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Sample records for fuel debris bed

  1. Investigation of the structure of debris beds formed from fuel rods fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Duc-Hanh; Fichot, Florian; Topin, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.topin@irsn.fr

    2017-03-15

    This paper is a study of debris beds that can form in the core of a nuclear power plant under severe accident conditions. Such beds are formed of fragments of pellets and cladding remnants, as observed in the TMI-2 core. Many important issues are related with the morphology of those debris beds: are they coolable in case of water injection and how does molten corium progress through them if they are not coolable? The answers to those questions depend on the structure of the debris bed: porosity, number and arrangement of particles. In order to obtain relevant information, a numerical simulation of the formation of the debris bed is proposed. It relies on a granular approach of the type called “Contact Dynamics” to simulate the collapse of debris and their accumulation. Two different schemes of fuel pellet fragmentation are considered and simulations for different degrees of fragmentation of the pellets are performed. The results show that the number of axial cracks on fuel pellets strongly influences the final porosity of the debris bed. Porosities vary between 31% (less coolable cases) and 45% (similar to TMI-2 observations), with a most probable configuration around 41%. The specific surface of the bed is also evaluated. In the last part, a simple model is used to estimate the impact of the variation in geometry of the numeric debris beds on their flow properties. We show that the permeability and passability can vary respectively with a range of 30% and 15% depending on the number of fragment per pellet. The other benefits of the approach are finally discussed. Among them, the possibility to print 3D samples from the calculated images of debris beds appears as a promising perspective to perform experiments with realistic debris beds.

  2. Fundamental study on dynamic behaviors of fuel debris bed. Research report in 2007 (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Koji; Fukuda, Kenji; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Tohru; Yamano, Hidemasa

    2009-05-01

    It is important to make a reasonable evaluation of coolability of debris bed with decay heat source in assessing post accident heat removal of a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. In general, the coolability of fuel debris depends on coolant convection, boiling and debris bed movement. In the present study, to understand fundamental characteristics of debris movement, self-leveling behavior caused by the coolant boiling was investigated experimentally using simulant materials. The present experiments employed depressurization boiling of water to simulate void distribution in a debris bed, which consists of solid particles of alumina. A rough estimation model of self-leveling occurrence was proposed and compared with the experimental results. Its extrapolation to reactor accident conditions was also discussed. In addition, solid-liquid flow experiments, which are relevant to debris bed movement behaviors, were analyzed to verify the validity of multiphase flow models employed in a safety analysis code. In the present verification study, basic validity of the code was demonstrated by analyzing experiments of water-column sloshing with solid particles. (author)

  3. Flow characteristics of counter-current flow in debris bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yutaka; Adachi, Hiromichi

    2004-01-01

    In the course of a severe accident, a damaged core would form a debris bed consisting of once-molten and fragmented fuel elements. It is necessary to evaluate the dryout heat flux for the judgment of the coolability of the debris bed during the severe accident. The dryout phenomena in the debris bed is dominated by the counter-current flow limitation (CCFL) in the debris bed. In this study, air-water counter-current flow behavior in the debris bed is experimentally investigated with glass particles simulating the debris beds. In this experiment, falling water flow rate and axial pressure distributions were experimentally measured. As the results, it is clarified that falling water flow rate becomes larger with the debris bed height and the pressure gradient in the upper region of the debris bed is different from that in the lower region of the debris bed. These results indicate that the dominant region for CCFL in the debris bed is identified near the top of the debris bed. Analytical results with annular flow model indicates that interfacial shear stress in the upper region of the debris bed is larger than that in the lower region of the debris bed. (author)

  4. Preliminary results from initial in-pile debris bed experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    An accident in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) in which molten core material is suddenly quenched with subcooled liquid sodium could result in extensive fragmentation and dispersal of fuel as subcritical beds of frozen particulate debris within the reactor vessel. Since this debris will continue to generate power due to decay of retained fission products, containment of the debris is threatened if the generated heat is not removed. Therefore, the initial safety question is the capacity which debris beds may have for transfer of the decay heat to overlying liquid sodium by natural processes--i.e., without the aid of forced circulation of the coolant. Up to the present time, all experiments on debris bed behavior either have used substitute materials (e.g., sand and water) or have employed actual materials, but atypical heating methods. Increased confidence in the applicability of debris bed simulations is afforded if the heat is generated within the fuel component of the appropriate fast reactor materials. The initial series of in-pile tests reported on herein constitutes the first experiments in which the internal heating mode has been produced in particulate oxide fuel immersed in liquid sodium. Fission heating of the fully-enriched UO 2 in the experiment while it is contained within Sandia Laboratories Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR), operating in its steady-state mode, approximates the decay heating of debris. Preliminary results are discussed

  5. Melt propagation in dry core debris beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosanjh, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    During severe light water reactor accidents like Three Mile Island Unit 2, the fuel rods can fragment and thus convert the reactor core into a large particle bed. The postdryout meltdown of such debris beds is examined. A two-dimensional model that considers the presence of oxidic (UO 2 and ZrO 2 ) as well as metallic (e.g., zirconium) constituents is developed. Key results are that a dense metallic crust is created near the bottom of the bed as molten materials flow downward and freeze; liquid accumulates above the blockage and, if zirconium is present, the pool grows rapidly as molten zirconium dissolved both UO 2 and ZrO 2 particles; if the melt wets the solid, a fraction of the melt flows radially outward under the action of capillary forces and freezes near the radial boundary; in a nonwetting system, all of the melt flows into the bottom of the bed; and when zirconium and iron are in intimate contact and the zirconium metal atomic fraction is > 0.33, these metals can liquefy and flow out of the bed very early in the meltdown sequence

  6. Experimental study of self-leveling behavior in debris bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bin; Harada, Tetsushi; Hirahara, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Morita, Koji; Fukuda, Kenji; Yamano, Hidemasa; Suzuki, Tohru; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2008-01-01

    After a core disruptive accident in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, core debris may settle on locations such as within the core-support structure or in the lower inlet plenum of the reactor vessel as debris beds, as a consequence of rapid quenching and fragmentation of core materials in subcooled sodium. The particle beds that are initially of varying depth have been observed to undergo a process of self-leveling when sodium boiling occurs within the beds. The boiling is believed to provide the driven force with debris needed to overcome resisting forces. Self-leveling ability has much effect on heat-removal capability of debris beds. In the present study, characteristics of self-leveling behaviors were investigated experimentally with simulant materials. Although the decay heat from fuel debris drives the coolant boiling in reactor accident conditions, the present experiments employed depressurization boiling of water to simulate axially increasing void distribution in a debris bed, which consists of solid particles of alumina or lead with different density. The particle size (from 0.5 mm to 6 mm in diameter) and shape (spherical or non-spherical particles) were also taken as experimental parameters. A rough criteria for self-leveling occurrence is proposed and compared with the experimental results. Characteristics of the self-leveling behaviors observed are analyzed and extrapolate to reactor accident conditions. (author)

  7. Simulant - water experiments to characterize the debris bed formed in severe core melt accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathai, Amala M.; Anandan, J.; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Murthy, S.S.; Malarvizhi, B.; Lydia, G.; Das, Sanjay Kumar; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2015-01-01

    Molten Fuel Coolant Interaction (WO) and debris bed configuration on the core catcher plate assumes importance in assessing the Post Accident Heat Removal (PARR) of a heat generating debris bed. The key factors affecting the coolability of the debris bed are the bed porosity, morphology of the fragmented particles, degree of spreading/heaping of the debris on the core catcher and the fraction of lump formed. Experiments are conducted to understand the fragmentation kinetics and subsequent debris bed formation of molten woods metal in water at interface temperatures near the spontaneous nucleation temperature of water. Morphology of the debris particles is investigated to understand the fragmentation mechanisms involved. The spreading behavior of the debris on the catcher plate and the particle size distribution are presented for 5 kg and 10 kg melt inventories. Porosity of the undisturbed bed on the catcher plate is evaluated using a LASER sensor technique. (author)

  8. Numerical simulation for debris bed behavior in sodium cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, Hirotaka; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    For safety analysis of SFR, it is necessary to evaluate behavior along with coolability of debris bed in lower plenum which is formed in severe accident. In order to analyze debris behavior, model for dense sediment particles behavior was proposed and installed in SFR safety analysis code SIMMER. SIMMER code could adequately reproduce experimental results simulating the self-leveling phenomena with appropriate model parameters for bed stiffness. In reactor condition, the self-leveling experiment for prototypical debris bed has not been performed. Additionally, the prototypical debris bed consists of non-spherical particles and it is difficult to quantify model parameters. This situation brings sensitivity analysis to investigate effect of model parameters on the self-leveling phenomena of prototypical debris bed in present paper. As initial condition for sensitivity analysis, simple mound-like debris bed in sodium-filled lower plenum in reactor vessel is considered. The bed consists of the mixture of fuel debris of 3,300 kg and steel debris of 1,570 kg. Decay heat is given to this fuel debris. The model parameter is chosen as sensitivity parameter. Sensitivity analysis shows that the model parameters can effect on intensity of self-leveling phenomena and eventual flatness of bed. In all analyses, however, coolant and sodium vapor break the debris bed at mainly center part of bed and the debris is relocated to outside of bed. Through this process, the initial debris bed is almost planarized before re-melting of debris. This result shows that the model parameters affect the self-leveling phenomena, but its effect in the safety analysis of SFRs is limited. (author)

  9. Thermal-hydraulic and characteristic models for packed debris beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.E.; Sozer, A.

    1986-12-01

    APRIL is a mechanistic core-wide meltdown and debris relocation computer code for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) severe accident analyses. The capabilities of the code continue to be increased by the improvement of existing models. This report contains information on theory and models for degraded core packed debris beds. The models, when incorporated into APRIL, will provide new and improved capabilities in predicting BWR debris bed coolability characteristics. These models will allow for a more mechanistic treatment in calculating temperatures in the fluid and solid phases in the debris bed, in determining debris bed dryout, debris bed quenching from either top-flooding or bottom-flooding, single and two-phase pressure drops across the debris bed, debris bed porosity, and in finding the minimum fluidization mass velocity. The inclusion of these models in a debris bed computer module will permit a more accurate prediction of the coolability characteristics of the debris bed and therefore reduce some of the uncertainties in assessing the severe accident characteristics for BWR application. Some of the debris bed theoretical models have been used to develop a FORTRAN 77 subroutine module called DEBRIS. DEBRIS is a driver program that calls other subroutines to analyze the thermal characteristics of a packed debris bed. Fortran 77 listings of each subroutine are provided in the appendix

  10. Fission-product releases from a PHWR terminal debris bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.J.; Bailey, D.G., E-mail: morgan.brown@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    During an unmitigated severe accident in a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) with horizontal fuel channels, the core may disassemble and relocate to the bottom of the calandria vessel. The resulting heterogeneous in-vessel terminal debris bed (TDB) would likely be quenched by any remaining moderator, and some of the decay heat would be conducted through the calandria vessel shell to the surrounding reactor vault or shield tank water. As the moderator boiled off, the solid debris bed would transform into a more homogeneous molten corium pool located between top and bottom crusts. Until recently, the severe accident code MAAP-CANDU assumed that unreleased volatile and semi-volatile fission products remained in the TDB until after calandria vessel failure, due to low diffusivity through the top crust and the lack of gases or steam to flush released fission products from the debris. However, national and international experimental results indicate this assumption is unlikely; instead, high- and medium-volatility fission products would be released from a molten debris pool, and their volatility and transport should be taken into account in TDB modelling. The resulting change in the distribution of fission products within the reactor and containment, and the associated decay heat, can have significant effects upon the progression of the accident and fission-product releases to the environment. This article describes a postulated PHWR severe accident progression to generate a TDB and the effects of fission-product releases from the terminal debris, using the simple release model in the MAAP-CANDU severe accident code. It also provides insights from various experimental programs related to fission-product releases from core debris, and their applicability to the MAAP-CANDU TDB model. (author)

  11. Particle fuel bed tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Savino, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H 2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  12. Application of debris-bed dryout data to CONACS-1 modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Cassulo, J.C.; Pedersen, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    CONACS-1 (the first version of the DOE Containment Analysis Code System) which is currently under development requires extension of existing debris-bed dryout data to the wide range of conditions possible in an accident sequence. While there has been much effort on modeling of debris-bed dryout from first principles, there is no definitive model for beds of irregularly shaped particles of wide size distribution and for beds of varying heights. Existing debris-bed heat-transfer data with real materials are for the most part limited to dryout as a function of bed depth for adiabatic conditions of atmospheric pressure. These data must be extrapolated with the use of appropriate theoretical models based on experimentation with simulant materials to the ocnditions under consideration in the containment analysis. The data base selected for CONACS-1 is from measurements of dryout for beds of 100 to 1000 μm UO 2 with the sodium phase Joule heated. This particle size range which is typical for debris from fuel-coolant interactions is the most reasonable to use

  13. Investigation of debris bed formation, spreading and coolability

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    Kudinov, P.; Konovalenko, A.; Grishchenko, D.; Yakush, S.; Basso, S.; Lubchenko, N.; Karbojian, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH. Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    The work is motivated by the severe accident management strategy adopted in Nordic type BWRs. It is assumed that core melt ejected from the vessel will fragment, quench and form a coolable debris bed in a deep water pool below the vessel. In this work we consider phenomena relevant to the debris bed formation and coolability. Several DEFOR-A (Debris Bed Formation - Agglomeration) tests have been carried out with new corium melt material and a melt releasing nozzle mockup. The influence of the melt material, melt superheat, jet free fall height on the (i) faction of agglomerated debris, (ii) particle size distribution, (iii) ablation/plugging of the nozzle mockup has been addressed. Results of the DECOSIM (Debris Coolability Simulator) code validation against available COOLOCE data are presented in the report. The dependence of DHF on system pressure from COOLOCE experiments can be reproduced quite accurately if either the effective particle diameter or debris bed porosity is increased. For a cylindrical debris bed, good agreement is achieved in DECOSIM simulations for the particle diameter 0.89 mm and porosity 0.4. The results obtained are consistent with MEWA simulation where larger particle diameters and porosities were found to be necessary to reproduce the experimental data on DHF. It is instructive to note that results of DHF prediction are in better agreement with POMECO-HT data obtained for the same particles. It is concluded that further clarification of the discrepancies between different experiments and model predictions. In total 13 exploratory tests were carried out in PDS (particulate debris spreading) facility to clarify potential influence of the COOLOCE (VTT) facility heaters and TCs on particle self-leveling process. Results of the preliminary analysis suggest that there is no significant influence of the pins on self-leveling, at least for the air superficial velocities ranging from 0.17 up to 0.52 m/s. Further confirmatory tests might be needed

  14. Investigation of debris bed formation, spreading and coolability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudinov, P.; Konovalenko, A.; Grishchenko, D.; Yakush, S.; Basso, S.; Lubchenko, N.; Karbojian, A.

