core around 3.8 %. Reactivity effect at 1000 ppm boron solution of BOC and EOC is 6.44 % and 1.703 % respectively. Distribution neutron flux and power density using NODAL and FDM methods have the same result. The results show that the verification PWR-FUEL code work properly, especially for core design and in-core fuel management for PWR. (author)

  17. Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Nuclear Power Plant Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wati, Nurokhim

    2008-01-01

    Management of spent nuclear fuel from Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) reactor had been studied to anticipate program of NPP operation in Indonesia. In this paper the quantity of generated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is predicted based on the national electrical demand, power grade and type of reactor. Data was estimated using Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) NPP type 1.000 MWe and the SNF management overview base on the experiences of some countries that have NPP. There are four strategy nuclear fuel cycle which can be developed i.e: direct disposal, reprocessing, DUPlC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In Candu) and wait and see. There are four alternative for SNF management i.e : storage at the reactor building (AR), away from reactor (AFR) using wet centralized storage, dry centralized storage AFR and prepare for reprocessing facility. For the Indonesian case, centralized facility of the wet type is recommended for PWR or BWR spent fuel. (author)

  18. Intergovernmental Advanced Stationary PEM Fuel Cell System Demonstration Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich Chartrand

    2011-08-31

    efficiency and reducing costs of PEMFC based power systems using LPG fuel and continues to makes steps towards meeting DOE's targets. Plug Power would like to thank DOE for their support of this program.

  19. Micro solid oxide fuel cell on the chip. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutz, M.; Hotz, N.; Bieri, N.; Poulikakos, D.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this project is the numerical and experimental investigation of hydrocarbon-to-syngas reforming in micro reformers for incorporation into an entire micro fuel cell system. Numerical simulations are used to achieve deeper understanding of several determining aspects in such a micro reformer. These insights are used to optimize the reforming performance by proper choice of operational and geometrical parameters of a reformer. These numerical results are continued by comprehensive experimental studies. In the first chapter, the effect of wall conduction of a tubular methane micro reformer is investigated numerically. Methane is used as the representative hydrocarbon because its detailed surface reaction mechanism is known. It is found that the axial wall conduction can strongly influence the performance of the microreactor and should not be neglected without a careful a priori investigation of its impact. In the second chapter, the effect of the catalyst amount and reactor geometry on the reforming process was investigated. It was found that the hydrogen selectivity changes significantly with varying catalyst loading. Thus, the reaction path leading to higher hydrogen production becomes more important by increasing the catalyst surface site density on the active surface. Another unexpected result is the presence of optimum channel geometry and optimum catalyst amount. In the third chapter of this project, the capability of flame-made Rh/Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.5}O{sub 2} nanoparticles catalyzing the reforming of butane to H{sub 2}- and CO-rich syngas was investigated experimentally in a packed bed reactor. The main goal of this study was the efficient reforming of butane at temperatures between 500 and 600 {sup o}C for a micro intermediate-temperature SOFC system. Our results showed that Rh/Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.5}O{sub 2} nanoparticles proved to be a very promising material for butane-to-syngas reforming with complete butane conversion and a hydrogen yield of 77

  20. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Activity on Technical Influence of High Burnup UOX and MOX Water Reactor Fuel on Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovasic, Z.; Einziger, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the results of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project investigating the influence of high burnup and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels, from water power reactors, on spent fuel management. These data will provide information on the impacts, regarding spent fuel management, for those countries operating light-water reactors (LWR)s and heavy-water reactors (HWR)s with zirconium alloy-clad uranium dioxide (UOX) fuels, that are considering the use of higher burnup UOX or the introduction of reprocessing and MOX fuels. The mechanical designs of lower burnup UOX and higher burnup UOX or MOX fuel are very similar, but some of the properties (e.g., higher fuel rod internal pressures; higher decay heat; higher specific activity; and degraded cladding mechanical properties of higher burnup UOX and MOX spent fuels) may potentially significantly affect the behavior of the fuel after irradiation. These properties are reviewed. The effects of these property changes on wet and dry storage, transportation, reprocessing, re-fabrication of fuel, and final disposal were evaluated, based on regulatory, safety, and operational considerations. Political and strategic considerations were not taken into account since relative importance of technical, economic and strategic considerations vary from country to country. There will also be an impact of these fuels on issues like non-proliferation, safeguards, and sustainability, but because of the complexity of factors affecting those issues, they are only briefly discussed. Data gaps were also identified during this investigation. The pros and cons of using high burnup UOX or MOX, for each applicable issue in each stage of the back end of the fuel cycle, were evaluated and are discussed.. Although, in theory, higher burnup fuel and MOX fuels mean a smaller quantity of spent fuel, the potential need for some changes in design of spent fuel storage, transportation, handling, reprocessing, re-fabrication, and

  1. Site selection - siting of the final repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    SKB has selected Forsmark as the site for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The site selection is the end result of an extensive siting process that began in the early 1990s. The strategy and plan for the work was based on experience from investigations and development work over a period of more than ten years prior to then. This document describes the siting work and SKB's choice of site for the final repository. It also presents the information on which the choice was based and the reasons for the decisions made along the way. The document comprises Appendix PV to applications under the Nuclear Activities Act and the Environmental Code for licences to build and operate an encapsulation plant adjacent to the central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel in Oskarshamn, and to build and operate a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark in Oesthammar Municipality

  2. Site selection - siting of the final repository for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-03-15

    SKB has selected Forsmark as the site for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The site selection is the end result of an extensive siting process that began in the early 1990s. The strategy and plan for the work was based on experience from investigations and development work over a period of more than ten years prior to then. This document describes the siting work and SKB's choice of site for the final repository. It also presents the information on which the choice was based and the reasons for the decisions made along the way. The document comprises Appendix PV to applications under the Nuclear Activities Act and the Environmental Code for licences to build and operate an encapsulation plant adjacent to the central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel in Oskarshamn, and to build and operate a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark in Oesthammar Municipality

  3. Managing Proliferation Issues with Iran; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, C. Richard; Saltiel, David H.

    2002-01-01

    particular, will continue to play a vital role in determining the extent to which Iran is able to pursue WMD options. Without a fundamental change in the regional security environment, however, there is little reason to expect changes in Iranian WMD and missile policies, and the United States, acting alone and short of war, cannot prevent Iran from ultimately developing WMD and delivery systems. Furthermore, U.S. policies that take a tougher line with Russia, China and North Korea are not likely to lead to more restraint among these potential sources of WMD and missile technology. In the absence of engagement with Iran, unilateral U.S. economic sanctions will remain the principal, if flawed, U.S. policy tool for seeking to prevent Iran from acquiring WMD. The rationale is that by discouraging trade and investment, particularly in Iran's energy sector, the government of Iran will have less revenue to pursue proliferation. Without broad international support for economic isolation, however, such an effort may hinder Iran's WMD programs, though it cannot block them. Finally, options are needed to deal with major failures in nonproliferation efforts. These options include measures to deter Iranian use of WMD, to defend against their use if deterrence fails, and to destroy Iranian WMD capabilities should the need arise

  4. Update on Canada's nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.

    1992-09-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP) was launched in 1978 as a joint initiative by the governments of Canada and Ontario. Under the program, AECL has been developing and assessing a generic concept to dispose of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The disposal concept has been referred for review under the Environmental Assessment and Review Process. AECL will submit an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to an Environmental Assessment Panel, which was appointed in late 1989. Hearings will be held in areas that have a particular interest in the concept and its application. At the end of the review, the Panel will make recommendations as to the acceptability of the concept and the course of future action. The federal government will decide on the next steps to be taken. In the spring of 1990 public open houses were held to tell prospective participants how to enter the process. Sessions designed to assist the Panel in determining the scope of the EIS took place in the autumn of 1990. In June 1991 the Panel issued for comment a set of draft guidelines for the EIS. More than 30 groups and individuals submitted comments. The final guidelines were issued in March 1992, and AECL expects to submit its EIS to the Panel in 1993. If the concept review is completed by 1995 and if the concept is approved, disposal could begin some time after 2025. (L.L.) (12 refs.)

  5. MISER-I: a computer code for JOYO fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Yoshioki

    1976-06-01

    A computer code ''MISER-I'' is for a nuclear fuel management of Japan Experimental Fast Breeder Reactor JOYO. The nuclear fuel management in JOYO can be regarded as a fuel assembly management because a handling unit of fuel in JOYO plant is a fuel subassembly (core and blanket subassembly), and so the recording of material balance in computer code is made with each subassembly. The input information into computer code is given with each subassembly for a transfer operation, or with one reactor cycle and every one month for a burn-up in reactor core. The output information of MISER-I code is the fuel assembly storage record, fuel storage weight record in each material balance subarea at any specified day, and fuel subassembly transfer history record. Change of nuclear fuel composition and weight due to a burn-up is calculated with JOYO-Monitoring Code by off-line computation system. MISER-I code is written in FORTRAN-IV language for FACOM 230-48 computer. (auth.)

  6. The 2016-2018 National Plan of Management of Radioactive Materials and Wastes. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    A first document contains the final version of the French National Plan of Management of Radioactive Materials and Wastes (PNGMDR) for the period 2016-2018: principles and objectives (presentation of radioactive materials and wastes, principles to be taken into account to define pathways of management of radioactive wastes, legal and institutional framework, information transparency), the management of radioactive materials (context and challenges, management pathways, works on fast breeder reactors of fourth generation), assessment and perspectives of existing pathways of management of radioactive wastes (management of historical situations, management of residues of mining and sterile processing, management of waste with a high natural radioactivity, management of very short life waste, of very low activity wastes, and low and medium activity wastes), needs and perspectives regarding management processes to be implemented for the different types of radioactive wastes. Appendices to this document contain: a recall of the content of previous PNGMDR since 2007, a synthesis of realisations and researches performed abroad, research orientations for the concerned period, and international agreement on spent fuel and radioactive waste management. A second document, released by the ASN, proposes an environmental and strategic assessment of the plan. A third one and a fourth one contain the opinion of the Environmental Authority on the plan preliminary focus and the answer to the Environmental Authority by the ASN. Finally, a synthesis of the remarks made by the public about the PNGMDR and the answers to these remarks conclude the document

  7. LMFBR fuel analysis. Task A: oxide fuel dynamics. Final report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, V.K.; Hauss, B.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Saqui, R.; Sun, Y.H.; Wong, K.

    1976-11-01

    The report summarizes the results of studies conducted in support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's review of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor. In particular it deals with three aspects of the unprotected transient overpower accident. The first aspect is the response of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor to low reactivity insertion rates. Second, the investigation of a new method for computing the time, place and mode of fuel pin failure is studied. Lastly, the question of post-failure, fuel freezing, and plate-out is addressed. Several areas of uncertainty in the analysis of these accidents is also discussed

  8. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    As storage of spent fuel has become a key technology in spent fuel management, wet and dry storage have become mature technologies and continue to demonstrate good performance. Increased spent fuel storage capacity in combination with longer storage durations will be needed over the foreseeable future as many countries have delayed their decision on spent fuel disposal or reprocessing. Extended spent fuel storage is, and will remain, an important activity for all countries with nuclear power programmes. A number of countries are planning or have already initiated research programmes on spent fuel storage performance, and there is a continuing benefit in exchanging spent fuel storage experience of the Member States in order to build a comprehensive technology knowledge base. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during wet storage are uniform corrosion, pitting, galvanic, and microbiologically-influenced corrosion. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during dry storage and subsequent handling and transportation operations are air oxidation, thermal creep, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride re-orientation, hydrogen migration and re-distribution. Investigations carried out so far indicate that from the degradation mechanisms that may affect the integrity of spent fuel assembly/bundle structure during interim storage, hydride re-orientation has the potential to impair the ability of the cladding to effectively withstand potentially adverse mechanical challenges resulting from handling or transportation accidents. Fuel integrity issues are related to the definition and criteria of fuel integrity, failure classification, packaging and retrieval of damaged fuel and transport of damaged fuel assemblies. Various monitoring technologies have been developed and used to confirm the continued spent fuel integrity during storage or to provide an early indication of developing

  9. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    As storage of spent fuel has become a key technology in spent fuel management, wet and dry storage have become mature technologies and continue to demonstrate good performance. Increased spent fuel storage capacity in combination with longer storage durations will be needed over the foreseeable future as many countries have delayed their decision on spent fuel disposal or reprocessing. Extended spent fuel storage is, and will remain, an important activity for all countries with nuclear power programmes. A number of countries are planning or have already initiated research programmes on spent fuel storage performance, and there is a continuing benefit in exchanging spent fuel storage experience of the Member States in order to build a comprehensive technology knowledge base. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during wet storage are uniform corrosion, pitting, galvanic, and microbiologically-influenced corrosion. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during dry storage and subsequent handling and transportation operations are air oxidation, thermal creep, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride re-orientation, hydrogen migration and re-distribution. Investigations carried out so far indicate that from the degradation mechanisms that may affect the integrity of spent fuel assembly/bundle structure during interim storage, hydride re-orientation has the potential to impair the ability of the cladding to effectively withstand potentially adverse mechanical challenges resulting from handling or transportation accidents. Fuel integrity issues are related to the definition and criteria of fuel integrity, failure classification, packaging and retrieval of damaged fuel and transport of damaged fuel assemblies. Various monitoring technologies have been developed and used to confirm the continued spent fuel integrity during storage or to provide an early indication of developing

  10. Make use of EDF orientations in PWR fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloaguen, A.

    1989-01-01

    The EDF experience acquired permits to allow the PWR fuel performances and to make use of better management. In this domain low progress can be given considerable financial profits. The industrial and commercial structures, the time constant of the fuel cycle, has for consequence that the electric utilities can take advantage only progressively of the expected profits [fr

  11. Management of spent fuel; Gestion del combustible irradiado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrampes Blanch, J.

    2015-07-01

    The management of irradiated fuel has become one of the materials that more time and resources deals within their responsibilities that also cover other areas such as the design of the new cycles, supply of fresh fuel, tracking operation cycles and strategies of power changes. (Author)

  12. Application of genetic algorithm in reactor fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Gang

    2002-01-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) has been used in reactor fuel management of core arrangement optimal calculation. The chromosome coding method has been selected, and the parameters in GA operators have been improved, so the quality and efficiency of calculation in GA program have been greatly improved. According to the result, better core fuel position arrangement can be obtained from the GA calculation

  13. Fuels Management-How to Measure Success: Conference Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews; Bret W. Butler

    2006-01-01

    Fuels management programs are designed to reduce risks to communities and to improve and maintain ecosystem health. The International Association of Wildland Fire initiated the 1st Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference to address development, implementation, and evaluation of these programs. The focus was on how to measure success. Over 500 participants from several...

  14. Modeling the optimal management of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachlas, J.A.; Kurstedt, H.A. Jr.; Swindle, D.W. Jr.; Korcz, K.O.

    1977-01-01

    Recent governmental policy decisions dictate that strategies for managing spent nuclear fuel be developed. Two models are constructed to investigate the optimum residence time and the optimal inventory withdrawal policy for fuel material that presently must be stored. The mutual utility of the models is demonstrated through reference case application

  15. Quantify and improve PEM fuel cell durability. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahl-Madsen, L.; Odgaard, M.; Munksgaard Nielsen, R. (IRD Fuel Cell A/S, Svendborg (Denmark)); Li, Q.; Jensen, Jens Oluf (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Dept. of Chemistry, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Andersen, Shuang Ma; Speder, J.; Skou, E. (Syddansk Univ. (SDU), Odense (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present project is to systematically quantify and improve the durability of the PEM FC including the following three PEM FC variants: LT PEM FC, DMFC, and HT PEM FC. Different factors influencing dissolution properties of noble metal catalyst platinum and platinum-ruthenium alloy has been studied. The dissolution was found to increase by increasing the CV cycle upper potential limit, number of potential cycles, solution acidity, oxygen partial pressure, involvement of chloride, and temperature. Ruthenium was found to deteriorate ten (10) times faster than platinum catalyst; and carbon supported catalyst (Pt: 20%, Ru: up to 100%) deteriorate ten (10) times faster than non-supported catalyst (Pt: 2%, Ru: 30%) at the same condition. Loss of sulphonic acid groups and fluoride from perfluorinated sulfonic acid membrane was confirmed by different techniques, which locally leads to loss of acidity, and consequently enhances dissolution of noble metal catalyst. Degradation of Nafion ionomer in the electrode was enhanced by noble metal catalyst and the thermal decomposition properties has synergetic effect with carbon degradation. Hydrophobicity of GDL and electrode on GDL were found to degrade e.g. radical attack, oxidation, and physical wear out. The very top micro surface structure turned out to be responsible for wetting property after chemical ageing. Optimal catalyst and ionomer ratio is also reflected in contact angle value, which can be understood in terms of catalyst/carbon - ionomer affinity and layered structure. Long-term tested and 'virgin' LT PEM MEAs have been characterised with respect to SEM, TEM, EDS, and XRD. Both failed and well-functioning MEAs have been characterised. The Post Mortem analysis has shown and quantified degradation mechanisms like catalyst growth and carbon corrosion. Furthermore, the effect of fuel starvation was shown by pronounced Ru-catalyst band within the membrane. The catalyst coarsening observed after

  16. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

  17. Radioactive waste management decommissioning spent fuel storage. V. 3. Waste transport, handling and disposal spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    As part of the book entitled Radioactive waste management decommissioning spent fuel storage, vol. 3 dealts with waste transport, handling and disposal, spent fuel storage. Twelve articles are presented concerning the industrial aspects of nuclear waste management in France [fr

  18. Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousselier, Yves.

    1981-05-01

    After a short description of the nuclear fuel cycle mining, milling, enrichment and reprocessing, radioactive waste management in France is exposed. The different types of radioactive wastes are examined. Storage, solidification and safe disposal of these wastes are described

  19. Radioactive waste management and advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In 2007 ENEA's Department of Nuclear Fusion and Fission, and Related Technologies acted according to national policy and the role assigned to ENEA FPN by Law 257/2003 regarding radioactive waste management and advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies

  20. Comparative techniques for nuclear fuel cycle waste management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelto, P.J.; Voss, J.W.

    1979-09-01

    A safety assessment approach for the evaluation of predisposal waste management systems is described and applied to selected facilities in the light water reactor (LWR) once-through fuel cycle and a potential coprocessed UO 2 -PuO 2 fuel cycle. This approach includes a scoping analysis on pretreatment waste streams and a more detailed analysis on proposed waste management processes. The primary evaluation parameters used in this study include radiation exposures to the public from radionuclide releases from normal operations and potential accidents, occupational radiation exposure from normal operations, and capital and operating costs. On an overall basis, the waste management aspects of the two fuel cycles examined are quite similar. On an individual facility basis, the fuel coprocessing plant has the largest waste management impact

  1. Management number identification method for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Nobuo; Mori, Kazuma.

    1995-01-01

    In the present invention, a management number indicated to appropriate portions of a fuel assembly can be read with no error for the management of nuclear fuel materials in the nuclear fuel assembly (counting management) and physical protection: PP. Namely, bar codes as a management number are printed by electrolytic polishing to one or more portions of a side surface of an upper nozzle of the assembly, an upper surface of a clamp and a side surface of a lower nozzle. The bar codes are read by a reader at one or more portions in a transporting path for transporting the fuel assembly and at a fuel detection device disposed in a fuel storage pool. The read signals are inputted to a computer. With such procedures, the nuclear fuel assembly can be identified with no error by reading the bar codes and without applying no danger to a human body. Since the reader is disposed in the course of the transportation and test for the assembly, and the read signals are inputted to the computer, the management for the counting number and PP is facilitated. (I.S.)

  2. Advanced CANDU reactors fuel analysis through optimal fuel management at approach to refuelling equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingle, C.P.; Bonin, H.W.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of alternate CANDU fuels along with natural uranium-based fuel was carried out from the view point of optimal in-core fuel management at approach to refuelling equilibrium. The alternate fuels considered in the present work include thorium containing oxide mixtures (MOX), plutonium-based MOX, and Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel recycled in CANDU reactors (Direct Use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU (DUPIC)); these are compared with the usual natural UO 2 fuel. The focus of the study is on the 'Approach to Refuelling Equilibrium' period which immediately follows the initial commissioning of the reactor. The in-core fuel management problem for this period is treated as an optimization problem in which the objective function is the refuelling frequency to be minimized by adjusting the following decision variables: the channel to be refuelled next, the time of the refuelling and the number of fresh fuel bundles to be inserted in the channel. Several constraints are also included in the optimisation problem which is solved using Perturbation Theory. Both the present 37-rod CANDU fuel bundle and the proposed CANFLEX bundle designs are part of this study. The results include the time to reach refuelling equilibrium from initial start-up of the reactor, the average discharge burnup, the average refuelling frequency and the average channel and bundle powers relative to natural UO 2 . The model was initially tested and the average discharge burnup for natural UO 2 came within 2% of the industry accepted 199 MWh/kgHE. For this type of fuel, the optimization exercise predicted the savings of 43 bundles per full power year. In addition to producing average discharge burnups and other parameters for the advanced fuels investigated, the optimisation model also evidenced some problem areas like high power densities for fuels such as the DUPIC. Perturbation Theory has proven itself to be an accurate and valuable optimization tool in predicting the time between

  3. Influence of safety limitations on the fuel cycle management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, G

    1972-05-03

    The choice of an optimum fuel cycle has been up to now governed from the safety point of view, by the setting of very general limitations on few parameters, as for instance on the fuel temperature and on the surface temperature. As a better understanding of the design and materials limitations become available, the philosophy of the fuel cycle optimisation can be improved. The aim of this contribution is to shortly revise the safety aspects involved in the choice of a fuel cycle management and thereafter try to draw some general conclusions.

  4. Spent fuel interim management: 1995 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.K.

    1995-01-01

    The problems of interim away-from-reactor spent fuel storage and storage in spent fuel pools at the reactor site are discussed. An overview of the state-of-the-art in the USA, Europe, and Japan is presented. The technical facilities for away-from-reactor storage are briefly described, including wet storage pools, interactive concrete systems, metallic containers, and passive concrete systems. Reprocessing technologies are mostly at the design stage only. It is predicted that during the 20 years to come, about 50 000 tonnes of spent fuel will be stored at reactor sites regardless of the advance of spent fuel reprocessing or interim storage projects. (J.B.). 4 tabs., 2 figs

  5. Spent fuel management: Current status and prospects 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    Spent fuel management has always been one of the most important stages in the nuclear fuel cycle and it is still one of the most vital problems common to all countries with nuclear reactors. It begins with the discharge of spent fuel from a power or a research reactor and ends with its ultimate disposition, either by direct disposal or by reprocessing of the spent fuel. Two options exist at present - an open, once-through cycle with direct disposal of the spent fuel and a closed cycle with reprocessing of the spent fuel and recycling of plutonium and uranium in new mixed oxide fuels. The selection of a spent fuel strategy is a complex procedure in which many factors have to be weighed, including political, economic and safeguards issues as well as protection of the environment. Continuous attention is being given by the IAEA to the collection, analysis and exchange of information on spent fuel management. Its role in this area is to provide a forum for the exchange of information and to co-ordinate and to encourage closer co-operation among Member States in certain research an development activities that are of common interest. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. International trade and waste and fuel managment issue, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2006-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: HLW management in France, by Michel Debes, EDF, France; Breakthroughs from future reactors, by Jacques Bouchard, CEA, France; 'MOX for peace' a reality, by Jean-Pierre Bariteau, AREVA Group, France; Swedish spent fuel and radwaste, by Per H. Grahn and Marie Skogsberg, SKB, Sweden; ENC2005 concluding remarks, by Larry Foulke, 'Nuclear Technology Matters'; Fuel crud formation and behavior, by Charles Turk, Entergy; and, Plant profile: major vote of confidence for NP, by Martti Katka, TVO, Finland.

