WorldWideScience

Sample records for fuel lattice burnup

  1. Lattice cell burnup calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.

    1977-01-01

    Accurate burnup prediction is a key item for design and operation of a power reactor. It should supply information on isotopic changes at each point in the reactor core and the consequences of these changes on the reactivity, power distribution, kinetic characters, control rod patterns, fuel cycles and operating strategy. A basic stage in the burnup prediction is the lattice cell burnup calculation. This series of lectures attempts to give a review of the general principles and calculational methods developed and applied in this area of burnup physics

  2. Development of high burnup nuclear fuel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, Ho Chun; Kang, Young Hwan; Jung, Jin Gone; Hwang, Won; Park, Zoo Hwan; Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, Bong Goo; Kim, Il Gone

    1987-04-01

    The objectives of the project are mainly to develope both design and manufacturing technologies for 600 MWe-CANDU-PHWR-type high burnup nuclear fuel, and secondly to build up the foundation of PWR high burnup nuclear fuel technology on the basis of KAERI technology localized upon the standard 600 MWe-CANDU- PHWR nuclear fuel. So, as in the first stage, the goal of the program in the last one year was set up mainly to establish the concept of the nuclear fuel pellet design and manufacturing. The economic incentives for high burnup nuclear fuel technology development are improvement of fuel utilization, backend costs plant operation, etc. Forming the most important incentives of fuel cycle costs reduction and improvement of power operation, etc., the development of high burnup nuclear fuel technology and also the research on the incore fuel management and safety and technologies are necessary in this country

  3. Progress in extending burnup of LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freshley, M.D.

    1986-04-01

    Progress in increasing burnup of LWR fuel has been and continues to be made. Initially, LWR fuels were designed to achieve a burnup of about 33 GWd/tu for PWRs and about 28 GWd/tu for BWRs. Current warranties are about 36 GWd/tu and 31 GWd/tu for PWRs and BWRs, respectively. Present optimum extended burnups (batch average) are typically about 50 GWd/tu and 45 GWd/tu for PWRs and BWRs on 12-month cycles, respectively, and about 10% higher for 18-month cycles. Thus, the goal of research and development programs of the recent past has been to achieve these burnup levels reliably with maximum duty cycle flexibility

  4. Features of fuel performance at high fuel burnups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proselkov, V.N.; Scheglov, A.S.; Smirnov, A.V.; Smirnov, V.P.

    2001-01-01

    Some features of fuel behavior at high fuel burnups, in particular, initiation and development of rim-layer, increase in the rate of fission gas release from the fuel and increase in the inner gas pressure in the fuel rod are briefly described. Basing on the analysis of the data of post-irradiation examinations of fuel rods of WWER-440 working FA and CR fuel followers, that have been operated for five fuel cycles and got the average fuel burnup or varies as 50MW-day/kgU, a conclusion is made that the WWER-440 fuel burnup can be increased at least to average burnups of 55-58 MW-day/kgU per fuel assembly (Authors)

  5. Fuel analysis code FAIR and its high burnup modelling capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, P.S.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1995-01-01

    A computer code FAIR has been developed for analysing performance of water cooled reactor fuel pins. It is capable of analysing high burnup fuels. This code has recently been used for analysing ten high burnup fuel rods irradiated at Halden reactor. In the present paper, the code FAIR and its various high burnup models are described. The performance of code FAIR in analysing high burnup fuels and its other applications are highlighted. (author). 21 refs., 12 figs

  6. High Burnup Fuel Performance and Safety Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Je Keun; Lee, Chan Bok; Kim, Dae Ho (and others)

    2007-03-15

    The worldwide trend of nuclear fuel development is to develop a high burnup and high performance nuclear fuel with high economies and safety. Because the fuel performance evaluation code, INFRA, has a patent, and the superiority for prediction of fuel performance was proven through the IAEA CRP FUMEX-II program, the INFRA code can be utilized with commercial purpose in the industry. The INFRA code was provided and utilized usefully in the universities and relevant institutes domesticallly and it has been used as a reference code in the industry for the development of the intrinsic fuel rod design code.

  7. Increased fuel burn-up and fuel cycle equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debes, M.

    2001-01-01

    Improvement of nuclear competitiveness will rely mainly on increased fuel performance, with higher burn-up, and reactors sustained life. Regarding spent fuel management, the EDF current policy relies on UO 2 fuel reprocessing (around 850 MTHM/year at La Hague) and MOX recycling to ensure plutonium flux adequacy (around 100 MTHM/year, with an electricity production equivalent to 30 TWh). This policy enables to reuse fuel material, while maintaining global kWh economy with existing facilities. It goes along with current perspective to increase fuel burn-up up to 57 GWday/t mean in 2010. The following presentation describes the consequences of higher fuel burn-up on fuel cycle and waste management and implementation of a long term and global equilibrium for decades in spent fuel management resulting from this strategy. (author)

  8. Activity ratio measurement and burnup analysis for high burnup PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shunsuke; Nauchi, Yasushi; Hayakawa, Takehito; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Suyama, Kenya

    2015-01-01

    Applying burnup credit to spent fuel transportation and storage system is beneficial. To take burnup credit to criticality safety design for a spent fuel transportation cask and storage rack, the burnup of target fuel assembly based on core management data must be confirmed by experimental methods. Activity ratio method, in which measured the ratio of the activity of a nuclide to that of another, is one of the ways to confirm burnup history. However, there is no public data of gamma-ray spectrum from high burnup fuels and validation of depletion calculation codes is not sufficient in the evaluation of the burnup or nuclide inventories. In this study, applicability evaluation of activity ratio method was carried out for high burnup fuel samples taken from PWR lead use assembly. In the gamma-ray measurement experiments, energy spectrum was taken in the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), and 134 Cs/ 137 Cs and 154 Eu/ 137 Cs activity ratio were obtained. With the MVP-BURN code, the activity ratios were calculated by depletion calculation tracing the operation history. As a result, 134 Cs/ 137 Cs and 154 Eu/ 137 Cs activity ratios for UO 2 fuel samples show good agreements and the activity ratio method has good applicability to high burnup fuels. 154 Eu/ 134 Cs activity ratio for Gd 2 O 3 +UO 2 fuels also shows good agreements between calculation results and experimental results as well as the activity ratio for UO 2 fuels. It also becomes clear that it is necessary to pay attention to not only burnup but also axial burnup distribution history when confirming the burnup of UO 2 +Gd 2 O 3 fuel with 134 Cs/ 137 Cs activity ratios. (author)

  9. Modeling of PWR fuel at extended burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Raphael Mejias

    2016-01-01

    This work studies the modifications implemented over successive versions in the empirical models of the computer program FRAPCON used to simulate the steady state irradiation performance of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods under high burnup condition. In the study, the empirical models present in FRAPCON official documentation were analyzed. A literature study was conducted on the effects of high burnup in nuclear fuels and to improve the understanding of the models used by FRAPCON program in these conditions. A steady state fuel performance analysis was conducted for a typical PWR fuel rod using FRAPCON program versions 3.3, 3.4, and 3.5. The results presented by the different versions of the program were compared in order to verify the impact of model changes in the output parameters of the program. It was observed that the changes brought significant differences in the results of the fuel rod thermal and mechanical parameters, especially when they evolved from FRAPCON-3.3 version to FRAPCON-3.5 version. Lower temperatures, lower cladding stress and strain, lower cladding oxide layer thickness were obtained in the fuel rod analyzed with the FRAPCON-3.5 version. (author)

  10. ABB PWR fuel design for high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, S.; Jourdain, P.; Limback, M.; Garde, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion, hydriding and irradiation induced growth of a based materials are important factors for the high burnup performance of PWR fuel. ABB has developed a number of Zr based alloys to meet the need for fuel that enables operation to elevated burnups. The materials include composition and processing optimised Zircaloy 4 (OPTIN TM ) and Zircaloy 2 (Zircaloy 2P), as well as advanced Zr based alloys with chemical compositions outside the composition specified for Zircaloy. The advanced alloys are either used as Duplex or as single component claddings. The Duplex claddings have an inner component of Zircaloy and an outer layer of Zr with small additions of alloying elements. ABB has furthermore improved the dimensional stability of the fuel assembly by developing stiffer and more bow resistant guide tubes while debris related fuel failures have been eliminated from ABB fuel by introducing the Guardian TM grid. Intermediate flow mixers that improve the thermal hydraulic performance and the dimensional stability of the fuel has also been developed within ABB. (author)

  11. Criticality implications of extended fuel burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, R.

    1985-01-01

    The advantages (and disadvantages) of extended fuel burnup to the operating nuclear utility are well documented. Niagara Mohawk found that increasing the refueling interval from 12 months to 24 months led to a 60% increase in full power days per refueling outage day. Today's incentives include decreasing spent fuel accumulation, increasing plant capacity factors through longer cycles, reducing uranium ore requirements, reducing radiation exposures of workers during refueling, reduced disposal requirements, reduced number of heat-up and cooldown transients, reduced plant security burden (during refueling outages), and reduced manpower time for regulatory review

  12. Advanced fuel cycles and burnup increase of WWER-440 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proselkov, V.; Saprykin, V.; Scheglov, A.

    2003-01-01

    Analyses of operational experience of 4.4% enriched fuel in the 5-year fuel cycle at Kola NPP Unit 3 and fuel assemblies with Uranium-Gadolinium fuel at Kola NPP Unit 4 are made. The operability of WWER-440 fuel under high burnup is studied. The obtained results indicate that the fuel rods of WWER-440 assemblies intended for operation within six years of the reviewed fuel cycle totally preserve their operability. Performed analyses have demonstrated the possibility of the fuel rod operability during the fuel cycle. 12 assemblies were loaded into the reactor unit of Kola 3 in 2001. The predicted burnup in six assemblies was 59.2 MWd/kgU. Calculated values of the burnup after operation for working fuel assemblies were ∼57 MWd/kgU, for fuel rods - up to ∼61 MWd/kgU. Data on the coolant activity, specific activity of the benchmark iodine radionuclides of the reactor primary circuit, control of the integrity of fuel rods of the assemblies that were operated for six years indicate that not a single assembly has reached the criterion for the early discharge

  13. Burnup determination of a fuel element concerning different cooling times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriquez, C.; Navarro, G.; Pereda, C.; Mutis, O.; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Zeituni, Carlos A.

    2002-01-01

    In this work we report a complete set of measurements and some relevant results regarding the burnup process of a fuel element containing low enriched nuclear fuel. This fuel element was fabricated at the Plant of Fuel Elements of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN). Measurements were carried out using gamma-ray spectroscopy and the absolute burnup of the fuel element was determined. (author)

  14. Analysis of BWR high burnup fuel in LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Sedano, Pablo; Dey Navarro, Jose Manuel; Gallego Cabezon, Ines; Orive Moreno, Raul

    2004-01-01

    High Burnup Fuel Behaviour has been growing in importance since middle 80's when pellet microstructure changes (rim effect) and cladding oxidation rates increase were observed. Later on, Cadarache reactivity tests revealed cladding integrity failures below safety limits. These phenomena, occurred at high burnup, stressed the necessity of having a wide experimental data base that would allow to dispose non-extrapolated data of material properties submitted to higher burnups than 40000 MWd/TM and data of new materials at the same time. One of the objectives of the EPRI's Fuel Reliability Program is to establish the bases for the licensing of nuclear fuel to burnup levels beyond the current licensed value of 62 GWd/MTU rod average burnup. The technical bases to support those high burnup levels are being developed. One of the licensing points of concern is the behaviour of the high burnup fuel in LOCA conditions. To respond to this concern a series of LOCA experiments are being performed at Argonne National Laboratory using fuel rods from Limerick NPP at 57 GWd/TM and H.B. Robinson at 67 GWd/MTU. When the ANL tests have been finished, a conservative Peak Cladding Temperature/ Equivalent Cladding Reacted (PCT/ECR) limit will be determine from the residual ductility tests to be applied to the high burnup fuel. This makes necessary to determine the behaviour of the high burnup fuel in LOCA conditions and to determine the available safety margin. In licensing LOCA calculations, corresponding to present core designs and future core designs, the calculated PCT and ECR values as a function of the fuel burnup could be used to determine the relative severity of LOCA for the high burnup fuel. This report presents the LOCA analyses performed by IBERDROLA (Spanish utility), using results from the Cofrentes NPP (BWR-6) LOCA evaluations. (authors)

  15. BNFL assessment of methods of attaining high burnup MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.; Hesketh, K.W.; Palmer, I.D.

    1998-01-01

    It is clear that in order to maintain competitiveness with UO 2 fuel, the burnups achievable in MOX fuel must be enhanced beyond the levels attainable today. There are two aspects which require attention when studying methods of increased burnups - cladding integrity and fuel performance. Current irradiation experience indicates that one of the main performance issues for MOX fuel is fission gas retention. MOX, with its lower thermal conductivity, runs at higher temperatures than UO 2 fuel; this can result in enhanced fission gas release. This paper explores methods of effectively reducing gas release and thereby improving MOX burnup potential. (author)

  16. Safety aspects related to burnup increase and mixed oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.

    1992-01-01

    The dominant factor presently limiting the fuel burnup is the response of the cladding hulls. To maintain the excellent record of very low fuel failure rates for increased burnups further technical development is underway and necessary. In the nuclear fuel cycle increased burnups lead to a remarkable reduction of spent fuel arisings and corresponding economic savings. Thermal recycling of plutonium presently provides an opportunity to reduce the rising accumulation of plutunium in a situation where there is no demand for this fissile material in Fast Breeder Reactors. (orig.) [de

  17. Basic study of thermal and mechanical properties of high burnup MOX fuel with simulated burnup fuel. 3. Co-operative new technology research. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Uno, Masayoshi; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Namekawa, Takashi

    2001-03-01

    For the purpose of establishment of evaluation method of thermal and mechanical properties of high burnup uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel of fast reactor, basic study on both simulated burnup fuel technique and computer simulation was carried out. The following results were obtained in this study. Simulated burnup MOX fuel, that is urania fuel added ceria simulating plutonia and niobium oxide or zirconia simulating soluble fission products (FP), was synthesized. It is suggested that thermal conductivity of high burnup MOX fuel can be derived from the thermal conductivity of fuel matrix and the concentration of the soluble FP. It is also suggested that elastic constants and Vickers hardness decreases with the increase of the concentration of soluble FP. As the gray oxide phase with perovskite type structure, which is major FP precipitation, BaUO 3 , BaZrO 3 , and BaCeO 3 were chosen and the correlations between thermal and mechanical properties were investigated. It is shown that the thermal conductivity and the correlations of the mechanical properties of BaUO 3 are resemble to those of quartz glass. The molecular dynamics calculations show the capability of simulation of heat capacity and thermal conductivity of MOX fuel, using basic properties, such as lattice parameters, thermal expansion coefficients and compressibilities, of UO 2 and PuO 2 . Obtained results in this study suggests that the molecular dynamics simulation technique is usefulness and applicable to estimate the physico-chemical properties of MOX fuel. Evaluation of thermal conductivity degradation effect of FP precipitation in high burnup MOX fuel with finite element method, exhibited that the effect of FP precipitation was about a figure lower than that of soluble FP. (author)

  18. Technical Basis for Peak Reactivity Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Mertyurek, Ugur [ORNL; Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate application of burnup credit for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase (1) investigates applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in spent fuel pools (SFPs) to storage and transportation systems and (2) evaluates validation of both reactivity (keff) calculations and burnup credit nuclide concentrations within these methods. The second phase will focus on extending burnup credit beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the first phase, including an analysis of lattice design parameters and depletion effects, as well as both validation components. Initial efforts related to extended burnup credit are discussed in a companion paper. Peak reactivity analyses have been used in criticality analyses for licensing of BWR fuel in SFPs over the last 20 years. These analyses typically combine credit for the gadolinium burnable absorber present in the fuel with a modest amount of burnup credit. Gadolinium burnable absorbers are used in BWR assemblies to control core reactivity. The burnable absorber significantly reduces assembly reactivity at beginning of life, potentially leading to significant increases in assembly reactivity for burnups less than 15–20 GWd/MTU. The reactivity of each fuel lattice is dependent on gadolinium loading. The number of gadolinium-bearing fuel pins lowers initial lattice reactivity, but it has a small impact on the burnup and reactivity of the peak. The gadolinium concentration in each pin has a small impact on initial lattice reactivity but a significant effect on the reactivity of the peak and the burnup at which the peak occurs. The importance of the lattice parameters and depletion conditions are primarily determined by their impact on the gadolinium depletion. Criticality code validation for BWR burnup

  19. Simulation of integral local tests with high-burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyori, G.

    2011-01-01

    The behaviour of nuclear fuel under LOCA conditions may strongly depend on the burnup-dependent fuel characteristics, as it has been indicated by recent integral experiments. Fuel fragmentation and the associated fission gas release can influence the integral fuel behaviour, the rod rupture and the radiological release. The TRANSURANUS fuel performance code is a proper tool for the consistent simulation of burnup-dependent phenomena during normal operation and the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod in a subsequent accident. The code has been extended with an empirical model for micro-cracking induced FGR and fuel fragmentation and verified against integral LOCA tests of international projects. (author)

  20. Problems associated with high burnup of VVER reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshetnikov, F.G.; Golovin, I.S.; Bibilashvili, Yu.K.; Solyany, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    One of the principal direction of improving the characteristics of the thermal power reactor fuel cycle is to increase the burn-up of fuel in fuel elements. So in future for VVER-1000 elements the planned burn-up of fuel must be up to 40000-50000 MW-day/t U. The realization of those parameters would permit a substantial decrease in the consumption of natural uranium in the open fuel cycle, a considerable reduction of the load on fuel element fabrication and reprocessing plants, which will favourably affect the whole economics of the fuel - power cycle. However, the position of the optimum of the fuel component of the cost depending on burn-up is determined not only by the economy of uranium, the cost of fuel element fabrication processes, uranium enrichment and the chemical reprocessing of burnt fuel, but also by the provision of the required safety of high burn-up fuel elements. Thus, scientists and designing engineers face the problem of designing serviceable and reliable thermal power reactor fuel elements intended for longer service life and higher burn-ups and ensuring the safety of the whole reactor plant. This paper deals with some of the aspects of this most complicated problem for the fuel elements of VVER type only

  1. Advances in Metallic Fuels for High Burnup and Actinide Transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, S. L.; Harp, J. M.; Chichester, H. J. M.; Fielding, R. S.; Mariani, R. D.; Carmack, W. J.

    2016-10-01

    Research and development activities on metallic fuels in the US are focused on their potential use for actinide transmutation in future sodium fast reactors. As part of this application, there is a desire to demonstrate a multifold increase in burnup potential. A number of metallic fuel design innovations are under investigation with a view toward significantly increasing the burnup potential of metallic fuels, since higher discharge burnups equate to lower potential actinide losses during recycle. Promising innovations under investigation include: 1) lowering the fuel smeared density in order to accommodate the additional swelling expected as burnups increase, 2) utilizing an annular fuel geometry for better geometrical stability at low smeared densities, as well as the potential to eliminate the need for a sodium bond, and 3) minor alloy additions to immobilize lanthanide fission products inside the metallic fuel matrix and prevent their transport to the cladding resulting in fuel-cladding chemical interaction. This paper presents results from these efforts to advance metallic fuel technology in support of high burnup and actinide transmutation objectives. Highlights include examples of fabrication of low smeared density annular metallic fuels, experiments to identify alloy additions effective in immobilizing lanthanide fission products, and early postirradiation examinations of annular metallic fuels having low smeared densities and palladium additions for fission product immobilization.

  2. Extended burnup with SEU fuel in Atucha-1 NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, L.; Casario, J.; Fink, J.; Perez, R.; Higa, M.

    2002-01-01

    Atucha-1 is a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor originally fuelled with natural uranium. Fuel Assemblies consist of 36 fuel rods and the active length is 5300 mm. The total length of the fuel assembly is about 6 m. The average discharge burnup of natural UO 2 fuel is 5900 MWd/tU. After the deregulation of the Argentine electricity market there was an important incentive to reduce the impact of fuel cost on the cost of generation. To keep the competitiveness of the nuclear energy against another sources of electricity it was necessary to reduce the cost of the nuclear fuel. With this objective a program to introduce SEU (0.85 % 235 U) fuel in Atucha-1 was launched in 1993. As a result of this program the average SEU fuel discharge burnup increased to more than 11000 MWd/tU. The first SEU fuels were introduced in Atucha-1 in 1995 and, in the present stage of the program, 71% of core positions are loaded with this type of fuel. This paper describes key aspects of Atucha-1 fuel design and their relevance limiting the burnup extension and shows relevant data regarding the SEU in-reactor performance. At the present time 125 SEU Fuel Assemblies have been irradiated without failures associated with the extended burnup or unfavorable influences on the operation of the power station. (author)

  3. Analysis of burnup credit on spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, T.; Sasahara, A.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical analyses were carried out on high burnup UO 2 (65 GWd/t) and MOX (45 GWd/t) spent fuel pins. Measured data of the composition of nuclides from 234 U to 242 Pu were used for evaluation of ORIGEN-2/82 code. Criticality calculations were executed for the casks which were being designed to store 52 BWR or 21 PWR spent fuel assemblies. The reactivity biases were evaluated for (1) axial and horizontal profiles of burnup, and void history (BWR), (2) operational histories such as control rod insertion history, BPR insertion history and others, and (3) calculational accuracy of ORIGEN-2/82 code on the composition of nuclides. Present evaluation shows that introduction of burnup credit has a substantial merit in criticality safety analysis of the cask, even if these reactivity biases are considered. The concept of equivalent uniform burnup was adapted for present reactivity bias evaluation and showed a possibility of simplifying the reactivity bias evaluation in burnup credit. Finally, adapting procedures of burnup credit such as the burnup meter were evaluated. (author)

  4. Impact of extended burnup on the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Advisory Group Meeting was held in Vienna from 2 to 5 December 1991, to review, analyse, and discuss the effects of burnup extension in both light and heavy water reactors on all aspects of the fuel cycle. Twenty experts from thirteen countries participated in this meeting. There was consensus that both economic and environmental benefits are driving forces toward the achievement of higher burnups and that the present trend of burnup extension may be expected to continue. The extended burnup has been considered for the three main stages of the fuel cycle: the front end, in-reactor issues and the back end. Thirteen papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. An optimized BWR fuel lattice for improved fuel utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernander, O.; Helmersson, S.; Schoen, C.G.

    1984-01-01

    Optimization of the BWR fuel lattice has evolved into the water cross concept, termed ''SVEA'', whereby the improved moderation within bundles augments reactivity and thus improves fuel cycle economy. The novel design introduces into the assembly a cruciform and double-walled partition containing nonboiling water, thus forming four subchannels, each of which holds a 4x4 fuel rod bundle. In Scandinavian BWRs - for which commercial SVEA reloads are now scheduled - the reactivity gain is well exploited without adverse impact in other respects. In effect, the water cross design improves both mechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance. Increased average burnup is also promoted through achieving flatter local power distributions. The fuel utilization savings are in the order of 10%, depending on the basis of comparison, e.g. choice of discharge burnup and lattice type. This paper reviews the design considerations and the fuel utilization benefits of the water cross fuel for non-Scandinavian BWRs which have somewhat different core design parameters relative to ASEA-ATOM reactors. For one design proposal, comparisons are made with current standard 8x8 fuel rod bundles as well as with 9x9 type fuel in reactors with symmetric or asymmetric inter-assembly water gaps. The effect on reactivity coefficients and shutdown margin are estimated and an assessment is made of thermal-hydraulic properties. Consideration is also given to a novel and advantageous way of including mixed-oxide fuel in BWR reloads. (author)

  6. Credit to fuel burnup for criticality safety evaluations in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, J.M.; Recio, M.

    1998-01-01

    The status of development of burnup credit for criticality safety analyses in Spain is described in this paper. Ongoing activities in the country in this field, both national and international, are resumed. Burnup credit is currently being applied to wet storage of PWR fuel, and credit to integral burnable absorbers is given for BWR fuel storage. It is envisaged to apply burnup credit techniques to the new generation of transport casks now in the design phase. The analysis methodologies submitted for the analyses of PWR and BWR fuel wet storage are outlined. Analysis characteristics specific to burnup credit are described, namely the need to increase the experimental data to allow for a more detailed validation of the depletion codes, and of the criticality codes when applied to spent fuel. Reactivity effects that arise in burnup credit analysis, such as axial and radial effects, fuel irradiation history and others are revised. The methods used to address them in the approved methodologies are outlined. Finally, the regulatory approach used to accept these new analytical methodologies is described. (author)

  7. Transient behaviour of high burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The main subjects of the meeting were the discussion of regulatory background, integral tests and analysis, plant calculations, separate-effect test and analysis, concerning high burnup phenomena during RIA accidents in reactors, especially LWR, BWR and PWR type reactors. 32 papers were abstracted and indexed individually for the INIS database. (R.P.)

  8. Ultrasonic measurement of high burn-up fuel elastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laux, D.; Despaux, G.; Augereau, F.; Attal, J.; Gatt, J.; Basini, V.

    2006-01-01

    The ultrasonic method developed for the evaluation of high burn-up fuel elastic properties is presented hereafter. The objective of the method is to provide data for fuel thermo-mechanical calculation codes in order to improve industrial nuclear fuel and materials or to design new reactor components. The need for data is especially crucial for high burn-up fuel modelling for which the fuel mechanical properties are essential and for which a wide range of experiments in MTR reactors and high burn-up commercial reactor fuel examinations have been included in programmes worldwide. To contribute to the acquisition of this knowledge the LAIN activity is developing in two directions. First one is development of an ultrasonic focused technique adapted to active materials study. This technique was used few years ago in the EdF laboratory in Chinon to assess the ageing of materials under irradiation. It is now used in a hot cell at ITU Karlsruhe to determine the elastic moduli of high burnup fuels from 0 to 110 GWd/tU. Some of this work is presented here. The second on going programme is related to the qualification of acoustic sensors in nuclear environments, which is of a great interest for all the methods, which work, in a hostile nuclear environment

  9. Burnup credit feasibility for BWR spent fuel shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Considerable interest in the allowance of reactivity credit for the exposure history of power reactor fuel currently exists. This ''burnup credit'' issue has the potential to greatly reduce risk and cost when applied to the design and certification of spent of fuel casks used for transportation and storage. Analyses 1 have shown the feasibility estimated the risk and economic incentives for allowing burnup credit in pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel shipping cask applications. This paper summarizes the extension of the previous PWR feasibility assessments to boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel. As with the PWR analysis, the purpose was not verification of burnup credit (see ref. 2 for ongoing work in this area) but a reasonable assessment of the feasibility and potential gains from its use in BWR applications. This feasibility analysis aims to apply simple methods that adequately characterize the time-dependent isotopic compositions of typical BWR fuel. An initial analysis objective was to identify a simple and reliable method for characterizing BWR spent fuel. The method includes characterization of a typical pin-cell spectrum, using a one-dimensional (1-D) model of a BWR assembly. The calculated spectrum allows burnup-dependent few-group material constants to be generated. Point depletion methods were then used to obtain the time-varying characteristics of the fuel. These simple methods were validated, where practical, with multidimensional methods. 6 refs., 1 tab

  10. TRIGA fuel burn-up calculations and its confirmation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, R., E-mail: rustamzia@yahoo.co [Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien)/Atominstitute (ATI), Stadionallee 2, A-1020, Vienna (Austria); Karimzadeh, S.; Boeck, H. [Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien)/Atominstitute (ATI), Stadionallee 2, A-1020, Vienna (Austria)

    2010-05-15

    The Cesium (Cs-137) isotopic concentration due to irradiation of TRIGA Fuel Elements FE(s) is calculated and measured at the Atominstitute (ATI) of Vienna University of Technology (VUT). The Cs-137 isotope, as proved burn-up indicator, was applied to determine the burn-up of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor FE. This article presents the calculations and measurements of the Cs-137 isotope and its relevant burn-up of six selected Spent Fuel Elements SPE(s). High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy based non-destructive method is employed to measure spent fuel parameters. By the employment of this method, the axial distribution of Cesium-137 for six SPE(s) is measured, resulting in the axial burn-up profiles. Knowing the exact irradiation history and material isotopic inventory of an irradiated FE, six SPE(s) are selected for on-site gamma scanning using a special shielded scanning device developed at the ATI. This unique fuel inspection unit allows to scan each millimeter of the FE. For this purpose, each selected FE was transferred to the fuel inspection unit using the standard fuel transfer cask. Each FE was scanned at a scale of 1 cm of its active length and the Cs-137 activity was determined as proved burn-up indicator. The measuring system consists of a high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) together with suitable fast electronics and on-line PC data acquisition module. The absolute activity of each centimeter of the FE was measured and compared with reactor physics calculations. The ORIGEN2, a one-group depletion and radioactive decay computer code, was applied to calculate the activity of the Cs-137 and the burn-up of selected SPE. The deviation between calculations and measurements was in range from 0.82% to 12.64%.

  11. Achieving High Burnup Targets With Mox Fuels: Techno Economic Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement Ravi Chandar, S.; Sivayya, D.N.; Puthiyavinayagam, P.; Chellapandi, P.

    2013-01-01

    For a typical MOX fuelled SFR of power reactor size, Implications due to higher burnup have been quantified. Advantages: – Improvement in the economy is seen upto 200 GWd/ t; Disadvantages: – Design changes > 150 GWd/ t bu; – Need for 8/ 16 more fuel SA at 150/ 200 GWd/ t bu; – Higher enrichment of B 4 C in CSR/ DSR at higher bu; – Reduction in LHR may be required at higher bu; – Structural material changes beyond 150 GWd/ t bu; – Reprocessing point of view-Sp Activity & Decay heat increase. Need for R & D is a must before increasing burnup. bu- refers burnup. Efforts to increase MOX fuel burnup beyond 200 GWd/ t may not be highly lucrative; • MOX fuelled FBR would be restricted to two or four further reactors; • Imported MOX fuelled FBRs may be considered; • India looks towards launching metal fuel FBRs in the future. – Due to high Breeding Ratio; – High burnup capability

  12. Investigation of Burnup Credit Issues in BWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.; DeHart, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    Calculations for long-term-disposal criticality safety of spent nuclear fuel requires the application of burnup credit because of the large mass of fissile material that will be present in the repository. Burnup credit calculations are based on depletion calculations that provide a conservative estimate of spent fuel contents, followed by criticality calculations to assess the value of keff for a spent fuel cask or a fuel configuration under a variety of probabilistically derived events. In order to ensure that the depletion calculation is conservative, it is necessary to both qualify and quantify assumptions that can be made in depletion models used to characterize spent fuel. Most effort in the United States this decade has focused on burnup issues related to pressurized-water reactors. However, requirements for the permanent disposal of fuel from boiling-water reactors has necessitated development of methods for prediction of spent fuel contents for such fuels. Concomitant with such analyses, validation is also necessary. This paper provides a summary of initial efforts at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to better understand and validate spent fuel analyses for boiling-water-reactor fuel

  13. Fission gas release from fuel at high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.O.; Beyer, C.E.; Voglewede, J.C.

    1978-03-01

    The release of fission gas from fuel pellets at high burnup is reviewed in the context of the safety analysis performed for reactor license applications. Licensing actions are described that were taken to correct deficient gas release models used in these safety analyses. A correction function, which was developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff and its consultants, is presented. Related information, which includes some previously unpublished data, is also summarized. The report thus provides guidance for the analysis of high burnup gas release in licensing situations

  14. Criticality safety assessment by assuming spent fuel burnup distribution. Examination of various methods for setting burnup (1) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasushi; Okuno, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori

    2004-03-01

    Firstly, concerning the methods to set burnup for depletion calculation linked with criticality safety evaluation taking burnup credit into consideration, the upper 50 cm averaged burnups approved by regulations in European countries and USA are comparatively evaluated. Secondary, errors produced by different shapes of axial spent fuel burnup distribution assumed for criticality calculation, bias errors associated with depletion calculation compensated by correction factors applied to calculated nuclide isotopic composition, and statistic errors exerted by variation of irradiation history parameters used as input data for depletion calculation, are separately evaluated by performing criticality analyses with the spent fuel transport cask model of OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark. As a result, methods are proposed to set equivalent burnups reduced from a given burnup so as to compensate these errors to obtain criticality calculation results on the conservative side. Finally, 'Equivalent Uniform Burnup' and Equivalent Initial Enrichment' which are derived by incorporating these errors synthetically, are described to mention possibility of their common usage irrespective of difference in spent fuel transport cask specification. (author)

  15. Burnup credit in operations in the British nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, P.R.; Rice, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) is involved in all aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle, including the transport, storage, and reprocessing of irradiated oxide fuel. Irradiated fuel is transported from reactor sites to BNFL Sellafield in Cumbria, where it is stored in ponds. In the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP), the design of the plant and the associated processes must ensure safe operation, and often pessimistic assumptions are made about the materials involved. Currently, BNFL assumes that fuel is unirradiated for the purposes of criticality assessment and takes no account of the reduction in reactivity known to occur with fuel irradiation. It is recognized that the unirradiated fuel assumption can impose substantial economic liability because the introduction of burnup arguments have the potential to lead to increased fuel transport payloads, increased capacity in fuel stores, increased plant throughputs, and a reduction in costly neutron poisoning. It is of prime importance that a methodology be established covering fuel identification, burnup quantification, inventory prediction, and reactivity calculation to enable BNFL to convince the regulatory bodies that there is an adequate margin to criticality safety in assessments. It is our goal to establish a route that will show that having taken all error margins into account, the operations are adequately safe, allowing for the irradiation of the fuel

  16. Methods of RECORD, an LWR fuel assembly burnup code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skardhamar, T.; Naess, H.K.

    1982-06-01

    The RECORD computer code is a detailed rector physics code for performing efficient LWR fuel assembly calculations, taking into account most of the features found in BWR and PWR fuel designs. The code calculates neutron spectrum, reaction rates and reactivity as a function of fuel burnup, and it generates the few-group data required for use in full scale core simulation and fuel management calculations. The report describes the methods of the RECORD computer code and the basis for fundamental models selected, and gives a review of code qualifications against measured data. (Auth. /RF)

  17. Models for fuel rod behaviour at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernkvist, Lars O.; Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    This report deals with release of fission product gases and irradiation-induced restructuring in uranium dioxide nuclear fuel. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloy clad tubes to light water reactor fuel rods is also discussed. Computational models, suitable for implementation in the FRAPCON-3.2 computer code, are proposed for these potentially life-limiting phenomena. Hence, an integrated model for the calculation or thermal fission gas release by intragranular diffusion, gas trapping in grain boundaries, irradiation-induced re-solution, grain boundary saturation, and grain boundary sweeping in UO{sub 2} fuel, under time varying temperature loads, is formulated. After a brief review of the status of thermal fission gas release modelling, we delineate the governing equations for the aforementioned processes. Grain growth kinetic modelling is briefly reviewed and pertinent data on grain growth of high burnup fuel obtained during power ramps in the Third Risoe Fission Gas Release Project are evaluated. Sample computations are performed, which clearly show the connection between fission gas release and gram growth as a function of time at different isotherms. Models are also proposed for the restructuring of uranium dioxide fuel at high burnup, the so-called rim formation, and its effect on fuel porosity build-up, fuel thermal conductivity and fission gas release. These models are assessed by use of recent experimental data from the High Burnup Rim Project, as well as from post irradiation examinations of high-burnup fuel, irradiated in power reactors. Moreover, models for clad oxide growth and hydrogen pickup in PWRs, applicable to Zircaloy-4, ZIRLO or M5 cladding, are formulated, based on recent in-reactor corrosion data for high-burnup fuel rods. Our evaluation of these data indicates that the oxidation rate of ZIRLO-type materials is about 20% lower than for standard Zircaloy-4 cladding under typical PWR conditions. Likewise, the oxidation rate of M5 seems to be

  18. Transport safety of high burnup fuel elements and HAW moulds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baier, G.; Hoermann, E.; Winter, M.

    1991-09-01

    The effect of changes of the peripheral conditions laid down in the project 'Safety studies on waste management' (PSE), on the assessment of transport safety of the transport container CASTOR IIa was analysed. Changes as against the PSE are due to the reprocessing of fuel elements abroad; increased burnup of fuel elements, and changes of transport conditions by rail. The higher burnup of fuel elements has only limited effects on the activity, thermal output, neutron and gamma radiation of the inventory. The analysis of inventory data shows that increased burnup has no serious influence on the container design. In the area of neutron shielding, toughening is required which, however, is possible by simply adding further polyethylene rods. An essential effect is the notable reduction of the transport volume from 155 transports in the past to 125 transports altogether now, with an increase of the medium burnup from 40 to 50 Gwd/tSM. That entails a reduction by 18% of the collective dose during normal operation, because above all the dose-intensive handling operations are reduced. The accident risk also decreases with increasing burnup, because the effect of a reduced transport volume leading to a lower accident frequency is stronger than that of inventory increase. Reprocessing abroad has only little influence of the transport distances to be covered altogether, and so on the normal loads and incident risks proportionate to the overall distance. With regard to the HAW glass forms, a slightly higher number of forms results from the lower loading of the glass with fission products prescribed in France. The number of HAW transports therefore rises from 16 to 19 (both by road and rail). The technical changes in the area of rail transport are characterized by higher speeds of goods trains and passenger trains. However, this does not yet apply to transports with heavy containers for which a speed limit of 100 km/h continues to be valid. (orig.) [de

  19. Analysis of rim effect in high burnup (U, Gd)O2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, Takanori; Matsumura, Tetsuo; Kinoshita, Mikiyasu

    1992-01-01

    Extending burnup of LWR fuel is efficient to reduce the fuel cycle cost and the number of spent fuels. Gadolinia will be mixed in LWR fuels to control the initial reactivity of the high burnup assembly because gadolinia is one of the good burnable poisons of neutron. Rim effect in (U,Gd)O 2 fuel was analyzed by the detailed burnup analysis code VIMBURN. The rim effect in (U,Gd)O 2 is more significant than that in UO 2 fuel below 20 MWd/kgU and the difference of the rim effects in both fuels decreases as burnup proceeds above 20 MWd/kgU. The rim effects in (U,Gd)O 2 and UO 2 fuels are in the same level at high burnup of 80 MWd/kgU when the rim structure forms. The burnup rate of (U,Gd)O 2 rod is less than that of UO 2 rods surrounding the (U,Gd)O 2 rod in the assembly due to neutron absorption of gadolinium. Accordingly local burnup at the peripheral region in (U,Gd)O 2 fuel reaches the high burnup of 80 MWd/kgU a little after the local burnup in UO 2 fuel does. Therefore, it can be predicted that the impact of rim structure on the fuel behaviour in (U,Gd)O 2 fuel is as much as in UO 2 fuel at high burnup of the assembly. (author)

  20. Investigation of Burnup Credit Modeling Issues Associated with BWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2000-10-12

    Although significant effort has been dedicated to the study of burnup-credit issues over the past decade, U.S. studies to-date have primarily focused on spent pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) fuel. The current licensing approach taken by the U.S. Department of Energy for burnup credit in transportation seeks approval for PWR fuel only. Burnup credit for boiling-water-reactor (BWR) fuel has not yet been formally sought. Burnup credit for PWR fuel was pursued first because: (1) nearly two-thirds (by mass) of the total discharged commercial spent fuel in the United States is PWR fuel, (2) it can substantially increase the fuel assembly capacity with respect to current designs for PWR storage and transportation casks, and (3) fuel depletion in PWRs is generally less complicated than fuel depletion in BWRs. However, due to international needs, the increased enrichment of modern BWR fuels, and criticality safety issues related to permanent disposal within the United States, more attention has recently focused on spent BWR fuel. Specifically, credit for fuel burnup in the criticality safety analysis for long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel enables improved design efficiency, which, due to the large mass of fissile material that will be stored in the repository, can have substantial financial benefits. For criticality safety purposes, current PWR storage and transportation canister designs employ flux traps between assemblies. Credit for fuel burnup will eliminate the need for these flux traps, and thus, significantly increase the PWR assembly capacity (for a fixed canister volume). Increases in assembly capacity of approximately one-third are expected. In contrast, current BWR canister designs do not require flux traps for criticality safety, and thus, are already at their maximum capacity in terms of physical storage. Therefore, benefits associated with burnup credit for BWR storage and transportation casks may be limited to increasing the enrichment capacity and

  1. The dependence of the global neutronic parameters on the fuel burnup for CANDU SEU43 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaceanu, V.; Pavelescu, M.

    2010-01-01

    In order to reduce the total fuel costs for the CANDU reactors, mainly by extending the fuel burnup limits, some fuel bundle concepts have been developed in different CANDU owner countries. Therefore, in our Institute the SEU43 (Slightly Enriched Uranium with 43 fuel elements) project was started in early '90s. The neutronic behavior analysis of the CANDU core with SEU43 fuel was an important step in our project design. The objective of this paper is to highline an analysis of the neutronic behavior of the CANDU SEU43 core with the fuel burnup. More exactly, the study refers to the dependence of some global neutronic parameters, mainly the reactivity, on the fuel burnup. Two types of CANDU core were taken into consideration: reference core (without any reactivity devices) and perturbed core (with a strong reactivity system inserted). The considered reactivity system is the Mechanical Control Absorber (MCA) one. The performed parameters are: k eff. values, the MCA reactivity worth and flux distributions. The fuel bundles in the core are SEU43, with the fuel enrichment in U 235 of 0.96% and at nominal power. For the fuel burnup the values are: 0.00 GWd/tU (fresh fuel); 8.00 GWd/tU and 25.00 GWd/tU. For reaching this objective, a global neutronic calculation system named WIMSPIJXYZ LEGENTR is used. Starting from a 69-groups ENDF/B-V based library, this system uses three transport codes: (1) the standard lattice-cell code WIMS, for generating macroscopic cross sections in supercell option and also for burnup calculations; (2) the PIJXYZ code for 3D simulation of the MCA reactivity devices and the 3D correction of the macroscopic cross sections; (3) the LEGENTR 3D transport code for estimating global neutronic parameters (CANDU core). The analysis of the neutronic parameters consists of comparing the obtained results with the similar results calculated with the DRAGON and DIREN codes. This comparison shows a good agreement between these results. (orig.)

  2. Summary report on the French burnup credit working group. Knowledge regarding PWR UOX fuel. French Burnup Credit WG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    The 'Burnup Credit' Working Group was established in 1997 to examine the various parameters, such as the irradiation conditions, the burnup profile and the nuclides (actinides and fission products), to be taken into consideration in the criticality studies that take credit from burnup. This report offers an overview of the work that has been completed or agreed under this framework. It presents the group findings on the following topics: - the axial distribution of nuclides or the axial burnup profile; - methods for validating the actual burnup and its axial distribution; - the calculation of nuclide concentrations after irradiation; - the calculation methods that will be used to determine the effective multiplication factor for systems containing used fuel assemblies. This document gathers together the work carried out by the French Burnup Credit Working Group; it is not a guide validating a particular method for taking burnup credit into account. All of the findings presented here may serve as a basis in industry for defining a method to take account of burnup credit in criticality studies; any industrial body effectively adopting such a method will also be responsible for defining it, based on its knowledge of the used fuel assemblies and the configuration to be addressed. This document forms a collection of the work completed by the Working Group up to 1 January 2007 but does not necessarily reflect ongoing work in the various institutes. (authors)

  3. Change of fuel-to-cladding gap width with the burn-up in FBR MOX fuel irradiated to high burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Koji; Asaga, Takeo

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the dependence of the gap width change on the burn-up, the fuel-to-cladding gap widths were investigated by ceramography in a large number of FBR MOX fuel pins irradiated to high burn-up. The dependence of gap widths on the burn-up was closely connected with the formations of JOG (joint oxyde-gaine) and rim structure. The gap widths decreased gradually due to the fuel swelling until ∼30 GWd/t, but beyond this burn-up the dependence showed two different tendencies. With the increase of burn-up, the gap widths decreased due to the increase of fuel swelling in the low fuel temperature region where the rim structure was observed, but they increased in the high fuel temperature region where the JOG rich in Cs and Mo formed in the gap

  4. Burnup credit in the storage of LWR fuel - conceptual considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, O.C.; Wimpy, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    As a natural outgrowth of improved nodal calculation methods and the accessibility of detailed fuel assembly operating data from core monitoring systems, taking credit for burnup in the storage of light water reactor fuel represents a logical alternative to reracking for storing higher enriched fuel. The paper summarizes a number of array reactivity calculations that indicate: (1) taking credit for burnup leads to significantly lower array k/sub eff's/; (2) axial exposure distribution effects on array reactivity increase with exposure and are more significant in BWR than PWR fuel; (3) BWR fuel void history effects on array reactivity can be significant; and (4) an array of all fresh 3.83 wt% enriched PWR fuel is equivalent in array reactivity to a checkerboard array of 20 GWd/tonne U and fresh fuel enriched to 5.1 wt%. One approach to minimizing operator error in the handling of assemblies would be to first select and store exposed fuel in a checkerboard arrangement throughout the array. These cells could then be capped with a lockout device to preclude removal with the grappling machine. Once these assemblies were in place, all other assemblies could be safely stored in any other available cell

  5. Modelling of fission gas swelling in the high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Chan Bock; Bang, Je Gun; Jung, Yeon Ho

    1999-06-01

    Discharge burnup of the fuel in LWR has been increased to improve the fuel economy, and currently the high burnup fuel of over 70 MWd/kg U-rod avg. is being developed by the fuel vendors worldwide. At high burnup, thermal / mechanical properties of the fuel is known to change and new phenomenon could arise. This report describes the model development on fission gas swelling in high burnup UO 2 fuel. For the low burnup fuel, swelling only by the solid fission products has been considered in the fuel performance analysis. However, at high burnup fuel, swelling by fission gas bubbles can not be neglected anymore. Therefore, fission gas swelling model which can predict bubble swelling of the high burnup UO 2 fuel during the steady-state and the transient conditions in LWR was developed. Based on the bubble growth model, the empirical fission gas swelling model was developed as function of burnup, time and temperature. The model showed that fuel bubble swelling would be proportional to the burnup by the power of 1.157 and to the time by the power of 0.157. Comparison of the model prediction with the measured fission gas swelling data under the various burnup and temperature conditions showed that the model would predict the measured data reasonably well. (author). 20 refs., 8 tabs., 17 figs

  6. Analysis of high burnup pressurized water reactor fuel using uranium, plutonium, neodymium, and cesium isotope correlations with burnup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Suk Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The correlation of the isotopic composition of uranium, plutonium, neodymium, and cesium with the burnup for high burnup pressurized water reactor fuels irradiated in nuclear power reactors has been experimentally investigated. The total burnup was determined by Nd-148 and the fractional 235U burnup was determined by U and Pu mass spectrometric methods. The isotopic compositions of U, Pu, Nd, and Cs after their separation from the irradiated fuel samples were measured using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The contents of these elements in the irradiated fuel were determined through an isotope dilution mass spectrometric method using 233U, 242Pu, 150Nd, and 133Cs as spikes. The activity ratios of Cs isotopes in the fuel samples were determined using gamma-ray spectrometry. The content of each element and its isotopic compositions in the irradiated fuel were expressed by their correlation with the total and fractional burnup, burnup parameters, and the isotopic compositions of different elements. The results obtained from the experimental methods were compared with those calculated using the ORIGEN-S code.

  7. Determination of burnup grade of fuel plates by gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Perrotta, Jose A.

    1999-01-01

    This work describes absolute burnup measurements on spent MTR fuel elements by means of non-destructive gamma-ray spectroscopy which correlates activities of radioactive fission products with the fissioned mass of 235 U. Experiments based on such method were performed at the storage pool area of the IEA-R1 research reactor. The obtained results were compared with calculational ones based on neutronics. (author)

  8. Analytical and numerical study of radiation effect up to high burnup in power reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemes, M; Denis, A; Soba, A

    2012-01-01

    In the present work the behavior of fuel pellets for power reactors in the high burnup range (average burnup higher than 50 MWd/kgHM) is analyzed. For extended irradiation periods, a considerable Pu concentration is reached in the pellet periphery (rim zone), that contributes to local burnup, as long as a new microstructure develops, characterized by small grains and large pores as compared with those of the original material. In this region Xe is absent from the solid lattice (although it continues to be dissolved in the rest of the pellet). The porous microstructure in the pellet edge causes local changes in the mechanical and thermal properties, thus affecting the overall fuel behaviour. The evolution of porosity in the high burnup structure (HBS) is assumed to be determinant of the retention capacity of the fission gases released by the matrix. This is the reason why, during the latest years a considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the parameters that influence porosity. Starting from several works published in the open literature, a model was developed to describe the behaviour and evolution of porosity at local burnup values ranging from 60 to 300 MWd/KgHM. The model is mathematically expressed by a system of non-linear differential equations that take into account the open and closed porosity, the interactions between pores and the free surface and phenomena like pore's coalescence and migration and gas venting. Interactions of different orders between open and closed pores, growth of pores radius by vacancies trapping, the evolution of the pores number density, the internal pressure and over pressure within the pores, the fission gas retained in the matrix and released to the free volume are analyzed. The results of the simulations performed in the present work are in excellent agreement with experimental data available in the open literature and with results calculated by other authors (author)

  9. Oxygen stoichiometry shift of irradiated LWR-fuels at high burn-ups: Review of data and alternative interpretation of recently published results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spino, J.; Peerani, P.

    2008-01-01

    The available oxygen potential data of LWR-fuels by the EFM-method have been reviewed and compared with thermodynamic data of equivalent simulated fuels and mixed oxide systems, combined with the analysis of lattice parameter data. Up to burn-ups of 70-80 GWd/tM the comparison confirmed traditional predictions anticipating the fuels to remain quasi stoichiometric along irradiation. However, recent predictions of a fuel with average burn-up around 100 GWd/tM becoming definitely hypostoichiometric were not confirmed. At average burn-ups around 80 GWd/tM and above, it is shown that the fuels tend to acquire progressively slightly hyperstoichiometric O/M ratios. The maximum derived O/M ratio for an average burn-up of 100 GWd/tM lies around 2.001 and 2.002. Though slight, the stoichiometry shift may have a measurable accelerating impact on fission gas diffusion and release

  10. Burnup measuring method for nuclear fuel substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Iwao.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable non-destructive measurement for the amounts of fissile nucleides contained in nuclear fuel substances by the use of the difference in neutron spectra. Method: Neutrons generated from a neutron source are irradiated to a nuclear fuel substance, the neutrons generated from the nuclear fission reactions in the nuclear fuel substance are identified as epithermal neutrons and the neutrons from the neutron source as thermal neutrons and only the epithermal neutrons are detected to thereby measure the amounts of fissile neucleides in the nuclear fuel substances. For example, a neutron source is provided movably on one side of fuel assemblies placed in water and a neutron detector is situated on the other side by way of gamma-ray shield made of lead. The neutron detector is covered with a thermal neutron-absorbing substance such as cadmium and boron at the outer circumference so that only the epithermal neutrons can permeate therethrough. A high sensitivity detector for thermal neutron are used for improving the detecting efficiency, and the epithermal neutrons are introduced into hydrogen-containing substances such as paraffins to be detected as thermal neutrons. (Kawakami, Y.)

  11. Burnup code for fuel assembly by Monte Carlo code. MKENO-BURN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya; Masukawa, Fumihiro; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Kurosawa, Masayoshi; Kaneko, Toshiyuki.

    1996-12-01

    The evaluation of neutron spectrum is so important for burnup calculation of the heterogeneous geometry like recent BWR fuel assembly. MKENO-BURN is a multi dimensional burnup code that based on the three dimensional monte carlo neutron transport code 'MULTI-KENO' and the routine for the burnup calculation of the one dimensional burnup code 'UNITBURN'. MKENO-BURN analyzes the burnup problem of arbitrary regions after evaluating the neutron spectrum and making one group cross section in three dimensional geometry with MULTI-KENO. It enables us to do three dimensional burnup calculation. This report consists of general description of MKENO-BURN and the input data. (author)

  12. Burnup code for fuel assembly by Monte Carlo code. MKENO-BURN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya; Masukawa, Fumihiro; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Kurosawa, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kaneko, Toshiyuki

    1996-12-01

    The evaluation of neutron spectrum is so important for burnup calculation of the heterogeneous geometry like recent BWR fuel assembly. MKENO-BURN is a multi dimensional burnup code that based on the three dimensional monte carlo neutron transport code `MULTI-KENO` and the routine for the burnup calculation of the one dimensional burnup code `UNITBURN`. MKENO-BURN analyzes the burnup problem of arbitrary regions after evaluating the neutron spectrum and making one group cross section in three dimensional geometry with MULTI-KENO. It enables us to do three dimensional burnup calculation. This report consists of general description of MKENO-BURN and the input data. (author)

  13. chemical determination of burnup ratio in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guereli, L.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of the extent of fission are important to determine the irradiation performance of a nuclear fuel. The energy released per unit mass of uranium (burnup) can be determined from measurement of the percent of heavy atoms that have fissioned during irradiation.The preferred method for this determination is choosing a suitable fission monitor (usually ''1''4''8Nd) and its determination after separation from the fuel matrix. In thermal reactor fuels where the only heavy element in the starting material is uranium, uranium depletion can be used for burnup determination. ''2''3''5U depletion method requires measurement of uranium isotopic ratios of both irradiated and unirradiated fuel. Isotopic ratios can be determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometer following separation of uranium from the fuel matrix. Separation procedures include solvent extraction, ion exchange and anion exchange chromatography. Another fission monitor used is ''1''3''9La determination by HPLC. Because La is monoisotopic (''1''3''9La) in the fuel, it can be determined by chemical analysis techniques

  14. Pu-rich MOX agglomerate-by-agglomerate model for fuel pellet burnup analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, G.S.

    2004-01-01

    In support of potential licensing of the mixed oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium and depleted uranium for use in United States reactors, an experiment containing WG-MOX fuel is being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The WG-MOX comprises five percent PuO 2 and 95% depleted UO 2 . Based on the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) observation, the volume fraction (VF) of MOX agglomerates in the fuel pellet is about 16.67%, and PuO 2 concentration of 30.0 = (5 / 16.67 x 100) wt% in the agglomerate. A pressurized water reactor (PWR) unit WG-MOX lattice with Agglomerate-by-Agglomerate Fuel (AbAF) modeling has been developed. The effect of the irregular agglomerate distribution can be addressed through the use of the Monte Carlo AbAF model. The AbAF-calculated cumulative ratio of Agglomerate burnup to U-MAtrix burnup (AG/MA) is 9.17 at the beginning of life, and decreases to 2.88 at 50 GWd/t. The MCNP-AbAF-calculated results can be used to adjust the parameters in the MOX fuel fission gas release modeling. (author)

  15. The burnup dependence of light water reactor spent fuel oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, B.D.

    1998-07-01

    Over the temperature range of interest for dry storage or for placement of spent fuel in a permanent repository under the conditions now being considered, UO{sub 2} is thermodynamically unstable with respect to oxidation to higher oxides. The multiple valence states of uranium allow for the accommodation of interstitial oxygen atoms in the fuel matrix. A variety of stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric phases is therefore possible as the fuel oxidizers from UO{sub 2} to higher oxides. The oxidation of UO{sub 2} has been studied extensively for over 40 years. It has been shown that spent fuel and unirradiated UO{sub 2} oxidize via different mechanisms and at different rates. The oxidation of LWR spent fuel from UO{sub 2} to UO{sub 2.4} was studied previously and is reasonably well understood. The study presented here was initiated to determine the mechanism and rate of oxidation from UO{sub 2.4} to higher oxides. During the early stages of this work, a large variability in the oxidation behavior of samples oxidized under nearly identical conditions was found. Based on previous work on the effect of dopants on UO{sub 2} oxidation and this initial variability, it was hypothesized that the substitution of fission product and actinide impurities for uranium atoms in the spent fuel matrix was the cause of the variable oxidation behavior. Since the impurity concentration is roughly proportional to the burnup of a specimen, the oxidation behavior of spent fuel was expected to be a function of both temperature and burnup. This report (1) summarizes the previous oxidation work for both unirradiated UO{sub 2} and spent fuel (Section 2.2) and presents the theoretical basis for the burnup (i.e., impurity concentration) dependence of the rate of oxidation (Sections 2.3, 2.4, and 2.5), (2) describes the experimental approach (Section 3) and results (Section 4) for the current oxidation tests on spent fuel, and (3) establishes a simple model to determine the activation energies

  16. Impact on burnup performance of coated particle fuel design in pebble bed reactor with ROX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Hai Quan; Obara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The pebble bed reactor (PBR), a kind of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is expected to be among the next generation of nuclear reactors as it has excellent passive safety features, as well as online refueling and high thermal efficiency. Rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel has been studied at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as a new once-through type fuel concept. Rock-like oxide used as fuel in a PBR can be expected to achieve high burnup and improve chemical stabilities. In the once-through fuel concept, the main challenge is to achieve as high a burnup as possible without failure of the spent fuel. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact on burnup performance of different coated fuel particle (CFP) designs in a PBR with ROX fuel. In the study, the AGR-1 Coated Particle design and Deep-Burn Coated Particle design were used to make the burnup performance comparison. Criticality and core burnup calculations were performed by MCPBR code using the JENDL-4.0 library. Results at equilibrium showed that the two reactors utilizing AGR-1 Coated Particle and Deep-Burn Coated Particle designs could be critical with almost the same multiplication factor k eff . However, the power peaking factor and maximum power per fuel ball in the AGR-1 coated particle design was lower than that of Deep-Burn coated particle design. The AGR-1 design also showed an advantage in fissions per initial fissile atoms (FIFA); the AGR-1 coated particle design produced a higher FIFA than the Deep-Burn coated particle design. These results suggest that the difference in coated particle fuel design can have an effect on the burnup performance in ROX fuel. (author)

  17. Technical Issues in the development of high burnup and long cycle fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Joo; Yang, Jae Ho; Oh, Jang Soo; Kim, Keon Sik; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Nam, Ik Hui

    2012-01-01

    Over the last half century, a nuclear fuel cycle, a fuel discharged burnup and a uranium enrichment of the LWR (Light Water Reactor) fuel have continuously increased. It was the efforts to reduce the LWR fuel cycle cost, and to make reactor operation more efficiently. Improved fuel and reactor performance contribute further to the reduction and management efficiency of spent fuels. The primary incentive for operating nuclear reactor fuel to higher burnup and longer cycle is the economic benefits. The fuel cycle costs could be reduced by extending fuel discharged burnup and fuel cycle length. The higher discharged burnup can increase the energy production per unit fuel mass or fuel assembly. The longer fuel cycle can increase reactor operation flexibility and reduce the fuel changing operation and the spent fuel management burden. The margin to storage capacity limits would be also increased because high burnup and long cycle fuel reduces the mass of spent fuels. However, increment of fuel burnup and cycle length might result in the acceleration of material aging consisting fuel assembly. Then, the safety and integrity of nuclear fuel will be degraded. Therefore, to simultaneously enhance the safety and economics of the LWR fuel through the fuel burnup and cycle extension, it is indispensable to develop the innovative nuclear fuel material concepts and technologies which can overcome degradation of fuel safety. New fuel research project to extend fuel discharged burnup and cycle length has been launched in KAERI. Main subject is to develop innovative LWR fuel pellets which can provide required fuel performance and safety at extended fuel burnup and cycle length. In order to achieve the mission, we need to know that what the impediments are and how to break through current limit of fuel pellet properties. In this study, the technical issues related to fuel pellets at high burnup were surveyed and summarized. We have collected the technical issues in the literatures

  18. Determination of IRT-2M fuel burnup by gamma spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleška, Michal; Viererbl, Ladislav; Marek, Milan; Ernest, Jaroslav; Šunka, Michal; Vinš, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    A spectrometric system was developed for evaluating spent fuel in the LVR-15 research reactor, which employs highly enriched (36%) IRT-2M-type fuel. Such system allows the measurement of detailed fission product profiles. Within these measurements, nuclides such as (137)Cs, (134)Cs, (144)Ce, (106)Ru and (154)Eu may be detected in fuel assemblies with different cooling times varying between 1.67 and 7.53 years. Burnup calculations using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code data showed good agreement with measurements, though some discrepancies were observed in certain regions. These discrepancies are attributed to the evaluation of irradiation history, reactor regulation pattern and buildup schemes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanical Fatigue Testing of High Burnup Fuel for Transportation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report describes testing designed to determine the ability of high burnup (HBU) (>45 GWd/MTU) spent fuel to maintain its integrity under normal conditions of transportation. An innovative system, Cyclic Integrated Reversible-bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT), has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to test and evaluate the mechanical behavior of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under conditions relevant to storage and transportation. The CIRFT system is composed of a U-frame equipped with load cells for imposing the pure bending loads on the SNF rod test specimen and measuring the in-situ curvature of the fuel rod during bending using a set up with three linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs).