    2013-08-01

    The work is motivated by the severe accident management strategy adopted in Nordic type BWRs. It is assumed that core melt ejected from the vessel will fragment, quench and form a coolable debris bed in a deep water pool below the vessel. In this work we consider phenomena relevant to the debris bed formation and coolability. Several DEFOR-A (Debris Bed Formation - Agglomeration) tests have been carried out with new corium melt material and a melt releasing nozzle mockup. The influence of the melt material, melt superheat, jet free fall height on the (i) faction of agglomerated debris, (ii) particle size distribution, (iii) ablation/plugging of the nozzle mockup has been addressed. Results of the DECOSIM (Debris Coolability Simulator) code validation against available COOLOCE data are presented in the report. The dependence of DHF on system pressure from COOLOCE experiments can be reproduced quite accurately if either the effective particle diameter or debris bed porosity is increased. For a cylindrical debris bed, good agreement is achieved in DECOSIM simulations for the particle diameter 0.89 mm and porosity 0.4. The results obtained are consistent with MEWA simulation where larger particle diameters and porosities were found to be necessary to reproduce the experimental data on DHF. It is instructive to note that results of DHF prediction are in better agreement with POMECO-HT data obtained for the same particles. It is concluded that further clarification of the discrepancies between different experiments and model predictions. In total 13 exploratory tests were carried out in PDS (particulate debris spreading) facility to clarify potential influence of the COOLOCE (VTT) facility heaters and TCs on particle self-leveling process. Results of the preliminary analysis suggest that there is no significant influence of the pins on self-leveling, at least for the air superficial velocities ranging from 0.17 up to 0.52 m/s. Further confirmatory tests might be needed

  15. Self-leveling onset criteria in debris beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bin; Harada, Tetsushi; Hirahara, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Morita, Koji; Fukuda, Kenji; Yamano, Hidemasa; Suzuki, Tohru; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    In a core-disruptive accident of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor, core debris may settle on the core-support structure and/or in the lower inlet plenum of the reactor vessel because of rapid quenching and fragmentation of molten core materials in the subcooled sodium plenum. Coolant boiling is the mechanism driving the self-leveling of a debris bed that causes significant changes in the heat-removal capability of the beds. In the present study, we develop criteria establishing the onset of this self-leveling behavior that we base on a force balance model assuming a debris bed with a single-sized spherical particle. The model considers drag, buoyancy, and gravity acting on each particle. A series of experiments with simulant materials verified the applicability of this description of self-leveling. Particle size (between 0.5-6 mm), shape (spherical and nonspherical), density (namely of alumina, zirconia, lead, and stainless steel), along with boiling intensity, bed volume, and even experimental methods were taken into consideration to obtain general characteristics of the self-leveling process. We decided to use depressurization boiling to simulate an axially increasing void distribution in the debris bed, although bottom heating was also used to validate the use of the depressurization method. On the self-leveling onset issues, we obtained good agreement between model predictions and experimental results. Extrapolation of our model to actual reactor conditions is discussed. (author)

  16. Electrometallurgical treatment of TMI-2 fuel debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karell, E.J.; Gourishankar, K.V.; Johnson, G.K.

    1997-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed an electrometallurgical treatment process suitable for conditioning DOE oxide spent fuel for long-term storage or disposal. The process consists of an initial oxide reduction step that converts the actinide oxides to a metallic form, followed by an electrochemical separation of uranium from the other fuel constituents. The final product of the process is a uniform set of stable waste forms suitable for long-term storage or disposal. The suitability of the process for treating core debris from the Three Mile Island-2 (TMI-2) reactor is being evaluated. This paper reviews the results of preliminary experimental work performed using simulated TMI-2 fuel debris

  17. TMI defueling project fuel debris removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdge, B.

    1992-01-01

    The three mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident on March 28, 1979, presented the nuclear community with many challenging remediation problems; most importantly, the removal of the fission products within the reactor containment vessel. To meet this removal problem, an air-lift system (ALS) can be used to employ compressed air to produce the motive force for transporting debris. Debris is separated from the transport stream by gravity separation. The entire method does not rely on any moving parts. Full-scale testing of the ALS at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has demonstrated the capability of transporting fuel debris from beneath the LCSA into a standard fuel debris bucket at a minimum rate of 230 kg/min

  18. Effect of particle stratification on debris-bed dryout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Cassulo, J.C.; Pederson, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Significant work has been performed on debris-bed dryout on beds of either uniformly sized particles or particles of a wide size range which are well mixed. This work has provided an understanding of the mechanisms of dryout and an empirical basis for containment analysis. However, the debris bed resulting from a HCDA would not consist of uniformly sized particles and for certain scenarios the bed could be stratified rather than well mixed. Tests have been conducted on the effect of particle size distribution on dryout and concluded that not only is the mean particle size an important parameter but also the standard deviation of the distribution and change in porosity. The D6 in-pile test at Sandia with a 114-mm deep stratified bed resulted in a reduced dryout heat flux compared to a uniformly mixed bed. Because of the many questions concerning the dryout behavior of stratified beds of wide size distribution out-of-pile experiments in which metal particles in water pools are inductively heated were initiated at Argonne

  19. Experimental and theoretical study of large scale debris bed reflood in the PEARL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikhi, Nourdine, E-mail: nourdine.chikhi@irsn.fr; Fichot, F.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Five reflooding tests have been carried out with an experimental bed, 500 mm in height and 500 mm in diameter, made of 4 mm stainless steel balls. • For the first time, such a large bed was heated practically homogenously. • The quench front velocity was determined according to thermocouple measurements inside the bed. • An analytical model, assuming a quasi-steady progression of the quench front, allows to predict the conversion ratio in most cases. • It appears that the efficiency of cooling can be increased only up to a certain limit when increasing the inlet water flow rate. - Abstract: During a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, the degradation of fuel rods and melting of materials lead to the accumulation of core materials, which are commonly, called “debris beds”. To stop core degradation and avoid the reactor vessel rupture, the main accident management procedure consists in injecting water. In the case of debris bed, the reflooding models used for Loss of Coolant Accident are not applicable. The IRSN has launched an experimental program on debris bed reflooding to develop new models and to validate severe accident codes. The PEARL facility has been designed to perform, for the first time, the reflooding of large scale debris bed (Ø540 mm, h = 500 mm and 500 kg of steel debris) in a pressurized containment. The bed is heated by means of an induction system. A specific instrumentation has been developed to measure the debris bed temperature, pressure drop inside the bed and the steam flow rate during the reflooding. In this paper, the results of the first integral reflooding tests performed in the PEARL facility at atmospheric pressure up to 700 °C are presented. Focus is made on the quench front propagation and on the steam flow rate during reflooding. The effect of water injection flow rate, debris initial temperature and residual power are also discussed. Finally, an analytical model providing the steam flow rate and

  20. Transient quenching of superheated debris beds during bottom reflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutu, N.K.; Ginsberg, T.; Klein, J.; Schwarz, C.E.; Klages, J.

    1984-01-01

    The experimental data suggest that for small liquid supply rate and low initial particle temperature, the bed quench process is a one-dimensional frontal phenomenon. The bed heat flux is constant during most of the duration of the quench period. The range of conditions which display one-dimensional frontal cooling characteristics is identified as the deep bed regime of bed quenching, and a limiting mathematical model was developed to describe the observed behavior. For large liquid supply rate and high initial bed temperature, the bed quench process is a complex phenomenon. Under these conditions, the bed heat flux displays a nonuniform time dependence. In order to characterize this shallow bed regime, it was necessary to develop a detailed transient model of the coolant-debris interaction. This model, while developed for the shallow bed regime, also applies to the deep bed regime. Numerical computations clearly demonstrate the importance of developing a general reliable model for the solid-fluid heat transfer coefficients

  1. Quench cooling of superheated debris beds in containment during LWR core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Chen, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Light water reactor core meltdown accident sequence studies suggest that superheated debris beds may settle on the concrete floor beneath the reactor vessel. A model for the heat transfer processes during quench of superheated debris beds cooled by an overlying pool of water has been presented in a prior paper. This paper discusses the coolability of decay-heated debris beds from the standpoint of their transient quench characteristics. It is shown that even though a debris bed configuration may be coolable from the point of view of steady-state decay heat removal, the quench behavior from an initially elevated temperature may lead to bed melting prior to quench of the debris

  2. Experimental study and modelling of pressure losses during reflooding of a debris beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavier, Remi

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with single and two-phase flow pressure losses in porous media. The aim is to improve understanding and modeling of momentum transfer inside particle beds, in relation with nuclear safety issues concerning the reflooding of debris beds during severe nuclear accidents. Indeed, the degradation of the core during such accidents can lead to the collapse of the fuel assemblies, and to the formation of a debris bed, which can be described as a hot porous medium. This thesis is included in a nuclear safety research project on coolability of debris beds during reflooding sequences. An experimental study of single and two-phase cold-flow pressure losses in particle beds is proposed. The geometrical characteristics of the debris and the hydrodynamic conditions are representative of the real case, in terms of granulometry, particle shapes, and flow velocities. The new data constitute an important contribution. In particular, they contain pressure losses and void fraction measurements in two-phase air-water flows with non-zero liquid Reynolds numbers, which did not exist before. Predictive models for pressure losses in single and two-phase flow through particle beds have been established from experimental data. Their structures are based on macroscopic equations obtained from the volume averaging of local conservation equations. Single-phase flow pressure losses can be described by a Darcy-Forchheimer law with a quadratic correction, in terms of filtration velocity, with a better-than-10 % precision. Numerical study of single-phase flows through porous media shows that this correlation is valid for disordered smooth particle beds. Two-phase flow pressure losses are described using a generalized Darcy-Forchheimer structure, involving inertial and cross flow terms. A new model is proposed and compared to the experimental data and to the usual models used in severe accident simulation codes. (author)

  3. Experimental study on coolability of particulate core-metal debris bed with oxidization, (2). Fragmentation and enhanced heat transfer in zircaloy debris bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Guanghui; Sugiyama, Ken-ichiro; Aoki, Hiroomi; Kimura, Iichi

    2006-01-01

    The oxidization and coolability characteristics of the particulate Zircaloy debris bed, which is deposited under the hard debris and through which first vapor penetrates and then water penetrates, are studied in the present paper. In the vapor penetration experiments, it is found that Zircaloy debris particles are effectively broken into small pieces after making thick oxidized layer with deep clacks by rapid oxidization under the condition that vapor with 20 cm/s penetrates for 30 to 70 min at an initial debris bed temperature of 1,030degC. It is also confirmed in the water penetration experiments that the oxidized particle debris bed has potentially of high coolability when water penetrates through the fully oxidized particle bed because of a high capillary force originating from those particles with deep cracks on their surfaces. Based on the present study, a new scenario for the appearance and disappearance of the hot spot in the TMI-2 accident is possible. The particulate core-metal core-metal debris bed is first heated up by rapid oxidization with heat generation when vapor can penetrate through the debris bed with porosities. This corresponds to the appearance of the hot spot. The resultant oxidized particulate debris bed causes a high coolability due to its high capillary force when the water can touch the debris bed at wet condition. This corresponds to the disappearance of the hot spot. (author)

  4. Property measurements and inner state estimation of simulated fuel debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirooka, S.; Kato, M.; Morimoto, K.; Washiya, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Fuel debris properties and inner state such as temperature profile were evaluated by using analysis of simulated fuel debris manufactured from UO{sub 2} and oxidized zircaloy. The center of the fuel debris was expected to be molten state soon after the melt down accident of LWRs because power density was very high. On the other hand, the surface of the fuel debris was cooled in the water. This large temperature gradient may cause inner stress and consequent cracks were expected. (author)

  5. Review of the Technical Status on the Debris Bed Cooling Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eui Kwang; Cho, Chung Ho; Lee, Yong Bum

    2007-09-15

    Preliminary safety analyses of the KALIMER-600 design have shown that the design has inherent safety characteristics and is capable of accommodating double-fault initiators such as ATWS events without coolant boiling or fuel melting. However, for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor, the evaluation of the safety performance and the determination of containment requirements may be worth due consideration of triple-fault accident sequences of extremely low probability of occurrence that leads to core melting. For any postulated accident sequence which leads to core melting, in-vessel retention of the core debris will be required as a design requirement for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor. Also, proof of the capacity of the debris bed cooling is an essential condition to solve the problem of in-vessel retention of the core debris. In this study, review of the technical status on the debris bed cooling model was carried out for in-vessel retention of the core debris0.

  6. Review of the Technical Status on the Debris Bed Cooling Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Kwang; Cho, Chung Ho; Lee, Yong Bum

    2007-09-01

    Preliminary safety analyses of the KALIMER-600 design have shown that the design has inherent safety characteristics and is capable of accommodating double-fault initiators such as ATWS events without coolant boiling or fuel melting. However, for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor, the evaluation of the safety performance and the determination of containment requirements may be worth due consideration of triple-fault accident sequences of extremely low probability of occurrence that leads to core melting. For any postulated accident sequence which leads to core melting, in-vessel retention of the core debris will be required as a design requirement for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor. Also, proof of the capacity of the debris bed cooling is an essential condition to solve the problem of in-vessel retention of the core debris. In this study, review of the technical status on the debris bed cooling model was carried out for in-vessel retention of the core debris

  7. Code development for debris bed coolability problem. Final report for the period 1997-05-01 - 1999-08-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loboiko, A.I.

    2000-03-01

    The study was devoted to the problem of debris bed coolability arising from severe accident at nuclear power reactor. After reactor core melting occurs and subsequent debris bed is formed in the lower plenum of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) it is important to confine this debris bed inside RPV boundary. One of the possible accident scenarios assumes the interaction between coolant and molten core materials resulting from rapid melt quenching, freezing and fragmentation. Particulated fuel and steel may subsequently settle on available surfaces within the reactor vessel, forming debris porous beds which produce radioactive decay heating. In case of severe core degradation, such heat transfer mechanisms as radiation, conduction and natural single-phase convection may appear to be insufficient and coolant boiling may happen on the surface or inside the bed. Depending on rate of heat generation there may be sufficient debris cool down or its 'dryout' which pose a danger for RPV integrity. The study considers development of 2D numerical code capable to predict coolant saturation as a function of different parameters. Analysis of previous activities on one-dimensional and multi-dimensional models was done. On the basis of the analysis it was concluded that the correct prediction of the debris saturation on dryant power requires two-dimensional numerical simulation considering the processes like two-phase convection, capillary effects, different models of permeability, different models of heat transfer between solid debris and coolant, non-homogeneity of parameters porous medium, heat and mass transfer between debris bed and a highly porous gap along the inner RPV surface. Particular attention was given to consideration of boundary conditions for debris bed. Introduction of the analytical model for dependence of gap properties on heat flux from debris bed allowed to create an algorithm for use in numerical calculations and finally to develop a code which allowed for stable

  8. Coarse-grained debris flow dynamics on erodible beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzoni, Stefano; Gregoretti, Carlo; Stancanelli, Laura Maria

    2017-03-01

    A systematic set of flume experiments is used to investigate the features of velocity profiles within the body of coarse-grained debris flows and the dependence of the transport sediment concentration on the relevant parameters (runoff discharge, bed slope, grain size, and form). The flows are generated in a 10 m long laboratory flume, initially filled with a layer consisting of loose debris. After saturation, a prescribed water discharge is suddenly supplied over the granular bed, and the runoff triggers a debris flow wave that reaches nearly steady conditions. Three types of material have been used in the tests: gravel with mean grain size of 3 and 5 mm, and 3 mm glass spheres. Measured parameters included: triggering water discharge, volumetric sediment discharge, sediment concentration, flow depth, and velocity profiles. The dynamic similarity with full-sized debris flows is discussed on the basis of the relevant dimensionless parameters. Concentration data highlight the dependence on the slope angle and the importance of the quasi-static friction angle. The effects of flow rheology on the shape of velocity profiles are analyzed with attention to the role of different stress-generating mechanisms. A remarkable collapse of the dimensionless profiles is obtained by scaling the debris flow velocity with the runoff velocity, and a power law characterization is proposed following a heuristic approach. The shape of the profiles suggests a smooth transition between the different rheological regimes (collisional and frictional) that establish in the upper and lower regions of the flow and is compatible with the presence of multiple length scales dictated by the type of contacts (instantaneous or long lasting) between grains.