  7. Comparison of spent fuel management fee collection alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.K.; Engel, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Five alternative methods for recovering the costs of spent fuel management were evaluated. These alternatives consist of collecting the fee for various components of spent fuel management cost (AFR basin storage, transportation from AFR basin to the repository, packaging, repository, R and D, and government overhead) at times ranging from generation of power to delivery of the spent fuel to the government. The five fee collection mechanisms were analyzed to determine how well they serve the interests of the public and the electricity ratepayer

  8. Current status of IAEA activities in spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danker, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    Spent fuel storage is a common issue in all IAEA Member States with nuclear reactors. Whatever strategy is selected for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, the storage of spent fuel will be an increasingly significant consideration. Notwithstanding considerable efforts to increase the efficient use of nuclear fuel and to optimize storage capacity, delays in plans for geological repositories or in implementing reprocessing result in increased spent fuel storage capacity needs in combination with longer storage durations over the foreseeable future. As storage inventories and durations increase, issues associated with long term storage compel more attention...monitoring for potential degradation mechanisms, records retention, maintenance, efficiencies through burnup credit. Since the IAEA contribution to ICNC'99 focused exclusively on IAEA burnup credit activities including requirements and methods, this paper provides a broader perspective on IAEA activities in response to the above trends in spent fuel management, while also describing efforts to disseminate information regarding burnup credit applications. (author)

  9. Multi-purpose container technologies for spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    The management of spent nuclear fuel is an integral part of the nuclear fuel cycle. Spent fuel management resides in the back end of the fuel cycle, and is not revenue producing as electric power generation is. It instead results in a cost associated power generation. It is a major consideration in the nuclear power industry today. Because technologies, needs and circumstances vary from country to country, there is no single, standardized approach to spent fuel management. The projected cumulative amount of spent fuel generated worldwide by 2010 will be 330 000 t HM. When reprocessing is accounted for, that amount is likely to be reduced to 215 000 t HM, which is still more than twice as much as the amount now in storage. Considering the limited capacity of at-reactor (AR) storage, various technologies are being developed for increasing storage capacities. At present, many countries are developing away-from-reactor (AFR) storage in the form of pool storage or as dry storage. Further these AFR storage systems may be at-reactor sites or away-from-reactor sites (e.g. centrally located interim storage facilities, serving several reactors). The dry storage technologies being developed are varied and include vaults, horizontal concrete modules, concrete casks, and metal casks. The review of the interim storage plans of several countries indicates that the newest approaches being pursued for spent fuel management use dual-purpose and multi-purpose containers. These containers are envisaged to hold several spent fuel assemblies, and be part of the transport, storage, and possibly geological disposal systems of an integrated spent fuel management system

  10. Fuel management in CANDU reactors: Daniel Rozon's contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozon, D.; Varin, E.; Chambon, R.

    2010-01-01

    The CANDU fuel management optimization problem is in many ways different from LWRs fuel management, because of the on-line refueling and the complete 3-D geometry problem. Daniel Rozon was an outstanding leader in the understanding and resolution of this optimization problem and remained during his entire career. Daniel Rozon and his students have used the generalized adjoint formalism implemented in standard mathematical programming methods to solve the optimization of the exit burnup in the reactor as well as the optimization of control rod worth or fuel enrichment. We have summarized here the theoretical basis of fuel management and resolution methods, the latest approaches of optimization and results as obtained using the OPTEX code. (author)

  11. An economic analysis of spent fuel management and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Koji

    1998-01-01

    Spent fuel management is becoming a key issue not only in the countries that have already experienced years of nuclear operation but also in the Asian countries that started nuclear utilization rather lately. This paper summarizes the key aspects that essentially determine optimal conditions for desired spent fuel management strategies from the engineering-economic point of view, in both national and regional perspectives. The term 'desired' is intended to highlight positive and beneficial aspects of such strategies, namely mobile and timely exploitation of spent fuel storage. Among all, the economy of scale, the economy of scope, the learning-by-doing effect, and benefits of R and D are reviewed theoretically and empirically, and the paper overviews to what extent these factors are implemented in solving spent fuel management strategy optimization problem. (author)

  12. National briefing summaries: Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Silviera, D.J.; Leigh, I.W.

    1987-09-01

    This report is a compilation of publicly-available information concerning the nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management strategies and programs of 20 nations and three international agencies that have publicized their activities in this field. The information in this document is compiled to provide summary information on radioactive waste management activities in other countries. This document indicates what is occurring in other countries with regard to strategies, activities, and facilities. This document first presents a short overview of the activities and trends for managing low- to high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel by the entities covered in this review. This is followed by information for each country for nuclear power; fuel cycle and waste management strategy/policy; highlights and major milestones; institutional considerations/organizations; nuclear fuel production; fuel recycle; spent fuel storage and transport; waste conditioning, storage and transport; surface and near-surface waste disposal; geologic waste disposal; management of uranium mine and mill wastes; decommissioning; international; and references. 406 refs

  13. Yugoslav spent nuclear fuel management program and international perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Subotic, K.; Sotic, O.; Plecas, I.; Ljubenov, V.; Peric, A.; Milosevic, M.

    2002-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel stored in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Yugoslavia, consists of about 2.5 tons of metal uranium (initial enrichment 2%) and about 20 kg uranium dioxide (dispersed in aluminum matrix, initial fuel uranium enrichment 80%). This spent nuclear fuel is generated in operation of the RA heavy water research reactor during 1959-1984 period. Both types of fuel are of ex-USSR origin, have the same shape and dimensions and approximately the same initial mass of 235 nuclide. They are known as the TVR-S type of fuel elements. The total of 8030 spent fuel elements are stored at the RA research reactor premises, almost all in the spent fuel pool filled by ordinary water. The last used 480 high-enriched uranium spent fuel elements are kept in the drained RA reactor core since 1984. Fuel layer of both enrichments is covered with thin aluminium cladding. Due to non-suitable chemical parameters of water in the spent fuel storage pool, the corrosion processes penetrated aluminium cladding and aluminium walls od storage containers during storage period long from 20 to 40 years. Activity of fission products ( 137 Cs) is detected in water samples during water inspection in 1996 and experts of the lAEA Russia and USA were invited to help. By end of 2001, some remediation of the water transparency of the storage pool and inspections of water samples taken from the storage containers with the spent fuel elements were carried out by the Vinca Institute staff and with the help of experts from the Russia and the IAEA. Following new initiatives on international perspective on spent fuel management, a proposal was set by the IAEA, and was supported by the governments of the USA and the Russian Federation to ship the spent fuel elements of the RA research reactor to Mayak spent fuel processing plant in Russia. This paper describes current status of the reactor RA spent fuel elements, initiative for new Yugoslav spent fuel management program speculates on some of the

  14. Safeguards for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Methods and technologies for the Olkiluoto site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okko, O.

    2003-05-01

    The final disposal of the nuclear material shall introduce new safeguards concerns which have not been addressed previously in IAEA safeguards approaches for spent fuel. The encapsulation plant to be built at the site will be the final opportunity for verification of spent fuel assemblies prior to their transfer to the geological repository. Moreover, additional safety and safeguards measures are considered for the underground repository. Integrated safeguards verification systems will also concentrate on environmental monitoring to observe unannounced activities related to possible diversion schemes at the repository site. The final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in geological formation will begin in Finland within 10 years. After the geological site investigations and according to legal decision made in 2001, the final repository of the spent nuclear fuel shall be located at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki. The next phase of site investigations contains the construction of an underground facility, called ONKALO, for rock characterisation purposes. The excavation of the ONKALO is scheduled to start in 2004. Later on, the ONKALO may form a part of the final repository. The plans to construct the underground facility for nuclear material signify that the first safeguards measures, e.g. baseline mapping of the site area, need to take prior to the excavation phase. In order to support the development and implementation of the regulatory control of the final disposal programme, STUK established an independent expert group, LOSKA. The group should support the STUK in the development of the technical safeguards requirements, in the implementation of the safeguards and in the evaluation of the plans of the facility operator. This publication includes four background reports produced by this group. The first of these 'NDA verification of spent fuel, monitoring of disposal canisters, interaction of the safeguards and safety issues in the final disposal' describes the new

  15. A loading pattern optimization method for nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argaud, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reload of PWR core leads to the search of an optimal nuclear fuel assemblies distribution, namely of loading pattern. This large discrete optimization problem is here expressed as a cost function minimization. To deal with this problem, an approach based on gradient information is used to direct the search in the patterns discrete space. A method using an adjoint state formulation is then developed, and final results of complete patterns search tests by this method are presented. (author)

  16. Spent fuel stability under repository conditions - final report of the european project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, Ch.; Ferry, C.; Kelm, M.; Cavedon, J.M.; Corbel, C.; Jegou, Ch.; Lovera, P.; Miserque, F.; Poulesquen, A.; Grambow, B.; Andriambololona, Z.; Martinez-Esparza, A.; Kelm, M.; Loida, A.; Rondinella, V.; Wegen, D.; Spahiu, K.; Johnson, L.; Cachoir, Ch.; Lemmens, K.; Quinones, J.; Bruno, J.; Christensen, H.; Grambow, B.; Pablo, J. de

    2005-01-01

    This report is the final report of the European Project 'Spent Fuel Stability under Repository Conditions' (FIKW-CT-2001-00192 SFS) funded by the European Commission from Nov.2000 to Oct.2004. Gathering the work performed by 13 partners from 6 countries, it aims to specifically focus on the spent nuclear fuel long term alteration in deep repository and the subsequent radionuclides release rate as a function of time. This report synthesised the wide experimental work performed within this project and enlightens the major outcomes, which can be summarised as follow: - A new model for defining the Instant Release Fraction was developed in order to consider the potential fuel evolution before the water penetrates the canister. Quantitative assessment has been produced and shows a significant contribution to the long term dose; - Based on new experimental data, kinetic radiolytic scheme have been upgraded and are used to determine the amount of oxidants produced at the fuel/water interface; - The existence of a dose threshold below which the water radiolysis does not influence the fuel alteration has been demonstrated and occurs between 3.5 and 33 MBq.g UO21. Above the threshold, the fuel alteration rates is directly related to the dose rate. - Hydrogen was experimentally demonstrated to be an efficient oxidants scavenger preventing therefore the fuel oxidation. Molecular mechanism still need to be understood. - Finally, a new Matrix Alteration Model integrating most of the SFS results (apart of the hydrogen effect) has been developed and used to assess the fuel long tern stability in representative conditions of deep repository in salt, clay-rock and granite. The breadth of the results and the significance of the conclusions testify of the success of the collaboration within the project. (authors)

  17. INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION. FINAL REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

    2001-01-01

    This Final Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3,3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the MH/C System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem. Because of USEPA policies and regulations that do not require treatment of low level or low-level/PCB contaminated wastes, DOE terminated the project because there is no purported need for this technology

  18. ENS RRFM 2005: 9th international topical meeting on research reactor fuel management. Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The ENS topical meeting on research reactor fuel management is an annual conference launched successfully in 1997. It has since then grown into well established international forum for the exchange and expertise on all significant aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle of research reactors. Oral presentations at this meeting were divided in the following four sessions: International Topics; Fuel Development, Qualification, Fabrication and Licensing; Reactor Operation, Fuel Safety and Core Conversion; Spent Fuel Management, Back-end Options, Transportation. The three poster sessions were devoted to fuel development, qualification, fabrication and licensing; reactor operation, fuel safety, core conversion, spent fuel; spent fuel management, fuel cycle back-end options, transportation

  19. RA3: Application of a calculation model for fuel management with SEFE (Slightly Enriched Fuel Elements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estryk, G.; Higa, M.

    1993-01-01

    The RA-3 (5 MW, MTR) reactor is mainly utilized to produce radioisotopes (Mo-99, I-131, etc.). It started operating with Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) in 1990, and spends around 12 fuels per year. Although this consumption is small compared to a nuclear power station. It is important to do a good management of them. The present report describes: - A reactor model to perform the Fuel Shuffling. - Results of fuel management simulations for 2 and a half years of operation. Some features of the calculations can be summarized as follows: 1) A 3D calculation model is used with the code PUMA. It does not have experimental adjustments, except for some approximations in the reflector representation and predicts: power, flux distributions and reactivity of the core in an acceptable way. 2) Comparisons have been made with the measurements done in the commissioning with LEU fuels, and it has also been compared with the empirical method (the previous one) which had been used in the former times of operation with LEU fuel. 3) The number of points of the model is approximately 13500, an it can be run in 80386 personal computer. The present method has been verified as a good tool to perform the simulations for the fuel management of RA-3 reactor. It is expected to produce some economic advantages in: - Achieving a better utilization of the fuels. - Leaving more time of operation for radioisotopes production. The activation measurements through the whole core required by the previous method can be significantly reduced. (author)

  20. L/ILW management and final disposal. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This is a proceedings of the Sino-French Seminar on Low- and Intermediate-Level waste Management and Final Disposal. The seminar was held on 26-28 April 1993 in Beijing of China. 33 papers are included in the proceedings. The great efforts in the treatment and disposal of different level radwastes and achievements in the research and development in China are introduced. The rich experience on the radwaste management in France are also introduced

  1. Comparison of national programs and regulations for the management of spent fuel and disposal of high-level waste in seven countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numark, N.J.; Mattson, R.J.; Gaunt, J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes programs and regulatory requirements affecting the management of spent fuel and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in seven nations with large nuclear power programs. The comparison is intended to illustrate that the range of spent fuel management options is influenced by certain technical and political constraints. It begins by providing overall nuclear fuel cycle facts for each country, including nuclear generating capacities, rates of spent fuel discharge, and policies on spent fuel reprocessing. Spent fuel storage techniques and reprocessing activities are compared in light of constraints such as fuel type. Waste disposal investigations are described, including a summary of the status of regulatory developments affecting repository siting and disposal. A timeline is provided to illustrate the principle milestones in spent fuel management and waste disposal in each country. Finally, policies linking nuclear power licensing and development to nuclear waste management milestones and RandD progress are discussed

  2. Preparation of the National Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralj, M.; Zeleznik, N.; Mele, I.; Veselic, M.

    2006-01-01

    spent fuel: nuclear power plant, research reactor, small producers in the industry, medicine, research and army, uranium mine in decommissioning, storage facilities and naturally occurring radioactive material with a considerable radiation. ARAO identified the existing and possible future problems and proposed the technical solutions and action plans for two distinctive periods: 2005-2008 and 2009-2013. The necessary financial, technical and human resources were evaluated and the requirements to fulfil the programme were described. The core activities of the radioactive waste management in this period is siting and construction of the LILW repository, the final closure and decommissioning of the uranium mine, providing the complete control over the institutional waste, identification of TENORM sources and harmonisation of nuclear legislation with the environmental, spatial and construction legislation. (author)

  3. Radiological impacts of spent nuclear fuel management options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riotte, H.; Lazo, T.; Mundigl, S.

    2000-01-01

    An important technical study on radiological impacts of spent nuclear fuel management options, recently completed by the NEA, is intended to facilitate informed international discussions on the nuclear fuel cycle. The study compares the radiological impacts on the public and on nuclear workers resulting from two approaches to handling spent fuel from nuclear power plants: - the reprocessing option, that includes the recycling of spent uranium fuel, the reuse of the separated plutonium in MOX fuel, and the direct disposal of spent MOX fuel; and the once-through option, with no reprocessing of spent fuel, and its direct disposal. Based on the detailed research of a group of 18 internationally recognised experts, under NEA sponsorship, the report concludes that: The radiological impacts of both the reprocessing and the non-reprocessing fuel cycles studied are small, well below any regulatory dose limits for the public and for workers, and insignificantly low as compared with exposures caused by natural radiation. The difference in the radiological impacts of the two fuel cycles studied does not provide a compelling argument in favour of one option or the other. The study also points out that other factors, such as resource utilisation efficiency, energy security, and social and economic considerations would tend to carry more weight than radiological impacts in decision-making processes. (authors)

  4. Radioactive waste management and spent nuclear fuel storing. Options and priorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Ion

    2001-01-01

    As a member of the states' club using nuclear energy for peaceful applications, Romania approaches all the activities implied by natural uranium nuclear fuel cycle, beginning with uranium mining and ending with electric energy generation. Since, in all steps of the nuclear fuel cycle radioactive wastes are resulting, in order to protect the environment and the life, the correct and competent radioactive waste management is compulsory. Such a management implies: a. Separating the radioisotopes in all the effluences released into environment; b. Treating separately the radioisotopes to be each properly stored; c. Conditioning waste within resistant matrices ensuring long term isolation of the radioactive waste destined to final disposal; d. Building radioactive waste repositories with characteristics of isolation guaranteed for long periods of time. To comply with the provisions of the International Convention concerning the safety of the spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management, signed on 5 September 1997, Romania launched its program 'Management of Radioactive Wastes and Dry Storing of Spent Nuclear Fuel' having the following objectives: 1. Establishing the technology package for treating and conditioning the low and medium active waste from Cernavoda NPP to prepare them for final disposal; 2. Geophysical and geochemical investigations of the site chosen for the low and medium active final disposal (DFDSMA); 3. Evaluating the impact on environment and population of the DFDSMA; 4. Providing data necessary in the dry intermediate storing of spent nuclear fuel and the continuous and automated surveillance; 5. Establishing multiple barriers for spent nuclear fuel final disposal in order to establish the repository in granitic rocks and salt massives; 6. Designing and testing containers for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel guaranteeing the isolation over at least 500 years; 7. Computational programs for evaluation of radionuclide leakage in environment in

  5. Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) fuel and In-Core Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, K.D.; Sterbentz, J.; Meyer, M.; Lowden, R.; Hoffman, E.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) has been chosen as one of six candidates for development as a Generation IV nuclear reactor based on: its ability to fully utilize fuel resources; minimize or reduce its own (and other systems) actinide inventory; produce high efficiency electricity; and the possibility to utilize high temperature process heat. Current design approaches include a high temperature (2 850 C) helium cooled reactor using a direct Brayton cycle, and a moderate temperature (550 C - 650 C) helium or supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) cooled reactor using direct or indirect Brayton cycles. These design choices have thermal efficiencies that approach 45% to 50%, and have turbomachinery sizes that are much more compact compared to steam plants. However, there are challenges associated with the GCFR, which are the focus of current research. This includes safety system design for decay heat removal, development of high temperature/high fluence fuels and materials, and development of fuel cycle strategies. The work presented here focuses on the fuel and preliminary in-core fuel management, where advanced ceramic-ceramic (cercer) dispersion fuels are the main focus, and average burnups to 266 M Wd/kg appear achievable for the reference Si C/(U,TRU)C block/plate fuel. Solid solution (pellet) fuel in composite ceramic clad (Si C/Si C) is also being considered, but remains as a backup due to cladding fabrication challenges, and high centerline temperatures in the fuel. (Author)

  6. Acceptance of spent nuclear fuel in multiple element sealed canisters by the Federal Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E.R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high level waste will be accepted in the following categories: (1) failed fuel; (2) consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; (3) non-fuel-assembly hardware; (4) fuel in metal storage casks; (5) fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; (6) inspection and testing requirements for wastes; (7) canister criteria; (8) spent fuel selection for delivery; and (9) defense and commercial high-level waste packages. 14 refs., 27 figs

  7. Acceptance of non-fuel assembly hardware by the Federal Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E. R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high-priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high-level waste will be accepted in the following categories: failed fuel; consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; non-fuel-assembly hardware; fuel in metal storage casks; fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; inspection and testing requirements for wastes; canister criteria; spent fuel selection for delivery; and defense and commercial high-level waste packages. 14 refs., 12 figs., 43 tabs

  8. Development of advanced spent fuel management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Joon; Cho, S. H.; You, G. S.

    2001-04-01

    Currently, the economic advantage of any known approach to the back end fuel cycle of a nuclear power reactor has not been well established. Thus the long term storage of the spent fuel in a safe manner is one of the important issues to be resolved in countries where the nuclear power has a relatively heavy weight in power production of that country. At KAERI, as a solution to this particular issue midterm storage of the spent fuel, an alternative approach has been developed. This approach includes the decladding and pulverization process of the spent PWR fuel rod, the reducing process from the uranium oxide to a metallic uranium powder using Li metal in a LiCl salt, the continuous casting process of the reduced metal, and the recovery process of Li from mixed salts by the electrolysis. We conducted the laboratory scale tests of each processes for the technical feasibility and determination for the operational conditions for this approach. Also, we performed the theoretical safety analysis and conducted integral tests for the equipment integration through the Mock-up facility with non-radioactive samples. There were no major issues in the approach, however, material incompatibility of the alkaline metal and oxide in a salt at a high temperature and the reactor that contains the salt became a show stopper of the process. Also the difficulty of the clear separation of the salt with metals reduced from the oxide became a major issue

  9. Environmental management in Framatome nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiebaut, B.; Ferre, A.

    1999-01-01

    Environmental preservation is both a national regulatory requirement and a condition for economic and social development. The various industrial sites belonging to the Framatome Nuclear Fuel Organisation, whose activities range from the processing and transformation of Zirconium alloy products to the fabrication of fuel assemblies, have always demonstrated that protection of the environment was their prime concern by implementing low pollution level processes and reducing and/or recycling industrial waste and effluents. As early as January 1996, a directive issued by the Framatome Group defined its environmental policy and responsibilities in the matter. Within the Framatome Nuclear Fuel Organization, this directive has been applied by implementation of: low level pollution processes; better performance of recycling of effluents, by-products and waste; environmental information policy. In all its plants, the Framatome Nuclear Fuel Organization has decided to pursue and to step up its environmental protection policy by: officializing its action through compliance with ISO standard 14001 and certification of all its industrial sites by 2001 at the latest; launching new actions and extra investment programs. In this context, FBFC has applied for a modification of the decrees concerning the dumping of liquid and gas effluents at the Romans factory. (authors)

  10. EDF advanced fuel management strategies for the next century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, A.; Charmensat, P.; Larderet, M.