  20. Micro-Raman analysis of the fuel-cladding interface in a high burnup PWR fuel rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszak, Clément; Mermoux, Michel; Miro, Sandrine; Gutierrez, Gaëlle; Lepretre, Frédéric; Popa, Ioana; Hanifi, Karine; Zacharie-Aubrun, Isabelle; Fayette, Laurent; Chevalier, Sébastien

    2017-11-01

    New insights on the fuel-cladding bonding layer in high burnup nuclear fuel were obtained using micro-Raman spectroscopy. A specimen was specifically prepared from a cladded Zircaloy-4 fuel rod which had been irradiated to an average burnup of 58.7 GWd.tU-1 in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Both inner and outer corrosion regions were investigated. A 10-15 μm thick zirconia bonding layer between fuel and cladding materials which consisted of three distinct regions was observed. Close to the fuel, tetragonal, then monoclinic zirconia were identified as the main phases. Close to the bonding layer-cladding interface, peculiar Raman signals were observed. Similar signals were obtained for the outer zirconia scale at the metal-oxide interface, and for ion-irradiated zirconia scales grown on Zircaloy-4. Phase transitions from monoclinic to tetragonal ZrO2 are tentatively discussed in connection with irradiation damages, chemical doping, annealing, mechanical stresses and defects in the oxygen sub-lattices.

  1. Effect of Pu-rich agglomerate in MOX fuel on a lattice calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Yamamoto, Toru; Namekawa, Masakazu

    2007-01-01

    The effect of Pu-rich agglomerates in U-Pu mixed oxide (MOX) fuel on a lattice calculation has been demonstrated. The Pu-rich agglomerate parameters are defined based on the measurement data of MIMAS-MOX and the focus is on the highly enriched MOX fuel in accordance with increased burnup resulting in a higher volume fraction of the Pu-rich agglomerates. The lattice calculations with a heterogeneous fuel model and a homogeneous fuel model are performed simulating the PWR 17x17 fuel assembly. The heterogeneous model individually treats the Pu-rich agglomerate and U-Pu matrix, whereas the homogeneous model homogenizes the compositions within the fuel pellet. A continuous-energy Monte Carlo burnup code, MVP-BURN, is used for burnup calculations up to 70 GWd/t. A statistical geometry model is applied in modeling a large number of Pu-rich agglomerates assuming that they are distributed randomly within the MOX fuel pellet. The calculated nuclear characteristics include k-inf, Pu isotopic compositions, power density and burnup of the Pu-rich agglomerates, as well as the pellet-averaged Pu compositions as a function of burnup. It is shown that the effect of Pu-rich agglomerates on the lattice calculation is negligibly small. (author)

  2. Burnup performance of rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel in small pebble bed reactor with accumulative fuel loading scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanullang, Irwan Liapto; Obara, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Burnup performance using ROX fuel in PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme was analyzed. • Initial excess reactivity was suppressed by reducing 235 U enrichment in the startup condition. • Negative temperature coefficient was achieved in all condition of PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme using ROX fuel. • Core lifetime of PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme using ROX fuel was shorter than with UO 2 fuel. • In PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme using ROX fuel, achieved discharged burnup can be as high as that for UO 2 fuel. - Abstract: The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has proposed rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel as a new, once-through type fuel concept. Here, burnup performance using ROX fuel was simulated in a pebble bed reactor with an accumulative fuel loading scheme. The MVP-BURN code was used to simulate the burnup calculation. Fuel of 5 g-HM/pebble with 20% 235 U enrichment was selected as the optimum composition. Discharged burnup could reach up to 218 GWd/t, with a core lifetime of about 8.4 years. However, high excess reactivity occurred in the initial condition. Initial fuel enrichment was therefore reduced from 20% to 4.65% to counter the initial excess reactivity. The operation period was reduced by the decrease of initial fuel enrichment, but the maximum discharged burnup was 198 GWd/t. Burnup performance of ROX fuel in this reactor concept was compared with that of UO 2 fuel obtained previously. Discharged burnup for ROX fuel in the PBR with an accumulative fuel loading scheme was as high as UO 2 fuel. Maximum power density could be lowered by introducing ROX fuel compared to UO 2 fuel. However, PBR core lifetime was shorter with ROX fuel than with UO 2 fuel. A negative temperature coefficient was achieved for both UO 2 and ROX fuels throughout the operation period.

  3. Development of transport and storage cask for high burn-up spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuri, S.; Tamaki, H.; Hode, S.

    2004-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD. (MHI) has been developing various transport and storage casks (MSF cask fleet) for high burn-up spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This paper outlines the specifications and describes the features of the newly developed casks and the advanced technology that enables the maximize number of the accommodated fuel assemblies of high burn-up and short cooling period

  4. Fuel performance at high burnup for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    The present meeting was scheduled by the International Atomic Energy Agency, upon proposal of the Members of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology. The purpose of this meeting was to review the ''state-of-the-art'' in the area of Fuel Performance at High Burnup for Water Reactors. Previous IAEA meetings on this topic were held in Mol in 1981 and 1984 and on related topics in Stockholm and Lyon in 1987. Fifty-five participants from 16 countries and two international organizations attended the meeting and 28 papers were presented and discussed. The papers were presented in five sub-sessions and during the meeting, working groups composed of the session chairmen and paper authors prepared the summary of each session with conclusions and recommendations for future work. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Fuel lattice design in boiling water reactors using path relinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, A.; Ortiz, J. J.; Campos, Y.; Perusquia, R.; Montes, J. L.; Hernandez, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: A new system for the optimization of fuel lattice design in boiling water reactors (BWR), using the heuristic technique called Path Relinking was developed. The system starts with an initial uranium enrichment and gadolinium percent proposal. With this information, the system generates a seed fuel lattice, which it is used to perform an iterative process until an optimized fuel lattice design is achieved. The iterative process includes two steps. In the first one, we constructed a scatter set with 96 fuel lattices, each fuel lattice we called an element. Starting from this set, we build a reference set with 10 elements, which are the best elements according to the objective function. After, from remaining 86 elements, we build the 10 elements with the maximum distance with respect to reference set. During the iterative process, elements from both sets are used to generate a new element to update the reference set. In the second step, in order to improve the solution achieved up to this moment, two elements from the reference set for constructing new paths beyond to the neighbourhood space, are used. If the new element does not improve the solution, we continue working with the same reference set in the next iteration. The objective function includes both the power peaking factor and the effective multiplication factor at the beginning of the life of the fuel lattice. The principal idea is to minimize the power peaking factor and to keep the effective multiplication factor in a proposal interval. The fuel lattice designed corresponds to the bottom of the fuel assembly. Only, if fuel lattice fulfils the requirements, then it is evaluated at several burnup points. In order to calculate the parameters involved in the objective function the 2D Helios-1.5 code was used. The system was developed in an Alpha Workstation

  6. Thermal-mechanical analyses of fuel rods in extended burnup cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, S.R.; Sheppard, K.D.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate analytically the impact of low-leakage extended burnup cycling schemes on fuel performance in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The thermal-mechanical analysis was done with the COMETHE code. Power histories from various fuel cycling schemes were imposed on a single fuel design, and the behaviour of rod internal pressure, fuel centerline temperature, and susceptibility to PCI-induced failure assessed as a function of burnup. These estimates were made both for base load operating histories as well as power histories that included load-follow operations. The high burnup schemes were found to have potential, though not severe, increases in internal pin pressure and cladding hoop stresses. Load follow operations are not expected to degrade fuel performance at conventional burnups, but tend to aggravate the situation of tensile cladding hoop stress at higher burnups. (author)

  7. High burnup irradiation performance of annular fuel pins irradiated in fast reactor PFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganuma, M.; Koyama, S.; Asaga, T.; Noirot, J.; Lespiaux, D.; Rouault, J.; Crittenden, G.; Brown, C.

    2000-01-01

    The UK Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) has irradiated MOX annular pelleted fuel pins clad with PE16 up to burn-up of over 20% heavy atom (ha) without failure, these high burn-up fuel pins can provide the valuable data for the study of high burn-up capability. Thus, post irradiation examinations (PIE) have been performed on PFR high burn-up fuel pins, and the irradiation performance is evaluated focusing especially on the mechanical and thermal performance at high burn-up. The fuel pins from LVD and ANT assemblies were irradiated up to 23.2 and 18.9%ha (at peak burn-up). The results of LVD test pins have been evaluated, which demonstrate that these fuel pins have excellent mechanical and thermal performances at high burn-up because of the high swelling resistance of PE16, the maintenance of initial annular geometry up to high burn-up and the behavior of Fuel to Clad Joint (JOG) formation. In this paper, the newly obtained results of ANT test pins with different O/M ratio (ANT: 1.985, LVD: 1.965) are added, and compared with the LVD pins. The ANT results indicate that FCCI becomes larger and the fuel swelling behavior is different at high burn-up. However, the effects are evaluated not to be severe for the capability of high burn-up (-20%ha). Therefore, we conclude that MOX annular pelleted fuel pins clad with low swelling material have high burn-up capability in O/M ratios ranging from 1.965 to 1.985. (author)

  8. Calculation of effect of burnup history on spent fuel reactivity based on CASMO5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaobo; Xia Zhaodong; Zhu Qingfu

    2015-01-01

    Based on the burnup credit of actinides + fission products (APU-2) which are usually considered in spent fuel package, the effect of power density and operating history on k ∞ was studied. All the burnup calculations are based on the two-dimensional fuel assembly burnup program CASMO5. The results show that taking the core average power density of specified power plus a bounding margin of 0.0023 to k ∞ , and taking the operating history of specified power without shutdown during cycle and between cycles plus a bounding margin of 0.0045 to k ∞ can meet the bounding principle of burnup credit. (authors)

  9. Radiochemical Assays of Irradiated VVER-440 Fuel for Use in Spent Fuel Burnup Credit Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L J

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this spent fuel burnup credit work was to study and describe a VVER-440 reactor spent fuel assembly (FA) initial state before irradiation, its operational irradiation history and the resulting radionuclide distribution in the fuel assembly after irradiation. This work includes the following stages: (1) to pick out and select a specific spent (irradiated) FA for examination; (2) to describe the FA initial state before irradiation; (3) to describe the irradiation history, including thermal calculations; (4) to examine the burnup distribution of select radionuclides along the FA height and cross-section; (5) to examine the radionuclide distributions; (6) to determine the Kr-85 release into the plenum; (7) to select and prepare FA rod specimens for destructive examinations; (8) to determine the radionuclide compositions, isotope masses and burnup in the rod specimens; and (9) to analyze, document and process the results. The specific workscope included the destructive assay (DA) of spent fuel assembly rod segments with an ∼38.5 MWd/KgU burnup from a single VVER-440 fuel assembly from the Novovorenezh reactor in Russia. Based on irradiation history criteria, four rods from the fuel assembly were selected and removed from the assembly for examination. Next, 8 sections were cut from the four rods and sent for destructive analysis of radionuclides by radiochemical analyses. The results were documented in a series of seven reports over a period of ∼1 1/2 years

  10. Burn-up Effect to Quantity and Characteristics of Nuclear Power Plant Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurokhim

    2008-01-01

    Spent fuel Quantity and characteristics from nuclear power plant need to be predicted and understood in order to manage its appropriately. Development of nuclear fuel technology shows that increasing burn-up for a new type of nuclear reactor will be built. This paper was prepare to asses the effect of burn-up development to the quantity and characteristics of nuclear power plant spent fuel, its objective are to predict nuclear spent fuel quantity that will be built in Indonesia and also for its management purposes. Calculation conducted by assumption of 4 NPP PWR 1000 MWe type at year 2016, 2017, 2023, and 2024, using burn-up 33 and 35 (old NPP), 40, 45 and 50 GWd/tU. The result show that quantity of spent fuel from NPP decrease by using higher burn-up, using burn-up 50 GWd/tU will decrease one third of spent fuel which is generated by burn-up 33 GWd/tU. Using burn-up 50 GWd/tU accumulation of spent fuel at year 2040 will be 2210.54 ton or 3360 spent fuel assembly. However, its need to be noticed that radioactivity and potential hazard for every tonne or every spent fuel assembly is higher, so need to be managed more carefully. (author)

  11. Design and analytic evaluation of a rim effect reduction type LWR fuel for extending burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Tetsuo; Kameyama, Takanori; Kinoshita, Motoyasu

    1991-01-01

    We have designed a new concept fuel design 'Rim effect reduction type fuel' which has thin natural UO 2 layer on surface of a UO2 pellet. Our neutronic analyses with ANRB code show this fuel design can reduce rim effect (burnup at plelet rim) by about 30 GWd/t comparing a normal fuel. It is known that a high burnup fuel has different microstructure from as-fabricated one at fuel rim (which is called as rim region) due to rim effect. Therefore this fuel design can expect smaller rim region than a normal fuel. Our fuel performance analyses with EIMUS code show this fuel design can reduce fuel center temperature at high burnup if thermal conductivity of fuel pellet decreases with burnup in inverse proportion. However, this fuel design increases fuel center temperature at low and middle burnup than a normal fuel due to increase of thermal power density at pellet center. Additionally Irradiation experiment of this fuel design can be considered to offer important data which make clear the relation between rim effect and fuel performance. (author)

  12. Implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    The criticality safety analysis of spent fuel systems has traditionally assumed that the fuel is fresh. This results in significant conservatism in the calculated value of the system's reactivity. Improved calculational methods allows one to take credit for the reactivity reduction associated with fuel burnup, hence reducing the analysis conservatism while maintaining an adequate criticality safety margin. Motivation for using burnup credit in criticality safety applications is generally based on economic considerations. Although economics may be a primary factor in deciding to use burnup credit, other benefits may be realized. Many of the additional benefits of burnup credit that are not strictly economic, may be considered to contribute to public health and safety, and resource conservation and environmental quality. Interest in the implementation of burnup credit has been shown by many countries. A summary of the information gathered by the IAEA about ongoing activities and regulatory status of burnup credit in different countries is included. Burnup credit implementation introduces new parameters and effects that should be addressed in the criticality analysis (e.g., axial and radial burnup shapes, fuel irradiation history, and others). Analysis of these parameters introduces new variations as well as the uncertainties, that should be considered in the safety assessment of the system. Also, the need arises to validate the isotopic composition that results from a depletion calculation, as well as to extend the current validation range of criticality codes to cover spent fuel. The use of burnup credit implies a verification of the fuel burnup before loading for transport, storage, disposal, or reprocessing each assembly, to make sure that the burnup level achieved complies with the criteria established. Methods and procedures used in different countries are described in this report

  13. Burnup credit implementation in WWER spent fuel management systems: Status and future aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolova, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the motivation for possible burnup credit implementation in WWER spent fuel management systems in Bulgaria. The activities being done are described, namely: the development and verification of a 3D few-group diffusion burnup model; the application of the KORIGEN code for evaluation of WWER fuel nuclear inventory during reactor core lifetime and after spent fuel discharge; using the SCALE modular system (PC Version 4.1) for criticality safety analyses of spent fuel storage facilities. Future plans involving such important tasks as validation and verification of computer systems and libraries for WWER burnup credit analysis are shown. (author)

  14. High burn-up structure in nuclear fuel: impact on fuel behavior - 4005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noirot, J.; Pontillon, Y.; Zacharie-Aubrun, I.; Hanifi, K.; Bienvenu, P.; Lamontagne, J.; Desgranges, L.

    2016-01-01

    When UO 2 and (U,Pu)O 2 fuels locally reach high burn-up, a major change in the microstructure takes place. The initial grains are replaced by thousands of much smaller grains, fission gases form micrometric bubbles and metallic fission products form precipitates. This occurs typically at the rim of the pellets and in heterogeneous MOX fuel Pu rich agglomerates. The high burn-up at the rim of the pellets is due to a high capture of epithermal neutrons by 238 U leading locally to a higher concentration of fissile Pu than in the rest of the pellet. In the heterogeneous MOX fuels, this rim effect is also active, but most of the high burn-up structure (HBS) formation is linked to the high local concentration of fissile Pu in the Pu agglomerates. This Pu distribution leads to sharp borders between HBS and non-HBS areas. It has been shown that the size of the new grains, of the bubbles and of the precipitates increase with the irradiation local temperatures. Other parameters have been shown to have an influence on the HBS initiation threshold, such as the irradiation density rate, the fuel composition with an effect of the Pu presence, but also of the Gd concentration in poisoned fuels, some of the studied additives, like Cr, and, maybe some of the impurities. It has been shown by indirect and direct approaches that HBS formation is not the main contributor to the increase of fission gas release at high burn-up and that the HBS areas are not the main source of the released gases. The impact of HBS on the fuel behavior during ramp on high burn-up fuels is still unclear. This short paper is followed by the slides of the presentation

  15. Application of reactivity method to MTR fuel burn-up measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga, A.; Ravnik, M.; Cuya, R.

    2001-01-01

    Fuel element burn-up has been measured for the first time by reactivity method in a MTR reactor. The measurement was performed in RP-10 reactor of Peruvian Institute for Nuclear Energy (IPEN) in Lima. It is a pool type 10MW material testing reactor using standard 20% enriched uranium plate type fuel elements. A fresh element and an element with well defined burn-up were selected as reference elements. Several elements in the core were selected for burn-up measurement. Each of them was replaced in its original position by both reference elements. Change in excess reactivity was measured using control rod calibration curve. The burn-up reactivity worth of fuel elements was plotted as a function of their calculated burnup. Corrected burn-up values of the measured fuel elements were calculated using the fitting function at experimental reactivity for all elements. Good agreement between measured and calculated burn-up values was observed indicating that the reactivity method can be successfully applied also to MTR fuel element burn-up determination.(author)

  16. Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Yoshinori; Suyama, Kenya; Suzaki, Takenori

    2000-10-01

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled 'Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels'. Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burn-up and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report. (author)

  17. Technical Development on Burn-up Credit for Spent LWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2001-12-26

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled ''Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels.'' Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burnup and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report.

  18. Analysis of burnup credit on spent fuel transport / storage casks - estimation of reactivity bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mat sumura, T.; Sasahara, A.; Takei, M.; Takekawa, T.; Kagehira, K.; Nicolaou, G.; Betti, M.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical analyses of high burnup UO2 (65 GWd/t) and MOX (45 GWd/t) spent fuel pins were carried out. Measured data of nuclides' composition from U234 to P 242 were used for evaluation of ORIGEN-2/82 code and a nuclear fuel design code (NULIF). Critically calculations were executed for transport and storage casks for 52 BWR or 21 PWR spent fuel assemblies. The reactivity biases were evaluated for axial and horizontal profiles of burnup, and historical void fraction (BWR), operational histories such as control rod insertion history, BPR insertion history and others, and calculational accuracy of ORIGEN-2/82 on nuclides' composition. This study shows that introduction of burnup credit has a large merit in criticality safety analysis of casks, even if these reactivity biases are considered. The concept of equivalent uniform burnup was adapted for the present reactivity bias evaluation and showed the possibility of simplifying the reactivity bias evaluation in burnup credit. (authors)

  19. Application of burnup credit in spent fuel management at Russian NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koulikov, V.I.; Makarchuk, T.F.; Tikhonov, N.S.

    1998-01-01

    The article concerns implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel storage and transportation. Some of the problems with increased enrichment fuel can be resolved by use of modified transport methodology. Such as shipping in gas-filled casks only, reduced number of assemblies in casks, etc. However, the use of modified schemes of transportation results in essential financial losses. An actinide-only burnup credit is taken into account in most part of criticality calculations, and a parameter limiting loading of spent fuel in the cask or the repository is the avenge value of burnup on an assembly. The main method of burnup depth definition is its defect measurement. A short description of devices for measurement as well as some technical results of suing burnup credit approach in storage and transport are given. (author)

  20. Fabrication of DUPIC fuel pellets using high burn-up spent PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Won; Park, Geun-Il; Choi, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Technology for the direct usage of a spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors (DUPIC) was developed in KAERI to reduce the amount of spent fuel. DUPIC fuel pellets were fabricated using a dry processing method to re-fabricate CANDU fuel from spent PWR fuel without any intentional separation of fissile materials or fission products. The DUPIC fuel element fabrication process satisfied a quality assurance program in accordance with the Canadian standard. For the DUPIC fuels with various fuel burn-ups between 27,300 and 65,000 MWd/tU, the sintered pellet density decreased with increasing fuel burn-ups. Fission gas releases and powder properties of the spent fuel also influenced the DUPIC fuel characteristics. Measurement of cesium content released from green pellets revealed that their sintered density significantly depended on sintering temperature history. It was useful to establish a DUPIC fuel fabrication technology in which a high-burn-up fuel with 65,000 MWd/tU was treated. (author)

  1. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Development of a Stabilized Light Water Reactor Fuel Matrix for Extended Burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BD Hanson; J Abrefah; SC Marschman; SG Prussin

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to develop an advanced fuel matrix capable of achieving extended burnup while improving safety margins and reliability for present operations. In the course of this project, the authors improve understanding of the mechanism for high burnup structure (HBS) formation and attempt to design a fuel to minimize its formation. The use of soluble dopants in the UO 2 matrix to stabilize the matrix and minimize fuel-side corrosion of the cladding is the main focus

  2. Influence of burnup rate on the stability of nuclear fuel swelling, Annex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1966-01-01

    Positive influence of the burnup rate and precipits of the second phase on the fuel stability concerning swelling has been found according to the published results. This paper proposed a dynamic equilibrium model for the precipits state as a function of reactor power density and fuel temperature. It was estimated that the metal fuel can achieve rather high burnup rate in the heavy water power reactors [fr

  3. Basic evaluation on nuclear characteristics of BWR high burnup MOX fuel and core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, M.; Sakurai, S.; Yamaguchi, H.

    1997-01-01

    MOX fuel will be used in existing commercial BWR cores as a part of reload fuels with equivalent operability, safety and economy to UO 2 fuel in Japan. The design concept should be compatible with UO 2 fuel design. High burnup UO 2 fuels are being developed and commercialized step by step. The MOX fuel planned to be introduced in around year 2000 will use the same hardware as UO 2 8 x 8 array fuel developed for a second step of UO 2 high burnup fuel. The target discharge exposure of this MOX fuel is about 33 GWd/t. And the loading fraction of MOX fuel is approximately one-third in an equilibrium core. On the other hand, it becomes necessary to minimize a number of MOX fuels and plants utilizing MOX fuel, mainly due to the fuel economy, handling cost and inspection cost in site. For the above reasons, it needed to developed a high burnup MOX fuel containing much Pu and a core with a large amount of MOX fuels. The purpose of this study is to evaluate basic nuclear fuel and core characteristics of BWR high burnup MOX fuel with batch average exposure of about 39.5 GWd/t using 9 x 9 array fuel. The loading fraction of MOX fuel in the core is within a range of about 50% to 100%. Also the influence of Pu isotopic composition fluctuations and Pu-241 decay upon nuclear characteristics are studied. (author). 3 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  4. High Burnup Fuel: Implications and Operational Experience. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-08-01

    This publication reports on the outcome of a technical meeting on high burnup fuel experience and economics, held in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 2013. The purpose of the meeting was to revisit and update the current operational experience and economic conditions associated with high burnup fuel. International experts with significant experience in experimental programmes on high burnup fuel discussed and evaluated physical limitations at pellet, cladding and structural component levels, with a wide focus including fabrication, core behaviour, transport and intermediate storage for most types of commercial nuclear power plants

  5. Simulation of high burn-up fuel cladding and its safety assessment under LOCA condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Jun; Won, Sung Bin; Choi, Byoung Kwon; Park, Jeong Yong; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Current LOCA safety criteria was established in the beginning of 1970s and based on the results obtained from non-irradiated Zircaloy-4 claddings. Because of major advantages in fuel-cycle costs, reactor operation, and waste management, the increase in fuel discharge burn-up is current worldwide trend in the nuclear industry. As the fuel burn-up increases, various phenomena unexpected have been reported due to changes in the condition of reactor operation and in-core environment. Since, it should be considered whether the current Loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) criteria is suitable for high burn-up fuel cladding or not. In addition, many fuel vendors have recently developed new cladding alloys superior to Zircaloy-4 cladding. The performance of these advanced cladding alloys under LOCA, especially at high burn-up, is not well understood at this time. To better understand high burn-up effects and commercialize new cladding alloys, study of LOCA-related behavior of various types of high burn-up fuel cladding and their data base is essentially required. In this background, postulated LOCA test has been carried out with prehydrided Zircaloy-4 cladding as a surrogate for high burn-up cladding and the relevant results obtained are discussed

  6. Plutonium isotopic composition of high burnup spent fuel discharged from light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Yoshihiro; Okubo, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Pu isotopic composition of fuel affects FBR core nuclear characteristics very much. → Spent fuel compositions of next generation LWRs with burnup of 70 GWd/t were obtained. → Pu isotopic composition and amount in the spent fuel with 70 GWd/t were evaluated. → Spectral shift rods of high burnup BWR increases the fissile Pu fraction of spent fuel. → Wide fuel rod pitch of high burnup PWR lowers the fissile Pu fraction of spent fuel. - Abstract: The isotopic composition and amount of plutonium (Pu) in spent fuel from a high burnup boiling water reactor (HB-BWR) and a high burnup pressurized water reactor (HB-PWR), each with an average discharge burnup of 70 GWd/t, were estimated, in order to evaluate fast breeder reactor (FBR) fuel composition in the transition period from LWRs to FBRs. The HB-BWR employs spectral shift rods and the neutron spectrum is shifted through the operation cycle. The weight fraction of fissile plutonium (Puf) isotopes to the total plutonium in HB-BWR spent fuel after 5 years cooling is 62%, which is larger than that of conventional BWRs with average burnup of 45 GWd/t, because of the spectral shift operation. The amount of Pu produced in the HB-BWR is also larger than that produced in a conventional BWR. The HB-PWR uses a wider pitch 17 x 17 fuel rod assembly to optimize neutron slowing down. The Puf fraction of HB-PWR spent fuel after 5 years cooling is 56%, which is smaller than that of conventional PWRs with average burnup of 49 GWd/t, mainly because of the wider pitch. The amount of Pu produced in the HB-PWR is also smaller than that in conventional PWRs.

  7. Thermal conductivity evaluation of high burnup mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Masaki; Nakamura, Jinichi; Nagase, Fumihisa; Fuketa, Toyoshi

    2011-07-01

    The thermal conductivity formula of fuel pellet which contains the effects of burnup and plutonium (Pu) addition was proposed based on the Klemens' theory and reported thermal conductivities of unirradiated (U, Pu) O 2 and irradiated UO 2 pellets. The thermal conductivity of high burnup MOX pellet was formulated by applying a summation rule between phonon scattering parameters which show the effects of plutonium addition and burnup. Temperature of high burnup MOX fuel was evaluated based on the thermal conductivity integral which was calculated from the above-mentioned thermal conductivity formula. Calculated fuel temperatures were plotted against the linear heat rates of the fuel rods, and were compared with the fuel temperatures measured in a test reactor. Since both values agreed well, it was confirmed that the proposed thermal conductivity formula of MOX pellets is adequate.

  8. Fission gas release and fuel rod chemistry related to extended burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to review the state of the art in fission gas release and fuel rod chemistry related to extended burnup. The meeting was held in a time when national and international programmes on water reactor fuel irradiated in experimental reactors were still ongoing or had reached their conclusion, and when lead test assemblies had reached high burnup in power reactors and been examined. At the same time, several out-of-pile experiments on high burnup fuel or with simulated fuel were being carried out. As a result, significant progress has been registered since the last meeting, particularly in the evaluation of fuel temperature, the degradation of the global thermal conductivity with burnup and in the understanding of the impact on fission gas release. Fifty five participants from 16 countries and one international organization attended the meeting. 28 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the papers. Refs, figs, tabs and photos

  9. Taking burnup credit for interim storage and transportation system for BWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Ken-ichi; Ando, Y.; Kumanomido, H.; Sasaki, T.; Mitsuhashi, I.; Ueda, M.

    2001-01-01

    In order to establish a realistic burnup credit design system, a calculation system has been developed for determining isotope compositions, burnup, and criticality. The calculation system consists of several modules such as TGBLA, ORIGEN, CITATION, MCNP, and KENO. The TGBLA code is a fuel design code for LWR fuels developed in TOSHIBA Corporation. A compact measurement system for a fuel assembly has been being developed to meet requirements for the burnup determination, the neutron emission-rate evaluation, and the nuclear materials management. For a spent MOX fuel, a neutron emission rate measurement method has been being developed. The system consists of Cd-Te detectors and / or fission chambers. Some model calculations were carried out for the latest design BWR fuels. The effect of taking burnup credit for a transportation cask is shown. (authors)

  10. Implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this Technical Committee Meeting was to explore the status of international activities related to the use of burnup credit for spent fuel applications. This was the second major meeting on the issues of burnup credit for spent fuel management systems held since the IAEA began to monitor the uses of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems in 1997. Burnup credit for wet and dry storage systems is needed in many Member States to allow for increased initial fuel enrichment, and to increase the storage capacity and thus to avoid the need for extensive modifications of the spent fuel management systems involved. This document contains 31 individual papers presented at the Meeting; each of the papers was indexed separately

  11. Economic incentives and recommended development for commercial use of high burnup fuels in the once-through LWR fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, R.B.; Merckx, K.R.; Holm, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    This study calculates the reduced uranium requirements and the economic incentives for increasing the burnup of current design LWR fuels from the current range of 25 to 35 MWD/Kg to a range of 45 to 55 MWD/Kg. The changes in fuel management strategies which may be required to accommodate these high burnup fuels and longer fuel cycles are discussed. The material behavior problems which may present obstacles to achieving high burnup or to license fuel are identified and discussed. These problems are presented in terms of integral fuel response and the informational needs for commercial and licensing acceptance. Research and development programs are outlined which are aimed at achieving a licensing position and commercial acceptance of high burnup fuels.

  12. High Burn-Up Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Rob L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) approach to successfully demonstrate the controllable fatigue fracture on high burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a normal vibration mode. CIRFT enables examination of the underlying mechanisms of SNF system dynamic performance. Due to the inhomogeneous composite structure of the SNF system, the detailed mechanisms of the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interactions and the stress concentration effects at the pellet-pellet interface cannot be readily obtained from a CIRFT system measurement. Therefore, finite element analyses (FEAs) are used to translate the global moment-curvature measurement into local stress-strain profiles for further investigation. The major findings of CIRFT on the HBU SNF are as follows: SNF system interface bonding plays an important role in SNF vibration performance. Fuel structure contributes to SNF system stiffness. There are significant variations in stress and curvature of SNF systems during vibration cycles resulting from segment pellets and clad interactions. SNF failure initiates at the pellet-pellet interface region and appears to be spontaneous.

  13. Influence of porosity formation on irradiated UO2 fuel thermal conductivity at high burnup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roostaii, B.; Kazeminejad, H.; Khakshournia, S.

    2016-10-01

    Based on the existing low temperature high burnup gaseous swelling model for UO2 fuel, the matrix swelling terms are calculated and the formation of total volume porosity up to burnup of 120 MWd/KgU is computed. The irradiated UO2 thermal conductivity model based on the Maxwell-Eucken correlation for porosity factor is selected as a case study and the calculation of porosity evolution with burnup is carried out. It is shown that taking into account the formation of porosity with burnup compared to the case with constant porosity equal to as-fabricated value leads to a decrease in the UO2 fuel thermal conductivity up to 15% at high burnup values of 120 MWd/kgU. Results of the calculations are also compared with the available experimental data and good agreement was found. The conducted parametric study clearly demonstrated the impact of the key parameters on the results of the present investigation.

  14. Detailed description and user`s manual of high burnup fuel analysis code EXBURN-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Saitou, Hiroaki

    1997-11-01

    EXBURN-I has been developed for the analysis of LWR high burnup fuel behavior in normal operation and power transient conditions. In the high burnup region, phenomena occur which are different in quality from those expected for the extension of behaviors in the mid-burnup region. To analyze these phenomena, EXBURN-I has been formed by the incorporation of such new models as pellet thermal conductivity change, burnup-dependent FP gas release rate, and cladding oxide layer growth to the basic structure of low- and mid-burnup fuel analysis code FEMAXI-IV. The present report describes in detail the whole structure of the code, models, and materials properties. Also, it includes a detailed input manual and sample output, etc. (author). 55 refs.

  15. New high burnup fuel models for NRC's licensing audit code, FRAPCON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    Fuel behavior models have recently been updated within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission steady-state FRAPCON code used for auditing of fuel vendor/utility-codes and analyses. These modeling updates have concentrated on providing a best estimate prediction of steady-state fuel behavior up to the maximum burnup level s of current data (60 to 65 GWd/MTU rod-average). A decade has passed since these models were last updated. Currently, some U.S. utilities and fuel vendors are requesting approval for rod-average burnups greater than 60 GWd/MTU; however, until these recent updates the NRC did not have valid fuel performance models at these higher burnup levels. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has reviewed 15 separate effects models within the FRAPCON fuel performance code (References 1 and 2) and identified nine models that needed updating for improved prediction of fuel behavior at high burnup levels. The six separate effects models not updated were the cladding thermal properties, cladding thermal expansion, cladding creepdown, fuel specific heat, fuel thermal expansion and open gap conductance. Comparison of these models to the currently available data indicates that these models still adequately predict the data within data uncertainties. The nine models identified as needing improvement for predicting high-burnup behavior are fission gas release (FGR), fuel thermal conductivity (accounting for both high burnup effects and burnable poison additions), fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, fuel-cladding contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion, cladding mechanical properties and cladding axial growth. Each of the updated models will be described in the following sections and the model predictions will be compared to currently available high burnup data

  16. Development of base technology for high burnup PWR fuel improvement Volume 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yang Eun; Lee, Sang Hee; Bae, Seong Man [Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Research Center; Chung, Jin Gon; Chung, Sun Kyo; Kim, Sun Du [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Won; Chung, Sun Kyo; Kim, Sun Du [Korea Nuclear Fuel Development Inst., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-31

    Development of base technology for high burnup nuclear fuel -Development of UO{sub 2} pellet manufacturing technology -Improvement of fuel rod performance code -Improvement of plenum spring design -Study on the mechanical characteristics of fuel cladding -Organization of fuel failure mechanism Establishment of next stage R and D program (author). 226 refs., 100 figs.

  17. Extended burnup demonstration: reactor fuel program. Pre-irradiation characterization and summary of pre-program poolside examinations. Big Rock Point extended burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exarhos, C.A.; Van Swam, L.F.; Wahlquist, F.P.

    1981-12-01

    This report is a resource document characterizing the 64 fuel rods being irradiated at the Big Rock Point reactor as part of the Extended Burnup Demonstration being sponsored jointly by the US Department of Energy, Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and General Public Utilities. The program entails extending the exposure of standard BWR fuel to a discharge average of 38,000 MWD/MTU to demonstrate the feasibility of operating fuel of standard design to levels significantly above current limits. The fabrication characteristics of the Big Rock Point EBD fuel are presented along with measurement of rod length, rod diameter, pellet stack height, and fuel rod withdrawal force taken at poolside at burnups up to 26,200 MWD/MTU. A review of the fuel examination data indicates no performance characteristics which might restrict the continued irradiation of the fuel

  18. MTR fuel element burn-up measurements by the reactivity method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga, A.; Cuya, T.R.; Ravnik, M.

    2003-01-01

    Fuel element burn-up was measured by the reactivity method in the 10 MW Peruvian MTR reactor RP-10. The main purpose of the experiment was testing the reactivity method for an MTR reactor as the reactivity method was originally developed for TRIGA reactors. The reactivity worth of each measured fuel element was measured in its original core position in order to measure the burn-up of the fuel elements that were part of the experimental core. The burn-up of each measured fuel element was derived by interpolating its reactivity worth from the reactivity worth of two reference fuel elements of known burn-up, whose reactivity worth was measured in the position of the measured fuel element. The accuracy of the method was improved by separating the reactivity effect of burn-up from the effect of the position in the core. The results of the experiment showed that the modified reactivity method for fuel element burn-up determination could be applied also to MTR reactors. (orig.)

  19. Burnup measurements on spent fuel elements of the RP-10 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela Mora, Mariano; Gallardo Padilla, Alberto; Palomino, Jose Luis Castro, E-mail: mvela@ipen.gob.p [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN/Peru), Lima (Peru). Grupo de Calculo, Analisis y Seguridad de Reactores; Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac, E-mail: laaterre@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the measurement, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, of the average burnup attained by Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the RP-10 research reactor. Measurements were performed at the reactor storage pool area using {sup 137}Cs as the only burnup monitor, even for spent fuel elements with cooling times much shorter than two years. The experimental apparatus was previously calibrated in efficiency to obtain absolute average burnup values, which were compared against corresponding ones furnished by reactor physics calculations. The mean deviation between both values amounts to 6%. (author)

  20. Alternatives for implementing burnup credit in the design and operation of spent fuel transport casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.L.; Lake, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    It is possible to develop an optimal strategy for implementing burnup credit in spent fuel transport casks. For transport, the relative risk is rapidly reduced if additional pre-transport controls such as a cavity dryness verifications are conducted prior to transport. Some other operational and design features that could be incorporated into a burnup credit cask strategy are listed. These examples represent many of the system features and alternatives already available for use in developing a broadly based criticality safety strategy for implementing burnup credit in the design and operation of spent fuel transport casks. 4 refs., 1 tab

  1. Calculational prediction of fuel burn-up for the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Phuoc Lan; Do Quang Binh

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the method of expanding operators and functions in the neutron diffusion equations as chains of time variable is used for calculation of fuel burn-up of the Dalat nuclear reactors. A computer code, named BURREF, programmed in language Fortran-77 running on IBM PC-AT, has been developed based on this method to predict the fuel burn-up of the Dalat reactor. Some results will be presented here. (author)

  2. The Width of High Burnup Structure in LWR UO2 Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Oh, Jae-Yong; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2007-01-01

    The measured data available in the open literature on the width of high burnup structure (HBS) in LWR UO 2 fuel were analyzed in terms of pellet average burnup, enrichment, and grain size. Dependence of the HBS width on pellet average burnup was shown to be divided into three regions; while the HBS width is governed by accumulation of fission damage (i.e., burnup) for burnup below 60 GWd/tU, it seems to be restricted to some limiting value of around 1.5 mm for burnup above 75 GWd/tU due to high temperature which might have caused extensive annealing of irradiation damage. As for intermediate burnup between 60 and 75 GWd/tU, although temperature would not have been so high as to induce extensive annealing, the microstructural damage could have been partly annealed, resulting in the reduction of the HBS width. It was found that both enrichment and grain size also affects the HBS width. However, as long as the pellet average burnup is lower than about 75 GWd/tU, the effect does not appear to be significant for the enrichment and grain size that are typically used in current LWR fuel. (authors)

  3. Development of a fuel rod thermal-mechanical analysis code for high burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owaki, M.; Ikatsu, N.; Ohira, K.; Itagaki, N.

    2001-01-01

    The thermal-mechanical analysis code for high burnup BWR fuel rod has been developed by NFI. The irradiation data accumulated up to the assembly burnup of 55 GWd/t in commercial BWRs were adopted for the modeling. In the code, pellet thermal conductivity degradation with burnup progress was considered. Effects of the soluble FPs, irradiation defects and porosity increase due to RIM effect were taken into the model. In addition to the pellet thermal conductivity degradation, the pellet swelling due to the RIM porosity was studied. The modeling for the high burnup effects was also carried out for (U, Gd)O 2 and MOX fuel. The thermal conductivities of all pellet types, UO 2 , (U, Gd)O 2 and (U, Pu)O 2 pellets, are expressed by the same form of equation with individual coefficient γ in the code. The pellet center temperature was calculated using this modeling code, and compared with measured values for the code verification. The pellet center temperature calculated using the thermal conductivity degradation model agreed well with the measured values within ±150 deg. C. The influence of rim porosity on pellet center temperature is small, and the temperature increase in only 30 deg. C at 75 GWd/t and 200 W/cm. The pellet center temperature of MOX fuel was also calculated, and it was found that the pellet center temperature of MOX fuel with 10wt% PuO 2 is about 60 deg. C higher than UO 2 fuel at 75 GWd/t and 200 W/cm. (author)

  4. RIM formation and its effect on fission gas release in water reactor fuels at high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanadham, C.S.; Sah, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    Water Reactor Fuels irradiated to burnup of more than 45 MWD/kg were found by several investigators to contain a porous region near the pellet periphery with submicroscopic grain sizes and a local burnup higher than the average fuel burnup. The resonance capture of neutrons in the rim region results in higher plutonium concentrations there, which results in more fissions, more accumulated burnup and more defects in the microstructure. The exact mechanism of the formation of the rim microstructure is still not very clear. This so-called RIM effect results in different properties in the rim region compared to the rest of the fuel pellet. The thermal conductivity of the rim region is significantly degraded, thereby resulting in increases in the fuel center temperature and higher fission gas release. The modelling of the effects of the rim on fuel properties and fission gas release so far has been largely empirical in nature. A threshold burnup is usually identified beyond which the RIM formation starts, and then a growth rate of the rim with burnup is assumed. This paper describes the current understanding of the Rim Effect and its consequences on fission gas release in water reactor fuels. The approach of modelling rim effect in computer code PROFESS is also described. (author)

  5. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIB. Burnup calculations of BWR fuel assemblies for storage and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-02-01

    The report describes the final results of the Phase IIIB Benchmark conducted by the Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality Safety under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The Benchmark was intended to compare the predictability of current computer code and data library combinations for the atomic number densities of an irradiated PWR fuel assembly model. The fuel assembly was irradiated under specific power of 25.6 MW/tHM up to 40 GWd/tHM and cooled for five years. The void fraction was assumed to be uniform throughout the channel box and constant, at 0, 40 and 70%, during burnup. In total, 16 results were submitted from 13 institutes of 7 countries. The calculated atomic number densities of 12 actinides and 20 fission product nuclides were found to be for the most part within a range of {+-}10% relative to the average, although some results, esp. {sup 155}Eu and gadolinium isotopes, exceeded the band, which will require further investigation. Pin-wise burnup results agreed well among the participants. The results in the infinite neutron multiplication factor k{sub {infinity}} also accorded well with each other for void fractions of 0 and 40%; however some results deviated from the averaged value noticeably for the void fraction of 70%. (author)

  6. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIB: Burnup calculations of BWR fuel assemblies for storage and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya

    2002-02-01

    The report describes the final results of the Phase IIIB Benchmark conducted by the Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality Safety under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The Benchmark was intended to compare the predictability of current computer code and data library combinations for the atomic number densities of an irradiated PWR fuel assembly model. The fuel assembly was irradiated under specific power of 25.6 MW/tHM up to 40 GWd/tHM and cooled for five years. The void fraction was assumed to be uniform throughout the channel box and constant, at 0, 40 and 70%, during burnup. In total, 16 results were submitted from 13 institutes of 7 countries. The calculated atomic number densities of 12 actinides and 20 fission product nuclides were found to be for the most part within a range of ±10% relative to the average, although some results, esp. 155 Eu and gadolinium isotopes, exceeded the band, which will require further investigation. Pin-wise burnup results agreed well among the participants. The results in the infinite neutron multiplication factor k ∞ also accorded well with each other for void fractions of 0 and 40%; however some results deviated from the averaged value noticeably for the void fraction of 70%. (author)

  7. Fuel burnup calculation of Ghana MNSR using ORIGEN2 and REBUS3 codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrefah, R G; Nyarko, B J B; Fletcher, J J; Akaho, E H K

    2013-10-01

    Ghana Research Reactor-1 core is to be converted from HEU fuel to LEU fuel in the near future and managing the spent nuclear fuel is very important. A fuel depletion analysis of the GHARR-1 core was performed using ORIGEN2 and REBUS3 codes to estimate the isotopic inventory at end-of-cycle in order to help in the design of an appropriate spent fuel cask. The results obtained for both codes were consistent for U-235 burnup weight percent and Pu-239 build up as a result of burnup. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Proceedings of a workshop on the use of burnup credit in spent fuel transport casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    The Department of Energy sponsored a workshop on the use of burnup credit in the criticality design of spent fuel shipping casks on February 21 and 22, 1988. Twenty-five different presentations on many related topics were conducted, including the effects of burnup credit on the design and operation of spent fuel storage pools, casks and modules, and shipping casks; analysis and physics issues related to burnup credit; regulatory issues and criticality safety; economic incentives and risks associated with burnup credit; and methods for verifying spent fuel characteristics. An abbreviated version of the DOE workshop was repeated as a special session at the November 1988 American Nuclear Society Meeting in Washington, DC. Each of the invited speakers prepared detailed papers on his or her respective topic. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  9. Analysis on burnup step effect for evaluating reactor criticality and fuel breeding ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputra, Geby; Purnama, Aditya Rizki; Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi

    2014-09-01

    Criticality condition of the reactors is one of the important factors for evaluating reactor operation and nuclear fuel breeding ratio is another factor to show nuclear fuel sustainability. This study analyzes the effect of burnup steps and cycle operation step for evaluating the criticality condition of thereactor as well as the performance of nuclear fuel breeding or breeding ratio (BR). Burnup step is performed based on a day step analysis which is varied from 10 days up to 800 days and for cycle operation from 1 cycle up to 8 cycles reactor operations. In addition, calculation efficiency based on the variation of computer processors to runthe analysis in term of time (time efficiency in the calculation) have been also investigated. Optimization method for reactor design analysis which is used a large fast breeder reactor typeas a reference case was performed by adopting an established reactor design code of JOINT-FR. The results show a criticality condition becomes higher for smaller burnup step (day) and for breeding ratio becomes less for smaller burnup step (day). Some nuclides contribute to make better criticality when smaller burnup step due to individul nuclide half-live. Calculation time for different burnup step shows a correlation with the time consuming requirement for more details step calculation, although the consuming time is not directly equivalent with the how many time the burnup time step is divided.

  10. IAEA Consultancy on Technical Influence of High Burnup UOX and MOX LWR Fuel on Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.; Lovasic, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the results of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project investigating the influence of high burnup and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels, from water power reactors, on SFM. These data will provide information on the impacts, regarding SFM, for those countries operating light-water reactors (LWR) and heavy-water reactors (HWR)s with zirconium alloy-clad uranium dioxide (UOX) fuels, that are considering the use of higher burnup UOX or the introduction of reprocessing and MOX fuels. The mechanical designs of lower burnup UOX and higher burnup UOX or MOX fuel are very similar, but some of the properties (e.g., higher fuel rod internal pressures; higher decay heat; higher specific activity; and degraded cladding mechanical properties of higher burnup UOX and MOX spent fuels) may potentially significantly affect the behavior of the fuel after irradiation. The effects of these property changes on wet and dry storage, transportation, reprocessing, refabrication of fuel, and final disposal were evaluated, based on regulatory, safety, and operational considerations. Political and strategic considerations were not taken into account since relative importance of technical, economic and strategic considerations vary from country to country. There will also be an impact of these fuels on issues like non-proliferation, safeguards, and sustainability, but because of the complexity of factors affecting those issues, they are only briefly discussed. The advantages and drawbacks of using high burnup UOX or MOX, for each applicable issue in each stage of the back end of the fuel cycle, were evaluated and are discussed. Although, in theory, higher burnup fuel and MOX fuels mean a smaller quantity of spent fuel, the potential need for some changes in design of spent fuel storage, transportation, handling, reprocessing, refabrication, and disposal will have to be balanced with the benefits of their use. (author)

  11. Non destructive assay of nuclear LEU spent fuels for burnup credit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, A.; Bignan, G.

    2001-01-01

    Criticality safety analysis devoted to spent fuel storage and transportation has to be conservative in order to be sure no accident will ever happen. In the spent fuel storage field, the assumption of freshness has been used to achieve the conservative aspect of criticality safety procedures. Nevertheless, after being irradiated in a reactor core, the fuel elements have obviously lost part of their original reactivity. The concept of taking into account this reactivity loss in criticality safety analysis is known as Burnup credit. To be used, Burnup credit involves obtaining evidence of the reactivity loss with a Burnup measurement. Many non destructive assays (NDA) based on neutron as well as on gamma ray emissions are devoted to spent fuel characterization. Heavy nuclei that compose the fuels are modified during irradiation and cooling. Some of them emit neutrons spontaneously and the link to Burnup is a power link. As a result, burn-up determination with passive neutron measurement is extremely accurate. Some gamma emitters also have interesting properties in order to characterize spent fuels but the convenience of the gamma spectrometric methods is very dependent on characteristics of spent fuel. In addition, contrary to the neutron emission, the gamma signal is mostly representative of the peripheral rods of the fuels. Two devices based on neutron methods but combining different NDA methods which have been studied in the past are described in detail: 1. The PYTHON device is a combination of a passive neutron measurement, a collimated total gamma measurement, and an online depletion code. This device, which has been used in several Nuclear Power Plants in western Europe, gives the average Burnup within a 5% uncertainty and also the extremity Burnup, 2. The NAJA device is an automatic device that involves three nuclear methods and an online depletion code. It is designed to cover the whole fuel assembly panel (Active Neutron Interrogation, Passive Neutron

  12. Sensitivity analysis on various parameters for lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel with WIMS-AECL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok; Park, Jee Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The code WIMS-AECL has been used for the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel. The lattice parameters calculated by the code is sensitive to the choice of number of parameters, such as the number of tracking lines, number of condensed groups, mesh spacing in the moderator region, other parameters vital to the calculation of probabilities and burnup analysis. We have studied this sensitivity with respect to these parameters and recommend their proper values which are necessary for carrying out the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel.

  13. Modelling the high burnup UO2 structure in LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassmann, K.; Walker, C.T.; Laar, J. van de; Lindstroem, F.

    1995-01-01

    The concept of a burnup threshold for the formation of the high burnup UO 2 structure (HBS) is supported by experimental data, which also reveal that a transition zone exists between the normal UO 2 structure and the fully developed HBS. From the analysis of radial xenon profiles measured by EPMA a threshold burnup is obtained in the range 60-75 GW d/t U. The lower value is considered to be the threshold for the onset of the HBS and the higher value the threshold for the fully developed HBS. Xenon depletion in the transition zone and the fully developed HBS can be described by a simple model. At local burnups above 120 GW d/t U the xenon generated is in equilibrium with the xenon lost to the fission gas pores and the concentration does not fall below 0.25 wt%. The TRANSURANUS burnup model TUBRNP predicts reasonably well the penetration of the HBS and the associated xenon depletion up to a cross section average burnup of approximately 70 GW d/t U. (orig.)

  14. Development and characteristics of the rim region in high burnup UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, M.E.; Freshley, M.D.; Lanning, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Research to define the behavior of Zircaloy-clad light-water reactor fuel irradiated to high burnup levels was conducted as part of the High Burnup Effects Program. One observed microstructural change related to irradiation to high burnup levels (up to 83 MWd/kg M pellet-average) is the development of a well-defined, unique microstructural region at the fuel pellet edge (rim). This rim region is characterized by the loss of optically-definable grain structure, increased porosity, and the depletion of matrix fission gas. The rim region holds the potential for significant localized increases in the athermal release of fission gases at high burnup levels, but the contribution of the rim release to the fractional release of the total fission gas produced in the rod is small. (orig.)

  15. Sensitivity and parametric evaluations of significant aspects of burnup credit for PWR spent fuel packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1996-05-01

    Spent fuel transportation and storage cask designs based on a burnup credit approach must consider issues that are not relevant in casks designed under a fresh-fuel loading assumption. For example, the spent fuel composition must be adequately characterized and the criticality analysis model can be complicated by the need to consider axial burnup variations. Parametric analyses are needed to characterize the importance of fuel assembly and fuel cycle parameters on spent fuel composition and reactivity. Numerical models must be evaluated to determine the sensitivity of criticality safety calculations to modeling assumptions. The purpose of this report is to describe analyses and evaluations performed in order to demonstrate the effect physical parameters and modeling assumptions have on the criticality analysis of spent fuel. The analyses in this report include determination and ranking of the most important actinides and fission products; study of the effect of various depletion scenarios on subsequent criticality calculations; establishment of trends in neutron multiplication as a function of fuel enrichment, burnup, cooling time- and a parametric and modeling evaluation of three-dimensional effects (e.g., axially varying burnup and temperature/density effects) in a conceptual cask design. The sensitivity and parametric evaluations were performed with the consideration of two different burnup credit approaches: (1) only actinides in the fuel are considered in the criticality analysis, and (2) both actinides and fission products are considered. Calculations described in this report were performed using the criticality and depletion sequences available in the SCALE code system and the SCALE 27-group burnup library. Although the results described herein do not constitute a validation of SCALE for use in spent fuel analysis, independent validation efforts have been completed and are described in other reports.

  16. Sensitivity and parametric evaluations of significant aspects of burnup credit for PWR spent fuel packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1996-05-01

    Spent fuel transportation and storage cask designs based on a burnup credit approach must consider issues that are not relevant in casks designed under a fresh-fuel loading assumption. For example, the spent fuel composition must be adequately characterized and the criticality analysis model can be complicated by the need to consider axial burnup variations. Parametric analyses are needed to characterize the importance of fuel assembly and fuel cycle parameters on spent fuel composition and reactivity. Numerical models must be evaluated to determine the sensitivity of criticality safety calculations to modeling assumptions. The purpose of this report is to describe analyses and evaluations performed in order to demonstrate the effect physical parameters and modeling assumptions have on the criticality analysis of spent fuel. The analyses in this report include determination and ranking of the most important actinides and fission products; study of the effect of various depletion scenarios on subsequent criticality calculations; establishment of trends in neutron multiplication as a function of fuel enrichment, burnup, cooling time- and a parametric and modeling evaluation of three-dimensional effects (e.g., axially varying burnup and temperature/density effects) in a conceptual cask design. The sensitivity and parametric evaluations were performed with the consideration of two different burnup credit approaches: (1) only actinides in the fuel are considered in the criticality analysis, and (2) both actinides and fission products are considered. Calculations described in this report were performed using the criticality and depletion sequences available in the SCALE code system and the SCALE 27-group burnup library. Although the results described herein do not constitute a validation of SCALE for use in spent fuel analysis, independent validation efforts have been completed and are described in other reports

  17. Modeling of WWER-440 Fuel Pin Behavior at Extended Burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Koliel, M.S.; Abou-Zaid, A.A.; El-Kafas, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Currently, there is an ongoing effort to increase fuel discharge burn-up of all LWRs fuel including WWER's as much as possible in order to decrease power production cost. Therefore, burn-up is expected to be increased to 60 to 70 Mwd/kg U. The change in the fuel radial power distribution as a function of fuel burn up can affect the radial fuel temperature distribution as well as the fuel microstructure in the fuel pellet rim. In this paper, the radial burn-up and fissile products distributions of WWER-440 UO 2 fuel pin were evaluated using MCNP 4B and ORIGEN2 codes. The impact of the thermal conductivity on predicted fission gas release calculations is needed. For the analysis, a typical WWER-440 fuel pin and surrounding water moderator are considered in a hexagonal pin cell well. The thermal release and the athermal release from the pellet rim were modeled separately. The fraction of the rim structure and the excessive porosity in the rim structure in isothermal irradiation as a function of the fuel burn-up was predicted. a computer program; RIMSC-01, is developed to perform the required FGR calculations. Finally, the relevant phenomena and the corresponding models together with their validation are presented

  18. Technical and economic limits to fuel burnup extension. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    For many years, the increase of efficiency in the production of nuclear electricity has been an economic challenge in many countries which have developed this kind of energy. The increase of fuel burnup leads to a reduction in the volume of spent fuel discharged to longer fuel cycles in the reactor, which means bigger availability and capacity factors. After having increased the authorized burnup in plants, developing new alloys capable of resisting high burnup, and having accumulated data on fuel evolution with burnup, it has become necessary to establish the limitations which could be imposed by the physical evolution of the fuel, influencing fuel management, neutron properties, reprocessing or, more generally, the management of waste and irradiated fuels. It is also necessary to verify whether the benefits of lower electricity costs would not be offset by an increase in fuel management costs. The main questions are: Are technical and economic limits to the increasing of fuel burnup in parallel? Can we envisage nowadays the hardest limitation in some of these areas? Which are the main points to be solved from the technical point of view? Is this effort worthwhile considering the economy of the cycle? To which extent? For these reasons, the IAEA, following a recommendation by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology, held a Technical Committee Meeting on Technical and Economic Limits to Fuel Burnup Extension. The purpose of this meeting was to provide an international forum to review the evolution of fuel properties at increased burnup in order to estimate the limitations both from a physical and an economic point of view. The meeting was therefore divided into two parts. The first part, focusing on technical limits, was devoted to the improvement of the fuel element, such as fission gas release (FGR), RIM effect, cladding, etc. and the fabrication, core management, spent fuel and reprocessing. Eighteen related papers were presented which

  19. Rim characteristics and their effects on the thermal conductivity in high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung-Ho; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2001-01-01

    Characteristics of high burnup UO 2 fuel such as threshold burnup for the formation of high burnup microstructure (rim), rim average burnup and rim width were estimated and then the thermal conductivity degradation due to the porous rim region was investigated. The threshold burnup for rim formation was estimated as a function of temperature and fission rate using Rest's model. The calculated threshold burnup, which shows a particular dependence on temperature, ranges from 40 to 50 MWd/kgU at typical fuel periphery temperatures of 400 to 600degC. In addition, the rim average burnup and the rim width were obtained by statistical analysis of the data available in open literature. To consider the additional degradation of thermal conductivity in the rim region, a formula for rim porosity was presented with the assumption that rim pores are overpressurized and that all the produced fission gases are retained in the rim pores. To estimate the thermal conductivity in the porous rim using the general correction method applicable to two-phase structure, it was assumed that the rim region consists of pores and fully dense materials composed of UO 2 matrix and solid fission products. Then by combining the general model for two-phase with the rim porosity developed in the present paper and HALDEN's thermal conductivity model, a thermal conductivity model for the porous rim region was developed. The predicted thermal conductivity shows an additional reduction of ∼20% due to the porous rim structure which would cause to increase the fuel temperature of high burnup fuel during steady-state operation and transient irradiation. (author)

  20. Evaluation of burnup characteristics and energy deposition during NSRR pulse irradiation tests on irradiated BWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Yoshinaga, Makio

    2000-11-01

    Pulse irradiation tests of irradiated fuel are performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate the fuel behavior under Reactivity Initiated Accident Conditions (RIA). The severity of the RIA is represented by energy deposition or peak fuel enthalpy during the power excursion. In case of the irradiated fuel tests, the energy deposition varies depending both on the amounts and distribution of residual fissile and neutron absorbing fission products generated during the base irradiation. Thus, proper fuel burnup characterization, especially for low enriched commercial fuels, is important, because plutonium (Pu) takes a large part of fissile and its generation depends on the neutron spectrum during the base irradiation. Fuel burnup calculations were conducted with ORIGEN2, RODBURN and SWAT codes for the BWR fuels tested in the NSRR. The calculation results were compared with the measured isotope concentrations and used for the NSRR neutron calculations to evaluate energy depositions of the test fuel. The comparison of the code calculations and the measurements revealed that the neutron spectrum change due to difference in void fraction altered Pu generation and energy deposition in the NSRR tests considerably. With the properly evaluated neutron spectrum, the combined burnup and NSRR neutron calculation gave reasonably good evaluation of the energy deposition. The calculations provided radial distributions of the fission product accumulation during the base irradiation and power distribution during the NSRR pulse irradiation, which were important for the evaluation of both burnup characteristics and fission gas release behavior. (author)

  1. A computer program for nuclear fuel burnup determination using gamma spectrometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrin, Relu; Pavelescu, Margarit

    2010-01-01

    In the end of its service life in the reactor, the fuel needs to be characterized for reasons relating both to safety and economy. The main investigations carried out are oriented towards verifying the fuel cladding integrity and determining the fissile content and the fuel burnup. A computer program for fast burnup evaluation was developed at the Post-Irradiation Examination Laboratory (PIEL) from INR Pitesti, the only laboratory of this kind in Romania. The input data consists, on one hand, of axial and radial gamma-scanning profiles (for the experimental evaluation of the number of nuclei of a given fission product - selected as burnup monitor - in the end of irradiation) and, on the other hand, of the history of irradiation (the time length and relative value of the neutron flux for each step of irradiation). Using the equation for the build-up and decay of the burnup monitor during irradiation the flux value is iteratively adjusted until the calculated number of nucleus is equal to the experimental one. Then the flux value is used in the equations of evolution of the fissile and fertile nuclei to determine the number of fissions and consequently the fuel burnup. The program was successfully used in the analysis of more then one hundred of TRIGA and CANDU-type fuel rods. An experimental result is reported in some details. (authors)

  2. Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this topical report is to present to the NRC for review and acceptance a methodology for using burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems for PWR spent fuel transportation packages, while maintaining the criticality safety margins and related requirements of 10 CFR Part 71 and 72. The proposed methodology consists of five major steps as summarized below: (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations in SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, keff, of a spent nuclear fuel package. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). and (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper fuel assembly selection prior to loading. (This step is required but the details are outside the scope of this topical report.) When reviewed and accepted by the NRC, this topical report will serve as a criterion document for criticality control analysts and will provide steps for the use of actinide-only burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems. The NRC-accepted burnup credit methodology will be used by commercial SNF storage and transportation package designers. Design-specific burnup credit criticality analyses will be defined, developed, and documented in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for each specific storage or transportation package that uses burnup credit. These SARs will then be submitted to the NRC for review and approval. This topical report is expected to be referenced in a number of storage and transportation cask applications to be submitted by commercial cask and canister designers to the NRC. Therefore, NRC acceptance of this topical report will result in increased efficiency of the

  3. A survey of microstructural evolution in high burnup fuels for light water reactor. Implantation of high energy particles in accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Mikiyasu

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, the burnup of LWR UO 2 fuel has frequently been increased by steps from 33 to 55 GWd/tU assembly average have been reached. At burnups above about 45 GWd/tU of the pellet average, a porous outer ring (the so-called ''rim structure'') is formed with a typical thickness of 100 to 200 μm. This region exhibits several changes of material properties, such as degradation of thermal conductivity and swelling with high porosity. In order to develop fuels for high burnup usage, understanding of the formation process of the rim structure is essential. This survey summarizes the previous models for the formation mechanism of rim structure, and clarifies the relationship between the rim structure and the accumulation process of defects and precipitates under high burnup irradiation. The formation mechanism of rim structure is summarized as (1) fracture of grains due to intragranular pores and recrystallization, (2) polygonization, and (3) recrystallization after defect accumulation. The mechanism (1) occurs in the 'heterogeneous phase' and (2) and (3) to 'homogeneous phase' in the nucleation of recrystallized grains. In order to study various effects separately to investigate the formation and recovery of radiation damage as well as the behavior (lattice location, diffusion, dislocation, bubbles, precipitation, etc.) of the fission products, high energy particles (electron, γ, Kr, Xe, Cs and etc.) irradiation in accelerators is effective in clarifying the formation process of rim structure. This survey summarizes the advantages and possibilities of high energy particles irradiation experiments. Finally, the effective experiments for understanding of the formation mechanism of the rim structure are proposed. (author)

  4. Fission gas release and pellet microstructure change of high burnup BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, N.; Ohira, K.; Tsuda, K.; Fischer, G.; Ota, T.