  9. Cooling of particulate debris beds: analysis of the initial D-series experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    In an effort to provide basic data on the cooling of fast reactor debris, three in-pile experiments employing oxide fuel particulate in liquid sodium were completed in late 1977. Preliminary results from these experiments were reported shortly after their completion at the Third Post-Accident Heat Removal Information Exchange, at Argonne National Laboratory. In these experiments, a distribution of 100 μm to 1000 μm-sized particles of enriched UO 2 was fission-heated to simulate decay-heated debris. In each experiment, the UO 2 particles were contained in a closed, flat-bottomed vessel 012 mm in diameter which was insulated on the diameter and bottom. Sufficient sodium was included to saturate the bed of particles and to provide a volume of bulk sodium above the bed at a controlled temperature. Parameters of interest in the experiments are given

  10. Empirical closures for particulate debris bed spreading induced by gas–liquid flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basso, S., E-mail: simoneb@kth.se; Konovalenko, A.; Kudinov, P.

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Experimental study of the debris bed self-leveling phenomenon. • A scaling approach and a non-dimensional model to describe particle flow rate are proposed. • The model is validated against experiments with particles of different properties and at different gas injection conditions. - Abstract: Efficient removal of decay heat from the nuclear reactor core debris is paramount for termination of severe accident progression. One of the strategies is based on melt fragmentation, quenching and cooling in a deep pool of water under the reactor vessel. Geometrical configuration of the debris bed is among the important factors which determine possibility of removing the decay heat from the debris bed by natural circulation of the coolant. For instance, a tall mound-shape debris bed can be non-coolable, while the same debris can be coolable if spread uniformly. Decay heat generates a significant amount of thermal energy which goes to production of steam inside the debris bed. Two-phase flow escaping through the top layer of the bed becomes a source of mechanical energy which can move the particulate debris along the slope of the bed. The motion of the debris will lead to flattening of the bed. Such process is often called “self-leveling” phenomenon. Spreading of the debris bed by the self-leveling process can take significant time, depending on the initial debris bed configuration and other parameters. There is a competition between the time scales for reaching (i) a coolable configuration of the bed, and (ii) onset of dryout and re-melting of the debris. In the previous work we have demonstrated that the rate of particulate debris spreading is determined by local gas velocity and local slope angle of the bed. In this work we develop a scaling approach and a closure for prediction of debris spreading rate based on generalization of available experimental data. We demonstrate that introduced scaling criteria are universal for particles of different

  11. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Particle Shape on Frictional Pressure drop in Particulate Debris Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Eun Ho; Park, Hyun Sun [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To ensure the long-term cooling of corium in the reactor cavity, it is important to ensure the coolant ingression into the internally heat generated corium debris bed which is governed by pressure drop in porous media. For this reason, it is necessary to understand pressure drop mechanisms in porous bed to verify the feasibility of water penetration into particulate debris bed. According to the previous investigations on molten fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) experiments, it was found that quenched particulate debris bed was composed of irregular shape particles. Therefore, empirical or semiempirical models based on the Ergun equation (Ergun, 1952) for single-phase flow in porous media composed of single sized spherical particle were developed to consider the effect of particle shape on frictional pressure drop by means of adding a shape factor or modifying the Ergun constants etc. (Leva, 1959, Handley and Heggs, 1968, Macdonald, 1979, Foumeny et al., 1996). An experimental investigate on single-phase frictional pressure drop of water in packed bed was conducted in the transparent cylindrical test section with the inner diameter of 100 mm and the height of 700 mm to study the effect of particle shape on frictional pressure drop in porous media. This paper reports the experimental data for spherical particles with the diameter of 2 mm and 5 mm and cylindrical particles with ED of 2 mm and 5 mm. And also, the experimental data compared with the models to predict frictional pressure drop in particulate bed. The conclusions are summarized as follows. As a result of the experiment to measure frictional pressure drop in particulate bed composed of cylindrical particles the models predict the experimental data well within 22.11 % except the Handley and Heggs model when ED is applied to the models.

  12. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Particle Shape on Frictional Pressure drop in Particulate Debris Bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Eun Ho; Park, Hyun Sun

    2014-01-01

    To ensure the long-term cooling of corium in the reactor cavity, it is important to ensure the coolant ingression into the internally heat generated corium debris bed which is governed by pressure drop in porous media. For this reason, it is necessary to understand pressure drop mechanisms in porous bed to verify the feasibility of water penetration into particulate debris bed. According to the previous investigations on molten fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) experiments, it was found that quenched particulate debris bed was composed of irregular shape particles. Therefore, empirical or semiempirical models based on the Ergun equation (Ergun, 1952) for single-phase flow in porous media composed of single sized spherical particle were developed to consider the effect of particle shape on frictional pressure drop by means of adding a shape factor or modifying the Ergun constants etc. (Leva, 1959, Handley and Heggs, 1968, Macdonald, 1979, Foumeny et al., 1996). An experimental investigate on single-phase frictional pressure drop of water in packed bed was conducted in the transparent cylindrical test section with the inner diameter of 100 mm and the height of 700 mm to study the effect of particle shape on frictional pressure drop in porous media. This paper reports the experimental data for spherical particles with the diameter of 2 mm and 5 mm and cylindrical particles with ED of 2 mm and 5 mm. And also, the experimental data compared with the models to predict frictional pressure drop in particulate bed. The conclusions are summarized as follows. As a result of the experiment to measure frictional pressure drop in particulate bed composed of cylindrical particles the models predict the experimental data well within 22.11 % except the Handley and Heggs model when ED is applied to the models

  13. Numerical simulations on self-leveling behaviors with cylindrical debris bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Liancheng, E-mail: Liancheng.guo@kit.edu [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies (IKET), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Morita, Koji, E-mail: morita@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 2-3-7, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Tobita, Yoshiharu, E-mail: tobita.yoshiharu@jaea.go.jp [Fast Reactor Safety Technology Development Department, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, O-arai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • A 3D coupled method was developed by combining DEM with the multi-fluid model of SIMMER-IV code. • The method was validated by performing numerical simulations on a series of experiments with cylindrical particle bed. • Reasonable agreement can demonstrate the applicability of the method in reproducing the self-leveling behavior. • Sensitivity analysis on some model parameters was performed to assess their impacts. - Abstract: The postulated core disruptive accidents (CDAs) are regarded as particular difficulties in the safety analysis of liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs). In the CDAs, core debris may settle on the core-support structure and form conic bed mounds. Then debris bed can be levelled by the heat convection and vaporization of surrounding coolant sodium, which is named “self-leveling behavior”. The self-leveling behavior is a crucial issue in the safety analysis, due to its significant effect on the relocation of molten core and heat-removal capability of the debris bed. Considering its complicate multiphase mechanism, a comprehensive computational tool is needed to reasonably simulate transient particle behavior as well as thermal-hydraulic phenomenon of surrounding fluid phases. The SIMMER program is a successful computer code initially developed as an advanced tool for CDA analysis of LMFRs. It is a multi-velocity-field, multiphase, multicomponent, Eulerian, fluid dynamics code coupled with a fuel-pin model and a space- and energy-dependent neutron kinetics model. Until now, the code has been successfully applied in numerical simulations for reproducing key thermal-hydraulic phenomena involved in CDAs as well as performing reactor safety assessment. However, strong interactions between massive solid particles as well as particle characteristics in multiphase flows were not taken into consideration in its fluid-dynamics models. To solve this problem, a new method is developed by combining the discrete element method (DEM

  14. Two-Phase Flow Effect on the Ex-Vessel Corium Debris Bed Formation in Severe Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eunho; Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Moo Hwan; Park, Hyun Sun; Ma, Weimin; Bechta, Sevostian V.

    2014-01-01

    In Korean IVR-ERVC(In-Vessel Retention of molten corium through External Reactor Vessel Cooling) strategy, if the situation degenerates into insufficient external vessel cooling, the molten core mixture can directly erupt into the flooded cavity pool from the weakest point of the vessel. Then, FCI (molten Fuel Coolant Interaction) will fragment the corium jet into small particulates settling down to make porous debris bed on the cavity basemat. To secure the containment integrity against the MCCI (Molten Core - Concrete Interaction), cooling of the heat generating porous corium debris bed is essential and it depends on the characteristics of the bed itself. For the characteristics of corium debris bed, many previous experimental studies with simulant melts reported the heap-like shape mostly. There were also following experiments to develop the correlation for the heap-like shaped debris bed. However, recent studies started to consider the effect of the decay heat and reported some noticeable results with the two-phase flow effect on the debris bed formation. The Kyushu University and JAEA group reported the experimental studies on the 'self-leveling' effect which is the flattening effect of the particulate bed by the inside gas generation. The DECOSIM simulation study of RIT (Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden) with Russian researchers showed the 'large cavity pool convection' effect, which is driven by the up-rising gas bubble flow from the pre-settled debris bed, on the particle settling trajectories and ultimately final bed shape. The objective of this study is verification of the two-phase flow effect on the ex-vessel corium debris bed formation in the severe accident. From the analysis on the test movie and resultant particle beds, the two-phase flow effect on the debris bed formation, which has been reported in the previous studies, was verified and the additional findings were also suggested. For the first, in quiescent pool the

  15. Experimental investigation on single-phase pressure losses in nuclear debris beds: Identification of flow regimes and effective diameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavier, R., E-mail: remi.clavier@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SEREX/LE2M, Cadarache bât. 327, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chikhi, N., E-mail: nourdine.chikhi@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SEREX/LE2M, Cadarache bât. 327, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Fichot, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SAG/LEPC, Cadarache bât. 700, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Quintard, M. [Université de Toulouse – INPT – UPS – Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT), Allée Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS – IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Single-phase pressure drops versus flow rates in particle beds are measured. • Conditions are representative of the reflooding of a nuclear fuel debris bed. • Darcy, weak inertial, strong inertial and weak turbulent regimes are observed. • A Darcy–Forchheimer law is found to be a good approximation in this domain. • A predictive correlation is derived from new experimental data. - Abstract: During a severe nuclear power plant accident, the degradation of the reactor core can lead to the formation of debris beds. The main accident management procedure consists in injecting water inside the reactor vessel. Nevertheless, large uncertainties remain regarding the coolability of such debris beds. Motivated by the reduction of these uncertainties, experiments have been conducted on the CALIDE facility in order to investigate single-phase pressure losses in representative debris beds. In this paper, these results are presented and analyzed in order to identify a simple single-phase flow pressure loss correlation for debris-bed-like particle beds in reflooding conditions, which cover Darcean to Weakly Turbulent flow regimes. The first part of this work is dedicated to study macro-scale pressure losses generated by debris-bed-like particle beds, i.e., high sphericity (>80%) particle beds with relatively small size dispersion (from 1 mm to 10 mm). A Darcy–Forchheimer law, involving the sum of a linear term and a quadratic deviation, with respect to filtration velocity, has been found to be relevant to describe this behavior in Darcy, Strong Inertial and Weak Turbulent regimes. It has also been observed that, in a restricted domain (Re = 15 to Re = 30) between Darcy and Weak Inertial regimes, deviation is better described by a cubic term, which corresponds to the so-called Weak Inertial regime. The second part of this work aims at identifying expressions for coefficients of linear and quadratic terms in Darcy–Forchheimer law, in order to obtain a

  16. Coolability of oxidized particulate debris bed accumulated in horizontal narrow gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Y.; Sugiyama, K.; Narabayashi, T.

    2007-01-01

    When LOCA occurs in a nuclear reactor system, the coolability of the core would be kept as reported at a series of presentations in ICONE14. Therefore the probability of the core meltdown is negligible small. However, from the view point of defense in depth, it is necessary to be sure that the coolability of the bottom of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is maintained even if a part of the core should melt and a substantial amount of debris should be deposited on the lower plenum. We carried out an experimental study in order to observe the coolability of particulate core-metal debris bed with 12 mm thickness accompanied with rapid heat generation because of oxidization, which was reported at ICONE14. The coolability was assured by a small amount of coolant supply because of high capillary force of oxidized fine particulate debris produced. In the present study, we examined the coolability of particulate debris bed deposited in narrower gap of 1 mm or 5 mm that coolant supply is hard. The particulate debris beds were piled up on the stainless steel sheet with 0.1 mm thickness, which was used to measure the bottom temperatures of particulate debris bed by using a thermo-video camera. We set up a heat supply section with heat input of 2.1 kW, which simulates the hard debris bed deposited on the particulate debris bed as reported for the TMI-2 accident. We measured the temperatures of the bottom surface of the heat supply section and the heat fluxes released into debris bed as well as the temperatures at the bottom of debris bed on the stainless steel sheet. It is found that when only the upper surface of particulate debris bed is in the film boiling, capillary force causes coolant supply to the particulate debris bed. Therefore, in the condition of thicker gap with small particulate debris, coolability of debris bed is improved. We find out that smaller particulate debris is moved by vapor movement. As a result, the area that high capillary force is caused because of

  17. Protecting AREVA ATRIUM™ BWR fuel from debris fretting failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, Steven E.; Garner, Norman L.; Lippert, Hans-Joachim; Graebert, Rüdiger; Mollard, Pierre; Hahn, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, debris fretting has been the leading cause of fuel rod failure in BWR fuel assemblies, costing the industry millions of dollars in lost generation and negatively impacting the working area of plant site personnel. In this paper the focus will be on recent BWR fuel product innovation designed to eliminate debris related failures. Experience feedback from more than three decades of operation history with non-line-of-sight FUELGUARD™ lower tie plate debris filters will be presented. The development and relative effectiveness of successive generations of filtration technology will be discussed. It will be shown that modern, state of the art debris filters are an effective defense against debris fretting failure. Protective measures extend beyond inlet nozzle debris filters. The comprehensive debris resistance features built into AREVA’s newest fuel design, the ATRIUM™ 11, reduce the overall risk of debris entrapment as well as providing a degree of protection from debris that may fall down on the fuel assembly from above, e.g., during refueling operations. The positive recent experience in a debris sensitive plant will be discussed showing that the combination of advanced fuel technology and a robust foreign material exclusion program at the reactor site can eliminate the debris fretting failure mechanism. (author)

  18. Quench cooling of superheated debris beds in containment during LWR core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Chen, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Light water reactor core meltdown accident sequence studies suggest that superheated debris beds may settle on the concrete floor beneath the reactor vessel. A model for the heat transfer processes during quench (removal of stored energy from initial temperature to saturation temperature) of superheated debris beds cooled by an overlying pool of water has been presented in a prior paper. This paper discusses the coolability of decay-heated debris beds from the standpoint of their transient quench characteristics. It is shown that even though a debris bed configuration may be coolable from the point of view of steady-state decay heat removal, the quench behavior from an initially elevated temperature may lead to bed melting prior to quench of the debris

  19. Alternative fuels in fire debris analysis: biodiesel basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Eric; Byron, Doug

    2007-03-01

    Alternative fuels are becoming more prominent on the market today and, soon, fire debris analysts will start seeing them in liquid samples or in fire debris samples. Biodiesel fuel is one of the most common alternative fuels and is now readily available in many parts of the United States and around the world. This article introduces biodiesel to fire debris analysts. Biodiesel fuel is manufactured from vegetable oils and/or animal oils/fats. It is composed of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and is sold pure or as a blend with diesel fuel. When present in fire debris samples, it is recommended to extract the debris using passive headspace concentration on activated charcoal, possibly followed by a solvent extraction. The gas chromatographic analysis of the extract is first carried out with the same program as for regular ignitable liquid residues, and second with a program adapted to the analysis of FAMEs.