    1999-01-01

    The French nuclear fleet represents 57 PWRs in operation, accounting for 80 % of France's total electricity production. The performance achieved by EDF reactors, in terms of availability (82.6% in 1997) and good cost control, have allowed to improve the nuclear KWh cost by 2% since 1992. The implementation of longer fuel cycles on the 1300 MW reactors from 1996 has contributed to this improvement and, as competitiveness is one of the main challenges for EDF, improving core management strategies is still at the order of the day. With this aim, a thinking process has been initiated to evaluate the benefit brought by the use of a fuel assembly like ALLIANCE, the new fuel product developed by Framatome-Fragema and FCF (Framatome Cogema Fuels) in close cooperation with EDF. The considered product provides enhanced performance, particularly as regards discharge burnup (at least up to 70 GWd/t) and thermal-hydraulic and mechanical behaviour. Fuel management improvements rely on the expertise gained by Framatome through designing core management strategies in a wide range of operating conditions prevailing in nuclear reactors all over the world. It will however be taken into account the necessity for EDF to adopt a policy of stepwise change owing to the potential impact of a 'series effect' on its numerous units. The proposed paper will describe innovative fuel managements, achievable thanks to advanced fuel assembly performance, that are jointly investigated by EDF and Framatome. It includes the following optimization schemes: extending cycle length by using higher enrichments up to 5%, while keeping the same reload size (1/3 core for example for the 1300 MW reactors); decreasing reload size (from 1/3 to 1/4 core), while keeping the same cycle length, using more enriched (up to 5 %) fuel assemblies; reaching annual cycle, with maximization of fuel cycle cost optimization (1/5 core). Beyond such schemes, combinations of optimized loading patterns and neutronic features of

  11. Handling of spent nuclear fuel and final storage of nitrified high level reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following stages of handling and transport of the fuel on its way to final storage are dealt with in the report. 1) The spent nuclear fuel is stored at the power station or in the central fuel storage facility awaiting reprocessing. 2) The fuel is reprocessed, i.e. uranium, plutonium and waste are separated from each other. Reprocessing does not take place in Sweden. The highlevel waste is vitrified and can be sent back to Sweden in the 1990s. 3) Vitrified waste is stored for about 30 years awaiting deposition in the final repository. 4) The waste is encapsulated in highly durable materials to prevent groundwater from coming into contact with the waste glass while the radioactivity of the waste is still high. 5) The canisters are emplaced in a final repository which is built at a depth of 500 m in rock of low permeability. 6) All tunnels and shafts are filled with a mixture of clay and sand of low permeability. A detailed analysis of possible harmful effects resulting from normal acitivties and from conceivable accidents is presented in a special section. (author)

  12. A comparative study of fuel management in PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, D.E.G.

    1980-01-01

    A comparitive study of fuel recycling in Pressurized Water Reactors was developed, considering not only the conventional uranium cycle, but also the use of thorium as an alternative. The use of thorium was done by varying its conoentration in the homogeneous mixture with uranium in the fuel from 30% up to 90%. The U-233 produced is incorporated within the isotopic composition of irradiated uranium. Various fractions of irradiated recycled fuel to be reprocessed and recycled was considered. Various alternatives of recycling were outlined and a final comparison in the tests done, is furnished in terms of U 3 O 8 and UTS requirements and approximated costs of fuel cycle stages involved. The recycled fuel is considered to be uniformly distributed in the fuel element rods introduced in the nucleus. The influence of the utilization of thorium was also considered for the development of an optimum fuel cycle, regarding the safeguards against nuclear proliferation when utilizing plutonium. A zero-dimensional cellular model was adopted to represent the reactor and the calculus of microscopic cross-sections for the homogenized cell was done by the computer code LEOPARD. A digital computer program was develped for neutronic and fuel depletion calculus and to simulate the refueling of various cycles. (Author) [pt

  13. 75 FR 50932 - Massachusetts: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ...: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental...-1990. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robin Biscaia, RCRA Waste Management Section, Office of Site... final [[Page 50933

  14. Methods of characterization of salt formations in view of spent fuel final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaconu, Daniela; Balan, Valeriu; Mirion, Ilie

    2002-01-01

    Deep disposal in geological formations of salt, granite and clay seems to be at present the most proper and commonly adopted solution for final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and spent fuel. Disposing such wastes represents the top-priority issue of the European research community in the field of nuclear power. Although seemingly premature for Romanian power system, the interest for final disposal of spent fuel is justified by the long duration implied by the studies targeting this objective. At the same time these studies represent the Romanian nuclear research contribution in the frame of the efforts of integration within the European research field. Although Romania has not made so far a decision favoring a given geological formation for the final disposal of spent fuel resulting from Cernavoda NPP, the most generally taken into consideration appears the salt formation. The final decision will be made following the evaluation of its performances to spent fuel disposal based on the values of the specific parameters of the geological formation. In order to supply the data required as input parameters in the codes of evaluation of the geological formation performances, the INR Pitesti initiated a package of modern and complex methodologies for such determinations. The studies developed so far followed up the special phenomenon of salt convergence, a phenomenon characteristic for only this kind of rock, as well as the radionuclide migration. These studies allow a better understanding of these processes of upmost importance for disposal's safety. The methods and the experimental installation designed and realized at INR Pitesti aimed at determination of thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, specific heat, which are all parameters of high specific interest for high level radioactive waste or spent fuel disposal. The paper presents the results of these studies as well as the methodologies, the experimental installations and the findings

  15. International trade and waste and fuel managment issue, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2007-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: New plants with high safety and availability, by Bill Poirier, Westinghouse Electric Company; Increased reliability and competitiveness, by Russell E. Stachowski, GE Energy, Nuclear; Fuel for long-term supply of nuclear power, by Kumiaki Moriya, Hitachi, Ltd., Japan; Super high burnup fuel, By Noboru Itagaki and Tamotsu Murata, Nuclear Fuel Industries LTD., Japan; Zero fuel failures by 2010, by Tom Patten, AREVA NP Inc.; Decommissioning opportunities in the UK, by David Brown and William Thorn, US Department of Commerce; Industry's three challenges, by Dale E. Klein, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and, A step ahead of the current ABWR's, compiled by Claire Zurek, GE Energy.

  16. Waste management in IFR [Integral Fast Reactor] fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.R.; Battles, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The fuel cycle of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) has important potential advantage for the management of high-level wastes. This sodium-cooled, fast reactor will use metal fuels that are reprocessed by pyrochemical methods to recover uranium, plutonium, and the minor actinides from spent core and blanket fuel. More than 99% of all transuranic (TRU) elements will be recovered and returned to the reactor, where they are efficiently burned. The pyrochemical processes being developed to treat the high-level process wastes are capable of producing waste forms with low TRU contents, which should be easier to dispose of. However, the IFR waste forms present new licensing issues because they will contain chloride salts and metal alloys rather than glass or ceramic. These fuel processing and waste treatment methods can also handle TRU-rich materials recovered from light-water reactors and offer the possibility of efficiently and productively consuming these fuel materials in future power reactors

  17. FOCUS: a fire management planning system -- final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick W. Bratten; James B. Davis; George T. Flatman; Jerold W. Keith; Stanley R. Rapp; Theodore G. Storey

    1981-01-01

    FOCUS (Fire Operational Characteristics Using Simulation) is a computer simulation model for evaluating alternative fire management plans. This final report provides a broad overview of the FOCUS system, describes two major modules-fire suppression and cost, explains the role in the system of gaming large fires, and outlines the support programs and ways of...

  18. General considerations in fuel management for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyror, J.G.; Fayers, F.J.

    1971-07-01

    By fuel management we mean the strategy for fuelling and refuelling a reactor together with any associated absorber movements. It incorporates (a) decisions made about the timing of fuel loading operations; (b) choice of enrichments to be loaded; (c) selection of sites at which reloading occurs; (d) programming of control rods and any other reactivity control facilities such as soluble or burnable poisons; and (e) evaluation of the resulting fuel element performance consequences. The topic of fuel management is thus a vast and vital one. It embraces most of the various aspects of core performance and determines many of a reactor's design characteristics. In this paper we review what to us appear to be some of the important issues in this important field

  19. Fuel management for the Beznau nuclear power plant in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, A.

    1988-01-01

    The Beznau nuclear power plant consists of two 350 MW(e) PWRs of Westinghouse design. A number of special features characterize the nuclear industry in Switzerland: there is no fuel cycle industry; nuclear materials must be moved through several countries before they arrive in our country, it is therefore important that agreements are in place between those countries and Switzerland; nearly all of the materials and services required have to be paid in foreign currencies; the interest rate in Switzerland is traditionally low. Aspects of fuel management at the Beznau plant discussed against this background are: the procurement of natural uranium, its conversion and enrichment; fuel fabrication, in-core management, reprocessing and plutonium recycling; and fuel cycle costs. (author)

  20. Historical fuel reprocessing and HLW management in Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knecht, D.A.; Staiger, M.D.; Christian, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    This article review some of the key decision points in the historical development of spent fuel reprocessing and waste management practices at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant that have helped ICPP to successfully accomplish its mission safely and with minimal impact on the environment. Topics include ICPP reprocessing development; batch aluminum-uranium dissolution; continuous aluminum uranium dissolution; batch zirconium dissolution; batch stainless steel dissolution; semicontinuous zirconium dissolution with soluble poison; electrolytic dissolution of stainless steel-clad fuel; graphite-based rover fuel processing; fluorinel fuel processing; ICPP waste management consideration and design decisions; calcination technology development; ICPP calcination demonstration and hot operations; NWCF design, construction, and operation; HLW immobilization technology development. 80 refs., 4 figs

  1. Introduction of HTR-PM Operation and Fuel Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fucheng; Luo Yong; Gao Qiang

    2014-01-01

    There is a big difference between High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Pebble-modules Demonstration Project(HTR-PM) and PWR in operation mode. HTR-PM is a continually refuelled reactor, and the operation and fuel management of it, which affect each other, are inseparable. Therefore, the analysis of HTR-PM fuel management needs to be carried out “in real time”. HTR-PM operation and fuel management system is developed for on-power refuelling mode of HTR-PM. The system, which calculates the core neutron flux and power distribution, taking high-temperature reactor physics analysis software-VSOP as a basic tool, can track and predict the core state online, and it has the ability to restructure core power distribution online, making use of ex-core detectors to correct and check tracking calculation. Based on the ability to track and predict, it can compute the core parameters to provide support for the operation of the reactor. It can also predict the operation parameters of the reactor to provide reference information for the fuel management.The contents of this paper include the development purposes, architecture, the main function modules, running process, and the idea of how to use the system to carry out HTR-PM fuel management. (author)

  2. Getting ready for final disposal in Finland - Independent verification of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarvainen, Matti; Honkamaa, Tapani; Martikka, Elina; Varjoranta, Tero; Hautamaeki, Johanna; Tiitta, Antero

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel has been known to be the solution for the back-end of the fuel cycle in Finland already for a long time. This has allowed the State system for accounting and control (SSAC) to prepare for the safeguards requirements in time. The Finnish SSAC includes the operator, the State authority STUK and the parties above them e.g. the Ministry for Trade and Industry. Undisputed responsibility of the safe disposal of spent fuel is on the operator. The role of the safety authority STUK. is to set up detailed requirements, to inspect the operator plans and by using different tools of a quality audit approach to verity that the requirements will be complied with in practice. Responsibility on the safeguards issues is similar with the addition of the role of the regional and the international verification organizations represented by Euratom and the IAEA, As the competent safeguards authority, STUK has decided to maintain its active role also in the future. This will be reflected in the future in the increasing cooperation between the SSAC and the IAEA in the new safeguards activities related to the Additional Protocol. The role of Euratom will remain the same concerning the implementation of conventional safeguards. Based on its SSAC role, STUK has continued carrying out safeguards inspections including independent verification measurements on spent fuel also after joining the EU and Euratom safeguards in 1995. Verification of the operator declared data is the key verification element of safeguards. This will remain to be the case also under the Integrated Safeguards (IS) in the future. It is believed that the importance of high quality measurements will rather increase than decrease when the frequency of interim inspections will decrease. Maintaining the continuity of knowledge makes sense only when the knowledge is reliable and independently verified. One of the corner stones of the high quality of the Finnish SSAC activities is

  3. Status of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.B.

    1985-10-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is in the fifth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The major objective of this phase of the program is to assess the basic safety and environmental aspects of the concept of isolating immobilized fuel waste by deep underground disposal in plutonic rock. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely immobilization studies, geoscience research, and environmental and safety assessment, are well established

  4. Interactive color graphics system for BWR fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    An interactive color graphics system has been developed by the General Electric Company for fuel management engineers. The system consists of a Hewlett-Packard color graphics workstation in communication with a host mainframe. The system aids in such tasks as fuel cycle optimization, refueling bundle shuffle and control blade sequence design. Since being installed in 1983 turn-around time for a typical cycle reload and control blade pattern design has been reduced by a factor of four

  5. Physics operating experience and fuel management of RAPS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakra, A.N.; Purandare, H.D.; Srinivasan, K.R.; Rastogi, B.P.

    1976-01-01

    Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit-1 achieved criticality on August 11, 1972. Thereafter the reactor was brought to power, in November, 1972. Due to non-availability of the depleted fuel, the loading of which was necessary to obtain full power to begin with, the core was loaded with all natural uranium fuel and only 70% of the full power could be achieved. During the reactor operation for the last three years, the reactor has seen more than one effective full power year and about 1400 fresh fuel bundles have been loaded in the core. The reactor was subjected to about 150 power cycles resulting in more than 30% variation in operating power level and about 10 fuel bundles have failed. For satisfactory fuel management and refuelling decisions, a three dimensional simulator TRIVENI was developed. This was extensively tested during the start-up experiments and was found to be a satisfactory tool for day to day operation of the plant. In this paper, a brief account of analysis of the start-up experiments, approach to full power, power distortions and flux peaking, fuel management service and analysis of the failed fuel data has been given. (author)

  6. LWR Spent Fuel Management for the Smooth Deployment of FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, T.; Yamashita, J.; Hoshino, K.; Sasahira, A.; Inoue, T.; Minato, K.; Sato, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fast breeder reactors (FBR) and FBR fuel cycle are indispensable to prevent the global warming and to secure the long-term energy supply. Commercial FBR expects to be deployed from around 2050 until around 2110 in Japan by the replacement of light water reactors (LWR) after their 60 years life. The FBR deployment needs Pu (MOX) from the LWR-spent fuel (SF) reprocessing. As Japan can posses little excess Pu, its balance control is necessary between LWR-SF management (reprocessing) and FBR deployment. The fuel cycle systems were investigated for the smooth FBR deployment and the effectiveness of proposed flexible system was clarified in this work. (author)

  7. Fuel management simulation for CANFLEX-RU in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Fuel management simulations have been performed for CANFLEX-09% RU fuel in the CANDU 6 reactor. In this study, the bi-directional 4-bundle shift fuelling scheme was assumed. The lattice cell and time-average calculation were carried out. The refuelling simulation calculations were performed for 600 full power days. Time-averaged results show good axial power profile with the CANFLEX-RU fuel. During the simulation period, the maximum channel and bundle power were maintained below the licensing limit of CANDU 6 reactor. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  8. Review of the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, S.R.

    1980-06-01

    Progress over the previous year in the nuclear fuel waste management program is reviewed. Universities, industry and consultants have become increasingly involved, and the work is being overseen by a Technical Advisory Committee. The program has also been investigated by Ontario's Porter Commission and Select Committe on Ontario Hydro Affairs. A public information program has been extended to cover most of the Canadian Shield region of Ontario. Ontario Hydro is studying spent fuel storage and transportation, while AECL is covering immobilization of spent fuel or processing wastes, geotechnical and geochemical research in the laboratory and in the field, design of disposal facilities, and environmental and safety assessments. (L.L.)

  9. Fuel management simulation for CANFLEX-RU in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    Fuel management simulations have been performed for CANFLEX-09% RU fuel in the CANDU 6 reactor. In this study, the bi-directional 4-bundle shift fuelling scheme was assumed. The lattice cell and time-average calculation were carried out. The refuelling simulation calculations were performed for 600 full power days. Time-averaged results show good axial power profile with the CANFLEX-RU fuel. During the simulation period, the maximum channel and bundle power were maintained below the licensing limit of CANDU 6 reactor. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  10. Management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The programme consists of the long-term and short-term programme, the continued bedrock investigations, the underground research laboratory, the decision-making procedure in the site selection process and information questions during the site selection process. The National Board for Spent Nuclear Fuel hereby subunits both the SKB's R and D Programme 86 and the Board's statement concerning the programme. Decisions in the matter have been made by the Board's executive committee. (DG)

  11. Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier; Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A.; Koch, Wolfgang; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Brucher, Wenzel; Steyskal, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO 2 , CeO 2 , plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively supported and

  12. Characterisation and final disposal behaviour of theoria-based fuel kernels in aqueous phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titov, M.

    2005-08-01

    Two high-temperature reactors (AVR and THTR) operated in Germany have produced about 1 million spent fuel elements. The nuclear fuel in these reactors consists mainly of thorium-uranium mixed oxides, but also pure uranium dioxide and carbide fuels were tested. One of the possible solutions of utilising spent HTR fuel is the direct disposal in deep geological formations. Under such circumstances, the properties of fuel kernels, and especially their leaching behaviour in aqueous phases, have to be investigated for safety assessments of the final repository. In the present work, unirradiated ThO 2 , (Th 0.906 ,U 0.094 )O 2 , (Th 0.834 ,U 0.166 )O 2 and UO 2 fuel kernels were investigated. The composition, crystal structure and surface of the kernels were investigated by traditional methods. Furthermore, a new method was developed for testing the mechanical properties of ceramic kernels. The method was successfully used for the examination of mechanical properties of oxide kernels and for monitoring their evolution during contact with aqueous phases. The leaching behaviour of thoria-based oxide kernels and powders was investigated in repository-relevant salt solutions, as well as in artificial leachates. The influence of different experimental parameters on the kernel leaching stability was investigated. It was shown that thoria-based fuel kernels possess high chemical stability and are indifferent to presence of oxidative and radiolytic species in solution. The dissolution rate of thoria-based materials is typically several orders of magnitude lower than of conventional UO 2 fuel kernels. The life time of a single intact (Th,U)O 2 kernel under aggressive conditions of salt repository was estimated as about hundred thousand years. The importance of grain boundary quality on the leaching stability was demonstrated. Numerical Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to explain the results of leaching experiments. (orig.)

  13. A fast-running fuel management program for a CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok

    2000-01-01

    A fast-running fuel management program for a CANDU reactor has been developed. The basic principle of this program is to select refueling channels such that the reference reactor conditions are maintained by applying several constraints and criteria when selecting refueling channels. The constraints used in this program are the channel and bundle power and the fuel burnup. The final selection of the refueling channel is determined based on the priority of candidate channels, which enhances the reactor power distribution close to the time-average model. The refueling simulation was performed for a natural uranium CANDU reactor and the results were satisfactory

  14. Spent fuel management in Japan - Facts and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses recent developments and future issues related to spent fuel management in Japan. With increasing pressure of spent fuel discharge from the power plants in operation and, in contrast, uncertainties in their processing and management services, spent fuel storage in short and medium terms has been receiving the highest priority in nuclear policy discussions in Japan. While small-scale interim storage devices, as well as capacity expansion (re-racking, etc.) and shared uses of existing devices, are introduced at number of power stations, large scale AFR (away from reactor) 'Storage of Recycle Fuel Resources' is expected to come in a medium and long-run. Commercial operation of 'Storage of Recycle Fuel Resources' is allowed its way, as the bill of amendment to the law for regulation of nuclear power reactors and other nuclear-related activities has passed in the Diet. In the meantime, the Atomic Energy Commission has launched working group discussions for revision of 'The Long-term Program of Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy' to be completed in 2000. This revision is hoped to set up a stage of national debate of nuclear policy, which might lead to fill conceptual gaps between bodies promoting nuclear development and general public. The author's attempt to illustrate the role of storage in spent fuel management is also presented from a theoretical point of view. (author)

  15. Management of spent fuel in Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pak, Hyun-Soo; Seo, In-Seok; Pak, Sang-Ki.

    1989-01-01

    At present in Republic of Korea, 8 PWR and 1 CANDU power plants are in operation or under construction, and the total capacity of power generation facilities has become 7.6 GWe. In addition, two PWRs of more than 900 MWe each are expected to be constructed by mid 1990s. More than 50 % of the electric power demand was supplied by nuclear power generation since 1987, but the spent fuel generated in nuclear power plants is stored in storage water tanks in respective reactor sites. The total capacity of spent fuel to be stored in the AR facilities of 9 nuclear power plants is about 2730 MTU, and the spent fuel released from these reactors since 1980 is about 810 MTU. The present capacity of AR storage pools seems to be used up by mid 1990s. According to the revised Atomic Energy Acts in May, 1986, the government is to take the responsibility of spent fuel management, and the policy of constructing the storage facilities outside reactor sites by the end of 1997 was established by the Atomic Energy Commission. The responsibility of the management of spent fuel that exceeds the present capacity of AR pools is to be taken by KEPCO, therefore the preliminary analysis of the feasible option on the extension of AR facilities and the comprehensive management plan for spent fuel placing emphasis on the research and development of away-from-reactor storage were decided. (Kako, I.)

  16. Effect of advanced fuel cycles on waste management policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavedon, J.M.; Haapalehto, T.

    2005-01-01

    The study aims at analysing a range of future fuel cycle options from the perspective of their impact on waste repository demand and specification. The study would focus on: Assessment of the characteristics of radioactive wastes arising from advanced nuclear fuel cycle options, repository performance analysis studies using source terms for waste arising from such advanced nuclear fuel cycles, identification of new options for waste management and disposal. Three families of fuel cycles having increasing recycling capabilities are assessed. Each cycle is composed of waste generating and management processes. Examples of waste generating processes are fuel factories (7 types) and reprocessing plants (7 types). Packaging and conditioning plants (7) and disposal facilities are examples of waste management processes. The characteristic of all these processes have been described and then total waste flows are summarised. In order to simplify the situation, three waste categories have been defined based on the IAEA definitions in order to emphasize the major effects of different types of waste. These categories are: short-life waste for surface or sub-surface disposal, long-life low heat producing waste for geological disposal, high-level waste for geological disposal. The feasibilities of the fuel cycles are compared in terms of economics, primary resource consumption and amount of waste generated. The effect of high-level waste composition for the repository performance is one of the tools in these comparisons. The results of this will be published as an NEA publication before the end of 2005. (authors)

  17. Mutual influences of reactor operation and fuel cycle management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewiner, C.; Schaerer, R.