    1998-01-01

    UO 2 fuel, with and without Gadolinium, irradiated for three, five, and six irradiation cycles up to about 60 GWd/t pellet burnup in a commercial BWR were studied. The fission gas release and the rim effect were investigated by the puncture test and gas analysis method, OM (optical microscope), SEM (scanning electron microscope), and EPMA (electron probe microanalyzer). The fission gas release rate of the fuel rods irradiated up to six cycles was below a few percent; there was no tendency for the fission gas release to increase abruptly with burnup. On the other hand, microstructure changes were revealed by OM and SEM examination at the rim position with burnup increase. Fission gas was found depleted at both the rim position and the pellet center region using EPMA. There was no correlation between the fission gas release measured by the puncture test and the fission gas depletion at the rim position using EPMA. However, the depletion of fission gas in the center region had good correlation with the fission gas release rate determined by the puncture test. In addition, because the burnup is very large at the rim position of high burnup fuel and also due to the fission rate of the produced Pu, the Xe/Kr ratio at the rim position of high burnup fuel is close to the value of the fission yield of Pu. The Xe/Kr ratio determined by the gas analysis after the puncture test was equivalent to the fuel average but not to the pellet rim position. From the results, it was concluded that fission gas at the rim position was released from the UO 2 matrix in high burnup, however, most of this released fission gas was held in the porous structure and not released from the pellet to the free volume. (author)

  5. About a fuel for burnup reactor of periodical pulsed nuclear pumped laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, A.I.; Lukin, A.V.; Magda, L.E.; Magda, E.P.; Pogrebov, I.S.; Putnikov, I.S.; Khmelnitsky, D.V.; Scherbakov, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    A physical scheme of burnup reactor for a Periodic Pulsed Nuclear Pumped Laser was supposed. Calculations of its neutron physical parameters were made. The general layout and construction of basic elements of the reactor are discussed. The requirements for the fuel and fuel elements are established. (author)

  6. Fission Gas Release in LWR Fuel Rods Exhibiting Very High Burn-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, H.

    1980-01-01

    Two UO2Zr BWR type test fuel rods were irradiated to a burn-up of about 38000 MWd/tUO2. After non-destructive characterization, the fission gas released to the internal free volume was extracted and analysed. The irradiation was simulated by means of the Danish fuel performance code WAFER-2, which...

  7. Development of the CANDU high-burnup fuel design/analysis technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, Ho Chun; Sim, K. S.; Oh, D. J.; Park, J. H.; Jun, J. S.; Yoo, K. J.

    1997-08-01

    This report contains all the information related to the development of the CANDU advanced fuel, so-called CANFLEX-NU, which is composed of 43 elements with natural uranium fuel. Also, it contains the compatibility study of CANFLEX-RU which is considered as a CANDU high burnup fuel. This report describes the mechanical design, thermalhydraulic and safety evaluations of CANFLEX fuel bundle. (author). 38 refs., 24 tabs., 74 figs.

  8. Burnup analysis of the VVER-1000 reactor using thorium-based fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkmaz, Mehmet E.; Agar, Osman; Bueyueker, Eylem [Karamanoglu Mehmetbey Univ., Karaman (Turkey). Faculty of Kamil Ozdag Science

    2014-12-15

    This paper aims to investigate {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U fuel cycles in a VVER-1000 reactor through calculation by computer. The 3D core geometry of VVER-1000 system was designed using the Serpent Monte Carlo 1.1.19 Code. The Serpent Code using parallel programming interface (Message Passing Interface-MPI), was run on a workstation with 12-core and 48 GB RAM. {sup 232}Th/{sup 235}U/{sup 238}U oxide mixture was considered as fuel in the core, when the mass fraction of {sup 232}Th was increased as 0.05-0.1-0.2-0.3-0.4 respectively, the mass fraction of {sup 238}U equally was decreased. In the system, the calculations were made for 3 000 MW thermal power. For the burnup analyses, the core is assumed to deplete from initial fresh core up to a burnup of 16 MWd/kgU without refuelling considerations. In the burnup calculations, a burnup interval of 360 effective full power days (EFPDs) was defined. According to burnup, the mass changes of the {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am and {sup 244}Cm were evaluated, and also flux and criticality of the system were calculated in dependence of the burnup rate.

  9. Pore pressure and swelling in the rim region of LWR high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2001-01-01

    Based on measured rim characteristics of LWR high burnup UO 2 fuel, the pressure of rim pores and the additional pellet swelling due to rim formation have been modeled. Using the assumption that the number of Xe atoms retained in the rim pores is the same as that which is depleted from the rim matrix, excessive pore pressure is derived as a function of temperature, pellet average burnup and pore radius. The rim pores with small radii are calculated to be highly overpressurized at high burnup. Comparison with experimental data shows that, while the pellet swelling obtained with best-estimate rim width is underpredicted, the one calculated with conservative rim width agrees well with the measured data for rim burnups between 50 and 65 GWd/tU. On the other hand, the measured swelling at 85 GWd/tU is about in-between the two calculations

  10. Model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongxing; Long, Chongsheng; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-04-01

    The restructuring process of the high burnup structure (HBS) formation in UO2 fuel results in sub-micron size grains that accelerate the fission gas swelling, which will raise some concern over the safety of extended the nuclear fuel operation life in the reactor. A mechanistic and engineering model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel based on the experimental observations of the HBS in the literature is presented. The model takes into account dislocations evolution under irradiation and the grain subdivision occur successively at increasing local burnup. It is assumed that the original driving force for subdivision of grain in the HBS of UO2 fuel is the production and accumulation of dislocation loops during irradiation. The dislocation loops can also be annealed through thermal diffusion when the temperature is high enough. The capability of this model is validated by the comparison with the experimental data of temperature threshold of subdivision, dislocation density and sub-grain size as a function of local burnup. It is shown that the calculated results of the dislocation density and subdivided grain size as a function of local burnup are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Burnup performance of OTTO cycle pebble bed reactors with ROX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Hai Quan; Obara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 300 MW t Small Pebble Bed Reactor with Rock-like oxide fuel is proposed. • Using ROX fuel can achieve high discharged burnup of spent fuel. • High geological stability can be expected in direct disposal of the spent ROX fuel. • The Pebble Bed Reactor with ROX fuel can be critical at steady state operation. • All the reactor designs have a negative temperature coefficient. - Abstract: A pebble bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (PBR) with rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel was designed to achieve high discharged burnup and improve the integrity of the spent fuel in geological disposal. The MCPBR code with a JENDL-4.0 library, which developed the analysis of the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle in PBR, was used to perform the criticality and burnup analysis. Burnup calculations for eight cases were carried out for both ROX fuel and a UO 2 fuel reactor with different heavy-metal loading conditions. The effective multiplication factor of all cases approximately equalled unity in the equilibrium condition. The ROX fuel reactor showed lower FIFA than the UO 2 fuel reactor at the same heavy-metal loading, about 5–15%. However, the power peaking factor and maximum power per fuel ball in the ROX fuel core were lower than that of UO 2 fuel core. This effect makes it possible to compensate for the lower-FIFA disadvantage in a ROX fuel core. All reactor designs had a negative temperature coefficient that is needed for the passive safety features of a pebble bed reactor

  12. A simple gamma spectrometry method for evaluating the burnup of MTR-type HEU fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makmal, T.; Aviv, O.; Gilad, E.

    2016-10-01

    A simple method for the evaluation of the burnup of a materials testing reactor (MTR) fuel element by gamma spectrometry is presented. The method was applied to a highly enriched uranium MTR nuclear fuel element that was irradiated in a 5 MW pool-type research reactor for a total period of 34 years. The experimental approach is based on in-situ measurements of the MTR fuel element in the reactor pool by a portable high-purity germanium detector located in a gamma cell. To corroborate the method, analytical calculations (based on the irradiation history of the fuel element) and computer simulations using a dedicated fuel cycle burnup code ORIGEN2 were performed. The burnup of the MTR fuel element was found to be 52.4±8.8%, which is in good agreement with the analytical calculations and the computer simulations. The method presented here is suitable for research reactors with either a regular or an irregular irradiation regime and for reactors with limited infrastructure and/or resources. In addition, its simplicity and the enhanced safety it confers may render this method suitable for IAEA inspectors in fuel element burnup assessments during on-site inspections.

  13. Burn-up credit applications for UO2 and MOX fuel assemblies in AREVA/COGEMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toubon, H.; Riffard, C.; Batifol, M.; Pelletier, S.

    2003-01-01

    For the last seven years, AREVA/COGEMA has been implementing the second phase of its burn-up credit program (the incorporation of fission products). Since the early nineties, major actinides have been taken into account in criticality analyses first for reprocessing applications, then for transport and storage of fuel assemblies Next year (2004) COGEMA will take into account the six main fission products (Rh103, Cs133, Nd143, Sm149, Sm152 and Gd155) that make up 50% of the anti-reactivity of all fission products. The experimental program will soon be finished. The new burn-up credit methodology is in progress. After a brief overview of BUC R and D program and COGEMA's application of the BUC, this paper will focus on the new burn-up measurement for UO2 and MOX fuel assemblies. It details the measurement instrumentation and the measurement experiments on MOX fuels performed at La Hague in January 2003. (author)

  14. Fission gas release behavior in high burnup UO2 fuels with developed rim-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Une, Katsumi; Kashibe, Shinji; Hayashi, Kimio

    2002-01-01

    The effect of rim structure formation and external restraint pressure on fission gas release at transient conditions has been examined by using an out-of-pile high pressure heating technique for high burnup UO 2 fuels (60, 74 and 90 GWd/t), which had been irradiated in test reactors. The latter two fuels bore a developed rim structure. The maximum heating temperature was 1500 degC, and the external pressures were independently controlled in the range of 10-150 MPa. The present high burnup fuel data were compared with those of previously studied BWR fuels of 37 and 54 GWd/t with almost no rim structure. The fission gas release and bubble swelling due to the growth of grain boundary bubbles and coarsened rim bubbles were effectively suppressed by the strong restraint pressure of 150 MPa for all the fuels; however the fission gas release remarkably increased for the two high burnup fuels with the developed rim structure, even at the strong restraint conditions. From the stepwise de-pressurization tests at an isothermal condition of 1500degC, the critical external pressure, below which a large burst release due to the rapid growth and interlinkage of the bubbles abruptly begins, was increased from a 40-60 MPa level for the middle burnup fuels to a high level of 120-140 MPa for the rim-structured high burnup fuels. The high potential for transient fission gas release and bubble swelling in the rim-structured fuels was attributed to highly over-pressurized fission gases in the rim bubbles. (author)

  15. The use of burnup credit in criticality control for the Korean spent fuel management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Duck Joon; Chon, Je Keun; Park, Chung Ryul; Ji, Pyung Kuk; Kim, Byung Tae; Jo, Chang Keun; Cho, Nam Zin

    1997-01-01

    More than 25% k-eff saving effect is observed in this burnup credit analysis. This mainly comes from the adoption of actinide nuclides and fission products in the criticality analysis. By taking burnup credit, the high capacity of the storage and transportation can be more fully utilized, reducing the space of storage and the number of shipments. Larger storage and fewer shipments for a given inventory of spent fuel result should in remarkable cost savings and more importantly reduce the risks to the public and occupational workers for the Korean Spent Fuel Management Program

  16. A practical extended discharge burnup design optimization technique using Penn State's fuel management package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feltus, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the advantages and disadvantages using a very high fuel burnup, reinsertion, and low leakage designs in the advance fuel cycle light water reactor cores as a technique to reduce vessel fluence, and total volume of spent fuel discharged into the waste management stream. The results demonstrate how to attain high practical burnup core design using Penn State Fuel Management Package (PSFMP). This package was used to scope out fuel management strategies, that can be verified directly with standard utility and vendor design calculations, such as CASMO and SIMULATE. This paper presents such a direct comparison between the PSFMP and CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 results. This paper focuses on the practical use of such advanced fuel design to: (a) achieve very high discharge burnup, (b) produce low leakage at the periphery, (c) have 24 month cycles, (d) maintain safety margins, peak power levels, thermal hydraulic limits, and non-positive moderator temperature coefficient. Evaluation of practical and optimal extended burnup core designs, using the PSFMP, will show that very high core designs are not only attainable, but are most cost-effective and beneficial to the environment in terms of waste reduction. (author). 12 refs., 4 figs

  17. The Gd-isotopic fuel for high burnup in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Marcio Soares; Mattos, João Roberto L. de; Andrade, Edison Pereira de

    2017-01-01

    Today, the discussion about the high burnup fuel is beyond the current fuel enrichment licensing and burnup limits. Licensing issues and material/design developments are again key features in further development of the LWR fuel design. Nevertheless, technological and economical solutions are already available or will be available in a short time. In order to prevent the growth of the technological gap, Brazil's nuclear sector needs to invest in the training of new human resources, in the access to international databases, and in the upgrading existing infrastructure. Experimental database and R&D infrastructure are essential components to support the autonomous development of Brazilian Nuclear Reactors, promoting the development of national technologies. The (U,Gd)O 2 isotopic fuel proposed by the CDTN's staff solve two main issues in the high burnup fuel, which are (1) the peak of reactivity resulting from the Gd-157 fast burnup, and (2) the peak of temperature in the (U,Gd)O 2 nuclear fuel resulting from detrimental effects in the thermal properties for gadolinia additions higher than 2%. A sustainable future can be envisaged for the nuclear energy. (author)

  18. The Gd-isotopic fuel for high burnup in PWR's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Marcio Soares; Mattos, João Roberto L. de; Andrade, Edison Pereira de, E-mail: marciod@cdtn.br, E-mail: jrmattos@cdtn.br, E-mail: epa@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Today, the discussion about the high burnup fuel is beyond the current fuel enrichment licensing and burnup limits. Licensing issues and material/design developments are again key features in further development of the LWR fuel design. Nevertheless, technological and economical solutions are already available or will be available in a short time. In order to prevent the growth of the technological gap, Brazil's nuclear sector needs to invest in the training of new human resources, in the access to international databases, and in the upgrading existing infrastructure. Experimental database and R&D infrastructure are essential components to support the autonomous development of Brazilian Nuclear Reactors, promoting the development of national technologies. The (U,Gd)O{sub 2} isotopic fuel proposed by the CDTN's staff solve two main issues in the high burnup fuel, which are (1) the peak of reactivity resulting from the Gd-157 fast burnup, and (2) the peak of temperature in the (U,Gd)O{sub 2} nuclear fuel resulting from detrimental effects in the thermal properties for gadolinia additions higher than 2%. A sustainable future can be envisaged for the nuclear energy. (author)

  19. Taking burnup credit for interim storage and transportation system for BWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, K.I.

    2000-01-01

    In the back-end issues of nuclear fuel cycle, selection of reprocessing or one-through is a big issue. For both of the cases, a reasonable interim storage and transportation system is required. This study proposes an advanced practical monitoring and evaluation system. The system features the followings: (l) Storage racks and transportation casks taking credit for burnup. (2) A burnup estimation system using a compact monitor with Cd- Te detectors and fission chambers. (3) A neutron emission-rate evaluation methodology, especially important for high burnup MOX fuels. (4) A nuclear materials management system for safeguards. Current storage system and transport casks are designed on the basis of a fresh fuel assumption. The assumption is too conservative. Taking burnup credit gives a reasonable design while keeping conservatism. In order to establish a reasonable burnup credit design system, a calculation system has been developed for determining isotope compositions, burnup, and criticality. The calculation system consists of some modules such as TGBLA, ORIGEN, CITATION, MCNP and KENO. The TGBLA code is a fuel design code for LWR fuels developed in TOSHIBA Corporation. The code takes operational history such as, power density, void fraction into account. This code is applied to the back-end issues for a more accurate design of a storage and a transportation system. The ORIGEN code is well-known one-point isotope depletion code. In the calculation system, the code calculates isotope compositions using libraries generated from the TGBLA code. The CITATION code, the MCNP code, and the KENO code are three dimensional diffusion code, continuous energy Monte Carlo code, discrete energy Monte Carlo code, respectively. Those codes calculate k- effective of the storage and transportation systems using isotope compositions generated from the ORIGEN code. The CITATION code and the KENO code are usually used for practical designs. The MCNP code is used for reference

  20. EPRI/DOE High-Burnup Fuel Sister Rod Test Plan Simplification and Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanson, B. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shimskey, R. W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Klymyshyn, N. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webster, R. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jensen, P. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); MacFarlan, P. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Billone, Mike [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Scaglione, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Montgomery, Rose [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevard, Bruce [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The EPRI/DOE High-Burnup Confirmatory Data Project (herein called the “Demo”) is a multi-year, multi-entity test with the purpose of providing quantitative and qualitative data to show if high-burnup fuel mechanical properties change in dry storage over a ten-year period. The Demo involves obtaining 32 assemblies of high-burnup PWR fuel of common cladding alloys from the North Anna Nuclear Power Plant, loading them in an NRC-licensed TN-32B cask, drying them according to standard plant procedures, and then storing them on the North Anna dry storage pad for ten years. After the ten-year storage time, the cask will be opened and the mechanical properties of the rods will be tested and analyzed.

  1. New approach to derive linear power/burnup history input for CANDU fuel codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lac Tang, T.; Richards, M.; Parent, G.

    2003-01-01

    The fuel element linear power / burnup history is a required input for the ELESTRES code in order to simulate CANDU fuel behavior during normal operating conditions and also to provide input for the accident analysis codes ELOCA and SOURCE. The purpose of this paper is to present a new approach to derive 'true', or at least more realistic linear power / burnup histories. Such an approach can be used to recreate any typical bundle power history if only a single pair of instantaneous values of bundle power and burnup, together with the position in the channel, are known. The histories obtained could be useful to perform more realistic simulations for safety analyses for cases where the reference (overpower) history is not appropriate. (author)

  2. Burnup determination of a high burnup PWR fuel by neodymium and cesium isotope monitor methods based on isotope dilution mass spectrometric measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Suk; Jeon, Young Shin; Park, Soon Dal; Han, Sun Ho; Ha, Yeong Keong; Song, Kyu Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    Destructive methods were used for the burnup determination of a PWR nuclear fuel irradiated to a high burnup in power reactors. The total burnup was determined from a measurement of the Nd and Cs isotope burnup monitors. The methods included U, Pu, {sup 148}Nd, {sup 145}Nd+{sup 146}Nd, total of the Nd isotopes, and {sup 133}Cs and {sup 137}Cs determinations by the isotope dilution mass spectrometric method (IDMS) by using quadrupole spikes ({sup 233}U, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 150}Nd and {sup 133}Cs). The methods involved two sequential anion exchange resin (AG 1X8 and 1X4) separation procedures and a Cs purification with a cation exchange resin (AG 50WX4) separation procedure. The effective fission yield was calculated from the weighted fission yields averaged over the irradiation period. The results obtained by the Nd and Cs isotopes from the mass spectrometric measurement were compared with those by the ORIGEN code.

  3. TOPICAL REPORT ON ACTINIDE-ONLY BURNUP CREDIT FOR PWR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL PACKAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE

    1997-01-01

    A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k eff , of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO 2 , UO 2 /Gd 2 O 3 , and UO 2 /PuO 2 critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on k eff (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased k eff , when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper assembly selection

  4. Topical report on actinide-only burnup credit for PWR spent nuclear fuel packages. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1997-04-01

    A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on k{sub eff} (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased k{sub eff}, when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package

  5. FRAPCON-3: Modifications to fuel rod material properties and performance models for high-burnup application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    This volume describes the fuel rod material and performance models that were updated for the FRAPCON-3 steady-state fuel rod performance code. The property and performance models were changed to account for behavior at extended burnup levels up to 65 Gwd/MTU. The property and performance models updated were the fission gas release, fuel thermal conductivity, fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, solid-solid contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion and hydriding, cladding mechanical properties, and cladding axial growth. Each updated property and model was compared to well characterized data up to high burnup levels. The installation of these properties and models in the FRAPCON-3 code along with input instructions are provided in Volume 2 of this report and Volume 3 provides a code assessment based on comparison to integral performance data. The updated FRAPCON-3 code is intended to replace the earlier codes FRAPCON-2 and GAPCON-THERMAL-2. 94 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs

  6. FRAPCON-3: Modifications to fuel rod material properties and performance models for high-burnup application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    This volume describes the fuel rod material and performance models that were updated for the FRAPCON-3 steady-state fuel rod performance code. The property and performance models were changed to account for behavior at extended burnup levels up to 65 Gwd/MTU. The property and performance models updated were the fission gas release, fuel thermal conductivity, fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, solid-solid contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion and hydriding, cladding mechanical properties, and cladding axial growth. Each updated property and model was compared to well characterized data up to high burnup levels. The installation of these properties and models in the FRAPCON-3 code along with input instructions are provided in Volume 2 of this report and Volume 3 provides a code assessment based on comparison to integral performance data. The updated FRAPCON-3 code is intended to replace the earlier codes FRAPCON-2 and GAPCON-THERMAL-2. 94 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Burnup simulations of different fuel grades using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asah-Opoku Fiifi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global energy problems range from the increasing cost of fuel to the unequal distribution of energy resources and the potential climate change resulting from the burning of fossil fuels. A sustainable nuclear energy would augment the current world energy supply and serve as a reliable future energy source. This research focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of pressurized water reactor systems. Three different fuel grades - mixed oxide fuel (MOX, uranium oxide fuel (UOX, and commercially enriched uranium or uranium metal (CEU - are used in this simulation and their impact on the effective multiplication factor (Keff and, hence, criticality and total radioactivity of the reactor core after fuel burnup analyzed. The effect of different clad materials on Keff is also studied. Burnup calculation results indicate a buildup of plutonium isotopes in UOX and CEU, as opposed to a decline in plutonium radioisotopes for MOX fuel burnup time. For MOX fuel, a decrease of 31.9% of the fissile plutonium isotope is observed, while for UOX and CEU, fissile plutonium isotopes increased by 82.3% and 83.8%, respectively. Keff results show zircaloy as a much more effective clad material in comparison to zirconium and stainless steel.

  8. Modeling of Pore Coarsening in the Rim Region of High Burn-up UO2 Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxing Xiao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the coarsening process of the large fission gas pores in the high burn-up structure (HBS of irradiated UO2 fuel is very necessary for analyzing the safety and reliability of fuel rods in a reactor. A numerical model for the description of pore coarsening in the HBS based on the Ostwald ripening mechanism, which has successfully explained the coarsening process of precipitates in solids is developed. In this model, the fission gas atoms are treated as the special precipitates in the irradiated UO2 fuel matrix. The calculated results indicate that the significant pore coarsening and mean pore density decrease in the HBS occur upon surpassing a local burn-up of 100 GWd/tM. The capability of this model is successfully validated against irradiation experiments of UO2 fuel, in which the average pore radius, pore density, and porosity are directly measured as functions of local burn-up. Comparisons with experimental data show that, when the local burn-up exceeds 100 GWd/tM, the calculated results agree well with the measured data.

  9. Depletion of gadolinium burnable poison in a PWR assembly with high burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Refeat, Riham Mahmoud [Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA), Cairo (Egypt). Safety Engineering Dept.

    2015-12-15

    A tendency to increase the discharge burnup of nuclear fuel for Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has been a characteristic of its operation for many years. It will be able to burn at very high burnup of about 70 GWd/t with UO{sub 2} fuels. The U-235 enrichment must be higher than 5 %, which leads to the necessity of using an extremely efficient burnable poison like Gadolinium oxide. Using gadolinium isotope is significant due to its particular depletion behavior (''Onion-Skin'' effect). In this paper, the MCNPX2.7 code is used to calculate the important neutronic parameters of the next generation fuels of PWR. K-infinity, local peaking factor and fission rate distributions are calculated for a PWR assembly which burn at very high burnup reaching 70 GWd/t. The calculations are performed using the recently released evaluated Gadolinium cross section data. The results obtained are close to those of a LWR next generation fuel benchmark problem. This demonstrates that the calculation scheme used is able to accurately model a PWR assembly that operates at high burnup values.

  10. Present status and future developments of the implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuber, J.C.; Kuehl, H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the experience gained in Germany in implementing burnup credit in wet storage and dry transport systems of spent PWR, BWR, and MOX fuel. It gives a survey of the levels of burnup credit presently used, the regulatory status and activities planned, the fuel depletion codes and criticality calculation codes employed, the verification methods used for validating these codes, the modeling assumptions made to ensure that the burnup credit criticality analysis is based on a fuel irradiation history which leads to bounding neutron multiplication factors, and the implementation of procedures used for fuel loading verification. (author)

  11. Estimation of the Fuel Depletion Code Bias and Uncertainty in Burnup-Credit Criticality Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Woon; Cho, Nam Zin; Lee, Sang Jin; Bae, Chang Yeal

    2006-01-01

    In the past, criticality safety analyses for commercial light-water-reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage and transportation canisters assumed the spent fuel to be fresh (unirradiated) fuel with uniform isotopic compositions. This fresh-fuel assumption provides a well-defined, bounding approach to the criticality safety analysis that eliminates concerns related to the fuel operating history, and thus considerably simplifies the safety analysis. However, because this assumption ignores the inherent decrease in reactivity as a result of irradiation, it is very conservative. The concept of taking credit for the reduction in reactivity due to fuel burnup is commonly referred to as burnup credit. Implementation of burnup credit requires the computational prediction of the nuclide inventories (compositions) for the dominant fissile and absorbing nuclide species in spent fuel. In addition to that, the bias and uncertainty in the predicted concentration of all nuclides used in the analysis be established by comparisons of calculated and measured radiochemical assay data. In this paper, three methods for considering the bias and uncertainty will be reviewed. The estimated bias and uncertainty that the results of 3rd method are presented

  12. Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

  13. New Fuel Alloys Seeking Optimal Solidus and Phase Behavior for High Burnup and TRU Burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, V.S.; Jones, Z.S.; Olson, D.L.; Mishra, B.; Mariani, R.D.; Porter, D.L.; Kennedy, J.R.; Hayes, S.L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: • Pd will bind lanthanide fission products. • 2 wt% Pd in alloy is expected to allow 20 at% Heavy Metal burnup, 4 wt% Pd possibly 30-40 at% HM burnup. • For recycled fuel with some lanthanide carryover, palladium additive will also prevent premature FCCI. • Novel uranium alloy systems suitable for burning transuranics were identified. • U-Mo-Ti-Zr and U-W-Mo irradiations may perform comparably to U-10Zr, but the real tests needed must include Pu and Np for TRU burning. – Diffusion couples with alloys and Fe or cladding; – Irradiations

  14. Evaluation of burnup credit for fuel storage analysis -- Experience in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, J.M.; Recio, M.

    1995-01-01

    Several Spanish light water reactor commercial nuclear power plants are close to maximum spent-fuel pool storage capacity. The utilities are working on the implementation of state-of-the-art methods to increase the storage capacity, including both changes in the pool design (recracking) and the implementation of new analysis approaches with reduced conservation (burnup credit). Burnup credit criticality safety analyses have been approved for two pressurized water reactor plants (four units) and one boiling water reactor (BWR); an other BWR storage analysis is being developed at this moment. The elimination of the ''fresh fuel assumption'' increases the complexity of the criticality analysis to be performed, sometimes putting into question the capability of the analytic tools to properly describe this new situation and increasing the scope of the scenarios to be analyzed. From a regulatory perspective, the reactivity reduction associated with burnup of the fuel can be given credit only if the exposure of each fuel bundle can be known with enough accuracy. Subcriticality of spent-fuel storage depends mainly on the initial fuel enrichment, storage geometry, fuel exposure history, and cooling time. The last two aspects introduced new uncertainties in the criticality analysis that should be quantified in an adequate way. In addition, each and every fuel bundle has its own specific exposure history, so that strong assumptions and simplified calculational schemes have to be developed to undertake the analysis. The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), Spanish regulatory authority on the matter of nuclear safety and radiation protection, plays an active role in the development of analysis methods to support burnup credit, making proposals that may be beneficial in terms of risk and cost while keeping the widest safety margins possible

  15. A SAS2H/KENO-V methodology for 3D fuel burnup analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.; Greenspan, E.; Vujic, J.

    2002-01-01

    An efficient methodology for 3D fuel burnup analysis of LWR reactors is described in this paper. This methodology is founded on coupling Monte Carlo method for 3D calculation of node power distribution, and transport method for depletion calculation in ID Wigner-Seitz equivalent cell for each node independently. The proposed fuel burnup modeling, based on application of SCALE-4.4a control modules SAS2H and KENO-V.a is verified for the case of 2D x-y model of IRIS 15 x 15 fuel assembly (with reflective boundary condition) by using two well benchmarked code systems. The one is MOCUP, a coupled MCNP-4C and ORIGEN2.1 utility code, and the second is KENO-V.a/ORIGEN2.1 code system recently developed by authors of this paper. The proposed SAS2H/KENO-V.a methodology was applied for 3D burnup analysis of IRIS-1000 benchmark.44 core. Detailed k sub e sub f sub f and power density evolution with burnup are reported. (author)

  16. Validation of a new continuous Monte Carlo burnup code using a Mox fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El bakkari, B.; El Bardouni, T.; Merroun, O.; El Younoussi, C.; Boulaich, Y.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, E.

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity of nuclear fuel decreases with irradiation (or burnup) due to the transformation of heavy nuclides and the formation of fission products. Burnup credit studies aim at accounting for fuel irradiation in criticality studies of the nuclear fuel cycle (transport, storage, etc...). The principal objective of this study is to evaluate the potential capabilities of a newly developed burnup code called 'BUCAL1'. BUCAL1 differs in comparison with other burnup codes as it does not use the calculated neutron flux as input to other computer codes to generate the nuclide inventory for the next time step. Instead, BUCAL1 directly uses the neutron reaction tally information generated by MCNP for each nuclide of interest to determine the new nuclides inventory. This allows the full capabilities of MCNP to be incorporated into the calculation and a more accurate and robust analysis to be performed. Validation of BUCAL1 was processed by code-to-code comparisons using predictions of several codes from the NEA/OCED. Infinite multiplication factors (k ∞ ) and important fission product and actinide concentrations were compared for a MOX core benchmark exercise. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  17. Analysis of bubble pressure in the rim region of high burnup PWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Yang Hyun; Lee, Byung Ho; Sohn, Dong Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    Bubble pressure in the rim region of high burnup PWR UO{sub 2} fuel has been modeled based on measured rim width, porosity and bubble density. Using the assumption that excessive bubble pressure in the rim is inversely proportional to its radius, proportionality constant is derived as a function of average pellet burnup and bubble radius. This approach is possible because the integration of the number of Xe atoms retained in the rim bubbles, which can be calculated as a function of bubble radius, over the bubble radius gives the total number of Xe atoms in the rim bubbles. Here the total number of Xe atoms in the rim bubbles can be derived from the measured Xe depletion fraction in the matrix and the calculated rim thickness. Then the rim bubble pressure is obtained as a function of fuel burnup and bubble size from the proportionality constant. Therefore, the present model can provide some useful information that would be required to analyze the behavior of high burnup PWR UO{sub 2} fuel under both normal and transient operating conditions. 28 refs., 9 figs. (Author)

  18. Actinide-only burnup credit methodology for PWR spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancaster, D.B.; Fuentes, E.; Kang, C.; Rahimi, M.

    1998-01-01

    A conservative methodology is presented that would allow taking credit for burnup in the criticality safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages. The method is based on the assumption that the isotopic concentration in the SNF and cross sections of each isotope for which credit is taken must be supported by validation experiments. The method allows credit for the changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps: 1. Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of spent nuclear fuel created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. 2. Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k eff , of a spent nuclear fuel package by use of UO 2 and UO 2 /Puo 2 critical experiments. 3. Establish conditions for the SNF (depletion analysis) and package (criticality analysis) which bounds k eff . 4. Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). 5. Verify by measurement that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper assembly selection prior to loading. (author)

  19. Development of high performance liquid chromatography for rapid determination of burn-up of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, M.; Karunasagar, D.; Saha, B.

    1996-01-01

    Burn-up an important parameter during evaluation of the performance of any nuclear fuel. Among the various techniques available, the preferred one for its determination is based on accurate measurement of a suitable fission product monitor and the residual heavy elements. Since isotopes of rare earth elements are generally used as burn-up monitors, conditions were standardized for rapid separation (within 15 minutes) of light rare earths using high performance liquid chromatography based on either anion exchange (Partisil 10 SAX) in methanol-nitric acid medium or by cation exchange on a reverse phase column (Spherisorb 5-ODS-2 or Supelcosil LC-18) dynamically modified with 1-octane sulfonate or camphor-10-sulfonic acid (β). Both these methods were assessed for separation of individual fission product rare earths from their mixtures. A new approach has been examined in detail for rapid assay of neodymium, which appears promising for faster and accurate measurement of burn-up. (author)

  20. Investigation of very high burnup UO{sub 2} fuels in Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappia, Fabiola

    2017-03-27

    Historically, the average discharge burnup of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel has increased almost continuously. On one side, increase in the average discharge burnup is attractive because it contributes to decrease part of the fuel cycle costs. On the other side, it raises the practical problem of predicting the performance, longevity and properties of reactor fuel elements upon accumulation of irradiation damage and fission products both during in-reactor operation and after discharge. Performance of the fuel and structural components of the core is one of the critical areas on which the economic viability and public acceptance of nuclear energy production hinges. Along the pellet radius, the fuel matrix is subjected to extremely heterogeneous alteration and damage, as a result of temperature and burnup gradients. In particular, in the peripheral region of LWR UO{sub 2} fuel pellets, when the local burnup exceeds 50-70 GWd/tHM, a microstructural transformation starts to take place, as a consequence of enhanced accumulation of radiation damage, fission products and limited thermal recovery. The newly formed structure is commonly named High Burnup Structure (HBS). The HBS is characterised by three main features: (a) formation of submicrometric grains from the original grains, (b) depletion of fission gas from the fuel matrix, (c) steep increase in the porosity, which retains most of the gas depleted from the fuel matrix. The last two aspects rose significant attention because of the important impact of the fission gas behaviour on integral fuel performance. The porosity increase controls the gas-driven swelling, worsening the cladding loading once the fuel-cladding gap is closed. Another concern is that the large retention of fission gas within the HBS could lead to significant release at high burnups through the degradation of thermal conductivity or contribute to fuel pulverisation during accidental conditions. Need of more experimental investigations about the

  1. Estimation of pore pressure in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Yang Hyun; Lee, Byung Ho; Sohn, Dong Seong

    1999-01-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate the pore pressure in the rim region of high burnup UO 2 fuel as a function of rim burnup using the measured rim width, average porosity and pore density in the rim region. First, a linear relationship is developed based on measured rim burnup and rim width. Second, fraction of fission gas retained in the grain boundary of rim region is estimated. Third, total pores in the rim is calculated from the measured pore density in the rim region. Finally using the assumption that all the pores in the rim have the same size of 1.2μm, pore pressure is calculated from the equation of state for ideal gas. An estimated pore pressure of about 60 to 80 MPa for the rim burnup of 90 GWd/tU appears to be in reasonable agreement with other value given in a literature that pore pressure at 800 K become 90-210 MPa for pellet average burnup of 80 GWd/tU

  2. Nuclide analysis in high burnup fuel samples irradiated in Vandellos 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicky, H.U., E-mail: hans-urs.zwicky@bluewin.c [Zwicky Consulting GmbH, Chilacherstr. 17, 5236 Remigen (Switzerland); Low, J.; Granfors, M. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, 611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden); Alejano, C.; Conde, J.M. [Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Justo Dorado 11, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Casado, C.; Sabater, J.; Lloret, M.; Quecedo, M. [ENUSA, Santiago Rosinol 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gago, J.A. [ENRESA, Emilio Vargas 7, 28043 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    In the framework of a high burnup fuel demonstration programme, rods with an enrichment of 4.5% {sup 235}U were operated to a rod average burnup of about 70 MWd/kgU in the Spanish Vandellos 2 pressurised water reactor. The rods were sent to hot cells and used for different research projects. This paper describes the isotopic composition measurements performed on samples of those rods, and the analysis of the measurement results based on comparison against calculated values. The fraction and composition of fission gases released to the rod free volume was determined for two of the rods. About 8% of Kr and Xe produced by fission were released. From the isotopic composition of the gases, it could be concluded that the gases were not preferentially released from the peripheral part of the fuel column. Local burnup and isotopic content of gamma emitting nuclides were determined by quantitatively evaluating axial gamma scans of the full rods. Nine samples were cut at different axial levels from three of the rods and analysed in two campaigns. More than 50 isotopes of 16 different elements were assessed, most of them by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry after separation with High Performance Liquid Chromatography. In general, these over 400 data points gave a consistent picture of the isotopic content of irradiated fuel as a function of burnup. Only in a few cases, the analysis provided unexpected results that seem to be wrong, in most cases due to unidentified reasons. Sample burnup analysis was performed by comparing experimental isotopic abundances of uranium and plutonium composition as well as neodymium isotopic concentrations with corresponding CASMO based data. The results were in agreement with values derived independently from gamma scanning and from core design data and plant operating records. Measured isotope abundances were finally assessed using the industry standard SAS2H sequence of the SCALE code system. This exercise showed good agreement

  3. Regulatory status of burnup credit for dry storage and transport of spent nuclear fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, D.E.

    2001-01-01

    During 1999, the Spent Fuel Project Office of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) introduced technical guidance for allowing burnup credit in the criticality safety analysis of casks for transporting or storing spent fuel from pressurized water reactors. This paper presents the recommendations embodied by the current NRC guidance, discusses associated technical issues, and reviews information needs and industry priorities for expanding the scope and content of the guidance. Allowable analysis approaches for burnup credit must account for the fuel irradiation variables that affect spent fuel reactivity, including the axial and horizontal variation of burnup within fuel assemblies. Consistent with international transport regulations, the burnup of each fuel assembly must be verified by pre-loading measurements. The current guidance limits the credited burnup to no more than 40 GWd/MTU and the credited cooling time to five years, imposes a burnup offset for fuels with initial enrichments between 4 and 5 wt% 235U, does not include credit for fission products, and excludes burnup credit for damaged fuels and fuels that have used burnable absorbers. Burnup credit outside these limits may be considered when adequately supported by technical information beyond that reviewed to-date by the NRC staff. The guidance further recommends that residual subcritical margins from the neglect of fission products, and any other nuclides not credited in the licensing-basis analysis, be estimated for each cask design and compared against estimates of the maximum reactivity effects associated with remaining computational uncertainties and potentially nonconservative modeling assumptions. The NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research is conducting a research program to help develop the technical information needed for refining and expanding the evolving guidance. Cask vendors have announced plans to submit the first NRC license applications for burnup credit later this year

  4. An analysis of nuclear fuel burnup in the AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment using gamma spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and computational simulation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The burnup of irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel was analyzed using gamma spectrometry. • The burnup of irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel was also analyzed using mass spectrometry. • Agreement between experimental results and neutron physics simulations was excellent. - Abstract: AGR-1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post-irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR-1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non-destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR-1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs-137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs-134 and Cs-137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy metal atom) for the direct method and 20.0% FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can be determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3% FIMA to 10.7% FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma

  5. Cellular automata approach to investigation of high burn-up structures in nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, E.P.; Ivanov, V.V.; Kostenko, B.F.

    2005-01-01

    Micrographs of uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) corresponding to exposure times in reactor during 323, 953, 971, 1266 and 1642 full power days were investigated. The micrographs were converted into digital files isomorphous to cellular automata (CA) checkerboards. Such a representation of the fuel structure provides efficient tools for its dynamics simulation in terms of primary 'entities' imprinted in the micrographs. Besides, it also ensures a possibility of very effective micrograph processing by CA means. Interconnection between the description of fuel burn-up development and some exactly soluble models is ascertained. Evidences for existence of self-organization in the fuel at high burn-ups were established. The fractal dimension of microstructures is found to be an important characteristic describing the degree of radiation destructions

  6. A validated methodology for evaluating burnup credit in spent fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, M.C.; Sanders, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of allowing reactivity credit for the transmuted state of spent fuel offers both economic and risk incentives. This paper presents a general overview of the technical work being performed in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to resolve issues related to the implementation of burnup credit. An analysis methodology is presented along with information representing the validation of the method against available experimental data. The experimental data that are applicable to burnup credit include chemical assay data for the validation of the isotopic prediction models, fresh fuel critical experiments for the validation of criticality calculations for various cask geometries, and reactor restart critical data to validate criticality calculations with spent fuel. The methodology has been specifically developed to be simple and generally applicable, therefore giving rise to uncertainties or sensitivities which are identified and quantified in terms of a percent bias in k eff . Implementation issues affecting licensing requirements and operational procedures are discussed briefly. (Author)

  7. A validated methodology for evaluating burnup credit in spent fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, M.C.; Sanders, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of allowing reactivity credit for the transmuted state of spent fuel offers both economic and risk incentives. This paper presents a general overview of the technical work being performed in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to resolve issues related to the implementation of burnup credit. An analysis methodology is presented along with information representing the validation of the method against available experimental data. The experimental data that are applicable to burnup credit include chemical assay data for the validation of the isotopic prediction models, fresh fuel critical experiments for the validation of criticality calculations for various casks geometries, and reactor restart critical data to validate criticality calculations with spent fuel. The methodology has been specifically developed to be simple and generally applicable, therefore giving rise to uncertainties or sensitivities which are identified and quantified in terms of a percent bias in k eff . Implementation issues affecting licensing requirements and operational procedures are discussed briefly

  8. A comparative study to investigate burnup in research reactor fuel using two independent experimental methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.; Mehmood, T.; Ayazuddin, S.K.; Salahuddin, A.; Pervez, S.

    2001-01-01

    Two independent experimental methods have been used for the comparative study of fuel burnup measurement in low enriched uranium, plate type research reactor. In the first method a gamma ray activity ratio method was employed. An experimental setup was established for gamma ray scanning using prior calibrated high purity germanium detector. The computer software KORIGEN gave the theoretical support. In the second method reactivity difference technique was used. At the same location in the same core configuration the fresh and burned fuel element's reactivity worth was estimated. For theoretical estimated curve, group cross-sections were generated using computer code WIMS-D/4, and three dimensional modeling was made by computer code CITATION. The measured burnup of different fuel elements using these methods were found to be in good agreement

  9. Modeling of burnup express-estimation for UO{sub 2}-fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likhanskii, Vladimir V.; Tokarev, Sergey A.; Vilkhivskaya, Olga V., E-mail: vilhivskaya_olga@mail.ru

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Proposed engineering model estimates fuel burnup by {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs activity ratio. • Buildup of cesium isotopes relies on changing neutron spectrum in the core cycle. • {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs activity ratios in FAs with Gd-doped fuel rods are analyzed. • Comparison of the model calculations with the NPPs spike measurements is presented. - Abstract: The paper presents the developed engineering model of cesium isotopes production as function of UO{sub 2}-fuel burnup and an assessment of their activity ratios. The model considers the evolution of linear power of gadolinium-doped fuel rods and fuel rods surrounding them in fuel assemblies with high enrichment fuel, harder neutron spectrum, and the changes in cross-sections of neutron reactions in thermal and epithermal energy areas. Parametrical dependences in the model are based on the fuel operation data for nuclear power plants and on the detailed neutronic-physical calculations of the core. Presented are the results of the model calculations for the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs activity ratios in fuel taking into account the parameter of hardness of the neutron spectrum during the first irradiation cycle for fuel with enrichment ranging from 3.6 wt% in {sup 235}U.

  10. The criticality implications of taking credit for fuel burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemson, P.D.; Thorne, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The first problem usually facing a criticality engineer is data specification. The design engineer and operator need a design and operating envelope of data which allows practical operation, but the criticality engineer must ensure that key parameters remain within specific limits to maintain criticality safety. Given the high safety standards demanded in the nuclear industry, a naturally cautious view is taken and pessimistic assumptions of parameter values are therefore made. This explains why assessments of spent fuel transport and storage assume unirradiated fissile compositions (the fresh fuel assumption). Looking ahead, the pressure to achieve more economic designs and the need to extend design specifications is likely to increase. The large decrease in spent fuel reactivity resulting from fuel burn-up provides a potential way of meeting these requirements. The challenge is to develop ways of taking credit for fuel burn-up with no reduction in safety. This raises various issues which are discussed briefly in this paper, together with a scoping study to investigate the scale of reactivity change with burn-up for an existing BNFL cask design

  11. Modelling of high burnup structure in UO2 fuel with the RTOP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhanskii, V.; Zborovskii, V.; Evdokimov, I.; Kanyukova, V.; Sorokin, A.

    2008-01-01

    The present work deals with self-consistent physical approach aimed to derive the criterion of fuel restructuring avoiding correlations. The approach is based on study of large over pressurized bubbles formation on dislocations, at grain boundaries and in grain volume. At first, stage of formation of bubbles non-destroyable by fission fragments is examined using consistent modelling of point defects and fission gas behavior near dislocation and in grain volume. Then, evolution of formed large non-destroyable bubbles is considered using results of the previous step as initial values. Finally, condition of dislocation loops punching by sufficiently large over pressurized bubbles is regarded as the criterion of fuel restructuring onset. In the present work consideration of large over pressurized bubbles evolution is applied to modelling of the restructuring threshold depending on temperature, burnup and grain size. Effect of grain size predicted by the model is in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. Restructuring threshold criterion as an analytical function of local burnup and fuel temperature is derived and compared with HBRP project data. To predict rim-layer width formation depending on fuel burnup and irradiation conditions the model is implemented into the mechanistic fuel performance code RTOP. Calculated dependencies give upper estimate for the width of restructured region. Calculations show that one needs to consider temperature distribution within pellet which depends on irradiation history in order to model rim-structure formation

  12. Correlation of waterside corrosion and cladding microstructure in high-burnup fuel and gadolinia rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.

    1989-09-01

    Waterside corrosion of the Zircaloy cladding has been examined in high-burnup fuel rods from several BWRs and PWRs, as well as in 3 wt % gadolinia burnable poison rods obtained from a BWR. The corrosion behavior of the high-burnup rods was then correlated with results from a microstructural characterization of the cladding by optical, scanning-electron, and transmission-electron microscopy (OM, SEM, and TEM). OM and SEM examination of the BWR fuel cladding showed both uniform and nodular oxide layers 2 to 45 μm in thickness after burnups of 11 to 30 MWd/kgU. For one of the BWRs, which was operated at 307 degree C rather than the normal 288 degree C, a relatively thick (50 to 70 μm) uniform oxide, rather than nodular oxides, was observed after a burnup of 27 to 30 MWd/kgU. TEM characterization revealed a number of microstructural features that occurred in association with the intermetallic precipitates in the cladding metal, apparently as a result of irradiation-induced or -enhanced processes. The BWR rods that exhibited white nodular oxides contained large precipitates (300 to 700 nm in size) that were partially amorphized during service, indicating that a distribution of the large intermetallic precipitates is conductive to nodular oxidation. 23 refs., 9 figs

  13. Investigation and basic evaluation for ultra-high burnup fuel cladding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Nagase, Fumihisa; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2001-03-01

    In ultra-high burnup of the power reactor, it is an essential problem to develop the cladding with excellent durability. First, development history and approach of the safety assessment of Zircaloy for the high burnup fuel were summarized in the report. Second, the basic evaluation and investigation were carried out on the material with high practicability in order to select the candidate materials for the ultra-high burnup fuel. In addition, the basic research on modification technology of the cladding surface was carried out from the viewpoint of the addition of safety margin as a cladding. From the development history of the zirconium alloy including the Zircaloy, it is hard to estimate the results of in-pile test from those of the conventional corrosion test (out-pile test). Therefore, the development of the new testing technology that can simulate the actual environment and the elucidation of the corrosion-controlling factor of the cladding are desired. In cases of RIA (Reactivity Initiated Accident) and LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident), it seems that the loss of ductility in zirconium alloys under heavy irradiation and boiling of high temperature water restricts the extension of fuel burnup. From preliminary evaluation on the high corrosion-resistance materials (austenitic stainless steel, iron or nickel base superalloys, titanium alloy, niobium alloy, vanadium alloy and ferritic stainless steel), stabilized austenitic stainless steels with a capability of future improvement and high-purity niobium alloys with a expectation of the good corrosion resistance were selected as candidate materials of ultra-high burnup cladding. (author)

  14. Application of Genetic Algorithm methodologies in fuel bundle burnup optimization of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayalal, M.L.; Ramachandran, Suja; Rathakrishnan, S.; Satya Murty, S.A.V.; Sai Baba, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study and compare Genetic Algorithms (GA) in the fuel bundle burnup optimization of an Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) of 220 MWe. • Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are considered. • For the selected problem, Multi Objective GA performs better than Penalty Functions based GA. • In the present study, Multi Objective GA outperforms Penalty Functions based GA in convergence speed and better diversity in solutions. - Abstract: The work carried out as a part of application and comparison of GA techniques in nuclear reactor environment is presented in the study. The nuclear fuel management optimization problem selected for the study aims at arriving appropriate reference discharge burnup values for the two burnup zones of 220 MWe Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) core. Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are applied in this study. The study reveals, for the selected problem of PHWR fuel bundle burnup optimization, Multi Objective GA is more suitable than Penalty Functions based GA in the two aspects considered: by way of producing diverse feasible solutions and the convergence speed being better, i.e. it is capable of generating more number of feasible solutions, from earlier generations. It is observed that for the selected problem, the Multi Objective GA is 25.0% faster than Penalty Functions based GA with respect to CPU time, for generating 80% of the population with feasible solutions. When average computational time of fixed generations are considered, Penalty Functions based GA is 44.5% faster than Multi Objective GA. In the overall performance, the convergence speed of Multi Objective GA surpasses the computational time advantage of Penalty Functions based GA. The ability of Multi Objective GA in producing more diverse feasible solutions is a desired feature of the problem selected, that helps the

  15. Improvement of burnup analysis for pebble bed reactors with an accumulative fuel loading scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanullang, Irwan Liapto; Obara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Given the limitations of natural uranium resources, innovative nuclear power plant concepts that increase the efficiency of nuclear fuel utilization are needed. The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) shows some potential to achieve high efficiency in natural uranium utilization. To simplify the PBR concept, PBR with an accumulation fuel loading scheme was introduced and the Fuel Handling System (FHS) removed. In this concept, the pebble balls are added little by little into the reactor core until the pebble balls reach the top of the reactor core, and all pebble balls are discharged from the core at the end of the operation period. A code based on the MVP/MVP-BURN method has been developed to perform an analysis of a PBR with the accumulative fuel loading scheme. The optimum fuel composition was found using the code for high burnup performance. Previous efforts provided several motivations to improve the burnup performance: First, some errors in the input code were corrected. This correction, and an overall simplification of the input code, was implemented for easier analysis of a PBR with the accumulative fuel loading scheme. Second, the optimum fuel design had been obtained in the infinite geometry. To improve the optimum fuel composition, a parametric survey was obtained by varying the amount of Heavy Metal (HM) uranium per pebble and the degree of uranium enrichment. Moreover, an entire analysis of the parametric survey was obtained in the finite geometry. The results show that improvements in the fuel composition can lead to more accurate analysis with the code. (author)

  16. Uranium and plutonium determinations for evaluation of high burnup fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, R.R.; Popek, R.J.; Bowers, D.L.; Essling, A.M.; Callis, E.L.; Persiani, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose of this work is to experimentally test computational methods being developed for reactor fuel operation. Described are the analytical techniques used in the determination of uranium and plutonium compositions on PWR fuel that has spanned five power cycles, culminating in 55,000 to 57,000 MWd/T burnup. Analyses have been performed on ten samples excised from selected sections of the fuel rods. Hot cell operations required the separation of fuel from cladding and the comminution of the fuel. These tasks were successfully accomplished using a SpectroMil, a ball pestle impact grinding and blending instrument manufactured by Chemplex Industries, Inc., Eastchester, New York. The fuel was dissolved using strong mineral acids and bomb dissolution techniques. Separation of the fuel from fission products was done by solvent (hexone) extraction. Fuel isotopic compositions and assays were determined by the mass spectrometric isotope dilution (MSID) method using NBS standards SRM-993 and SRM-996. Alpha spectrometry was used to determine the 238 Pu composition. Relative correlations of composition with burnup were obtained by gamma-ray spectrometry of selected fission products in the dissolved fuel

  17. Burnup credit in the design of spent-fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.L.; Westfall, R.M.; Wilmot, E.L.