  20. Dryout heat flux and flooding phenomena in debris beds consisting of homogeneous diameter particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Yu; Abe, Yutaka; Yamano, Norihiro; Soda, Kunihisa

    1988-08-01

    Since the TMI-2 accident, which occurred in 1979, necessity of understanding phenomena associated with a severe accident have been recognized and researches have been conducted in many countries. During a severe accident of a light water reactor, a debris bed consisting of the degraded core materials would be formed. Because the debris bed continues to release decay heat, the debris bed would remelt when the coolable geometry is not maintained. Thus the degraded core coolability experiments to investigate the influence of the debris particle diameter and coolant flow conditions on the coolability of the debris bed and the flooding experiments to investigate the dependence of flooding phenomena on the configuration of the debris bed have been conducted in JAERI. From the degraded core coolability experiments, the following conclusions were derived; the coolability of debris beds would be improved by coolant supply into the beds, Lipinski's 1-dimensional model shows good agreement with the measured dryout heat flux for the beds under stagnant and forced flow conditions from the bottom of the beds, and the analytical model used for the case that coolant is fed by natural circulation through the downcomer reproduces the experimental results. And the following conclusions were given from the flooding experiments ; no dependence between bed height and the flooding constant exists for the beds lower than the critical bed height, flooding phenomena of the stratified beds would be dominated by the layer consisting of smaller particles, and the predicted dryout heat flux by the analytical model based on the flooding theory gives underestimation under stagnant condition. (author)

  1. Experimental results on the coolability of a debris bed with multidimensional cooling effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, M.; Kulenovic, R.; Laurien, E.; Nayak, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: ► Performing of dryout experiments with a polydispersed bed for top- and bottom-flooding. ► Study of influence of different down comer configurations on the coolability of debris bed. ► Measurement of temperature profiles, pressure drops and determination of dryout heat flux. ► Observation of noticeable increase in coolability of debris bed with the use of down comer is observed. - Abstract: Within the reactor safety research, the removal of decay heat from a debris bed (formed from corium and residual water) is of great importance. In order to investigate experimentally the long term coolability of debris beds, the scaled test facility “DEBRIS” (Fig. 1) has been built at IKE. A large number of experiments had been carried out to investigate the coolability limits for different bed configurations (). Analyses based on one-dimensional configurations underestimate the coolability in realistic multidimensional configurations, where lateral water access and water inflow via bottom regions are favoured. Following the experiments with top- and bottom-flooding flow conditions this paper presents experimental results of boiling and dryout tests at different system pressures based on top- and bottom-flooding via a down comer configuration. A down comer with an internal diameter of 10 mm has been installed at the centre of the debris bed. The debris bed is built up in a cylindrical crucible with an inner diameter of 125 mm. The bed of height 640 mm is composed of polydispersed particles with particle diameters 2, 3 and 6 mm. Since the long term coolability of such particle bed is limited by the availability of coolant inside the bed and not by heat transfer limitations from the particles to the coolant, the bottom inflow of water improves the coolability of the debris bed and an increase of the dryout heat flux can be observed. With increasing system pressure, the coolability limits are enhanced (increased dryout heat flux).

  2. ABB. CASE's GUARDIANTM Debris Resistant Fuel Assembly Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D. J.; Wohlsen, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    ABB CE's experience, that 72% of all recent fuel-rod failures are caused by debris fretting, is typical. In response to this problem, ABB Combustion Engineering began supplying in the late 1980s fuel assemblies with a variety of debris resistant features, including both long-end caps and small flow holes. Now ABB CAE has developed an advanced debris resistant design concept, GUARDIAN TM , which has the advantage of capturing and retaining more debris than other designs, while displacing less plenum or active fuel volume than the long end-cap design. GUARDIAN TM design features have now been implemented into four different assembly designs. ABB CASE's GUARDIAN TM fuel assembly is an advanced debris-resistant design which has both superior filtering performance and uniquely, excellent debris retention, Retention effectively removes the debris from circulation in the coolant so that it is not able to threaten the fuel again. GUARDIAN TM features have been incorporated into four ABB. CAE fuel assembly designs. These assemblies are all fully compatible with the NSLS, and full-batch operation with GUARDIAN TM began in 1992. The number of plants of both CAE and non-CAE design which accept GUARDIAN TM for debris protection is expected to grow significantly during the next few years

  3. The effect of self-leveling on debris bed coolability under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basso, S.; Konovalenko, A. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Roslagstullsbacken 21, D5, Stockholm 106 91 (Sweden); Yakush, S.E. [Institute for Problems in Mechanics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ave. Vernadskogo 101 Bldg 1, Moscow 119526 (Russian Federation); Kudinov, P. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Roslagstullsbacken 21, D5, Stockholm 106 91 (Sweden)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A model for coolability of a self-leveling, variable-shape debris bed is proposed. • Sensitivity analysis is performed to screen out the less influential input parameters. • A small fraction of scenarios has initially a non-coolable debris bed configuration. • The fraction of non-coolable scenarios decreases with time due to self-leveling. - Abstract: Nordic-type boiling water reactors employ melt fragmentation, quenching, and long term cooling of the debris bed in a deep pool of water under the reactor vessel as a severe accident (SA) mitigation strategy. The height and shape of the bed are among the most important factors that determine if decay heat can be removed from the porous debris bed by natural circulation of water. The debris bed geometry depends on its formation process (melt release, fragmentation, sedimentation and settlement on the containment basemat), but it also changes with time afterwards, due to particle redistribution promoted by coolant flow (self-leveling). The ultimate goal of this work is to develop an approach to the assessment of the probability that debris in such a variable-shape bed can reach re-melting (which means failure of SA mitigation strategy), i.e. the time necessary for the slumping debris bed to reach a coolable configuration is larger than the time necessary for the debris to reach the re-melting temperature. For this purpose, previously developed models for particulate debris spreading by self-leveling and debris bed dryout are combined to assess the time necessary to reach a coolable state and evaluate its uncertainty. Sensitivity analysis was performed to screen out less important input parameters, after which Monte Carlo simulation was carried out in order to collect statistical characteristics of the coolability time. The obtained results suggest that, given the parameters ranges typical of Nordic BWRs, only a small fraction of debris beds configurations exhibits the occurrence of dryout. Of the

  4. PIV Visualization of Bubble Induced Flow Circulation in 2-D Rectangular Pool for Ex-Vessel Debris Bed Coolability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Teayang; Kim, Eunho; Park, Hyun Sun; Moriyama, Kiyofumi [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The previous research works demonstrated the debris bed formation on the flooded cavity floor in experiments. Even in the cases the core melt is once solidified, the debris bed can be re-melted due to the decay heat. If the debris bed is not cooled enough by the coolant, the re-melted debris bed will react with the concrete base mat. This situation is called the molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) which threatens the integrity of the containment by generated gases which pressurize the containment. Therefore securing the long term coolability of the debris bed in the cavity is crucial. According to the previous research works, the natural convection driven by the rising bubbles affects the coolability and the formation of the debris bed. Therefore, clarification of the natural convection characteristics in and around the debris bed is important for evaluation of the coolability of the debris bed. In this study, two-phase flow around the debris bed in a 2D slice geometry is visualized by PIV method to obtain the velocity map of the flow. The DAVINCI-PIV was developed to investigate the flow around the debris bed. In order to simulate the boiling phenomena induced by the decay heat of the debris bed, the air was injected separately by the air chamber system which consists of the 14 air-flowmeters. The circulation flow developed by the rising bubbles was visualized by PIV method.

  5. Cooling of an internal-heated debris bed with fine particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Z.L.; Sehgal, B.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an analytical model on dryout heat flux of ex-vessel debris beds with fines particles under top flooding conditions has been developed. The parametric study is performed on the effect of the stratification of the debris beds on the dryout heat flux. The calculated results show that the stratification configuration of the debris beds with smaller particles and lower porosity layer resting on the top of another layer of the beds has profound effect on the dryout heat flux for the debris beds both with and without a downcomer. The enhancement of the dryout heat flux by the downcomer is significant. The efficiency of the single downcomer on the enhancement of the dryout heat flux is also analyzed. This, in general, agrees well with experimental data. The model is also employed to perform the assessment on the coolability of the ex-vessel debris bed under representative accidental conditions. One conservative case is chosen, and it is found that the downcomer could be efficient measure to cool the debris bed and hence terminate the severe accident. (authors)

  6. Transient core-debris bed heat-removal experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Klein, J.; Klages, J.; Schwarz, C.E.; Chen, J.C.

    1982-08-01

    An experimental investigation is reported of the thermal interaction between superheated core debris and water during postulated light-water reactor degraded core accidents. Data are presented for the heat transfer characteristics of packed beds of 3 mm spheres which are cooled by overlying pools of water. Results of transient bed temperature and steam flow rate measurements are presented for bed heights in the range 218 mm-433 mm and initial particle bed temperatures between 530K and 972K. Results display a two-part sequential quench process. Initial frontal cooling leaves pockets or channels of unquenched spheres. Data suggest that heat transfer process is limited by a mechanism of countercurrent two-phase flow. An analytical model which combines a bed energy equation with either a quasisteady version of the Lipinski debris bed model or a critical heat flux model reasonably well predicts the characteristic features of the bed quench process. Implications with respect to reactor safety are discussed

  7. Internal structure of an ex-vessel corium debris bed during severe accidents of LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eunho; Park, Jin Ho; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun Sun [POSTECH, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In the aspect of the coolability assessment the configuration of the debris bed, including internal and external characteristics, has significant importance as boundary conditions for simulations, however, relatively little investigation of the sedimentation process. For the development of a debris bed, recently there have been several studies that focused on thermal characteristics of corium particles. Yakush et al. performed simulation studies and showed that two phase natural convection affects the particle settling trajectory and changes the final arrival location of particles to result more flattened bed. Those simulation results have been supported by the experimental studies of Kim et al. using simulant particles and air bubble injection. For the internal structure of a debris bed, there have been several simulation and experimental studies, which investigated the effect of internal structure on debris bed coolability. Magallon has reported the particle size distribution at three elevations of the debris bed of FARO L-31 case, where the mean particle size was bigger for the lower elevation. However, there is a lack of detailed information on the characteristics of the debris bed, including the local structure and porosity. In this study, we investigated the internal structure of the debris bed using a mixture of stainless steel particles and air bubble injection. Local particle sedimentation quantity, particle size distribution change in radial direction and axial direction, and bed porosity was measured to investigate a relationship between the internal structure and the accident condition. An experimental investigation was carried out for the internal structure of ex-vessel corium debris bed in the flooded cavity during sever accident. Moderate corium discharge in high flooding level was assumed for full fragmentation of melt jet. The test particle mixture was prepared by following an empirical correlation, which reflects the particle size distribution of

  8. Internal structure of an ex-vessel corium debris bed during severe accidents of LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eunho; Park, Jin Ho; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun Sun

    2015-01-01

    In the aspect of the coolability assessment the configuration of the debris bed, including internal and external characteristics, has significant importance as boundary conditions for simulations, however, relatively little investigation of the sedimentation process. For the development of a debris bed, recently there have been several studies that focused on thermal characteristics of corium particles. Yakush et al. performed simulation studies and showed that two phase natural convection affects the particle settling trajectory and changes the final arrival location of particles to result more flattened bed. Those simulation results have been supported by the experimental studies of Kim et al. using simulant particles and air bubble injection. For the internal structure of a debris bed, there have been several simulation and experimental studies, which investigated the effect of internal structure on debris bed coolability. Magallon has reported the particle size distribution at three elevations of the debris bed of FARO L-31 case, where the mean particle size was bigger for the lower elevation. However, there is a lack of detailed information on the characteristics of the debris bed, including the local structure and porosity. In this study, we investigated the internal structure of the debris bed using a mixture of stainless steel particles and air bubble injection. Local particle sedimentation quantity, particle size distribution change in radial direction and axial direction, and bed porosity was measured to investigate a relationship between the internal structure and the accident condition. An experimental investigation was carried out for the internal structure of ex-vessel corium debris bed in the flooded cavity during sever accident. Moderate corium discharge in high flooding level was assumed for full fragmentation of melt jet. The test particle mixture was prepared by following an empirical correlation, which reflects the particle size distribution of

  9. Experimental investigation of multidimensional cooling effects on the coolability of a debris bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashidi, M.; Kulenovici, R.; Laurieni, E.

    2011-01-01

    During a severe accident in a light water reactor, the core can melt and be relocated to the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel. There it can form a particulate debris bed due to the possible presence of water. Within the reactor safety research, the removal of decay heat from a debris bed (formed from corium and residual water) is of great importance. In order to investigate experimentally the long-term coolability of debris beds, the down-scaled non nuclear test facility DEBRIS has been established at IKE. The major objectives of the experimental investigations at this test facility are the determination of local pressure drops for steady state boiling to check friction laws, the determination of dryout heat fluxes under various conditions for validation of numerical models, and the analysis of quenching processes of dry hot debris beds. A large number of 1D-experiments were carried out to investigate the coolability limits for different bed configurations at various thermohydraulic conditions, and to validate numerical models which can be used in reactor safety studies. Analyses based on one-dimensional configurations underestimate the coolability in realistic multidimensional configurations, where lateral water access and water inflow via bottom regions are favored. This paper presents 2D experimental results, based on various kinds of water inflow conditions into the bed, boiling and dryout tests with different bed configurations and different system pressures. Preliminary results show that the system pressure has no significant effect on the fundamental shape of the pressure gradient inside the bed, whereas with increasing system pressure the coolability limits are increased

  10. An experimental simulation study of debris quenching in a radially stratified porous bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Nayak, A.K.; Stepanyan, A.

    2004-01-01

    During a severe accident condition in a nuclear power plant, the core melt can fail the reactor vessel and relocate into the containment basement. In some accident management schemes, the vessel cavity is flooded with water. For these a particulate debris bed is likely to form on the cavity floor due to melt break-up in water. . In this situation, the coolability of debris bed on the containment floor is a crucial issue. This is because the debris bed still generates the decay heat and if it is uncoolable, it can eventually remelt and react with concrete basement generating a lot of noncondensable gases and pressurising the containment. Hence, it is important to cool the debris bed as an accident management programme. The main parameters affecting the coolability of the debris bed are its porosity which is a function of the size and shape of the particles which constitute the debris bed, the operating condition such as water flooding from the top or bottom of debris bed, water temperature and non-condensable gas generated during bed-concrete interactions. It is found from previous studies that the debris bed has a non-uniform particle distribution or a porosity stratification. This can happen both in radial and axial plane. For example, the bed can have a lower porosity at the centre and higher porosity at the periphery. It is of interest to investigate the quenching phenomena in such configurations so as to find an effective means of quenching the heat generating bed. While most of the previous investigations mainly concentrate on quenching of a homogenous or axially stratified particulate bed with volumetric heat generation, there are almost no studies on the above phenomena in a radially stratified porous bed. So the objective of this paper is to investigate the quenching phenomena in a radially stratified bed. To simulate the phenomena, we conducted experiments in an experimental facility named as POMECO (POrous MEdia COolability). The facility has a square

  11. Modes of heat removal from a heat-generating debris bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squarer, D.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Piecznski, A.T.