    1989-01-01

    OPEN (Organisation des Producteurs d'Energie Nucleaire) comprises the electricity producers from seven European countries which now operate or intend to operate nuclear power plants. Its activities include the study of technical, economic and legal subjects related to nuclear electricity. A continuous analysis of the fuel cycle market has been pursued within OPEN for almost 15 years. For the past few years, OPEN has also been concerned with the subject of fuel management in the reactors operated by its members. The purpose of this effort was to obtain an overall picture of possible fuel improvements and to evaluate the effects, in particular the economic ones, of diverse fuel reload managements and of reprocessed uranium and plutonium recycling. The conclusions of this study are as follows: Increase in burn-ups produces notable savings in electricity generating costs. It also permits adaptation of fuel loading mode to the desirable irradiation campaign length. This allows for better management of the country's overall means of electricity generation (nuclear, fossil-fuelled or hydro plants), and adjustment to the electrical demand. These new reload schemes have various impacts on natural uranium consumption and enrichment, but, above all, they affect directly all fuel cycle operations linked to the number of assemblies (fabrication, reprocessing, etc.). 6 figs

  18. Position paper on irradiated fuel and waste management. The Achille's heel of the nuclear industry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    The management and final disposal of irradiated fuel and nuclear waste is often presented by the media and perceived by the public as being an unsolved problem that restricts the future of nuclear energy. However, the nuclear industry focused on this problem very early on and has developed proven technical solutions. Nuclear energy will continue developing worldwide, in spite of the Fukushima accident. Even in those European countries that have decided to phase-out nuclear energy there is a legacy of nuclear waste that must be dealt with. The scientific and technical expertise needed for waste management already exists. Management decisions must be taken. Now is the time for political courage. (orig.)

  19. Considerations Regarding ROK Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, Chaim; Forrest, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss spent fuel management options in the Republic of Korea (ROK) from two interrelated perspectives: Centralized dry cask storage and spent fuel pyroprocessing and burning in sodium fast reactors (SFRs). We argue that the ROK will run out of space for at-reactors spent fuel storage by about the year 2030 and will thus need to transition centralized dry cask storage. Pyroprocessing plant capacity, even if approved and successfully licensed and constructed by that time, will not suffice to handle all the spent fuel discharged annually. Hence centralized dry cask storage will be required even if the pyroprocessing option is successfully developed by 2030. Pyroprocessing is but an enabling technology on the path leading to fissile material recycling and burning in future SFRs. In this regard we discuss two SFR options under development in the U. S.: the Super Prism and the Travelling Wave Reactor (TWR). We note that the U. S. is further along in reactor development than the ROK. The ROK though has acquired more experience, recently in investigating fuel recycling options for SFRs. We thus call for two complementary joint R and D project to be conducted by U. S. and ROK scientists. One leading to the development of a demonstration centralized away-from-reactors spent fuel storage facility. The other involve further R and D on a combined SFR-fuel cycle complex based on the reactor and fuel cycle options discussed in the paper

  20. An assessment of the use of tires as an alternative fuel : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegg, M.J.; Amyotte, P.R.; Fels, M.; Cumming, C.R.R.; Poushay, J.C. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, NS (Canada). Dept. of Process Engineering and Applied Science

    2007-04-15

    This study examined the benefits of using scrap tires as tire-derived fuel (TDF) in industrial applications. The study was comprised of a literature review of emissions from TDF in cement plants; risk management frameworks for TDF applications; and a review of potential applications. The aim of the study was to consider a program for recycling waste tires in the province of Nova Scotia. In Canada, approximately 20 per cent of waste tires are used as TDF. The majority of TDF in Canada is used as a supplemental fuel in cement kilns. The fuel now has a number of potential industrial applications within the province of Nova Scotia in the pulp and paper industry as well as in generating stations. A review of reported emissions showed decreases in nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) when tires were used as a supplementary fuel in industrial applications. However, carbon monoxide (CO) levels are typically higher when TDF fuels are used. Emission levels of dioxins and furans show wide variability. The study provided recommendations for future studies on dioxin and furan emissions, as well as a comprehensive testing program at a cement plant to determine stack emissions and off-site ground pollutant concentrations. Dispersion modelling and risk management assessments were also recommended. 59 refs., 19 tabs., 15 figs.

  1. An assessment of the use of tires as an alternative fuel : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegg, M.J.; Amyotte, P.R.; Fels, M.; Cumming, C.R.R.; Poushay, J.C.

    2007-04-01

    This study examined the benefits of using scrap tires as tire-derived fuel (TDF) in industrial applications. The study was comprised of a literature review of emissions from TDF in cement plants; risk management frameworks for TDF applications; and a review of potential applications. The aim of the study was to consider a program for recycling waste tires in the province of Nova Scotia. In Canada, approximately 20 per cent of waste tires are used as TDF. The majority of TDF in Canada is used as a supplemental fuel in cement kilns. The fuel now has a number of potential industrial applications within the province of Nova Scotia in the pulp and paper industry as well as in generating stations. A review of reported emissions showed decreases in nitrogen oxides (NO x ) when tires were used as a supplementary fuel in industrial applications. However, carbon monoxide (CO) levels are typically higher when TDF fuels are used. Emission levels of dioxins and furans show wide variability. The study provided recommendations for future studies on dioxin and furan emissions, as well as a comprehensive testing program at a cement plant to determine stack emissions and off-site ground pollutant concentrations. Dispersion modelling and risk management assessments were also recommended. 59 refs., 19 tabs., 15 figs

  2. NUFACTS-nuclear fuel cycle activity simulator: reference manual. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplett, M.B.; Waddell, J.D.; Breese, T.A.

    1978-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Activity Simulator (NUFACTS) is a package of FORTRAN subroutines which facilitate the simulation of a diversity of nuclear power growth scenarios. An approach to modeling the nuclear fuel cycle has been developed that is highly adaptive and capable of addressing a variety of problems. Being a simulation model rather than an optimization model, NUFACTS mimics the events and processes that are characteristic of the nuclear fuel cycle. This approach enables the model user to grasp the modeling approach rather quickly. Within this report descriptions of the model and its components are provided with several emphases. First, a discussion of modeling approach and basic assumptions is provided. Next, instructions are provided for generating data, inputting the data properly, and running the code. Finally, detailed descriptions of individual program element are given as an aid to modifying and extending the present capabilities

  3. Situation and perspective of spent fuel management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Garcia, A.

    2009-01-01

    Between september 2006 and september 2007, the Foundation for Energy Studies carried out the study Radioactive Waste Management: Situation, Analysis and Perspectives. This study focuses specially on spent fuel and high level radioactive waste management. The different aspects covered in this study are as follows: -Description of the different applicable technologies -Analysis and comparison of the different options of spent fuel management, including the strategic and economic aspects. - Situation, strategies and forecasts in the main countries. -Analysis of the situation and alternatives for the spent fuel management in spain. Although the report focuses principally pn the technological and environmental aspects other issues related with the management of these materials were considered, such as the strategic, economic and institutional aspects as well as the social acceptation. In answer to the request of the SNE publication, the article enclosed is a summary of one of the chapters of this study, and more particularly the one dedicated to the situation of spent fuel and high level radioactive waste management in Spain. (Author)

  4. Engineering study: 105KE to 105KW Basin fuel and sludge transfer. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gant, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    In the last five years, there have been three periods at the 105KE fuel storage basin (KE Basin) where the reported drawdown test rates were in excess of 25 gph. Drawdown rates in excess of this amount have been used during past operations as the primary indicators of leaks in the basin. The latest leak occurred in March, 1993. The reported water loss from the KE Basin was estimated at 25 gph. This engineering study was performed to identify and recommend the most feasible and practical method of transferring canisters of irradiated fuel and basin sludge from the KE Basin to the 105KW fuel storage basin (KW Basin). Six alternatives were identified during the performance of this study as possible methods for transferring the fuel and sludge from the KE Basin to the KW Basin. These methods were then assessed with regard to operations, safety, radiation exposure, packaging, environmental concerns, waste management, cost, and schedule; and the most feasible and practical methods of transfer were identified. The methods examined in detail in this study were based on shipment without cooling water except where noted: Transfer by rail using the previously used transfer system and water cooling; Transfer by rail using the previously used transfer system (without water cooling); Transfer by truck using the K Area fuel transfer cask (K Area cask); Transfer by truck using a DOE shipping cask; Transfer by truck using a commercial shipping cask; and Transfer by truck using a new fuel shipping cask

  5. Nuclear plant life cycle management implementation guide. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliter, G.E.; Negin, C.A.

    1998-11-01

    Nuclear power plants, as baseload suppliers of electricity, are major corporate assets. As the nuclear industry enters its fourth decade as a major producer of clean electricity, the structure of the utility industry is undergoing a historical landmark transition from economic deregulation to a competitive, market-driven industry. An integral part of competition is to manage the operation of the key asset, the plant, in the long term, thereby enhancing its long-term profitability. Life cycle management (LCM) is a well-known technical-economic decision-making process for any large industrial facility. LCM optimizes the service life of a facility and maximizes its life-cycle asset value. LCM integrates aging management (maintaining the availability of costly-to-replace components and structures) with asset management (plant valuation and investment strategies that account for economic, performance, regulatory, and environmental uncertainties). LCM involves predicting maintenance, repair, and other capital costs for a nuclear unit far into the future, as well as planning and managing strategic issues such as waste disposal, fuel storage, decommissioning, and public acceptance. This Life Cycle Management Implementation Guide introduces the reader to the LCM concept and its benefits, describes the elements and activities associated with an LCM program (most of which already exist in all plants), gives an overview of asset and aging management, and provides key references related to life cycle management for nuclear power plants. It also summarizes the major elements of life cycle management required for license renewal or, for newer plants, keeping open the option of license renewal

  6. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Configuration Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a rewrite of the draft ''C'' that was agreed to ''in principle'' by SNF Project level 2 managers on EDT 609835, dated March 1995 (not released). The implementation process philosphy was changed in keeping with the ongoing reengineering of the WHC Controlled Manuals to achieve configuration management within the SNF Project

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Document Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, M.D.; Harizison, G.L.; Rice, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    The SNF Project Document Management Plan identifies and describes the currently available systems and processes for implementing and maintaining an effective document control and records management program. This program governs the methods by which documents are generated, released, distributed, maintained current, retired, and ultimately disposed

  8. Long Term Management of Spent Fuel from NEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kegel, L.; Zeleznik, N.; Lokner, V.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 Slovenian national agency for radioactive waste management ARAO started together with Croatian sister organization APO elaboration of a new revision of Decommissioning, Radioactive waste and Spent fuel management program for NPP Krsko. In scope of this work also new studies for spent fuel storage and disposal were prepared in which technical solutions were analyzed and proposed for specific spent fuel (SF) from NPP Krsko. Time schedules for main activities of SF disposal development were elaborated for two alternative scenarios which correspond to normal NPP Krsko operation and 20 - year lifetime extension. All technical activities were financially assessed and costs estimates of SF storage and geological disposal development provided. The prepared studies were verified by international experts in order to confirm the correctness of technical inputs, proposed solutions, time schedules of activities and costs evaluations. The calculated nominal and discounted costs of spent fuel management served for the recalculation of annuities in the integral scenarios of interrelated activities on NPP Krsko decommissioning, LILW and SF management. Besides new first proposal of long-term management of spent fuel from NPP Krsko the joint work also opened additional questions. One of this is time schedule of proposed activities for long term SF management - what were the criteria used in the determination of actions and are they optimal for both countries. How the process of site selection for SF storage or disposal should be prepared having in mind that it will bring many questions in both countries? Is direct disposal of SF still the best solution in current development of nuclear prospects? The paper will present the current development and solutions for SF management from NPP Krsko and will try to answer questions which need to be solved and future development in the SF management.(author).

  9. Savannah River Site FY 1998 Spent Nuclear Fuel Interim Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    This document has been prepared to present in one place the near and long-term plans for safe management of Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel inventories until final disposition has been identified and implemented. The activities described are consistent with FY 1998 Annual Operational Plan guidance and with the December 1997 SRS Accelerated Cleanup Plan update. Summarized are highlights, key decision dates, and baseline assumptions of this plan

  10. Long term fuel price elasticity: effects on mobility tool ownership and residential location choice - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erath, A.; Axhausen, K. W.

    2010-04-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) examines the long-term effects of fuel price elasticity. The study analyses how mobility tool usage and ownership as well as residence location choice are affected by rising fuel costs. Based on econometric models, long-term fuel price elasticity is derived. The authors quote that the demand reactions to higher fuel prices mainly observed are the reduction of mileage and the consideration of smaller-engined and diesel-driven cars. As cars with natural gas powered engines and electric drives were hardly considered in the survey, the results of the natural gas model can, according to the authors, only serve as a trend. No stable model could be estimated for the demand and usage of electric cars. A literature overview is presented and the design of the survey is discussed, whereby socio-demographical variables and the effects of price and residence changes are discussed. Modelling of mobility tool factors and results obtained are looked at. Finally, residence choice factors are modelled and discussed. Several appendices complete the report.

  11. CRACKEL: a computer code for CFR fuel management calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burstall, R.F.; Ball, M.A.; Thornton, D.E.J.

    1975-12-01

    The CRACKLE computer code is designed to perform rapid fuel management surveys of CFR systems. The code calculates overall features such as reactivity, power distributions and breeding gain, and also calculates for each sub-assembly plutonium content and power output. A number of alternative options are built into the code, in order to permit different fuel management strategies to be calculated, and to perform more detailed calculations when necessary. A brief description is given of the methods of calculation, and the input facilities of CRACKLE, with examples. (author)

  12. Program summary. Nuclear waste management and fuel cycle programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This Program Summary Document describes the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Programs. Particular emphasis is given to near-term, specifically Fiscal Year (FY) 1982, activities. The overall objective of these programs will be achieved by the demonstration of: (1) safe radioactive waste management practices for storage and disposal of high-level waste and (2) advanced technologies necessary to close the nuclear fuel cycle on a schedule which would assure a healthy future for the development of nuclear power in this country

  13. Overview of the spent fuel management policy in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, Jussi

    1985-01-01

    The basic factors affecting the spent fuel management policy are highlighted: small size of the nuclear programme in the worldwide scale, no recycling of plutonium envisaged, no governmental organizations for back-end operations foreseen. The prinsiple objective of the policy permanent disposal of high-level wastes irrevocably outside the domestic territory, and the limited success in its implementation are discussed. The preparations of the implementation of the back-up alternative, direct disposal of spent fuel in the Finnish bedrock are described. The basic philosophy behind the system of funding the future waste management costs is clarified. (author)

  14. Research reactor utilization, safety, decommissioning, fuel and waste management. Posters of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    self assessments. Current developments in research reactor design criteria. Calculation methods and codes. Regulatory aspects and experience with current research reactor issues. Quality assurance programmes during the various stages of a reactor life. Training and qualification of reactor operating personnel and regulators. Modifications in operating procedures and training and qualification. In-service and special inspections with respect to ageing. c) Fuel cycle issues covering new high-density fuel development. Fuel fabrication and performance. Fuel qualification programmes. Core conversion. Fuel management (including spent fuel storage). Spent fuel transportation. Final disposition. d) Reactor Decommissioning including Preliminary decommissioning planning (long term). Creation of data base for decommissioning (e.g. during refurbishment). Final decommissioning planning. Extensive research and development activities associated with decommissioning of research reactors. On-going/recently completed research reactor decommissioning projects. e) Waste management (operational waste management) and decommissioning waste management

  15. Sensitivity of nuclear fuel-cycle cost to uncertainties in nuclear data. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.; Harris, D.R.

    1980-11-01

    An improved capability for assessing the economic implications of uncertainties in nuclear data and methods on the power reactor fuel cycle was developed. This capability is applied to the sensitivity analysis of fuel-cycle cost with respect to changes in nuclear data and related computational methods. Broad group sensitivities for both a typical BWR and a PWR are determined under the assumption of a throwaway fuel cycle as well as for a scenario under which reprocessing is allowed. Particularly large dollar implications are found for the thermal and resonance cross sections of fissile and fertile materials. Sensitivities for the throwaway case are found to be significantly larger than for the recycle case. Constrained sensitivities obtained for cases in which information from critical experiments or other benchmarks is used in the design calculation to adjust a parameter such as anti ν are compared with unconstrained sensitivities. Sensitivities of various alternate fuel cycles were examined. These included the extended-burnup (18-month) LWR cycle, the mixed-oxide (plutonium) cycle, uranium-thorium and denatured uranium-thorium cycles, as well as CANDU-type reactor cycles. The importance of the thermal capture and fission cross sections of 239 Pu is shown to be very large in all cases. Detailed, energy dependent sensitivity profiles are provided for the thermal range (below 1.855 eV). Finally, sensitivity coefficients are combined with data uncertainties to determine the impact of such uncertainties on fuel-cycle cost parameters

  16. Japan's spent fuel and plutonium management challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuta, Tadahiro; Suzuki, Tatsujiro

    2011-01-01

    Japan's commitment to plutonium recycling has been explicitly stated in its long-term program since 1956. Despite the clear cost disadvantage compared with direct disposal or storage of spent fuel, the Rokkasho reprocessing plant started active testing in 2006. Japan's cumulative consumption of plutonium has been only 5 tons to date and its future consumption rate is still uncertain. But once the Rokkasho reprocessing plant starts its full operation, Japan will separate about 8 tons of plutonium annually. Our analysis shows that, with optimum use of available at-reactor and away-from-reactor storage capacity, there would be no need for reprocessing until the mid-2020s. With an additional 30,000 tons of away-from-reactor (AFR) spent-fuel storage capacity reprocessing could be avoided until 2050. Deferring operation of the Rokkasho plant, at least until the plutonium stockpile had been worked down to the minimum required level, would also minimize international concern about Japan's plutonium stockpile. The authors are happy to acknowledge Frank von Hippel, Harold Feiveson, Jungming Kang, Zia Mian, M.V. Ramana, and other IPFM members, as well as the generous grant from the MacArthur Foundation for helping make this research possible.

  17. Analysis of fuel management in the KIPT neutron source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong Zhaopeng, E-mail: zzhong@anl.gov [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Fuel management of KIPT ADS was analyzed. > Core arrangement was shuffled in stage wise. > New fuel assemblies was added into core periodically. > Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life. - Abstract: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility consisting of an electron accelerator driven sub-critical assembly. The neutron source driving the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The sub-critical assembly surrounding the target is fueled with low enriched WWR-M2 type hexagonal fuel assemblies. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel material is <20%. The facility will be utilized for basic and applied research, producing medical isotopes, and training young specialists. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is {approx}360 kW including the fission power of {approx}260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products continuously reduce the system reactivity during the operation, decrease the neutron flux level, and consequently impact the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, the fuel assemblies should be added and shuffled for compensating the lost reactivity caused by burnup. Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life time in the sub-critical core. This paper studies the fuel cycles and shuffling schemes of the fuel assemblies of the sub-critical assembly to preserve the system reactivity and the neutron flux level during the operation.

  18. Analysis of fuel management in the KIPT neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Zhaopeng; Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Fuel management of KIPT ADS was analyzed. → Core arrangement was shuffled in stage wise. → New fuel assemblies was added into core periodically. → Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life. - Abstract: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility consisting of an electron accelerator driven sub-critical assembly. The neutron source driving the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The sub-critical assembly surrounding the target is fueled with low enriched WWR-M2 type hexagonal fuel assemblies. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel material is <20%. The facility will be utilized for basic and applied research, producing medical isotopes, and training young specialists. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is ∼360 kW including the fission power of ∼260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products continuously reduce the system reactivity during the operation, decrease the neutron flux level, and consequently impact the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, the fuel assemblies should be added and shuffled for compensating the lost reactivity caused by burnup. Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life time in the sub-critical core. This paper studies the fuel cycles and shuffling schemes of the fuel assemblies of the sub-critical assembly to preserve the system reactivity and the neutron flux level during the operation.

  19. Addressing ethical considerations about nuclear fuel waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greber, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Ethical considerations will be important in making decisions about the long-term management of nuclear fuel waste. Public discussions of nuclear fuel waste management are dominated by questions related to values, fairness, rights and responsibilities. To address public concerns, it is important to demonstrate that ethical responsibilities associated with the current management of the waste are being fulfilled. It is also important to show that our responsibilities to future generations can be met, and that ethical principles will be applied to the implementation of disposal. Canada's nuclear fuel waste disposal concept, as put forward in an Environmental Impact Statement by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), is currently under public review by a Federal Environmental Assessment Panel. Following this review, recommendations will be made about the direction that Canada should take for the long-term management of this waste. This paper discusses the ethical principles that are seen to apply to geological disposal and illustrates how the Canadian approach to nuclear fuel waste management can meet the challenge of fulfilling these responsibilities. The author suggests that our ethical responsibilities require that adaptable technologies to site, design, construct, operate decommission and close disposal facilities should de developed. We cannot, and should not, present future generations from exercising control over what they inherit, nor control whether they modify or even reverse today's decisions if that is what they deem to be the right thing to do. (author)

  20. Centralized disassembly and packaging of spent fuel in the DOE spent fuel management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    In October 1984, E.R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) initiated a study of the prospective use of a centralized facility for the disassembly and packaging of spent fuel to support the various elements of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) spent fuel management system, including facilities for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and repositories. It was DOE's original plan to receive spent fuel at each repository where it would be disassembled and packaged (overpacked) for disposal purposes. Subsequently, DOE considered the prospective use of MRS of spent fuel as an option for providing safe and reliable management of spent fuel. This study was designed to consider possible advantages of the use of centralized facilities for disassembly and packaging of spent fuel at whose location storage facilities could be added as required. The study was divided into three principal technical tasks that covered: (a) development of requirements and criteria for the central disassembly and packaging facility and associated systems. (2) Development of conceptual designs for the central disassembly and packaging facility and associated systems. (3) Estimation of capital and operating costs involved for all system facilities and determination of life cycle costs for various scenarios of operation - for comparison with the reference system

  1. Issues related to EM management of DOE spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, D.G.; Abashian, M.S.; Chakraborti, S.; Roberson, K.; Meloin, J.M.