    1987-01-01

    The spent-fuel carrying capacities of previous generation shipping casks have been primarily thermal and/or shielding limited. Shielding and heat transfer requirements for casks designed to transport older spent fuel with longer decay times are reduced significantly. Thus, a considerable weight margin is available to the designer for increasing the payload capacity. One method of achieving an increase in capacity is by reducing fuel assembly spacing. The amount of reduction in assembly spacing available is limited by criticality and fuel support structural concerns. The optimum fuel assembly achievable is then limited by requirements to control neutron multiplication and to ensure the structural integrity of fuel support components. An investigation of the feasibility of accounting for fuel burnup in the design of spent-fuel shipping casks was recently completed for the US Dept. of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. Criticality analyses have been performed, and potential impacts in terms of increased cask capacities with associated costs and safety benefits have been determined. The scope of the analysis is limited to typical burnups of full-cycle, discharged pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel and generic shipping cask designs. A sensitivity analysis was performed to estimate the impact of cask capacity on total transportation system life cycle costs

  18. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    The purpose of this research was to develop a burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model within Pennsylvania State University, Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Management Group (RDFMG) version of the subchannel thermal-hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF). The model takes into account first, the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity with high burnup; and second, the fuel thermal conductivity dependence on the Gadolinium content for both UO2 and MOX fuel rods. The modified Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) model for UO2 fuel rods and Duriez/Modified NFI Model for MOX fuel rods were incorporated into CTF and fuel centerline predictions were compared against Halden experimental test data and FRAPCON-3.4 predictions to validate the burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF. Experimental test cases from Halden reactor fuel rods for UO2 fuel rods at Beginning of Life (BOL), through lifetime without Gd2O3 and through lifetime with Gd 2O3 and a MOX fuel rod were simulated with CTF. Since test fuel rod and FRAPCON-3.4 results were based on single rod measurements, CTF was run for a single fuel rod surrounded with a single channel configuration. Input decks for CTF were developed for one fuel rod located at the center of a subchannel (rod-centered subchannel approach). Fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF were compared against the measurements from Halden experimental test data and the predictions from FRAPCON-3.4. After implementing the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF and validating the model with experimental data, CTF model was applied to steady state and transient calculations. 4x4 PWR fuel bundle configuration from Purdue MOX benchmark was used to apply the new model for steady state and transient calculations. First, one of each high burnup UO2 and MOX fuel rods from 4x4 matrix were selected to carry out single fuel rod calculations and fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD were compared against CTF /TORT-TD /FRAPTRAN

  19. A technique of melting temperature measurement and its application for irradiated high-burnup MOX fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namekawa, Takashi; Hirosawa, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    A melting temperature measurement technique for irradiated oxide fuels is described. In this technique, the melting temperature was determined from a thermal arrest on a heating curve of the specimen which was enclosed in a tungsten capsule to maintain constant chemical composition of the specimen during measurement. The measurement apparatus was installed in an alpha-tight steel box within a gamma-shielding cell and operated by remote handling. The temperature of the specimen was measured with a two-color pyrometer sighted on a black-body well at the bottom of the tungsten capsule. The diameter of the black-body well was optimized so that the uncertainties of measurement were reduced. To calibrate the measured temperature, two reference melting temperature materials, tantalum and molybdenum, were encapsulated and run before and after every oxide fuel test. The melting temperature data on fast reactor mixed oxide fuels irradiated up to 124 GWd/t were obtained. In addition, simulated high-burnup mixed oxide fuel up to 250 GWd/t by adding non-radioactive soluble fission products was examined. These data shows that the melting temperature decrease with increasing burnup and saturated at high burnup region. (author)

  20. A linear reactivity model approximation to predict BWR fuel assembly burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delfin L, A.; Alonso V, G. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Valle G, E. del [IPN, ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: adl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    A second order nodal method was derived for the one and a half group version of neutron diffusion theory in X-Y geometry. Based on the linear reactivity model, two reactivity relations are developed to treat fresh and depleted loading batches as a way to account for the spatial variation of moderator properties due to the substantial fraction of steam void present as well as the effect of the control rod positioning. Based on these ideas a program was developed to predict fuel batch burnup in a BWR operating cycle and fuel power sharing. The method was used to test two consecutive BWR operating fuel cycles. (Author)

  1. Flowchart evaluations of irradiated fuel treatment process of low burnup thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linardi, M.

    1987-01-01

    A literature survey has been carried out, on some versions of the acid-thorex process. Flowsheets of the different parts of the process were evaluated with mixer-settlers experiments. A low burnup thorium fuel (mass ratio Th/U∼100/1), proposed for Brazilian fast breeder reactor initial program, was considered. The behaviour of some fission products was studied by irradiated tracers techniques. Modifications in some of the process parameters were necessary to achieve low losses of 233 U and 232 U and 232 Th. A modified acid-thorex process flowsheet, evaluated in a complete operational cycle, for the treatment of low burnup thorium fuels, is presented. High decontamination factors of thorium in uranium, with reasonable decontamination of uranium in thorium, were achieved. (author) [pt

  2. The role of ORIGEN-S in the design of burnup credit spent fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    Current licensing practices for spent fuel pools, storage facilities, and transportation casks require a conservative ''fresh fuel assumption'' be used in the criticality analysis. Burnup credit refers to a new approach in criticality analyses for spent fuel handling systems in which reactivity credit is allowed for the depleted state of the fuel. Studies have shown that the increased cask capacities that can be achieved with burnup credit offer both economic and risk incentives. The US Department of Energy is currently sponsoring a program to develop analysis methodologies and establish a new generation of spent fuel casks using the principle of burnup credit. The key difference in this new approach is the necessity to accurately predict the isotopic composition of the spent fuel. ORIGEN-S was selected to satisfy this requirement because of the flexibility and user-friendly input offered via its usage in the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing and Evaluation (SCALE) code system. Specifically, through the Shielding Analysis Sequence 2H (SAS2H), ORIGEN-S is linked with cross-section processing codes and one-dimensional transport analyses to produce problem-specific cross-section data for the point-depletion calculation. The utility code COUPLE facilitates updating basic cross-section and fission-yield data for the calculations. This paper describes the fundamental role fulfilled by ORIGEN-S in the development of the analysis methodology, validation of the methods, definition of criticality safety margins and other licensing considerations in the design of a new generation of spent fuel casks. Particular emphasis is given to the performance of ORIGEN-S in comparisons with measurements of irradiated fuel compositions and in predicting isotopics for use in the calculation of reactor restart critical configurations that are performed as a part of the validation process

  3. The DACC system. Code burnup of cell for projection of the fuel elements in the power net work PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepraga, D.; Boeriu, St.; Gheorghiu, E.; Cristian, I.; Patrulescu, I.; Cimporescu, D.; Ciuvica, P.; Velciu, E.

    1975-01-01

    The calculation system DACC-5 is a zero-dimensional reactor physics code used to calculate the criticality and burn-up of light-water reactors. The code requires as input essential extensive reactor parameters (fuel rod radius, water density, etc.). The nuclear constants (intensive parameters) are calculated with a five-group model (2 thermal and 3 fast groups). A fitting procedure is systematically employed to reduce the computation time of the code. Zero-dimensional burn-up calculations are made in an automatic way. Part one of the paper contains the code physical model and computer structure. Part two of the paper will contain tests of DACC-5 credibility for different light-water power lattices

  4. Optimization of FBR fuel element for high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marbach, G.; Millet, P.

    1985-03-01

    After a brief historical background showing evolution of the French fast reactor fuel element from RAPSODIE to PHENIX and SUPER PHENIX we have examined the main points which have permitted to increase irradiation performance of the subassembly

  5. Fuel temperature prediction during high burnup HTGR fuel irradiation test. US-JAERI irradiation test for HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kousaku; Acharya, R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the preirradiation thermal analysis of the HRB-22 capsule designed for an irradiation test in a removable beryllium position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor(HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This test is being carried out under Annex 2 of the Arrangement between the U.S. Department of Energy and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute on Cooperation in Research and Development regarding High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors. The fuel used in the test is an advanced type. The advanced fuel was designed aiming at burnup of about 10%FIMA(% fissions per initial metallic atom) which was higher than that of the first charge fuel for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor(HTTR) and was produced in Japan. CACA-2, a heavy isotope and fission product concentration calculational code for experimental irradiation capsules, was used to determine time-dependent fission power for the fuel compacts. The Heat Engineering and Transfer in Nine Geometries(HEATING) code was used to solve the steady-state heat conduction problem. The diameters of the graphite fuel body, which contains the fuel compacts, and of the primary pressure vessel were determined such that the requirements of running the fuel compacts at an average temperature less than 1250degC and of not exceeding a maximum fuel temperature of 1350degC were met throughout the four cycles of irradiation. The detail design of the capsule was carried out based on this analysis. (author)

  6. Investigation of burnup credit allowance in the criticality safety evaluation of spent fuel casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, W.H. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA)); Sanders, T.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Parks, C.V. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    This presentation discusses work in progress on criticality analysis verification for designs which take account of the burnup and age of transported fuel. The work includes verification of cross section data, correlation with experiments, proper extension of the methods into regimes not covered by experiments, establishing adequate reactivity margins, and complete documentation of the project. Recommendations for safe operational procedures are included, as well as a discussion of the economic and safety benefits of such designs.

  7. Investigation of burnup credit allowance in the criticality safety evaluation of spent fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, W.H.; Sanders, T.L.; Parks, C.V.

    1990-01-01

    This presentation discusses work in progress on criticality analysis verification for designs which take account of the burnup and age of transported fuel. The work includes verification of cross section data, correlation with experiments, proper extension of the methods into regimes not covered by experiments, establishing adequate reactivity margins, and complete documentation of the project. Recommendations for safe operational procedures are included, as well as a discussion of the economic and safety benefits of such designs

  8. iBEST: a program for burnup history estimation of spent fuels based on ORIGEN-S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do-Yeon Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe a computer program, iBEST (inverse Burnup ESTimator, that we developed to accurately estimate the burnup histories of spent nuclear fuels based on sample measurement data. The burnup history parameters include initial uranium enrichment, burnup, cooling time after discharge from reactor, and reactor type. The program uses algebraic equations derived using the simplified burnup chains of major actinides for initial estimations of burnup and uranium enrichment, and it uses the ORIGEN-S code to correct its initial estimations for improved accuracy. In addition, we newly developed a stable bisection method coupled with ORIGEN-S to correct burnup and enrichment values and implemented it in iBEST in order to fully take advantage of the new capabilities of ORIGEN-S for improving accuracy. The iBEST program was tested using several problems for verification and well-known realistic problems with measurement data from spent fuel samples from the Mihama-3 reactor for validation. The test results show that iBEST accurately estimates the burnup history parameters for the test problems and gives an acceptable level of accuracy for the realistic Mihama-3 problems.

  9. iBEST: a program for burnup history estimation of spent fuels based on ORIGEN-S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Yeon; Hong, Ser Gi; Ahn, Gil Hoon

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a computer program, iBEST (inverse Burnup ESTimator), that we developed to accurately estimate the burnup histories of spent nuclear fuels based on sample measurement data. The burnup history parameters include initial uranium enrichment, burnup, cooling time after discharge from reactor, and reactor type. The program uses algebraic equations derived using the simplified burnup chains of major actinides for initial estimations of burnup and uranium enrichment, and it uses the ORIGEN-S code to correct its initial estimations for improved accuracy. In addition, we newly developed a stable bisection method coupled with ORIGEN-S to correct burnup and enrichment values and implemented it in iBEST in order to fully take advantage of the new capabilities of ORIGEN-S for improving accuracy. The iBEST program was tested using several problems for verification and well-known realistic problems with measurement data from spent fuel samples from the Mihama-3 reactor for validation. The test results show that iBEST accurately estimates the burnup history parameters for the test problems and gives an acceptable level of accuracy for the realistic Mihama-3 problems

  10. Analysis of burnup and isotopic compositions of BWR 9 x 9 UO2 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Ando, Y.; Nakajima, T.

    2012-01-01

    In order to extend isotopic composition data focusing on fission product nuclides, measurements are progressing using facilities of JAEA for five samples taken from high burnup BWR 9 x 9 UO 2 fuel assemblies. Neutronics analysis with an infinite assembly model was applied to the preliminary measurement data using a continuous-energy Monte Carlo burnup calculation code MVP-BURN with nuclear libraries based on JENDL-3.3 and JENDL-4.0. The burnups of the samples were determined to be 28.0, 39.3, 56.6, 68.1, and 64.0 GWd/t by the Nd-148 method. They were compared with those calculated using node-average irradiation histories of power and in-channel void fractions which were taken from the plant data. The comparison results showed that the deviations of the calculated burnups from the measurements were -4 to 3%. It was confirmed that adopting the nuclear data library based on JENDL-4.0 reduced the deviations of the calculated isotopic compositions from the measurements for 238 Pu, 144 Nd, 145 Nd, 146 Nd, 148 Nd, 134 Cs, 154 Eu, 152 Sm, 154 Gd, and 157 Gd. On the other hand, the effect of the revision in the nuclear. data library on the neutronics analysis was not significant for major U and Pu isotopes. (authors)

  11. Fuel lattice design using heuristics and new strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz S, J. J.; Castillo M, J. A.; Torres V, M.; Perusquia del Cueto, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Pelta, D. A. [ETS Ingenieria Informatica y Telecomunicaciones, Universidad de Granada, Daniel Saucedo Aranda s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Campos S, Y., E-mail: juanjose.ortiz@inin.gob.m [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edif. 9, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    This work show some results of the fuel lattice design in BWRs when some allocation pin rod rules are not taking into account. Heuristics techniques like Path Re linking and Greedy to design fuel lattices were used. The scope of this work is to search about how do classical rules in design fuel lattices affect the heuristics techniques results and the fuel lattice quality. The fuel lattices quality is measured by Power Peaking Factor and Infinite Multiplication Factor at the beginning of the fuel lattice life. CASMO-4 code to calculate these parameters was used. The analyzed rules are the following: pin rods with lowest uranium enrichment are only allocated in the fuel lattice corner, and pin rods with gadolinium cannot allocated in the fuel lattice edge. Fuel lattices with and without gadolinium in the main diagonal were studied. Some fuel lattices were simulated in an equilibrium cycle fuel reload, using Simulate-3 to verify their performance. So, the effective multiplication factor and thermal limits can be verified. The obtained results show a good performance in some fuel lattices designed, even thought, the knowing rules were not implemented. A fuel lattice performance and fuel lattice design characteristics analysis was made. To the realized tests, a dell workstation was used, under Li nux platform. (Author)

  12. Fuel lattice design using heuristics and new strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz S, J. J.; Castillo M, J. A.; Torres V, M.; Perusquia del Cueto, R.; Pelta, D. A.; Campos S, Y.

    2010-10-01

    This work show some results of the fuel lattice design in BWRs when some allocation pin rod rules are not taking into account. Heuristics techniques like Path Re linking and Greedy to design fuel lattices were used. The scope of this work is to search about how do classical rules in design fuel lattices affect the heuristics techniques results and the fuel lattice quality. The fuel lattices quality is measured by Power Peaking Factor and Infinite Multiplication Factor at the beginning of the fuel lattice life. CASMO-4 code to calculate these parameters was used. The analyzed rules are the following: pin rods with lowest uranium enrichment are only allocated in the fuel lattice corner, and pin rods with gadolinium cannot allocated in the fuel lattice edge. Fuel lattices with and without gadolinium in the main diagonal were studied. Some fuel lattices were simulated in an equilibrium cycle fuel reload, using Simulate-3 to verify their performance. So, the effective multiplication factor and thermal limits can be verified. The obtained results show a good performance in some fuel lattices designed, even thought, the knowing rules were not implemented. A fuel lattice performance and fuel lattice design characteristics analysis was made. To the realized tests, a dell workstation was used, under Li nux platform. (Author)

  13. A relative risk comparison of criticality control strategies based on fresh fuel and burnup credit design bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.L.

    1989-01-01

    The fresh fuel design basis provides some margin of safety, i.e., criticality safety is almost independent of loading operations if fuel designs do not change significantly over the next 40 years. However, the design basis enrichment for future nuclear fuel will most likely vary with time. As a result, it cannot be guaranteed that the perceived passivity of the concept will be maintained over the life cycle of a future cask system. Several options are available to ensure that the reliability of a burnup credit system is comparable to or greater than that of a system based on a fresh fuel assumption. Criticality safety and control reliability could increase with burnup credit implementation. The safety of a burnup credit system could be comparable to that for a system based on the fresh fuel assumption. A burnup credit philosophy could be implemented without any cost-benefit tradeoff. A burnup credit design basis could result in a significant reduction in total system risk as well as economic benefits. These reductions occur primarily as a result of increased cask capacities and, thus, fewer shipments. Fewer shipments also result in fewer operations over the useful life of a cask, and opportunities for error decrease. The system concept can be designed such that only benefits occur. These benefits could include enhanced criticality safety and the overall reliability of cask operations, as well as system risk and economic benefits. Thus, burnup credit should be available as an alternative for the criticality design of spent fuel shipping casks

  14. Some Thermodynamic Features of Uranium-Plutonium Nitride Fuel in the Course of Burnup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinkevich, A. A.; Ivanov, A. S.; Belov, G. V.; Skupov, M. V.

    2017-12-01

    Calculation studies on the effect of carbon and oxygen impurities on the chemical and phase compositions of nitride uranium-plutonium fuel in the course of burnup are performed using the IVTANTHERMO code. It is shown that the number of moles of UN decreases with increasing burnup level, whereas UN1.466, UN1.54, and UN1.73 exhibit a considerable increase. The presence of oxygen and carbon impurities causes an increase in the content of the UN1.466, UN1.54 and UN1.73 phases in the initial fuel by several orders of magnitude, in particular, at a relatively low temperature. At the same time, the presence of impurities abruptly reduces the content of free uranium in unburned fuel. Plutonium in the considered system is contained in form of Pu, PuC, PuC2, Pu2C3, and PuN. Plutonium carbides, as well as uranium carbides, are formed in small amounts. Most of the plutonium remains in the form of nitride PuN, whereas unbound Pu is present only in the areas with a low burnup level and high temperatures.

  15. Simulation of the effects of the extend fuel rod burn-up under LOCA scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira; Abe, Alfredo, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixiera@ipen.br, E-mail: ayabe@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo Ramos, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br, E-mail: mrmartin@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (POLI/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2015-07-01

    Due to the high burn-up imposed to the nuclear fuel in the last recent years, new challenges become important, including a deep review of the fuel performance under accident conditions. In this sense, available data in the open literature show that some experiments were carried out in order to study the behavior of fuel rods under LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) scenario. For instance, a series of experiments, designated IFA-650 series, performed in the Halden reactor in 2010 present data related to zircaloy fuel rods submitted to LOCA conditions. In the tests were addressed issues such as fuel fragmentation, relocation and dispersal for an extended irradiation cycle. In the studied case (IFA-650.5), the LOCA scenario was evaluated after a burnup of 83.4 MWd/kg. The aim of this paper is to compare the experimental data to the fuel performance obtained applying the codes FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN. Different phenomena were evaluated, such as ballooning, burst, cladding oxidation and fuel relocation. Also, the cladding metallurgical phase transformation was considered. The obtained results reproduced in a good way the experimental data, showing that the adopted models are representative of the observed phenomena. (author)

  16. A two-dimensional fuel loading optimization method for the pressurized water reactor burnup cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stillman, J.A.; Chao, Y.A.; Downar, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    A method was developed and reported earlier that determines the optimum fuel and power distributions for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) burnup cycle. The backward diffusion calculation and the corewise Green's function method were used for the core model, which provided analytic derivatives for solving the nonlinear optimization problem using successive linear programming methods. The solution algorithm consisted of a reverse depletion strategy that begins at the end of cycle and solves simultaneously for the optimal fuel and burnable absorber distributions while the core is depleted to the beginning of cycle. These distributions were constrained by a maximum fuel power peaking and by the fuel and burnable absorber depletion characteristics. Additionally, the problem was formulated to consider specific numbers of feed and discharge assemblies by including penalty terms in the objective function. The resulting optimal solutions were shown to minimize the required fissile fuel inventory and burnable absorber lading for several PWR examples. Previously reported solutions were not required to meet some specified fuel batch size; therefore, the optimal solutions did not represent practical PWR problems. The purpose of the work reported in this paper is to investigate the effect of imposing batch size constraints on the optimization problem. Specifically, results are presented here for the case of a core consisting of three equal-sized fuel batches in which an equilibrium condition is imposed on the batch average burnups

  17. Fuel burnup analysis of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Pozzi, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Alloni, Daniele; Magrotti, Giovanni; Manera, Sergio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Cammi, Antonio; Zanetti, Matteo; Sartori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A fuel evolution model for a TRIGA Mark II reactor has been developed. • Reproduction of nearly 50 years of reactor operation. • The model was used to predict the best reactor reconfiguration. • Reactor life was extended without adding fresh fuel elements. - Abstract: A time evolution model was developed to study fuel burnup for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia. The results were used to predict the effects of a complete core reconfiguration and the accuracy of this prediction was tested experimentally. We used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 to reproduce system neutronics in different operating conditions and to analyze neutron fluxes in the reactor core. The software that took care of time evolution, completely designed in-house, used the neutron fluxes obtained by MCNP5 to evaluate fuel consumption. This software was developed specifically to keep into account some features that differentiate low power experimental reactors from those used for power production, such as the daily ON/OFF cycle and the long fuel lifetime. These effects can not be neglected to properly account for neutron poison accumulation. We evaluated the effect of 48 years of reactor operation and predicted a possible new configuration for the reactor core: the objective was to remove some of the fuel elements from the core and to obtain a substantial increase in the Core Excess reactivity value. The evaluation of fuel burnup and the reconfiguration results are presented in this paper.

  18. Fission gas release and fuel swelling at burn-ups higher than 50 Mwd/kg U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremier, S.; Walker, C.T.; Manzel, R.

    2002-01-01

    Post-irradiation examination results from commercial PWR fuel rods with average burn-ups up to 98 MWd/kgU are presented. The fractional fission gas release increased exponentially with rod burn-up from less than 10% at 50 MWd/kgU to around 25% at 98 MWd/kgU. It is argued that most of the gas released to rod-free volume originated in the central region of the fuel. The penetration of the high burn-up structure in the outer region of the fuel increased markedly with burn-up, and at a pellet burn-up of 102 MWd/kgU it extended over a distance of 1.15 mm to about r/ro = 0.75. The porosity of the high burn-up structure increased linearly with the local burn-up, and in fuel pellets with burn-ups greater than 80 MWd/kgU the pores in the vicinity of the pellet rim showed a distinct increase in size. Above 70 MWd/kgU, the widespread formation of the high burn-up structure caused the fuel swelling rate to increase from 1% to 1.5% per 10 MWd/kgU. The concentration of Xe retained in the grains of the high burn-up structure did not increase with burn-up, but remained at a low level of around 0.25 wt.% over the whole burn-up range studied. It is concluded that radiation-enhanced diffusion is responsible for the release of fission gas from the re-crystallized grains and that there is no build-up of gas in the grains with burn-up because equilibrium exists between the rate at which gas atoms are produced and the rate at which they diffuse to grain boundaries. The diffusion coefficient required to obtain an equilibrium Xe concentration of 0.2-0.3 wt.% in grains 0.1-0.3 μm in diameter is of the order of 10 -24 -10 -22 m 2 s -1 . (authors)

  19. Development of CANDU high-burnup fuel fabrication technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Ki Seob; Suk, H. C.; Kwon, H. I.; Ji, C. G.; Cho, M. S.; Chang, H. I.

    1997-07-01

    This study is focused on the achievement of the fabrication process improvement of CANFLEX-NU and for this purpose, following two areas of basic research were executed this year. 1) development of amorphous alloy for use in brazing of nuclear materials. 2) development of ECT techniques for the end-cap weld inspection. Also, preliminary feasibility analyses on the characteristics and handling techniques of CANFLEX-RU fuel were executed this year. - Selection of optimum conversion process of RU power -Characterization of the composition of RU power - Radiological characterization of RU power and sintered pellets - Compaction and sintering characteristics of RU power - Required special process for the production of CANFLEX-RU fuel - Development of technical specification for RU powder and pellets. In addition, technical support activities were performed for in-pile and out-pile fuel performance tests such as precision measurement of out-pile test fuel dimensions, establishment of quality control technique on fuel bundle by providing bundle kits to AECL for use in-pile irradiation tests in the NRU research reactor. (author). 57 refs., 16 tabs.,40 figs

  20. Fabrication of simulated mid-burnup CANDU fuel in the RFFL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimayuga, F.C.

    1997-01-01

    Prediction of the coefficient of void reactivity for CANDU reactor cores is key to modeling postulated loss-of-coolant scenarios to support safety analyses. To reduce the uncertainty in these predictions, computer codes used to generate the predictions have to be well validated for cores at equilibrium burnup. To this end, a COG-funded project was launched to resume mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication operations in the mothballed Recycle Fuel Fabrication Laboratory (RFFL) at CRL, and produce (U,Pu)O 2 fuel simulating mid-burnup CANDU fuel for physics testing in the ZED-2 reactor. In August 1996, rehabilitation of the RFFL was completed, and MOX operations were resumed in the facility. An up-to-date description of the RFFL, including the upgraded safety systems and process equipment, is presented. An overview of the fabrication campaign to produce 37 MOX fuel bundles for ZED-2 tests is given. The fabrication process used to manufacture the fuel from the starting powders to the finished elements and bundles is summarized. Fabrication data including production throughputs and inspection results is discussed. (author)

  1. Thermal behaviour of high burnup PWR fuel under different fill gas conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tverberg, T.

    2001-01-01

    During its more than 40 years of existence, a large number of experiments have been carried out at the Halden Reactor Project focusing on different aspects related to nuclear reactor fuel. During recent years, the fuels testing program has mainly been focusing on aspects related to high burnup, in particular in terms of fuel thermal performance and fission gas release, and often involving reinstrumentation of commercially irradiated fuel. The paper describes such an experiment where a PWR rod, previously irradiated in a commercial reactor to a burnup of ∼50 MWd/kgUO 2 , was reinstrumented with a fuel central oxide thermocouple and a cladding extensometer together with a high pressure gas flow line, allowing for different fill gas compositions and pressures to be applied. The paper focuses on the thermal behaviour of such LWR rods with emphasis on how different fill gas conditions influence the fuel temperatures and gap conductance. Rod growth rate was also monitored during the irradiation in the Halden reactor. (author)

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Activity on Technical Influence of High Burnup UOX and MOX Water Reactor Fuel on Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovasic, Z.; Einziger, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the results of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project investigating the influence of high burnup and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels, from water power reactors, on spent fuel management. These data will provide information on the impacts, regarding spent fuel management, for those countries operating light-water reactors (LWR)s and heavy-water reactors (HWR)s with zirconium alloy-clad uranium dioxide (UOX) fuels, that are considering the use of higher burnup UOX or the introduction of reprocessing and MOX fuels. The mechanical designs of lower burnup UOX and higher burnup UOX or MOX fuel are very similar, but some of the properties (e.g., higher fuel rod internal pressures; higher decay heat; higher specific activity; and degraded cladding mechanical properties of higher burnup UOX and MOX spent fuels) may potentially significantly affect the behavior of the fuel after irradiation. These properties are reviewed. The effects of these property changes on wet and dry storage, transportation, reprocessing, re-fabrication of fuel, and final disposal were evaluated, based on regulatory, safety, and operational considerations. Political and strategic considerations were not taken into account since relative importance of technical, economic and strategic considerations vary from country to country. There will also be an impact of these fuels on issues like non-proliferation, safeguards, and sustainability, but because of the complexity of factors affecting those issues, they are only briefly discussed. Data gaps were also identified during this investigation. The pros and cons of using high burnup UOX or MOX, for each applicable issue in each stage of the back end of the fuel cycle, were evaluated and are discussed.. Although, in theory, higher burnup fuel and MOX fuels mean a smaller quantity of spent fuel, the potential need for some changes in design of spent fuel storage, transportation, handling, reprocessing, re-fabrication, and

  3. Development of experimental methods for measuring fuel elements burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PEREDA, C; HENRIQUEZ, C; NAVARRO, G; TORRES, H; KLEIN, J; CALDERON, D; MEDEL, J; MUTIS, O; DAIE, J; ITURRIETA, L; LONCOMILLA, M; ZAMBRANO, J; KESTELMAN, A

    2003-01-01

    This paper is a summary of the work carried out during the last two years in fuel burning measurements at RECH-1 for different enrichments, cooling times and burning rates. The measurements were made in two gamma-spectrometric facilities, one is installed in a hot cell and the other inside of the secondary pool of the RECH-1, where the element is under 2 meters of water. The hot cell measurements need at least 100 cooling days because of the problems generated by the transport of highly active fuel elements from the Reactor to the cell. This was the main reason for using the in-pool facility because of its capability to measure the burning of fuel elements without having to wait so long, that is with only 5 cooling days. The accumulated experience in measurements achieved in both facilities and the encouraging results show that this measuring method is reliable. The results agreed well with those obtained using the reactor's physics codes, which was the way they were obtained previously (Cw)

  4. Gamma spectrometric measurements of power distribution and burnup on irradiated fuel elements of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, Jacques; Frejaville, Gerard; Robin, Michel.

    1977-08-01

    Based on experience gained from experiments at the COMIR laboratory and with the installation at the Adennes reactor and on the use of these results for evaluation of calculation methods, this report includes a synthesis of the aspects concerning in particular non-destructive measurement of irradiated fuel in water reactors, fuel assemblies or fuel pins. Following a brief summary of gamma emitting radioactive fission products and, measurement conditions, there is a description of the fuel cooling installation at the Ardennes reactor, including the results obtained with this installation as well as from measurements on the fuel pins. In conclusion, the problem concerning burn-up determination, especially the 134 Cs/ 137 Cs method, are discussed [fr

  5. Comparative study on plutonium and MA recycling in equilibrium burnup and standard burnup of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waris, Abdul; Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki; Permana, Sidik

    2005-01-01

    The equilibrium burnup model is a powerful method since its can handle all possible generated nuclides in any nuclear system. Moreover, this method is a simple time independent method. Hence the equilibrium burnup method could be very useful for evaluating and forecasting the characteristics of any nuclear fuel cycle, even the strange one, e.g. all nuclides are confined in the reactor. However, this method needs to be verified since the method is not a standard tool. The present study aimed to compare the characteristics of plutonium recycling and plutonium and minor actinides (MA) recycling in PWR with the equilibrium burnup and the standard burnup. In order to become more comprehensive study, an influence of moderator-to-fuel volume ratio (MFR) changes by changing the pin-pitch of fuel cell has been evaluated. The MFR ranges from 0.5 to 4.0. For the equilibrium burnup we used equilibrium cell-burnup code. We have employed 1368 nuclides in the equilibrium calculation with 129 of them are heavy metals (HMs). For standard burnup, SRAC2002 code has been utilized with 26 HMs and 66 fission products (FPs). The JENDL 3.2 library has been employed for both burnup schemes. The uranium, plutonium and MA vector, which resulted from the equilibrium burnup are directly used as fuel input composition for the standard burnup calculation. Both burnup results demonstrate that plutonium recycling and plutonium and MA recycling can be conducted safer in tight lattice core. They are also show the similar trend in neutron spectrum, which become harder with the increasing number of recycled heavy nuclides as well as the decreasing of the MFR values. However, there are some discrepancy on the effective multiplication factor and the conversion ratio, especially for the reactor core for MFR ≥ 2.0. (author)

  6. EPRI/DOE High Burnup Fuel Sister Pin Test Plan Simplification and Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanson, Brady [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Billone, Mike [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Scaglione, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Montgomery, Rose [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevard, Bruce [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The EPRI/DOE High Burnup Confirmatory Data Project (herein called the "Demo") is a multi-year, multi-entity confirmation demonstration test with the purpose of providing quantitative and qualitative data to show how high-burnup fuel ages in dry storage over a ten-year period. The Demo involves obtaining 32 assemblies of high-burnup PWR fuel of four common cladding alloys from the North Anna Nuclear Power Plant, drying them according to standard plant procedures, and then storing them in an NRC-licensed TN-3 2B cask on the North Anna dry storage pad for ten years. After the ten-year storage time, the cask will be opened and the rods will be examined for signs of aging. Twenty-five rods from assemblies of similar claddings, in-reactor placement, and burnup histories (herein called "sister rods") have been shipped from the North Anna Nuclear Power Plant and are currently being nondestructively tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After the non-destructive testing has been completed for each of the twenty-five rods, destructive analysis will be performed at ORNL, PNNL, and ANL to obtain mechanical data. Opinions gathered from the expert interviews, ORNL and PNNL Sister Rod Test Plans, and numerous meetings has resulted in the Simplified Test Plan described in this document. Some of the opinions and discussions leading to the simplified test plan are included here. Detailed descriptions and background are in the ORNL and PNNL plans in the appendices . After the testing described in this simplified test plan h as been completed , the community will review all the collected data and determine if additional testing is needed.

  7. Comparison of matrix exponential methods for fuel burnup calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Hyung Suk; Yang, Won Sik

    1999-01-01

    Series expansion methods to compute the exponential of a matrix have been compared by applying them to fuel depletion calculations. Specifically, Taylor, Pade, Chebyshev, and rational Chebyshev approximations have been investigated by approximating the exponentials of bum matrices by truncated series of each method with the scaling and squaring algorithm. The accuracy and efficiency of these methods have been tested by performing various numerical tests using one thermal reactor and two fast reactor depletion problems. The results indicate that all the four series methods are accurate enough to be used for fuel depletion calculations although the rational Chebyshev approximation is relatively less accurate. They also show that the rational approximations are more efficient than the polynomial approximations. Considering the computational accuracy and efficiency, the Pade approximation appears to be better than the other methods. Its accuracy is better than the rational Chebyshev approximation, while being comparable to the polynomial approximations. On the other hand, its efficiency is better than the polynomial approximations and is similar to the rational Chebyshev approximation. In particular, for fast reactor depletion calculations, it is faster than the polynomial approximations by a factor of ∼ 1.7. (author). 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Study on burnup credit evaluation method at JAERI towards securing criticality safety rationale for management of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Lately, due to massive accumulation of spent fuel discharged from light water reactors in Japan, it is gradually demanded to introduce the so-called burnup credit methodology into criticality safety design for nuclear fuel cycle facilities, such as spent fuel storage pools and transport casks. In order to save space in the spent fuel storage pool of the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant, the burnup credit design has been firstly implemented for its criticality safety evaluation. Here, its design conditions and operational control procedures are briefly shown and research using burned fuel at JAERI is explained to support its licensing safety review, focusing on the relevant content of the Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook of Japan, which has been prepared so far and planned in the near future. Finally, international co-operation for study on burnup credit issues practiced by JAERI is addressed. (author)

  9. Parametric neutronic analyses related to burnup credit cask design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.V.

    1989-01-01

    The consideration of spent fuel histories (burnup credit) in the design of spent fuel shipping casks will result in cost savings and public risk benefits in the overall fuel transportation system. The purpose of this paper is to describe the depletion and criticality analyses performed in conjunction with and supplemental to the referenced analysis. Specifically, the objectives are to indicate trends in spent fuel isotopic composition with burnup and decay time; provide spent fuel pin lattice values as a function of burnup, decay time, and initial enrichment; demonstrate the variation of k eff for infinite arrays of spent fuel assemblies separated by generic cask basket designs (borated and unborated) of varying thicknesses; and verify the potential cask reactivity margin available with burnup credit via analysis with generic cask models

  10. An extended discharge burnup optimization technique using Penn State's Fuel Management Package and CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feltus, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the advantages and disadvantages of using very high fuel burnup, reinsertion, and low leakage designs in advanced fuel cycle light water reactor cores as a technique to reduce vessel fluence, and total volume of spent fuel discharged into the waste management stream. The results demonstrate how to attain practical high burnup core designs using the Penn State Fuel Management Package (PSFMP, i.e., LEOPARD, MCRAC, ADMARC, OPHAL computer codes) (Levine, 1992). The PSFMP was used to scope out fuel management strategies, that can be verified with a direct comparison between the PSFMP and CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 (Smith, 1989) results. This paper focuses on the practical use of such advanced fuel designs to: (a) achieve very high discharge burnups, (b) produce low leakage at the periphery, (c) have 24 month cycles, and (d) maintain safety margins and peak power levels, based on using the Haling power distribution as a target. Evaluations of practical and optimal extended burnup core designs, using the PSFMP, will show that very high burnup core designs are not only attainable, but are most cost-effective and beneficial to the environment in terms of waste reduction. (author)

  11. Incentives for the allowance of ''burnup credit'' in the design of spent nuclear fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.L.; Westfall, R.M.; Jones, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis has been completed which indicates that the consideration of spent fuel histories ('burnup credit') in the criticality design of spent fuel shipping casks could result in significant public risk benefits and cost savings in the transport of spent nuclear fuel. Capacities of casks could be increased considerably in some cases. These capacity increases result in lower public and occupational exposures to ionizing radiation due to the reduced number of shipments necessary to transport a given amount of fuel. Additional safety benefits result from reduced non-radiological risks to both public and occupational sectors. In addition, economic benefits result from lower in-transit shipping costs, reduced transportation fleet capital costs, and fewer cask handling requirements at both shipping and receiving facilities

  12. Framatome-ANP extended burnup experience and views on LWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteve, B.; Gueldner, R.; Hoffman, R.; Watteau, M.

    2002-01-01

    In every sense of the term, nuclear fuel forms the core of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Although there are many equipment items important for their safety function or for their participation in NPP availability, the fuel, in essence renewable, is one of the key elements which have to be acted upon if utilities are to be helped to fulfil their mission of generating power in total safety and supplying the kWh to their customers at the best price. Nuclear fuel is also the core business of the Framatome-ANP Fuel Business Group: pooling and rationalising the available skills - technical, cultural and human - supplied by each of the partners forms a challenge which it is up to each and every one to meet in a cooperative spirit. This paper gives an outline of the company's extended burnup experience, current R and D, and its plans for the future. (author)

  13. Progress of criticality experiments and nuclear design studies on Erbia-bearing super high burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Masatoshi; Kuroishi, Takeshi; Takeda, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Akio; Unesaki, Hironobu; Sano, Tadafumi; Mori, Masaaki

    2009-01-01

    To cope with the '5wt% enrichment barrier', the development project on Erbia bearing super high-burnup fuel with high uranium enrichment, such as critical experiments with fully Erbia loaded core in KUCA, criticality safety analyses against simple shapes, physicochemical properties measurement and so on, is under going. Following the three experiments of fully-Er-loaded core, the result of the fourth core of higher content of Erbia is presented. As a second topic, fuel design using isotopically modified Erbia, such as a) Er-166 removed from Erbium content, b) Only Er-167 used, is shown. In use of isotopically modified Erbia, the ECOS diagram, which shows minimum Erbia contents that should be mixed into above 5wt% enriched fuel, so that the criticality safety will be equivalent to that with the conventional below 5wt% enriched fuel, should be modified in order to correspond to various Erbia isotope vectors. (author)

  14. Incentives for the allowance of burnup credit in the design of spent nuclear fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.L.; Westfall, R.M.; Jones, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis has been completed which indicates that the consideration of spent fuel histories ('burnup credit') in the criticality design of spent fuel shipping casks could result in considerable public risk benefits and cost savings in the transport of spent nuclear fuel. Capacities of casks could be increased considerably in some cases. These capacity increases result in lower public and occupational exposures to ionizing radiation due to the reduced number of shipments necessary to transport a given amount of fuel. Additional safety benefits result from reduced non-radiological risks to both public and occupational sectors. In addition, economic benefits result from lower in-transit shipping costs, reduced transportation fleet capital costs, and fewer cask handling requirements at both shipping and receiving facilities

  15. EBSD and TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Mixed Oxide Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teague, Melissa C; Gorman, Brian P.; Miller, Brandon D; King, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and studying the irradiation behavior of high burn-up oxide fuel is critical to licensing of future fast breeder reactors. Advancements in experimental techniques and equipment are allowing for new insights into previously irradiated samples. In this work dual column focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscope (SEM) was utilized to prepared transmission electron microscope samples from mixed oxide fuel with a burn-up of 6.7% FIMA. Utilizing the FIB/SEM for preparation resulted in samples with a dose rate of <0.5 mRem/h compared to approximately 1.1 R/h for a traditionally prepared TEM sample. The TEM analysis showed that the sample taken from the cooler rim region of the fuel pellet had approximately 2.5x higher dislocation density than that of the sample taken from the mid-radius due to the lower irradiation temperature of the rim. The dual column FIB/SEM was additionally used to prepared and serially slice approximately 25 um cubes. High quality electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) were collected from the face at each step, showing, for the first time, the ability to obtain EBSD data from high activity irradiated fuel

  16. A validated methodology for evaluating burn-up credit in spent fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, M.C.; Sanders, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of allowing reactivity credit for the transmuted state of spent fuel offers both economic and risk incentives. This paper presents a general overview of the technical work being performed in support of the US Department of Energy (USDOE) programme to resolve issues related to the implementation of burn-up credit in spent fuel cask design. An analysis methodology is presented along with information representing the validation of the method against available experimental data. The experimental data that are applicable to burn-up credit include chemical assay data for the validation of the isotopic prediction models, fresh fuel critical experiments for the validation of criticality calculations for various cask geometries, and reactor re-start critical data to validate criticality calculations with spent fuel. The methodology has been specifically developed to be simple and generally applicable, therefore giving rise to uncertainties or sensitivities which are identified and quantified in terms of a percent bias effective multiplication (k eff ). Implementation issues affecting licensing requirements and operational procedures are discussed briefly. (Author)

  17. The impact of interface bonding efficiency on high-burnup spent nuclear fuel dynamic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hao, E-mail: jiangh@ornl.gov; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • To investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on its dynamic performance. • Flexural rigidity, EI = M/κ, estimated from FEA results were benchmarked with SNF dynamic experimental results, and used to evaluate interface bonding efficiency. • Interface bonding efficiency can significantly dictate the SNF system rigidity and the associated dynamic performance. • With consideration of interface bonding efficiency and fuel cracking, HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with SNF static and dynamic experimental data. - Abstract: Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on system dynamic performance. Bending moments M were applied to FEA model to evaluate the system responses. From bending curvature, κ, flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI = M/κ. The FEA simulation results were benchmarked with experimental results from cyclic integrated reversal bending fatigue test (CIRFT) of HBR fuel rods. The consequence of interface debonding between fuel pellets and cladding is a redistribution of the loads carried by the fuel pellets to the clad, which results in a reduction in composite rod system flexural rigidity. Therefore, the interface bonding efficiency at the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces can significantly dictate the SNF system dynamic performance. With the consideration of interface bonding efficiency, the HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with CIRFT test data.

  18. FUEL BURN-UP CALCULATION FOR WORKING CORE OF THE RSG-GAS RESEARCH REACTOR AT BATAN SERPONG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tukiran Surbakti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The neutronic parameters are required in the safety analysis of the RSG-GAS research reactor. The RSG-GAS research reactor, MTR (Material Testing Reactor type is used for research and also in radioisotope production. RSG-GAS has been operating for 30 years without experiencing significant obstacles. It is managed under strict requirements, especially fuel management and fuel burn-up calculations. The reactor is operated under the supervision of the Regulatory Body (BAPETEN and the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency. In this paper, the experience of managing RSG-GAS core fuels will be discussed, there are hundred possibilities of fuel placements on the reactor core and the strategy used to operate the reactor will be crucial. However, based on strict calculation and supervision, there is no incorrect placement of the fuels in the core. The calculations were performed on working core by using the WIMSD-5B computer code with ENDFVII.0 data file to generate the macroscopic cross-section of fuel and BATAN-FUEL code were used to obtain the neutronic parameter value such as fuel burn-up fractions. The calculation of the neutronic core parameters of the RSG-GAS research reactor was carried out for U3Si2-Al fuel, 250 grams of mass, with an equilibrium core strategy. The calculations show that on the last three operating cores (T90, T91, T92, all fuels meet the safety criteria and the fuel burn-up does not exceed the maximum discharge burn-up of 59%. Maximum fuel burn-up always exists in the fuel which is close to the position of control rod.

  19. Performance of Bruce natural UO2 fuel irradiated to extended burnups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y.N.; Floyd, M.R.; Ryz, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    Bruce-type bundles XY, AAH and GF were successfully irradiated in the NRU reactor at Chalk River Laboratories to outer-element burnups of 570-900 MWh/kgU. These bundles were of the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station (NGS)-A 'first-charge' design that contained gas plenums in the outer elements. The maximum outer-element linear powers were 33-37 kW/m. Post-irradiation examination of these bundles confirmed that all the elements were intact. Bundles XY and AAH, irradiated to outer-element burnups of 570-700 MWh/kgU, experienced low fission-gas release (FGR) ( 500 MWh/kgU (equivalent to bundle-average 450 MWh/kgU) when maximum outer-element linear powers are > 50 kW/m. The analysis in this paper suggests that CANDU 37-element fuel can be successfully irradiated (low-FGR/defect-free) to burnups of at least 700 MWh/kgU, provided maximum power do not exceed 40 kW/m. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs

  20. High burnup fuel onset conditions in dry storage. Prediction of EOL rod internal pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L.E.

    2015-07-01

    During dry storage, cladding resistance to failure can be affected by several degrading mechanisms like creep or hydrides radial reorientation. The driving force of these effects is the stress at which the cladding is submitted. The maximum stress in the cladding is determined by the end-of-reactor-life (EOL) rod internal pressure, PEOL, at the maximum temperature attained during dry storage. Thus, PEOL sets the initial conditions of storage for potential time-dependent changes in the cladding. Based on FRAPCON-3.5 calculations, the aim of this work is to analyse the PEOL of a PWR fuel rod irradiated to burnups greater than 60 GWd/tU, where limited information is available. In order to be conservative, demanding irradiation histories have been used with a peak linear power of 44 kW/m. FRAPCON-3.5 results show an increasing exponential trend of PEOL with burnup, from which a simple correlation has been derived. The comparison with experimental data found in the literature confirms the enveloping nature of the predicted curve. Based on that, a conservative prediction of cladding stress in dry storage has been obtained. The comparison with a critical stress threshold related to hydrides embrittlement seems to point out that this issue should not be a concern at burnups below 65 GWd/tU. (Author)

  1. Establishing the fuel burn-up measuring system for 106 irradiated assemblies of Dalat reactor by using gamma spectrometer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Minh Tuan; Pham Quang Huy; Tran Tri Vien; Trang Cao Su; Tran Quoc Duong; Dang Tran Thai Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    The fuel burn-up is an important parameter needed to be monitored and determined during a reactor operation and fuel management. The fuel burn-up can be calculated using computer codes and experimentally measured. This work presents the theory and experimental method applied to determine the burn-up of the irradiated and 36% enriched VVR-M2 fuel type assemblies of Dalat reactor. The method is based on measurement of Cs-137 absolute specific activity using gamma spectrometer. Designed measuring system consists of a collimator tube, high purity Germanium detector (HPGe) and associated electronics modules and online computer data acquisition system. The obtained results of measurement are comparable with theoretically calculated results. (author)

  2. Investigation of the CANLUB/sheath interface in CANDU fuel at extended burnup by XPS and SEM/WDX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocking, W.H.; Behnke, R.; Duclos, A.M.; Gerwing, A.F.; Chan, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the fuel-sheath interface in CANDU fuel as a function of extended burnup has been undertaken by XPS and SEM/WDX analysis. Adherent deposits of UO 2 and fission products, including Cs, Ba, Rb, I, Te, Cd and possibly Ru, have been routinely identified on CANLUB coated and bare Zircaloy surfaces. Some trends in the distribution and chemistry of key fission products have begun to emerge. Several potential mechanisms for degradation of the CANLUB graphite layer at high burnup have been practically excluded. New evidence of carbon relocation within the fuel element and limited reaction with excess oxygen has also been obtained. (author)

  3. Dependence of rim pore radius on rim porosity and temperature behavior in the high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun; Sohn, Dong Seong

    1997-01-01

    The rim porosity at the high burnup UO 2 fuel is obtained at the various rim pore radius ranging from 0.25 to 1.0 μm. The rim pore radius of 1.0 μm gives the best estimation for the rim porosity. With increasing the rim pore radius, thermal conductivity degrades with pellet average burnup because the rim pore acts as the thermal barrier. And by using the NEA database, the culculated fuel centerline temperature considering the rim effect is compared with the experimentally measured NEA database. The calculated temperature predicts reasonably well the temperature behavior of irradiated fuel

  4. Alternatives for implementing burnup credit in the design and operation of spent fuel transport casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.L.; Lake, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    The traditional assumption used in evaluating criticality safety of spent fuel cask is that the spent fuel is as reactive as when it was fresh (new). This is known as the fresh fuel assumption. It avoids a number of calculational and verification difficulties, but could take a heavy toll in decreased efficiency. The alternative to the fresh fuel assumption is called burnup credit. That is, the reduced reactivity of spent fuel that comes about from depletion of fissile radionuclides and net increase in neutron absorbers (poisons) is taken into account. It is recognizable that the use of burnup credit will in fact increase the percentage of unacceptable or non-specification fuel available for misloading. This could reduce individual cask safety margins if current practices with respect to loading procedures are maintained. As such, additional operational, design, analysis, and validation requirements should be established that, as a minimum, compensate for any potential reduction in fuel loading safety margin. This method is based on a probabilistic (PRA) approach and is called a relative risk comparison. The method assumes a linear risk model, and uses a selected probability function to compare the system of interest and an acceptable reference system by varying the features of each to assess effects on system safety. While risk is the product of an event probability and its consequence, the consequences of criticality in a cask are considered to be both unacceptable and the same, regardless of the initiating sequence. Therefore, only the probability of the event is considered in a relative risk evaluation

  5. Numerical solution of the point reactor kinetics equations with fuel burn-up and temperature feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashakor, S.; Jahanfarnia, G.; Hashemi-Tilehnoee, M.

    2010-01-01

    Point reactor kinetics equations are solved numerically using one group of delayed neutrons and with fuel burn-up and temperature feedback included. To calculate the fraction of one-group delayed neutrons, a group of differential equations are solved by an implicit time method. Using point reactor kinetics equations, changes in mean neutrons density, temperature, and reactivity are calculated in different times during the reactor operation. The variation of reactivity, temperature, and maximum power with time are compared with the predictions by other methods.

  6. A validated methodology for evaluating burnup credit in spent fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, M.C.; Sanders, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of allowing reactivity credit for the transmuted state of spent fuel offers both economic and risk incentives. This paper presents a general overview of the technical work being performed in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to resolve issues related to the implementation of burnup credit. An analysis methodology is presented along with information representing the validation of the method against available experimental data. The experimental data that are applicable to burnup credit include chemical assay data for the validation of the isotopic prediction models, fresh fuel critical experiments for the validation of criticality calculations for various cask geometries, and reactor restart critical data to validate criticality calculations with spent fuel. The methodology has been specifically developed to be simple and generally applicable, therefore giving rise to uncertainties or sensitivities which are identified and quantified in terms of a percent bias in k eff . Implementation issues affecting licensing requirements and operational procedures are discussed briefly. 24 refs., 3 tabs

  7. Determination of nuclear fuel burnup by non-destructive gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of nuclear fuel burnup by the non-destructive gamma spectroscopy method is studied. A MTR (Materials Testing Reactor) -type fuel element is used in the measurement. The fuel element was removed from the reactor core in 1958 and, because of the long decay time, show only one peak in is gamma spectrum at 661.6 Kev. Corresponding to 137 Cs. Measurements are made at 330 points of the element using a Nal detector and the final result revealed that the quantity of 235 U consumed was 3.3 +- 0,8 milligram in the entire element. The effect of the migration of 137 Cs in the element is neglected in view of the fact that it occurs only when the temperature is above 1000 0 C, which is not the case in IEAR-1. (Author)

  8. Mechanical Fatigue Testing of High-Burnup Fuel for Transportation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL

    2015-05-01

    This report describes testing designed to determine the ability of high burnup (HBU) (>45 GWd/MTU) spent fuel to maintain its integrity under normal conditions of transportation. An innovative system, Cyclic Integrated Reversible-bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT), has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to test and evaluate the mechanical behavior of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under conditions relevant to storage and transportation. The CIRFT system is composed of a U-frame equipped with load cells for imposing the pure bending loads on the SNF rod test specimen and measuring the in-situ curvature of the fuel rod during bending using a set up with three linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs).

  9. Corrosion performance of optimised and advanced fuel rod cladding in PWRs at high burnups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourdain, P.; Hallstadius, L.; Pati, S.R.; Smith, G.P.; Garde, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour both in-pile and out-of-pile for a number of cladding alloys developed by ABB to meet the current and future needs for fuel rod cladding with improved corrosion resistance is presented. The cladding materials include: 1) Zircaloy-4 (OPTIN) with optimised composition and processing and Zircaloy-2 optimised for Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR), (Zircaloy-2P), and 2) several alternative zirconium-based alloys with compositions outside the composition range for Zircaloys. The data presented originate from fuel rods irradiated in six PWRs to burnups up to about 66 MWd/kgU and from tests conducted in 360 o water autoclave. Also included are in-pile fuel rod growth measurements on some of the alloys. (UK)

  10. Microprobe study of fission product behavior in high-burnup HTR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleykamp, H.

    Electron microprobe analysis of irradiated coated particles with high burnup (greater than 50 percent fima) gives detailed information on the chemical state and the transport behavior of the fission products in UO 2 and UC 2 kernels and in the coatings. In oxide fuel kernels, metallic inclusions and ceramic precipitations are observed. The solubility behavior of the fission products in the fuel matrix has been investigated. Fission product inclusions could not be detected in carbide fuel kernels; post irradiation annealed UC 2 kernels, however, give information on the element combinations of some fission product phases. Corresponding to the chemical state in the kernel, Cs, Sr, Ba, Pd, Te and the rare earths are released easily and diffuse through the entire pyrocarbon coating. These fission products can be retained by a silicon carbide layer. The initial stage of a corrosive attack of the SiC coating by the fission products is evidenced

  11. Temperature and Burnup Correlated FCCI in U-10Zr Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William J. Carmack

    2012-05-01

    Metallic fuels are proposed for use in advanced sodium cooled fast reactors. The experience basis for metallic fuels is extensive and includes development and qualification of fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor I, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II, FERMI-I, and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactors. Metallic fuels provide a number of advantages over other fuel types in terms of fabricability, performance, recyclability, and safety. Key to the performance of all nuclear fuel systems is the resistance to “breach” and subsequent release of fission products and fuel constituents to the primary coolant system of the nuclear power plant. In metallic fuel, the experience is that significant fuel-cladding chemical (FCCI) interaction occurs and becomes prevalent at high power-high temperature operation and ultimately leads to fuel pin breach and failure. Empirical relationships for metallic fuel pin failure have been developed from a large body of in-pile and out of pile research, development, and experimentation. It has been found that significant in-pile acceleration of the FCCI rate is experienced over similar condition out-of-pile experiments. The study of FCCI in metallic fuels has led to the quantification of in-pile failure rates to establish an empirical time and temperature dependent failure limit for fuel elements. Up until now the understanding of FCCI layer formation has been limited to data generated in EBR-II experiments. This dissertation provides new FCCI data extracted from the MFF-series of metallic fuel irradiations performed in the FFTF. These fuel assemblies contain valuable information on the formation of FCCI in metallic fuels at a variety of temperature and burnup conditions and in fuel with axial fuel height three times longer than EBR-II experiments. The longer fuel column in the FFTF and the fuel pins examined have significantly different flux, power, temperature, and FCCI profiles than that found in similar tests conducted in

  12. Corrosion behaviour of Zircaloy 4 fuel cans for high burnup in EdF PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blat, M.; Kerrec, O.; Bourgoin, J.; Vrignaud, E.; Amanrich, H.

    1994-01-01

    Uniform corrosion of fuel cladding could be a limitation for burn-up enhancement. First, the oxide thickness measured on fuel cladding for high burn-up has been compared to the prediction of the EDF code, CYRANO 2E. A comparative metallurgical characterization has been also performed on samples which were oxidized in pile and in autoclave. Then, laboratories studies have been launched for a better understanding of the corrosion mechanisms. A reflection was proposed on the two main theoretical concepts proposed for these mechanisms. Their kinetics could be controlled by transfers in liquid medium (electrolyte) or in solid medium (compact oxide). For the first topic, a nanoscopic characterization of the oxide is in progress, using Atomic Force Microscope. The first results are presented. In the second case, an electrochemical approach (impedance spectroscopy and voltametry) is developed in our laboratories. The obtained results could give some new keys in order to understand the influence of some parameters (alloys composition, coolant chemistry,...). (authors). 7 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  13. Burnup determination of a fuel element concerning different cooling times; Seguimiento del quemado de un elemento combustible, para diferentes tiempos de enfriamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriquez, C.; Navarro, G.; Pereda, C.; Mutis, O. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile). Dept. de Aplicaciones Nucleares. Unidad de Reactores; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Zeituni, Carlos A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    In this work we report a complete set of measurements and some relevant results regarding the burnup process of a fuel element containing low enriched nuclear fuel. This fuel element was fabricated at the Plant of Fuel Elements of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN). Measurements were carried out using gamma-ray spectroscopy and the absolute burnup of the fuel element was determined. (author)

  14. Assessing the Effect of Fuel Burnup on Control Rod Worth for HEU and LEU Cores of Gharr-1

    OpenAIRE

    E.K. Boafo; E. Alhassan; E.H.K. Akaho; C. Odoi

    2013-01-01

    An important parameter in the design and analysis of a nuclear reactor is the reactivity worth of the control rod which is a measure of the efficiency of the control rod to absorb excess reactivity. During reactor operation, the control rod worth is affected by factors such as the fuel burnup, Xenon concentration, Samarium concentration and the position of the control rod in the core. This study investigates the effect of fuel burnup on the control rod worth by comparing results of a fresh an...

  15. Compound effects of operating parameters on burnup credit criticality analysis in boiling water reactor spent fuel assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Chien Wu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a new method of analyzing the burnup credit in boiling water reactor spent fuel assemblies against various operating parameters. The operating parameters under investigation include fuel temperature, axial burnup profile, axial moderator density profile, and control blade usage. In particular, the effects of variations in one and two operating parameters on the curve of effective multiplication factor (keff versus burnup (B are, respectively, the so-called single and compound effects. All the calculations were performed using SCALE 6.1 together with the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files, part B (ENDF/B-VII238-neutron energy group data library. Furthermore, two geometrical models were established based on the General Electric (GE14 10 × 10 boiling water reactor fuel assembly and the Generic Burnup-Credit (GBC-68 storage cask. The results revealed that the curves of keff versus B, due to single and compound effects, can be approximated using a first degree polynomial of B. However, the reactivity deviation (or changes of keff,Δk in some compound effects was not a summation of the all Δk resulting from the two associated single effects. This phenomenon is undesirable because it may to some extent affect the precise assessment of burnup credit. In this study, a general formula was thus proposed to express the curves of keff versus B for both single and compound effects.

  16. Burn-up analysis of uranium silicide fuels 20% 235U, in the LFR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amor, Ricardo A.; Bouza, Edgardo; Cabrejas, Julian L.; Devida, Claudio A.; Gil, Daniel A.; Stankevicius, Alejandro; Gautier, Eduardo; Garavaglia, Ricardo N.; Lobo, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    The LFR Facility is a laboratory designed and constructed with a Hot-Cells line, a Globe-Box and a Fume-Hood, all of them suited to work with radioactive materials such as samples of irradiated silicide MTR fuel elements. A series of dissolutions of this material was performed. From the resulting solutions, two fractions were separated by HPLC. One contained U + Pu, and other the fission product Nd. The concentrations of these elements were obtained by isotopic dilution and mass spectrometry (IDMS). It is concluded that this technique is very powerful and accurate when properly applied, and makes the validation of burn-up calculation codes possible. It is worth remarking the Lfr capacity to carry on different Research and Development (R + D) tasks in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle field. (author)

  17. Burn-up measurements of LEU fuel for short cooling times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereda B, C.; Henriquez A, C.; Klein D, J.; Medel R, J.