    1984-01-01

    In the worst hypothetical accident in a light water reactor, when all protection systems fail, the core could be converted into a deep particulate bed either in-vessel or ex-vessel. The containment of such an accident depends on the coolability of a heat-generating debris bed. Some recent experimental and analytical studies that are concerned with heat removal from such a particulate bed are reviewed. Studies have indicated that bed dryout flux and, therefore, the heat removal rate from the particulate bed increases with the particle diameter (i.e., the permeability) for pool boiling conditions and can exceed the critical heat flux of a flat plate. Bed dryout in a large particle bed (i.e., a few millimetres) was found to be closely related to the ''flooding'' limit of the bed. Dryout under forced flow conditions was found to be affected by both forced and natural convection for mass flow rate smaller than m /SUB cr/ , whereas above this mass flow rate, bed dryout is proportional to the mass flow rate. Recent analyses were found to be in agreement with experimental data; however, additional research is needed to assess factors not accounted for in previous studies (e.g., effect of pressure, multidimensionality, stratification, etc.). Based on the expected pressure and particle sizes in a postulated severe accident sequence, a debris bed should be coolable, given a sufficient water supply

  12. Conditioning of metallic Magnox fuel element debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    The conditioning of metallic Magnox debris poses particular problems arising from its chemical reactivity and from the presence in discrete amounts of highly radioactive components. The treatment of this waste is currently being studied by the Central Electricity Generating Board. Following retrieval from store it is envisaged that the debris will be dried and comminuted to facilitate the removal for further storage of the highly active components from the bulk debris. A satisfactory means of sorting the debris appears to be by magnetic induction. The relatively low activity but potentially reactive Magnox will then be directly encapsulated prior to disposal off-site. Currently the only disposal route open for this waste is to the deep ocean. Matrices for encapsulating Magnox have been developed and others are under investigation. The desirable features of such matrices include low chemical reactivity and impermeability to water. The methods used to characterize the resultant waste forms and the results obtained are presented. Thermosetting polymers produce suitable waste forms for sea disposal, exhibiting high mechanical strength and resistance to leaching, and possessing very low chemical reactivity with respect to the Magnox waste. Low viscosity matrices are advantageous from the point of view of the process plant engineering as they enable the comminuted waste to be directly encapsulated. (author)

  13. Design report on SCDAP/RELAP5 model improvements - debris bed and molten pool behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, C.M.; Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.

    1994-11-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 computer code is designed to describe the overall reactor coolant system thermal-hydraulic response, core damage progression, and in combination with VICTORIA, fission product release and transport during severe accidents. Improvements for existing debris bed and molten pool models in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1 code are described in this report. Model improvements to address (a) debris bed formation, heating, and melting; (b) molten pool formation and growth; and (c) molten pool crust failure are discussed. Relevant data, existing models, proposed modeling changes, and the anticipated impact of the changes are discussed. Recommendations for the assessment of improved models are provided

  14. Evolution of Particle Bed Reactor Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Russell R.; Evans, Robert S.; Husser, Dewayne L.; Kerr, John M.

    1994-07-01

    To realize the potential performance advantages inherent in a particle bed reactor (PBR) for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) applications, high performance particle fuel is required. This fuel must operate safely and without failure at high temperature in high pressure, flowing hydrogen propellant. The mixed mean outlet temperature of the propellant is an important characteristic of PBR performance. This temperature is also a critical parameter for fuel particle design because it dictates the required maximum fuel operating temperature. In this paper, the evolution in PBR fuel form to achieve higher operating temperatures is discussed and the potential thermal performance of the different fuel types is evaluated. It is shown that the optimum fuel type for operation under the demanding conditions in a PBR is a coated, solid carbide particle.

  15. Experimental investigation of coolability behaviour of irregularly shaped particulate debris bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, P.P.; Rashid, M.; Kulenovic, R.; Nayak, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    In case of a severe nuclear reactor accident, the core can melt and form a particulate debris bed in the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Due to the decay heat, the particle bed, if not cooled properly, can cause failure of the RPV. In order to avoid further propagation of the accident, complete coolability of the debris bed is necessary. For that, understanding of various phenomena taking place during the quenching is important. In the frame of the reactor safety research, fundamental experiments on the coolability of debris beds are carried out at IKE with the test facility 'DEBRIS'. In the present paper, the boiling and dry-out experimental results on a particle bed with irregularly shaped particles mixed with stainless steel balls have been reported. The pressure drops and dry-out heat fluxes of the irregular-particle bed are very similar to those for the single-sized 3 mm spheres bed, despite the fact that the irregular-particle bed is composed of particles with equivalent diameters ranging from 2 to 10 mm. Under top-flooding conditions, the pressure gradients are all smaller than the hydrostatic pressure gradient of water, indicating an important role of the counter-current interfacial drag force. For bottom-flooding with a liquid inflow velocity higher than about 2.7 mm/s, the pressure gradient generally increases consistently with the vapour velocity and the fluid-particle drag becomes important. The system pressures (1 and 3 bar) have negligible effects on qualitative behaviour of the pressure gradients. The coolability of debris beds is mainly limited by the counter-current flooding limit (CCFL) even under bottom-flooding conditions with low flow rates. The system pressure and the flow rate are found to have a distinct effect on the dry-out heat flux. Different classical models have been used to predict the pressure drop characteristics and the dry-out heat flux (DHF). Comparisons are made among the models and experimental results for

  16. Transporting fuel debris from TMI-2 to INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, G.J.; Burton, H.M.; Bixby, W.W.; McIntosh, T.W.; McGoff, O.J.; Barkonic, R.J.; Henrie, J.O.

    1986-06-01

    Transportation of the damaged fuel from Unit 2 of Three Mile Island (TMI-2) presented noteworthy technical challenges involving complex institutional issues. The program resulted from both a need to package and remove the accident debris and also the opportunity to receive and study damaged core components. These combined to establish the safe transport of the TMI-2 fuel debris as a high priority for many diverse organizations. The capability of the sending and receiving facilities to handle spent fuel transport casks in the most cost-effective manner was assessed and resulted in the development by Nuclear Packaging Inc. (NuPac) of the NuPac 125-B rail cask. This paper reviews the technical challenges in preparation of the TMI-2 core debris for transport from TMI-2 to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and receipt and storage of that material at INEL. Challenges discussed include design and testing of fuel debris canisters; design, fabrication and licensing of a new rail cask for spent fuel transport; cask loading operations, equipment and facilities at TMI-2; transportation logistics; and, receipt, storage and core examination operations at INEL. 10 refs

  17. Development of an ex-vessel corium debris bed with two-phase natural convection in a flooded cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eunho; Lee, Mooneon; Park, Hyun Sun; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • For ex-vessel severe accidents in LWRs with wet-cavity strategy, development of debris bed with two-phase natural convection flow due to thermal characteristics of prototypic corium particles was investigated experimentally by using simulant particles and local air bubble control system. • Based on the experimental results of this study, an analytical model was established to describe the spreading of the debris bed in terms of two-phase flow and the debris injection parameters. • This model was then used to analyze the formation of debris beds at the reactor scale, and a sensitivity analysis was carried out based on key accident parameters. - Abstract: During severe accidents of light water reactors (LWRs), the coolability of relocated corium from the reactor vessel is a significant safety issue and a threat to the integrity of containment. With a flooded cavity, a porous debris bed is expected to develop on the bottom of the pool due to breakup and fragmentation of the melt jet. As part of the coolability assessment under accident conditions, the geometrical configuration of the debris bed is important. The Debris Bed Research Apparatus for Validation of the Bubble-Induced Natural Convection Effect Issue (DAVINCI) experimental apparatus facility was constructed to investigate the formation of debris beds under the influence of a two-phase flow induced by steam generation due to the decay heat of the debris bed. Using this system, five kilograms of stainless steel simulant debris were injected from the top of the water level, while air bubbles simulating the vapor flow were injected from the bottom of the particle catcher plate. The airflow rate was determined based on the quantity of settled debris, which will form a heat source due to the decay of corium. The radial distribution of the settled debris was examined using a ‘gap–tooth’ approach. Based on the experimental results of this study, an analytical model was established to

  18. Development of an ex-vessel corium debris bed with two-phase natural convection in a flooded cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eunho; Lee, Mooneon; Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Jin Ho

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • For ex-vessel severe accidents in LWRs with wet-cavity strategy, development of debris bed with two-phase natural convection flow due to thermal characteristics of prototypic corium particles was investigated experimentally by using simulant particles and local air bubble control system. • Based on the experimental results of this study, an analytical model was established to describe the spreading of the debris bed in terms of two-phase flow and the debris injection parameters. • This model was then used to analyze the formation of debris beds at the reactor scale, and a sensitivity analysis was carried out based on key accident parameters. - Abstract: During severe accidents of light water reactors (LWRs), the coolability of relocated corium from the reactor vessel is a significant safety issue and a threat to the integrity of containment. With a flooded cavity, a porous debris bed is expected to develop on the bottom of the pool due to breakup and fragmentation of the melt jet. As part of the coolability assessment under accident conditions, the geometrical configuration of the debris bed is important. The Debris Bed Research Apparatus for Validation of the Bubble-Induced Natural Convection Effect Issue (DAVINCI) experimental apparatus facility was constructed to investigate the formation of debris beds under the influence of a two-phase flow induced by steam generation due to the decay heat of the debris bed. Using this system, five kilograms of stainless steel simulant debris were injected from the top of the water level, while air bubbles simulating the vapor flow were injected from the bottom of the particle catcher plate. The airflow rate was determined based on the quantity of settled debris, which will form a heat source due to the decay of corium. The radial distribution of the settled debris was examined using a ‘gap–tooth’ approach. Based on the experimental results of this study, an analytical model was established to

  19. Enhanced stability of steep channel beds to mass failure and debris flow initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prancevic, J.; Lamb, M. P.; Ayoub, F.; Venditti, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Debris flows dominate bedrock erosion and sediment transport in very steep mountain channels, and are often initiated from failure of channel-bed alluvium during storms. While several theoretical models exist to predict mass failures, few have been tested because observations of in-channel bed failures are extremely limited. To fill this gap in our understanding, we performed laboratory flume experiments to identify the conditions necessary to initiate bed failures in non-cohesive sediment of different sizes (D = 0.7 mm to 15 mm) on steep channel-bed slopes (S = 0.45 to 0.93) and in the presence of water flow. In beds composed of sand, failures occurred under sub-saturated conditions on steep bed slopes (S > 0.5) and under super-saturated conditions at lower slopes. In beds of gravel, however, failures occurred only under super-saturated conditions at all tested slopes, even those approaching the dry angle of repose. Consistent with theoretical models, mass failures under super-saturated conditions initiated along a failure plane approximately one grain-diameter below the bed surface, whereas the failure plane was located near the base of the bed under sub-saturated conditions. However, all experimental beds were more stable than predicted by 1-D infinite-slope stability models. In partially saturated sand, enhanced stability appears to result from suction stress. Enhanced stability in gravel may result from turbulent energy losses in pores or increased granular friction for failures that are shallow with respect to grain size. These grain-size dependent effects are not currently included in stability models for non-cohesive sediment, and they may help to explain better the timing and location of debris flow occurrence.

  20. Development of anti-debris filter for WWER-440 working fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolosovsky, V.; Aksyonov, P.; Kukushkin, Y.; Molchanov, V.; Kolobaev, A.

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical damaging of the fuel rod claddings caused by debris is one of the main reasons for fuel assembly failures. The paper focuses on the program and results of experimental and design activities carried out by Russian organizations relating to the development and investigation of operational characteristics of anti-debris filters for WWER-440 working fuel assemblies. Lead working fuel assemblies equipped with anti-debris filters have been loaded in the core of Kola-2 NPP. The results obtained can be used for making the decision concerning the application of anti-debris filter for WWER-440 working fuel assemblies with the purpose of enhancing their debris-resistance properties. (authors)

  1. Development and application of surrogate model for assessment of ex-vessel debris bed dryout probability - 15157

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakush, S.E.; Lubchenko, N.T.; Kudinov, P.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we consider a water-cooled power reactor severe accident scenario with pressure vessel failure and subsequent release of molten corium. A surrogate model for prediction of dryout heat flux for ex-vessels debris beds of different shapes is developed. Functional form of dryout heat flux dependence on problem parameters is developed by the analysis of coolability problem in non-dimensional variables. It is shown that for a flat debris bed the dryout heat flux can be represented in terms of three 1-dimensional functions for which approximating formulas are found. For two-dimensional debris beds (cylindrical, conical, Gaussian heap, mound-shaped), an additional function taking into account the bed shape geometry is obtained from numerical simulations using DECOSIM code as a full model. With the surrogate model in hand, risk analysis of debris bed coolability is carried out by Monte Carlo sampling of the input parameters within selected ranges, with assumed distribution functions

  2. Mechanical properties of fuel debris for defueling toward decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Takanori; Kitagaki, Toru; Yano, Kimihiko; Okamura, Nobuo; Koizumi, Kenji; Ohara, Hiroshi; Fukasawa, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    In the decommissioning of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F), safe and steady defueling work is required. Before defueling 1F, it is necessary to evaluate fuel debris for properties related to the defueling procedure and technology. While defueling after the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, a core boring system played an important role. Considering the working principle of core boring, hardness, elastic modulus, and fracture toughness were found to be important fuel debris properties that had a profound effect on the performance of the boring machine. It is speculated that uranium and zirconium oxide solid solution ((U,Zr)O_2) is one of the major materials of fuel debris in 1F, according to the TMI-2 accident experience and the results of past severe accident studies. In addition, the Zr content of 1F fuel debris is expected to be higher than that of TMI-2 debris, because the 1F reactors were boiling-water reactor (BWR). In this report, the mechanical properties of (U,Zr)O_2 are evaluated in the ZrO_2 content range from 10% to 65%. The hardness, elastic modulus, and fracture toughness were measured by Vickers test, ultrasonic pulse echo method, and indentation fracture method, respectively. In the ZrO_2 content range under 50%, the Vickers hardness and fracture toughness of (U,Zr)O_2 increased, and the elastic modulus decreased slightly with ZrO_2 content. In the case of 55% and 65% ZrO_2, all of those measures increased slightly with ZrO_2 content. Summarizing those results, ZrO_2 content affects mechanical properties significantly in the case of low ZrO_2 content. Higher Zr content (exceeding 50%) has little effect on mechanical properties. In the future, nonradioactive surrogate debris will be necessary for small-scale functional and large-scale mockup tests of various defueling technologies. These results are useful to select the material for surrogate debris. (author)

  3. Models for dryout in debris beds. Review and application to the analysis of PAHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshinori

    2000-03-01

    There are many models for dryout in debiris beds and various conditions under which these models are applicable. For a reliable analysis of post-accident heat removal (PAHR), it is important that characteristics and applicability of each model should be made clear. In this report, formulation of the models for dryout and applicability of them are studied through comparing with experimental data. A new model for dryout prediction is also discussed here. It is difficult to predict the dryout power especially for a relatively shallow bed using a conventional model for channeled beds. The new model, which is based on the one-dimensional model derived by Lipinski, has permeability of channels in the governing equation, and enables us to predict the dryout power for relatively shallow beds. The following conclusions are derived from comparing the predicted dryout power with experimental data. The model for series heat removal is applicable to a packed bed while the DEBRIS-MD underestimates the dryout power for it. Either the original model assuming channel formation on the top of the bed or the modified model is applicable to a relatively deep bed with channels. For a relatively shallow bed with channels, the dryout power predicted by the modified model agrees with the experimental data in comparison with other models. (author)

  4. Elementary theory of bed-sediment entrainment by debris flows and avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of mass and momentum exchange between a debris flow or avalanche and an underlying sediment layer aid interpretations and predictions of bed-sediment entrainment rates. A preliminary analysis assesses the behavior of a Coulomb slide block that entrains bed material as it descends a uniform slope. The analysis demonstrates that the block's momentum can grow unstably, even in the presence of limited entrainment efficiency. A more-detailed, depth-integrated continuum analysis of interacting, deformable bodies identifies mechanical controls on entrainment efficiency, and shows that entrainment rates satisfy a jump condition that involves shear-traction and velocity discontinuities at the flow-bed boundary. Explicit predictions of the entrainment rateEresult from making reasonable assumptions about flow velocity profiles and boundary shear tractions. For Coulomb-friction tractions, predicted entrainment rates are sensitive to pore fluid pressures that develop in bed sediment as it is overridden. In the simplest scenario the bed sediment liquefies completely, and the entrainment-rate equation reduces toE = 2μ1gh1 cos θ(1 − λ1)/ , where θ is the slope angle, μ1 is the flow's Coulomb friction coefficient, h1 is its thickness, λ1 is its degree of liquefaction, and is its depth-averaged velocity. For values ofλ1ranging from 0.5 to 0.8, this equation predicts entrainment rates consistent with rates of 0.05 to 0.1 m/s measured in large-scale debris-flow experiments in which wet sediment beds liquefied almost completely. The propensity for bed liquefaction depends on several factors, including sediment porosity, permeability, and thickness, and rates of compression and shear deformation that occur when beds are overridden.