    1993-07-01

    This document is a summary of the important issues involved in managing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). Issues related to civilian SNF activities are not discussed. DOE-owned SNF is stored primarily at the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River Site (SRS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and West Valley Demonstration Project. Smaller quantities of SNF are stored at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There is a wide variety of fuel types, including both low and high enrichment fuels from weapons production, DOE reactors, research and development programs, naval programs, and universities. Most fuel is stored in pools associated with reactor or reprocessing facilities. Smaller quantities are in dry storage. Physical conditions of the fuel range from excellent to poor or severely damaged. An issue is defined as an important question that must be answered or decision that must be made on a topic or subject relevant to achieving the complimentary objectives of (a) storing SNF in compliance with applicable regulations and orders until it can be disposed, and (b) safely disposing of DOE's SNF. The purpose of this document is to define the issues; no recommendations are made on resolutions. As DOE's national SNF management program is implemented, a system of issues identification, documentation, tracking, and resolution will be implemented. This document is an initial effort at issues identification. The first section of this document is an overview of issues that are common to several or all DOE facilities that manage SNF. The common issues are organized according to specific aspects of spent fuel management. This is followed by discussions of management issues that apply specifically to individual DOE facilities. The last section provides literature references

  2. Fuel Behaviour in Transport after Dry Storage: a Key Issue for the Management of used Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issard, Herve

    2014-01-01

    Interim used fuel dry storage has been developed in many countries providing an intermediate solution while waiting for evaluation and decisions concerning future use (such as recycling) or disposal sites. There is an important industrial experience feedback and excellent safety records. It appears that the duration of interim storage may become longer than initially expected. At the start of storage operations 40 years was considered sufficiently long to make a decision on either recycling or direct disposal of used nuclear fuel. Now it is said that storage time may have to be extended. Whatever the choice for the management of used fuel, it will finally have to be transported from the storage facility to another location, for recycling or final disposal. Bearing in mind the important principle that radioactive waste shall be managed in such a way that undue burdens will not be imposed on future generations, there is no guarantee that the fuel characteristics can be maintained in perpetuity. On the other hand, transport accident conditions from applicable regulation (IAEA SSR-6) are very severe for irradiated materials. Therefore, in compliance with transport regulations, the safety analysis of the fuel in transport after storage is mandatory. This paper will give an overview of the current situation related to the used fuel behaviour in transport after dry storage. On this matter there are some elements of information already available as well as some gaps of knowledge. Several national R and D programs and international teams are presently addressing these gaps. A lot of R and D work has already been done. An objective of these R and D projects is to aid decision makers. It is important to fix a limit and not to multiply intermediate operations because it means higher costs and more uncertainties. The identified gaps concern the following issues especially for high burn-up (HBU) fuels: thermal model for casks, degradation process of fuel material, cladding creep

  3. Publicly administrated nuclear waste management research programme 1994-1996. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuori, S. [ed.] [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    The main objective of the JYT-programme has been to provide the authorities with independent information and research results relevant for the safety of nuclear waste management. The main emphasis in this research programme has been devoted to the final disposal of spent fuel. The whole area of the research programme has been subdivided into following main topic areas: (1) bedrock structure and stability, rock investigation methods and characteristics and flow of ground water, (2) release of radionuclides from a repository and subsequent transport in the bedrock, (3) performance and safety assessment of repositories and other phases of nuclear waste management, (4) natural analogue studies, (5) waste management technology and costs and (6) socio political and other societal issues and environmental impact assessment.

  4. Publicly administrated nuclear waste management research programme 1994-1996. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1997-09-01

    The main objective of the JYT-programme has been to provide the authorities with independent information and research results relevant for the safety of nuclear waste management. The main emphasis in this research programme has been devoted to the final disposal of spent fuel. The whole area of the research programme has been subdivided into following main topic areas: (1) bedrock structure and stability, rock investigation methods and characteristics and flow of ground water, (2) release of radionuclides from a repository and subsequent transport in the bedrock, (3) performance and safety assessment of repositories and other phases of nuclear waste management, (4) natural analogue studies, (5) waste management technology and costs and (6) socio political and other societal issues and environmental impact assessment

  5. Recommendations for the nuclear fuel management in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega C, R.F.

    2003-01-01

    In this work some observations about the economic and strategic importance of the nuclear fuel management of a nucleo electric power station are presented, especially of the fuel management outside of the reactor core or supply function. We know that the economic competitiveness of the nucleo electric generation in fact resides in its low cost of fuel, in comparison with other alternative energy generation sources. Notwithstanding, frequently it is not given to this function the importance that should to have. The objective of this work is to focus again the mission of this activity, at view of the evolution and the peculiarities of the international markets of the nuclear fuel cycle. Equally a brief exhibition of the markets is made, from the uranium supply until the post- irradiation phase. In the case of the pre-irradiation phase we are in front of a market that the buyers dominate and that seemingly it will not present bigger problems in the next years, however situations exist like the decrease of the existent uranium inventories and the lack opening of new mines that can change the panorama. In relation with the post-irradiation phase, is necessary to study the strategies followed by other countries as the one uranium and plutonium recycled. As I have observed that the reality of that this passing in these markets and the practice of the fuel management, sometimes do not go of the hand, I have looked for to contribute some ideas and suggestions, on as going adapting this important function. (Author)

  6. Spent fuel management in China: Current status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the development of nuclear power in China, its status of operating nuclear power plants and progress of on-going NPP projects are described. With the arising of spent fuel from NPPs, a national policy of a closed nuclear fuel cycle has been determined. Following storage at reactor sites for at least 5 years (generally maximum 10 years), spent fuel will be transferred to an away-from-reactor pool type centralized storage facility. Adjacent to the storage facility, a multi-purpose reprocessing pilot plant will be set up by the end of this century. An industrial scale reprocessing plant would be succeeded around the year 2020. China's spent fuel management activities include at-reactor storage, transportation, away-from-reactor storage and reprocessing. Relatively detailed description of the work done up to now on spent fuel management and plans for the future are described. It should be noted that activities related to the management of high level radioactive waste are not included here. (author)

  7. Development of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Management Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Colozza, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA Exploration program. The passive thermal management system relies on heat conduction within highly thermally conductive cooling plates to move the heat from the central portion of the cell stack out to the edges of the fuel cell stack. Using the passive approach eliminates the need for a coolant pump and other cooling loop components within the fuel cell system which reduces mass and improves overall system reliability. Previous development demonstrated the performance of suitable highly thermally conductive cooling plates that could conduct the heat, provide a sufficiently uniform temperature heat sink for each cell of the fuel cell stack, and be substantially lighter than the conventional thermal management approach. Tests were run with different materials to evaluate the design approach to a heat exchanger that could interface with the edges of the passive cooling plates. Measurements were made during fuel cell operation to determine the temperature of individual cooling plates and also to determine the temperature uniformity from one cooling plate to another.

  8. Optimization of in-core fuel management and control rod strategy in equilibrium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1975-01-01

    An in-core fuel management problem is formulated for the equilibrium fuel cycle in an N-region nuclear reactor model. The formulation shows that the infinite multiplication factor k infinity requisite for newly charged fuel can be separated into two terms - one corresponding to the average k infinity at the end of the cycle and the other representing the direct contribution of the shuffling scheme and control rod programming. This formulation is applied to a three-region cylindrical reactor to obtain simultaneous optimization of shuffling and control rod programming. It is demonstrated that this formulation aids greatly in gaining a better understanding of the effects of changes in the shuffling scheme and control rod programming on equilibrium fuel cycle performance. (auth.)

  9. Safety aspects of dry spent fuel storage and spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botsch, W.; Smalian, S.; Hinterding, P.; Voelzke, H.; Wolff, D.; Kasparek, E.

    2014-01-01

    The storage of spent nuclear fuel (SF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) must conform to safety requirements. Safety aspects like safe enclosure of radioactive materials, safe removal of decay heat, nuclear criticality safety and avoidance of unnecessary radiation exposure must be achieved throughout the storage period. The implementation of these safety requirements can be achieved by dry storage of SF and HLW in casks as well as in other systems such as dry vault storage systems or spent fuel pools, where the latter is neither a dry nor a passive system. In Germany dual purpose casks for SF or HLW are used for safe transportation and interim storage. TUV and BAM, who work as independent experts for the competent authorities, present the storage licensing process including sites and casks and inform about spent nuclear fuel management and issues concerning dry storage of spent nuclear fuel, based on their long experience in these fields (authors)

  10. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormuth, K.W.; Nuttall, K.

    1987-01-01

    Canada has established an extensive research program to develop and demonstrate the technology for safely disposing of nuclear fuel waste from Canadian nuclear electric generating stations. The program focuses on the concept of disposal deep in plutonic rock, which is abundant in the province of Ontario, Canada's major producer of nuclear electricity. Research is carried out at field research areas in the Canadian Precambrian Shield, and in government and university laboratories. The schedule calls for a document assessing the disposal concept to be submitted to regulatory and environmental agencies in late 1988. This document will form the basis for a review of the concept by these agencies and by the public. No site selection will be carried out before this review is completed. 10 refs.; 2 figs

  11. Material control in nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Part I. Fuel descriptions and fabrication processes, P.O. 1236909 Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgonovi, G.M.; McCartin, T.J.; Miller, C.L.

    1978-12-01

    The report presents information on foreign nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Fuel descriptions and fuel fabrication information for three basic reactor types are presented: The information presented for LWRs assumes that Pu--U Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) will be used as fuel

  12. Influence of the poison management in the optimization of the fuel management in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Ipojuca, T. da.

    1981-03-01

    The global optimum fuel and poison management policy was determined by the method of Dynamic Programming. A 620 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor similar to Angra I was studied. The reactor core was divided into three regions of equal volume surrounded by a reflector. Two fuel shuffling schemes and three poison management schemes were simultaneously employed, and fifteen consecutive stages were studied. When uniform poisoning was permitted in all the three regions the out-in scheme of fuel shuffling was the best scheme along the cycles. For the first stages the poison management reduces the generated energy cost, but this reduction gets smaller along the cycles. (Author) [pt

  13. Fuel management for TRIGA reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totenbier, R.E.; Levine, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    One responsibility of the Supervisor of Reactor Operations is to follow the TRIGA core depletion and recommend core loading changes for refueling and special experiments. Calculations required to analyze such changes normally use digital computers and are extremely difficult to perform for one who is not familiar with computer language and nuclear reactor diffusion theory codes. The TRICOM/SCRAM program developed to perform such calculations for the Penn State TRIGA Breazeale Reactor (PSBR), has a very simple input format and is one which can be used by persons having no knowledge of computer codes. The person running the program need not understand computer language such as Fortran, but should be familiar with reactor core geometry and effects of loading changes. To further simplify the input requirements but still allow for all of the studies normally needed by the reactor operations supervisor, the options required for input have been isolated to two. Given a master deck of computer cards one needs to change only three cards; a title card, core energy history information card and one with core changes. With this input, the program can provide individual fuel element burn-up for a given period of operation and the k eff of the core. If a new loading is desired, a new master deck containing the changes is also automatically provided. The life of a new core loading can be estimated by feeding in projected core burn-up factors and observing the resulting loss in individual fuel elements. The code input and output formats have now been made sufficiently convenient and informative as to be incorporated into a standard activity for the Reactor Operations Supervisor. (author)

  14. A database system for enhancing fuel records management capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieke, Phil; Razvi, Junaid

    1994-01-01

    The need to modernize the system of managing a large variety of fuel related data at the TRIGA Reactors Facility at General Atomics, as well as the need to improve NRC nuclear material reporting requirements, prompted the development of a database to cover all aspects of fuel records management. The TRIGA Fuel Database replaces (a) an index card system used for recording fuel movements, (b) hand calculations for uranium burnup, and (c) a somewhat aged and cumbersome system of recording fuel inspection results. It was developed using Microsoft Access, a relational database system for Windows. Instead of relying on various sources for element information, users may now review individual element statistics, record inspection results, calculate element burnup and more, all from within a single application. Taking full advantage of the ease-of-use features designed in to Windows and Access, the user can enter and extract information easily through a number of customized on screen forms, with a wide variety of reporting options available. All forms are accessed through a main 'Options' screen, with the options broken down by categories, including 'Elements', 'Special Elements/Devices', 'Control Rods' and 'Areas'. Relational integrity and data validation rules are enforced to assist in ensuring accurate and meaningful data is entered. Among other items, the database lets the user define: element types (such as FLIP or standard) and subtypes (such as fuel follower, instrumented, etc.), various inspection codes for standardizing inspection results, areas within the facility where elements are located, and the power factors associated with element positions within a reactor. Using fuel moves, power history, power factors and element types, the database tracks uranium burnup and plutonium buildup on a quarterly basis. The Fuel Database was designed with end-users in mind and does not force an operations oriented user to learn any programming or relational database theory in

  15. Generic waste management concepts for six LWR fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePue, J.D.

    1979-04-01

    This report supplements the treatment of waste management issues provided in the Generic Environmental Statement on the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel in light water cooled reactors (GESMO, NUREG-0002). Three recycle and three no-recycle options are described in this document. Management of the radioactive wastes that would result from implementation of either type of fuel cycle alternative is discussed. For five of the six options, wastes would be placed in deep geologic salt repositories for which thermal criteria are considered. Radiation doses to the workers at the repositories and to the general population are discussed. The report also covers the waste management schedule, the land and salt commitments, and the economic costs for the management of wastes generated

  16. ETRR-2 in-core fuel management strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.Y.; Amin, Esmat; Belal, M.G.

    2005-01-01

    The Egypt second research reactor has many irradiation channels, beam tubes and irradiation boxes, inside and outside the reactor core. The core reload configuration has great effect on the core performance and fluxes in the irradiation channels. This paper deals with the design and safety analysis that were performed for the determination of ETRR2 in-core fuel management strategy which fulfills neutronic design criteria, safety reactor operation, utility optimization and achieve the overall fuel management criteria. The core is divided into 8 zones, in order to obtain the minimum and adjacent fuel movement scheme that is recommended from the operational point of view. Then a search for the initial core using backward iteration, one get different initial cores, one initial core would assume the equilibrium core after 250 full power days of operation, while the other assumes equilibrium after 199 full power days, and shows a better performance of power peaking factor. (author)

  17. Nuclear fuel cycle reprocessing and waste management technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    In this address, the status of global and US nuclear fuel cycles is briefly reviewed. Projections for Europe and the Pacific basin include a transition towards mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) recycle in thermal and, eventually, fast reactors. Major environmental benefits could be expected by the development of fast reactor technology. Published estimates of the principal greenhouse gas emission from nuclear operations are reviewed. The final section notes the reduction in radiation dose uptake by operators and general public which can be anticipated when fast reactor and thermal reactor fuel cycles are compared. The major reduction follows elimination of the uranium mining/milling operation

  18. Methods and techniques of nuclear in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, A.J. de.

    1992-04-01

    Review of methods of nuclear in-core fuel management (the minimal critical mass problem, minimal power peaking) and calculational techniques: reactorphysical calculations (point reactivity models, continuous refueling, empirical methods, depletion perturbation theory, nodal computer programs); optimization techniques (stochastic search, linear programming, heuristic parameter optimization). (orig./HP)

  19. In-core fuel management code package validation for BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The main goal of the present CRP (Coordinated Research Programme) was to develop benchmarks which are appropriate to check and improve the fuel management computer code packages and their procedures. Therefore, benchmark specifications were established which included a set of realistic data for running in-core fuel management codes. Secondly, the results of measurements and/or operating data were also provided to verify and compare with these parameters as calculated by the in-core fuel management codes or code packages. For the BWR it was established that the Mexican Laguna Verde 1 BWR would serve as the model for providing data on the benchmark specifications. It was decided to provide results for the first 2 cycles of Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde reactor. The analyses of the above benchmarks are performed in two stages. In the first stage, the lattice parameters are generated as a function of burnup at different voids and with and without control rod. These lattice parameters form the input for 3-dimensional diffusion theory codes for over-all reactor analysis. The lattice calculations were performed using different methods, such as, Monte Carlo, 2-D integral transport theory methods. Supercell Model and transport-diffusion model with proper correction for burnable absorber. Thus the variety of results should provide adequate information for any institute or organization to develop competence to analyze In-core fuel management codes. 15 refs, figs and tabs

  20. Modeled forest inventory data suggest climate benefits from fuels management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremy S. Fried; Theresa B. Jain; Jonathan. Sandquist

    2013-01-01

    As part of a recent synthesis addressing fuel management in dry, mixed-conifer forests we analyzed more than 5,000 Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots, a probability sample that represents 33 million acres of these forests throughout Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, and extreme northern California. We relied on the BioSum analysis framework that...

  1. Transition cycle fuel management problems of NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, B.; Pevec, D.; Smuc, T.; Urli, N.

    1989-01-01

    Transition cycle fuel management problems are described and illustrated using results and experience attained during core reload design of NPP Krsko. Improved version of computer code package PSU-LEOPARD/Mcrac is successfully applied to NPP Krsko loading pattern design. (author)

  2. Fuels and fire in land-management planning. Part 1. Forest-fuel classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne G. Maxwell; Franklin R. Ward

    1981-01-01

    This report describes a way to collect and classify the total fuel complex within a planning area. The information can be used as input for appraising and rating probable fire behavior and calculating expected costs and losses from various land uses and management alternatives, reported separately as Part 2 and Part 3 of this series. This total package can be used...

  3. Swedish approach to spent fuel management as regards intermediate storage and reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, B.

    1980-01-01

    The cost of spent fuel management has been calculated to be between SEK 0.006 and 0.015 per kWh, depending upon what assumptions are made. Assuming that spent fuel from 12 reactors is reprocessed and that the radioactive waste is conditioned, transported, temporarily stored, and finally disposed of, the alternative cost SEK 0.006/kWh results from a low estimate of the costs incurred for the waste and a high estimate of credits allowed for recovered uranium and plutonium. This, in turn, assumes a certain real price increase for uranium and a value for plutonium corresponding to the quantity of energy represented by the material. The high alternative is based on a high estimate of the costs incurred for the waste and a low estimate of the credits allowed for recovered uranium and plutonium. This, in turn, assumes today's price for uranium and no credits at all for plutonium. Swedish power producers are now reserving SEK 0.01/kWh for future investment requirements for spent fuel management and waste disposal. The total allocation up to the current year amounts to about SEK 1000 million. Capacity for the temporary storage of spent fuel exists at the Swedish nuclear power plants. As a result of the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel (CLAB) in Sweden, this buffer capacity will be increased to accommodate fuel from approximately 12 years of operation. The CLAB has a design capacity of 3000 tons of spent fuel. Construction of the facility, which is basically a rock cavern containing water-filled pools, started in May 1980 with operation planned in early 1985. Expansion of capacity for an additional 6000 tons is possible if it is needed. As a result of planned domestic measures, freedom of action with respect to the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle will be obtained; a high degree of independence from industrial and political developments abroad will also be obtained

  4. Management of spent fuel from research reactor in Latin America: A regional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, J.R.; Soares, A.J.; Novara, O.; Klein, J.; Mazon, R.; Llamas, I.; Ritchie, I.; Guarnizo, J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports progress in a Regional Technical Cooperation Project for Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru), sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Project main objective is to define a regional strategy for managing research reactor (RR) spent fuel, which would provide solutions that are technologically and economically suited to the realities in countries involved. In particular, to determine the needs for temporary wet or dry storage of RR spent fuel and to establish forms of regional cooperation for: (a) storage (operational, interim, and final) of spent fuel or its derivatives; (b) harmonization among the participating countries of safety rules and regulations, and (c): communicational strategies and public information. Argentina, Brazil, and Chile have returned some of their spent fuel to the USA, but this option will cease to be viable in May 2006. Consequently, it was deemed appropriate and timely to identify and assess all possible options that might be implemented in the region. This paper has two purposes: first, to describe a database of inventories of RR irradiated fuel in the participating countries; and second, the main activities already being conducted or planned within the framework of the project from the coordinators point of view. Finally, plans for the second phase of the project in 2003-2004 will be outlined. (author)

  5. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report Annex B-Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1999, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 4, and the CVDF Final Design Report. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence and references to the CVDF System Design Descriptions (SDDs). This manual has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved

  6. Treatment and final storage of radioactive wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, H [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany, F.R.)

    1977-05-01

    Types, amounts and activity concentrations of the radioactive wastes arising from the different sections of the fuel cycle are described as well as the methods of their treatment and final disposal. By conversion to glass products, highly active fission product solutions can be transferred into a form well suited for final disposal. Low and medium level waste waters are purified so far that safe discharge or reuse is possible. The concentrates thus produced are incorporated into concrete or bitumen. Baling lends itself for treatment of non-combustible solid wastes. Combustible wastes can be incinerated, the residues are incorporated into concrete. For final storage of the conditioned wastes, salt formations in the deep underground are chosen in the Federal Republic of Germany. They offer a series of favourable preconditions for this purpose and guarantee the isolation of the radionuclides from the biocycle over secular periods of time.

  7. 75 FR 59622 - Supplemental Determination for Renewable Fuels Produced Under the Final RFS2 Program From Canola Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ..., heating oil or jet fuel). In addition, this rule includes a new regulatory provision establishing a... work would be completed through a supplemental final rulemaking process. This supplemental final rule... the final RFS2 rule, EPA will revisit our lifecycle analyses in the future as new information becomes...

  8. Development of a practical Monte Carlo based fuel management system for the Penn State University Breazeale Research Reactor (PSBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tippayakul, Chanatip; Ivanov, Kostadin; Frederick Sears, C.