    2005-01-01

    The measurements presented in this work were made essentially at in-pool gamma-spectrometric facility, installed inside of the secondary pool of the RECH-1 research reactor, where the measured fuel elements are under 2 meters of water. The main reason for using the in-pool facility was because of its capability to measure the burning of fuel elements without having to wait so long, that is with only 5 cooling days, which are the usual times between reactor operations. Regarding these short cooling times, this work confirms again the possibility of using the 95 Zr as a promising burnup monitor, in spite of the rough approximations used to do it. These results are statistically reasonable within the range calculated using codes. The work corroborates previous results, presented in Santiago de Chile, and it suggests future improvements in that way. (author)

  18. Burnup calculation with estimated neutron spectrum of JMTR irradiation field. Development of the burnup calculation method for fuel pre-irradiated in the JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okonogi, Kazunari; Nakamura, Takehiko; Yoshinaga, Makio; Hosoyamada, Ryuji

    1999-03-01

    As a series of the pulse irradiation tests with the irradiated fuel, the high-enriched fuel rods pre-irradiated in the JMTR as well as the fuels irradiated in commercial reactors have been irradiated in the NSRR. In the pre-irradiation at the JMTR, the test fuels were placed at the irradiation holes in the reflector region far from the driver core to keep the linear heat generation rate of the test fuel low. Accordingly, neutron energy spectra of the irradiation holes for the test fuels are softened due to the higher moderator ratio than in those of the ordinary LWR core, which causes quite different burnup characteristics. JMTR post irradiation condition corresponds to the pre-test condition in the NSRR. Therefore, proper understanding of the condition is quite important for the precise evaluating the energy deposition and FP generation in the test. Then, neutron spectra at the JMTR irradiation field were evaluated and its effects on the burnup calculation were quantified. Basing on the configuration of the JMTR core in the operation cycle No.85, neutron diffusion calculations of 107 groups were executed in 2-D slab (X-Y) geometry of CITATION of SRAC95 code system, and neutron energy spectra of the irradiation hole for the test fuels were evaluated. Burnup calculations of Test JMN-1 fuel with the estimated neutron energy spectra were performed and the results were compared to both the measurements and calculation results with the PWR and BWR libraries in ORIGEN2 code. SWAT code was used to collapse the 107 groups spectra into 1 group libraries for the ORIGEN2 use. The calculation results for both the generation and depletion of U, Pu and Nd with the JMTR libraries obtained in the present study were in the reasonably good agreement with the measurements, while in the case of calculation with the PWR and BWR libraries in ORIGEN2, the generation of fission products having mass numbers from 105 to 130 and some actinides were overestimated by about 1.5 to 3.5 times

  19. Cladding stress during extended storage of high burnup spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Patrick A. C.; Einziger, Robert E.

    2015-09-01

    In an effort to assess the potential for low temperature creep and delayed hydride cracking failures in high burnup spent fuel cladding during extended dry storage, the U.S. NRC analytical fuel performance tools were used to predict cladding stress during a 300 year dry storage period for UO2 fuel burned up to 65 GWd/MTU. Fuel swelling correlations were developed and used along with decay gas production and release fractions to produce circumferential average cladding stress predictions with the FRAPCON-3.5 fuel performance code. The resulting stresses did not result in cladding creep failures. The maximum creep strains accumulated were on the order of 0.54-1.04%, but creep failures are not expected below at least 2% strain. The potential for delayed hydride cracking was assessed by calculating the critical flaw size required to trigger this failure mechanism. The critical flaw size far exceeded any realistic flaw expected in spent fuel at end of reactor life.

  20. Cladding stress during extended storage of high burnup spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raynaud, Patrick A.C., E-mail: Patrick.raynaud@nrc.gov; Einziger, Robert E.

    2015-09-15

    In an effort to assess the potential for low temperature creep and delayed hydride cracking failures in high burnup spent fuel cladding during extended dry storage, the U.S. NRC analytical fuel performance tools were used to predict cladding stress during a 300 year dry storage period for UO{sub 2} fuel burned up to 65 GWd/MTU. Fuel swelling correlations were developed and used along with decay gas production and release fractions to produce circumferential average cladding stress predictions with the FRAPCON-3.5 fuel performance code. The resulting stresses did not result in cladding creep failures. The maximum creep strains accumulated were on the order of 0.54–1.04%, but creep failures are not expected below at least 2% strain. The potential for delayed hydride cracking was assessed by calculating the critical flaw size required to trigger this failure mechanism. The critical flaw size far exceeded any realistic flaw expected in spent fuel at end of reactor life.

  1. Development of destructive methods of burn-up determination and their application on WWER type nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, A.; Stephan, H.; Nebel, D.

    1984-03-01

    Results are described of a cooperation between the Central Institute of Nuclear Research Rossendorf and the Radium Institute 'V.G. Chlopin' Leningrad in the field of destructive burn-up determination. Laboratory methods of burn-up determination using the classical monitors 137 Cs, 106 Ru, 148 Nd and isotopes of heavy metals (U, Pu) as well as the usefulness of 90 Sr, stable isotopes of Ru and Mo as monitors are dealt with. The analysis of the fuel components uranium (spectrophotometry, potentiometric titration, mass-spectrometric isotope dilution) and plutonium (spectrophotometry, coulometric titration, mass- and alpha-spectrometric isotope dilution) is fully described. Possibilities of increasing the reproducibility (automatic adjusting of measurement conditions) and the sensibility (ion impuls counting) of mass-spectrometric measurements are proposed and applied to a precise determination of Am and Cm isotopic composition. The methods have been used for burn-up analysis of spent WWER (especially WWER-440) fuel. (author)

  2. Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety Benchmark Phase III-C. Nuclide Composition and Neutron Multiplication Factor of a Boiling Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assembly for Burn-up Credit and Criticality Control of Damaged Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, K.; Uchida, Y.; Kashima, T.; Ito, T.; Miyaji, T.

    2016-01-01

    Criticality control of damaged nuclear fuel is one of the key issues in the decommissioning operation of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident. The average isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel as a function of burn-up is required in order to evaluate criticality parameters of the mixture of damaged nuclear fuel with other materials. The NEA Expert Group on Burn-up Credit Criticality (EGBUC) has organised several international benchmarks to assess the accuracy of burn-up calculation methodologies. For BWR fuel, the Phase III-B benchmark, published in 2002, was a remarkable landmark that provided general information on the burn-up properties of BWR spent fuel based on the 8x8 type fuel assembly. Since the publication of the Phase III-B benchmark, all major nuclear data libraries have been revised; in Japan from JENDL-3.2 to JENDL-4, in Europe from JEF-2.2 to JEFF-3.1 and in the US from ENDF/B-VI to ENDF/B-VII.1. Burn-up calculation methodologies have been improved by adopting continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes and modern neutronics calculation methods. Considering the importance of the criticality control of damaged fuel in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident, a new international burn-up calculation benchmark for the 9 x 9 STEP-3 BWR fuel assemblies was organised to carry out the inter-comparison of the averaged isotopic composition in the interest of the burnup credit criticality safety community. Benchmark specifications were proposed and approved at the EGBUC meeting in September 2012 and distributed in October 2012. The deadline for submitting results was set at the end of February 2013. The basic model for the benchmark problem is an infinite two-dimensional array of BWR fuel assemblies consisting of a 9 x 9 fuel rod array with a water channel in the centre. The initial uranium enrichment of fuel rods without gadolinium is 4.9, 4.4, 3.9, 3.4 and 2.1 wt% and 3.4 wt% for the rods using gadolinium. The burn-up conditions are

  3. Practices and developments in spent fuel burnup credit applications. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a technical committee Meeting on Requirements, Practices and Developments in Burnup Credit (BUC) Applications in Madrid, Spain, from 22 to 26 April 2002. The purpose of this meeting was to explore the progress and status of international activities related to the BUC applications for spent nuclear fuel. This meeting was the third major meeting on the uses of BUC for spent fuel management systems held since the IAEA began to monitor the uses of BUC in spent fuel management systems in 1997. The first major meeting was an Advisory Group meeting (AGM), which was held in Vienna, in October 1997. The second major meeting was a technical committee meeting (TCM), which was held in Vienna, in July 2000. Several consultants meetings were held since 1997 to advise and assist the IAEA in planning and conducting its BUC activities. The proceedings of the 1997 AGM were published as IAEA-TECDOC-1013, and the proceedings of the 2000 TCM as IAEA-TECDOC-1241. BUC for wet and dry storage systems, spent fuel transport, reprocessing and final disposal is needed in many Member States to allow for increased enrichment, and to increase storage capacities, cask capacities and dissolver capacities avoiding the need for extensive modifications. The use of BUC is a necessity for spent fuel disposal

  4. ANS/ENS tutorial session: Burnup credit issues in spent fuel transportation: Overview and objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    A number of opportunities exist to increase the efficiency of the next generation of spent fuel shipping casks. Improving cask efficiency will not only reduce life cycle transportation costs, but also is consistent with maintaining public and occupational radiological risks and, more importantly, total risks (radiological and nonradiological) within the guidelines of the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) philosophy. Increases in cask capacities will reduce both the total number of shipments required to transport a given amount of fuel and the number of handling operations at both shipping and receiving facilities. Additional capacity increases can be achieved by implementing various design strategies based on new concepts and/or the actual characteristics of the majority of the spent fuel to be shipped in the future. For example, it has been determined that additional capacity increases can be achieved by taking credit for burnup, the reduced reactivity that results when fuel has been used to produce power in a nuclear reactor. That is, as the fuel is used the atoms of fissile material decrease, and neutron absorbers (or ''poisons'') that tend to retard the fission process are produced. 7 refs., 1 fig

  5. Fuel burnup analysis for IRIS reactor using MCNPX and WIMS-D5 codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, E. A.; Bashter, I. I.; Hassan, Nabil M.; Mustafa, S. S.

    2017-02-01

    International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) reactor is a compact power reactor designed with especial features. It contains Integral Fuel Burnable Absorber (IFBA). The core is heterogeneous both axially and radially. This work provides the full core burn up analysis for IRIS reactor using MCNPX and WIMDS-D5 codes. Criticality calculations, radial and axial power distributions and nuclear peaking factor at the different stages of burnup were studied. Effective multiplication factor values for the core were estimated by coupling MCNPX code with WIMS-D5 code and compared with SAS2H/KENO-V code values at different stages of burnup. The two calculation codes show good agreement and correlation. The values of radial and axial powers for the full core were also compared with published results given by SAS2H/KENO-V code (at the beginning and end of reactor operation). The behavior of both radial and axial power distribution is quiet similar to the other data published by SAS2H/KENO-V code. The peaking factor values estimated in the present work are close to its values calculated by SAS2H/KENO-V code.

  6. High Cr ODS steels R and D for high burnup fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, A.; Kasada, R.; Kishimoto, H.; Iwata, N.; Cho, H.-S.; Toda, N.; Yutani, K.; Ukai, S.; Fujiwara, M.

    2007-01-01

    High-performance cladding materials is essential to realize highly efficient and high-burnup operation over 150 GWd/t of so called Generation IV nuclear energy systems, such as supercritical-water-cooled reactor (SCWR) and lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR). Oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) ferritic/ martensitic steels, which contain 9-12%Cr, show rather high resistance to neutron irradiation embrittlement and high strength at elevated temperatures. However, their corrosion resistance is not good enough in SCW and in lead at high temperatures. High-Cr ODS steels have been developed to improve corrosion resistance. An increase in Cr content an addition resulted in a drastic improvement of corrosion resistance in SCW and in lead. On the contrary, high-Cr steels often show an enhancement of aging embrittlement as well as irradiation embrittlement. Anisotropy in tensile properties is another issue. In order to overwhelm these issues, surveillance tests of the material performance have been performed for high Cr-ODS steels produced by new processing technologies. It is demonstrated that the dispersion of nono-sized oxide particles in high density is effective to attain high-performance and high-Cr ODS steels have a high potential as fuel cladding materials for SCWR and LFR with high efficiency and high burnup. (authors)

  7. Thorium-Based Fuels Preliminary Lattice Cell Studies for Candu Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, C.A.; Rizoiu, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The choice of nuclear power as a major contributor to the future global energy needs must take into account acceptable risks of nuclear weapon proliferation, in addition to economic competitiveness, acceptable safety standards, and acceptable waste disposal options. Candu reactors offer a proven technology, safe and reliable reactor technology, with an interesting evolutionary potential for proliferation resistance, their versatility for various fuel cycles creating premises for a better utilization of global fuel resources. Candu reactors impressive degree of fuel cycle flexibility is a consequence of its channel design, excellent neutron economy, on-power refueling, and simple fuel bundle. These features facilitate the introduction and exploitation of various fuel cycles in Candu reactors in an evolutionary fashion. The main reasons for our interest in Thorium-based fuel cycles have been, globally, to extend the energy obtainable from natural Uranium and, locally, to provide a greater degree of energy self-reliance. Applying the once through Thorium (OTT) cycle in existing and advanced Candu reactors might be seen as an evaluative concept for the sustainable development both from the economic and waste management points of view. Two Candu fuel bundles project will be used for the proposed analysis, namely the Candu standard fuel bundle with 37 fuel elements and the CANFLEX fuel bundle with 43 fuel elements. Using the Canadian proposed scheme - loading mixed ThO 2 -SEU CANFLEX bundles in Candu 6 reactors - simulated at lattice cell level led to promising conclusions on operation at higher fuel burnups, reduction of the fissile content to the end of the cycle, minor actinide content reduction in the spent fuel, reduction of the spent fuel radiotoxicity, presence of radionuclides emitting strong gamma radiation for proliferation resistance benefit. The calculations were performed using the lattice codes WIMS and Dragon (together with the corresponding nuclear data

  8. Advances in fuel pellet technology for improved performance at high burnup. Proceedings of a Technical Committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    The IAEA has recently completed two co-ordinated Research Programmes (CRPs) on The Development of Computer Models for Fuel Element Behaviour in Water Reactors, and on Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup. Through these CRPs it became evident that there was a need to obtain data on fuel behaviour at high burnup. Data related o thermal behaviour, fission gas release and pellet to clad mechanical interaction were obtained and presented at the Technical Committee Meeting on Advances in Fuel Pellet Technology for Improved Performance at High Burnup which was recommended by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT). The 34 papers from 10 countries are published in this proceedings and presented by a separate abstract. The papers were grouped in 6 sessions. First two sessions covered the fabrication of both UO 2 fuel and additives and MOX fuel. Sessions 3 and 4 covered the thermal behaviour of both types of fuel. The remaining two sessions dealt with fission gas release and the mechanical aspects of pellet to clad interaction

  9. Modeling of pore coarsening in the rim region of high burn-up UO{sub 2} fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Hongxing; Long, Chong Sheng [Science and Technology on Reactor Fuel and Materials Laboratory, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China)

    2016-08-15

    An understanding of the coarsening process of the large fission gas pores in the high burn-up structure (HBS) of irradiated UO{sub 2} fuel is very necessary for analyzing the safety and reliability of fuel rods in a reactor. A numerical model for the description of pore coarsening in the HBS based on the Ostwald ripening mechanism, which has successfully explained the coarsening process of precipitates in solids is developed. In this model, the fission gas atoms are treated as the special precipitates in the irradiated UO{sub 2} fuel matrix. The calculated results indicate that the significant pore coarsening and mean pore density decrease in the HBS occur upon surpassing a local burn-up of 100 GWd/tM. The capability of this model is successfully validated against irradiation experiments of UO{sub 2} fuel, in which the average pore radius, pore density, and porosity are directly measured as functions of local burn-up. Comparisons with experimental data show that, when the local burn-up exceeds 100 GWd/tM, the calculated results agree well with the measured data.

  10. Feasibility assessment of burnup credit in the criticality analysis of shipping casks with boiling water reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-08-01

    Considerable interest in the allowance of reactivity credit for the exposure history of power reactor fuel currently exists. This ''burnup credit'' issue has the potential to greatly reduce risk and cost when applied to the design and certification of spent fuel casks used for transportation and storage. Recently, analyses have demonstrated the technical feasibility and estimated the risk and economic incentives for allowing burnup credit in pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel shipping cask applications. This report summarizes the extension of the previous PWR technical feasibility assessment to boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel. This feasibility analysis aims to apply simple methods that adequately characterize the time-dependent isotopic compositions of typical BWR fuel. An initial analysis objective was to identify a simple and reliable method for characterizing BWR spent fuel. Two different aspects of fuel characterization were considered:l first, the generation of burn- up dependent material interaction probabilities; second, the prediction of material inventories over time (depletion). After characterizing the spent fuel at various stages of exposure and decay, three dimensional (3-D) models for an infinite array of assemblies and, in several cases, infinite arrays of assemblies in a typical shipping cask basket were analyzed. Results for assemblies without a basket provide reactivity control requirements as a function of burnup and decay, while results including the basket allow assessment of typical basket configurations to provide sufficient reactivity control for spent BWR fuel. Resulting basket worths and reactivity trends over time are then evaluated to determine whether burnup credit is needed and feasible in BWR applications

  11. Analysis of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Flux Changes with Fuel Burnup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, Gerard; McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Garvey, G. T.; Wang, X. B.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the recent Daya Bay results on the changes in the antineutrino flux and spectrum with the burnup of the reactor fuel. We find that the discrepancy between current model predictions and the Daya Bay results can be traced to the original measured U 235 /Pu 239 ratio of the fission β spectra that were used as a base for the expected antineutrino fluxes. An analysis of the antineutrino spectra that is based on a summation over all fission fragment β decays, using nuclear database input, explains all of the features seen in the Daya Bay evolution data. However, this summation method still allows for an anomaly. We conclude that there is currently not enough information to use the antineutrino flux changes to rule out the possible existence of sterile neutrinos.

  12. Data Mining Techniques to Estimate Plutonium, Initial Enrichment, Burnup, and Cooling Time in Spent Fuel Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trellue, Holly Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fugate, Michael Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tobin, Stephen Joesph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-19

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a multi-laboratory, university, international partner collaboration to (1) detect replaced or missing pins from spent fuel assemblies (SFA) to confirm item integrity and deter diversion, (2) determine plutonium mass and related plutonium and uranium fissile mass parameters in SFAs, and (3) verify initial enrichment (IE), burnup (BU), and cooling time (CT) of facility declaration for SFAs. A wide variety of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques were researched to achieve these goals [Veal, 2010 and Humphrey, 2012]. In addition, the project includes two related activities with facility-specific benefits: (1) determination of heat content and (2) determination of reactivity (multiplication). In this research, a subset of 11 integrated NDA techniques was researched using data mining solutions at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for their ability to achieve the above goals.

  13. Methods For The Calculation Of Pebble Bed High Temperature Reactors With High Burnup Plutonium And Minor Actinide Based Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Astrid; Bernnat, Wolfgang; Lohnert, Guenter [Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The graphite moderated Modular High Temperature Pebble Bed Reactor enables very flexible loading strategies and is one candidate of the Generation IV reactors. For this reactor fuel cycles with high burnup (about 600 MWd/kg HM) based on plutonium (Pu) and minor actinides (MA) fuel will be investigated. The composition of this fuel is defined in the EU-PuMA-project which aims the reduction of high level waste. There exist nearly no neutronic full core calculations for this fuel composition with high burnup. Two methods (deterministic and Monte Carlo) will be used to determine the neutronics in a full core. The detailed results will be compared with respect to the influence on criticality and safety related parameters. (authors)

  14. Methods For The Calculation Of Pebble Bed High Temperature Reactors With High Burnup Plutonium And Minor Actinide Based Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, Astrid; Bernnat, Wolfgang; Lohnert, Guenter

    2008-01-01

    The graphite moderated Modular High Temperature Pebble Bed Reactor enables very flexible loading strategies and is one candidate of the Generation IV reactors. For this reactor fuel cycles with high burnup (about 600 MWd/kg HM) based on plutonium (Pu) and minor actinides (MA) fuel will be investigated. The composition of this fuel is defined in the EU-PuMA-project which aims the reduction of high level waste. There exist nearly no neutronic full core calculations for this fuel composition with high burnup. Two methods (deterministic and Monte Carlo) will be used to determine the neutronics in a full core. The detailed results will be compared with respect to the influence on criticality and safety related parameters. (authors)

  15. Parameterized representation of macroscopic cross section in the PWR fuel element considering burn-up cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belo, Thiago F.; Fiel, Joao Claudio B., E-mail: thiagofbelo@hotmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear reactor core analysis involves neutronic modeling and the calculations require problem dependent nuclear data generated with few neutron energy groups, as for instance the neutron cross sections. The methods used to obtain these problem-dependent cross sections, in the reactor calculations, generally uses nuclear computer codes that require a large processing time and computational memory, making the process computationally very expensive. Presently, analysis of the macroscopic cross section, as a function of nuclear parameters, has shown a very distinct behavior that cannot be represented by simply using linear interpolation. Indeed, a polynomial representation is more adequate for the data parameterization. To provide the cross sections of rapidly and without the dependence of complex systems calculations, this work developed a set of parameterized cross sections, based on the Tchebychev polynomials, by fitting the cross sections as a function of nuclear parameters, which include fuel temperature, moderator temperature and density, soluble boron concentration, uranium enrichment, and the burn-up. In this study is evaluated the problem-dependent about fission, scattering, total, nu-fission, capture, transport and absorption cross sections for a typical PWR fuel element reactor, considering burn-up cycle. The analysis was carried out with the SCALE 6.1 code package. The results of comparison with direct calculations with the SCALE code system and also the test using project parameters, such as the temperature coefficient of reactivity and fast fission factor, show excellent agreements. The differences between the cross-section parameterization methodology and the direct calculations based on the SCALE code system are less than 0.03 percent. (author)

  16. Nuclear fuel behaviour modelling at high burnup and its experimental support. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) included separate sessions on the specific topics of fuel thermal performance and fission product retention. On thermal performance, it is apparent that the capability exists to measure conductivity in high burnup fuel either by out-of-pile measurement or by instrumentation of test reactor rods. State-of-the-art modelling codes contain models for the conductivity degradation process, and hence adequate predictions of fuel temperature are achievable. Concerning fission product release, it is clear that many groups around the world are actively investigating the subject, with experimental and modelling programmes being pursued. However, a general consensus on the exact mechanisms of gas release and related gas bubble swelling has yet to emerge, even at medium burnup levels. Fission gas phenomena, not only the release to open volumes, but the whole sequence of processes taking place prior to this, need to be modelled in any modern fuel performance code. The presence of gaseous fission products may generate rapid fuel swelling during power transients, and this can cause PCI and rod failure. At high burnups, the quantity of released gases could give rise to pressures exceeding the safe limits. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) effects during transient operation is also an active area of study for many groups. In some situations a purely empirical approach to failure modelling can be justified, while for other applications a more detailed mechanistic approach is required. Another aspect of cladding modelling which was featured at the TCM concerned corrosion and hydriding. Although this issue can be the main life-limiting factor on fuel duty, it is apparent that modelling methods, and the experimental measurement techniques that underpin them, are adequate. A session was included on MOX fuel modelling. Substantial programmes of work, especially by the MOX vendors, appear to be underway to bring the level of understanding

  17. FUEL BURN-UP CALCULATION FOR WORKING CORE OF THE RSG-GAS RESEARCH REACTOR AT BATAN SERPONG

    OpenAIRE

    Tukiran Surbakti; Mochammad Imron

    2017-01-01

    The neutronic parameters are required in the safety analysis of the RSG-GAS research reactor. The RSG-GAS research reactor, MTR (Material Testing Reactor) type is used for research and also in radioisotope production. RSG-GAS has been operating for 30 years without experiencing significant obstacles. It is managed under strict requirements, especially fuel management and fuel burn-up calculations. The reactor is operated under the supervision of the Regulatory Body (BAPETEN) and the IAEA (Int...

  18. Choosing the optimum burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geller, L.; Goldstein, L.; Franks, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the considerations utilities must evaluate when going to higher discharge burnups. The advantages and disadvantages of higher discharge burnups are described, as well as a consistent approach for evaluating optimum discharge burnup and its comparison to current practice. When an analysis is performed over the life of the plant, the design of the terminal cycles has significant impact on the lifetime savings from higher burnups. Designs for high burnup cycles have a greater average inventory value in the core. As one goes to higher burnup, there is a greater likelihood of discarding a larger value in unused fuel unless the terminal cycles are designed carefully. This effect can be large enough in some cases to wipe out the lifetime cost savings relative to operating with a higher discharge burnup cycle

  19. Investigation of the dynamics of pulse energy noise at the IBR-2M reactor in the fuel burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepelyshev, Yu.N.; Tsogtsaikhan, Ts.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a study on the pulse energy noise dynamics of the IBR-2M in the fuel burnup for a significant period of the reactor operation, starting from the date of its commissioning in 2011 and until the end of 2016. It is shown that the pulse energy noise during the operation of the IBR-2M with burnup to about ∼1100 MW·day changes significantly by both the spectral component and the level. The standard deviation of the random power fluctuations did not exceed 5% and was less than allowable. In addition, the low level of low-frequency noise (∼1,6%) indicates the absence of sign of vibrational instability of the reactor and a substantial margin of burnup until instability. [ru

  20. Monte Carlo burnup simulation of the TAKAHAMA-3 benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle, Hugo M.

    2009-01-01

    High burnup PWR fuel is currently being studied at CDTN/CNEN-MG. Monte Carlo burnup code system MONTEBURNS is used to characterize the neutronic behavior of the fuel. In order to validate the code system and calculation methodology to be used in this study the Japanese Takahama-3 Benchmark was chosen, as it is the single burnup benchmark experimental data set freely available that partially reproduces the conditions of the fuel under evaluation. The burnup of the three PWR fuel rods of the Takahama-3 burnup benchmark was calculated by MONTEBURNS using the simplest infinite fuel pin cell model and also a more complex representation of an infinite heterogeneous fuel pin cells lattice. Calculations results for the mass of most isotopes of Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium, Americium, Curium and some fission products, commonly used as burnup monitors, were compared with the Post Irradiation Examinations (PIE) values for all the three fuel rods. Results have shown some sensitivity to the MCNP neutron cross-section data libraries, particularly affected by the temperature in which the evaluated nuclear data files were processed. (author)

  1. Verification to the RSG-GAS fuel discharge burn-up using SRAC2006 module of COREBN/HIST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J-Susilo; T-M-Sembiring; G-R-Sunaryo; M-Imron

    2018-01-01

    For 30 years operation, some of the modifications to the RSG GAS core has been done, that are changes included the type of fuel from U 3 O 8 -Al to U 3 Si 2 -Al with the same density 2.96 gU/cc, the loading pattern of standard fuel elements/fuel control elements from 6/1 & 6/2 to 5/1 pattern, and in core fuel management calculation tool has been change from IAFUEL to BATAN-FUEL. To obtain an extension of the operating license for the next 10 years, the RSG-GAS Periodic Safety Assessment Document is need to prepared. According to the Regulatory Body Chairman Regulation No. 2 2015, RSG-GAS safety assessment should be done independently. As part of this assessment the fuel discharge burn-up must be estimated. In this research, to ensure that the misposition of fuel element in the core has not occurred, the investigation to the document operating report related the fuel placement has been done. Therefore, by using 78 th to 93 rd operation data, verify of the fuel discharge burn-up of the RSG-GAS has been performed by using SRAC2006 module of COREBN/HIST. In addition, the results of these calculations are also made comparative with the operating report data that is calculated by using BATAN-FUEL. Maximum fuel discharge burn-up (57.73 % of U-235) was verified still under permissible value determined by the regulatory body (<60 % of U-235). Maximum differences value between two computer codes was about 2.12 % of U-235 (3.80 %) that is fuel at the B-7 position. Fuel discharge burn-up of RSG-GAS showed almost the same value for each the operation cycle, range of 1.52 % of U-235. So it can be concluded that the RSG-GAS core operation over the last ten years was in good fuel management performance, in accordance with the design. BATAN-FUEL has been conformed well enough with COREBN/HIST. (author)

  2. A feasibility and optimization study to determine cooling time and burnup of advanced test reactor fuels using a nondestructive technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Jorge [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method

  3. A contribution to the understanding of the high burn-up structure formation in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonnet, J.

    2007-01-01

    An increase of the discharge burn-up of UO 2 nuclear fuels in the light water reactors results in the appearance of a change of microscopic structure, called HBS. Although well characterised experimentally, important points on the mechanisms of its formation remain to be cleared up. In order to answer these questions, a study of the contribution of the dislocation-type defects was conducted. In a first part, a calculation method of the stress field associated with periodic configurations of dislocations was developed. The method was applied to the cases of edge dislocation pile-up and wall, for which an explicit expression of the internal stress potential was obtained. Through the study of other examples of dislocation configurations, it was highlighted that this method also allows the calculation of any periodic dislocation configuration. In a second part, the evolution of interstitial-type dislocation loops was studied in UO 2 fuel samples doped with 10% in mass of alpha emitters. The experimental loop size distributions were obtained for these samples stored during 4 and 7 years at room temperature. Kinetic equations are proposed in order to study the influence of the resolution process of interstitials from a loop back to the matrix due to an impact with the recoil atom 234 U, as well as the coalescence of two interstitial loops that can diffuse by a volume mechanism. The application of the model shows that the two processes must be considered in the study of the evolution of radiation damage. (author)

  4. BASHAN: A few-group three-dimensional diffusion code with burnup and fuel management features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, D.F.

    1970-12-01

    The diffusion equation for a two or three-dimensional, two-group or multi-group downscatter problem is solved by conventional finite difference techniques. An x-y-z geometry is assumed with an 'in-channel' mesh point representation. Options are available which allow representation of a soluble poison dispersed throughout the reactor, and also absorber rods in specified channels. The power distribution and multiplication factor k eff are calculated and a point rating map is used to advance the irradiation at each mesh point by a specified time-step so that burnup is followed. Fuel changes may be made so that radial shuffling and axial shuffling fuel management schemes can be studies. The code has been written in FORTRAN S2 for an IBM 7030 (STRETCH) computer which, with a fast store of 80,000 locations, allows problems of up to 15,000 mesh points to be dealt with. Conversion to FORTRAN IV for IBM 360 has now been completed. (author)

  5. Simulation of pore interlinkage in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Yang Hyun; Oh, Je Yong; Lee, Byung Ho; Cheon, Jin Sik; Joo, Hyung Kook; Sohn, Dong Seong

    2003-01-01

    Threshold porosity above which fission gas release channels would be formed in the rim region of high burnup UO 2 fuel was estimated by the Monte Carlo method and Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm. With the assumption that both rim pore and rim grain can be represented by cube, pore distribution in the rim was simulated 3-dimensionally by the Monte Carlo method according to porosity and pore size distribution. Then, using the Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm, the fraction of open rim pores interlinked to the outer surface of a fuel pellet was derived as a function of rim porosity. The simulation showed that porosity of 24-25% is the threshold above which the number of rim pores forming release channels increases very rapidly. On the other hand, channels would not be formed if the porosity is less than about 23.5%. This is consistent with the observation that, for porosity less than 23.5%, almost no fission gas is released in the rim. However, once the rim porosity reaches beyond 25%, extensive open paths would be developed and considerable fission gas release would start in the rim

  6. FUEL BURN-UP DISTRIBUTION AND TRANSURANIC NUCLIDE CONTENTS PRODUCED AT THE FIRST CYCLE OPERATION OF AP1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jati Susilo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT FUEL BURN-UP DISTRIBUTION AND TRANSURANIC NUCLIDE CONTENTS PRODUCED AT THE FIRST CYCLE OPERATION OF AP1000. AP1000 reactor core was designed with nominal power of 1154 MWe (3415 MWth, operated within life time of 60 years and cycle length of 18 months. For the first cycle, the AP1000 core uses three kinds of UO2 enrichment, they are 2.35 w/o, 3.40 w/o and 4.45 w/o. Absorber materials such as ZrB2, Pyrex and Boron solution are used to compensate the excess reactivity at the beginning of cycle. In the core, U-235 fuels are burned by fission reaction and  produce energy, fission products and new neutron. Because of the U-238 neutron absoption reaction, the high level radioactive waste of heavy nuclide transuranic such as Pu, Am, Cm and Np are also generated. They have a very long half life. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the result of fuel burn-up distribution and heavy nuclide transuranic contents produced by AP1000 at the end of first cycle operation (EOFC. Calculation of ¼ part of the AP1000 core in the 2 dimensional model has been done using SRAC2006 code with the module of COREBN/HIST. The input data called the table of macroscopic crossection, is calculated using module of PIJ. The result shows that the maximum fuel assembly (FA burn-up is 27.04 GWD/MTU, that is still lower than allowed maximum burn-up of 62 GWD/MTU.  Fuel loading position at the center/middle of the core will produce bigger burn-up and transuranic nuclide than one at the edges the of the core. The use of IFBA fuel just give a small effect to lessen the fuel burn-up and transuranic nuclide production. Keywords: Fuel Burn-Up, Transuranic, AP1000, EOC, SRAC2006   ABSTRAK DISTRIBUSI BURN-UP DAN KANDUNGAN NUKLIDA TRANSURANIUM YANG DIHASILKAN BAHAN BAKAR PADA SIKLUS OPERASI PERTAMA TERAS AP1000. Reaktor AP1000 didesain dengan daya nominal 1154 MWe (3415 MWth, mampu beroperasi selama umur reaktor sekitar 60 tahun dan memiliki panjang tiap siklus sekitar 18

  7. Determination of nuclear fuel burn-up using mass spectrometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, B.; Bagyalakshmi, R.; Periaswami, G.; Kavimandan, V.D.; Chitambar, S.A.; Jain, H.C.; Mathews, C.K.

    1977-01-01

    Determination of burn-up using a stable fission product monitor such as 148 Nd and heavy elements, determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry gives the most accurate data. This report describes the work carried out to standardise the conditions for burn-up determination. Some typical results are given. (author)

  8. The application of burnup credit for spent fuel operations in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper begins by outlining the structure of the nuclear industry in the United Kingdom. It then sets out the methodology of burnup credit, and provides a brief discussion of the validation and robustness of the calculational route. This leads to a description of both the current and intended applications of burnup credit in the United Kingdom. (author)

  9. Gamma spectrometry in the Osiris reactor. Determination of the power and burn-up rate of irradiated fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destot, M.; Musso, J.F.; Cerles, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The gamma spectrometry facility, original in design, located in the immediate proximity of the OSIRIS reactor core at Saclay, is described. This device is used to examine nuclear fuel elements irradiated in OSIRIS or in some power reactors. In most cases, it is possible to equip power reactors (in particular water reactors) with installations of this type. With this device, it is also possible to follow the evolution of a large number of fission products in space and time, and to obtain useful information concerning nuclear safety (for example, cladding rupture) and fuel economy (with burn-up rate determination). Details on the performance of this measuring device are given in connection with the study of burn-up rates and linear irradiation power. This OSIRIS reactor gamma spectrometry installation is a nondestructive testing technique, which is easy and rapid to use [fr

  10. Analysis of the behavior under irradiation of high burnup nuclear fuels with the computer programs FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Regis; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to verify the validity and accuracy of the results provided by computer programs FRAPCON-3.4a and FRAPTRAN-1.4, used in the simulation process of the irradiation behavior of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) fuel rods, in steady-state and transient operational conditions at high burnup. To achieve this goal, the results provided by these computer simulations are compared with experimental data available in the database FUMEX III. Through the results, it was found that the computer programs used have a good ability to predict the operational behavior of PWR fuel rods in high burnup steady-state conditions and under the influence of Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA). (author)

  11. Conservative axial burnup distributions for actinide-only burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, C.; Lancaster, D.

    1997-11-01

    Unlike the fresh fuel approach, which assumes the initial isotopic compositions for criticality analyses, any burnup credit methodology must address the proper treatment of axial burnup distributions. A straightforward way of treating a given axial burnup distribution is to segment the fuel assembly into multiple meshes and to model each burnup mesh with the corresponding isotopic compositions. Although this approach represents a significant increase in modeling efforts compared to the uniform average burnup approach, it can adequately determine the reactivity effect of the axial burnup distribution. A major consideration is what axial burnup distributions are appropriate for use in light of many possible distributions depending on core operating conditions and histories. This paper summarizes criticality analyses performed to determine conservative axial burnup distributions. The conservative axial burnup distributions presented in this paper are included in the Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages, Revision 1 submitted in May 1997 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). When approved by NRC, the conservative axial burnup distributions may be used to model PWR spent nuclear fuel for the purpose of gaining actinide only burnup credit

  12. UO2 fuel behaviour at rod burn-ups up to 105 MWd/kgHM. A review of 10 years of high burn-up examinations commissioned by AREVA NP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goll, W.; Hoffmann, P.B.; Hellwig, C.; Sauser, W.; Spino, J.; Walker, C.T.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation experience gained on fuel rods with burn-ups greater than 60 MWd/kgHM irradiated in the Nuclear Power Plant Goesgen, Switzerland, is described. Emphasis is placed on the fuel behaviour, which has been analysed by hot cell examinations at the Institute for Transuranium Elements and the Paul-Scherrer-Institute. Above 60 MWd/kgHM, the so-called high burn-up structure (HBS) forms and the fission gas release increases with burn-up and rod power. Examinations performed in the outer region of the fuel revealed that most if not all of the fission gas created was retained in the HBS, even at 25% porosity. Furthermore, the HBS has a relatively low swelling rate, greatly increased plasticity, and its thermal conductivity is higher than expected from the porosity. The post-irradiation examinations showed that the HBS has no detrimental effects on the performance of stationary irradiated PWR fuel irradiated to the high burn-ups that can be achieved with 5 wt% U-235 enrichment. On the contrary, the HBS results in fuel performance that is generally better than it would have been if the HBS had not formed. (orig.)

  13. Applicability of the MCNP-ACAB system to inventory prediction in high-burnup fuels: sensitivity/uncertainty estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Herranz, N.; Cabellos, O. [Madrid Polytechnic Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering (Spain); Cabellos, O.; Sanz, J. [Madrid Polytechnic Univ., 2 Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (Spain); Sanz, J. [Univ. Nacional Educacion a Distancia, Dept. of Power Engineering, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    We present a new code system which combines the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C and the inventory code ACAB as a suitable tool for high burnup calculations. Our main goal is to show that the system, by means of ACAB capabilities, enables us to assess the impact of neutron cross section uncertainties on the inventory and other inventory-related responses in high burnup applications. The potential impact of nuclear data uncertainties on some response parameters may be large, but only very few codes exist which can treat this effect. In fact, some of the most reported effective code systems in dealing with high burnup problems, such as CASMO-4, MCODE and MONTEBURNS, lack this capability. As first step, the potential of our system, ruling out the uncertainty capability, has been compared with that of those code systems, using a well referenced high burnup pin-cell benchmark exercise. It is proved that the inclusion of ACAB in the system allows to obtain results at least as reliable as those obtained using other inventory codes, such as ORIGEN2. Later on, the uncertainty analysis methodology implemented in ACAB, including both the sensitivity-uncertainty method and the uncertainty analysis by the Monte Carlo technique, is applied to this benchmark problem. We estimate the errors due to activation cross section uncertainties in the prediction of the isotopic content up to the high-burnup spent fuel regime. The most relevant uncertainties are remarked, and some of the most contributing cross sections to those uncertainties are identified. For instance, the most critical reaction for Am{sup 242m} is Am{sup 241}(n,{gamma}-m). At 100 MWd/kg, the cross-section uncertainty of this reaction induces an error of 6.63% on the Am{sup 242m} concentration.The uncertainties in the inventory of fission products reach up to 30%.

  14. Decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of power reactors with high burnup at long-term storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternovykh, Mikhail; Tikhomirov, Georgy; Saldikov, Ivan; Gerasimov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Decay heat power of actinides and fission products from spent nuclear fuel of power VVER-1000 type reactors at long-term storage is calculated. Two modes of storage are considered: mode in which single portion of actinides or fission products is loaded in storage facility, and mode in which actinides or fission products from spent fuel of one VVER reactor are added every year in storage facility during 30 years and then accumulated nuclides are stored without addition new nuclides. Two values of fuel burnup 40 and 70 MW·d/kg are considered for the mode of storage of single fuel unloading. For the mode of accumulation of spent fuel with subsequent storage, one value of burnup of 70 MW·d/kg is considered. Very long time of storage 105 years accepted in calculations allows to simulate final geological disposal of radioactive wastes. Heat power of fission products decreases quickly after 50-100 years of storage. The power of actinides decreases very slow. In passing from 40 to 70 MW·d/kg, power of actinides increases due to accumulation of higher fraction of 244Cm. These data are important in the back end of fuel cycle when improved cooling system of the storage facility will be required along with stronger radiation protection during storage, transportation and processing.

  15. Decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of power reactors with high burnup at long-term storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ternovykh Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Decay heat power of actinides and fission products from spent nuclear fuel of power VVER-1000 type reactors at long-term storage is calculated. Two modes of storage are considered: mode in which single portion of actinides or fission products is loaded in storage facility, and mode in which actinides or fission products from spent fuel of one VVER reactor are added every year in storage facility during 30 years and then accumulated nuclides are stored without addition new nuclides. Two values of fuel burnup 40 and 70 MW·d/kg are considered for the mode of storage of single fuel unloading. For the mode of accumulation of spent fuel with subsequent storage, one value of burnup of 70 MW·d/kg is considered. Very long time of storage 105 years accepted in calculations allows to simulate final geological disposal of radioactive wastes. Heat power of fission products decreases quickly after 50-100 years of storage. The power of actinides decreases very slow. In passing from 40 to 70 MW·d/kg, power of actinides increases due to accumulation of higher fraction of 244Cm. These data are important in the back end of fuel cycle when improved cooling system of the storage facility will be required along with stronger radiation protection during storage, transportation and processing.

  16. Water reactor fuel element modelling at high burnup and its experimental support. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    The Technical Committee Meeting on Fuel Element Modelling at High Burnup and its Experimental Support was recommended by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT). Its subject had been touched on in many of the IAEA's activities; however for the first time modellers and experimentalists were brought together to have an exchange of views on the research under way and to identify areas where new knowledge is necessary to improve the safety, reliability and/or economics of nuclear fuel. The timely organization of this meeting in conjunction with the second meeting of the Co-ordinated Research Programme on Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup, in short ''FUMEX'', allowed fruitful participation of representatives of developing countries which are only rarely exposed to such a scientific event. The thirty-nine papers presented covered the status of codes and experimental facilities and the main phenomena affecting the fuel during irradiation, namely: thermal fuel performance, clad corrosion and pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) and fission gas release (FGR). Refs, figs, tabs

  17. Impacts of the use of spent nuclear fuel burnup credit on DOE advanced technology legal weight truck cask GA-4 fleet size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobasheran, A.S.; Boshoven, J.; Lake, B.

    1995-01-01

    The object of this paper is to study the impact of full and partial spent fuel burnup credit on the capacity of the Legal Weight Truck Spent Fuel Shipping Cask (GA-4) and to determine the numbers of additional spent fuel assemblies which could be accommodated as a result. The scope of the study comprised performing nuclear criticality safety scoping calculations using the SCALE-PC software package and the 1993 spent fuel database to determine logistics for number of spent fuel assemblies to be shipped. The results of the study indicate that more capacity than 2 or 3 pressurized water reactor assemblies could be gained for GA-4 casks when burnup credit is considered. Reduction in GA-4 fleet size and number of shipments are expected to result from the acceptance of spent fuel burnup credit

  18. Reactors as a Source of Antineutrinos: Effects of Fuel Loading and Burnup for Mixed-Oxide Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel S.; Erickson, Anna S.

    2018-01-01

    In a conventional light-water reactor loaded with a range of uranium and plutonium-based fuel mixtures, the variation in antineutrino production over the cycle reflects both the initial core fissile inventory and its evolution. Under an assumption of constant thermal power, we calculate the rate at which antineutrinos are emitted from variously fueled cores, and the evolution of that rate as measured by a representative ton-scale antineutrino detector. We find that antineutrino flux decreases with burnup for low-enriched uranium cores, increases for full mixed-oxide (MOX) cores, and does not appreciably change for cores with a MOX fraction of approximately 75%. Accounting for uncertainties in the fission yields in the emitted antineutrino spectra and the detector response function, we show that the difference in corewide MOX fractions at least as small as 8% can be distinguished using a hypothesis test. The test compares the evolution of the antineutrino rate relative to an initial value over part or all of the cycle. The use of relative rates reduces the sensitivity of the test to an independent thermal power measurement, making the result more robust against possible countermeasures. This rate-only approach also offers the potential advantage of reducing the cost and complexity of the antineutrino detectors used to verify the diversion, compared to methods that depend on the use of the antineutrino spectrum. A possible application is the verification of the disposition of surplus plutonium in nuclear reactors.

  19. Analysis of high burnup fuel behavior under control rod ejection accident in Korea standard nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bok; Lee, Chung Chan; Kim, Oh Hwan; Kim, Jong Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    Test results of high burnup fuel behavior under RIA(reactivity insertion accident) indicated that fuel might fail at the fuel enthalpy lower than that in the current fuel failure criteria was derived by the conservative assumptions and analysis of fuel failure mechanisms, and applied to the analysis of control rod ejection accident in the 1,000 MWe Korea standard PWR. Except that three dimensional core analysis was performed instead of conventional zero dimensional analysis, all the other conservative assumptions were kept. Analysis results showed that less than on percent of the fuel rods in the core has failed which was much less than the conventional fuel failure fraction, 9.8 %, even though a newly derived fuel failure criteria -Fuel failure occurs at the power level lower than that in the current fuel failure criteria. - was applied, since transient fuel rod power level was significantly decreased by analyzing the transient fuel rod power level was significantly decreased by analyzing the transient core three dimensionally. Therefore, it can be said that results of the radiological consequence analysis for the control rod ejection accident in the FSAR where fuel failure fraction was assumed 9.8 % is still bounding. 18 tabs., 48 figs., 39 refs. (Author).

  20. Measurement of reactivity loss with burnup in PWR, BWR and MOX fuel in the CERES collaborative programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliford, N.T.; Hanlon, D. [AEA Technology, Winfrith (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    Measurements have been made on samples of spent PWR, BWR and MOX fuel in the DIMPLE reactor to validate codes and data used to predict reactivity loss with burnup. This work has been carried out as part of an International Collaborative Programme known as CERES and includes the participation of the UK, France and the USA. Measurements have also been made on thirteen of the major fission product absorbers to validate neutron cross-section data for these isotopes. Comparisons with calculations based on AEA Technology`s WIMS Reactor Physics Code using the JEF2.2 data library show excellent agreement for a wide range of irradiated fuel samples. (author)

  1. Postirradiation examinations of fuel pins from the GCFR F-1 series of mixed-oxide fuel pins at 5.5 at. % burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strain, R.V.; Johnson, C.E.

    1978-05-01

    Postirradiation examinations were performed on five fuel pins from the Gas-Cooled Fast-Breeder Reactor F-1 experiment irradiated in EBR-II to a peak burnup of approximately 5.5 at. %. These encapsulated fuel pins were irradiated at peak-power linear ratings from approximately 13 to 15 kW/ft and peak cladding inside diameter temperatures from approximately 625 to 760 0 C. The maximum diametral change that occurred during irradiation was 0.2% ΔD/D 0 . The maximum fuel-cladding chemical interaction depth was 2.6 mils in fuel pin G-1 and 1 mil or less in the other three pins examined destructively. Significant migration of the volatile fission products occurred axially to the fuel-blanket interfaces. Teh postirradiation examination data indicate that fuel melted at the inner surface of the annular fuel pellets in the two highest power rating fuel pins, but little axial movement of fuel occurred

  2. Separation of Pu and Nd from Uranium matrix by equilibrated cation exchanger for burnup measurement of irradiated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joe, Kih Soo; Kim, Jung Suk; Jeon, Young Shin; Han, Sun Ho; Eom, Tae Yoon

    1993-01-01

    Ion chromatographic method has been applied for burnup measurement of irradiated nuclear fuel by dynamic system using 1-octanesulfonate as a cation exchanger and α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as an eluant. A number of elution techniques were evaluated for the optimum separation of plutonium, uranium and neodymium. These elements were individually separated and collected by gradient elution between 0.05 M and 0.40 M of α-hydroxyisobutyric acid in a single column, and finally determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The burnup data from this method were compared with those from conventional anion exchange method. The results showed a good agreement within 3.5 % of difference between two methods. (Author)

  3. A relative risk comparison of criticality control strategies based on fresh fuel and burnup credit design bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    The proposed use of burnup credit in spent fuel cask design and operation represents a departure from current regulatory practice, and creates technical issues that ultimately must be resolved for the concept to be implemented. Issues related to specific technical considerations can generally be resolved conclusively. However, an underlying perception may still exist that the use of burnup credit compromises criticality safety. In practice, individual casks are designed to satisfy regulatory requirements in a generally conservative manner. The designer's application of the regulatory requirements involves some engineering judgement, as does the regulator's implementation of them. This does not have an adverse effect on safety, but does make it difficult to objectively compare new or alternative designs and/or operating approaches. 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Development of a method for xenon determination in the microstructure of high burn-up nuclear fuel[Dissertation 17527

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, M. I

    2008-07-01

    In nuclear fuel, in approximately one quarter of the fissions, one of the two formed fission products is gaseous. These are mainly the noble gases xenon and krypton with isotopes of xenon contributing up to 90% of the product gases. These noble fission gases do not combine with other species, and have a low solubility in the normally used uranium oxide matrix. They can be dissolved in the fuel matrix or precipitate in nanometer-sized bubbles within the fuel grain, in micrometer-sized bubbles at the grain boundaries, and a fraction also precipitates in fuel pores, coming from fuel fabrication. A fraction of the gas can also be released into the plenum of the fuel rod. With increasing fission, and therefore burn-up, the ceramic fuel material experiences a transformation of its structure in the 'cooler' rim region of the fuel. A subdivision occurs of the original fuel grains of few microns size into thousands of small grains of sub-micron sizes. Additionally, larger pores are formed, which also leads into an increasing porosity in the fuel rim, called high burn-up structure. In this structure, only a small fraction of the fission gas remains in the matrix, the major quantity is said to accumulate in these pores. Because of this accumulation, the knowledge of the quantities of gas within these pores is of major interest in consideration to burn-up, fuel performance and especially for safety issues. In case of design based accidents, i.e. rapidly increasing temperature transients, the behavior of the fuel has to be estimated. Various analytical techniques have been used to determine the Xe concentration in nuclear fuel samples. The capabilities of EPMA (Electron Probe Micro-Analyser) and SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) have been studied and provided some qualitative information, which has been used for determining Xe-matrix concentrations. First approaches combining these two techniques to estimate pore pressures have been recently reported. However

  5. Behavior of low-burnup metallic fuels for the integral fast reactor at elevated temperatures in ex-reactor tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Hanchung; Liu, Yung Y.; Wang, Da-Yung; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    A series of ex-reactor heating tests on low burnup U-26wt.%Pu-10wt.%Zr metallic fuel for the PRISM reactor was conducted to evaluate fuel/cladding metallurgical interaction and its effect on cladding integrity at elevated temperatures. The reaction between the fuel and cladding caused liquid-phase formation and dissolution of the inner surface of the cladding. The rate of cladding penetration was below the existing design correlation, which provides a conservative margin to cladding failure. In a test which enveloped a wide range of postulated reactor transient events, a substantial temporal cladding integrity margin was demonstrated for an intact, whole fuel pin. The cause of the eventual pin breach was reaction-induced cladding thinning combined with fission-gas pressure loading. The behavior of the breached pin was benign. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  6. Accident source terms for light-water nuclear power plants using high-burnup or MOX fuel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salay, Michael (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Gauntt, Randall O.; Lee, Richard Y. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Representative accident source terms patterned after the NUREG-1465 Source Term have been developed for high burnup fuel in BWRs and PWRs and for MOX fuel in a PWR with an ice-condenser containment. These source terms have been derived using nonparametric order statistics to develop distributions for the timing of radionuclide release during four accident phases and for release fractions of nine chemical classes of radionuclides as calculated with the MELCOR 1.8.5 accident analysis computer code. The accident phases are those defined in the NUREG-1465 Source Term - gap release, in-vessel release, ex-vessel release, and late in-vessel release. Important differences among the accident source terms derived here and the NUREG-1465 Source Term are not attributable to either fuel burnup or use of MOX fuel. Rather, differences among the source terms are due predominantly to improved understanding of the physics of core meltdown accidents. Heat losses from the degrading reactor core prolong the process of in-vessel release of radionuclides. Improved understanding of the chemistries of tellurium and cesium under reactor accidents changes the predicted behavior characteristics of these radioactive elements relative to what was assumed in the derivation of the NUREG-1465 Source Term. An additional radionuclide chemical class has been defined to account for release of cesium as cesium molybdate which enhances molybdenum release relative to other metallic fission products.

  7. High Frequency Acoustic Microscopy for the Determination of Porosity and Young's Modulus in High Burnup Uranium Dioxide Nuclear Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Mara; Laux, Didier; Cappia, Fabiola; Laurie, M.; Van Uffelen, P.; Rondinella, V. V.; Wiss, T.; Despaux, G.

    2016-06-01

    During irradiation UO2 nuclear fuel experiences the development of a non-uniform distribution of porosity which contributes to establish varying mechanical properties along the radius of the pellet. Radial variations of both porosity and elastic properties in high burnup UO2 pellet can be investigated via high frequency acoustic microscopy. For this purpose ultrasound waves are generated by a piezoelectric transducer and focused on the sample, after having travelled through a coupling liquid. The elastic properties of the material are related to the velocity of the generated Rayleigh surface wave (VR). A UO2 pellet with a burnup of 67 GWd/tU was characterized using the acoustic microscope installed in the hot cells of the JRC-ITU at a 90 MHz frequency, with methanol as coupling liquid. VR was measured at different radial positions. A good agreement was found, when comparing the porosity values obtained via acoustic microscopy with those determined using SEM image analysis, especially in the areas close to the centre. In addition, Young's modulus was calculated and its radial profile was correlated to the corresponding burnup profile and to the hardness radial profile data obtained by Vickers micro-indentation.

  8. Measurement of the composition of noble-metal particles in high-burnup CANDU fuel by wavelength dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocking, W.H.; Szostak, F.J.

    1999-09-01

    An investigation of the composition of the metallic inclusions in CANDU fuel, which contain Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh and Pd, has been conducted as a function of burnup by wavelength dispersive X-ray (WDX) microanalysis. Quantitative measurements were performed on micrometer sized particles embedded in thin sections of fuel using elemental standards and the ZAF method. Because the fission yields of the noble metals change with burnup, as a consequence of a shift from almost entirely 235 U fission to mainly 239 Pu fission, their inventories were calculated from the fuel power histories using the WIMS-Origin code for comparison with experiment. Contrary to expectations that the oxygen potential would be buffered by progressive Mo oxidation, little evidence was obtained for reduced incorporation of Mo in the noble-metal particles at high burnup. These surprising results are discussed with respect to the oxygen balance in irradiated CANDU fuels and the likely intrinsic and extrinsic sinks for excess oxygen. (author)

  9. FUEL BURN-UP DISTRIBUTION AND TRANSURANIC NUCLIDE CONTENTS PRODUCED AT THE FIRST CYCLE OPERATION OF AP1000

    OpenAIRE

    Jati Susilo; Jupiter Sitorus Pane

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT FUEL BURN-UP DISTRIBUTION AND TRANSURANIC NUCLIDE CONTENTS PRODUCED AT THE FIRST CYCLE OPERATION OF AP1000. AP1000 reactor core was designed with nominal power of 1154 MWe (3415 MWth), operated within life time of 60 years and cycle length of 18 months. For the first cycle, the AP1000 core uses three kinds of UO2 enrichment, they are 2.35 w/o, 3.40 w/o and 4.45 w/o. Absorber materials such as ZrB2, Pyrex and Boron solution are used to compensate the excess reactivity at the begin...

  10. Twenty-third water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 1, plenary session, high burnup fuel behavior, thermal hydraulic research. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty- Third Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23-25, 1995. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and Switzerland. This document, Volume 1, present topics on High Burnup Fuel Behavior, Thermal Hydraulic Research, and Plenary Session topics. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  11. Twenty-third water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 1, plenary session, high burnup fuel behavior, thermal hydraulic research. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteleone, S.

    1996-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty- Third Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23-25, 1995. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and Switzerland. This document, Volume 1, present topics on High Burnup Fuel Behavior, Thermal Hydraulic Research, and Plenary Session topics. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  12. The effect of fuel burnup and dispersed water intrusion on the criticality of spent high-level nuclear fuel in a geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culbreth, W.G.; Zielinski, P.R.

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the spent fuel waste package have been conducted through the use of a Monte-Carlo neutron simulation program to determine the ability of the fuel to sustain a chain reaction. These studies have included fuel burnup and the effect of water mists on criticality. Results were compared with previous studies. In many criticality studies of spent fuel waste packages, fresh fuel with an enrichment as high as 4.5% is used as the conservative (worst) case. The actual spent fuel has a certain amount of burnup that decreases the concentration of fissile uranium and increases the amount of radionuclides present. The LWR Radiological Data Base from OCRWM has been used to determine the relative radionuclide ratios and KENO 5.1 was used to calculate values of the effective multiplication factor, k eff . Spent fuel is not capable of sustaining a chain reaction unless a suitable moderator, such as water, is present. A completely flooded container has been treated as the worst case for criticality. Results of a previous report that demonstrated that k eff actually peaked at a water-to-mixture ratio of 13% were analyzed for validity. In the present study, these results did not occur in the SCP waste package container

  13. Impacts of burnup-dependent swelling of metallic fuel on the performance of a compact breed-and-burn fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartanto, Donny; Heo, Woong; Kim, Chi Hyung; Kim, Yong Hee [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The U-Zr or U-TRU-Zr cylindrical metallic fuel slug used in fast reactors is known to swell significantly and to grow during irradiation. In neutronics simulations of metallic-fueled fast reactors, it is assumed that the slug has swollen and contacted cladding, and the bonding sodium has been removed from the fuel region. In this research, a realistic burnup-dependent fuel-swelling simulation was performed using Monte Carlo code McCARD for a single-batch compact sodium-cooled breed-and-burn reactor by considering the fuel-swelling behavior reported from the irradiation test results in EBR-II. The impacts of the realistic burnup-dependent fuel swelling are identified in terms of the reactor neutronics performance, such as core lifetime, conversion ratio, axial power distribution, and local burnup distributions. It was found that axial fuel growth significantly deteriorated the neutron economy of a breed-and-burn reactor and consequently impaired its neutronics performance. The bonding sodium also impaired neutron economy, because it stayed longer in the blanket region until the fuel slug reached 2% burnup.

  14. Burn-up calculation of different thorium-based fuel matrixes in a thermal research reactor using MCNPX 2.6 code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamzadeh Zohreh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Decrease of the economically accessible uranium resources and the inherent proliferation resistance of thorium fuel motivate its application in nuclear power systems. Estimation of the nuclear reactor’s neutronic parameters during different operational situations is of key importance for the safe operation of nuclear reactors. In the present research, thorium oxide fuel burn-up calculations for a demonstrative model of a heavy water- -cooled reactor have been performed using MCNPX 2.6 code. Neutronic parameters for three different thorium fuel matrices loaded separately in the modelled thermal core have been investigated. 233U, 235U and 239Pu isotopes have been used as fissile element in the thorium oxide fuel, separately. Burn-up of three different fuels has been calculated at 1 MW constant power. 135X and 149Sm concentration variations have been studied in the modelled core during 165 days burn-up. Burn-up of thorium oxide enriched with 233U resulted in the least 149Sm and 135Xe productions and net fissile production of 233U after 165 days. The negative fuel, coolant and void reactivity of the used fuel assures safe operation of the modelled thermal core containing (233U-Th O2 matrix. Furthermore, utilisation of thorium breeder fuel demonstrates several advantages, such as good neutronic economy, 233U production and less production of long-lived α emitter high radiotoxic wastes in biological internal exposure point of view

  15. Research on burnup physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.

    1974-01-01

    the validity of the equivalent material buckling definition, measurements were performed on experimental heavy water zero power reactor RB in Vinca, for three lattice pitches and lattice mixed of two kinds of fuel elements. The application of quasilinear programming for solving the control rod distribution problem to achieve maximum average fuel burnup resulted in a flexible optimization procedure (author)

  16. Electron probe microanalysis of a METAPHIX UPuZr metallic alloy fuel irradiated to 7.0 at.% burn-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brémier, S., E-mail: stephan.bremier@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Inagaki, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Capriotti, L.; Poeml, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ogata, T.; Ohta, H. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The METAPHIX project is a collaboration between CRIEPI and JRC-ITU investigating safety and performance of a closed fuel cycle option based on fast reactor metal alloy fuels containing Minor Actinides (MA). The aim of the project is to investigate the behaviour of this type of fuel and demonstrate the transmutation of MA under irradiation. A UPuZr metallic fuel sample irradiated to a burn-up of 7 at.% was examined by electron probe microanalysis. The fuel sample was extensively characterised qualitatively and quantitatively using elemental X-ray imaging and point analysis techniques. The analyses reveal a significant redistribution of the fuel components along the fuel radius highlighting a nearly complete depletion of Zr in the central part of the fuel. Numerous rare earth and fission products secondary phases are present in various compositions. Fuel cladding chemical interaction was observed with creation of a number of intermediary layers affecting a cladding depth of 15–20 μm and migration of cladding elements to the fuel. - Highlights: • Electron Probe MicroAnalysis of a UPuZr metallic fuel alloy irradiated to 7.0 at.% burn-up. • Significant redistribution of the fuel components along the fuel radius, nearly complete depletion of Zr in the central part of the fuel. • Interactions between the fuel and the cladding with occurrence of a number of intermediary layers and migration of cladding elements to the fuel. • Safe irradiation behaviour of the base alloy fuel.