  5. COOLOCE debris bed experiments and simulations investigating the coolability of cylindrical beds with different materials and flow modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasuo, E.; Kinnunen, T.; Holmstroem, S.; Lehtikuusi, T. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland)

    2013-07-15

    The COOLOCE experiments aim at investigating the coolability of debris beds of different geometries, flow modes and materials. A debris bed may be formed of solidified corium as a result of a severe accident in a nuclear power reactor. The COOLOCE-8 test series consisted of experiments with a top-flooded test bed with irregular gravel as the simulant material. The objective was to produce comparison data useful in estimating the effects of different particle materials and the possible effect of the test arrangement on the results. It was found that the dryout heat flux (DHF) measured for the gravel was lower compared to previous experiments with spherical beads, and somewhat lower compared to the early STYX experiments. The difference between the beads and gravel is at least partially explained by the smaller average size of the gravel particles. The COOLOCE-9 test series included scoping experiments examining the effect of subcooling of the water pool in which the debris bed is immersed. The experiments with initially subcooled pool suggest that the subcooling may increase DHF and increase coolability. The aim of the COOLOCE-10 experiments was to investigate the effect of lateral flooding on the DHF a cylindrical test bed. The top of the test cylinder and its sidewall were open to water infiltration. It was found that the DHF is increased compared to a top-flooded cylinder by more than 50%. This suggests that coolability is notably improved. 2D simulations of the top-flooded test beds have been run with the MEWA code. Prior to the simulations, the effective particle diameter for the spherical beads and the irregular gravel was estimated by single-phase pressure loss measurements performed at KTH in Sweden. Parameter variations were done for particle size and porosity used as input in the models. It was found that with the measured effective particle diameter and porosity, the simulation models predict DHF with a relatively good accuracy in the case of spherical

  6. CHARACTERISTICS OF SELF-LEVELING BEHAVIOR OF DEBRIS BEDS IN A SERIES OF EXPERIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SONGBAI CHENG

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available During a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (CDA in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR, degraded core materials can form roughly conically-shaped debris beds over the core-support structure and/or in the lower inlet plenum of the reactor vessel from rapid quenching and fragmentation of the core material pool. However, coolant boiling may ultimately lead to leveling of the debris bed, which is crucial to the relocation of the molten core and heat-removal capability of the debris bed. To clarify the mechanisms underlying this self-leveling behavior, a large number of experiments were performed within a variety of conditions in recent years, under the constructive collaboration between the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA and Kyushu University (Japan. The present contribution synthesizes and gives detailed comparative analyses of those experiments. Effects of various experimental parameters that may have potential influence on the leveling process, such as boiling mode, particle size, particle density, particle shape, bubbling rate, water depth and column geometry, were investigated, thus giving a large palette of favorable data for the better understanding of CDAs, and improved verifications of computer models developed in advanced fast reactor safety analysis codes.

  7. Characteristics of Self-Leveling Behavior of Debris Beds in A Series of Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Songbai; Yamano, Hidemasa; Suzuki, Tohru; Tobita, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Yuya, Nakamura; Bin, Zhang; Tatsuya, Matsumoto; Koji, Morita [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    During a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (CDA) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), degraded core materials can form roughly conically-shaped debris beds over the core-support structure and/or in the lower inlet plenum of the reactor vessel from rapid quenching and fragmentation of the core material pool. However, coolant boiling may ultimately lead to leveling of the debris bed, which is crucial to the relocation of the molten core and heat-removal capability of the debris bed. To clarify the mechanisms underlying this self-leveling behavior, a large number of experiments were performed within a variety of conditions in recent years, under the constructive collaboration between the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and Kyushu University (Japan). The present contribution synthesizes and gives detailed comparative analyses of those experiments. Effects of various experimental parameters that may have potential influence on the leveling process, such as boiling mode, particle size, particle density, particle shape, bubbling rate, water depth and column geometry, were investigated, thus giving a large palette of favorable data for the better understanding of CDAs, and improved verifications of computer models developed in advanced fast reactor safety analysis codes.

  8. Characteristics of Self-Leveling Behavior of Debris Beds in A Series of Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Songbai; Yamano, Hidemasa; Suzuki, Tohru; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Yuya, Nakamura; Bin, Zhang; Tatsuya, Matsumoto; Koji, Morita

    2013-01-01

    During a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (CDA) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), degraded core materials can form roughly conically-shaped debris beds over the core-support structure and/or in the lower inlet plenum of the reactor vessel from rapid quenching and fragmentation of the core material pool. However, coolant boiling may ultimately lead to leveling of the debris bed, which is crucial to the relocation of the molten core and heat-removal capability of the debris bed. To clarify the mechanisms underlying this self-leveling behavior, a large number of experiments were performed within a variety of conditions in recent years, under the constructive collaboration between the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and Kyushu University (Japan). The present contribution synthesizes and gives detailed comparative analyses of those experiments. Effects of various experimental parameters that may have potential influence on the leveling process, such as boiling mode, particle size, particle density, particle shape, bubbling rate, water depth and column geometry, were investigated, thus giving a large palette of favorable data for the better understanding of CDAs, and improved verifications of computer models developed in advanced fast reactor safety analysis codes

  9. Coolability of a 3D homogeneous debris bed, experimental and numerical investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkhen, K.; Berthoud, G.

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of nuclear safety analysis, we present here experimental and numerical results in the field of debris bed coolability. Experimental data are provided by the SILFIDE 3D experimental facility in which the debris bed is heated by induction, at Electricite de France (EDF). Numerical computations are obtained with MC3D-REPO which is a 3-phase and 3D code developed by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA). The uniform debris bed consists of 2 and 3,17 mm diameter steel beads contained in a 50 cm x 60 cm x 10 cm vessel. Water is used as a coolant and can be introduced either by the top or the bottom of the bed at a determined temperature. Due to heterogeneous power distribution within the bed, two definitions for the critical heat flux are proposed: the classical mean value and the local flux (much higher). Even in the first case, the measured dryout heat flux is higher than the Lipinsky 1-D flux. Temperature curve analyses show that the dryout phenomenon is very local, therefore one should be careful about the right flux definition to use. As the injected power is being increased stepwise, steady temperature stages above saturation temperature before dryout can be observed. A discussion is proposed. For some very high values of the induction power, some spheres melted together, leading to a bigger non-porous region. Even if the local temperature went over 1300 C, the bed was still coolable and the critical heat flux value was not impacted. Some parametric studies led to the following conclusions: bottom coolant injection leads to a twice time higher critical flux than by top injection, the influence of the height of the water pool above debris bed is negligible, a sub-cooled liquid injection has no influence on the coolability. Fluidization of surface particles is also discussed. The MC3D-REPO model assumes a thermal equilibrium between the three phases, which gives results in agreement with experiments until dryout occurs. (author)

  10. Idealized debris flow in flume with bed driven by a conveyor belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Chi-Hai; Chen, Cheng-lung

    1989-01-01

    The generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model is used to derive the theoretical expressions of two-dimensional velocities and surface profile for debris flow established in a flume with bed driven by a conveyor belt. The rheological parameters of the GVF model are evaluated through the comparison of theoretical results with measured data. A slip velocity of the established (steady) nonuniform flow on the moving bed (i.e., the conveyor belt) is observed, and a relation between the slip velocity and the velocity gradient at the bed is derived. Two belts, one rough and the other smooth, were tested. The flow profile in the flume is found to be linear and dependent on the roughness of the belt, but not much on its speed.

  11. Debris bed cooling following an HCDA in a fast reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1983-01-01

    Natural convection within simulated core debris beds has been experimentally and theoretically investigated. The effect of heating method on bed behavior has been found to be important. For directly-heated beds, variations of the downward and upward power fraction and Nusselt numbers with bed loading, power density, particle size, overlying fluid layer height and top surface boundary condition have been determined. Generalized correlations for the upward and downward Nusselt numbers as functions of the internal Rayleigh number have been obtained. Particle tracing techniques have been used to visualize the flow patterns within the bed and overlying fluid layer. The temperature distributions within the bed and overlying fluid layer have also been measured. The experimental data have been compared with COMMIX-lA predictions. Poor agreement has been obtained for both the integral quantities, i.e. downward and upward power fractions and Nusselt numbers, as well as the steady state velocity and temperature distributions. The code does not correctly predict either the magnitude or even the trend of the data

  12. Modelling transient energy release from molten fuel coolant interaction debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, D.F.

    1984-05-01

    A simple model of transient energy release in a Molten Fuel Coolant Interaction is presented. A distributed heat transfer model is used to examine the effect of heat transfer coefficient, time available for rapid energy heat transfer and particle size on transient energy release. The debris is assumed to have an Upper Limit Lognormal distribution. Model predictions are compared with results from the SUW series of experiments which used thermite-generated uranium dioxide molybdenum melts released below the surface of a pool of water. Uncertainties in the physical principles involved in the calculation of energy transfer rates are discussed. (author)

  13. Comparison of Two Phase Pressure Drop Models in 1-D Top Flooded Debris Bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Moon Eon; Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Eun ho; Park, Hyun Sun

    2016-01-01

    The dry out of coolant inside debris bed can be considered as the limitation of cooling in the conservative point of view and the heat flux through whole bed at the situation is named as Dryout Heat Flux (DHF). The modeling of DHF for debris bed started from early 1980s by several researchers. It is known that DHF mainly occurs by hydrodynamic limitation inside porous media. Therefore, there have been following attempts to capture flow resistance in porous media, precisely. Up to date, although there are about seven pressure drop models available in literatures, it is hard to find comparison of those models with a wide range of DHF experimental data. The one attempt[9] was conducted in 2013, but due to lack of consideration of the capillary pressure in his work, the DHF values that he calculated seem to be underestimated, especially in the range of the small particle diameter cases. In this research, the importance of capillary pressure in the comparison of pressure drop model with experimental data was checked and model selection among pressure drop models for the DHF calculation was also conducted. The model comparison with 108 experimental data from various conditions has been conducted and the Schmidt model shows the best agreement to the experimental data although Reed, Rahman model also show similar results.

  14. Comparison of Two Phase Pressure Drop Models in 1-D Top Flooded Debris Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Moon Eon; Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Eun ho; Park, Hyun Sun [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The dry out of coolant inside debris bed can be considered as the limitation of cooling in the conservative point of view and the heat flux through whole bed at the situation is named as Dryout Heat Flux (DHF). The modeling of DHF for debris bed started from early 1980s by several researchers. It is known that DHF mainly occurs by hydrodynamic limitation inside porous media. Therefore, there have been following attempts to capture flow resistance in porous media, precisely. Up to date, although there are about seven pressure drop models available in literatures, it is hard to find comparison of those models with a wide range of DHF experimental data. The one attempt[9] was conducted in 2013, but due to lack of consideration of the capillary pressure in his work, the DHF values that he calculated seem to be underestimated, especially in the range of the small particle diameter cases. In this research, the importance of capillary pressure in the comparison of pressure drop model with experimental data was checked and model selection among pressure drop models for the DHF calculation was also conducted. The model comparison with 108 experimental data from various conditions has been conducted and the Schmidt model shows the best agreement to the experimental data although Reed, Rahman model also show similar results.

  15. Dryout heat flux in a debris bed with forced coolant flow from below

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Kwang-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Myung

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to experimentally investigate the enhancement of dryout heat flux in debris beds with coolant flow from below. The experimental facility consists mainly of an induction heater (40 kW, 35 kHz), a double-wall quartz-tube test section containing steel-particle bed and coolant injection and recovery condensing loop. A fairly uniform heating of particle bed was achieved by induction heating. This paper reports the experimental data for 5 mm particle bed and 300 mm bed height. The dryout heat rate data were obtained of both top-flooding case and forced coolant injection from below with the injection mass flux up to 1.5 kg/m 2 s. For the top-flooded case, the volumetric dryout heat rate was about 4 MW/m 3 and it increased as the rate of coolant injection from below was increased. At the coolant injection mass flux of 1.5 kg/m 2 s, the volumetric dryout heat rate was about 10 MW/m 3 , the enhancement factor was more than two. (author)

  16. Unsteady void measurements within debris beds using high speed X-ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurien, E., E-mail: Laurien@ike.uni-stuttgart.de; Stürzel, T., E-mail: thilo.stuerzel@stihl.de; Zhou, M., E-mail: mi.zhou@ike.uni-stuttgart.de

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • A high speed X-ray tomography facility has been built for the investigation on two-phase flow. • The two-phase flow through beds of packed plastic spheres has been investigated in the facility. • 3D-reconstructions from the measurements show the fluxes in the two-phase flow. • The gas fraction has been calculated from the reconstruction and used for validation of the modeling. • A new bed with closest regular spheres arrangement has been manufactured by 3D-plotter and used in the measurement. - Abstract: Two-phase flow and boiling within debris beds representing a destroyed reactor core after a severe accident with core fragmentation can be simulated by using the porous media approach. In this approach, a local pressure drop and the heat transfer between the solid debris particles and the two-phase flow is modelled with the help flow-pattern maps, in which the boundaries between bubbly, slug, and annular flow are assumed. In order to support further understanding of these flows we have developed a very fast X-ray measurement device to visualize the 3D-void distribution within particle beds or porous media, which are otherwise un-accessible internally. The experimental setup uses a scanned electron beam directed in circles on a tungsten target to generate the X-rays. The particle bed, which has a diameter of 70 mm, is located between this target and a field of 256 X-ray detectors, which are arranged on a circle concentric to the target. The void distribution is reconstructed numerically from the attenuation of signals, which penetrates the particle bed and the two-phase flow inside. A 3D frame rate of up to 1000 Hz can be reached. The spatial resolution is such that bubbles with a diameter > 1.7 mm can be detected. We have investigated two-phase flows air/water through beds of packed plastic spheres (diameter between 3 and 15 mm) as well as through plastic beds, which were manufactured using a ‘3D-plotter’. Flow patterns can be

  17. Fixed bed gasification of solid biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haavisto, I [Condens Oy, Haemeenlinna (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Fixed bed biomass gasifiers are feasible in the effect range of 100 kW -10 MW. Co-current gasification is available only up to 1 MW for technical reasons. Counter-current gasifiers have been used in Finland and Sweden for 10 years in gasification heating plants, which are a combination of a gasifier and an oil boiler. The plants have proved to have a wide control range, flexible and uncomplicated unmanned operation and an excellent reliability. Counter-current gasifiers can be applied for new heating plants or for converting existing oil and natural gas boilers into using solid fuels. There is a new process development underway, aiming at motor use of the producer gas. The development work involves a new, more flexible cocurrent gasifier and a cleaning step for the counter-current producer gas. (orig.)

  18. Fixed bed gasification of solid biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haavisto, I. [Condens Oy, Haemeenlinna (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Fixed bed biomass gasifiers are feasible in the effect range of 100 kW -10 MW. Co-current gasification is available only up to 1 MW for technical reasons. Counter-current gasifiers have been used in Finland and Sweden for 10 years in gasification heating plants, which are a combination of a gasifier and an oil boiler. The plants have proved to have a wide control range, flexible and uncomplicated unmanned operation and an excellent reliability. Counter-current gasifiers can be applied for new heating plants or for converting existing oil and natural gas boilers into using solid fuels. There is a new process development underway, aiming at motor use of the producer gas. The development work involves a new, more flexible cocurrent gasifier and a cleaning step for the counter-current producer gas. (orig.)