    2008-01-01

    A practical fuel management system for the he Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Research Reactor (PSBR) based on the advanced Monte Carlo methodology was developed from the existing fuel management tool in this research. Several modeling improvements were implemented to the old system. The improved fuel management system can now utilize the burnup dependent cross section libraries generated specifically for PSBR fuel and it is also able to update the cross sections of these libraries by the Monte Carlo calculation automatically. Considerations were given to balance the computation time and the accuracy of the cross section update. Thus, certain types of a limited number of isotopes, which are considered 'important', are calculated and updated by the scheme. Moreover, the depletion algorithm of the existing fuel management tool was replaced from the predictor only to the predictor-corrector depletion scheme to account for burnup spectrum changes during the burnup step more accurately. An intermediate verification of the fuel management system was performed to assess the correctness of the newly implemented schemes against HELIOS. It was found that the agreement of both codes is good when the same energy released per fission (Q values) is used. Furthermore, to be able to model the reactor at various temperatures, the fuel management tool is able to utilize automatically the continuous cross sections generated at different temperatures. Other additional useful capabilities were also added to the fuel management tool to make it easy to use and be practical. As part of the development, a hybrid nodal diffusion/Monte Carlo calculation was devised to speed up the Monte Carlo calculation by providing more converged initial source distribution for the Monte Carlo calculation from the nodal diffusion calculation. Finally, the fuel management system was validated against the measured data using several actual PSBR core loadings. The agreement of the predicted core

  9. Critical management system for nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, Ichiro; Seki, Eiji.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to provide display for the scale of accidents and critical state by detecting gamma-rays issued from nuclear fuels by gamma-ray level indicators to obtain outputs in proportion to the input level of the gamma-rays based on the detected pulse signals. Constitution: The gamma-ray level indicators comprises a plastic scintillator that emits light upon input of gamma-rays and a photomultiplier that amplifies weak fluorescence obtained from the scintillator. The photomultiplier is applied with a high voltage from a power source. A pre-amplifier amplifies pulse signals corresponding to individual gamma-rays at a high amplification factor and send them to a pulse counter circuit if the detected signal level from the gamma-ray level indicators is low, or amplifies the pulse detection signals at a low amplification factor and sends them to a voltage pulse averaging circuit if the detection signal level is high. A signal procession circuit selects the output from the pulse counter circuit or the voltage pulse averaging circuit. Thus, the system has a linear characteristic over a wide range equivalent to a wide range of incident gamma-rays. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. Development of an international safeguards approach to the final disposal of spent fuel in geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphey, W.M.; Moran, B.W.; Fattah, A.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is currently pursuing development of an international safeguards approach for the final disposal of spent fuel in geological repositories through consultants meetings and through the Program for Development of Safeguards for Final Disposal of Spent Fuel in Geological Repositories (SAGOR). The consultants meetings provide policy guidance to IAEA; SAGOR recommends effective approaches that can be efficiently implemented by IAEA. The SAGOR program, which is a collaboration of eight Member State Support Programs (MSSPs), was initiated in July 1994 and has identified 15 activities in each of three areas (i.e. conditioning facilities, active repositories, and closed repositories) that must be performed to ensure an efficient, yet effective safeguards approach. Two consultants meetings have been held: the first in May 1991 and the last in November 1995. For nuclear materials emplaced in a geological repository, the safeguards objectives were defined to be (1) to detect the diversion of spent fuel, whether concealed or unconcealed, from the repository and (2) to detect undeclared activities of safeguards concern (e.g., tunneling, underground reprocessing, or substitution in containers)

  11. Fuel cells and electricity companies - new risk management opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whale, M.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' Deregulation, distributed generation, combined heat and power, renewables, fuel cells, hydrogen. Power companies are facing a rapidly evolving environment that is testing their ability to effectively deploy capital and earn profits. While recent deregulation trends have shifted the structure of power markets into separating generators from distributors, the improving economic value proposition offered by smaller scale distributed generation technologies - such as fuel cells - would seem to be a conflicting development. In this complex and changing environment, decisions based on the economic reality of the capital markets are likely to prevail. By examining the opportunity to enhance risk management offered by stationary fuel cells, particularly in CHP applications, we provide a context for the issues being discussed in today's sessions focusing on power companies and electric utilities. Our risk management perspective suggests a pathway for implementing fuel cells in combined heat and power applications that large power generators can introduce in increasingly smaller sizes. With capital costs of fuel cells high and risk tolerance of power companies low, the challenge for smaller technology developers will be to reduce the apparently long time horizon that persists for substantial deployment. (author)

  12. Evaluation of the problems associated with ENEL's irradiated fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sani, L.; Belelli, U.

    1978-01-01

    The present difficulties in the reprocessing field, wich will continue for a period of time not easily definable, impose on the nuclear utilities the research of adequate solutions to solve the problem associated with storage of the fuels discharged by the nuclear power stations in operation. In this context, the paper examines the technical aspects of the various possible alternatives and on the basis of the Italian nuclear program, possible storage strategies are discussed in the assumption of the development of an adequate oxide-fuel reprocessing capacity. The problems related to storage in pools at the station or away from reactor are described in the light of the recent experience made in Italy with the adaptation of an old pool reactor out of service, that is, the Avogadro reactor in Saluggia, to store the fuels of the stations now in operation. Finally some economic aspects are considered in order to ascertain their impact on the cost of energy produced. (author)

  13. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently deciding the direction of its environmental restoration and waste management programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the next 10 years. Pertinent to this decision is establishing policies for the environmentally sensitive and safe transport, storage, and management of spent nuclear fuels. To develop these policies, it is necessary to revisit or examine the available options. As a part of the DOE complex, the Hanford Site not only has a large portion of the nationwide DOE-owned inventory of spent nuclear fuel, but also is a participant in the DOE decision for management and ultimate disposition of spent nuclear fuel. Efforts in this process at Hanford include assessment of several options for stabilizing, transporting, and storing all or portions of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. Such storage and management of spent nuclear fuel will be in a safe and suitable manner until a final decision is made for ultimate disposition of spent nuclear fuel. Five alternatives involving the Hanford Site are being considered for management of the spent nuclear fuel inventory: (1) the No Action Alternative, (2) the Decentralization Alternative, (3) the 1992/1993 Planning Basis Alternative, (4) the Regionalization Alternative, and (5) the Centralization Alternative. AU alternatives will be carefully designed to avoid environmental degradation and to provide protection to human health and safety at the Hanford Site and surrounding region

  14. Status of spent fuel management in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, R.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear generating capacity in the UK is static with no units currently under construction following the completion of the Sizewell B PWR. The Government's reviews of nuclear energy policy and radioactive waste management policy have been published following a public consultation procedure, largely with an endorsement of current policies. Nuclear Electric plc (NE) and Scottish Nuclear Limited's (SNL) AGR and PWR stations are to be privatised as two subsidiaries of a holding company, and it is planned that the Magnox stations and their liabilities will be kept in the public sector, initially in a stand alone company but ultimately integrated with BNFL. Prompt reprocessing of all Magnox fuel will continue. NE and SNL have signed contracts for extensive reprocessing of AGR fuel. In addition, SNL has agreed contractual arrangements with BNFL for long term storage of its remaining overlife arisings of AGR fuel and has therefore on commercial ground opted not to dry store their fuel at the reactor site. NE have not yet made a decision on the fate of their AGR fuel not covered by existing reprocessing contracts. No option selection has taken place for PWR fuel. Following the closure of the Dounreay PFR and the withdrawal from the EFR project, the option of recycle of plutonium in fast reactors has been suspended. (author)

  15. Sustainomics of the AMBIDEXTER-NEC Fuel Cycle and Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Se Kee; Lee, Young Joon; Ham, Tae Kyu; Seo, Myung Hwan; Hong, Sung Taek; Kwon, Tae An [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Energy issues these days become planetary concerns, recognized as the major driver for the resiliency of the earth in the sustainomics framework of the society, economy and environment axes. In the circumstances, in order for the nuclear to take advantage of its GHG-free nature, criticisms associated with the fuel cycle should be defied. As long as the uranium fuel cycle persists, problems bearing on the HLW management and the proliferation prevention could be neither completely decoupled nor independently resolved. Geopolitics around the Korean peninsula makes them be more complicated. Reference of the AMBIDEXTER fuel cycle relies on the DUPIC technology. Combined with fluoride volatility process, desired quantity of uranium contents in the PWR spent fuel powder could be removed. Then, the reactor system runs with the fluorides salt of this uranium-reduced DUPIC fuel material. Surplus uranium from the AMBIDEXTER-DUPIC1 processes should satisfy the LLW classification criteria. So far, the sustainomics goal of the AMBIDEXTER fuel cycle focuses on generating energy from the HLW, meanwhile, converting into LLW without jeopardizing proliferation transparency.

  16. Phase 1A Final Report for the AREVA Team Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrell, Mike E. [AREVA Federal Services LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2015-03-19

    In response to the Department of Energy (DOE) funded initiative to develop and deploy lead fuel assemblies (LFAs) of Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel (EATF) into a US reactor within 10 years, AREVA put together a team to develop promising technologies for improved fuel performance during off normal operations. This team consisted of the University of Florida (UF) and the University of Wisconsin (UW), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Duke Energy and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). This team brought broad experience and expertise to bear on EATF development. AREVA has been designing; manufacturing and testing nuclear fuel for over 50 years and is one of the 3 large international companies supplying fuel to the nuclear industry. The university and National Laboratory team members brought expertise in nuclear fuel concepts and materials development. Duke and TVA brought practical utility operating experience. This report documents the results from the initial “discovery phase” where the team explored options for EATF concepts that provide enhanced accident tolerance for both Design Basis (DB) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDB). The main driver for the concepts under development were that they could be implemented in a 10 year time frame and be economically viable and acceptable to the nuclear fuel marketplace. The economics of fuel design make this DOE funded project very important to the nuclear industry. Even incremental changes to an existing fuel design can cost in the range of $100M to implement through to LFAs. If this money is invested evenly over 10 years then it can take the fuel vendor several decades after the start of the project to recover their initial investment and reach a breakeven point on the initial investment. Step or radical changes to a fuel assembly design can cost upwards of $500M and will take even longer for the fuel vendor to recover their investment. With the projected lifetimes of the current generation of nuclear power

  17. Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Steyskal, Michele D.

    2008-03-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively

  18. Evaluation of the Field Performance of Residential Fuel Cells: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrero, E.; McClelland, R.

    2004-05-01

    Distributed generation has attracted significant interest from rural electric cooperatives and their customers. Cooperatives have a particular nexus because of inherently low customer density, growth patterns at the end of long lines, and an influx of customers and high-tech industries seeking to diversify out of urban environments. Fuel cells are considered a particularly interesting DG candidate for these cooperatives because of their power quality, efficiency, and environmental benefits. The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Cooperative Research Network residential fuel cell program demonstrated RFC power plants and assessed related technical and application issues. This final subcontract report is an assessment of the program's results. This 3-year program leveraged Department of Energy (DOE) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) funding.

  19. Inventory of concepts for mixed diesel fuels containing renewable components. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronberg, B. [Inst. for Surface Chemistry, Stockholm (Sweden); Berg, R. [Befri Konsult, Solna (Sweden); Berg, J. [Svenska Lantmaennen/Agro Oil, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-08-01

    The present report has involved the assembly of two sub-reports, which have been put together to form this final report. Both of the sub-reports deal with the incorporation of ethanol in diesel fuels. The potential advantages are the decreased net emissions of carbon dioxide, due to the renewable nature of ethanol (if obtained from renewable raw materials), and the decrease of NO{sub x} emissions, due to the decreased combustion temperature. The first sub-report is a compilation of scientific articles and patents/patent applications regarding the possibility to blend ethanol into diesel to form a stable solution in the form of a so called microemulsion, with the aid of surfactants and/or co-solvents. The second sub-report briefly describes the test work, both in the laboratory and in field tests, that is being done in various countries, regarding the blending of ethanol into diesel fuel.

  20. Coastdown in light water reactors as a fuel management strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, L.G.

    1980-12-01

    Improved uranium utilization by means of extended burnup via routine end-of-cycle coastdown has been analyzed, with a specific focus on pressurided water reactors. Both computer and simple analytic models have been developed to determine the optimal coastdown length. Coastdown has been compared with the use of higher fuel-enrichment to achieve comparable burnup values. Temperature and Power coastdown modes were analyzed and changes in the plant thermodynamic efficiency determined. Effects on fuel integrity due to coastdown were examined using a fuel reliability code (SPEAR). Finally the effects on coastdown duration of major parameters involved in charaterizing reactor operation and the economic enviroment were examined. It was found that natural uranium savings up to 7% could be achieved in a typical application by the use of routine pre-planned coast down up to the economic optimun. If coastdown is carried out all the way up to the economic breakeven point yellowcake savings sum up to 16%. Coastdown is substantially more effective than increasing enrichment to extend cycle length without coastdown. Thermodynamic efficiency does not change appreciably during coastdown, a circumstance which greatly simplifies modeling. Coastdown was found to have no statistically significant effect on predicted fuel failure rates. Finally, simple back-of-the evenlope analytic models were found to give an excellent estimate of coastdown duration to both the optimum and breakeven points, and to correctly track the functional behavior induced by all major variables

  1. Used fuel management system architecture and interface analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nutt, Mark [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Howard, Robert; Busch, Ingrid [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carter, Joe; Delley, Alexcia [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Hardin, Ernest; Kalinina, Elena [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM (United States); Cotton, Thomas [Complex Systems LLC, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-07-01

    between at-reactor used fuel management, consolidated storage facilities, and disposal facilities, along with the development of supporting logistics simulation tools, have been initiated to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other stakeholders with information regarding the various alternatives for managing used nuclear fuel (UNF) generated by the current fleet of light water reactors operating in the United States. An important UNF management system interface consideration is the need for ultimate disposal of UNF assemblies contained in waste packages that are sized to be compatible with different geologic media. Thermal analyses indicate that waste package sizes for the geologic media under consideration by the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign may be significantly smaller than the canisters being used for on-site dry storage by the nuclear utilities. Therefore, at some point along the UNF disposition pathway, there could be a need to repackage fuel assemblies already loaded and being loaded into the dry storage canisters currently in use. The implications of where and when the packaging or repackaging of commercial UNF will occur are key questions being addressed in this evaluation. The analysis demonstrated that thermal considerations will have a major impact on the operation of the system and that acceptance priority, rates, and facility start dates have significant system implications. (authors)

  2. Aviation Management Perception of Biofuel as an Alternative Fuel Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marticek, Michael

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore lived experiences and perceptions from a population of 75 aviation managers in various locations in Pennsylvania about the use of aviation biofuel and how it will impact the aviation industry. The primary research question for this study focused on the impact of biofuel on the airline industry and how management believes biofuel can contribute to the reduction of fossil fuel. Grounded in the conceptual framework of sustainability, interview data collected from 27 airline and fueling leaders were analyzed for like terms, coded, and reduced to 3 themes. Data were organized and prioritized based on frequency of mention. The findings represented themes of (a) flight planning tools, (b) production, and (c) costs that are associated with aviation fuel. The results confirmed findings addressed in the literature review, specifically that aviation biofuel will transform the airline industry through lower cost and production. These findings have broad applicability for all management personnel in the aviation industry. Implications for social change and improved business environments could be realized with a cleaner environment, reduced fuel emissions, and improved air quality.

  3. Used fuel management system architecture and interface analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, Mark; Howard, Robert; Busch, Ingrid; Carter, Joe; Delley, Alexcia; Hardin, Ernest; Kalinina, Elena; Cotton, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    between at-reactor used fuel management, consolidated storage facilities, and disposal facilities, along with the development of supporting logistics simulation tools, have been initiated to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other stakeholders with information regarding the various alternatives for managing used nuclear fuel (UNF) generated by the current fleet of light water reactors operating in the United States. An important UNF management system interface consideration is the need for ultimate disposal of UNF assemblies contained in waste packages that are sized to be compatible with different geologic media. Thermal analyses indicate that waste package sizes for the geologic media under consideration by the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign may be significantly smaller than the canisters being used for on-site dry storage by the nuclear utilities. Therefore, at some point along the UNF disposition pathway, there could be a need to repackage fuel assemblies already loaded and being loaded into the dry storage canisters currently in use. The implications of where and when the packaging or repackaging of commercial UNF will occur are key questions being addressed in this evaluation. The analysis demonstrated that thermal considerations will have a major impact on the operation of the system and that acceptance priority, rates, and facility start dates have significant system implications. (authors)

  4. In-core fuel management via perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingle, J.O.

    1975-01-01

    A two-step procedure is developed for the optimization of in-core nuclear fuel management using perturbation theory to predict the effects of various core configurations. The first procedure is a cycle cost minimization using linear programming with a zoned core and discrete burnup groups. The second program utilizes an individual fuel assembly shuffling sequence to minimize the maldistribution of power generation. This latter quantity is represented by a figure of merit or by an assembly power peaking factor. A pressurized water reactor example calculation is utilized. 24 references

  5. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, A.; Dufour, Ph.; Golfier, H.; Grouiller, J.P.; Guillet, J.L.; Poinot, Ch.; Youinou, G.; Zaetta, A.

    2003-01-01

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h) -1 . More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate

  6. Managing low-level radioactive waste in Massachusetts. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bander, S.R.; Goldstein, M.E.

    1983-12-01

    As one of the country's largest generators of low-level radioactive waste, Massachusetts has begun independently seeking solutions to the questions surrounding low-level waste management issues. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Radiation Control Program, obtained funding from the U.S. Department ofEnergy through EG and G, Idaho, Inc. to develop a low-level waste management strategy for the Commonwealth. The Working Group was made up of individuals from various waste generating industries, environmental and public interest groups, medical and academic institutions, and affected state agencies. This final report document contains the following staff project reports: Proposed Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Plan for The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, February 1983 and Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management in Massachusetts - Actions to be Considered for Implementation in 1984-1986, December 1983. These two staff reports represent the completion of the Massachusetts Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Project. The first report provides some of the background material to the issues and some of the alternative courses of action which can be considered by state policy-makers. The second report provides the next phase in the process by delineating specific steps which may be taken before 1986 in order to address the low-level waste problem, and the estimated amount of time needed to complete each step

  7. Savannah River Site, spent nuclear fuel management, draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) has been an integral part of the mission of the Savannah River Site (SRS) for more than 40 years. Until the early 1990s, SNF management consisted primarily of short-term onsite storage and reprocessing in the SRS chemical separation facilities to produce strategic nuclear materials. With the end of the Cold War, the US Department of Energy (DOE) decided to phase out reprocessing of SNF for the production of nuclear weapons materials. Therefore, the management strategy for this fuel has shifted from short-term storage and reprocessing for the recovery of highly-enriched uranium and transuranic isotopes to stabilization, when necessary, and interim storage pending final disposition that includes preparing aluminum-based SNF for placement in a geologic repository. In addition to the fuel already onsite, the SRS will receive SNF from foreign research reactors until 2009 and from domestic research reactors until, potentially, 2035. As a result, the safe and efficient management of SNF will continue to be an important SRS mission. This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of DOE's proposed plans for management SNF assigned to SRS

  8. Integrated scheme of long-term for spent fuel management of power nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Palacios H, J. C.; Martinez C, E.

    2015-09-01

    After of irradiation of the nuclear fuel in the reactor core, is necessary to store it for their cooling in the fuel pools of the reactor. This is the first step in a processes series before the fuel can reach its final destination. Until now there are two options that are most commonly accepted for the end of the nuclear fuel cycle, one is the open nuclear fuel cycle, requiring a deep geological repository for the fuel final disposal. The other option is the fuel reprocessing to extract the plutonium and uranium as valuable materials that remaining in the spent fuel. In this study the alternatives for the final part of the fuel cycle, which involves the recycling of plutonium and the minor actinides in the same reactor that generated them are shown. The results shown that this is possible in a thermal reactor and that there are significant reductions in actinides if they are recycled into reactor fuel. (Author)

  9. Full-Length High-Temperature Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 5: Final safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the final safety analysis for the preparation, conduct, and post-test discharge operation for the Full-Length High Temperature Experiment-5 (FLHT-5) to be conducted in the L-24 position of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test is sponsored by an international group organized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The test is designed and conducted by staff from Pacific Northwest Laboratory with CRNL staff support. The test will study the consequences of loss-of-coolant and the progression of severe fuel damage

  10. International trade and waste and fuel managment issue, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2008-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A global solution for clients, by Yves Linz, AREVA NP; A safer, secure and economical plant, by Andy White, GE Hitachi Nuclear; Robust global prospects, by Ken Petrunik, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited; Development of NPPs in China, by Chen Changbing and Li Huiqiang, Huazhong University of Science and Technology; Yucca Mountain update; and, A class of its own, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear. The Industry Innovation articles in this issue are: Fuel assembly inspection program, by Jim Lemons, Tennessee Valley Authority; and, Improved in-core fuel shuffle for reduced refueling duration, by James Tusar, Exelon Nuclear.

  11. Operational Readiness Review Final Report for K Basin Fuel Transfer System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVIES, T.H.

    2002-01-01

    An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) to verify that an adequate state of readiness had been achieved for startup of the K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS). The DOE ORR was conducted during the period November 6-18, 2002. The DOE ORR team concluded that the K Basin Fuel Transfer System is ready to start operations, subject to completion and verification of identified pre-start findings. The ORR was conducted in accordance with the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS) Operational Readiness Review (ORR) Plan of Action and the Operational Readiness Review Implementation Plan for K Basin Fuel Transfer System. Review activities consisted of staff interviews, procedure and document reviews, and observations of normal facility operations, operational upset conditions, and an emergency drill. The DOE ORR Team also reviewed and assessed the adequacy of the contractor ORR3 and the RL line management review. The team concurred with the findings and observations identified in these two reports. The DOE ORR for the FTS evaluated the contractor under single-shift operations. Of concern to the ORR Team was that SNF Project management intended to change from a single-shift FTS operation to a two-shift operation shortly after the completion of the DOE ORR. The ORR team did not assess two-shift FTS operations and the ability of the contractor to conduct a smooth transition from shift to shift. However, the DOE ORR team did observe an operational upset drill that was conducted during day shift and carried over into swing shift; during this drill, swing shift was staffed with fewer personnel as would be expected for two-shift operations. The facility was able to adequately respond to the event with the reduced level of staff. The ORR Team was also able to observe a Shift Manager turnover meeting when one shift manager had to be relieved during the middle of the day. The ORR

  12. MORE: Management of Requirements in NPP Modernisation Projects, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredriksen, R.; Katta, V.; Raspotnig, C.; Valkonen, J.

    2008-09-01

    This report documents the work and related activities of the MORE (Management of Requirements in NPP Modernisation Projects) (NKS-R project number NKS-R-2005-47) project. This report also provides a summary of the project activities and deliverables, and discusses possible application areas. The project has aimed at the industrial utilisation of the results from the TACO: (Traceability and Communication of Requirements in Digital I and C Systems Development) (NKS-R project number NKS-R-2002-16, completed June, 2005) project, and practical application of improved approaches and methods for requirements engineering and change management. Finally, the report provides a brief description of the extended industrial network and disseminations of the results in Nordic and NKS related events such as seminars and workshops. (au)

  13. MORE: Management of Requirements in NPP Modernisation Projects, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredriksen, R.; Katta, V.; Raspotnig, C. (Inst. for energiteknikk (IFE) (Norway)); Valkonen, J. (Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) (Finland))

    2008-09-15

    This report documents the work and related activities of the MORE (Management of Requirements in NPP Modernisation Projects) (NKS-R project number NKS-R-2005-47) project. This report also provides a summary of the project activities and deliverables, and discusses possible application areas. The project has aimed at the industrial utilisation of the results from the TACO: (Traceability and Communication of Requirements in Digital I and C Systems Development) (NKS-R project number NKS-R-2002-16, completed June, 2005) project, and practical application of improved approaches and methods for requirements engineering and change management. Finally, the report provides a brief description of the extended industrial network and disseminations of the results in Nordic and NKS related events such as seminars and workshops. (author)

  14. Management of wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heafield, W.; Barlow, P.

    1988-01-01

    The management of wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle is a key activity which affects all stages of the cycle and in which there is intense public interest, particularly at the culmination of waste management activities where dispersal and disposal are practised or are proposed. The different categories of waste are considered - high, intermediate and low level. A description is given of how and where in the fuel cycle they are produced, giving indications of volumes and activities. The fundamental objectives of waste management are reviewed and the application of these objectives to select practicable waste management processes, covering process systems product and safety considerations is discussed. Current technology can deal with the wastes now in storage, those which will be generated from oxide fuel reprocessing and future decommissioning activities; examples of these technologies, ranging from compaction and incineration for low level waste, encapsulation for intermediate level waste through to vitrification for high level waste, are described. The specific objectives relating to disposal are considered in the context of international co-operation on development and national strategies aimed at providing safe, deep repositories over the next 20 years. (author)

  15. Radioactive wastes and spent fuels management in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maset, Elvira R.