  17. Detailed Burnup Calculations for Testing Nuclear Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczynski, F.

    2005-05-01

    -section data for burnup calculations, using some of the main available evaluated nuclear data files (ENDF-B-VI-Rel.8, JEFF-3.0, JENDL-3.3), on an isotope-by-isotope basis as much as possible. The selected experimental burnup benchmarks are reference cases for LWR and HWR reactors, with analysis of isotopic composition as a function of burnup. For LWR (H2O-moderated uranium oxide lattices) four benchmarks are included: ATM-104 NEA Burnup credit criticality benchmark; Yankee-Rowe Core V; H.B.Robinson Unit 2 and Turkey Point Unit 3. For HWR (D2O-moderated uranium oxide cluster lattices), three benchmarks were selected: NPD-19-rod Fuel Clusters; Pickering-28-rod Fuel Clusters; and Bruce-37-rod Fuel Clusters. The isotopes with experimental concentration data included in these benchmarks are: Se-79, Sr90, Tc99, Ru106, Sn126, Sb125,1129, Cs133-137, Nd143, 145, Sm149-150, 152, Eul53-155, U234-235, 238, Np237, Pu238-242, Am241-243, and Cm242-248. Results and analysis of differences between calculated and measured absolute and/or relative concentrations of these isotopes for the seven benchmarks are included in this work.

  18. Simulation of High Burnup Structure in UO2 Using Potts Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae Yong; Koo, Yang Hyun; Lee, Byung Ho

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of a high burnup structure (HBS) in a light water reactor (LWR) UO 2 fuel was simulated using the Potts model. A simulation system for the Potts model was defined as a two-dimensional triangular lattice, for which the stored energy was calculated from both the irradiation damage of the UO 2 matrix and the formation of a grain boundary in the newly recrystallized small HBS grains. In the simulation, the evolution probability of the HBS is calculated by the system energy difference between before and after the Monte Carlo simulation step. The simulated local threshold burnup for the HBS formation was 62 MWd/kgU, consistent with the observed threshold burnup range of 60-80 MWd/kgU. The simulation revealed that the HBS was heterogeneously nucleated on the intergranular bubbles in the proximity of the threshold burnup and then additionally on the intragranular bubbles for a burnup above 86 MWd/kgU. In addition, the simulation carried out under a condition of no bubbles indicated that the bubbles played an important role in lowering the threshold burnup for the HBS formation, thereby enabling the HBS to be observed in the burnup range of conventional high burnup fuels

  19. Changes of the inventory of radioactive materials in reactor fuel from uranium in changing to higher burn-up and determining the important effects of this

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, G.; Schaefer, R.

    1985-01-01

    The knowledge of the nuclide composition during and after use in the reactor is an essential, in order to be able to determine the effects associated with the operation of nuclear plants. The missing reliable data on the inventory of radioactive materials resulting from the expected change to higher burn-ups of uranium fuels in West Germany are calculated. The reliability of the program system used for this, which permits a one-dimensional account taken of the fuel rod cell and measurement of the changes of specific sets of nuclear data depending on burn-up, is confirmed by the comparison with experimentally found concentrations of important nuclides in fuel samples at Obrigheim nuclear power station. Realistic conditions of use are defined for a range of burn-up of 33 GWd/t to 55 GWd/t and the effects of changes of the number of cycles and the use of types of fuel elements being developed on the composition of the inventory are determined. The plutonium compositions during use in the reactor are given and are tabulated with the inventory for decay times up to 30 years. Effects during change to higher burn-ups are examined and discussed for the maximum inventories during use of fuel and for heat generation during final storage. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Corrosion studies with high burnup light water reactor fuel. Release of nuclides into simulated groundwater during accumulated contact time of up to two years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicky, Hans-Urs (Zwicky Consulting GmbH, Remigen (Switzerland)); Low, Jeanett; Ekeroth, Ella (Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden))

    2011-03-15

    In the framework of comprehensive research work supporting the development of a Swedish concept for the disposal of highly radioactive waste and spent fuel, Studsvik has performed a significant number of spent fuel corrosion studies under a variety of different conditions. These experiments, performed between 1990 and 2002, covered a burnup range from 27 to 49 MWd/kgU, which was typical for fuel to be disposed at that time. As part of this work, the so called Series 11 tests were performed under oxidising conditions in synthetic groundwater with fuel samples from a rod irradiated in the Ringhals 1 Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). In the meantime, Swedish utilities tend to increase the discharge burnup of fuel operated in their reactors. This means that knowledge of spent fuel corrosion performance has to be extended to higher burnup as well. Therefore, a series of experiments has been started at Studsvik, aiming at extending the data base acquired in the Series 11 corrosion tests to higher burnup fuel. Fuel burnup leads to complex and significant changes in the composition and properties of the fuel. The transformed microstructure, which is referred to as the high burnup structure or rim structure in the outer region of the fuel, consists of small grains of submicron size and a high concentration of pores of typical diameter 1 to 2 mum. This structure forms in UO{sub 2} fuel at a local burnup above 50 MWd/kgU, as long as the temperature is below 1,000-1,100 deg C. The high burnup at the pellet periphery is the consequence of plutonium build-up by neutron capture in 238U followed by fission of the formed plutonium. The amount of fission products in the fuel increases more or less linearly with burnup, in contrast to alpha emitting actinides that increase above average. As burnup across a spent fuel pellet is not uniform, but increases towards the periphery, the radiation field is also larger at the pellet surface. At the same time, it is easier for water to access the

  1. Highest average burnups achieved by MTR fuel elements of the IEA-R1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damy, Margaret A.; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Silva, Jose E.R.; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Castanheira, Myrthes; Teodoro, Celso A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear (CEN)]. E-mail: madamy@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Different nuclear fuels were employed in the manufacture of plate type at IPEN , usually designated as Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements. These fuel elements were used at the IEA-R1 research reactor. This work describes the main characteristics of these nuclear fuels, emphasizing the highest average burn up achieved by these fuel elements. (author)

  2. Highest average burnups achieved by MTR fuel elements of the IEA-R1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damy, Margaret A.; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Silva, Jose E.R.; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Castanheira, Myrthes; Teodoro, Celso A.

    2007-01-01

    Different nuclear fuels were employed in the manufacture of plate type at IPEN , usually designated as Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements. These fuel elements were used at the IEA-R1 research reactor. This work describes the main characteristics of these nuclear fuels, emphasizing the highest average burn up achieved by these fuel elements. (author)

  3. A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique and Three Types of Gamma-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Navarro; Rahmat Aryaeinejad,; David W. Nigg

    2011-05-01

    A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique1 Rahmat Aryaeinejad, Jorge Navarro, and David W Nigg Idaho National Laboratory Abstract Effective and efficient Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel management require state of the art core modeling tools. These new tools will need isotopic and burnup validation data before they are put into production. To create isotopic, burn up validation libraries and to determine the setup for permanent fuel scanner system a feasibility study was perform. The study consisted in measuring short and long cooling time fuel elements at the ATR canal. Three gamma spectroscopy detectors (HPGe, LaBr3, and HPXe) and two system configurations (above and under water) were used in the feasibility study. The first stage of the study was to investigate which detector and system configuration would be better suited for different scenarios. The second stage of the feasibility study was to create burnup and cooling time calibrations using experimental isotopic data collected and ORIGEN 2.2 burnup data. The results of the study establish that a better spectra resolution is achieve with an above the water configuration and that three detectors can be used in the permanent fuel scanner system for different situations. In addition it was conclude that a number of isotopic ratios and absolute measurements could be used to predict ATR fuel burnup and cooling times. 1This work was supported by the U.S. Depart¬ment of Energy (DOE) under Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Contract No. DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  4. Application of Integral Ex-Core and Differential In-Core Neutron Measurements for Adjustment of Fuel Burn-Up Distributions in VVER-1000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodkin, Pavel G.; Borodkin, Gennady I.; Khrennikov, Nikolay N.

    2010-10-01

    The paper deals with calculational and semi-analytical evaluations of VVER-1000 reactor core neutron source distributions and their influence on measurements and calculations of the integral through-vessel neutron leakage. Time-integrated neutron source distributions used for DORT calculations were prepared by two different approaches based on a) calculated fuel burn-up (standard routine procedure) and b) in-core measurements by means of SPD & TC (new approach). Taking into account that fuel burn-up distributions in operating VVER may be evaluated now by analytical methods (calculations) only it is needed to develop new approaches for testing and correction of calculational evaluations. Results presented in this paper allow to consider a reverse task of alternative estimation of fuel burn-up distributions. The approach proposed is based on adjustment (fitting) of time-integrated neutron source distributions, and hence fuel burn-up patterns in some part of reactor core, on the base of ex-core neutron leakage measurement, neutron-physical calculation and in-core SPD & TC measurement data.

  5. Fuel modelling at extended burnup. Report of the co-ordinated research programme on fuel modelling at extended burnup - FUMEX 1993-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report provides a description of the experiments chosen, an overview of the codes used by participants in the exercise, and the improvements implemented as a consequence of FUMEX. A commentary is given regarding the various aspects of fuel behavior tested and a detailed quantitative comparison is made between experimental data and code predictions. The report concludes with a discussion of the main findings of the exercise, the identified improvements and shortcomings in codes and modelling, and outstanding technical issues that require further attention

  6. A concise design o the irradiation of U-10Zr metallic fuel at a very low burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hai Bing; Zhou, Wei; Sun, Yong; Qian, Dazhi; Ma, Jimin; Leng, Jun; Huo, Hyoung; Wang, Shaohua [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China)

    2017-06-15

    In order to investigate the swelling behavior and fuel–cladding interaction mechanism of U–10Zr alloy metallic fuel at very low burnup, an irradiation experiment was concisely designed and conducted on the China Mianyang Research Reactor. Two types of irradiation samples were designed for studying free swelling without restraint and the fuel–cladding interaction mechanism. A new bonding material, namely, pure aluminum powder, was used to fill the gap between the fuel slug and sample shell for reducing thermal resistance and allowing the expansion of the fuel slug. In this paper, the concise irradiation rig design is introduced, and the neutronic and thermal–hydraulic analyses, which were carried out mainly using MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) and FLUENT codes, are presented. Out-of-pile tests were conducted prior to irradiation to verify the manufacturing quality and hydraulic performance of the rig. Nondestructive postirradiation examinations using cold neutron radiography technology were conducted to check fuel cladding integrity and swelling behavior. The results of the preliminary examinations confirmed the safety and effectiveness of the design.

  7. A Concise Design for the Irradiation of U–10Zr Metallic Fuel at a Very Low Burnup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibing Guo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the swelling behavior and fuel–cladding interaction mechanism of U–10Zr alloy metallic fuel at very low burnup, an irradiation experiment was concisely designed and conducted on the China Mianyang Research Reactor. Two types of irradiation samples were designed for studying free swelling without restraint and the fuel–cladding interaction mechanism. A new bonding material, namely, pure aluminum powder, was used to fill the gap between the fuel slug and sample shell for reducing thermal resistance and allowing the expansion of the fuel slug. In this paper, the concise irradiation rig design is introduced, and the neutronic and thermal–hydraulic analyses, which were carried out mainly using MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle and FLUENT codes, are presented. Out-of-pile tests were conducted prior to irradiation to verify the manufacturing quality and hydraulic performance of the rig. Nondestructive postirradiation examinations using cold neutron radiography technology were conducted to check fuel cladding integrity and swelling behavior. The results of the preliminary examinations confirmed the safety and effectiveness of the design.

  8. Computer modelling of the WWER fuel elements under high burnup conditions by the computer codes PIN-W and RODQ2D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valach, M.; Zymak, J.; Svoboda, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the development status of the computer codes for the WWER fuel elements thermomechanical behavior modelling under high burnup conditions at the Nuclear Research Institute Rez. The accent is given on the analysis of the results from the parametric calculations, performed by the programmes PIN-W and RODQ2D, rather than on their detailed theoretical description. Several new optional correlations for the UO2 thermal conductivity with degradation effect caused by burnup were implemented into the both codes. Examples of performed calculations document differences between previous and new versions of both programmes. Some recommendations for further development of the codes are given in conclusion. (author). 6 refs, 9 figs

  9. A multi-platform linking code for fuel burnup and radiotoxicity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, R.; Pereira, C.; Veloso, M. A. F.; Cardoso, F.; Costa, A. L.

    2014-02-01

    A linking code between ORIGEN2.1 and MCNP has been developed at the Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear/UFMG to calculate coupled neutronic/isotopic results for nuclear systems and to produce a large number of criticality, burnup and radiotoxicity results. In its previous version, it evaluated the isotopic composition evolution in a Heat Pipe Power System model as well as the radiotoxicity and radioactivity during lifetime cycles. In the new version, the code presents features such as multi-platform execution and automatic results analysis. Improvements made in the code allow it to perform simulations in a simpler and faster way without compromising accuracy. Initially, the code generates a new input for MCNP based on the decisions of the user. After that, MCNP is run and data, such as recoverable energy per prompt fission neutron, reaction rates and keff, are automatically extracted from the output and used to calculate neutron flux and cross sections. These data are then used to construct new ORIGEN inputs, one for each cell in the core. Each new input is run on ORIGEN and generates outputs that represent the complete isotopic composition of the core on that time step. The results show good agreement between GB (Coupled Neutronic/Isotopic code) and Monteburns (Automated, Multi-Step Monte Carlo Burnup Code System), developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  10. Estimate of fuel burnup spatial a multipurpose reactor in computer simulation; Estimativa da queima espacial do combustivel de um reator multiproposito por simulacao computacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nadia Rodrigues dos, E-mail: nadia.santos@ifrj.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ), Paracambi, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br, E-mail: zrlima@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In previous research, which aimed, through computer simulation, estimate the spatial fuel burnup for the research reactor benchmark, material test research - International Atomic Energy Agency (MTR/IAEA), it was found that the use of the code in FORTRAN language, based on the diffusion theory of neutrons and WIMSD-5B, which makes cell calculation, bespoke be valid to estimate the spatial burnup other nuclear research reactors. That said, this paper aims to present the results of computer simulation to estimate the space fuel burnup of a typical multipurpose reactor, plate type and dispersion. the results were considered satisfactory, being in line with those presented in the literature. for future work is suggested simulations with other core configurations. are also suggested comparisons of WIMSD-5B results with programs often employed in burnup calculations and also test different methods of interpolation values obtained by FORTRAN. Another proposal is to estimate the burning fuel, taking into account the thermohydraulics parameters and the appearance of xenon. (author)

  11. Fuel rod analysis to respond to high burnup and demanding loading requirements. Probabilistic methodology recovers design margins narrowed by degrading fuel thermal conductivity and progressing FGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, R.; Heins, L.; Sontheimer, F.

    1997-01-01

    The proof that fuel rods will safely withstand all loads arising from inpile service conditions is generally achieved through the assessment of a number of design criteria by using a conservative analysis methodology in conjunction with design limits ''on the safe side''. The classical approach is the application of a fuel rod code to the Worst Case which is defined by the combination of most unfavorable conditions and assumptions with respect to the criterion under consideration. As it is evident that the deterministic construction of such Worst Cases imply an (unknown but) intuitively very high degree of conservatism, it is not surprising that this will develop to cause problems the more demanding fuel insertion conditions have to be anticipated (increased burnup, high efficiency loading schemes, etc.). A certain relief can be gained form cautious revisions of single design limits based on grown performance experience. But this increase of knowledge allows as well to change the established deterministic ''go/no-go'' conception into a better differentiating assessment methodology by which the quantification of the implied conservatism and the remaining design margins is possible: the Probabilistic Design Methodology (PDM). Principles and elements of the PDM are described. An essential prerequisite is a best-estimate fuel rod code which incorporates the latest state of knowledge about potential performance limiting phenomena (e.g. burnup degradation of fuel oxide thermal conductivity) as Siemens/KWU's CARO-E does. An example is given how input distributions for rod data and model parameters transfer into a frequency distribution of maximum rod internal pressure, and indications are given how this is to be interpreted in view of a probabilistically re-formulated design criterion. The PDM provides a realistic conservative assessment of design criteria and will thus recover design margins for increasingly aggravated loading conditions. (author). 9 refs, 9 figs, 2 tabs

  12. Burnup simulations of different fuel grades using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    OpenAIRE

    Asah-Opoku Fiifi; Liang Zhihua; Huque Ziaul; Kommalapati Raghava R.

    2014-01-01

    Global energy problems range from the increasing cost of fuel to the unequal distribution of energy resources and the potential climate change resulting from the burning of fossil fuels. A sustainable nuclear energy would augment the current world energy supply and serve as a reliable future energy source. This research focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of pressurized water reactor systems. Three different fuel grades - mixed oxide fuel (MOX), uranium oxide ...

  13. Distribution of equilibrium burnup for an homogeneous core with fuel elements of slightly enriched uranium (0.85% U-235) at Atucha I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidelnik, J.I.; Perez, R.A.; Salom, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    At Atucha I, the present fuel management with natural uranium comprises three burnup areas and one irradiation path, sometimes performing four steps in the reactor core, according to the requirements. The discharge burnup is 6.0 Mw d/kg U for a waste reactivity of 6.5 m k and a heavy water purity of 99.75%. This is a preliminary study to obtain the distribution of equilibrium burnup of an homogeneous core with slightly enriched uranium (0.85% by weight U-235), using the time-averaged method implemented in the code PUMA and a representative model of one third of core and fixed rod position. It was found a strategy of three areas and two paths that agrees with the present limits of channel power and specific power in fuel rod. The discharge burnup obtained is 11.6 Mw d/kg U. This strategy is calculated with the same method and a full core representation model is used to verify the obtained results. (Author)

  14. Analysis of burnup of Angra 2 PWR nuclear with addition of thorium dioxide fuel using ORIGEN-ARP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Isadora C.; Wichrowski, Caio C.; Oliveira, Claudio L. de; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Baptista, Camila O.

    2017-01-01

    It is known that isotope 232 thorium is a fertile nuclide with the ability to convert into 233 uranium, a potentially fissile isotope, after absorbing a neutron. As there is a large stock of available thorium in the world, this element shows great promise in mitigate the world energy crisis, more particularly in the problem of uranium scarcity, besides being an alternative nuclear fuel for those currently used in reactors, and yet presenting advantages as an option for the non-proliferation movement, among others. In this study, the analysis of the remaining nuclides of burnup was carried out for the core configuration of a PWR (pressurized water reactor) reactor, specifically the Angra 2 reactor, using only uranium dioxide, its current configuration, and in different configurations including a mixed oxide of uranium and thorium in three concentrations, allowing a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of the modification of the fuel, the resulting production of 233 uranium, the emergence of 231 protactinium (an isotope that only occurs as a fission product of 232 Th) resulting from burning. The study was carried out using data obtained from FSAR (Final Safety Analysis Report) of Angra 2, using the SCALE 6.1, a modeling and simulation nuclear code, especially its ORIGEN-ARP module, which analyzes the depletion of isotopes presents in a reactor. (author)

  15. Analysis of burnup of Angra 2 PWR nuclear with addition of thorium dioxide fuel using ORIGEN-ARP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Isadora C.; Wichrowski, Caio C.; Oliveira, Claudio L. de; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Baptista, Camila O., E-mail: isadora.goncalves@ime.eb.br, E-mail: wichrowski@ime.eb.br, E-mail: d7luiz@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: vellozo@ime.eb.br, E-mail: camila.oliv.baptista@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    It is known that isotope {sup 232}thorium is a fertile nuclide with the ability to convert into {sup 233}uranium, a potentially fissile isotope, after absorbing a neutron. As there is a large stock of available thorium in the world, this element shows great promise in mitigate the world energy crisis, more particularly in the problem of uranium scarcity, besides being an alternative nuclear fuel for those currently used in reactors, and yet presenting advantages as an option for the non-proliferation movement, among others. In this study, the analysis of the remaining nuclides of burnup was carried out for the core configuration of a PWR (pressurized water reactor) reactor, specifically the Angra 2 reactor, using only uranium dioxide, its current configuration, and in different configurations including a mixed oxide of uranium and thorium in three concentrations, allowing a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of the modification of the fuel, the resulting production of {sup 233}uranium, the emergence of {sup 231}protactinium (an isotope that only occurs as a fission product of {sup 232}Th) resulting from burning. The study was carried out using data obtained from FSAR (Final Safety Analysis Report) of Angra 2, using the SCALE 6.1, a modeling and simulation nuclear code, especially its ORIGEN-ARP module, which analyzes the depletion of isotopes presents in a reactor. (author)

  16. Burnup Credit of French PWR-MOx fuels: methodology and associated conservatisms with the JEFF-3.1.1 evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambon, A.

    2013-01-01

    Considering spent fuel management (storage, transport and reprocessing), the approach using 'fresh fuel assumption' in criticality-safety studies results in a significant conservatism in the calculated value of the system reactivity. The concept of Burnup Credit (BUC) consists in considering the reduction of the spent fuel reactivity due to its burnup. A careful BUC methodology, developed by CEA in association with AREVA-NC was recently validated and written up for PWR-UOx fuels. However, 22 of 58 French reactors use MOx fuel, so more and more irradiated MOx fuels have to be stored and transported. As a result, why industrial partners are interested in this concept is because taking into account this BUC concept would enable for example a load increase in several fuel cycle devices. Recent publications and discussions within the French BUC Working Group highlight the current interest of the BUC concept in PWR-MOx spent fuel industrial applications. In this case of PWR-MOx fuel, studies show in particular that the 15 FPs selected thanks to their properties (absorbing, stable, non-gaseous) are responsible for more than a half of the total reactivity credit and 80% of the FPs credit. That is why, in order to get a conservative and physically realistic value of the application k eff and meet the Upper Safety Limit constraint, calculation biases on these 15 FPs inventory and individual reactivity worth should be considered in a criticality-safety approach. In this context, thanks to an exhaustive literature study, PWR-MOx fuels particularities have been identified and by following a rigorous approach, a validated and physically representative BUC methodology, adapted to this type of fuel has been proposed, allowing to take fission products into account and to determine the biases related to considered isotopes inventory and to reactivity worth. This approach consists of the following studies: - isotopic correction factors determination to guarantee the criticality

  17. The effect of dissolved hydrogen on the dissolution of {sup 233}U doped UO{sub 2}(s) high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbol, P. [Inst. for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Spahiu, K. (ed.) [and others

    2005-03-01

    In this report the results of the experimental work carried out in a large EU-research project (SFS, 2001-2004) on spent fuel stability in the presence of various amounts of near field hydrogen are presented. Studies of the dissolution of {sup 233}U doped UO{sub 2}(s) simulating 'old' spent fuel were carried out as static leaching tests, autoclave tests with various hydrogen concentrations and electrochemical tests. The results of the leaching behaviour of a high burn-up spent fuel pellet in 5 M NaCl solutions in the presence of 3.2 bar H{sub 2} pressure and of MOX fuel in dilute synthetic groundwater under 53 bar H{sub 2} pressure are also presented. In all the experimental studies carried out in this project, a considerable effect of hydrogen in the dissolution rates of radioactive materials was observed. The experimental results obtained in this project with a-doped UO{sub 2}, high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel together with literature data give a reliable background to use fractional alteration/dissolution rates for spent fuel of the order of 10{sup -6}/yr - 10{sup -8}/yr with a recommended value of 4x10{sup -7}/yr for dissolved hydrogen concentrations above 10{sup -3} M and Fe(II) concentrations typical for European repository concepts. Finally, based on a review of the experimental data and available literature data, potential mechanisms of the hydrogen effect are also discussed. The work reported in this document was performed as part of the Project SFS of the European Commission 5th Framework Programme under contract no FIKW-CT-2001-20192 SFS. It represents the deliverable D10 of the experimental work package 'Key experiments using a-doped UO{sub 2} and real spent fuel', coordinated by SKB with the participation of ITU, FZK-INE, ENRESA, CIEMAT, ARMINES-SUBATECH and SKB.

  18. Experimental methods for burn-up determination in nuclear fuels, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taddei, J.F. de A.C.; Rodrigues, C.

    1977-01-01

    A method is presented that allows the calculation of the total percentage of atoms having undergone fission ('burn up') in nuclear fuels, from the measurement of absolute amounts of fission product neodymium-148 and of uranium and plutoniun present in the spent fuel, the fission yield of neodymium-148 being known. These measurements are performed through the mass spectrometry- isotope dilution technique [pt

  19. A study on the in-reactor behavior of centrifugally atomized U3Si dispersion fuel irradiated up to high burn-up under normal power condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Lee, C. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, D. G.; Kim, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    In order to localize the nuclear fuels for HANARO, centrifugally atomized and mechanically comminuted U 3 Si mini-element fuels were fabricated and irradiated up to high burn-up under normal power condition in HANARO reactor. The average interaction thickness in atomized U 3 Si dispersion fuel meat was observed as about 8 μm. It was almost same thickness and more uniform comparing to that of comminuted U 3 Si dispersion fuel meats. The interaction thickness of U 3 Si dispersion fuel meats were generally assumed acceptable in the fuel performance point of view. The U 3 Si fuel particles were examined containing a relatively fine and uniform fission gas bubble distribution without any indications of unstable and rapid breakway swelling, irrespective of powdering methods

  20. Preferential removal of Sm by evaporation from Nd-Sm mixture and its application in direct burn-up determination of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajimol, R.; Bera, S.; Nalini, S.; Sivaraman, N.; Joseph, M.; Kumar, T.

    2016-01-01

    Rate of evaporation of Sm and Nd from their mixture was studied based on their ion intensities using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Because of the comparatively larger evaporation rate of Sm, it was found possible to get the isotopic composition of Nd (fission product monitor) free from isobaric interference of Sm isotopes. The decrease in ion intensity of Sm was studied as a function of time and filament temperature. Based on this study, an easy and time effective method for the determination of burn-up of spent nuclear fuel was examined and the results are compared with that obtained by the conventional method. Typical burn-up value obtained for a pressurized heavy water reactor fuel dissolver solution using the direct method by preferential evaporation of Sm is: 0.84 at.%, whereas the one obtained by the use of conventional method is 0.82 at.%. In both the cases, Nd was employed as the fission product monitor. (author)

  1. Determination of burnup grade of fuel plates by gamma spectrometry; Determinacao do grau de queima em elementos combustiveis tipo placa por meio de espectrometria gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Perrotta, Jose A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Engenharia do Nucleo

    1999-11-01

    This work describes absolute burnup measurements on spent MTR fuel elements by means of non-destructive gamma-ray spectroscopy which correlates activities of radioactive fission products with the fissioned mass of {sup 235} U. Experiments based on such method were performed at the storage pool area of the IEA-R1 research reactor. The obtained results were compared with calculational ones based on neutronics. (author) 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.; e-mail: laaterre at net.ipen.br

  2. Investigation of the applicability of solid state detectors for the determination of reactor fuel burn-up, development and making of a jumping spark counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csikai, J.

    1979-04-01

    A method was investigated for the determination of reactor fuel burn-up by measuring the spontaneous fission cross sections ratio 235 U/ 238 U. The method was adopted for the determination of uranium in powdered solid samples. The angular distribution of fission fragments of 239 Pu has been measured by means of a polycarbonate solid state nuclear track detector, using a 252 Cf neutron source

  3. Microstructure and fracture toughness characterization of irradiated PWR fuels in the burnup range of 40-67 GWd/tM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spino, J.; Coquerelle, M.; Baron, D.

    1998-01-01

    The radial variation of porosity, pore density, pore size distributions and fracture toughness parameter (K IC ) was characterised for several PWR-UO 2 fuel samples in the burnup range 40-67 GWd/tM. In all cases, the formation of a porous zone at the pellet periphery was confirmed, the thickness of which increases with the average burnup. Within this zone, an exponential growth of the fuel porosity and pore density towards the pellet edge was measured, while the mean pore size remaining constant at about 1μm. At the pellet edge both porosity and pore density appeared to reach a saturating value, almost independently on the average burnup considered, which in the case of porosity was in the range 15-17%. Accompanying this porosity increase, also a structure modification of the original fuel is evidenced, leading to a band of completely grain subdivided material at the pellet edge, with a grain size of 0.29+-0.14 μm, compared to the as-fabricated grain sizes of 5-10 μm. As increasing the distance from the pellet edge, a characteristic of this grain subdivision is that it becomes unambiguously concentrated around pores, first at both intragranular and intergranular positions, and then clearly located at the boundaries of the original matrix grains. The resistance of the material to crack propagation (K IC ), showed an increase of 80 to 100 % in the rim zone, compared to the rest of the fuel. This unexpected improvement is supposed to be caused by a type of Hall-Petch strengthening mechanism, due to the grain refinement occurring in the rim region. The positive contribution of this effect apparently overrides the detrimental influence of the porosity in the material toughness. In this paper, also the influence of the local burnup on the above results is discussed. (author)

  4. Reactor critical benchmark calculations for burnup credit applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renier, J.P.; Parks, C.V.

    1990-01-01

    In the criticality safety analyses for the development and certification of spent fuel casks, the current approach requires the assumption of ''fresh fuel'' isotopics. It has been shown that the removal of the ''fresh fuel'' assumption and the use of spent fuel isotopics (''burnup credit'') greatly increases the payload of spent fuel casks by reducing the reactivity of the fuel. Regulatory approval of burnup credit and the requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. Criticality analyses for low-enriched lattices of fuel pins using the ''fresh fuel isotopics'' assumption have been widely benchmarked against applicable critical experiments. However, the same computational methods have not been benchmarked against criticals containing spent fuel because of the non-existence of spent fuel critical experiments. Commercial reactors offer an excellent and inexhaustible source of critical configurations against which criticality analyses can be benchmarked for spent fuel configurations. This document provides brief descriptions of the benchmarks and the computational methods for the criticality analyses. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  5. Application of burnup credit concept to transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futamura, Yoshiaki; Nakagome, Yoshihiro.

    1994-01-01

    For the design and safety assessment of the casks for transporting spent fuel, the fuel contained in them has been assumed to be new fuel. The reason is, it was difficult to evaluate the variation of the reactivity of fuel, and the research on the affecting factors and the method of measuring burnup were not much advanced. Recently, high burnup fuel has been adopted, and initial degree of enrichment rose. The research has been advanced for pursuing the economy of the casks for spent fuel, and burnup credit has become applicable to their design and safety assessment. As the result, the containing capacity increases by about 20%. When burnup credit is considered, it is necessary to confirm accurately the burnup of spent fuel. The burnup dependence of the concentration of fissile substances and neutron emissivity, the coolant void dependence of the concentration of fissile substances, and the relation of neutron multiplication rate with initial degree of enrichment or burnup are discussed. The conceptual design of casks considering burnup credit and its assessment, the merit, problem and the countermeasures to it when burnup credit is introduced are described. (K.I.)

  6. Fission gas release from oxide fuels at high burnups (AWBA development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollins, C.C.

    1981-02-01

    The steady state gas release, swelling and densification model previously developed for oxide fuels has been modified to accommodate the slow transients in temperature, temperature gradient, fission rate and pressure that are encountered in normal reactor operation. The gas release predictions made by the model were then compared to gas release data on LMFBR-EBRII fuels obtained by Dutt and Baker and reported by Meyer, Beyer, and Voglewede. Good agreement between the model and the data was found. A comparison between the model and three other sets of gas release data is also shown, again with good agreement

  7. PLUTON: Three-group neutronic code for burnup analysis of isotope generation and depletion in highly irradiated LWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemehov, Sergei E; Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    PLUTON is a three-group neutronic code analyzing, as functions of time and burnup, the change of radial profiles, together with average values, of power density, burnup, concentration of trans-uranium elements, plutonium buildup, depletion of fissile elements, and fission product generation in water reactor fuel rod with standard UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, inhomogeneous MOX, and UO{sub 2}-ThO{sub 2}. The PLUTON code, which has been designed to be run on Windows PC, has adopted a theoretical shape function of neutron attenuation in pellet, which enables users to perform a very fast and accurate calculation easily. The present code includes the irradiation conditions of the Halden Reactor which gives verification data for the code. The total list of trans-uranium elements included in the calculations consists of {sub 92}U{sup 233-239}, {sub 93}Np{sup 237-239}, {sub 94}Pu{sup 238-243}, {sub 95}Am{sup 241-244} (including isomers), and {sub 96}Cm{sup 242-245}. Poisoning fission products are represented by {sub 54}Xe{sup 131,133,135}, {sub 48}Cd{sup 113}, {sub 62}Sm{sup 149,151,152}, {sub 64}Gd{sup 154-160}, {sub 63}Eu{sup 153,155}, {sub 36}Kr{sup 83,85}, {sub 42}Mo{sup 95}, {sub 43}Tc{sup 99}, {sub 45}Rh{sup 103}, {sub 47}Ag{sup 109}, {sub 53}I{sup 127,129,131}, {sub 55}Cs{sup 133}, {sub 57}La{sup 139}, {sub 59}Pr{sup 141}, {sub 60}Nd{sup 143-150}, {sub 61}Pm{sup 147}. Fission gases and volatiles included in the code are {sub 36}Kr{sup 83-86}, {sub 54}Xe{sup 129-136}, {sub 52}Te{sup 125-130}, {sub 53}I{sup 127-131}, {sub 55}Cs{sup 133-137}, and {sub 56}Ba{sup 135-140}. Verification has been performed up to 83 GWd/tU, and a satisfactory agreement has been obtained. (author)

  8. On the use of the FALCON code for modeling the behaviour of high burn-up BWR fuel during the LS-1 pulse-irradiation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostov, G.; Zimmermann, M.A.; Sugiyama, T.; Fuketa, T.

    2008-01-01

    The LS-1 RIA-simulating test conducted in NSRR with high-burnup fuel base irradiated in the BWR KKL to a pellet burn-up of 69 MWd/kgU is analysed using the FALCON fuel behaviour code coupled with the advanced GRSW-A model for fission gas release and swelling of the uranium dioxide fuels. A reasonable agreement of the results of calculation with the measured value of fission gas release in the failed fuel rod, amounting to about 23 % of total gas generated in the pellets is obtained. The mechanisms able to result in as significant fission gas release as measured by the post-test-examination are analysed with the model and discussed in consideration of the predicted initial micro-structural state of the fuel after the base irradiation. The minor role of gaseous swelling in the early failure of the LS-1 test-fuel-rod is shown by calculation, which is due to premature brittle cracking of the highly hydrated cladding under the conditions of the Room-Temperature capsule used in the LS-1 test. However, a significant potential impact of the gaseous swelling on cladding strain-stress conditions during the RIA is shown by the calculation when assuming a sufficient residual cladding ductility in the hypothetical test with the same parameters as in LS-1, but under conditions of the High- Temperature-High-Pressure capsule. (authors)

  9. Modeling of PWR fuel at extended burnup; Estudo de modelos para o comportamento a altas queimas de varetas combustiveis de reatores a agua leve pressurizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Raphael Mejias

    2016-11-01

    This work studies the modifications implemented over successive versions in the empirical models of the computer program FRAPCON used to simulate the steady state irradiation performance of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods under high burnup condition. In the study, the empirical models present in FRAPCON official documentation were analyzed. A literature study was conducted on the effects of high burnup in nuclear fuels and to improve the understanding of the models used by FRAPCON program in these conditions. A steady state fuel performance analysis was conducted for a typical PWR fuel rod using FRAPCON program versions 3.3, 3.4, and 3.5. The results presented by the different versions of the program were compared in order to verify the impact of model changes in the output parameters of the program. It was observed that the changes brought significant differences in the results of the fuel rod thermal and mechanical parameters, especially when they evolved from FRAPCON-3.3 version to FRAPCON-3.5 version. Lower temperatures, lower cladding stress and strain, lower cladding oxide layer thickness were obtained in the fuel rod analyzed with the FRAPCON-3.5 version. (author)

  10. Isotopic analyses and calculation by use of JENDL-3.2 for high burn-up UO{sub 2} and MOX spent fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasahara, Akihiro; Matsumura, Tetsuo [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.; Nicolaou, G.; Betti, M.; Walker, C.T.

    1997-03-01

    The post irradiation examinations (PIE) were carried out for high burn-up UO{sub 2} spent fuel (3.8%U235, average burn-up:60GWd/t) and mixed oxide (MOX) spent fuel (5.07%Pu, average burn-up:45GWd/t). The PIE includes, (a) isotopic analysis, (b) electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) in pellet cross section and so on. The results of isotopic analyses and EPMA were compared with ORIGEN2/82 and VIM-BURN calculation results. In VIM-BURN calculation, the nuclear data of actinides were proceeded from new data file, JENDL-3.2. The sensitivities of power history and moderator density to nuclides composition were investigated by VIM-BURN calculation and consequently power history mainly effected on Am241 and Am242m and moderator density effected on fissile nuclides. From EPMA results of U and Pu distribution in pellet, VIM-BURN calculation showed reasonable distribution in pellet cross section. (author)

  11. BURNY-SQUID, 2-D Burnup of UO2 and Mix UO2 PuO2 Fuel in X-Y or R-Z Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, I.; Zara, G.; Guidotti, R.

    1974-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: - Multigroup neutron diffusion and burnup equations for two- to five- energy groups over a rectangular region of the x-y or r-z plane. - For a given geometry and initial enrichment, it calculates the two- to five- group flux distributions, the nuclides burnt in a time step t, and then the flux distribution again. This process is repeated until the maximum burn-up is reached. - Criticality search by uniform variation of a control isotope. - Solution of problems with fuel having different geometrical parameters, by means of super-compositions. - Recycle and restart options are available. - UO 2 and PUO 2 -UO 2 fuel can be handled. 2 - Method of solution: The zero-dimension burn-up program RIBOT-5 is coupled with the two-dimension program SQUID and alternately executed. The differential equations are solved by the difference method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: 200 maximum number of compositions 10,000 maximum number of mesh points 5 maximum Number of groups. 4 maximum number of super-compositions. Diagonal symmetry allowed

  12. Determination of the burn-up in fuels of the MTR type by means of gamma spectroscopy with crystal of INa(Tl)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestelman, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    One of the responsibilities of the Laboratory of Analysis by Neutronic Activation of the RA-6 reactor is to determine the burn-up in fuels of the MTR type. In order to gain experience, up to the arrival of the hyperpure Germanium detector (HPGe) to be used in normal operation, preliminary measurements with a crystal of INa(Tl) were made. The fuel elements used are originated in the RA-3 reactor, with a decay superior to the thirteen years. For this reason, the unique visible photoelectric peak is the one of Cs-137, owing to the low resolution of the INa(Tl). After preliminary measurements, the profiles of burn-up, rectified by attenuation, were measured. Once the efficiency of the detector was determined, the calculation of the burn-up was made; for the element No. 144, a value of 21.6 ± 2.9 g was obtained to be compared with the value 21.9 g which was the evaluation made by the operators. (Author) [es

  13. Transmutation, Burn-Up and Fuel Fabrication Trade-Offs in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor Thorium Fuel Cycles - 13502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindley, Benjamin A.; Parks, Geoffrey T. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Franceschini, Fausto [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Multiple recycle of long-lived actinides has the potential to greatly reduce the required storage time for spent nuclear fuel or high level nuclear waste. This is generally thought to require fast reactors as most transuranic (TRU) isotopes have low fission probabilities in thermal reactors. Reduced-moderation LWRs are a potential alternative to fast reactors with reduced time to deployment as they are based on commercially mature LWR technology. Thorium (Th) fuel is neutronically advantageous for TRU multiple recycle in LWRs due to a large improvement in the void coefficient. If Th fuel is used in reduced-moderation LWRs, it appears neutronically feasible to achieve full actinide recycle while burning an external supply of TRU, with related potential improvements in waste management and fuel utilization. In this paper, the fuel cycle of TRU-bearing Th fuel is analysed for reduced-moderation PWRs and BWRs (RMPWRs and RBWRs). RMPWRs have the advantage of relatively rapid implementation and intrinsically low conversion ratios. However, it is challenging to simultaneously satisfy operational and fuel cycle constraints. An RBWR may potentially take longer to implement than an RMPWR due to more extensive changes from current BWR technology. However, the harder neutron spectrum can lead to favourable fuel cycle performance. A two-stage fuel cycle, where the first pass is Th-Pu MOX, is a technically reasonable implementation of either concept. The first stage of the fuel cycle can therefore be implemented at relatively low cost as a Pu disposal option, with a further policy option of full recycle in the medium term. (authors)

  14. Transmutation, Burn-Up and Fuel Fabrication Trade-Offs in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor Thorium Fuel Cycles - 13502

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindley, Benjamin A.; Parks, Geoffrey T.; Franceschini, Fausto

    2013-01-01

    Multiple recycle of long-lived actinides has the potential to greatly reduce the required storage time for spent nuclear fuel or high level nuclear waste. This is generally thought to require fast reactors as most transuranic (TRU) isotopes have low fission probabilities in thermal reactors. Reduced-moderation LWRs are a potential alternative to fast reactors with reduced time to deployment as they are based on commercially mature LWR technology. Thorium (Th) fuel is neutronically advantageous for TRU multiple recycle in LWRs due to a large improvement in the void coefficient. If Th fuel is used in reduced-moderation LWRs, it appears neutronically feasible to achieve full actinide recycle while burning an external supply of TRU, with related potential improvements in waste management and fuel utilization. In this paper, the fuel cycle of TRU-bearing Th fuel is analysed for reduced-moderation PWRs and BWRs (RMPWRs and RBWRs). RMPWRs have the advantage of relatively rapid implementation and intrinsically low conversion ratios. However, it is challenging to simultaneously satisfy operational and fuel cycle constraints. An RBWR may potentially take longer to implement than an RMPWR due to more extensive changes from current BWR technology. However, the harder neutron spectrum can lead to favourable fuel cycle performance. A two-stage fuel cycle, where the first pass is Th-Pu MOX, is a technically reasonable implementation of either concept. The first stage of the fuel cycle can therefore be implemented at relatively low cost as a Pu disposal option, with a further policy option of full recycle in the medium term. (authors)

  15. Qualification of the B and W Mark B fuel assembly for high burnup. First semi-annual progress report, July-December 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, T.A.; Coppola, E.J.; Doss, P.L.; Uotinen, V.O.; Davis, H.H.

    1979-08-01

    Five Babcock and Wilcox standard Mark B (15 x 15) fuel assemblies are being irradiated in Duke Power Company's Oconee Unit 1 reactor under a research and development program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. Valuable experimental data on fuel performance characteristics at burnups of > 40,000 MWd/mtU will be obtained from these assemblies. This information, at a duty approximately 20% greater than that achieved by typical discharged assemblies, will be used to qualify standard Mark B fuel assemblies for extended burnups. Efforts during this period included fuel cycle design and reload licensing of Oconee 1 for cycle 5, in which the assemblies are being irradiated, and nondestructive examination of the assemblies during the refueling outage between cycles 4 and 5. The Oconee 1 cycle 5 startup tests proceeded in a routine manner, and the reactor has operated with a 92% capacity factor since completion of power escalation testing on November 10, 1978. Irradiation of the fuel assemblies is currently in progress

  16. Analysis of Fresh Fuel Critical Experiments Appropriate for Burnup Credit Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The ANS/ANS-8.1 standard requires that calculational methods used in determining criticality safety limits for applications outside reactors be validated by comparison with appropriate critical experiments. This report provides a detailed description of 34 fresh fuel critical experiments and their analyses using the SCALE-4.2 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. The 34 critical experiments were selected based on geometry, material, and neutron interaction characteristics that are applicable to a transportation cask loaded with pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel. These 34 experiments are a representative subset of a much larger data base of low-enriched uranium and mixed-oxide critical experiments. A statistical approach is described and used to obtain an estimate of the bias and uncertainty in the calculational methods and to predict a confidence limit for a calculated neutron multiplication factor. The SCALE-4.2 results for a superset of approximately 100 criticals are included in uncertainty analyses, but descriptions of the individual criticals are not included

  17. Phenomena and parameters important to burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.V.; Dehart, M.D.; Wagner, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, a significant number of studies have been directed at understanding the phenomena and parameters important to implementation of burnup credit in out-of-reactor applications involving pressurized-water- reactor (PWR) spent fuel. The efforts directed at burnup credit involving boiling-water-reactor (BWR) spent fuel have been more limited. This paper reviews the knowledge and experience gained from work performed in the United States and other countries in the study of burnup credit. Relevant physics and analysis phenomenon are identified, and an assessment of their importance to burnup credit implementation for transport and dry cask storage is given. (author)

  18. Reactors as a source of antineutrinos: the effect of fuel loading and burnup for mixed oxide fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel; Erickson, Anna

    2016-01-01

    In a conventional light water reactor loaded with a range of uranium and plutonium-based fuel mixtures, the variation in antineutrino production over the cycle reflects both the initial core fissile inventory and its evolution. Under the assumption of constant thermal power, we calculate the rate at which antineutrinos are emitted from variously fueled cores, and the evolution of that rate as measured by a representative ton-scale antineutrino detector. We find that antineutrino flux decrease...

  19. Burnup degree measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, Tatsuo.

    1994-01-01

    A fixing stand on which a nuclear fuel support and a detector guide support stand are disposed is placed at a predetermined position in a fuel storage pool. Spent nuclear fuels stored in the pool are set in the nuclear fuel support. A closed end of a detector guide tube is secured to the detector guide support stand. The radiation detector is inserted to the detector guide tube, and it is disposed at a predetermined position near the nuclear fuel support. Radiation detection signals detected by the radiation detector are sent to a measuring device for measuring a burnup degree of spent nuclear fuels disposed to the outside of the pool by way of cables. Since the radiation detector is placed near the spent nuclear fuels only upon measurement of the burnup degree, radiation injuries of the radiation detector and the cables are reduced. Further, since the radiation detector and the cables are kept from contact with pool water, radiation decontamination upon maintenance and inspection is not necessary, to facilitate a calibration operation. (I.N.)

  20. Preliminary Content Evaluation of the North Anna High Burn-Up Sister Fuel Rod Segments for Transportation in the 10-160B and NAC-LWT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) Program has transported high-burnup nuclear sister fuel rods from a commercial nuclear power plant for purposes of evaluation and testing. The evaluation and testing of high-burnup used nuclear fuel is integral to DOE initiatives to collect information useful in determining the integrity of fuel cladding for future safe transportation of the fuel, and for determining the effects of aging, on the integrity of UNF subjected to extended storage and subsequent transportation. The UFDC Program, in collaboration with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the commercial nuclear industry, has obtained individual used nuclear fuel rods for testing. The rods have been received at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for both separate effects testing (SET) and small-scale testing (SST). To meet the research objectives, testing on multiple 6 inch fuel rod pins cut from the rods at ORNL will be performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Up to 10 rod equivalents will be shipped. Options were evaluated for multiple shipments using the 10-160B (based on 4.5 rod equivalents) and a single shipment using the NAC-LWT. Based on the original INL/Virginia Power transfer agreement, the rods are assumed to 152 inches in length with a 0.374-inch diameter. This report provides a preliminary content evaluation for use of the 10-160B and NAC-LWT for transporting those fuel rod pins from ORNL to PNNL. This report documents the acceptability of using these packagings to transport the fuel segments from ORNL to PNNL based on the following evaluations: enrichment, A2 evaluation, Pu-239 FGE evaluation, heat load, shielding (both gamma and neutron), and content weight/structural evaluation.

  1. Fuel lattice design in a boiling water reactor using a knowledge-based automation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung, Wu-Hsiung; Lee, Tien-Tso; Kuo, Weng-Sheng; Yaur, Shung-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An automation system was developed for the fuel lattice radial design of BWRs. • An enrichment group peaking equalizing method is applied to optimize the design. • Several heuristic rules and restrictions are incorporated to facilitate the design. • The CPU time for the system to design a 10x10 lattice was less than 1.2 h. • The beginning-of-life LPF was improved from 1.319 to 1.272 for one of the cases. - Abstract: A knowledge-based fuel lattice design automation system for BWRs is developed and applied to the design of 10 × 10 fuel lattices. The knowledge implemented in this fuel lattice design automation system includes the determination of gadolinium fuel pin location, the determination of fuel pin enrichment and enrichment distribution. The optimization process starts by determining the gadolinium distribution based on the pin power distribution of a flat enrichment lattice and some heuristic rules. Next, a pin power distribution flattening and an enrichment grouping process are introduced to determine the enrichment of each fuel pin enrichment type and the initial enrichment distribution of a fuel lattice design. Finally, enrichment group peaking equalizing processes are performed to achieve lower lattice peaking. Several fuel lattice design constraints are also incorporated in the automation system such that the system can accomplish a design which meets the requirements of practical use. Depending on the axial position of the lattice, a different method is applied in the design of the fuel lattice. Two typical fuel lattices with U 235 enrichment of 4.471% and 4.386% were taken as references. Application of the method demonstrates that improved lattice designs can be achieved through the enrichment grouping and the enrichment group peaking equalizing method. It takes about 11 min and 1 h 11 min of CPU time for the automation system to accomplish two design cases on an HP-8000 workstation, including the execution of CASMO-4 lattice

  2. Determination of Fission Gas Inclusion Pressures in High Burnup Nuclear Fuel using Laser Ablation ICP-MS combined with SEM/EPMA and Optical Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, Matthias I.; Guenther-Leopold, Ines; Kivel, Niko; Restani, Renato [Laboratory for Materials Behavior, Nuclear Energy and Safety, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH-5232 (Switzerland); Guillong, Marcel [Institute for Isotope Geology/Mineralogic Elements, ETH Zuerich, CH-8092 (Switzerland); Izmer, Andrei [Environmental and Resource Studies, Trent University, Peterborough, K9J 7B8 (Canada); Hellwig, Christian [Nuclear Technology Department, Nordostschweizerische Kraftwerke AG (NOK), Baden, CH-5401 (Switzerland); Guenther, Detlef [Laboratory for Inorganic Chemistry, Trace Elements and Microanalysis Group, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    In approximately 20% of all fissions at least one of the fission products is gaseous. These are mainly xenon and krypton isotopes contributing up to 90% by the xenon isotopes. Upon reaching a burn-up of 60 - 75 GWd/tHM a so called High Burnup Structure (HBS) is formed in the cooler rim of the fuel. In this region a depletion of the noble fission gases (FG) in the matrix and an enrichment of FG in {mu}m-sized pores can be observed. Recent calculations show that in these pores the pressure at room temperature can be as large as 30 MPa. The knowledge of the FG pressure in pores is important to understand the high burn-up fuel behavior under accident conditions (i.e. RIA or LOCA). With analytical methods routinely used for the characterization of solid samples, i.e. Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), the quantification of gaseous inclusions is very difficult to almost impossible. The combination of a laser ablation system (LA) with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) offers a powerful tool for quantification of the gaseous pore inventory. This method offers the advantages of high spatial resolution with laser spot sizes down to 10 {mu}m and low detection limits. By coupling with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the pore size distribution, EPMA for the FG inventory in the fuel matrix and optical microscopy for the LA-crater sizes, the pressures in the pores and porosity was calculated. As a first application of this calibration technique for gases, measurements were performed on pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel with a rod average of 105 GWd/tHM to determine the local FG pressure distribution. (authors)

  3. Impacts of the turbogenerator reactive operation in the nuclear fuel burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Helio Ricardo V. de; Martinez, Aquilino S.

    2002-01-01

    The parameterization of the losses in a turbogenerator in function of an operation with the electrical system reactive allowed to model in a simple and exact way the equations that define and they quantify the additional of nuclear potency that it should be generated by a reactor, in order to maintain the commitment with the national system operator, that is, the electric active power contracted. starting from this additional of nuclear power it was modeled the additional burn up of the fuel elements, as well as the numbers of effective days to full power wasted. it was promoted a safety analysis and some limitations due to the reactive operation of the electrical system. inside of this context it was made a financial evaluation in which we ask some questions to companies and government organs in order to define what losses are acceptable and also the reason why we don't use other technician resources such as: increase of the electrical mesh, electrical power injection in strategic points, capacitor banks and increase of the number the electrical plants. (author)

  4. Inspection device for fuel rod restraint by support lattice of fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Isao; Senga, Masatoshi; Kada, Mitoshi.

    1991-01-01

    An inspection operation section for disposing fuel assembly vertically at predetermined positions, a control section wired therewith, a moving operation section movable in the direction of X, Y and Z axes by a driving signal sent from the control section are disposed to an inspection section main body. A downward bore scope and a upward bore scope, each of such a size as can be inserted to the gaps between the fuel rods, are disposed while opposing to each other for observing the inside of each of cells from above and below in support lattices of fuel assemblies. High performance television cameras are disposed to each of bore scopes to supply images to monitoring televisions in the control section. Thus, a displacing operation section of the inspection operation section is automatically controlled three-dimensionally, the downward bore scope and the upward bore scope are integrally intruded to the inside of the gaps between the predetermined fuel rods from a required height and stopped at a predetermined position, mounted automatically to a required cell of the support lattice to efficiently observe and inspect the fuel rod restraint. (N.H.)

  5. Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety Benchmark-Phase II-E. Impact of Isotopic Inventory Changes due to Control Rod Insertions on Reactivity and the End Effect in PWR UO2 Fuel Assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuber, Jens Christian; Tippl, Wolfgang; Hemptinne, Gwendoline de; Maes, Philippe; Ranta-aho, Anssu; Peneliau, Yannick; Jutier, Ludyvine; Tardy, Marcel; Reiche, Ingo; Kroeger, Helge; Nakata, Tetsuo; Armishaw, Malcom; Miller, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The report describes the final results of the Phase II-E Burn-up Credit Criticality Benchmark conducted by the Expert Group on Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety. The objective of Phase II of the Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety programme is to study the impact of axial burn-up profiles of PWR UO 2 spent fuel assemblies on the reactivity of PWR UO 2 spent fuel assembly configurations. The objective of the Phase II-E benchmark was to study the impact of changes on the spent nuclear fuel isotopic composition due to control rod insertion during depletion on the reactivity and the end effect of spent fuel assemblies with realistic axial burn-up profiles for different control rod insertion depths ranging from 0 cm (no insertion) to full insertion (i.e. to the case that the fuel assemblies were exposed to control rod insertion over their full active length). For this purpose two axial burn-up profiles have been extracted from an AREVA-NP-GmbH-owned 17x17-(24+1) PWR UO 2 spent fuel assembly burn-up profile database. One profile has an average burn-up of 30 MWd/kg U, the other profile is related to an average burn-up of 50 MWd/kg U. Two profiles with different average burn-up values were selected because the shape of the burn-up profile is affected by the average burn-up and the end effect depends on the average burn-up of the fuel. The Phase II-E benchmark exercise complements the Phase II-C and Phase II-D benchmark exercises. In Phase II-D different irradiation histories were analysed using different control rod insertion histories during depletion as well as irradiation histories without control rod insertion. But in all the histories analysed a uniform distribution of the burn-up and hence a uniform distribution of the isotopic composition were assumed; and in all the histories including any usage of control rods full insertion of the control rods was assumed. In Phase II-C the impact of the asymmetry of axial burn-up profiles on the reactivity and the end effect of

  6. Determination of curie content and 134/137cesium ratios by gamma spectroscopy of high burnup plutonium-aluminum fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggard, D.L.; Tanner, J.E.

    1997-06-01

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) gamma spectroscopy techniques were used to measure 134/137 Cs ratios on nine PuAl Mark 42 fuel assemblies. The purpose of the ratio measurement was to confirm theoretical burnup calculations. 134/137 Cs ratios were determined from the measured activity based on corrected net peak area counts for the 605 keV peak from 134 Cs and the 662 keV peak from 137 Cs/ 137m Ba. Assembly No. 2 134/137 Cs ratio measured on 4-15-92 was 0.19. The measured 134/137 Cs ratio was decay corrected to be 2.11 on 8-1-84 based on the half lives of 134 Cs and 137 Cs. The measured 134/137 Cs ratio range was 1.90--2.14 for all nine assemblies. These measured values compare to a theoretical ratio of 1.7 on 8-1-84 determined by burnup calculations. Total cesium curie content was also requested and determined using the NDA direct measurements. Gamma spectral data were measured on the nine sectioned Mark 42 fuel assemblies. Measured cesium curie content, decay corrected to 8-1-84, ranged from 18170--24480 curies of 134 Cs and 8620--11646 curies of 137 Cs. Theoretical cesium curie content of 8-1-84 was 15200 curies 134 Cs and 8973 curies 137 Cs. Direct assay cesium ratio is 12% to 26% higher than the predicted ratio of 1.7. The measured 134 Cs data indicate between 20%--61% more activity than that predicted by the burnup code, whereas the measured 137 Cs activity is between 4% less to 30% more than the predicted activity. This information may be used to address issues concerning criticality safety, storage, and shipping of this type of material

  7. Determination of curie content and {sup 134/137}cesium ratios by gamma spectroscopy of high burnup plutonium-aluminum fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggard, D.L.; Tanner, J.E.

    1997-06-01

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) gamma spectroscopy techniques were used to measure {sup 134/137}Cs ratios on nine PuAl Mark 42 fuel assemblies. The purpose of the ratio measurement was to confirm theoretical burnup calculations. {sup 134/137}Cs ratios were determined from the measured activity based on corrected net peak area counts for the 605 keV peak from {sup 134}Cs and the 662 keV peak from {sup 137}Cs/{sup 137m}Ba. Assembly No. 2 {sup 134/137}Cs ratio measured on 4-15-92 was 0.19. The measured {sup 134/137}Cs ratio was decay corrected to be 2.11 on 8-1-84 based on the half lives of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs. The measured {sup 134/137}Cs ratio range was 1.90--2.14 for all nine assemblies. These measured values compare to a theoretical ratio of 1.7 on 8-1-84 determined by burnup calculations. Total cesium curie content was also requested and determined using the NDA direct measurements. Gamma spectral data were measured on the nine sectioned Mark 42 fuel assemblies. Measured cesium curie content, decay corrected to 8-1-84, ranged from 18170--24480 curies of {sup 134}Cs and 8620--11646 curies of {sup 137}Cs. Theoretical cesium curie content of 8-1-84 was 15200 curies {sup 134}Cs and 8973 curies {sup 137}Cs. Direct assay cesium ratio is 12% to 26% higher than the predicted ratio of 1.7. The measured {sup 134}Cs data indicate between 20%--61% more activity than that predicted by the burnup code, whereas the measured {sup 137}Cs activity is between 4% less to 30% more than the predicted activity. This information may be used to address issues concerning criticality safety, storage, and shipping of this type of material.