  19. Fuel Retrieval and Management of Fuel Element Debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chande, Shridhar; Lachaume, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear accidents involving core meltdown have not been so rare. While the first occurred in early fifties, it is reported that about 20 have occurred worldwide in military and commercial reactors. The more recent and major accidents are 1. Three Mile Island, USA in 1979: Approximately half the core was melted, and flowed to the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel however the pressure vessel remained intact and contained the damaged fuel. 2. Chernobyl, former USSR in 1984: Explosive release of radioactive material occurred. About 6 tons of fuel was dispersed as air-borne particles. Most of the core was damaged or melted. 3. Fukushima, Japan 2011: Three units suffered melt down. In unit 1 almost all the fuel assemblies melted and accumulated at the bottom of the vessel. It is reported that the vessel failed and the molten corium has penetrated the concrete. In the units 2 and 3, partial melting of cores has occurred. In several of these cases, fuel retrieval and management activities have been carried out. The experience and insights gained from these activities will be extremely useful for planning and execution of similar activities in future if ever they are needed. The purpose of this session was to exchange this experience and also to share the lessons learned. This is of particularly important, at this juncture, when planning and preparation for retrieval of damaged cores in Fukushima NPP is in progress. (author)

  20. Investigation of flow regime in debris bed formation behavior with nonspherical particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songbai Cheng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available It is important to clarify the characteristics of flow regimes underlying the debris bed formation behavior that might be encountered in core disruptive accidents of sodium-cooled fast reactors. Although in our previous publications, by applying dimensional analysis technique, an empirical model, with its reasonability confirmed over a variety of parametric conditions, has been successfully developed to predict the regime transition and final bed geometry formed, so far this model is restricted to predictions of debris mixtures composed of spherical particles. Focusing on this aspect, in this study a new series of experiments using nonspherical particles have been conducted. Based on the knowledge and data obtained, an extension scheme is suggested with the purpose of extending the base model to cover the particle-shape influence. Through detailed analyses and given our current range of experimental conditions, it is found that, by coupling the base model with this scheme, respectable agreement between experiments and model predictions for the regime transition can be achieved for both spherical and nonspherical particles. Knowledge and evidence from our work might be utilized for the future improvement of design of an in-vessel core catcher as well as the development and verification of sodium-cooled fast reactor severe accident analysis codes in China.

  1. Preparation of UO2 fragments for fuel-debris experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinkle, M.C.; Kircher, J.A.; Zinn, R.M.; Eash, D.T.

    1982-01-01

    A unique process was developed for preparing multi-kilogram quantities of > 90% dense fragments of enriched and depleted UO 2 sized 20 mm to 0.038 mm for fuel debris experiments. Precipitates of UO 4 . xH 2 O were treated to obtain UO 2 powders that would yield large cohesive green pieces when isostatically pressed to 206 MPa. The pressed pieces were crushed into fragments that were about 30% oversized, and heated to 1800 0 C for 24 h in H 2 . Oversizing compensates for shrinkage during densification. Effort was dramatically reduced by working on a large scale and by presizing the green UO 2 instead of directly crushing densified pellets

  2. An examination of fire spread thresholds in discontinuous fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Jack D. Cohen; Isaac C. Grenfell; Kara M. Yedinak

    2010-01-01

    Many fuel beds, especially live vegetation canopies (conifer forests, shrub fields, bunch-grasses) contain gaps between vegetation clumps. Fires burning in these fuel types often display thresholds for spread that are observed to depend on environmental factors like wind, slope, and fuel moisture content. To investigate threshold spread behaviours, we conducted a set...

  3. Numerical models for the analysis of thermal behavior and coolability of a particulate debris bed in reactor lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Kwang Il; Kim, Sang Baik; Kim, Byung Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    This report provides three distinctive, but closely related numerical models developed for the analysis of thermal behavior and coolability of a particulate debris bed that is may be formed inside the reactor lower head during severe accident late phases. The first numerical module presented in the report, MELTPRO-DRY, is used to analyze numerically heat-up and melting process of the dry particle bed, downward- and sideward-relocation of the liquid melt under gravity force and capillary force acting among porous particles, and solidification of the liquid melt relocated into colder region. The second module, MELTPROG-WET, is used to simulate numerically the cooling process of the particulate debris bed under the existence of water, which is subjected to two types of numerical models. The first type of WET module utilizes distinctive models that parametrically simulate the water cooling process, that is, quenching region, dryout region, and transition region. The choice of each parametric model depends on temperature gradient between the cooling water and the debris particles. The second type of WET module utilizes two-phase flow model that mechanically simulates the cooling process of the debris bed. For a consistent simulation from the water cooling to the dryout debris bed, on the other hand, the aforementioned two modules, MELTPROG-DRY and MELTPROG-WET, were integrated into a single computer program DBCOOL. Each of computational models was verified through limited applications to a heat-generating particulate bed contained in the rectangular cavity. 22 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  4. Analysis of dryout behaviour in laterally non-homogeneous debris beds using the MEWA-2D code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Saidur; Buerger, Manfred; Buck, Michael; Pohlner, Georg; Kulenovic, Rudi; Nayak, Arun Kumar; Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2009-01-01

    The present study analyses the impact of lateral non-homogeneities on the coolability of heated, initially water filled debris beds. Debris beds which may be formed in a postulated severe accident in light water reactors can not be expected to have a homogeneous structure. Lateral non-homogeneities are given e.g. already by a variation in height as in a heap of debris. Internally, less porous or more porous region may occur, the latter even as downcomer-like structures are considered to favour supply of water to the bed and thus coolability. In previous work it has been shown that such non-homogeneities are often strongly enhancing coolability, as compared to earlier investigations on laterally homogeneous beds. The present contribution aims at extending the view by analysing further cases of non-homogeneities with the MEWA-2D code. Especially, effects of capillary forces are considered in contrast to earlier analysis. Part of the paper deals with specific experiments performed in the POMECO facility at KTH in which a laterally stratified debris bed has been considered, whereby especially a strong jump of porosity, from 0.26 to 0.38, has been established. Astonishingly, under top as well as bottom flooding, dryout in these experiments occurred first in the lateral layer with higher porosity. Understanding is now provided by the effect of capillary forces: water is drawn from this layer to the less porous one. This effect improves the cooling in the less porous layer while it reduces coolability of the more porous layer. No real loop behaviour of inflow via the higher porosities with subsequent upflow in the less porous layer establishes here, in contrast to expectations. Other cases (different lateral heating in an otherwise homogeneous bed, closed downcomer in a homogeneous bed and heap-like debris) show, on the other hand, strongly improved coolability by such loops establishing due to the lateral differences in void and the corresponding pressure differences

  5. Debris bed coolability using a 3-D two phase model in a porous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechaud, C.; Duval, F.; Fichot, F. [CEA Cadarache, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Quintard, M. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, 31 (France); Parent, M. [CEA Grenoble, Dept. de Thermohydraulique et de Physique, 38 (France)

    2001-07-01

    During a severe nuclear accident, a part of the molten corium resulting from the core degradation may relocate in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel. In order to predict the safety margin of the reactor under such conditions, the coolability of this porous heat-generating medium is evaluated in this study and compared with other investigations. In this work, conservation equations derived for debris beds are implemented in the three dimensional thermal-hydraulic module of the CATHARE code. The coolant flow is a two phase flow with phase change. The momentum balance equation for each fluid phase is an extension of Darcy's law. This extension takes into account the capillary effects between the two phases, the relative permeabilities and passabilities of each phase, the interfacial drag force between liquid and gas, and the porous bed configuration (porosity, particle diameter,... ). The model developed is three-dimensional which is important to better predict the flow in configuration such as counter-current flow or to emphasize preferential ways induced by porous geometry. The energy balance equations of the three phases (liquid, gas and solid phase) are obtained by a volume averaging process of the local conservation equations. In this method, the local thermal non-equilibrium between the three phases is considered and the heat exchanges, the phase change rate as well as the thermal dispersion coefficients are calculated as a function of the local geometry of the porous medium. Such a method allows the numerical estimation of these thermal properties which are very difficult to determine experimentally. This feature is a great advantage of this approach. After a brief description of the thermal-hydraulic model, one-dimensional predictions of critical dryout fluxes are presented and compared with results from the literature. Reasonable agreement is obtained. Then a two-dimensional calculation is presented and shows the influence of the porous medium

  6. Potential for Fuel Tank Fire and Hydrodynamic Ram from Uncontained Aircraft Engine Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report addresses the potential consequences of the impact and penetration of fuel tanks by debris from uncontained engine failures on commercial jet aircraft. The report presents a brief review of accident data and of the pertinent technical lit...

  7. Autothermal gasification of low-grade fuels in fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.A. Belyaev [Scientific Center for Comprehensive Processing of Solid Combustible Minerals (IGI), Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Combustible Minerals Federal State Unitary Enterprise

    2009-01-15

    Autothermal gasification of high-ash flotation wastes of Grade Zh Kuzbass coal and low-ash fuel in a suspended-spouted (fluidized) bed at atmospheric pressure is investigated, and a comparison is presented of experimental results that indicate that the ash content of fuels has only slight influence on the generator gas heating value.

  8. Supercritical kinetic analysis in simplified system of fuel debris using integral kinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuya, Delgersaikhan; Obara, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Kinetic analysis in simplified weakly coupled fuel debris system was performed. • The integral kinetic model was used to simulate criticality accidents. • The fission power and released energy during simulated accident were obtained. • Coupling between debris regions and its effect on the fission power was obtained. - Abstract: Preliminary prompt supercritical kinetic analyses in a simplified coupled system of fuel debris designed to roughly resemble a melted core of a nuclear reactor were performed using an integral kinetic model. The integral kinetic model, which can describe region- and time-dependent fission rate in a coupled system of arbitrary geometry, was used because the fuel debris system is weakly coupled in terms of neutronics. The results revealed some important characteristics of coupled systems, such as the coupling between debris regions and the effect of the coupling on the fission rate and released energy in each debris region during the simulated criticality accident. In brief, this study showed that the integral kinetic model can be applied to supercritical kinetic analysis in fuel debris systems and also that it can be a useful tool for investigating the effect of the coupling on consequences of a supercritical accident.

  9. Experiments and procedures for bottom-heating heat-transfer experiments through UO2 debris beds in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, E.S.; Pedersen, D.R.; Pavlik, J.; Purviance, R.

    1982-01-01

    Real materials experiments in heat transfer through beds of UO 2 in sodium have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory over a period of years. The most recent method utilizes the resistive heating in a sheet tungsten filament located at the base of the debris container. A schematic diagram of the apparatus is shown. The tungsten is clamped between two water cooled copper electrodes. The filament is a sheet of tungsten 0.15 mm thick, 5 cm wide and 18 cm long. Two 6.5 mm thick sheets of boron nitride sandwich the filament. The upper face of the upper boron nitride sheet is in intimate contact with the bottom of the debris container. Temperatures are measured at various levels in the bed as well as in the boron nitride plate. In addition, the sodium pool temperature is measured by the thermocouple. The heat transferral through the bed is measured by the temperature difference and mass flowrate in a NaK condenser located above the debris bed. The NaK inlet and outlet temperatures are recorded individually, as well as, differentially

  10. Bed mixing dryer for high moisture content fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulkkonen, S; Heinonen, O. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Bed mixing dryer is a new type of fuel drying technology for fluidized bed combustion. The idea is to extract hot bed material from the fluidized bed and use it as a heat source for drying the fuel. Drying occurs at steam atmosphere which makes it possible to recover the latent heat of evaporation to process. This improves the thermal efficiency of the power plant process considerably, especially in combined heat and power applications. Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) has developed the Bed Mixing Dryer technology since early 1990s. The first pilot plant was built in 1994 to IVO`s Kuusamo peat and wood fired power plant. The capacity of the plant is 6 MW{sub e} and 20 MW of district heat. In Kuusamo the dryer is connected to a bubbling fluidized bed. Since it`s commissioning the dryer has been used successfully for about 3000 hours during the heating season in wintertime. The second application of the technology will be a demonstration project in Oerebro (S). IVO Power Engineering Ltd will supply in 1997 a dryer to Oerebro Energi`s peat, wood and coal fired CHP plant equipped with circulating fluidized bed boiler. The fuel to be dried is sawdust with fuel input of about 60 MW. In Kuusamo the dryer produces 3 MW of additional district heat and in Oerebro 6 MW. The fuels in Kuusamo are peat, saw dust and bark. In addition to the municipal heat production this type of drying technology has its benefits in pulp and paper industry processes. Disposal of paper mill sludges is becoming more difficult and costly which has resulted in need of alternative treatment. Drying of the sludge before combustion in a boiler for power production is an attractive option. At the moment IVO is carrying out several studies to apply the Bed Mixing Dryer in pulp and paper industry processes. Economy of drying the sludge looks promising

  11. Bed mixing dryer for high moisture content fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulkkonen, S.; Heinonen, O. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Bed mixing dryer is a new type of fuel drying technology for fluidized bed combustion. The idea is to extract hot bed material from the fluidized bed and use it as a heat source for drying the fuel. Drying occurs at steam atmosphere which makes it possible to recover the latent heat of evaporation to process. This improves the thermal efficiency of the power plant process considerably, especially in combined heat and power applications. Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) has developed the Bed Mixing Dryer technology since early 1990s. The first pilot plant was built in 1994 to IVO`s Kuusamo peat and wood fired power plant. The capacity of the plant is 6 MW{sub e} and 20 MW of district heat. In Kuusamo the dryer is connected to a bubbling fluidized bed. Since it`s commissioning the dryer has been used successfully for about 3000 hours during the heating season in wintertime. The second application of the technology will be a demonstration project in Oerebro (S). IVO Power Engineering Ltd will supply in 1997 a dryer to Oerebro Energi`s peat, wood and coal fired CHP plant equipped with circulating fluidized bed boiler. The fuel to be dried is sawdust with fuel input of about 60 MW. In Kuusamo the dryer produces 3 MW of additional district heat and in Oerebro 6 MW. The fuels in Kuusamo are peat, saw dust and bark. In addition to the municipal heat production this type of drying technology has its benefits in pulp and paper industry processes. Disposal of paper mill sludges is becoming more difficult and costly which has resulted in need of alternative treatment. Drying of the sludge before combustion in a boiler for power production is an attractive option. At the moment IVO is carrying out several studies to apply the Bed Mixing Dryer in pulp and paper industry processes. Economy of drying the sludge looks promising

  12. Non-local rheology of stony debris flow propagating over a cohesionless sediment bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzoni, Stefano; Gregoretti, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    normal to the flow, with particular attention to the role played by frictional stresses near to the movable bed over which the debris flow propagates.

  13. Loads on pebble bed fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuchert, E.; Maly, V.

    1974-03-15

    A comparison is made of key parameters for multi-recycle pebbles and single-pass once-through (OTTO) pebbles. The parameters analyzed include heat transfer characteristics with burn-up, temperature profiles, power per element as a function of axial position in the core, and burn-up. For the OTTO-scheme, the comparisons addressed the use of the conventional fuel element and the advanced "shell ball" designed to reduce the peak fuel temperature in the center of the fuel element. All studies addressed the uranium-thorium fuel cycle.