    2006-01-01

    CNEA was created in 1950 and since then has carried out research and development activities, production of radioisotopes, medical and industrial applications, and those activities related with the nuclear fuel cycle, including the operation of two nuclear power stations. More ever, different public and private institutions use radioactive materials in medical, industrial and research activities. These activities generate different types of radioactive waste, desuse sealed sources and spent fuel. The management of radioactive waste of all types produced in the country, as the spent nuclear fuel of power and research reactors and the used radioactive sources was always and it is at present a CNEA's responsibility. In February 2003, according to the Law No. 25.018, called 'Management of Radioactive Waste Regimen', the 'Radioactive Waste Management National Programme' was created by CNEA to fulfill the institutional functions and responsibilities established in the Law, in order to guarantee the safe management of radioactive waste according to the regulations established by the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Agency and to the legislation in force. (author) [es

  16. Practice of fuel management and outage strategy at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farago, P.; Hamvas, I.; Szecsenyi, Zs.; Nemes, I.; Javor, E.

    2000-01-01

    The Paks Nuclear Power Plant generates almost 40% of Hungarian electricity production at lowest price. In spite of this fact the reduction of operational and maintenance costs is one of the most important goal of the plant management. The proper fuel management and outage strategy can give a considerable influence for this cost reduction. The aim of loading pattern planning is to get the required cycle length with available fuel cassettes and to keep all key parameters of safety analysis under safety limits. Another important point is production at profit, where both the fuel and spent fuel cost are determining. Earlier the conditions given by our only fuel supplier restricted our possibilities, so at the beginning the fuel arrangement changing was the only way to improve efficiency of fuel using. As first step we introduced the low leakage core design. The next step was the 4 years cycle using of some cassettes. By this way nearly half of 3 years cycle old cassettes remained in the core for fourth cycle. In the immediate future we want to use profiled cassettes developed by Russian supplier. Simultaneously we will load new type of WWER cassettes with burnable poison developed by BNFL Company. Hereby we can apply more BNFL cassettes for four years cycle even more. Both cost of fuel and number of spent fuel can be reduced besides keeping parameters under safety limits. The Hungarian in service inspection rules determine that every four year we have to make a complete inspection of reactor vessel. Therefore earlier we had two types of outages. Every 4 years we planned a long outage with 55-65 days duration and normal ones with about 30-35 days duration between the long ones. During the normal outages this way did not give us enough room to utilise the shortest possible critical path determined by works on reactor. Some years ago we changed our outage strategy. Now we plan every 4 years a long outage, and between them one normal and two short ones. As a result the

  17. Integrating fire behavior models and geospatial analysis for wildland fire risk assessment and fuel management planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan A. Ager; Nicole M. Vaillant; Mark A. Finney

    2011-01-01

    Wildland fire risk assessment and fuel management planning on federal lands in the US are complex problems that require state-of-the-art fire behavior modeling and intensive geospatial analyses. Fuel management is a particularly complicated process where the benefits and potential impacts of fuel treatments must be demonstrated in the context of land management goals...

  18. 78 FR 13315 - Bridger-Teton National Forest; Wyoming; Teton to Snake Fuels Management Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Fuels Management Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an...) to document the potential effects of the Teton to Snake Fuels Management Project. The analysis will... Caribou-Targhee National Forest. The Teton to Snake Fuels Management Project was previously scoped and...

  19. Use of expert knowledge to develop fuel maps for wildland fire management [chapter 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Matt Reeves

    2012-01-01

    Fuel maps are becoming an essential tool in fire management because they describe, in a spatial context, the one factor that fire managers can control over many scales ­ surface and canopy fuel characteristics. Coarse-resolution fuel maps are useful in global, national, and regional fire danger assessments because they help fire managers effectively plan, allocate, and...

  20. Determination of consumption biogenic solid fuels in the commercial sector, trade, services (tertiary sector). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viehmann, Cornelia; Westerkamp, Tanja; Schwenker, Andre; Schenker, Marian; Thraen, Daniela; Lenz, Volker; Ebert, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    The policy has both national and European level ambitious program aimed at expansion of renewable energy and related to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. In the national action plan for renewable energy of the Federal Republic of Germany these goals are defined by 2020. The share of renewable energy in the provision of heat and cold should therefore rise from 6.6% to 15.5% of gross final energy consumption. According to the increasing importance of solar-thermal, near-surface and geothermal heat, the relative share of biomass is decreasing. However biomass makes with those listed in the national action plan with 79% an essential amount in regenerative heat market [BMU 2010]. For the pursuit of goals and reviews, the support measures and packages of measures which are initiated in this context, a regular and timely reporting on the development of the above objectives is mandatory. The diverse and growing reporting requirements such as in the EU directive on the promotion of renewable energy, require, however well-founded knowledge of the sector-specific energy consumption from renewable sources. While the data available for use of biogenic solid fuels in the sectors household and industry has improved significantly in recent years, for the sector commercial sector, trade, services (tertiary sector) reliable figures are still lacking. Against this background, the objective is to present study, in close cooperation with the Federal Environment Agency (UBA), the determination of the final energy consumption biogenic solid fuels in the tertiary sector in Germany for the year 2008. The basis is, in addition to the development of the current knowledge of the energy and heat consumption, the delimitation and characterization of the sector and the development of an extrapolation tools. The demand for this tool is its expandability and update possibility. From the industry-nonspecific and industry-specific input data can be derived, collecting for the extrapolation

  1. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 08: Evaluating sedimentation risks associated with fuel management

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Elliot; Pete Robichaud

    2005-01-01

    This fact sheet describes the sources of sediment in upland forest watersheds in the context of fuel management activities. It presents the dominant forest soil erosion processes, and the principles behind the new sediment delivery interface developed to aid in erosion analysis of fuel management projects.

  2. Development of Experimental Facilities for Advanced Spent Fuel Management Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, G. S.; Jung, W. M.; Ku, J. H. [and others

    2004-07-01

    The advanced spent fuel management process(ACP), proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel, is under research and development. This technology convert spent fuels into pure metal-base uranium with removing the highly heat generating materials(Cs, Sr) efficiently and reducing of the decay heat, volume, and radioactivity from spent fuel by 1/4. In the next phase(2004{approx}2006), the demonstration of this technology will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For this demonstration, the hot cell facilities of {alpha}-{gamma} type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of {beta}-{gamma} type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. In this study, the design requirements are established, and the process detail work flow was analysed for the optimum arrangement to ensure effective process operation in hot cell. And also, the basic and detail design of hot cell facility and process, and safety analysis was performed to secure conservative safety of hot cell facility and process.

  3. Spent fuel management in Hungary: Current status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferenczi, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Paks Nuclear Power Plant Ltd. operates the only NPP of Hungary, consisting of a 4 WWER-440 type units. Since 1989, approximately 40-50 % of the total yearly electricity generation of the country has been supplied by this plant. The fresh fuel is imported from Russia (previously from the Soviet Union) and the spent fuel assemblies are shipped back to Russia for later reprocessing after 5 years of decay storage in the spent fuel pools of the plant. Seeing the political and economical changes that started in Russia, the Paks NPP's management made a decision in 1990 to study the implementation of an independent spent fuel storage facility (ISFSF) at the Paks site and in 1992 to choose the GEC-ALSTHOM's MVDS. On the basis of the Construction License issued by the HAEC, the construction of the ISFSF was started in March 1995. The paper gives general information on the spent fuel arisings, the storage at the site, the shipment to Russia and on the implementation of the ISFSF. (author). 3 refs

  4. Fuel Management at the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, V.L.; Nguyen, N.D.; Luong, B.V.; Le, V.V.; Huynh, T.N.; Nguyen, K.C. [Nuclear Research Institute, 01 Nguyen Tu Luc Street, Dalat City (Viet Nam)

    2011-07-01

    among JSC TVEL, Moscow, Russia and Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute and Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho Falls, USA has been realized. The plan for realization of full core configuration of LEU fuel is planned. In the plan the first working core with 92 fresh LEU FAs will be created. This paper presents the fuel management at the DNRR. (author)

  5. Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications development phase. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The deployment and operation of clean power generation is becoming critical as the energy and transportation sectors seek ways to comply with clean air standards and the national deregulation of the utility industry. However, for strategic business decisions, considerable analysis is required over the next few years to evaluate the appropriate application and value added from this emerging technology. To this end the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) is proposing a three-year industry-driven project that centers on the creation of ``The Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications.`` A collaborative laboratory housed at and managed by HARC, the Center will enable a core group of six diverse participating companies--industry participants--to investigate the economic and operational feasibility of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells in a variety of applications (the core project). This document describes the unique benefits of a collaborative approach to PEM applied research, among them a shared laboratory concept leading to cost savings and shared risks as well as access to outstanding research talent and lab facilities. It also describes the benefits provided by implementing the project at HARC, with particular emphasis on HARC`s history of managing successful long-term research projects as well as its experience in dealing with industry consortia projects. The Center is also unique in that it will not duplicate the traditional university role of basic research or that of the fuel cell industry in developing commercial products. Instead, the Center will focus on applications, testing, and demonstration of fuel cell technology.

  6. Management of radioactive wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The increased emphasis in many countries on the development and utilization of nuclear power is leading to an expansion of all sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle, giving rise to important policy issues and radioactive-waste management requirements. Consequently, the IAEA and the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD felt that it would be timely to review latest technology for the management of the radioactive wastes arising from nuclear fuel cycle facilities, to identify where important advances have been made, and to indicate those areas where further technological development is needed. Beginning in 1959, the IAEA, either by itself or jointly with OECD/NEA has held seven international symposia on the management of radioactive wastes. The last symposium, on the management of radioactive wastes from fuel reprocessing, was held jointly by the IAEA and OECD/NEA in Paris in November 1972. An objective of the 1976 symposium was to update the information presented at the previous symposia with the latest technological developments and thinking regarding the management and disposal of all categories of radioactive wastes. Consequently, although the scope of the symposium was rather broad, attention was focussed on operational experience and progress in unresolved areas of radioactive waste management. The programme dealt primarily with the solidification of liquid radioactive wastes and disposal of the products, especially the high-level fission products and actinide-containing waste from fuel reprocessing. Other topics covered policy and planning, treatment of hulls and solvent, management of plutonium-contaminated waste, and removal of gaseous radionuclides. The major topic of interest was the current state of the technology for the reduction and incorporation of the high-level radioactive liquid from fuel reprocessing into solid forms, such as calcines, glasses or ceramics, for safe interim storage and eventual disposal. The approaches to vitrification ranged from two stage

  7. Fuel element burnup measurements for the equilibrium LEU silicide RSG GAS (MPR-30) core under a new fuel management strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinem, Surian; Liem, Peng Hong; Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Surbakti, Tukiran

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Burnup measurement of fuel elements comprising the new equilibrium LEU silicide core of RSG GAS. • The burnup measurement method is based on a linear relationship between reactivity and burnup. • Burnup verification was conducted using an in-house, in-core fuel management code BATAN-FUEL. • A good agreement between the measured and calculated burnup was confirmed. • The new fuel management strategy was confirmed and validated. - Abstract: After the equilibrium LEU silicide core of RSG GAS was achieved, there was a strong need to validate the new fuel management strategy by measuring burnup of fuel elements comprising the core. Since the regulatory body had a great concern on the safety limit of the silicide fuel element burnup, amongst the 35 burnt fuel elements we selected 22 fuel elements with high burnup classes i.e. from 20 to 53% loss of U-235 (declared values) for the present measurements. The burnup measurement method was based on a linear relationship between reactivity and burnup where the measurements were conducted under subcritical conditions using two fission counters of the reactor startup channel. The measurement results were compared with the declared burnup evaluated by an in-house in-core fuel management code, BATAN-FUEL. A good agreement between the measured burnup values and the calculated ones was found within 8% uncertainties. Possible major sources of differences were identified, i.e. large statistical errors (i.e. low fission counters’ count rates), variation of initial U-235 loading per fuel element and accuracy of control rod indicators. The measured burnup of the 22 fuel elements provided the confirmation of the core burnup distribution planned for the equilibrium LEU silicide core under the new fuel management strategy.

  8. SKB 91. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Importance of the bedrock for safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The safety of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel has been assessed in this report. The spent fuel is assumed to be encapsulated in a copper canister and deposited at a depth of 600 m in the bedrock. The primary purpose has been to shed light on the importance of the geological features of the site for the safety of a final repository. The assessment shows that the encapsulated fuel will, in all likelihood, be kept isolated from the groundwater for millions of years. This is considerably longer than the more than 100 000 years that are required in order for the toxicity of the waste to have declined to a level equivalent to that of rich uranium ores. However, in order to be able to study the role of the rock as a barrier to the dispersal of radioactive materials, calculations have been carried out under the assumption that waste canisters leak. The results show that the safety of a carefully designed repository is only affected to a small extent by the ability of the rock to retain the escaping radionuclides. The primary role of the rock is to provide stable mechanical and chemical conditions in the repository over a long period of time so that the function of the engineered barriers is not jeopardized. (187 refs.) (au)

  9. Thermal hydraulic model validation for HOR mixed core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Vries, J.W. de; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1997-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic core management model has been developed for the Hoger Onderwijsreactor (HOR), a 2 MW pool-type university research reactor. The model was adopted for safety analysis purposes in the framework of HEU/LEU core conversion studies. It is applied in the thermal-hydraulic computer code SHORT (Steady-state HOR Thermal-hydraulics) which is presently in use in designing core configurations and for in-core fuel management. An elaborate measurement program was performed for establishing the core hydraulic characteristics for a variety of conditions. The hydraulic data were obtained with a dummy fuel element with special equipment allowing a.o. direct measurement of the true core flow rate. Using these data the thermal-hydraulic model was validated experimentally. The model, experimental tests, and model validation are discussed. (author)

  10. In-core fuel management programs for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    In response to the interest shown by Member States, the IAEA organized a co-ordinated research programme to develop and make available in the open domain a set of programs to perform in-core fuel management calculations. This report summarizes the work performed in the context of the CRP. As a result of this programme, complete in-core fuel management packages for three types of reactors, namely PWR's, BWR's and PHWR are now available from the NEA Data Bank. For some reactor types, these program packages are available with three levels of sophistication ranging from simple methods for educational purposes to more comprehensive methods that can be used for reactor design and operation. In addition some operating data have been compiled to allow code validation. (author)

  11. Underlying chemistry research for the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.; Sagert, N.H.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Taylor, P.

    1984-04-01

    This document reviews the underlying chemistry research part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, carried out in the Research Chemistry Branch. This research is concerned with developing the basic chemical knowledge and under-standing required in other parts of the Program. There are four areas of underlying research: Waste Form Chemistry, Solute and Solution Chemistry, Rock-Water-Waste Interactions, and Abatement and Monitoring of Gas-Phase Radionuclides

  12. UK methods for studying fuel management in water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayers, F.J.

    1970-10-01

    Current UK methods for studying fuel management and for predicting the reactor physics performance for both light and heavy water moderated power reactors are reviewed. Brief descriptions are given of the less costly computer codes used for initial assessment studies, and also the more elaborate programs associated with detailed evaluation are discussed. Some of the considerations influencing the accuracy of predictions are included with examples of various types of experimental confirmation. (author)

  13. Fuel cycle and waste management demonstration in the IFR Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; Benedict, R.W.; Laidler, J.J.; Battles, J.E.; Miller, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    Argonne's National Laboratory's Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is the main element in the US advanced reactor development program. A unique fuel cycle and waste process technology is being developed for the IFR. Demonstration of this technology at engineering scale will begin within the next year at the EBR-II test facility complex in Idaho. This paper describes the facility being readied for this demonstration, the process to be employed, the equipment being built, and the waste management approach

  14. Review of decommissioning, spent fuel and radwaste management in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamrich, J.

    2000-01-01

    Two nuclear power plants with two WWER reactors are currently under operation in Jaslovske Bohunice and NPP A-1 is under decommissioning on the same site. At the second nuclear site in the Slovak Republic in Mochovce third nuclear power plant with two units is in operation. In accordance with the basic Slovak legislation (Act on Peaceful Utilisation of Nuclear Energy) defining the responsibilities, roles and authorities for all organisations involved in the decommissioning of nuclear installations Nuclear Regulatory Authority requires submission of conceptual decommissioning plans by the licensee. The term 'decommissioning' is used to describe the set of actions to be taken at the end of the useful life of a facility, in order to retire the facility from service while, simultaneously, ensuring proper protection of the workers, the general public and the environment. This set of activities is in principle comprised of planning and organisation of decommissioning inclusive strategy development, post-operational activities, implementation of decommissioning (physical and radiological characterisation, decontamination, dismantling and demolition, waste and spent fuel management), radiological, aspects, completion of decommissioning as well as ensuring of funding for these activities. Responsibility for nuclear installations decommissioning, radwaste and spent fuel, management in Slovakia is with a subsidiary of Slovak Electric called Nuclear Installations Decommissioning Radwaste and Spent Fuel Management (acronym SE VYZ), established on January 1, 1996. This paper provides description of an approach to planning of the NPP A-1 and NPPs with WWER reactors decommissioning, realisation of treatment, conditioning and disposal of radwaste, as well as spent fuel management in Slovakia. It takes into account that detail papers on all these issues will follow later during this meeting. (author)

  15. An integrated expert system for optimum in core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Elmoatty, Mona S.; Nagy, M.S.; Aly, Mohamed N.; Shaat, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → An integrated expert system constructed for optimum in core fuel management. → Brief discussion of the ESOIFM Package modules, inputs and outputs. → Package was applied on the DALAT Nuclear Research Reactor (0.5 MW). → The Package verification showed good agreement. - Abstract: An integrated expert system called Efficient and Safe Optimum In-core Fuel Management (ESOIFM Package) has been constructed to achieve an optimum in core fuel management and automate the process of data analysis. The Package combines the constructed mathematical models with the adopted artificial intelligence techniques. The paper gives a brief discussion of the ESOIFM Package modules, inputs and outputs. The Package was applied on the DALAT Nuclear Research Reactor (0.5 MW). Moreover, the data of DNRR have been used as a case study for testing and evaluation of ESOIFM Package. This paper shows the comparison between the ESOIFM Package burn-up results, the DNRR experimental burn-up data, and other DNRR Codes burn-up results. The results showed good agreement.

  16. USA: energy policy and spent fuel and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroll, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    The new US administration under President Bush has shifted political weights in the country's energy policy. The policy pursued by the Clinton administration, which had been focused strongly on energy efficiency and environmental protection, will be revoked in a number of points, and the focus instead will now be on economics and continuity of supply, also against the backdrop of the current power supply crisis in California. However, it is more likely that fossil-fired generating capacity will be expanded or added than new nuclear generating capacity. As far as the policy of managing radioactive waste is concerned, no fast and fundamental changes are expected. Low-level waste arising in medicine, research, industry, and nuclear power plants will be stored in a number of shallow ground burial facilities also involving more than one federal state. The Yucca Mountain repository project will be advanced with a higher budget, and WIPP (Waste Isolation Plant) in the state of New Mexico has been in operation since 1998. Plans for the management of spent fuel elements include interim stores called ISFSIs (Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations) both near and independent of nuclear power sites. Nineteen sites have been licensed, another eighteen are ready to be licensed. In addition, also international spent fuel and nuclear waste management approaches are being discussed in the United States which, inter alia, are meant to offer comprehensive solutions to countries running only a small number of nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  17. Management of severely damaged nuclear fuel and related waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report is concerned primarily with severe fuel damage accidents in large electric power producing reactors such as those in the TMI and Chernobyl plants. It does include, as appropriate, knowledge gained from accidents in other power, research and military reactors. It is believed that the conclusions and recommendations apply to a large extent to severe fuel damage accidents in all types of reactors. The period considered in this publication begins after the initial crisis of an accident has been brought under control. (This initial crisis could be from one day to several weeks after the event, depending on the specific conditions). Accordingly, it is assumed that the plant is shut down, the reactor is under control and decay heat removal is in progress in a stable manner so that attention must be given to cleanup. This report addresses the principles involved in planning, engineering, construction, operation and other activities to characterize, clean up and dispose of the fuel and related waste. The end of the period under consideration is when the fuel and abnormal wastes are packaged either for interim storage or final disposal and activities are started either to restore the plant to service or to establish a safe state from which decommissioning planning can start. 36 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs.

  18. Interface agreement for the management of FFTF Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormack, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Hanford Site Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project was formed to manage the SNF at Hanford. The mission of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project is to place the facility in a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition for turnover to the Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) for subsequent D ampersand D. To satisfy both project missions, FFTF SNF must be removed from the FFTF and subsequently dispositioned. This documented provides the interface agreement between FFTF Transition Project and SNF Project for management of the FFTF SNF

  19. Management of the fuel-cycle back-end: The Electricite de France's strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteve, B.

    2001-01-01

    Countries are following three options for management of spent fuel from nuclear power plants: reprocess-recycle, direct disposal, and ''wait and see''. France has adopted the reprocess-recycle strategy for managing its spent fuel, which has created a stable environment for Electricite de France to plan its spent fuel management. However, the French government is planning to debate its spent fuel management strategy and may choose a different direction. A number of factors affecting the choice of spent fuel management strategy are discussed and the benefits of maintaining the status quo from the point of view of the nuclear utility are explained. (author)

  20. German Spent Nuclear Fuel Legacy: Characteristics and High-Level Waste Management Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schwenk-Ferrero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Germany is phasing-out the utilization of nuclear energy until 2022. Currently, nine light water reactors of originally nineteen are still connected to the grid. All power plants generate high-level nuclear waste like spent uranium or mixed uranium-plutonium dioxide fuel which has to be properly managed. Moreover, vitrified high-level waste containing minor actinides, fission products, and traces of plutonium reprocessing loses produced by reprocessing facilities has to be disposed of. In the paper, the assessments of German spent fuel legacy (heavy metal content and the nuclide composition of this inventory have been done. The methodology used applies advanced nuclear fuel cycle simulation techniques in order to reproduce the operation of the German nuclear power plants from 1969 till 2022. NFCSim code developed by LANL was adopted for this purpose. It was estimated that ~10,300 tonnes of unreprocessed nuclear spent fuel will be generated until the shut-down of the ultimate German reactor. This inventory will contain ~131 tonnes of plutonium, ~21 tonnes of minor actinides, and 440 tonnes of fission products. Apart from this, ca.215 tonnes of vitrified HLW will be present. As fission products and transuranium elements remain radioactive from 104 to 106 years, the characteristics of spent fuel legacy over this period are estimated, and their impacts on decay storage and final repository are discussed.