  8. Estimation of average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors by using the 134Cs/137Cs ratio method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, T.; Sato, S.; Yamamoto, A.

    2012-01-01

    Average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors is estimated, using the 134 Cs/ 137 Cs ratio method for measured radioactivities of 134 Cs and 137 Cs in contaminated soils within the range of 100 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants. As a result, the measured 134 Cs/ 137 Cs ratio from the contaminated soil is 0.996±0.07 as of March 11, 2011. Based on the 134 Cs/ 137 Cs ratio method, the estimated burnup of damaged fuels is approximately 17.2±1.5 [GWd/tHM]. It is noted that the numerical results of various calculation codes (SRAC2006/PIJ, SCALE6.0/TRITON, and MVP-BURN) are almost the same evaluation values of 134 Cs/ 137 Cs ratio with same evaluated nuclear data library (ENDF-B/VII.0). The void fraction effect in depletion calculation has a major impact on 134 Cs/ 137 Cs ratio compared with the differences between JENDL-4.0 and ENDF-B/VII.0. (authors)

  9. Measurement of fission gas release, internal pressure and cladding creep rate in the fuel pins of PHWR bundle of normal discharge burnup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, U. K.; Sah, D. N.; Rath, B. N.; Anantharaman, S.

    2009-08-01

    Fuel pins of a Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) fuel bundle discharged from Narora Atomic Power Station unit #1 after attaining a fuel burnup of 7528 MWd/tU have been subjected to two types of studies, namely (i) puncture test to estimate extent of fission gas release and internal pressure in the fuel pin and (ii) localized heating of the irradiated fuel pin to measure the creep rate of the cladding in temperature range 800 °C-900 °C. The fission gas release in the fuel pins from the outer ring of the bundle was found to be about 8%. However, only marginal release was found in fuel pins from the middle ring and the central fuel pin. The internal gas pressure in the outer fuel pin was measured to be 0.55 ± 0.05 MPa at room temperature. In-cell isothermal heating of a small portion of the outer fuel pins was carried out at 800 °C, 850 °C and 900 °C for 10 min and the increase in diameter of the fuel pin was measured after heat treatment. Creep rates of the cladding obtained from the measurement of the diameter change of the cladding due to heating at 800 °C, 850 °C and 900 °C were found respectively to be 2.4 × 10 -5 s -1, 24.6 × 10 -5 s -1 and 45.6 × 10 -5 s -1.

  10. Core burn-up calculation method of JRR-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Kiyonobu

    2007-01-01

    SRAC code system is utilized for core burn-up calculation of JRR-3. SRAC code system includes calculation modules such as PIJ, PIJBURN, ANISN and CITATION for making effective cross section and calculation modules such as COREBN and HIST for core burn-up calculation. As for calculation method for JRR-3, PIJBURN (Cell burn-up calculation module) is used for making effective cross section of fuel region at each burn-up step. PIJ, ANISN and CITATION are used for making effective cross section of non-fuel region. COREBN and HIST is used for core burn-up calculation and fuel management. This paper presents details of NRR-3 core burn-up calculation. FNCA Participating countries are expected to carry out core burn-up calculation of domestic research reactor by SRAC code system by utilizing the information of this paper. (author)

  11. Local atomic structure of Pd and Ag in the SiC containment layer of TRISO fuel particles fissioned to 20% burn-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Rachel L.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Velázquez, Daniel; Hunn, John D.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Terry, Jeff

    2018-03-01

    The structure and speciation of fission products within the SiC barrier layer of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles irradiated to 19.6% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) burnup in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was investigated. As-irradiated fuel particles, as well as those subjected to simulated accident scenarios, were examined. The TRISO particles were characterized using synchrotron X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) at the Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MRCAT) beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The TRISO particles were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program and sent to the ATR for irradiation. XAFS measurements on the palladium and silver K-edges were collected using the MRCAT undulator beamline. Analysis of the Pd edge indicated the formation of palladium silicides of the form PdxSi (2 ≤ x ≤ 3). In contrast, Ag was found to be metallic within the SiC shell safety tested to 1700 °C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first result demonstrating metallic bonding of silver from fissioned samples. Knowledge of these reaction pathways will allow for better simulations of radionuclide transport in the various coating layers of TRISO fuels for next generation nuclear reactors. They may also suggest different ways to modify TRISO particles to improve their fuel performance and to mitigate potential fission product release under both normal operation and accident conditions.

  12. Approaches to modeling of high burn-up structure and analysis of its effects on the behaviour of light water reactor fuels in the START-3 fuel performance code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostov, Grigori; Novikov, Vladimir; Medvedev, Anatoli; Bogatyr, Serguey

    2005-01-01

    An advanced model GRSWEL-A for fission gas behavior and micro-structural evolutions in Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels was developed for and embedded in the START-3 fuel performance code. This paper represents the physical basis and verification of the model with emphasis on analysis of High Burn-up Structure (HBS), which is generally ascribed to a so-called rim-layer of high burn-up fuel pellets. Specifically, the issues of microscopic polygonization, loss of matrix fission gas, growth of fuel porosity and fission gas release are highlighted. The effects of HBS on total fission gas release, temperature distribution in the pellet, pellet swelling and permanent strain of the cladding are considered in the appropriate section of the paper by means of comparative and sensitivity analysis with the use of both modeling and available experimental data. In all the cases, an accounting for the present effects is found to be an important integral part of thorough analysis of LWR fuel behavior. Aside from the description of current capabilities of modeling, some priority directions of further improvement are outlined. (author)

  13. Analyses of PWR spent fuel composition using SCALE and SWAT code systems to find correction factors for criticality safety applications adopting burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hee Sung; Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki; Okuno, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yasushi

    2001-01-01

    The isotopic composition calculations were performed for 26 spent fuel samples from the Obrigheim PWR reactor and 55 spent fuel samples from 7 PWR reactors using the SAS2H module of the SCALE4.4 code system with 27, 44 and 238 group cross-section libraries and the SWAT code system with the 107 group cross-section library. For the analyses of samples from the Obrigheim PWR reactor, geometrical models were constructed for each of SCALE4.4/SAS2H and SWAT. For the analyses of samples from 7 PWR reactors, the geometrical model already adopted in the SCALE/SAS2H was directly converted to the model of SWAT. The four kinds of calculation results were compared with the measured data. For convenience, the ratio of the measured to calculated values was used as a parameter. When the ratio is less than unity, the calculation overestimates the measurement, and the ratio becomes closer to unity, they have a better agreement. For many important nuclides for burnup credit criticality safety evaluation, the four methods applied in this study showed good coincidence with measurements in general. More precise observations showed, however: (1) Less unity ratios were found for Pu-239 and -241 for selected 16 samples out of the 26 samples from the Obrigheim reactor (10 samples were deselected because their burnups were measured with Cs-137 non-destructive method, less reliable than Nd-148 method the rest 16 samples were measured with); (2) Larger than unity ratios were found for Am-241 and Cm-242 for both the 16 and 55 samples; (3) Larger than unity ratios were found for Sm-149 for the 55 samples; (4) SWAT was generally accompanied by larger ratios than those of SAS2H with some exceptions. Based on the measured-to-calculated ratios for 71 samples of a combined set in which 16 selected samples and 55 samples were included, the correction factors that should be multiplied to the calculated isotopic compositions were generated for a conservative estimate of the neutron multiplication factor

  14. The Cs2MoO4 / Na reaction: application to the fuel / sodium interaction during a high burnup clad failure in a FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tete, F.

    1999-01-01

    The use of sodium as coolant in fast neutron reactors (FBRs) has led to analyze the effects of an accidental input of sodium inside a fuel rod with a tightness defect. This work presents the study of the fuel/sodium interaction, in particular in high burnup conditions, and the study of the equilibrium of the seal/oxide/clad (SOC) / Na system using a simplified model: the Cs 2 MoO 4 / Na reaction, cesium molybdate being the main SOC constituent. In a first step, a bibliographic study about clad failure modeling is presented. It shows the main phenomena controlling the behaviour of a broken low burnup rod and makes a status of the present day knowledge about the consequences of Na penetration in the SOC parts, at high burnup. Then an experimental, thermodynamical and structural study is carried out on the Cs 2 MoO 4 compound in order to determine its physico-chemical properties and its behaviour without the presence of Na. The fundamental study of the compatibility of the Cs 2 MoO 4 / Na system is performed, first theoretically using a classical thermodynamic approach, and then experimentally using the differential thermal analysis and the scanning electron microscopy. The hypothesis of Cs substitution by Na, commonly accepted in the past, is rejected and replaced by the formation of cesium, sodium and molybdenum oxides as indicated by the thermodynamical results (reaction temperature and enthalpy variation). Finally, the study of the Cs 2 MoO 4 / Na system in the concrete case of the nuclear fuel is performed by the direct observation of the SOC / Na reaction zone on a rod broken in experimental reactor and using the Sage thermochemical calculation software. This work proposes, first, some new thermodynamical information, and second, confirms the results previously obtained and gives some elements about the behaviour of other fission products with respect to sodium, like the formation of sodium telluride Na 2 Te and sodium iodides NaI and Na 2 I 2 . (J.S.)

  15. ZZ PWR-AXBUPRO-GKN, Measured Axial Burnup Profiles, NPP Neckarewstheim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuber, Jens-Christian; Lamprecht, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Description or function: PWR-AXBUPRO-GKN12 contains Axial Burnup Shapes released by Siemens AG Power Generation Group. It contains data sets relative to following NPP and initial enrichment: - NPP Neckarwestheim 1, Fuel assemblies with an initial enrichment of 3.5 wt.-% 235-U; - NPP Neckarwestheim 2, Fuel assemblies with an initial enrichment of 3.5 wt.-% 235-U; - NPP Neckarwestheim 2, Fuel assemblies with an initial enrichment of 3.8 wt.-% 235-U; - NPP Neckarwestheim 2, Fuel assemblies with an initial enrichment of 4.0 wt.-% 235-U. In each of these files the axial shapes are listed one after the other. Each shape is characterised by: - the number of the cycle; - the number of the fuel assembly. - axial burnup shape characteristics: - height (in centimeter) of the nodes with respect to the active length of the fuel assemblies normalized to the cold, unirradiated state. - the nodal burnup (in MWd/kg U). - fuel assembly design data as well as core geometry and operating data pertinent to depletion calculations: NPP Neckarwestheim 1 (GKN1) - (square pitch lattice 15X15 - thermal Power 2497 MW)thermal Power 2497 MW); More than 700 EOC axial shapes from cycle 18 up. From cycle 18 to cycle 20 a change from an Out-In-Loading to an In-Out-Loading has taken place. Fuel assemblies up to number 1093 have spacer grids made of Inconel, whereas all the fuel assemblies from number 1094 up have spacer grids made of Zircaloy. Discharge burnups range from: 9.7 to 52.8 MWd/kg. NPP Neckarwestheim 2 (GKN2) - (square pitch lattice 18X18 - thermal Power 3850 MW) more than 500 EOC axial shapes from cycle 5 up: - More than 170 shapes for an initial fuel enrichment of 3.5 wt.-% 235-U, discharge burnup ranges from 16.3 to 44.4 MWd/kg; - more than 170 shapes for an initial fuel enrichment of 3.8 wt.-% 235-U, discharge burnup ranges from 14.0 to 52.8 MWd/kg; - more than 180 shapes for an initial fuel enrichment of 4.0 wt.-% 235-U. discharge burnup ranges from 15.5 to 48.9 MWd/kg. PWR AXBUPRO

  16. Minimizing the power peaking factor of fuel lattices using factors of group for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, J. R.; Longoria, L. C.; De la Cruz, E.; Arredondo, C.

    2010-10-01

    A method to design the distribution and composition of nuclear fuel for the array of fuel rods in a lattice for BWRs is presented in this work. The aim of the method is to minimize the power peaking factor until an adequate value is reached. Also, this method uses a few calculations of lattice. The method is based on the classification of the fuel rods in two groups: the group of fuel rods with the higher power level (group pow ), and the other group of fuel rods (no-group pow ). The enrichment of 235 U of each fuel rod of the group pow is multiplied by a factor called group fissile factor (f group ), and the enrichment of 235 U of each fuel rod of the no-group pow is multiplied by a factor called no-group fissile factor (f no-group ). These factors are fitted so that the power peaking factor is minimized. The importance of the method with the use of these two factors is applied to the design of a fuel lattice for BWRs as the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant. The calculations of lattice are made by means of the Helios code. (Author)

  17. Validation of integrated burnup code system SWAT2 by the analyses of isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, K.; Mochizuki, H.; Okuno, H.; Miyoshi, Y.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides validation results of SWAT2, the revised version of SWAT, which is a code system combining point burnup code ORIGEN2 and continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP, by the analysis of post irradiation examinations (PIEs). Some isotopes show differences of calculation results between SWAT and SWAT2. However, generally, the differences are smaller than the error of PIE analysis that was reported in previous SWAT validation activity, and improved results are obtained for several important fission product nuclides. This study also includes comparison between an assembly and a single pin cell geometry models. (authors)

  18. Long-term radiotoxicity, in the framework of the ICRP-48, of high level wastes and spent fuels produced by light water reactors: impact of burn-up extension and of the use of mixed oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elayi, A.G.; Schapira, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The time evolution of radiotoxicities of spent fuels and high-level wastes have been calculated up to 10 7 years, in the framework of the recent I.C.R.P.-48 guideline, in which the ratio dose/ingested-activity has been divided by 10 for Np, multiplied by 10 for Pu and by 2 for Am, Cm and Cf, with respect to the previous I.C.R.P.-30 values. In the case of burn-up extension of the standard 33,000 MWd/t enriched uranium fuel, and in the case of plutonium recycle in light-water reactors, one shows that the spent fuel radiotoxicity is now dominated by its plutonium content, most of the time up to about 10 5 years. Possible incineration effects are discussed within these two fuel cycle options

  19. Recommendations for Addressing Axial Burnup in the PWR Burnup Credit Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2002-10-23

    This report presents studies performed to support the development of a technically justifiable approach for addressing the axial-burnup distribution in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety analyses. The effect of the axial-burnup distribution on reactivity and proposed approaches for addressing the axial-burnup distribution are briefly reviewed. A publicly available database of profiles is examined in detail to identify profiles that maximize the neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, assess its adequacy for PWR burnup credit analyses, and investigate the existence of trends with fuel type and/or reactor operations. A statistical evaluation of the k{sub eff} values associated with the profiles in the axial-burnup-profile database was performed, and the most reactive (bounding) profiles were identified as statistical outliers. The impact of these bounding profiles on k{sub eff} is quantified for a high-density burnup credit cask. Analyses are also presented to quantify the potential reactivity consequence of loading assemblies with axial-burnup profiles that are not bounded by the database. The report concludes with a discussion on the issues for consideration and recommendations for addressing axial burnup in criticality safety analyses using burnup credit for dry cask storage and transportation.

  20. Modelling of thermal mechanical behaviour of high burn-Up VVER fuel at power transients with special emphasis on the impact of fission gas induced swelling of fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, V.; Medvedev, A.; Khvostov, G.; Bogatyr, S.; Kuzetsov, V.; Korystin, L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the modelling of unsteady state mechanical and thermo-physical behaviour of high burn-up VVER fuel at a power ramp. The contribution of the processes related to the kinetics of fission gas to the consequences of pellet-clad mechanical interaction is analysed by the example of integral VVER-440 rod 9 from the R7 experimental series, with a pellet burn-up in the active part at around 60 MWd/kgU. This fuel rod incurred ramp testing with a ramp value ΔW 1 ∼ 250 W/cm in the MIR research reactor. The experimentally revealed residual deformation of the clad by 30-40 microns in the 'hottest' portion of the rod, reaching a maximum linear power of up to 430 W/cm, is numerically justified on the basis of accounting for the unsteady state swelling and additional degradation of fuel thermal conductivity due to temperature-induced formation and development of gaseous porosity within the grains and on the grain boundaries. The good prediction capability of the START-3 code, coupled with the advanced model of fission gas related processes, with regard to the important mechanical (residual deformation of clad, pellet-clad gap size, central hole filling), thermal physical (fission gas release) and micro-structural (profiles of intra-granular concentration of the retained fission gas and fuel porosity across a pellet) consequences of the R7 test is shown. (authors)

  1. Proceedings of the twenty-fourth water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 1: Plenary session; High burnup fuel; Containment and structural aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteleone, S.

    1997-01-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Fourth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, maryland, October 21--23, 1996. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, Norway, Russia and United Kingdom. This first volume is divided into 3 sections: plenary session; high burnup fuel; and containment and structural aging. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  2. Proceedings of the twenty-fourth water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 1: Plenary session; High burnup fuel; Containment and structural aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Fourth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, maryland, October 21--23, 1996. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, Norway, Russia and United Kingdom. This first volume is divided into 3 sections: plenary session; high burnup fuel; and containment and structural aging. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. Mechanical fracture study of nuclear fuel high burn-up structure (HBS or RIM) during annealing test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcet, M.

    2010-01-01

    The ceramics used in Power Water Reactors ar made of uranium dioxide. Irradiated at high Burn-up, they present a characteristic zone in periphery called High Burn-Up Structure or RIM zone with micrometer pores containing over-pressurized gas bubbles. Annealing texts simulating incidental or accidental reactor situations, a strong release of the RIM zone is observed. We have considered that the fission gas release mechanism is the mechanical fracture of the RIM grain boundaries. The we have compared the different types of mechanical stress applied to a grain boundary with the fracture stress of the oxide. The first stress is due to RIM over-pressurized gas bubbles, these bubbles apply a stress field determined at a microscopic level i.e. at the gas bubbles scale and its local environment. The second stress is generated by the Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction (PCMI). This stress applies a stress field on a microscopic scale i.e. at the RIM zone and its overall environment. The last stress is occurred by a strain due to the RIM structural evolution during annealing test. The experimental results show that microscopic and macroscopic stress fields to do not explain the RIM grain boundary fracture during annealing test. The stresses induced by the RIM structural evolution as a function of the temperature is a possible mechanism to explain the overall mechanical behavior of the RIM zone during annealing test. (author)

  4. Comparison of square and hexagonal fuel lattices for high conversion PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotlyar, D.; Shwageraus, E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into fuel design choices of a PWR operating in a self sustainable Th- 233 U fuel cycle. Achieving such self-sustainable with respect to fissile material fuel cycle would practically eliminate concerns over nuclear fuel supply hundreds of years into the future. Moreover, utilization of light water reactor technology and its associated vast experience would allow faster deployment of such fuel cycle without immediate need for development of fast reactor technology, which tends to be more complex and costly. In order to evaluate feasibility of this concept, two types of fuel assembly lattices were considered: square and hexagonal. The hexagonal lattice may offer some advantages over the square one. For example, the fertile blanket fuel can be packed more tightly reducing the blanket volume fraction in the core and potentially allowing to achieve higher core average power density. Furthermore, hexagonal lattice may allow more uniform leakage of neutrons from fissile to fertile regions and therefore more uniform neutron captures in thorium blanket. The calculations were carried out with Monte-Carlo based BGCore system, which includes neutronic, fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic modules. The results were compared to those obtained from Serpent Monte-Carlo code and deterministic fuel assembly transport code BOXER. One of the major design challenges associated with the square seed-blanket concept is high power peaking due to the high concentration of fissile material in the seed region. In order to explore feasibility of the studied designs, the calculations were extended to include 3D fuel assembly analysis with thermal-hydraulic feedback. The coupled neutronic - thermal-hydraulic calculations were performed with BGCore code system. The analysis showed that both hexagonal and square seed-blanket fuel assembly designs have a potential of achieving net breeding. While no major neutronic advantages were observed for either fuel

  5. Issues for effective implementation of burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.V.; Wagner, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In the United States, burnup credit has been used in the criticality safety evaluation for storage pools at pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and considerable work has been performed to lay the foundation for use of burnup credit in dry storage and transport cask applications and permanent disposal applications. Many of the technical issues related to the basic physics phenomena and parameters of importance are similar in each of these applications. However, the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States has never been fully integrated and the implementation of burnup credit to each of these applications is dependent somewhat on the specific safety bases developed over the history of each operational area. This paper will briefly review the implementation status of burnup credit for each application area and explore some of the remaining issues associated with effective implementation of burnup credit. (author)

  6. Impact of neutron thermal scattering laws on the burn-up analysis of supercritical LWR's fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, Andrea

    2011-10-15

    . The third, most naive option is called the ''free gas approximation''. It is the goal of this work to make an estimate of the criticality calculations' inaccuracy due to the inadequate employed physical model and to determine which one of the available models can be the best replacement. The accuracy of criticality calculations referring to the HPLWR is a problem that had already been raised by Waata in 2006. In her Ph.D. thesis Waata reports having carried out MCNP runs referring to an HPLWR fuel element employing the free gas approximation. In her thesis Waata explicitly sifts through the factors that can affect her MCNP runs' accuracy, but leaves the inappropriate thermal treatment completely out. In this work, the inaccuracy of the criticality calculations has been investigated carrying out sets of similar burn-up calculations differing from each other only in the applied thermal cross section sets. The widest discrepancies were detected between the results obtained applying the free gas model and those obtained applying the molecular models. This, in conjunction with the fact that the free gas model does not even keep in count the molecular structure of H{sub 2}O suggest to discard it and to focus the investigation on the vapour and liquid models. Dr. J. Marti, from the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain registered the generalized frequency distributions obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations of 216 molecules of H{sub 2}O in 10 simulated supercritical states and published in an article (1999) the frequencies of the three characteristic distribution peaks for each simulated state, in numerical format. A confrontation with the corresponding peaks from Bernnat's available frequency distributions for liquid water and vapour revealed the peaks of the latter to be closest to the supercritical water ones in nearly all cases. Hence the inference that thermal cross section sets for vapour are for the time

  7. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, A.; Vo, D.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Tobin, S. J.; Trellue, H.; Vaccaro, S.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)-Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI-SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity's behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  8. Optimum burnup of BAEC TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyric, Zoairia Idris; Mahmood, Mohammad Sayem; Motalab, Mohammad Abdul; Khan, Jahirul Haque

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Optimum loading scheme for BAEC TRIGA core is out-to-in loading with 10 fuels/cycle starting with 5 for the first reload. ► The discharge burnup ranges from 17% to 24% of U235 per fuel element for full power (3 MW) operation. ► Optimum extension of operating core life is 100 MWD per reload cycle. - Abstract: The TRIGA Mark II research reactor of BAEC (Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission) has been operating since 1986 without any reshuffling or reloading yet. Optimum fuel burnup strategy has been investigated for the present BAEC TRIGA core, where three out-to-in loading schemes have been inspected in terms of core life extension, burnup economy and safety. In considering different schemes of fuel loading, optimization has been searched by only varying the number of fuels discharged and loaded. A cost function has been defined and evaluated based on the calculated core life and fuel load and discharge. The optimum loading scheme has been identified for the TRIGA core, the outside-to-inside fuel loading with ten fuels for each cycle starting with five fuels for the first reload. The discharge burnup has been found ranging from 17% to 24% of U235 per fuel element and optimum extension of core operating life is 100 MWD for each loading cycle. This study will contribute to the in-core fuel management of TRIGA reactor

  9. Feasibility assessment of burnup credit in the criticality analysis of shipping casks with boiling water reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    The possible allowance of reactivity credit for the exposure history, of power reactor fuel has spurred interest because of the potential of greatly reduced risk and cost when applied to the design and certification of spent-fuel casks used for transportation and storage. Previous pressurized water reactor feasibility assessments are extended to boiling water reactor fuel

  10. Studies on validation possibilities for computational codes for criticality and burnup calculations of boiling water reactor fuel; Untersuchungen zu Validierungsmoeglichkeiten von Rechencodes fuer Kritikalitaets- und Abbrandrechnungen von Siedewasserreaktor-Brennstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, Matthais; Hannstein, Volker; Kilger, Robert; Sommer, Fabian; Stuke, Maik

    2017-06-15

    The Application of the method of Burn-up Credit on Boiling Water Reactor fuel is much more complex than in the case of Pressurized Water Reactors due to the increased heterogeneity and complexity of the fuel assemblies. Strongly varying enrichments, complex fuel assembly geometries, partial length fuel rods, and strong axial variations of the moderator density make the verification of conservative irradiation conditions difficult. In this Report, it was investigated whether it is possible to take into account the burn-up in criticality analyses for systems with irradiated Boiling Water Reactor fuel on the basis of freely available experimental data and by additionally applying stochastic methods. In order to achieve this goal, existing methods for stochastic analysis were adapted and further developed in order to being applicable to the specific conditions needed in Boiling Water Reactor analysis. The aim was to gain first insight whether a workable scheme for using burn-up credit in Boiling Water Reactor applications can be derived. Due to the fact that the different relevant quantities, like e.g. moderator density and the axial power profile, are strongly correlated, the GRS-tool SUnCISTT for Monte-Carlo uncertainty quantification was used in the analysis. This tool was coupled to a simplified, consistent model for the irradiation conditions. In contrast to conventional methods, this approach allows to simultaneously analyze all involved effects.

  11. Burnup credit issues in transportation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, M.C.; Sanders, T.L.; Seager, K.D.; Lake, W.H.

    1992-01-01

    Reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control during transportation and storage is referred to as burnup credit. This concept has attracted international interest and is being actively pursued in the United States in the development of a new generation of transport casks. An overview of the US experience in developing a methodology to implement burnup credit in an integrated approach to transport cask design is presented in this paper. Specifically, technical issues related to the analysis, validation and implementation of burnup credit are identified and discussed

  12. Burnup credit issues in transportation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, M.C.; Sanders, T.L.; Seager, K.D.; Lake, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    Reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control during transportation and storage is referred to as burnup credit. This concept has attracted international interest and is being actively pursued in the United States in the development of a new generation of transport casks. An overview of the U.S. experience in developing a methodology to implement burnup credit in an integrated approach to transport cask design is presented in this paper. Specifically, technical issues related to the analysis, validation and implementation of burnup credit are identified and discussed. (author)

  13. Comparison of square and hexagonal fuel lattices for high conversion PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotlyar, Dan; Shwageraus, Eugene [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2012-08-15

    This paper reports on an investigation into fuel design choices of a pressurized water reactor operating in a self-sustainable Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle. In order to evaluate feasibility of this concept, two types of fuel assembly lattices were considered: square and hexagonal. The hexagonal lattice may offer some advantages over the square one. For example, the fertile blanket fuel can be packed more tightly reducing the blanket volume fraction in the core and potentially allowing to achieve higher core average power density. The calculations were carried out with Monte-Carlo based BGCore code system and the results were compared to those obtained with Serpent Monte-Carlo code and deterministic transport code BOXER. One of the major design challenges associated with the SB concept is high power peaking due to the high concentration of fissile material in the seed region. The second objective of this work is to estimate the maximum achievable core power density by evaluation of limiting thermal hydraulic parameters. The analysis showed that both fuel assembly designs have a potential of achieving net breeding. Although hexagonal lattice was found to be somewhat more favorable because it allows achieving higher power density, while having breeding performance comparable to the square lattice case. (orig.)

  14. Burnup verification tests with the FORK measurement system-implementation for burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.I.

    1994-01-01

    Verification measurements may be used to help ensure nuclear criticality safety when burnup credit is applied to spent fuel transport and storage systems. The FORK system measures the passive neutron and gamma-ray emission from spent fuel assemblies while in the storage pool. It was designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards program and is well suited to verify burnup and cooling time records at commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) sites. This report deals with the application of the FORK system to burnup credit operations

  15. Stress intensity factor at the tip of cladding incipient crack in RIA-simulating experiments for high-burnup PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udagawa, Yutaka; Suzuki, Motoe; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Fuketa, Toyoshi

    2009-01-01

    RIA-simulating experiments for high-burnup PWR fuels have been performed in the NSRR, and the stress intensity factor K 1 at the tip of cladding incipient crack has been evaluated in order to investigate its validity as a PCMI failure threshold under RIA conditions. An incipient crack depth was determined by observation of metallographs. The maximum hydride-rim thickness in the cladding of the test fuel rod was regarded as the incipient crack depth in each test case. Hoop stress in the cladding periphery during the pulse power transient was calculated by the RANNS code. K 1 was calculated based on crack depth and hoop stress. According to the RANNS calculation, PCMI failure cases can be divided into two groups: failure in the elastic phase and failure in the plastic phase. In the former case, elastic deformation was predominant around the incipient crack at failure time. K 1 is available only in this case. In the latter, plastic deformation was predominant around the incipient crack at failure time. Failure in the elastic phase never occurred when K 1 was less than 17 MPa m 1/2 . For failure in the plastic phase, the plastic hoop strain of the cladding periphery at failure time clearly showed a tendency to decrease with incipient crack depth. The combination of K 1 , for failure in the elastic phase, and plastic hoop strain at failure, for failure in the plastic phase, can be an effective index of PCMI failure under RIA conditions. (author)

  16. Nuclide inventories of spent fuels from light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Keisuke; Okamoto, Tsutomu

    2012-02-01

    Accurate information on nuclide inventories of spent fuels from Light Water Reactors (LWRs) is important for evaluations of criticality, decay heat, radioactivity, toxicity, and so on, in the safety assessments of storage, transportation, reprocessing and waste disposal of the spent fuels. So, a lot of lattice burn-up calculations were carried out for the possible fuel specifications and irradiation conditions in Japanese commercial LWRs by using the latest nuclear data library JENDL-4.0 and a sophisticated lattice burn-up calculation code MOSRA-SRAC. As a result, burn-up changes of nuclide inventories and their possible ranges were clarified for 21 heavy nuclides and 118 fission products, which are important from the viewpoint of impacts to nuclear characteristics and nuclear fuel cycle and environment. (author)

  17. High burnup rim project. (IV) Threshold burnup of rim structure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, T.; Matzke, Hj.; Kinoshita, M.

    1999-01-01

    High burnup extension of LWR fuel is progressing to reduce the amount of total process flow in the nuclear fuel cycle and eventually to reduce the fuel cycle costs. As a result, the local burnup is now exceeding the anticipated range of the UO 2 fuel that was investigated in the great time of the 1960's. A 'new phenomenon', a crystallographic re-structuring, is commonly observed at the rim area of high burnup fuel pellets in LWRs, and also in FBRs to some extent. The objectives of the High Burnup Rim Project (HBRP) are to identify the conditions of the rim structure formation as functions of burnup and temperature, and to investigate physical and chemical properties of fuels following this re-structuring. After the irradiation, the rods were transported to the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe for Post Irradiation Examinations (PIE). This report shows recent progress of PIE, and discusses threshold burnup and temperature of the rim structure formation (author) (ml)

  18. Comparisons of calculated and measured parameters for a Pu-fueled LWHCR lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, R.; Gmuer, K.; Hager, H.; Hettergott, E.; Paratte, J.M.; Seiler, R.; Stahel, D.

    1982-05-01

    The lack of suitable integral experiments for Pu-fueled LWHCR lattices renders it difficult to assess the adequacy of calculational methods and data being applied to the physics design of such reactors. The authors present results for the first of a series of cores being investigated in the PROTEUS reactor at Wuerenlingen to help fill the gap - a PuO 2 /UO 2 fueled test lattice with an effective Pu enrichment of 7% and a fuel/moderator ratio of 2.0. The measurements reported include core-centre reaction rate ratios involving the capture rate in 238 U and fission rates in 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu and 241 Pu. Infinite-dilution reaction rates in the lattice were determined for the 10 B(n,α) reaction and for 232 Th, 233 U fission. Also measured were various radial and axial reaction rate traverses across the test zone to provide material-buckling, and hence ksub(infinity), related data. Comparisons of the measured parameters have been made with calculations based on the use of several different lattice codes and their associated cross-section libraries, viz. WIMS-D, EPRI-CPM and BOXER. For several of the calculated parameters, a strong dependence has been observed on the available data sets. These are discussed in the light of the experimental results, as also the unusual spectrum characteristics of the test lattice. (Auth.)

  19. Automated generation of burnup chain for reactor analysis applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Viet-Phu; Tran, Hoai-Nam; Yamamoto, Akio; Endo, Tomohiro

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an automated generation of burnup chain for reactor analysis applications. Algorithms are proposed to reevaluate decay modes, branching ratios and effective fission product (FP) cumulative yields of a given list of important FPs taking into account intermediate reactions. A new burnup chain is generated using the updated data sources taken from the JENDL FP decay data file 2011 and Fission yields data file 2011. The new burnup chain is output according to the format for the SRAC code system. Verification has been performed to evaluate the accuracy of the new burnup chain. The results show that the new burnup chain reproduces well the results of a reference one with 193 fission products used in SRAC. Burnup calculations using the new burnup chain have also been performed based on UO 2 and MOX fuel pin cells and compared with a reference chain th2cm6fp193bp6T.

  20. Power level effects on thorium-based fuels in pressure-tube heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromley, B.P.; Edwards, G.W.R., E-mail: blair.bromley@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Sambavalingam, P. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Lattice and core physics modeling and calculations have been performed to quantify the impact of power/flux levels on the reactivity and achievable burnup for 35-element fuel bundles made with Pu/Th or U-233/Th. The fissile content in these bundles has been adjusted to produce on the order of 20 MWd/kg burnup in homogeneous cores in a 700 MWe-class pressure-tube heavy water reactor, operating on a once-through thorium cycle. Results demonstrate that the impact of the power/flux level is modest for Pu/Th fuels but significant for U-233/Th fuels. In particular, high power/flux reduces the breeding and burnup potential of U-233/Th fuels. Thus, there may be an incentive to operate reactors with U-233/Th fuels at a lower power density or to develop alternative refueling schemes that will lower the time-average specific power, thereby increasing burnup.(author)

  1. Modelling fission gas release at high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loesoenen, Pekka

    1999-01-01

    High burn-up phenomena in LWR/HWR UO 2 fuel pellets important for fission gas release were modelled. The degradation of the thermal conductivity of UO 2 was accounted for 1) with a burnup -dependent factor in the phonon term of the corresponding equation and 2) with a correlation describing the increase in the porosity at the pellet rim as a function of local burnup and radial position. The model was tested against IFA-432 and IFA-429 data. It was found out that the degradation of the thermal conductivity in the phonon term is perhaps not a function of the local burnup only, but the irradiation temperature may play an important role, too. The burnup as a function of the pellet radius has to be known to determine the local thermal conductivity. A model for this was picked up from the literature, but a new estimation of a few empirical fitting parameters was performed with hundreds of data points from the OECD/NEA data base and from the literature. The model predicts reliably the radial burnup profile and the fission gas generation across the pellet in typical LWR and HWR fuels. The thermal release and the athermal release from the pellet rim were modelled separately. The model for the rim release is a function of the temperature history and the local burnup. The rim release and the thermal release can occur at the same radial position of the pellets simultaneously, which is accounted for in the calculation of the total release. The model for the rim release in in agreement with the latest experimental findings, but the tuning of the model parameters is yet to be done. However, the fraction of the rim structured fuel and the excessive porosity in the rim structure in isothermal irradiation as a function of the burnup was predicted by using typical model parameters (author) (ml)

  2. Optimization of Water Chemistry to Ensure Reliable Water Reactor Fuel Performance at High Burnup and in Ageing Plant (FUWAC). Additional Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-10-01

    This report presents the results of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Optimization of Water Chemistry to Ensure Reliable Water Reactor Fuel Performance at High Burnup and in Ageing Plants (FUWAC, 2006-2009). It provides an overview of the results of the investigations into the current state of water chemistry practice and concerns in the primary circuit of water cooled power reactors including: corrosion of primary circuit materials; deposit composition and thickness on the fuel; crud induced power shift; fuel oxide growth and thickness; radioactivity buildup in the reactor coolant system (RCS). The FUWAC CRP is a follow-up to the DAWAC CRP (Data Processing Technologies and Diagnostics for Water Chemistry and Corrosion Control in Nuclear Power Plants 2001-2005). The DAWAC project improved the data processing technologies and diagnostics for water chemistry and corrosion control in nuclear power plants (NPPs). With the improved methods for controlling and monitoring water chemistry now available, it was felt that a review of the principles of water chemistry management should be undertaken in the light of new materials, more onerous operating conditions, emergent issues such as CIPS, also known as axial offset anomaly (AOA) and the ageing of operating power plant. In the framework of this CRP, water chemistry specialists from 16 nuclear utilities and research organizations, representing 15 countries, exchanged experimental and operational data, models and insights into water chemistry management. This CD-ROM attached to the printed IAEA-TECDOC includes the report itself, detailed progress reports of three Research Coordination Meetings (RCMs) (Annexes I-III) and the reports and presentations made during the project by the participants.

  3. On the definition of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity for pin-cell calculations on an infinite lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Janssen, A.J.

    1993-03-01

    The fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is an important parameter in the evaluation of transients in light water reactors. The fuel temperature coefficient of an infinite lattice, often used in pin-cell calculations, is not a correct measure for the fuel temperature effect in such a lattice. We present a somewhat different definition of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity. This definition gives a more correct measure for the fuel temperature effect. Some calculations on lattices which are characteristic for a PWR show its accuracy. The newly defined fuel temperature coefficient is much less dependent on the fuel enrichment and the 10 B-concentration. The fuel temperature coefficient is analysed by calculating the different components constituting this coefficient. (orig.)

  4. Theory analysis and simple calculation of travelling wave burnup scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jian; Yu Hong; Gang Zhi

    2012-01-01

    Travelling wave burnup scheme is a new burnup scheme that breeds fuel locally just before it burns. Based on the preliminary theory analysis, the physical imagine was found. Through the calculation of a R-z cylinder travelling wave reactor core with ERANOS code system, the basic physical characteristics of this new burnup scheme were concluded. The results show that travelling wave reactor is feasible in physics, and there are some good features in the reactor physics. (authors)

  5. Burnup analysis of the power reactor, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezure, Hideo

    1975-09-01

    In burnup analysis of JPDR-1 with FLARE, it was found to have problems. The program FLORA was developed for solution of the problems. By their bench mark tests FLORA was found to be useful for three-dimensional thermal-hydro-dynamic analysis of BWRs. It was applied to analysis of the burnup of JPDR-1. The input data and option of FLORA were corrected on referring to the results of gammer probe tests for JPDR-1. The void, source and burnup distributions were calculated each month during the operation. The burnup distribution in three assemblies revealed by a destructive test agrees better with that by FLORA than by FLARE. It was shown that the distortion of power distribution around the control rods by FLORA was smaller and closer to that by the gammer probe tests than by FLARE, and the connector of fuel assemblies and the plugs in the reflector had much influence on the power distribution. (auth.)

  6. Comparisons of calculated and measured parameters for a Pu-fueled LWHCR lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, R.; Gmuer, K.; Hager, H.; Hettergott, E.; Paratte, J.M.; Seiler, R.; Stahel, D.

    1982-01-01

    The lack of suitable integral experiments for Pu-fueled LWHCR lattices renders it difficult to assess the adequacy of calculational methods and data being applied to the physics design of such reactors. The current paper presents results for the first of a series of Cores being investigated in the PROTEUS reactor at Wuerenlingen to help fill the gap - a PuO 2 /UO 2 fueled test lattice with an effective Pu enrichment of 7% and a fuel/moderator ratio of 2.0. The measurements reported include core-centre reaction rate ratios involving the capture rate in 238 U and fission rates in 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu and 241 Pu. Infinite-dilution reaction rates in the lattice were determined for the 10 B(n,α) reaction and for 232 Th, 233 U fission. Also measured were various radial and axial reaction rate traverses across the test zone to provide material-buckling, and hence k/sub infinity/, related data. Comparisons of the measured parameters have been made with calculations based on the use of several different lattice codes and their associated cross-section libraries, viz. WIMS-D, EPRI-CPM and BOXER

  7. Tradeoff of sodium void worth and burnup reactivity swing: Impacts on balance safety position in metallic-fueled cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigeland, R.A.; Turski, R.B.; Pizzica, P.A.

    1994-01-01

    A study has been conducted to investigate the effect of a lower sodium void worth on the consequences of severe accidents in metallic-fueled sodium-cooled reactors. Four 900 MWth designs were used for the study, where all of the reactor cores were designed based on the metallic fuel of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept. The four core designs each have different sodium void worth, in the range of -3$ to 5$. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the differences in severe accident response for the four core designs, in order to estimate the improvement in overall safety that could be achieved from a reduction in the sodium void worth for reactor cores which use a metallic fuel form

  8. Status of burnup credit implementation in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, P.

    1998-01-01

    Burnup credit is currently not used for the storage of spent fuel in the reactor pools in Switzerland, but credit is taken for integral burnable absorbers. Interest exists to take credit of burnup in future for the storage in a central away-from-reactor facility presently under construction. For spent fuel transports to foreign reprocessing plants the regulations of the receiving countries must be applied in addition to the Swiss licensing criteria. Burnup credit has been applied by one Swiss PWR utility for such transports in a consistent manner with the licensing practice in the receiving countries. Measurements of reactivity worths of small spent fuel samples in a Swiss zero-power research reactor are at an early stage of planning. (author)

  9. Dopant solubility and lattice contraction in gadolinia and gadolinia-chromia doped UO2 fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinaels, T.; Hertog, J.; Vos, B.; de Tollenaere, L.; Delafoy, C.; Verwerft, M.

    2012-05-01

    Gadolinia doped UO2 fuel is widely used as burnable neutron absorber in Light Water Reactors to reduce power peaking and excess reactivity during the first reactor cycle of fresh fuel assemblies. The thermal conductivity of gadolinia doped fuel is substantially lower than that of standard UO2. To maintain safety margins later in life, some design or operating restrictions can be defined, for example to compensate higher fission gas release levels. Development of large grain U/Gd fuel by suitable doping, e.g. Cr2O3, could offer a solution to such restrictions, but solid state information about the double doped (U1-x-yGdxCry)O2 system is very scarce. In the present paper, we present X-ray diffraction and microstructure results of standard U/Gd fuel and chromia doped U/Gd fuel manufactured by powder metallurgy. The dissolution of chromium in (U1-xGdx)O2 as a function of Gd content, the role of free UO2 and the lattice contraction at different Gd and Cr doping levels of (U1-x-yGdxCry)O2 is studied both for the single doped and double doped system. On the basis of lattice contraction and precise measurements of the composition of the solid solution phases, the evolution of theoretical density with dopant concentration is derived.

  10. A guide introducing burnup credit, preliminary version. Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    It is examined to take burnup credit into account for criticality safety control of facility treating spent fuel. This work is a collection of current technical status of predicting isotopic composition and criticality of spent fuel, points to be specially considered for safety evaluation, and current status of legal affairs for the purpose of applying burnup credit to the criticality safety evaluation of the facility treating spent fuel in Japan. (author)

  11. Benchmarking burnup reconstruction methods for dynamically operated research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternat, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Charlton, William S. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). National Strategic Research Institute; Nichols, Theodore F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    The burnup of an HEU fueled dynamically operated research reactor, the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, was experimentally reconstructed using two different analytic methodologies and a suite of signature isotopes to evaluate techniques for estimating burnup for research reactor fuel. The methods studied include using individual signature isotopes and the complete mass spectrometry spectrum to recover the sample’s burnup. The individual, or sets of, isotopes include 148Nd, 137Cs+137Ba, 139La, and 145Nd+146Nd. The storage documentation from the analyzed fuel material provided two different measures of burnup: burnup percentage and the total power generated from the assembly in MWd. When normalized to conventional units, these two references differed by 7.8% (395.42GWd/MTHM and 426.27GWd/MTHM) in the resulting burnup for the spent fuel element used in the benchmark. Among all methods being evaluated, the results were within 11.3% of either reference burnup. The results were mixed in closeness to both reference burnups; however, consistent results were achieved from all three experimental samples.

  12. Burn-up measurements coupling gamma spectrometry and neutron measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toubon, H.; Pin, P.; Lebrun, A.; Oriol, L.; Saurel, N.; Gain, T.

    2006-01-01

    The need to apply for burn-up credit arises with the increase of the initial enrichment of nuclear fuel. When burn-up credit is used in criticality safety studies, it is often necessary to confirm it by measurement. For the last 10 years, CANBERRA has manufactured the PYTHON system for such measurements. However, the method used in the PYTHON itself uses certain reactor data to arrive at burn-up estimates. Based on R and D led by CEA and COGEMA in the framework of burn-up measurement for burn-up credit and safeguards applications, CANBERRA is developing the next generation of burn-up measurement device. This new product, named SMOPY, is able to measure burn-up of any kind of irradiated fuel assembly with a combination of gamma spectrometry and passive neutron measurements. The measurement data is used as input to the CESAR depletion code, which has been developed and qualified by CEA and COGEMA for burn-up credit determinations. In this paper, we explain the complementary nature of the gamma and neutron measurements. In addition, we draw on our previous experience from PYTHON system and from COGEMA La Hague to show what types of evaluations are required to qualify the SMOPY system, to estimate its uncertainties, and to detect discrepancies in the fuel data given by the reactor plant to characterize the irradiated fuel assembly. (authors)

  13. A guide to introducing burnup credit, preliminary version (English translation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Suyama, Kenya; Ryufuku, Susumu

    2017-06-01

    There is an ongoing discussion on the application of burnup credit to the criticality safety controls of facilities that treat spent fuels. With regard to such application of burnup credit in Japan, this document summarizes the current technical status of the prediction of the isotopic composition and criticality of spent fuels, as well as safety evaluation concerns and the current status of legal affairs. This report is an English translation of A Guide to Introducing Burnup Credit, Preliminary Version, originally published in Japanese as JAERI-Tech 2001-055 by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility Safety Research Committee. (author)

  14. A parametric thermohydraulic study an advanced pressurized light water reactor with a tight fuel rod lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Hame, W.

    1982-12-01

    A parametric thermohydraulic study for an Advanced Pressurized Light Water Reactor (APWR) with a tight fuel rod lattice has been performed. The APWR improves the uranium utilisation. The APWR core should be placed in a modern German PWR plant. Within this study about 200 different reactors have been calculated. The tightening of the fuel rod lattice implies a decrease of the net electrical output of the plant, which is greater for the heterogeneous reactor than for the homogeneous reactor. APWR cores mean higher core pressure drops and higher water velocities in the core region. The cores tend to be shorter and the number of fuel rods to be higher than for the PWR. At the higher fuel rod pitch to diameter ratios (p/d) the DNB limitation is more stringent than the limitation on the fuel rod linear rating given by the necessity of reflooding after a reactor accident. The contrary is true for the lower p/d ratios. Subcooled boiling in the highest rated coolant channels occurs for the most of the calculated reactors. (orig.) [de

  15. Parallel GPU implementation of PWR reactor burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimlich, A.; Silva, F.C.; Martinez, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three GPU algorithms used to evaluate the burn-up in a PWR reactor. • Exhibit speed improvement exceeding 200 times over the sequential. • The C++ container is expansible to accept new nuclides chains. - Abstract: This paper surveys three methods, implemented for multi-core CPU and graphic processor unit (GPU), to evaluate the fuel burn-up in a pressurized light water nuclear reactor (PWR) using the solutions of a large system of coupled ordinary differential equations. The reactor physics simulation of a PWR reactor spends a long execution time with burnup calculations, so performance improvement using GPU can imply in better core design and thus extended fuel life cycle. The results of this study exhibit speed improvement exceeding 200 times over the sequential solver, within 1% accuracy.

  16. A PWR Thorium Pin Cell Burnup Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Zhao, X.; Pilat, E. E; Hejzlar, P.

    2000-05-01

    As part of work to evaluate the potential benefits of using thorium in LWR fuel, a thorium fueled benchmark comparison was made in this study between state-of-the-art codes, MOCUP (MCNP4B + ORIGEN2), and CASMO-4 for burnup calculations. The MOCUP runs were done individually at MIT and INEEL, using the same model but with some differences in techniques and cross section libraries. Eigenvalue and isotope concentrations were compared on a PWR pin cell model up to high burnup. The eigenvalue comparison as a function of burnup is good: the maximum difference is within 2% and the average absolute difference less than 1%. The isotope concentration comparisons are better than a set of MOX fuel benchmarks and comparable to a set of uranium fuel benchmarks reported in the literature. The actinide and fission product data sources used in the MOCUP burnup calculations for a typical thorium fuel are documented. Reasons for code vs code differences are analyzed and discussed.

  17. Burnup credit effect on proposed cask payloads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, I.K.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the Cask Systems Development Program (CSDP) is to develop a variety of cask systems which will allow safe and economical movement of commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste from the generator to the Federal repository or Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. Program schedule objectives for the initial phase of the CSDP include the development of certified spent fuel cask systems by 1995 to support Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management shipments from the utilities beginning in the late 1990s. Forty-nine proposals for developing a family of spent fuel casks were received and comparisons made. General conclusions that can be drawn from the comparisons are that (1) the new generation of casks will have substantially increased payloads in comparison to current casks, and (2) an even greater payload increase may be achievable with burnup credit. The ranges in the payload estimates do not allow a precise separation of the payload increase attributable to the proposed allowance of fuel burnup credit, as compared wilt the no-burnup-credit case. The beneficial effects of cask payload increases on overall costs and risks of transporting spent fuel are significant; therefore further work aimed toward taking advantage of burnup credit is warranted

  18. Comparative calculations and operation-to-PIE data juxtaposition of the Zaporozhye NPP, WWER-1000 FA-E0325 fuel rods after 4 years of operation up to ∼49 MWd/kgU burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passage, G.; Stefanova, S.; Scheglov, A.; Proselkov, V.

    2006-01-01

    Operational and PIE data for the Zaporozhe NPP, FA-E0325, WWER-1000 fuel rods were provided in the OECD NEA IFPE Database and were used to perform comparative calculations among several fuel performance codes. The fuel rods had been irradiated for 4 years of operation up to ∼49 MWd/kg U burnup. The fuel rod operation histories are developed for the PINw99, TRANSURANUS (V1M1J03) and TOPRA-2 codes. The initial state fuel rod parameters are analysed and calculations are carried out. The PIE data enable the comparison of experimental measurement with code-calculated values for cladding elongation (49 rods), FGR and gas pressure (35 rods). Cladding diameter creep-down and gap closure results are juxtaposed as well. The capability of the applied codes correctly to predict the WWER fuel rod performance is shown. The WWER-1000 fuel rod data include initial geometrical and design parameters of the fuel rods, as well as description of the operation regime, NPP unit loading history and PIE results at normal conditions. The data are sufficient for modelling all 312 fuel rod and for comparison of calculations with experimental results for a limited number of fuel rods. The comparison between the calculated and measured results discussed in this paper shows that the codes PINw99, TRANSURANUS and TOPRA-2, are capable of adequate predicting the thermophysical and the mechanical performance of the WWER-1000 fuel rods. The PINw99 code predicts conservative BOL FGR values and conservative gas pressure values in the region of burnups higher than 30 MWd/kg U, which can be explained by the underprediction of the cladding gas inner volume and cladding elongation. The improved version PIN2K (not applied in the present study) predicts much better FGR and gas pressure, though, it is still under development in the high burnup FGR modelling part. In the TRANSURANUS code, there are also areas, where refinements are clearly indicated. They are subjects of the ongoing research projects and

  19. Isotopic Bias and Uncertainty for Burnup Credit Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.M. Scaglione

    2002-01-01

    The application of burnup credit requires calculating the isotopic inventory of the irradiated fuel. The depletion calculation simulates the burnup of the fuel under reactor operating conditions. The result of the depletion analysis is the predicted isotopic composition, which is ultimately input to a criticality analysis to determine the system multiplication factor (k eff ). This paper demonstrates an approach for calculating the isotopic bias and uncertainty in k eff for commercial spent nuclear fuel burnup credit. This paper covers 74 different radiochemical assayed spent fuel samples from 22 different fuel assemblies that were irradiated in eight different pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The samples evaluated span an enrichment range of 2.556 wt% U-235 through 4.67 wt% U-235, and burnups from 6.92 GWd/MTU through 55.7 GWd/MTU

  20. COGEMA/TRANSNUCLEAIRE's experience with burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanzy, Y.; Guillou, E.

    1998-01-01

    Facing a continuous increase in the fuel enrichments, COGEMA and TRANSNUCLEAIRE have implemented step by step a burnup credit programme to improve the capacity of their equipment without major physical modification. Many authorizations have been granted by the French competent authority in wet storage, reprocessing and transport since 1981. As concerns transport, numerous authorizations have been validated by foreign competent authorities. Up to now, those authorizations are restricted to PWR Fuel type assemblies made of enriched uranium. The characterization of the irradiated fuel and the reactivity of the systems are evaluated by calculations performed with well qualified French codes developed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission): CESAR as a depletion code and APPOLO-MORET as a criticality code. The authorizations are based on the assurance that the burnup considered is met on the least irradiated part of the fuel assemblies. Besides, the most reactive configuration is calculated and the burnup credit is restricted to major actinides only. This conservative approach allows not to take credit for any axial profile. On the operational side, the procedures have been reevaluated to avoid misloadings and a burnup verification is made before transport, storage and reprocessing. Depending on the level of burnup credit, it consists of a qualitative (go/no-go) verification or of a quantitative measurement. Thus the use of burnup credit is now a common practice in France and Germany and new improvements are still in progress: extended qualifications of the codes are made to enable the use of six selected fission products in the criticality evaluations. (author)

  1. Alloy development for high burnup cladding (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    An overview on current alloy development for high burnup PWR fuel cladding is given. It is mainly based on literature data. First, the reasons for an increase of the current mean discharge burnup from 35 MWd / kg(U) to 70 MWd / kg(U) are outlined. From the material data, it is shown that a batch average burnup of 60-70 MWd / kg(U), as aimed by many fuel vendors, can not be achieved with stand (=ASTM-) Zry-4 cladding tubes without violating accepted design criteria. Specifically criteria which limit maximum oxide scale thickness and maximum hydrogen content, and to a less degree, maximum creep and growth rate, can not be achieved. The development potential of standard Zry-4 is shown. Even when taking advantage of this potential, it is shown that an 'improved' Zry-4 is reaching its limits when it achieves the target burnup. The behavior of some Zr alloys outside the ASTM range is shown, and the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 alloy groups (ZrSn+transition metals, ZrNb, ZrSnNb+transition metals) which are currently considered to have the development potential for high burnup cladding materials are depicted. Finally, conclusions are drawn. (author). 14 refs., 11 tabs., 82 figs.

  2. Alloy development for high burnup cladding (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, R.; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, K. H.; Kim, S. J.; Choi, B. K.; Kim, J.M.

    1999-04-01

    An overview on current alloy development for high burnup PWR fuel cladding is given. It is mainly based on literature data. First, the reasons for an increase of the current mean discharge burnup from 35 MWd / kg(U) to 70 MWd / kg(U) are outlined. From the material data, it is shown that a batch average burnup of 60-70 MWd / kg(U), as aimed by many fuel vendors, can not be achieved with stand (=ASTM-) Zry-4 cladding tubes without violating accepted design criteria. Specifically criteria which limit maximum oxide scale thickness and maximum hydrogen content, and to a less degree, maximum creep and growth rate, can not be achieved. The development potential of standard Zry-4 is shown. Even when taking advantage of this potential, it is shown that an 'improved' Zry-4 is reaching its limits when it achieves the target burnup. The behavior of some Zr alloys outside the ASTM range is shown, and the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 alloy groups (ZrSn+transition metals, ZrNb, ZrSnNb+transition metals) which are currently considered to have the development potential for high burnup cladding materials are depicted. Finally, conclusions are drawn. (author). 14 refs., 11 tabs., 82 figs

  3. Burnup credit applications in a high-capacity truck cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boshoven, J.K.

    1992-09-01

    General Atomics (GA) has designed two legal weight truck (LWT) casks, the GA-4 and GA-9, to carry four pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) and nine boiling-water-reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies, respectively. GA plans to submit applications for certification to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the two casks in mid-1993. GA will include burnup credit analysis in the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for the GA-4 Cask. By including burnup credit in the criticality safety analysis for PWR fuels with initial enrichments above 3% U-235, public and occupation risks are reduced and cost savings are realized. The GA approach to burnup credit analysis incorporates the information produced in the US Department of Energy Burnup Credit Program. This paper describes the application of burnup credit to the criticality control design of the GA-4 Cask

  4. WWER-1000 Burnup Credit Benchmark (CB5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolova, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    In the paper the specification of WWER-1000 Burnup Credit Benchmark first phase (depletion calculations), given. The second phase - criticality calculations for the WWER-1000 fuel pin cell, will be given after the evaluation of the results, obtained at the first phase. The proposed benchmark is a continuation of the WWER benchmark activities in this field (Author)

  5. Influence of FIMA burnup on actinides concentrations in PWR reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oettingen Mikołaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we present the study on the dependence of actinides concentrations in the spent nuclear fuel on FIMA burnup. The concentrations of uranium, plutonium, americium and curium isotopes obtained in numerical simulation are compared with the result of the post irradiation assay of two spent fuel samples. The samples were cut from the fuel rod irradiated during two reactor cycles in the Japanese Ohi-2 Pressurized Water Reactor. The performed comparative analysis assesses the reliability of the developed numerical set-up, especially in terms of the system normalization to the measured FIMA burnup. The numerical simulations were preformed using the burnup and radiation transport mode of the Monte Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code – MCB, developed at the Department of Nuclear Energy, Faculty of Energy and Fuels of AGH University of Science and Technology.

  6. Burnup characteristics of binary breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, A.F.; Nascimento, J.A. do; Ishiguro, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Burnup calculations of a binary breeder reactor have been done for two cases of fueling. In one case the U 233 /TH fueled inner core and the Pu/U-fueled outer core have the same number of fuel assemblies. In the other case two outermost rings in the inner core are Pu/U-fueled. The second case is considered for an initial phase of thorim cycle introduction when the supply of U 233 could be limited. Results show an efficient breeding on the thorium cycle in both cases. (Author) [pt

  7. An economic evaluation of a storage system for casks with burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimura, Masahiro; Tsuda, Kazuaki; Yamada, Nobuyuki; O-iwa, Akio.

    1993-01-01

    It is generally recognized that casks designed with burnup credit are more economical than those without burnup credit. To estimate how much more economical they are, we made conceptual designs of transport/storage casks with and without burnup credit for PWR and BWR fuels of various uranium enrichment. The casks were designed to contain the maximum number of fuel assemblies under the necessary weight and dimensional limitations as well as the criticality and shielding criteria. The results showed that approximately 8 % to 44 % more fuel assemblies could be contained in casks with burnup credit. We then evaluated the economy of cask storage system incorporating the cask designs obtained above both with and without burnup credit. The results showed that the cost of storing casks with burnup credit is approximately 7 % to 30 % less expensive than storing casks without burnup credit. (J.P.N.)

  8. ISOTOPIC MODEL FOR COMMERCIAL SNF BURNUP CREDIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.H. Wells

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to demonstrate a process for selecting bounding depletion parameters, show that they are conservative for pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and establish the range of burnup for which the parameters are conservative. The general range of applicability is for commercial light water reactor (LWR) SNF with initial enrichments between 2.0 and 5.0 weight percent 235 U and burnups between 10 and 50 gigawatt-day per metric ton of uranium (GWd/MTU)

  9. The octopus burnup and criticality code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloosterman, J.L.; Kuijper, J.C.; Leege, P.F.A. de.

    1996-01-01

    The OCTOPUS burnup and criticality code system is described. This system links the spectrum codes from the SCALE4.1, WIMS7 and MCNP4A packages to the ORIGEN-S and FISPACT4.2 fuel depletion and activation codes, which enables us to perform very accurate burnup calculations in complicated three-dimensional geometries. The data used by all codes are consistently based on the JEF2.2 evaluated nuclear data file. Some special features of OCTOPUS not available in other codes are described, as well as the validation of the system. (author)

  10. The OCTOPUS burnup and criticality code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloosterman, J.L.; Kuijper, J.C.; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1996-06-01

    The OCTOPUS burnup and criticality code system is described. This system links the spectrum codes from the SCALE4.1, WIMS7 and MCNP4A packages to the ORIGEN-S and FISPACT4.2 fuel depletion and activation codes, which enables us to perform very accurate burnup calculations in complicated three-dimensional goemetries. The data used by all codes are consistently based on the JEF2.2 evaluated nuclear data file. Some special features of OCTOPUS not available in other codes are described, as well as the validation of the system. (orig.)

  11. Development of methods for burn-up calculations for LWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaschik, W.

    1978-01-01

    This method is based on all burn-up depending data, namely particle densities and neutron spectra, being available in a burn-up library. This one is created by means of a small number of cell burn-up calculations which can easily be carried out and in which the heterogeneous cell structure and self-shielding effects can explicitly be accounted for. Then the cluster burn-up is simulated by adequate correlation of the burn-up data. The advantage of this method is given by - an exact determination of the real spectrum distribution in the individual fuel element clusters; - an exact determination of the burn-up related spectrum variations for each fuel rod and for each burn-up value obtained; - accounting for heterogeneity of the fuel rod cells and the self-shielding in the fuel; high accuracy of the results of a comparably low effort and - simple handling by largely automating the process of computation. Programed realization was achieved by establishing the RSYST modules ABRAJA, MITHOM, and SIMABB and their implementation within the code system. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Nondestructive analysis of the RA fuel burnup, Calculation of the gamma activity ratio of fission products in the fuel - program QU0C1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulovic, V.F.

    1973-01-01

    The γ radiation of RA reactor fuel element was measured under precisely defined measuring conditions. The spectrum was analysed by spectrometer with semiconductor Ge(Li) detector. The gamma counting rate in the fuel spectrum is defined as a function of fission product activity, gamma energy and yield, fuel thickness and additional absorbers, dimensions of the gamma collimator. Activity ratio of two fission products is defined as a function of counting rate peaks and part of the mentioned quantities. Four options for calculating the activities for fission products are discussed. Three of them are covered by the QU0C1 code written in FORTRAN for the CDC 3600 computer. The code is included in this report [sr

  13. Test of test fuel elements with carbide fuel in the BOR 60 reactor until burn-up of 3 or 7%

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydov, E.F.; Majorsin, A.A.; Sjuzev, V.P.; Bibilasvili, J.K.; Golovin, I.S.; Men'sikova, T.S.

    1976-01-01

    Operational experience with the carbide zone of the BR-5 and a few foreign reactors shows the real possibility of utilizing carbide fission material in fast reactors. For the purpose of using the advantages of the uranium carbide as compared to oxide and development of the optimum construction of the fuel element, a number of problems must be clarified by careful experimental investigation, amongst others, the source of the fission material; the gas release, the compatibility of the fuel with the cladding, etc. (orig./TK) [de

  14. The use of irradiation zones in the fuel element lattice of research piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delattre, P.; Genthon, J.P.

    1960-01-01

    The first part of this report examines the advantages and disadvantages of the various types of canal which may be found in the fuel element lattice of research piles. Some examples relative to the piles EL2 and EL3 are discussed in detail. From the conclusions drawn in the last part, several norms are extracted which make it possible to define the conditions the various canals must fulfil in order that they can be used to the best possible advantage for each type of irradiation. (author) [fr

  15. Conceptual cask design with burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seong Hee; Ahn, Joon Gi; Hwang, Hae Ryong

    2003-01-01

    Conceptual design has been performed for a spent fuel transport cask with burnup credit and a neutron-absorbing material to maximize transportation capacity. Both fresh and burned fuel are assumed to be stored in the cask and boral and borated stainless steel are selected for the neutron-absorbing materials. Three different sizes of cask with typical 14, 21 and 52 PWR fuel assemblies are modeled and analyzed with the SCALE 4.4 code system. In this analysis, the biases and uncertainties through validation calculations for both isotopic predictions and criticality calculation for the spent fuel have been taken into account. All of the reactor operating parameters, such as moderator density, soluble boron concentration, fuel temperature, specific power, and operating history, have been selected in a conservative way for the criticality analysis. Two different burnup credit loading curves are developed for boral and borated stainless steel absorbing materials. It is concluded that the spent fuel transport cask design with burnup credit is feasible and is expected to increase cask payloads. (author)

  16. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of multi-phase phenomena related to fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhgar, A.; Khalili, B.; Moa, B.; Rahnama, M.; Djilali, N.

    2017-07-01

    Fuel cells are devices that allow conversion of the chemical potential of a fuel and oxidant to produce electricity. A key component of a fuel cell is the catalyst layer, which facilitates the electrochemical reaction and where transport of reactants, charge, and byproduct heat and water take place. The structure and morphology of the catalyst layer determine its effectiveness and, in turn, strongly impact the overall performance and cost of a fuel cell. This paper discusses two central issue related to catalyst layers involving two-phase flow: liquid water transport in the catalyst layer during fuel cell operation, and fabrication of the catalyst layer from colloidal inks where a process of particle agglomeration takes place and eventually determines the final catalyst layer structure. Insight into these two issues are obtained using lattice-Botzmann based multi-phase simulations with formulations tailored to deal with features including high density ratio gas-liquid flow in complex porous media, and particle-particle and particle-hydrodynamic interactions.

  17. Lattice-Strain Control of the Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strasser, P. [Berlin Institute of Technology (Technische Universitat Berlin); Koh, Shirlaine [University of Houston, Houston; Anniyev, Toyli [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Greeley, Jeff [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Yu, Chengfei [University of Houston, Houston; Liu, Zengcai [University of Houston, Houston; Kaya, Sarpa [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Nordlund, Dennis [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Ogasawara, Hirohito [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Toney, Michael F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Anders, Nilsson [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Electrocatalysis will play a key role in future energy conversion and storage technologies, such as water electrolysers, fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Molecular interactions between chemical reactants and the catalytic surface control the activity and efficiency, and hence need to be optimized; however, generalized experimental strategies to do so are scarce. Here we show how lattice strain can be used experimentally to tune the catalytic activity of dealloyed bimetallic nanoparticles for the oxygen-reduction reaction, a key barrier to the application of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. We demonstrate the core-shell structure of the catalyst and clarify the mechanistic origin of its activity. The platinum-rich shell exhibits compressive strain, which results in a shift of the electronic band structure of platinum and weakening chemisorption of oxygenated species. We combine synthesis, measurements and an understanding of strain from theory to generate a reactivity-strain relationship that provides guidelines for tuning electrocatalytic activity.

  18. Lattice-Strain Control of the Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strasser, Peter; Shirlaine, Koh; Anniyev, Toyli; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; More, Karren L.; Yu, Chengfei; Liu, Zengcai; Kaya, Sarp; Nordlund, Dennis; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Toney, Michael F.; Nilsson, Anders R.

    2010-04-30

    Electrocatalysis will play a key role in future energy conversion and storage technologies, such as water electrolysers, fuel cells and metal–air batteries. Molecular interactions between chemical reactants and the catalytic surface control the activity and efficiency, and hence need to be optimized; however, generalized experimental strategies to do so are scarce. Here we show how lattice strain can be used experimentally to tune the catalytic activity of dealloyed bimetallic nanoparticles for the oxygen-reduction reaction, a key barrier to the application of fuel cells and metal–air batteries. We demonstrate the core–shell structure of the catalyst and clarify the mechanistic origin of its activity. The platinum-rich shell exhibits compressive strain, which results in a shift of the electronic band structure of platinum and weakening chemisorption of oxygenated species. We combine synthesis, measurements and an understanding of strain from theory to generate a reactivity–strain relationship that provides guidelines for tuning electrocatalytic activity.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of transport phenomena in fuel cells and flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ao; Shyy, Wei; Zhao, Tianshou

    2017-06-01

    Fuel cells and flow batteries are promising technologies to address climate change and air pollution problems. An understanding of the complex multiscale and multiphysics transport phenomena occurring in these electrochemical systems requires powerful numerical tools. Over the past decades, the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method has attracted broad interest in the computational fluid dynamics and the numerical heat transfer communities, primarily due to its kinetic nature making it appropriate for modeling complex multiphase transport phenomena. More importantly, the LB method fits well with parallel computing due to its locality feature, which is required for large-scale engineering applications. In this article, we review the LB method for gas-liquid two-phase flows, coupled fluid flow and mass transport in porous media, and particulate flows. Examples of applications are provided in fuel cells and flow batteries. Further developments of the LB method are also outlined.

  20. Finnish contribution to the CB4 burnup credit benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasastjerna, F.

    2001-01-01

    The CB4 phase of the WWER burnup credit benchmark series studies the effect of flat and realistic axial burnup profiles on the multiplication factor of a conceptual WWER cask loaded with spent fuel. The benchmark was calculated at VTT Energy with MCNP4C, using mainly ENDF/B-V1 cross sections. According to the calculation results the effect of the axial homogenization on the k eff estimate is complex. At low burnups the use of a axial profile overestimates k eff but at high burnups the reverse is the case. Ignoring fission products leads to conservative k eff and the effect of axial homogenization on the multiplication factor is similar to a reduction of the burnup (Authors)

  1. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-03-01

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

  2. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ''end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified

  3. Issues related to criticality safety analysis for burnup credit applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V.

    1995-01-01

    Spent fuel transportation and storage cask designs based on a burnup credit approach must consider issues that are not relevant in casks designed under a fresh fuel loading assumption. Parametric analyses are required to characterize the importance of fuel assembly and fuel cycle parameters on spent fuel composition and reactivity. Numerical models are evaluated to determine the sensitivity of criticality safety calculations to modeling assumptions. This paper discusses the results of studies to determine the effect of two important modeling assumptions on the criticality analysis of pressurized-water reactor (PWR) spent fuel: (1) the effect of assumed burnup history (i.e., specific power during and time-dependent variations in operational power) during depletion calculations, and (2) the effect of axial burnup distributions on the neutron multiplication factor calculated for a three-dimensional (3-D) conceptual cask design

  4. Status of burnup credit implementation and research in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, P.

    2001-01-01

    Burnup credit has recently been approved by the Swiss licensing authority for the spent-fuel storage pool of a PWR plant for fuel exceeding the originally licensed initial enrichment. The criticality safety assessment is based on a configuration consisting of a small number (approximately a reload batch) of fresh assemblies surrounded by assemblies having a burnup corresponding to the minimum value in the top 1 m section after one cycle of irradiation. The allowable initial enrichment in this configuration is about 0.5% higher than for all fresh fuel. A central storage facility for all types of radioactive wastes from Switzerland, including cask storage of spent fuel assemblies is being commissioned presently. The first applications for licenses for casks to be used in this facility have been submitted. Credit for burnup has not been requested in these applications (conforming to the original licenses of the casks in their countries of origin), but utilities are interested in burnup credit for fuel with higher initial enrichments. Reactivity worth measurements as well as chemical assays of spent fuel samples in the LWR-PROTEUS facility at PSI are in detailed planning currently. The experiments, scheduled to start in 2001, will be performed in cooperation with the Swiss utilities and their fuel vendors. Although the focus of interest of these partners is on validation of in-core fuel management tools, the same experiments are also applicable to burnup credit, and contacts with further potential partners interested in this field are underway. (author)

  5. An empirical formulation to describe the evolution of the high burnup structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemes, Martín; Soba, Alejandro; Denis, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    In the present work the behavior of fuel pellets for LWR power reactors in the high burnup range (average burnup higher than about 45 MWd/kgU) is analyzed. For extended irradiation periods, a considerable Pu concentration is reached in the pellet periphery (rim zone), that contributes to local burnup. Gradually, a new microstructure develops in that ring, characterized by small grains and large pores as compared with those of the original material. In this region Xe is absent from the solid lattice (although it continues to be dissolved in the rest of the pellet). The porous microstructure in the pellet edge causes local changes in the mechanical and thermal properties, thus affecting the overall fuel behavior. It is generally accepted that the evolution of porosity in the high burnup structure (HBS) is determinant of the retention capacity of the fission gases rejected from the fuel matrix. This is the reason why, during the latest years a considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the parameters that influence porosity. Although the mechanisms governing the microstructural transformation have not been completely elucidated yet, some empirical expressions can be given, and this is the intention of the present work, for representing the main physical parameters. Starting from several works published in the open literature, some mathematical expressions were developed to describe the behavior and progress of porosity at local burnup values ranging from 60 to 300 MWd/kgU. The analysis includes the interactions of different orders between pores, the growth of the pore radius by capturing vacancies, the evolution of porosity, pore number density and overpressure within the closed pores, the inventory of fission gas dissolved in the matrix and retained in the pores. The model is mathematically expressed by a system of non-linear differential equations. In the present work, results of this calculation scheme are compared with experimental data available in

  6. Thermal conductivity of fresh and irradiated U-Mo fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Tanja K.; Breitkreutz, Harald; Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Elgeti, Stefan; Reiter, Christian; Robinson, Adam. B.; Smith, Frances. N.; Wachs, Daniel. M.; Petry, Winfried

    2018-05-01

    The thermal conductivity of fresh and irradiated U-Mo dispersion and monolithic fuel has been investigated experimentally and compared to theoretical models. During in-pile irradiation, thermal conductivity of fresh dispersion fuel at a temperature of 150 °C decreased from 59 W/m·K to 18 W/m·K at a burn-up of 4.9·1021 f/cc and further to 9 W/m·K at a burn-up of 6.1·1021 f/cc. Fresh monolithic fuel has a considerably lower thermal conductivity of 15 W/m·K at a temperature of 150 °C and consequently its decrease during in-pile irradiation is less steep than for dispersion fuel. For a burn-up of 3.5·1021 f/cc of monolithic fuel, a thermal conductivity of 11 W/m·K at a temperature of 150 °C has been measured by Burkes et al. (2015). The difference of decrease for both fuels originates from effects in the matrix that occur during irradiation, like for dispersion fuel the gradual disappearance of the Al matrix with increased burn-up and the subsequent growth of an interaction layer (IDL) between the U-Mo fuel particle and Al matrix and subsequent matrix hardening. The growth of fission gas bubbles and the decomposition of the U-Mo crystal lattice also affect both dispersion and monolithic fuel.

  7. Review of extended burnup research, development and implementation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the results to date of the various research and development projects on burnup extension of LWR fuel being sponsored by the author's organizations. These projects include a large number of test assembly irradiations in power reactors, both of current-design fuel and of several advanced designs. The burnups attained to date are tabulated and the status of postirradiation examination of these assemblies is reviewed. Current U.S. thinking on the implications of these results on possible fuel life limiting phenomena is presented, together with discussion and prioritization of further work to be done. The further work under discussion includes, in addition to other advanced designs and life limiting effects, economic studies to determine optimum burnups under present and projected future cost structures and the design of desirable extended burnup fuel cycles for power reactors. These include low leakage fuel management, improved burnable absorbers to control power distributions, extended cycle lengths, and practical transitions toward extended burnup. Results of recent studies on the impacts of extended burnup on the external fuel cycle operations of fuel fabrication, fresh fuel storage, spent fuel storage, and spent fuel transportation are briefly reviewed. The majority of U.S. utilities have already made positive decisions to implement at least a first step of burnup extension in their operating reactors. The results of a recent survey of such implementation are presented, with estimates of percentage of reactors going to burnup extension and of average and maximum increases in burnups now committed. The discussion of these results includes review of various utility motivations, both for restraint and for pressing forward with burnup extension. A summary of burnup extensions already achieved is also included. (author)

  8. Disposal criticality analysis methodology's principal isotope burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doering, T.W.; Thomas, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the burnup credit aspects of the United States Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Project's methodology for performing criticality analyses for commercial light-water-reactor fuel. The disposal burnup credit methodology uses a 'principal isotope' model, which takes credit for the reduced reactivity associated with the build-up of the primary principal actinides and fission products in irradiated fuel. Burnup credit is important to the disposal criticality analysis methodology and to the design of commercial fuel waste packages. The burnup credit methodology developed for disposal of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel can also be applied to storage and transportation of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel. For all applications a series of loading curves are developed using a best estimate methodology and depending on the application, an additional administrative safety margin may be applied. The burnup credit methodology better represents the 'true' reactivity of the irradiated fuel configuration, and hence the real safety margin, than do evaluations using the 'fresh fuel' assumption. (author)

  9. Delayed Fission Product Gamma-Ray Transmission Through Low Enriched UO2 Fuel Pin Lattices in Air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumbull, TH [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2004-10-18

    The transmission of delayed fission-product gamma rays through various arrangements of low-enriched UO2 fuel pin lattices in an air medium was studied. Experimental measurements, point-kernel and Monte Carlo photon transport calculations were performed to demonstrate the shielding effect of ordered lattices of fuel pins on the resulting gamma-ray dose to a detector outside the lattice. The variation of the gamma-ray dose on the outside of the lattice as a function of radial position, the so-called “channeling” effect, was analyzed. Techniques for performing experimental measurements and data reduction at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Reactor Critical Facility (RCF) were derived. An experimental apparatus was constructed to hold the arrangements of fuel pins for the measurements. A gamma-ray spectroscopy system consisting of a sodium-iodide scintillation detector was used to collect data. Measurements were made with and without a collimator installed. A point-kernel transport code was developed to map the radial dependence of the gamma-ray flux. Input files for the Monte Carlo code, MCNP, were also developed to accurately model the experimental measurements. The results of the calculations were compared to the experimental measurements. In order to determine the delayed fission-product gamma-ray source for the calculations, a technique was developed using a previously written code, DELBG and the reactor state-point data obtained during the experimental measurements. Calculations were performed demonstrating the effects of material homogenization on the gamma-ray transmission through the fuel pin lattice.Homogeneous and heterogeneous calculations were performed for all RCF fuel pin lattices as well as for a typical commercial pressurized water reactor fuel bundle. The results of the study demonstrated the effectiveness of the experimental measurements to isolate the channeling effect of delayed fission-product gamma-rays through lattices of RCF fuel pins

  10. Fuel performance update at Japanese BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Yasuyuki; Abe, Moriyasu

    2008-01-01

    Fuel Performance of Japanese BWRs has shown excellency with a very low fuel failure rate over the past couple of decades. In order to eliminate debris-fretting failures, which is considered as a dominant cause, efforts have been made to work out strict FME program and introduce lower tie plate with debris filters. Regarding a measure to detect failures without delay, an online off-gas monitor is installed, and there occurred no significant secondary failures leading to unnecessary plant shutdowns thanks to the monitor. Current standard fuel designs are 9x9 lattice configuration with the design maximum burnup set at 55 GWd/t and the bundle average discharge burnup at 45 GWd/t. Satisfactory performance of many fuels has gained so far to the burnup level. However recent data show an increase in hydrogen pickup of fuel claddings and spacers in the region of high burnup or high irradiation period, and this is one of the issues that should be addressed to maintain and improve fuel reliability for the reasons that hydrogen concentration may affect ductility of zirconium alloy. Furthermore, a recent study showed abnormally high hydrogen concentration in fuel cladding. Comprehensive root cause analyses were made, which include a poolside measurement for a number of high burnup fuels and development of new technique for tenacious crud removal, with the result that it is confirmed that a unique combination of cladding material, irradiation period and environment caused the phenomenon and it is not expected to occur again. New iron enhanced zirconium alloys, which have been investigated in for a long time, are expected to have greater resistance to hydrogen pickup, and introduction of the alloys is considered as the future materials. Regarding extensive inspections of fuel assemblies and channel boxes at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPS, no abnormality due to Niigata-ken Chuetsu-oki earthquake was observed for all plants. This paper deals with the current fuel performance at Japanese

  11. Application of WIMSD-4 for ''MARIA'' reactor lattice calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrzejewski, K.; Kulikowska, T.

    1993-12-01

    A general description of the WIMSD-4 lattice code is given with the emphasis on available geometrical models. The difficulties encountered while modelling reactor lattices with the tubular type fuel elements are explained. Then the analysis of code options allowing to overcome these difficulties is carried out. Eventually, recommendations of options and input parameters for calculations of MARIA reactor lattice with satisfactory accuracy are given. During the work a set of modifications had to be introduced leading to a new code version called WIMS-S. Another version, under the name WIMS-T has been developed to allow for burnup calculations of the MARIA reactor lattice with improved resonance approach. (author). 14 refs, 6 figs, 10 tabs

  12. Economic benefits of increased discharge burnup for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dingqin

    1991-09-01

    Increased discharge burnup brings a great deal of benefits to the utilities. The total fuel cost and its fraction in different fuel cycle activities have been calculated at different discharge burnup level and given specific conditions by using DQUECO code developed by author himself for the Qinshan NPP1 and Daya Bay NPP on a 12 month cycle. It is also pointed out that increasing burnup from 33.0 GWd/tU to 40.7 GWd/tU for the Daya Bay NPP and increasing burnup from 24.0 GWd/tU to 32.0 GWd/tU for the Qinshan NPP1 are not only technically possible, but also economically beneficial

  13. Triton burnup in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipsham, E.; Jarvis, O.N.; Sadler, G.

    1989-01-01

    Triton burnup measurements have been made at JET using time-integrated copper activation and time-resolved silicon detector techniques. The results confirm the classical nature of both the confinement and the slowing down of the 1 MeV tritons in a plasma. (author) 8 refs., 3 figs

  14. Effect of lattice deformation on temperature fields and heat transfer in the fuel elements of characteristic zones for a model of fast reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, A.V.; Matyukhin, N.M.; Sviridenko, E.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    Given are the experimental results for temperature fields in the model assembly in nonribbed simulators of the BN-600-type reactor fuel elements in the course of deformation of the lattice caused by shifting of the central and peripheral (lateral, angular) fuel elements by the value of the gap between the fuel elements (the limiting case when the fuel elements touch each other along the whole length). An assembly consisting of 37 electroheated pipes arranged in a triangular lattice with a relative step of S/d=1.185 is used as a model. The experiments were carried out on the sodium stand at constant energy release along the length of the fuel element simulators and at the Pe number changing in the 14-700 range. The data obtained show considerable increase of nonuniformities of the fuel element temperatures for characteristic zones of the fuel cassette assembly models of the fast reactor at deviations of the lattice geometric sizes from the nominal ones. For the central nonribbed element the temperature nonuniformity increases approximately 7.5 times and for the lateral element approximately 6 times when the elements touch each other along the whole length. The shift the central nonribbed element by the value of the gap between the fu.el elements leads to the decrease of heat transfer in comparison with heat transfer at the nominal geometry approximately 3-7 times in the 10-450 range for the Pe numbers. It is shown that the coolant temperature distribution along the assembly radius has a complex character (with a peak between the centre and the perifery) caused by redistribution of coolant consumptions due to fuel element lattice deformation

  15. Calculation routes to determine burnup credit loading curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuber, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the paper on hand is to describe the key steps of the calculation routes used for evaluating burnup credit loading curves and to discuss procedures which are adequate to estimate the biases and variances in the calculation routes. In addition, impacts of the formulation of bounding or conservative approaches on the estimates of these biases and variances as well as on the reactivity effects due to the non-uniformity of the burnup distribution within the fuel are discussed. (author)

  16. Development of an extended-burnup Mark B design. Second semiannual progress report, January-June 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    The immediate goal of the DOE/AP and L/B and W project is to extend the burnup of light water reactor fuel assemblies beyond present limits to 50,000 MWd/mtU batch average burnup. Fuel management plans and fuel designs are being directed to attain the increased burnup limits. Lead-test assemblies of extended-burnup designs will be manufactured, irradiated in a commercial pressurized water reactor, and examined to support extended-burnup fuel cycles. This report, covering the period from January through June 1979, is the second semiannual progress report for the program. Efforts have included analyses of extended-burnup fuel cycles, developed of both annular fuel pellet and segmented rod designs, and design of a nondestructive post-irradiation examination system

  17. Transnucleaire's experience with burnup credit in transport operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malesys, P.

    2001-01-01

    Facing a continued increase in fuel enrichment values, Transnucleaire has progressively implemented a burnup credit programme in order to maintain or, where possible, to improve the capacity of its transport packagings without physical modification. Many package design approvals, based on a notion of burnup credit, have been granted by the French competent authority for transport since the early eighties, and many of these approvals have been validated by foreign competent authorities. Up to now, these approvals are restricted to fuel assemblies made of enriched uranium and irradiated in pressurized water reactors (PWR). The characterization of the irradiated fuel and the reactivity of the package are evaluated by calculation, performed using qualified French codes developed by the CEA (Commisariat a l'Energie Atomique/French Atomic Energy Commission): CESAR as a depletion code and APOLO-MORET as a criticality code. The approvals are based on the hypothesis that the burnup considered is that applied on the least irradiated region of the fuel assemblies, the conservative approach being not to take credit for any axial profile of burnup along the fuel assembly. The most reactive configuration is calculated and the burnup credit is also restricted to major actinides only. On the operational side and in compliance with regulatory requirements, verification is made before transport, in order to meet safety objectives as required by the transport regulations. Besides a review of documentation related to the irradiation history of each fuel assembly, it consists of either a qualitative (go/no-go) verification or of a quantitative measurement, depending on the level of burnup credit. Thus the use of burnup credit is now a common practice with Transnucleaire's packages, particularly in France and Germany. New improvements are still in progress and qualifications of the calculation code are now well advanced, which will allow in the near future the use of six selected

  18. Preliminary design study of small long life boiling water reactor (BWR) with tight lattice thorium nitride fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trianti, Nuri, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Su' ud, Zaki, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Arif, Idam, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia) (Indonesia); Riyana, EkaSapta [Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    Neutronic performance of small long-life boiling water reactors (BWR) with thorium nitride based fuel has been performed. A recent study conducted on BWR in tight lattice environments (with a lower moderator percentage) produces small power reactor which has some specifications, i.e. 10 years operation time, power density of 19.1 watt/cc and maximum excess reactivity of about 4%. This excess reactivity value is smaller than standard reactivity of conventional BWR. The use of hexagonal geometry on the fuel cell of BWR provides a substantial effect on the criticality of the reactor to obtain a longer operating time. Supported by a tight concept lattice where the volume fraction of the fuel is greater than the moderator and fuel, Thorium Nitride give good results for fuel cell design on small long life BWR. The excess reactivity of the reactor can be reduced with the addition of gadolinium as burnable poisons. Therefore the hexagonal tight lattice fuel cell design of small long life BWR that has a criticality more than 20 years of operating time has been obtained.

  19. Analysis of neutron parameters in light water moderated lattices of ThO2 and UO2 fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onusic Junior, J.; Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A large number of light water moderated lattices of UO 2 and ThO 2 fuel rods were analyzed with the code HAMMER. The purpose of the study was to compare experimental results with computer calculated values. The model employed is described and some modification were introduced in the resonance parameters of Th-232 to increase the agreement with the experimental value [pt

  20. Burnup measurements with the Los Alamos fork detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosler, G.E.; Rinard, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The fork detector system can determine the burnup of spent-fuel assemblies. It is a transportable instrument that can be mounted permanently in a spent-fuel pond near a loading area for shipping casks, or be attached to the storage pond bridge for measurements on partially raised spent-fuel assemblies. The accuracy of the predicted burnup has been demonstrated to be as good as 2% from measurements on assemblies in the United States and other countries. Instruments have also been developed at other facilities throughout the world using the same or different techniques, but with similar accuracies. 14 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Reactor Physics Assessment of Thick Silicon Carbide Clad PWR Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    84 Appendix A: Fuel Composition and Cycle Burnup Calculations ...28 Table 11: 84 Assembly per Reload Core Burnups , LRM Calculation ...28 Table 12: 64 Assembly per Reload Core Burnups , LRM Calculation ........................................ 29 Table 13: Design-Limiting

  2. Twenty-fifth water reactor safety information meeting: Proceedings. Volume 2: Human reliability analysis and human performance evaluation; Technical issues related to rulemakings; Risk-informed, performance-based initiatives; High burn-up fuel research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteleone, S.

    1998-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the conference. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Japan, Norway, and Russia. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. This volume contains the following: (1) human reliability analysis and human performance evaluation; (2) technical issues related to rulemakings; (3) risk-informed, performance-based initiatives; and (4) high burn-up fuel research

  3. Light a CANDLE. An innovative burnup strategy of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2005-11-01

    CANDLE is a new burnup strategy for nuclear reactors, which stands for Constant Axial Shape of Neutron Flux, Nuclide Densities and Power Shape During Life of Energy Production. When this candle-like burnup strategy is adopted, although the fuel is fixed in a reactor core, the burning region moves, at a speed proportionate to the power output, along the direction of the core axis without changing the spatial distribution of the number density of the nuclides, neutron flux, and power density. Excess reactivity is not necessary for burnup and the shape of the power distribution and core characteristics do not change with the progress of burnup. It is not necessary to use control rods for the control of the burnup. This booklet described the concept of the CANDLE burnup strategy with basic explanations of excess neutrons and its specific application to a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor and a fast reactor with excellent neutron economy. Supplementary issues concerning the initial core and high burnup were also referred. (T. Tanaka)

  4. Direct methanol fuel cell bubble transport simulations via thermal lattice Boltzmann and volume of fluid methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, K.; Chen, T. S.; Hong, C. W.

    Carbon dioxide bubble removal at the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an important technique especially for applications in the portable power sources. This paper presents numerical investigations of the two-phase flow, CO 2 bubbles in a liquid methanol solution, in the anode microchannels from the aspect of microfluidics using a thermal lattice Boltzmann model (TLBM). The main purpose is to derive an efficient and effective computational scheme to deal with this technical problem. It is then examined by a commercially available software using Navier-Stokes plus volume of fluid (VOF) method. The latter approach is normally employed by most researchers. A simplified microchannel simulation domain with the dimension of 1.5 μm in height (or width) and 16.0 μm in length has been setup for both cases to mimic the actual flow path of a CO 2 bubble inside an anodic diffusion layer in the DMFC. This paper compares both numerical schemes and results under the same operation conditions from the viewpoint of fuel cell engineering.

  5. Strategies for Application of Isotopic Uncertainties in Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2002-12-23

    Uncertainties in the predicted isotopic concentrations in spent nuclear fuel represent one of the largest sources of overall uncertainty in criticality calculations that use burnup credit. The methods used to propagate the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations to the uncertainty in the predicted neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of the system can have a significant effect on the uncertainty in the safety margin in criticality calculations and ultimately affect the potential capacity of spent fuel transport and storage casks employing burnup credit. Methods that can provide a more accurate and realistic estimate of the uncertainty may enable increased spent fuel cask capacity and fewer casks needing to be transported, thereby reducing regulatory burden on licensee while maintaining safety for transporting spent fuel. This report surveys several different best-estimate strategies for considering the effects of nuclide uncertainties in burnup-credit analyses. The potential benefits of these strategies are illustrated for a prototypical burnup-credit cask design. The subcritical margin estimated using best-estimate methods is discussed in comparison to the margin estimated using conventional bounding methods of uncertainty propagation. To quantify the comparison, each of the strategies for estimating uncertainty has been performed using a common database of spent fuel isotopic assay measurements for pressurized-light-water reactor fuels and predicted nuclide concentrations obtained using the current version of the SCALE code system. The experimental database applied in this study has been significantly expanded to include new high-enrichment and high-burnup spent fuel assay data recently published for a wide range of important burnup-credit actinides and fission products. Expanded rare earth fission-product measurements performed at the Khlopin Radium Institute in Russia that contain the only known publicly-available measurement for {sup 103

  6. A simple formula for local burnup based on constant relative reaction rate per nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Cenxi; Wang, Xuming; Chen, Shengli

    2015-01-01

    A simple and analytical formula is suggested to solve the problems of the local burnup and the isotope distributions. The present method considers two extreme conditions of neutrons penetrating the fuel rod. Based on these considerations, the formula is obtained to calculate the reaction rates of $^{235}$U, $^{238}$U, and $^{239}$Pu and straightforward the local burnup and the isotope distributions. Starting from an initial burnup level, the parameters of the formula are fitted to the reactio...

  7. High burnup models in computer code fair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, B.K.; Swami Prasad, P.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodar, A.

    1997-01-01

    An advanced fuel analysis code FAIR has been developed for analyzing the behavior of fuel rods of water cooled reactors under severe power transients and high burnups. The code is capable of analyzing fuel pins of both collapsible clad, as in PHWR and free standing clad as in LWR. The main emphasis in the development of this code is on evaluating the fuel performance at extended burnups and modelling of the fuel rods for advanced fuel cycles. For this purpose, a number of suitable models have been incorporated in FAIR. For modelling the fission gas release, three different models are implemented, namely Physically based mechanistic model, the standard ANS 5.4 model and the Halden model. Similarly the pellet thermal conductivity can be modelled by the MATPRO equation, the SIMFUEL relation or the Halden equation. The flux distribution across the pellet is modelled by using the model RADAR. For modelling pellet clad interaction (PCMI)/ stress corrosion cracking (SCC) induced failure of sheath, necessary routines are provided in FAIR. The validation of the code FAIR is based on the analysis of fuel rods of EPRI project ''Light water reactor fuel rod modelling code evaluation'' and also the analytical simulation of threshold power ramp criteria of fuel rods of pressurized heavy water reactors. In the present work, a study is carried out by analysing three CRP-FUMEX rods to show the effect of various combinations of fission gas release models and pellet conductivity models, on the fuel analysis parameters. The satisfactory performance of FAIR may be concluded through these case studies. (author). 12 refs, 5 figs

  8. Burnable poisons in the light water reactor design, microburnup experiments and calculations. Part of a coordinated programme on burnup calculations and experiments for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penndorf, K.

    1976-04-01

    Investigations on Research Agreement N 1519/CF (1.8.1974 - 31.7.1975) entitled ''Burnable poisons in light water reactor design, microburnup experiments and calculations'' were carried out in the frame of the IAEA's coordinated research programme on ''Burn-up calculation and experiments for thermal reactors''. The theoretical and experimental work on application of solid burnable poison used for reduction of the amount of boric acid necessary to control of PWR or to lower the number of control rods needed in a BWR. Solid burnable poisons are needed in present PWR designs for the reduction of the boron acid concentration in order to prevent positive coefficients of reactivity. The special operational conditions of a ship reactor lead to the application of this kind of poison for compensation of almost all burnup reactivity. This strengthens the necessity of a very accurate and many dimensional calculations because an appropriate binding of reactivity has to be kept over the whole cycle time. Several burnup experiments had been run in the 15 MW material test reactor FRG-II. The following devices have been irradiated: poison pins within and without PWR fuel pin lattice segments and fuel pins containing pellets with a poison core. Measurements of reactivity, fluence, fission product concentration have been performed. Methods applied were γ-scanning and neutron pulse, radiography and transmission measurement techniques. Evaluation of the experiments was done by one and two dimensional Ssub(N) transport burnup calculations. In parallel a collision probability transport burnup code for current PWR design work is being developed, the main feature of which is economy in manpower and computer time

  9. Comparison of analysis methods for burnup credit applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.L.; Brady, M.C.; Renier, J.P.; Parks, C.V.

    1989-01-01

    The current approach used for the development and certification of spent fuel storage and transport casks requires an assumption of fresh fuel isotopics in the criticality safety analysis. However, it has been shown that there is a considerable reactivity reduction when the isotopics representative of the depleted (or burned) fuel are used in a criticality analysis. Thus, by taking credit for the burned state of the fuel (i.e., burnup credit), a cask designer could achieve a significant increase in payload. Accurate prediction of k eff for spent fuel arrays depends both on the criticality safety analysis and the prediction of the spent fuel isotopics via a depletion analysis. Spent fuel isotopics can be obtained from detailed multidimensional reactor analyses, e.g. the code PDQ, or from point reactor burnup models. These reactor calculations will help verify the adequacy of the isotopics and determine Δk eff biases for various analysis assumptions (with and without fission products, actinide absorbers, burnable poison rods, etc.). New software developed to interface PDQ multidimensional isotopics with KENO V.a reactor and cask models is described. Analyses similar to those performed for the reactor cases are carried out with a representative burnup credit cask model using the North Anna fuel. This paper presents the analysis methodology that has been developed for evaluating the physics issues associated with burnup credit. It is applicable in the validation and characterization of fuel isotopics as well as in determining the influence of various analysis assumptions in terms of δk eff . The methodology is used in the calculation of reactor restart criticals and analysis of a typical burnup credit cask

  10. Tag gas burnup based on three-dimensional FTR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidman, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    Flux spectra from a three-dimensional diffusion theory analysis of the Fast Test Reactor (FTR) are used to predict gas tag ratio changes, as a function of exposure, for each FTR fuel and absorber subassembly plenum. These flux spectra are also used to predict Xe-125 equilibrium activities in absorber plena in order to assess the feasibility of using Xe-125 gamma rays to detect and distinguish control rod failures from fuel rod failures. Worst case tag burnup changes are used in conjunction with burnup and mass spectrometer uncertainties to establish the minimum spacing of tags which allows the tags to be unambiguously identified

  11. Description of the lattice code POWDERPUFS-V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouben, B.; Tin, E.S.Y.; Loken, P.C.

    1995-10-01

    POWDERPUFS-V is a lattice code written specifically for CANDU lattices. The moderator is limited to reactor-grade heavy water, while the coolant may be light water, heavy water, air or HB-40 (organic fluid). The fuel can by UO 2 , U, U 3 Si, U-C or U-Zr, in the form of either a single rod or a cluster of pins. The program calculates the four-factor parameters and also provides lattice nuclear cross sections for use in finite-core neutron-diffusion codes. A burnup calculation is included. In this report, the general capabilities of the program are discussed. (author) 24 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs

  12. Lattice-Strain Control of Exceptional Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strasser, Peter

    2011-08-19

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical approach to demonstrate how lattice strain can be used to continuously tune the catalytic activity of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on bimetallic nanoparticles that have been dealloyed. The sluggish kinetics of the ORR is a key barrier to the adaptation of fuel cells and currently limits their widespread use. Dealloyed Pt-Cu bimetallic nanoparticles, however, have been shown to exhibit uniquely high reactivity for this reaction. We first present evidence for the formation of a core-shell structure during dealloying, which involves removal of Cu from the surface and subsurface of the precursor nanoparticles. We then show that the resulting Pt-rich surface shell exhibits compressive strain that depends on the composition of the precursor alloy. We next demonstrate the existence of a downward shift of the Pt d-band, resulting in weakening of the bond strength of intermediate oxygenated species due to strain. Finally, we combine synthesis, strain, and catalytic reactivity in an experimental/theoretical reactivity-strain relationship which provides guidelines for the rational design of strained oxygen reduction electrocatalysts. The stoichiometry of the precursor, together with the dealloying conditions, provides experimental control over the resulting surface strain and thereby allows continuous tuning of the surface electrocatalytic reactivity - a concept that can be generalized to other catalytic reactions.

  13. Burnup measurements at the RECH-1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriquez, C.; Navarro, G.; Pereda, C.; Torres, H.; Pena, L.; Klein, J.; Calderon, D.; Kestelman, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission has decided to produce LEU fuel elements for the RECH-1 research reactor. During December 1998, the Fuel Fabrication Plant delivered the first four fuel elements, called leaders, to the RECH-1 reactor. The set was introduced into the reactor's core, following the normal routine, but performing a special follow-up on their behavior inside and outside the core. In order to measure the burn-up of the leader fuel elements, it was decided to develop a burn-up measurements system to be installed into the RECH-1 reactor pool, and to decline the use of a similar system, which operates in a hot cell. The main reason to build this facility was to have the capability to measure the burn-up of fuel elements without waiting for long decay period. This paper gives a brief description of the facility to measure the burn-up of spent fuel elements installed into the reactor pool, showing the preliminary obtained spectra and briefly discussing them. (author)

  14. Power excursion analysis for high burnup cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D.J.; Neymotin, L.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-02-01

    A study was undertaken of power excursions in high burnup cores. There were three objectives in this study. One was to identify boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) transients in which there is significant energy deposition in the fuel. Another was to analyze the response of BWRs to the rod drop accident (RDA) and other transients in which there is a power excursion. The last objective was to investigate the sources of uncertainty in the RDA analysis. In a boiling water reactor, the events identified as having significant energy deposition in the fuel were a rod drop accident, a recirculation flow control failure, and the overpressure events; in a pressurized water reactor, they were a rod ejection accident and boron dilution events. The RDA analysis was done with RAMONA-4B, a computer code that models the space- dependent neutron kinetics throughout the core along with the thermal hydraulics in the core, vessel, and steamline. The results showed that the calculated maximum fuel enthalpy in high burnup fuel will be affected by core design, initial conditions, and modeling assumptions. The important uncertainties in each of these categories are discussed in the report.

  15. Calculation of isotope burn-up and change in efficiency of absorbing elements of WWER-1000 control and protection system during burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeeva, O.A.; Kurakin, K.U.

    2006-01-01

    The report deals with fast and thermal neutron flows distribution in structural elements of WWER-1000 fuel assembly and absorbing rods, determination of absorbing isotope burn-up and worth variation in WWER reactor control and protection system rods. Simulation of absorber rod burn-up is provided using code package SAPPHIRE 9 5 end RC W WER allowing detailed description of the core segment spatial model. Maximum burn-up of absorbing rods and respective worth variation of control and protection system rods is determined on the basis of a number of calculations considering known characteristics of fuel cycles (Authors)

  16. EVOLUT - a computer program for fast burnup evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craciunescu, T.; Dobrin, R.; Stamatescu, L.; Alexa, A.

    1999-01-01

    EVOLUT is a computer program for burnup evaluation. The input data consist on the one hand of axial and radial gamma-scanning profiles (for the experimental evaluation of the number of nuclei of a fission product - the burnup monitor - at the end of irradiation) and on the other hand of the history of irradiation (the time length and values proportional to the neutron flux for each step of irradiation). Using the equation of evolution of the burnup monitor the flux values are iteratively adjusted, by a multiplier factor, until the calculated number of nuclei is equal to the experimental one. The flux values are used in the equation of evolution of the fissile and fertile nuclei to determine the fission number and consequently the burnup. EVOLUT was successfully used in the analysis of several hundreds of CANDU and TRIGA-type fuel rods. We appreciate that EVOLUT is a useful tool in the burnup evaluation based on gamma spectrometry measurements. EVOLUT can be used on an usual AT computer and in this case the results are obtained in a few minutes. It has an original and user-friendly graphical interface and it provides also output in script MATLAB files for graphical representation and further numerical analysis. The computer program needs simple data and it is valuable especially when a large number of burnup analyses are required quickly. (authors)

  17. Analysis of temperature reactivity coefficient at very high burn-ups for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Shihe; Dai Xiang; Cao Xinrong

    2012-01-01

    In the high burn-up core, as the initial enrichment increases, the fast/thermal flux ratio also increases. The harder neutron spectrum influences the temperature reactivity coefficients. In this paper, a very high burn-up core was designed, very high burn-up levels was achieved using higher enrichments and various feed assembly and loading pattern options. The CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 code system is used to model the high burn-up core and calculate temperature reactivity coefficient for the burn-up more than 60 GWD/T. The results show that the hardening of the neutron spectrum leads to more negative moderator temperature coefficients at high burn-ups irrespective of whether or not there is burnable poison; the is little variation with fuel temperature coefficient. (authors)

  18. Advanced PWR fuel design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersor, C.K.; Harris, R.P.; Crump, M.W.; Fuhrman, N.

    1987-01-01

    For nearly 15 years, Combustion Engineering has provided pressurized water reactor fuel with the features most suppliers are now introducing in their advanced fuel designs. Zircaloy grids, removable upper end fittings, large fission gas plenum, high burnup, integral burnable poisons and sophisticated analytical methods are all features of C-E standard fuel which have been well proven by reactor performance. C-E's next generation fuel for pressurized water reactors features 24-month operating cycles, optimal lattice burnable poisons, increased resistance to common industry fuel rod failure mechanisms, and hardware and methodology for operating margin improvements. Application of these various improvements offer continued improvement in fuel cycle economics, plant operation and maintenance. (author)

  19. M5TM alloy high burnup behavior and worldwide licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardon, J.P.; Hoffmann, P.B.; Garner, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    The in-reactor behavior of advanced PWR Zirconium alloys at burnups equal to or below licensing limits has been widely reported. Specifically, the advanced alloy M5 has demonstrated impressive improvements over Zircaloy-4 for fuel rod cladding and fuel assembly structural components. To demonstrate superiority of the alloy at burnups beyond current licensing limits, M5 has been operated in PWR at burnups exceeding 71 GWd/tU in the United States and 78 GWd/tU in Europe. Two extensive irradiation programs have been performed in the United States to demonstrate alloy M5 performance beyond current licensing limits. Four M5 TM fuel rods were exposed to four 24-month cycles in a 15x15 reactor beginning in 1995. Additionally, one 17x17 lead assembly containing M5 fuel rods and guide tubes was operated for four 18-month cycles beginning from 1997. Post-irradiation examinations (PIE) performed after all four cycles in the 15x15 demonstration program revealed excellent performance in the licensed burnup and in the high burnup stages of the experience. Examination of the 4th cycle 17x17 assembly will be accomplished in two stages the first of which is scheduled for June 2005. Moreover, several irradiation campaigns have been performed in Europe in order to confirm the excellent M5 in-pile behavior in demanding PWRs irradiation conditions with regard to void fraction, heat flux, lithium content and temperature. Results from the high burnup fuel examinations verify that the excellent performance achieved up to 62 GWd/tU was continued into higher burnup. The results of high burnup PIE campaigns for European and American PWR's are presented in this paper. Measured performance indicators include fuel assembly dimensional stability parameters (assembly length, fuel rod length, assembly bow, fuel rod bow, fuel rod radial creep and spacer grid width), oxidation measurements (fuel rod and guide tube) and hydrogen pick-up data (fuel rod). In the framework of PCI studies, power ramp

  20. Development of ORIGEN libraries for mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assembly designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertyurek, Ugur, E-mail: mertyureku@ornl.gov; Gauld, Ian C., E-mail: gauldi@ornl.gov

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • ORIGEN MOX library generation process is described. • SCALE burnup calculations are validated against measured MOX fuel samples from the MALIBU program. • ORIGEN MOX libraries are verified using the OECD Phase IV-B benchmark. • There is good agreement for calculated-to-measured isotopic distributions. - Abstract: ORIGEN cross section libraries for reactor-grade mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assembly designs have been developed to provide fast and accurate depletion calculations to predict nuclide inventories, radiation sources and thermal decay heat information needed in safety evaluations and safeguards verification measurements of spent nuclear fuel. These ORIGEN libraries are generated using two-dimensional lattice physics assembly models that include enrichment zoning and cross section data based on ENDF/B-VII.0 evaluations. Using the SCALE depletion sequence, burnup-dependent cross sections are created for selected commercial reactor assembly designs and a representative range of reactor operating conditions, fuel enrichments, and fuel burnup. The burnup dependent cross sections are then interpolated to provide problem-dependent cross sections for ORIGEN, avoiding the need for time-consuming lattice physics calculations. The ORIGEN libraries for MOX assembly designs are validated against destructive radiochemical assay measurements of MOX fuel from the MALIBU international experimental program. This program included measurements of MOX fuel from a 15 × 15 pressurized water reactor assembly and a 9 × 9 boiling water reactor assembly. The ORIGEN MOX libraries are also compared against detailed assembly calculations from the Phase IV-B numerical MOX fuel burnup credit benchmark coordinated by the Nuclear Energy Agency within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The nuclide compositions calculated by ORIGEN using the MOX libraries are shown to be in good agreement with other physics codes and with experimental data.

  1. Determination of axial profit performed burnup credit by SCALE 4.3-system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miro, R.; Verdu, G.; Munoz-Cobo, J. L.

    1998-01-01

    SCALE 4.3 is a modular code system designed for realizing standard computational analysis for licensing evaluation. Since now, spent fuel storage pools criticality analysis have been done considering this fuel as fresh, with its maximum enrichment. With burnup credit we can obtain cheaper and compact configurations. The procedure for calculating a spent fuel storage consists of a burnup calculation plus a criticality calculation. We can perform a conservative approximation for the burnup calculations using 1-D results, but, besides the geometry configurations for the 3-D criticality calculation. we need an appropriate approximation to model the burnup axial variation. We assume that for a burnup profile set, the most conservative profile is between the lower and the upper range of this profile, set. We consider only combinations of the maximum and minimum burnup in each axial region, for each burnup range. This gives an estimation of the different burnup shapes effect and the general characteristics of the most conservative shape. (Author) 6 refs

  2. WIMSD4 calculations of the Westinghouse 'EDASA' lattices with plutonium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, M.J.

    1977-03-01

    A series of Westinghouse critical PuO 2 /UO 2 pin-cell assemblies is analysed using the lattice code WIMSD4. The results are presented in terms of computed k-effective values, with comment on the choice of method for calculating high leakage systems and on the adequacy of WIMSD4 for evaluating plutonium enriched lattices. (author)

  3. Effect of Burnable Absorbers on Inert Matrix Fuel Performance and Transuranic Burnup in a Low Power Density Light-Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Recktenwald

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Zirconium dioxide has received particular attention as a fuel matrix because of its ability to form a solid solution with transuranic elements, natural radiation stability and desirable mechanical properties. However, zirconium dioxide has a lower coefficient of thermal conductivity than uranium dioxide and this presents an obstacle to the deployment of these fuels in commercial reactors. Here we show that axial doping of a zirconium dioxide based fuel with erbium reduces power peaking and fuel temperature. Full core simulations of a modified AP1000 core were done using MCNPX 2.7.0. The inert matrix fuel contained 15 w/o transuranics at its beginning of life and constituted 28% of the assemblies in the core. Axial doping reduced power peaking at startup by more than ~23% in the axial direction and reduced the peak to average power within the core from 1.80 to 1.44. The core was able to remain critical between refueling while running at a simulated 2000 MWth on an 18 month refueling cycle. The results show that the reactor would maintain negative core average reactivity and void coefficients during operation. This type of fuel cycle would reduce the overall production of transuranics in a pressurized water reactor by 86%.

  4. Methodology for burnup credit application for WWER-440 reactors in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrapciak, V.

    2006-01-01

    Improved calculational methods allow one to take credit for the reactivity reduction associated with fuel burnup. This means reducing the analysis conservative while maintaining an adequate criticality safety margin. Application of burnup credit requires knowledge of the reactivity state of the irradiated fuel for which burnup credit is taken. The isotopic inventory and reactivity has to by calculated with validated codes. By depletion calculation is necessary to take into account: 1) List of used nuclides 2) Cooling time 3) Core parameters by irradiation - Fuel temperature - Moderator temperature/density - Soluble boron - Specific power and operating history 4) Axial and horizontal burnup profiles In this paper is numerical evaluation of impact of above parameters on reactivity for WWER-440 fuel (enrichment 3.6%) in condition of wet storage presented. The bounding conditions are defined. The SCALE 5.0 system is used for depletion and criticality calculation (Authors)

  5. Spent fuel management systems, burnup credit approach experience in expert activity of State Scientific and Technical Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovbasenko, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Implementing new devices and mechanisms, including those developed and manufactured abroad, at enterprises of the Ukrainian power industry makes it necessary to license them in advance by the Ukrainian Regulatory Authority. From time to time, situations occur when these systems or their close analogues have been already used in some countries and have successively passed licensing by the relevant Regulatory Authorities; however, they do not meet the regulatory requirements in force in Ukraine. Preliminary analysis of the regulations in Ukraine concerning nuclear safety of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management systems shows that some regulatory requirements in force are too conservative in view of current international practice. The extent of conservatism can be reduced, if necessary, only on the base of improving our level of understanding the processes occurring in nuclear dangerous systems and improving our capabilities as regards accuracy, correctness, and reliability in numerical modeling these processes. Such activity is consistent with the state-of-the-art production requirements. This work was intended to demonstrate that the excessive conservatism laid previously into the requirements on nuclear safety in Ukraine due to insufficient development of tools for modeling processes in nuclear fuel can be considerably decreased through using more modern and real modeling fuel systems. If such modeling is performed with the use of state-of-the-art methods, based on more complete understanding the processes in fuel systems, then removal of the excessive conservatism will not reduce the safety of nuclear dangerous systems

  6. Preparation of higher-actinide burnup and cross section samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adair, H.L.; Kobisk, E.H.; Quinby, T.C.; Thomas, D.K.; Dailey, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    A joint research program involving the United States and the United Kingdom was instigated about four years ago for the purpose of studying burnup of higher actinides using in-core irradiation in the fast reactor at Dounreay, Scotland. Simultaneously, determination of cross sections of a wide variety of higher actinide isotopes was proposed. Coincidental neutron flux and energy spectral measurements were to be made using vanadium encapsulated dosimetry materials in the immediate region of the burnup and cross section samples. The higher actinide samples chosen for the burnup study were 241 Am and 244 Cm in the forms of Am 2 O 3 , Cm 2 O 3 , and Am 6 Cm(RE) 7 O 21 , where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanide sesquioxides. It is the purpose of this paper to describe technology development and its application in the preparation of the fuel specimens and the cross section specimens that are being used in this cooperative program

  7. Validation issues for depletion and criticality analysis in burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.V.; Broadhead, B.L.; Dehart, M.D.; Gauld, I.C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews validation issues associated with implementation of burnup credit in transport, dry storage, and disposal. The issues discussed are ones that have been identified by one or more constituents of the United States technical community (national laboratories, licensees, and regulators) that have been exploring the use of burnup credit. There is not necessarily agreement on the importance of the various issues, which sometimes is what creates the issue. The broad issues relate to the paucity of available experimental data (radiochemical assays and critical experiments) covering the full range and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel in away-from-reactor systems. The paper will also introduce recent efforts initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide technical information that can help better assess the value of different experiments. The focus of the paper is on experience with validation issues related to use of burnup credit for transport and dry storage applications. (author)

  8. Studying the fuel burnup of MNSR reactor and estimating the concentrations of main fission products using the codes WIMS-D4 and CITATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haj Hassan, H.; Ghazi, N.; Hainoun, A.

    2007-01-01

    The codes WIMSD-4 and BORGLES - part of the MTR-PC code package- have been applied to prepare the microscopic cross section library for the main elements of MNSR core for 6 neutron energy groups. The generated library was utilized from the 3D code CITATION to perform the calculation of fuel burn up and depletion including the identification of main fission products and its effects on the multiplication factor. In this regard some modifications have been introduced to the subroutine NUCY in CITATION to incorporate estimating the concentration of the related actinides and fission products. The burn up results indicated that the core life time of MNSR is being mainly estimated by Sm-149 following by Gd-157 and Cd-113. The accumulation of these actinides during 100 continuous operation days caused a reduction of ca. 2 mk for the excess reactivity. This result seems to be in good agreement with the available empirical value of 1.8 mk which relates to the whole discontinuous operation period of the reactor since its start and up to now. The calculation procedure simulates the sporadic operation with an adequate continuous operation period. This approximation is valid for the long lived actinides that mainly dictate the core life time. However, it is an overestimation for the concentration of short lived radioactive products like Xe-135. In the framework of this analysis the possibility of replacement of current MNSR fuel through low enriched fuels has been explored for two the fuel types U02-Mg and U3Si-Al. The results indicate that the first type (UO2-Mg) realize the criticality conditions with low enrichment of 20%, whereas the second type (U3Si-Al) required increasing the uranium enrichment up to 33%. For both fuel types the contribution of plutonium isotopes on the criticality has been also evaluated. Additionally, the influence of mixing burnable absorbers (Gd-113, Cd- 113) with the fresh fuels was investigated to identify their long-term control effect on the

  9. Full MOX high burn-up PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Kugo, Teruhiko; Shimada, Shoichiro; Araya, Fumimasa; Ochiai, Masaaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    As a part of conceptual investigation on advanced light water reactors for the future, a light water reactor with the high burn-up of 100 GWd/t, the long cycle operation of 3 years and the full MOX core is being studied, aiming at the improvement on economical aspects, the reduction of the spent fuel production, the utilization of Plutonium and so forth. The present report summarizes investigation on PWR-type reactors. The core with the increased moderation of the moderator-to-fuel volume ratio of 2.6 {approx} 3.0 has been proposed be such a core that accomplishes requirements mentioned above. Through the neutronic and the thermo-hydrodynamic evaluation, the performances of the core have been evaluated. Also, the safety designing is underway considering the reactor system with the passive safety features. (author)

  10. Validation of SCALE-4 for burnup credit applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, S.M.; DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V.

    1995-01-01

    In the past, a criticality analysis of PWR fuel stored in racks and casks has assumed that the fuel is fresh with the maximum allowable initial enrichment. If credit is allowed for fuel burnup in the design of casks that are used in the transport of spent light water reactor fuel to a repository, the increase in payload can lead to a significant reduction in the cost of transport and a potential reduction in the risk to the public. A portion of the work has been performed at ORNL in support of the US DOE efforts to demonstrate a validation approach for criticality safety methods to be used in burnup credit cask design. To date, the SCALE code system developed at ORNL has been the primary computational tool used by DOE to investigate technical issues related to burnup credit. The ANSI/ANS-8.1 criticality safety standard requires validation and benchmarking of the calculational methods used in evaluating criticality safety limits for applications outside reactors by correlation against critical experiments that are applicable. Numerous critical experiments for fresh PWR-type fuel in storage and transport configurations exist and can be used as part of a validation database. However, there are no critical experiments with burned PWR-type fuel in storage and transport configurations. As an alternative, commercial reactors offer an excellent source of measured critical configurations. The results reported demonstrate the ability of the ORNL SCALE-4 methodology to predict a value of k eff very close to the known value of 1.0, both for fresh fuel criticals and for the more complex reactor criticals. Beyond these results, additional work in the determination of biases and uncertainties is necessary prior to use in burnup credit applications

  11. Development and verification of Monte Carlo burnup calculation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yoshihira; Yoshioka, Kenichi; Mitsuhashi, Ishi; Sakurada, Koichi; Sakurai, Shungo

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo burnup calculation code system has been developed to evaluate accurate various quantities required in the backend field. From the Actinide Research in a Nuclear Element (ARIANE) program, by using, the measured nuclide compositions of fuel rods in the fuel assemblies irradiated in the commercial Netherlands BWR, the analyses have been performed for the code system verification. The code system developed in this paper has been verified through analysis for MOX and UO2 fuel rods. This system enables to reduce large margin assumed in the present criticality analysis for LWR spent fuels. (J.P.N.)

  12. Optimization of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuffler, Carter A.; Trant, Jarrod M.; Todreas, Neil E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper reports the results of the thermal-hydraulic and economic analyses performed for hydride fueled PWR cores as part of a collaborative project on hydride fuels undertaken by MIT and UC Berkeley. The use of hydride fuels allows increased fuel to coolant ratios in a given core volume, and the achievement of higher burnups and thermal power from a core loading. A parametric study was developed to determine the optimum combination of latti