  1. Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project. Fiscal Year 2014 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Andrew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buck, Edgar C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Matthew K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); MacFarlan, Paul J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pool, Karl N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Slonecker, Bruce D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Frances N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Steen, Franciska H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with using PNNL facilities and processes to receive irradiated low enriched uranium–molybdenum (LEU-Mo) fuel plate samples and perform analysis in support of the M3 Reactor Conversion Program. This work is in support of the M3 Reactor Conversion Fuel Development Pillar that is managed by Idaho National Laboratory. The primary research scope was to determine the thermo-physical properties as a function of temperature and burnup. Work conducted in Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 complemented measurements performed in FY 2013 on four additional irradiated LEU-Mo fuel plate samples. Specifically, the work in FY 2014 investigated the influence of different processing methods on thermal property behavior, the absence of aluminum alloy cladding on thermal property behavior for additional model validation, and the influence of higher operating surface heat flux / more aggressive irradiation conditions on thermal property behavior. The model developed in FY 2013 and refined in FY 2014 to extract thermal properties of the U-Mo alloy from the measurements conducted on an integral fuel plate sample (i.e., U-Mo alloy with a thin Zr coating and clad in AA6061) continues to perform very well. Measurements conducted in FY 2014 on samples irradiated under similar conditions compare well to measurements performed in FY 2013. In general, there is no gross influence of fabrication method on thermal property behavior, although the difference in LEU-Mo foil microstructure does have a noticeable influence on recrystallization of grains during irradiation. Samples irradiated under more aggressive irradiation conditions, e.g., higher surface heat flux, revealed lower thermal conductivity when compared to samples irradiated at moderate surface heat fluxes, with the exception of one sample. This report documents thermal

  2. Novel catalysts for hydrogen fuel cell applications:Final report (FY03-FY05).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Jarek, Russell L.; Steen, William Arthur

    2005-12-01

    qualitatively as well as the ETEK material for the ORR, a non-trivial achievement. A fuel cell test showed that Pt/C outperformed the ETEK material by an average of 50% for a 300 hour test. Increasing surface area decreases the amount of Pt needed in a fuel cell, which translates into cost savings. Furthermore, the increased performance realized in the fuel cell test might ultimately mean less Pt is needed in a fuel cell; this again translates into cost savings. Finally, enhanced long-term stability is a key driver within the fuel cell community as improvements in this area must be realized before fuel cells find their way into the marketplace; these Pt/C materials hold great promise of enhanced stability over time. An external laser desorption ion source was successfully installed on the existing Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. However, operation of this laser ablation source has only generated metal atom ions, no clusters have been found to date. It is believed that this is due to the design of the pulsed-nozzle/laser vaporization chamber. The final experimental configuration and design of the two source housings are described.

  3. Coupling of the four design stages in the management of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinez R, R. L.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the main characteristics of the system to solve the four stages of the nuclear fuel management are presented; the above for boiling water reactors (BWR). The novelty of the system is that a complete solution is obtained in a coupled way; the involved stages are fuel lattice design, fuel assembly design, fuel reload design and control rod pattern design. To do this, in each stage of the process some heuristics techniques are applied, and each stage has its own objective function. The used heuristic techniques are neural network and a hybrid between scatter search and path re linking for fuel lattice design; for fuel assembly design a simple local search was applied and finally, for both fuel reload and control rod pattern designs, the tabu search technique was used. The system have two loops, one external loop and one internal loop, the first one starts with fuel lattice design and concludes with control rod pattern design; on the other hand, the internal loop executes an iterative process between both fuel reload design and control rod pattern designs, to start this loop a seed fuel reload is required, which is obtained applying Haling principle. The internal loop is finished when four iterations were achieved, while the external loop is finished when two iterations were achieved, this number of iterations was fixed due to the great quantity of required computational resources. An 18- months equilibrium cycle was considered to have a reference value to compare against the obtained results with our system, this cycle have two fuel fresh batches with the same average uranium enrichment, but different gadolinia content. The above cycle achieved a 10,896 Mwd/Tu of energy and was divided into 12 burnup steps. The obtained results show the advantage to solve the complete problem in a coupled way, even though a great quantity of computational resources are used. It is necessary to note that the energy value was not achieved in all cases, only in some

  4. The management of the Spend Fuel Pool Water Quality (1996-2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Eui Gyu; Choi, Ho Young; Choi, Mun Jo; Kim, Hyung Wook; Lee, Mun; Lee, Choong Sung; Hur, Soon Ock; Ahn, Guk Hun

    2008-12-15

    The water quality management of spent fuel storage pool water quality in HANARO is important to prevent the corrosion of nuclear fuel and reactor structure material. The condition of the spent fuel storage pool water has been monitored by measuring the electrical conductivity of the spent fuel storage pool purification system and pH periodically. The status of the spent fuel storage pool water quality management was investigated by using the measured data. taken from 1996 to 2007. In general, the electrical conductivity of the spent fuel storage pool water have been managed within 1 {mu}S/cm which is an operation target of HANARO.

  5. Development of pyrochemical spent fuel management in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banfield, Zara; Cogan, John; Farrant, Dave; Gaubert, Emmanuel; Hopkins, Phil; Lewin, Bob [BNFL - Nexia Solutions Limited, Workington Facility, B291 Trenches, Sellafield (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Nexia Solutions is undertaking a programme to investigate the role of pyrochemical techniques for spent nuclear fuel and legacy fuel management. The principal UK client is the energy unit, and the other clients are the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), for legacy fuel conditioning, and BNFL's corporate investment in advanced reactor systems which is contributing to the Generation IV programme. The emphasis of the programme is pragmatic industrialization, which we have identified as key for the establishment of pyrochemical fuel management. From our experience operating fuel manufacture, power generation and reprocessing plant we know that the areas which require particular attention for successful implementation are: - Plant Interfaces, - Operability, - Process Definition, - Underpinning Science. Plant Interfaces encompass the definition of feeds, products, effluents and wastes and whether the process can meet the constraints they impose. Operability is concerned with the sustainability of the plant processes and is linked to the use of nil-maintenance continuous systems and elimination of batch / mechanical operations and maintenance. Process Definition focuses on the performance, control, recovery and safety of individual unit operations. Together these underpin industrial nuclear plant implementability. As an example, we have built a test rig to demonstrate molten salts transfers, since we consider this to be a capability without which pyrochemical processing will not be viable. Similarly, we have developed pilot scale electro-refiner designs for high continuous throughput and we are building development modules to underpin key features of the designs. Scientific work has been targeted at electro-refiner actinide partitioning and has been expanded to investigate other critical areas of the process which include efficient uranium / salt separation, salt clean up and the development of waste forms which perform at least as well as borosilicate glass

  6. Development of pyrochemical spent fuel management in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banfield, Zara; Cogan, John; Farrant, Dave; Gaubert, Emmanuel; Hopkins, Phil; Lewin, Bob

    2006-01-01

    Nexia Solutions is undertaking a programme to investigate the role of pyrochemical techniques for spent nuclear fuel and legacy fuel management. The principal UK client is the energy unit, and the other clients are the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), for legacy fuel conditioning, and BNFL's corporate investment in advanced reactor systems which is contributing to the Generation IV programme. The emphasis of the programme is pragmatic industrialization, which we have identified as key for the establishment of pyrochemical fuel management. From our experience operating fuel manufacture, power generation and reprocessing plant we know that the areas which require particular attention for successful implementation are: - Plant Interfaces, - Operability, - Process Definition, - Underpinning Science. Plant Interfaces encompass the definition of feeds, products, effluents and wastes and whether the process can meet the constraints they impose. Operability is concerned with the sustainability of the plant processes and is linked to the use of nil-maintenance continuous systems and elimination of batch / mechanical operations and maintenance. Process Definition focuses on the performance, control, recovery and safety of individual unit operations. Together these underpin industrial nuclear plant implementability. As an example, we have built a test rig to demonstrate molten salts transfers, since we consider this to be a capability without which pyrochemical processing will not be viable. Similarly, we have developed pilot scale electro-refiner designs for high continuous throughput and we are building development modules to underpin key features of the designs. Scientific work has been targeted at electro-refiner actinide partitioning and has been expanded to investigate other critical areas of the process which include efficient uranium / salt separation, salt clean up and the development of waste forms which perform at least as well as borosilicate glass. Other

  7. System to solve three designs of the fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo M, J. A.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Montes T, J. L.; Perusquia del C, R.; Marinez R, R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper preliminary results are presented, obtained with the development of a computer system that resolves three stages of the nuclear fuel management, which are: the axial and radial designs of fuel, as well as the design of nuclear fuel reloads. The novelty of the system is that the solution is obtained solving the 3 mentioned stages, in coupled form. For this, heuristic techniques are used for each stage, in each one of these has a function objective that is applied to particular problems, but in all cases the obtained partial results are used as input data for the next stage. The heuristic techniques that were used to solve the coupled problem are: tabu search, neural networks and a hybrid between the scatter search and path re linking. The system applies an iterative process from the design of a fuel cell to the reload design, since are preliminary results the reload is designed using the operation strategy Haling type. In each one of the stages nuclear parameters inherent to the design are monitored. The results so far show the advantage of solving the problem in a coupled manner, even when a large amount of computer resources is used. (Author)

  8. Spent fuel management in France: Reprocessing, conditioning, recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Montalembert, J.A. de

    1994-01-01

    The French energy policy has been based for 20 years on the development of nuclear power. The some 75% share of nuclear in the total electricity generation, representing an annual production of 317 TWh requires full fuel cycle control from the head-end to the waste management. This paper presents the RCR concept (Reprocessing, Conditioning, Recycling) with its industrial implementation. The long lasting experience acquired in reprocessing and MOX fuel fabrication leads to a comprehensive industrial organization with minimized impact on the environment and waste generation. Each 900 MWe PWR loaded with MOX fuel avoids piling up 2,500 m 3 per year of mine tailings. By the year 2000, less than 500 m 3 of high-level and long-lived waste will be annually produced at La Hague for the French program. The fuel cycle facilities and the associated MOX loading programs are ramping-up according to schedule. Thus, the RCR concept is a reality as well as a policy adopted in several countries. Last but not least, RCR represents a strong commitment to non-proliferation as it is the way to fully control and master the plutonium inventory

  9. Summary of national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

    1984-07-01

    Worldwide activities related to nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs are summarized. Several trends have developed in waste management strategy: All countries having to dispose of reprocessing wastes plan on conversion of the high-level waste (HLW) stream to a borosilicate glass and eventual emplacement of the glass logs, suitably packaged, in a deep geologic repository. Countries that must deal with plutonium-contaminated waste emphasize pluonium recovery, volume reduction and fixation in cement or bitumen in their treatment plans and expect to use deep geologic repositories for final disposal. Commercially available, classical engineering processing are being used worldwide to treat and immobilize low- and intermediate-level wastes (LLW, ILW); disposal to surface structures, shallow-land burial and deep-underground repositories, such as played-out mines, is being done widely with no obvious technical problems. Many countries have established extensive programs to prepare for construction and operation of geologic repositories. Geologic media being studied fall into three main classes: argillites (clay or shale); crystalline rock (granite, basalt, gneiss or gabbro); and evaporates (salt formations). Most nations plan to allow 30 years or longer between discharge of fuel from the reactor and emplacement of HLW or spent fuel is a repository to permit thermal and radioactive decay. Most repository designs are based on the mined-gallery concept, placing waste or spent fuel packages into shallow holes in the floor of the gallery. Many countries have established extensive and costly programs of site evaluation, repository development and safety assessment. Two other waste management problems are the subject of major R and D programs in several countries: stabilization of uranium mill tailing piles; and immobilization or disposal of contaminated nuclear facilities, namely reactors, fuel cycle plants and R and D laboratories.

  10. Summary of national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

    1984-07-01

    Worldwide activities related to nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs are summarized. Several trends have developed in waste management strategy: All countries having to dispose of reprocessing wastes plan on conversion of the high-level waste (HLW) stream to a borosilicate glass and eventual emplacement of the glass logs, suitably packaged, in a deep geologic repository. Countries that must deal with plutonium-contaminated waste emphasize pluonium recovery, volume reduction and fixation in cement or bitumen in their treatment plans and expect to use deep geologic repositories for final disposal. Commercially available, classical engineering processing are being used worldwide to treat and immobilize low- and intermediate-level wastes (LLW, ILW); disposal to surface structures, shallow-land burial and deep-underground repositories, such as played-out mines, is being done widely with no obvious technical problems. Many countries have established extensive programs to prepare for construction and operation of geologic repositories. Geologic media being studied fall into three main classes: argillites (clay or shale); crystalline rock (granite, basalt, gneiss or gabbro); and evaporates (salt formations). Most nations plan to allow 30 years or longer between discharge of fuel from the reactor and emplacement of HLW or spent fuel is a repository to permit thermal and radioactive decay. Most repository designs are based on the mined-gallery concept, placing waste or spent fuel packages into shallow holes in the floor of the gallery. Many countries have established extensive and costly programs of site evaluation, repository development and safety assessment. Two other waste management problems are the subject of major R and D programs in several countries: stabilization of uranium mill tailing piles; and immobilization or disposal of contaminated nuclear facilities, namely reactors, fuel cycle plants and R and D laboratories

  11. Final environmental impact statement for the construction and operation of an independent spent fuel storage installation to store the Three Mile Island Unit 2 spent fuel at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Docket Number 72-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) contains an assessment of the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) for the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) fuel debris at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental laboratory (INEEL). US Department of Energy-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is proposing to design, construct, and operate at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The TMI-2 fuel debris would be removed from wet storage, transported to the ISFSI, and placed in storage modules on a concrete basemat. As part of its overall spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management program, the US DOE has prepared a final programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS) that provides an overview of the spent fuel management proposed for INEEL, including the construction and operation of the TMI-2 ISFSI. In addition, DOE-ID has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to describe the environmental impacts associated with the stabilization of the storage pool and the construction/operation of the ISFSI at the ICPP. As provided in NRC's NEPA procedures, a FEIS of another Federal agency may be adopted in whole or in part in accordance with the procedures outlined in 40 CFR 1506.3 of the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). Under 40 CFR 1506.3(b), if the actions covered by the original EIS and the proposed action are substantially the same, the agency adopting another agency's statement is not required to recirculate it except as a final statement. The NRC has determined that its proposed action is substantially the same as actions considered in DOE's environmental documents referenced above and, therefore, has elected to adopt the DOE documents as the NRC FEIS

  12. The neutron beam intensity increase by in-core fuel management enhancement in multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.; Vukadin, Z.; Konstantinovic, J.

    1986-01-01

    The exploitation characteristics of an existing multipurpose research reactor can be increased not only by great reconstruction, but also, to the considerable extent, by the in-core fuel management sophistication. The optimisation of the in-core fuel management procedure in such reactors is governed (among others) by the identified reactor utilisation goals, i.e. by weighting factors dedicated to different utilisation goals, which are often (regarding the in-core fuel management procedure) highly controversial. In this work the best solution for in-core fuel management is sought, with the highest weighting factor dedicated to the neutron beam usage, rather than sample irradiation in the reactor core. The term in-core fuel management includes: the core configuration, the locations of the fresh fuel inflow zone and spent fuel excite zone, and the fuel transfers between these two zones (author)

  13. An innovative fuel design concept for improved light water reactor performance and safety. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulenko, J.S.; Connell, R.G.

    1995-07-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance is limited by thermal and mechanical constraints associated with the design, fabrication, and operation of fuel in a nuclear reactor. The purpose of this research was to explore a technique for extending fuel performance by thermally bonding LWR fuel with a non-alkaline liquid metal alloy. Current LWR fuel rod designs consist of enriched uranium oxide (UO 2 ) fuel pellets enclosed in a zirconium alloy cylindrical clad. The space between the pellets and the clad is filled by an inert gas. Due to the thermal conductivity of the gas, the gas space thermally insulates the fuel pellets from the reactor coolant outside the fuel rod, elevating the fuel temperatures. Filling the gap between the fuel and clad with a high conductivity liquid metal thermally bonds the fuel to the cladding, and eliminates the large temperature change across the gap, while preserving the expansion and pellet loading capabilities. The resultant lower fuel temperature directly impacts fuel performance limit margins and also core transient performance. The application of liquid bonding techniques to LWR fuel was explored for the purposes of increasing LWR fuel performance and safety. A modified version of the ESCORE fuel performance code (ESBOND) has been developed under the program to analyze the in-reactor performance of the liquid metal bonded fuel. An assessment of the technical feasibility of this concept for LWR fuel is presented, including the results of research into materials compatibility testing and the predicted lifetime performance of Liquid Metal Bonded LWR fuel

  14. Addressing the long time horizon for managing used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The time horizon that must be considered in developing an approach to managing used nuclear fuel extends many thousands of years. Such a time horizon is without precedent in environmental, economic, social, technical and public policy terms. As a first step in addressing this issue, the Nuclear Waste Management Organization convened a team of 33 individuals to undertake a formal scenarios exercise. Such an exercise is a way of framing potential futures that might occur. There is no intent to predict the future. This exercise represents the first time that the scenarios technique has been used for such a long time horizon. The approach involved identifying two principle axes of potential change: (1) social - political - environmental well-being; and (2) magnitude of the used nuclear fuel challenge. Using this organizing template, four scenarios were developed reaching out 25 years, and an additional twelve were developed at 175 years branching out from the original four. In addition, a series of sixteen possible 'end-points' were identified to span conditions 500 years out and for 10,000 years a large number of 'what- ifs' were developed. The scenarios, end-points, and what- ifs were then used to identify a number of criteria that could be used for testing proposed management options and their capacity to deal with future conditions. This paper describes this work and the role that it has played in the deliberations of the Nuclear Waste Management Organization. (author)

  15. Artificial intelligence applied to fuel management in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz S, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    In this work two techniques of artificial intelligence, neural networks and genetic algorithms were applied to a practical problem of nuclear fuel management; the determination of the optimal fuel reload for a BWR type reactor. This is an important problem in the design of the operation cycle of the reactor. As a result of the application of these techniques, comparable or even better reloads proposals than those given by expert companies in the subject were obtained. Additionally, two other simpler problems in reactor physics were solved: the determination of the axial power profile and the prediction of the value of some variables of interest at the end of the operation cycle of the reactor. Neural networks and genetic algorithms have been applied to solve many problems of engineering because of their versatility but they have been rarely used in the area of fuel management. The results obtained in this thesis indicates the convenience of undertaking further work on this area and suggest the application of these techniques of artificial intelligence to the solution of other problems in nuclear reactor physics. (Author)

  16. Challenges facing air management for fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P.B. [Department of Energy (United States); Sutton, R. [Argonne National Lab. (United States); Wagner, F.W. [Energetics Incorporated (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. automotive industry are working cooperatively under the auspices of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) to develop a six-passenger automobile that can achieve up to 80 mpg. while meeting customer needs and all safety and emission requirements. These partners are continuing to invest heavily in the research and development of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells as a clean and efficient energy conversion system for the PNGV. A critical challenge facing fuel cell systems for the PNGV is the development of efficient, compact, cost-effective air management systems. The U.S. Department of Energy has been exploring several compressor/expander options for pressurized fuel cell systems, including scroll, toroidal intersecting vane, turbine, twin screw, and piston technologies. Each of these technologies has strengths and weaknesses regarding efficiency, pressure ratio over turndown, size and weight, and cost. This paper will present data from the U.S. Department of Energy's research and development efforts on air management systems and will discusses recent program developments resulting from an independent peer review evaluation. (author)

  17. Implementation of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, L.; Tonkay, D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The Joint Convention: establishes a commitment with respect to safe management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste; requires the Parties to ''take appropriate steps'' to ensure the safety of their spent fuel and waste management activities, but does not delineate standards the Parties must meet; and seeks to attain, through its Contracting Parties, a higher level of safety with respect to management of their spent nuclear fuel, disused sealed sources, and radioactive waste

  18. Economic analysis of fuel management philosophy amendment in the second Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Guangming

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve economic benefit, the Second Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant prepares to amend its fuel management philosophy after several fuel cycles. Economic evaluation is necessary before amendment of fuel management philosophy. Strong points and shortcomings are compared in this paper between yearly 1/4 refueling philosophy and 18 months refueling philosophy. (authors)

  19. Good Practices for Water Quality Management in Research Reactors and Spent Fuel Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Water is the most common fluid used to remove the heat produced in a research reactor (RR). It is also the most common media used to store spent fuel elements after being removed from the reactor core. Spent fuel is stored either in the at-reactor pool or in away-from-reactor wet facilities, where the fuel elements are maintained until submission to final disposal, or until the decay heat is low enough to allow migration to a dry storage facility. Maintaining high quality water is the most important factor in preventing degradation of aluminium clad fuel elements, and other structural components in water cooled research reactors. Excellent water quality in spent fuel wet storage facilities is essential to achieve optimum storage performance. Experience shows the remarkable success of many research reactors where the water chemistry has been well controlled. In these cases, aluminium clad fuel elements and aluminium pool liners show few, if any, signs of either localized or general corrosion, even after more than 30 years of exposure to research reactor water. In contrast, when water quality was allowed to degrade, the fuel clad and the structural parts of the reactor have been seriously corroded. The driving force to prepare this publication was the recognition that, even though a great deal of information on research reactor water quality is available in the open literature, no comprehensive report addressing the rationale of water quality management in research reactors has been published to date. This report is designed to provide a comprehensive catalogue of good practices for the management of water quality in research reactors. It also presents a brief description of the corrosion process that affects the components of a research reactor. Further, the report provides a basic understanding of water chemistry and its influence on the corrosion process; specifies requirements and operational limits for water purification systems of RRs; describes good practices

  20. Comparative evaluation of radioactive waste management options. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, D.; Kreusch, J.; Neumann, W.

    2001-05-01

    A comprehensive presentation of the various radioactive waste options under debate has not been made so far, let alone a comparative evaluation of the options with respect to their substantiated or assumed advantages or drawbacks. However, any appropriate discussion about the pros and cons of the specific options for final decision making has to be based on a comprehensive knowledge base drawn from profound comparative evaluation of essential options. Therefore, the study reported in this publication was to serve three major purposes: Presentation of the conditions and waste management policies and approaches in selected countries, in order to compile information about the various policy goals and the full scope of argumentation, as well as the range of individual arguments used for or against specific options. - Derivation of a methodology for evaluation, including development of criteria for a comparative and qualitative evaluation of options. - Identification of possible implications for a waste management strategy for Germany, derived from the results of the comparative evaluation and the examination of the reasonings and argumentation used in the various countries. (orig./CB) [de