  14. Experimental study of pressure drops through LOCA-generated debris deposited on a fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jeong Kwan, E-mail: jksuh@khnp.co.kr [KHNP Central Research Institute, 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Won; Kwon, Sun Guk; Lee, Jae Yong [KHNP Central Research Institute, 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyoung Kyu; Park, Goon Cherl [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • In-vessel downstream effect tests were performed in the presence of LOCA-generated debris. • Available driving heads under each LOCA scenario were verified using experimental data. • Fibrous debris was prepared to satisfy the length distribution obtained from the bypass test. • Limiting test conditions were identified through sensitivity studies. - Abstract: Under post loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions, it is postulated that debris can be generated and transported to the containment sump strainer. Some of the debris may pass through the strainer and could challenge the long-term core cooling capability of the plant. To address this safety issue, in-vessel downstream effect tests for the advanced power reactor (APR) 1400 were performed. Fibrous debris is the most crucial material in terms of causing pressure drops, and was prepared in this study to satisfy the fiber length distribution obtained through a strainer bypass test. Sensitivity studies on pressure drops through LOCA-generated debris deposited on a fuel assembly were performed to evaluate the effects of water chemistry and fiber length distribution. The pressure drops with debris laden pure water were substantially less than those with debris laden ordinary tap water. The experiment with fiber length distribution suggested by WCAP-16793 showed lower pressure drops than those with the APR1400 specific fiber length distribution. All the experimental results showed that the pressure drops in the mock-up fuel assembly were less than the available driving head at each LOCA scenario.

  15. Study on the leaching behavior of actinides from nuclear fuel debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirishima, Akira; Hirano, Masahiko; Akiyama, Daisuke; Sasaki, Takayuki; Sato, Nobuaki

    2018-04-01

    For the prediction of the leaching behavior of actinides contained in the nuclear fuel debris generated by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, simulated fuel debris consisting of a UO2-ZrO2 solid solution doped with 137Cs, 237Np, 236Pu, and 241Am tracers was synthesized and investigated. The synthesis of the debris was carried out by heat treatment at 1200 °C at different oxygen partial pressures, and the samples were subsequently used for leaching tests with Milli-Q water and seawater. The results of the leaching tests indicate that the leaching of actinides depends on the redox conditions under which the debris was generated; for example, debris generated under oxidative conditions releases more actinide nuclides to water than that generated under reductive conditions. Furthermore, we found that, as Zr(IV) increasingly substituted U(IV) in the fluorite crystal structure of the debris, the actinide leaching from the debris decreased. In addition, we found that seawater leached more actinides from the debris than pure water, which seems to be caused by the complexation of actinides by carbonate ions in seawater.

  16. Oxy-fuel combustion on circulating fluidized bed. Chapter 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, E.J. [Canmet, Natural Resources Canada (Canada); Hack, H. [Foster Wheeler North America Corporation (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This paper explores the developments and field tests carried out with oxy-fuel fluidized bed combustion. This method has the advantage over the other options of emitting a pure stream of CO2 which thus does not need to be concentrated to be liquefied, transported and stored. In addition, pilot scale tests have shown that oxy-fired circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) results in low emission and fuel flexibility. This paper highlighted that oxy-fired CFBC might be a good option for CCS but tests performed so far have been on a small scale. To confirm the promising results of pilot tests, demonstration projects are underway and are presented herein.

  17. Critical Issues for Particle-Bed Reactor Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert S.; Husser, Dewayne L.; Jensen, Russell R.; Kerr, John M.

    1994-07-01

    Particle-Bed Reactors (PBRs) potentially offer performance advantages for nuclear thermal propulsion, including very high power densities, thrust-to-weight ratios, and specific impulses. A key factor in achieving all of these is the development of a very-high-temperature fuel. The critical issues for all such PBR fuels are uranium loading, thermomechanical and thermochemical stability, compatibility with contacting materials, fission product retention, manufacturability, and operational tolerance for particle failures. Each issue is discussed with respect to its importance to PBR operation, its status among current fuels, and additional development needs. Mixed-carbide-based fuels are recommended for further development to support high-performance PBRs.

  18. Examinations of fuel debris samples from Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Fumihisa

    2012-01-01

    In the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plants, fuels were molten due to loss of coolant and heat-up of the reactor core. Information on properties of molten fuels (debris) is important to analyze progress of the accident, estimate the status inside the damaged reactors and work on a plan for debris removal. Extensive examinations for properties of debris have been conducted after the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 in 1979. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency conducted a part of the examinations in the frame of the OECD/NEA Three Mile Island Vessel Investigation Program. This issue report outline and main results of the TMI-2 debris examination programs. (author)

  19. Study on recriticality of fuel debris during hypothetical severe accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Shin, S.T.

    1995-09-01

    A study has been performed to measure the potential of recriticality during hypothetical severe accident in Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). For the lumped debris configuration in the Reactor Coolant System (RCS), as found in the previous study, recriticality potential may be very low. However, if fuel debris is dispersed and mixed with heavy water in RCS, recriticality potential has been predicted to be substantial depending on thermal-hydraulic conditions surrounding fuel debris mixture. The recriticality potential in RCS is substantially reduced for the three element core design with 50% enrichment. Also, as observed in the previous study, strong dependencies of k eff on key thermal hydraulic parameters are shown. Light water contamination is shown to provide a positive reactivity, and void formation due to boiling of mixed water provides enough negative reactivity and to bring the system down to subcritical. For criticality potential in the subpile room, the lumped debris configuration does not pose a concern. Dispersed configuration in light water pool of the subpile room is also unlikely to result in criticality. However, if the debris is dispersed in the pool that is mixed with heavy water, the results indicate that a substantial potential exists for the debris to reach the criticality. However, if prompt recriticality disperses the debris completely in the subpile room pool, subsequent recriticality may be prevented since neutron leakage effects become large enough

  20. Boiler for combustion fuel in a fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laković Mirjana S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel combustion in fluidized bed combustion is a process that is current and which every day gives more attention and there are many studies that have been closely associated with this technology. This combustion technology is widespread and constantly improving the range of benefits it provides primarily due to reduced emissions. This paper presents the boilers for combustion in a fluidized bed, whit characteristics and advantages. Also is shown the development of this type of boilers in Republic of Serbia. In this paper is explained the concept of fluidized bed combustion. Boilers for this type of combustion can be improved and thereby increase their efficiency level. More detailed characteristics are given for boilers with bubbling and circulating fluidized bed as well as their mutual comparison.

  1. Optimization of MOX fuel cycles in pebble bed HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jinfeng; Li Fu; Sun Yuliang

    2013-01-01

    Compared with light water reactor (LWR), the pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is able to operate in a full mixed oxide (MOX) fuelled core without significant change to core structure design. Based on a reference design of 250 MW pebble bed HTGR, four MOX fuel cycles were designed and evaluated by VSOP program package, including the mixed Pu-U fuel pebbles and mixed loading of separate Pu-pebbles and U-pebbles. Some important physics features were investigated and compared for these four cycles, such as the effective multiplication factor of initial core, the pebble residence time, discharge burnup, and temperature coefficients. Preliminary results show that the overall performance of one case is superior to other equivalent MOX fuel cycles on condition that uranium fuel elements and plutonium fuel elements are separated as the different fuel pebbles and that the uranium fuel elements are irradiated longer in the core than the plutonium fuel elements, and the average discharge burnup of this case is also higher than others. (authors)

  2. Nonproliferation and safeguard considerations: Pebble Bed reactor fuel cycle evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Nuclear fuel cycles were evaluated for the Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor under development in the Federal Republic of Germany. The basic fuel cycle specified for the HTR-K and PNP is well qualified and will meet the requirements of these reactors. Twenty alternate fuel cycles are described, including high-conversion cycles, net-breeding cycles, and proliferation-resistant cycles. High-conversion cycles, which have a high probability of being successfully developed, promise a significant improvement in resource utilization. Proliferation-resistant cycles, also with a high probability of successful development, conpare very favorably with those for other types of reactors. Most of the advanced cycles could be adapted to first-generation pebble bed reactors with no significant modifications

  3. Ten residual biomass fuels for circulating fluidized-bed gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drift, A. van der; Doorn, J. van [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Vermeulen, J.W. [NV Afvalzorg, Haarlem (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    In co-operation with a Dutch company (NV Afvalzorg) and the Dutch agency for energy and environment (Novem), ECN has successfully tested 10 different biomass residues in its 500 kW{sub th} circulating fluidized-bed gasification facility. Among the fuels used as demolition wood (both puree and mixed with sewage sludge and paper sludge), verge grass, railroad ties, cacao shells and different woody fuels. Railroad ties turn out to contain very little (heavy) metals. Initially, fuel feeding problems often impeded smooth operation. Contrary to feeding systems, the circulating fluidized-bed gasification process itself seems very flexible concerning the conversion of different kinds of biomass fuels. The fuel moisture content is one of the most important fuel characteristics. More moisture means that more air is needed to maintain the process temperature resulting in better carbon conversion and lower tar emission but also lower product gas heating value and lower cold gas efficiency. So, for a good comparison of the gasification behaviour of different fuels, the moisture content should be similar. However, the moisture content should be defined on an ash-free basis rather than on total mass (the usual way). Some of the ashes produced and retained in the second cyclone were analysed both for elemental composition and leaching behaviour. It turned out that the leaching rate of Mo and Br, elements only present in small concentrations, are preventing the ash to be considered as inert material according to the Dutch legislation for dumping on landfill sites. (Author)

  4. Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Whitty

    2007-06-30

    University of Utah's project entitled 'Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer' (DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41490) was developed in response to a solicitation released by the U.S. Department of Energy in December 2001, requesting proposals for projects targeted towards black liquor/biomass gasification technology support research and development. Specifically, the solicitation was seeking projects that would provide technical support for Department of Energy supported black liquor and biomass gasification demonstration projects under development at the time.

  5. Pebble bed reactor fuel cycle optimization using particle swarm algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavron, Barak, E-mail: btavron@bgu.ac.il [Planning, Development and Technology Division, Israel Electric Corporation Ltd., P.O. Box 10, Haifa 31000 (Israel); Shwageraus, Eugene, E-mail: es607@cam.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Particle swarm method has been developed for fuel cycle optimization of PBR reactor. • Results show uranium utilization low sensitivity to fuel and core design parameters. • Multi-zone fuel loading pattern leads to a small improvement in uranium utilization. • Thorium mixes with highly enriched uranium yields the best uranium utilization. - Abstract: Pebble bed reactors (PBR) features, such as robust thermo-mechanical fuel design and on-line continuous fueling, facilitate wide range of fuel cycle alternatives. A range off fuel pebble types, containing different amounts of fertile or fissile fuel material, may be loaded into the reactor core. Several fuel loading zones may be used since radial mixing of the pebbles was shown to be limited. This radial separation suggests the possibility to implement the “seed-blanket” concept for the utilization of fertile fuels such as thorium, and for enhancing reactor fuel utilization. In this study, the particle-swarm meta-heuristic evolutionary optimization method (PSO) has been used to find optimal fuel cycle design which yields the highest natural uranium utilization. The PSO method is known for solving efficiently complex problems with non-linear objective function, continuous or discrete parameters and complex constrains. The VSOP system of codes has been used for PBR fuel utilization calculations and MATLAB script has been used to implement the PSO algorithm. Optimization of PBR natural uranium utilization (NUU) has been carried out for 3000 MWth High Temperature Reactor design (HTR) operating on the Once Trough Then Out (OTTO) fuel management scheme, and for 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) operating on the multi-pass (MEDUL) fuel management scheme. Results showed only a modest improvement in the NUU (<5%) over reference designs. Investigation of thorium fuel cases showed that the use of HEU in combination with thorium results in the most favorable reactor performance in terms of

  6. Pebble bed reactor fuel cycle optimization using particle swarm algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavron, Barak; Shwageraus, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Particle swarm method has been developed for fuel cycle optimization of PBR reactor. • Results show uranium utilization low sensitivity to fuel and core design parameters. • Multi-zone fuel loading pattern leads to a small improvement in uranium utilization. • Thorium mixes with highly enriched uranium yields the best uranium utilization. - Abstract: Pebble bed reactors (PBR) features, such as robust thermo-mechanical fuel design and on-line continuous fueling, facilitate wide range of fuel cycle alternatives. A range off fuel pebble types, containing different amounts of fertile or fissile fuel material, may be loaded into the reactor core. Several fuel loading zones may be used since radial mixing of the pebbles was shown to be limited. This radial separation suggests the possibility to implement the “seed-blanket” concept for the utilization of fertile fuels such as thorium, and for enhancing reactor fuel utilization. In this study, the particle-swarm meta-heuristic evolutionary optimization method (PSO) has been used to find optimal fuel cycle design which yields the highest natural uranium utilization. The PSO method is known for solving efficiently complex problems with non-linear objective function, continuous or discrete parameters and complex constrains. The VSOP system of codes has been used for PBR fuel utilization calculations and MATLAB script has been used to implement the PSO algorithm. Optimization of PBR natural uranium utilization (NUU) has been carried out for 3000 MWth High Temperature Reactor design (HTR) operating on the Once Trough Then Out (OTTO) fuel management scheme, and for 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) operating on the multi-pass (MEDUL) fuel management scheme. Results showed only a modest improvement in the NUU (<5%) over reference designs. Investigation of thorium fuel cases showed that the use of HEU in combination with thorium results in the most favorable reactor performance in terms of

  7. Development of built-in debris-filter bottom nozzle for PWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juntaro Shimizu; Kazuki Monaka; Masaji Mori; Kazuo Ikeda

    2005-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has worked to improve the capability of anti debris bottom nozzle for a PWR fuel assembly. The Current debris filter bottom nozzle (DFBN) having 4mm diameter flow holes can capture the larger size of debris than the flow hole inner diameter. MHI has completed the development of the built-in debris filter bottom nozzle, which is the new idea of the debris-filter for high burnup (55GWd/t assembly average burnup). Built-in debris filter bottom nozzle consists of the blades and nozzle body. The blades made from inconel strip are embedded and welded on the grooved top surface of the bottom nozzle adapter plate. A flow hole is divided by the blade and the trap size of the debris is reduced. Because the blades block the coolant flow, it was anticipated to increase the pressure loss of the nozzle, however, adjusting the relation between blade and taper shape of the flow hole, the pressure loss has been successfully maintained the satisfactory level. Grooves are cut on the nozzle plate; nevertheless, the additional skirts on the four sides of the nozzle compensate the structural strength. (authors)

  8. Mathematical model for solid fuel combustion in fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostikj, Zvonimir; Noshpal, Aleksandar

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model for computation of the combustion process of solid fuel in fluidized bed is presented in this work. Only the combustor part of the plant (the fluidized bed and the free board) is treated with this model. In that manner, all principal, physical presumption and improvements (upon which this model is based) are given. Finally, the results of the numerical realisation of the mathematical model for combustion of minced straw as well as the results of the experimental investigation of a concrete physical model are presented. (author)

  9. The particle size distribution of fragmented melt debris from molten fuel coolant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, D.F.

    1984-04-01

    Results are presented of a study of the types of statistical distributions which arise when examining debris from Molten Fuel Coolant Interactions. The lognormal probability distribution and the modifications of this distribution which result from the mixing of two distributions or the removal of some debris are described. Methods of fitting these distributions to real data are detailed. A two stage fragmentation model has been developed in an attempt to distinguish between the debris produced by coarse mixing and fine scale fragmentation. However, attempts to fit this model to real data have proved unsuccessful. It was found that the debris particle size distributions from experiments at Winfrith with thermite generated uranium dioxide/molybdenum melts were Upper Limit Lognormal. (U.K.)

  10. Process Knowledge Summary Report for Materials and Fuels Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Debris Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Grant; P. J. Crane; S. Butler; M. A. Henry

    2010-02-01

    This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes the information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of transuranic (TRU) waste between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP). The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and the applicable portion of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and treatment of TRU debris waste in AMWTP. This report has been prepared for contact-handled TRU debris waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at MFC. The TRU debris waste will be shipped to AMWTP for purposes of supercompaction. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU debris waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for waste originating from MFC.

  11. Fuel relocation mechanism based on microstructures of debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strain, R.V.; Neimark, L.A.; Sanecki, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has performed a number of examinations to determine the microstructure and micro-chemistry of samples of debris from the TMI-2 reactor. These examinations have been a small part of the overall effort to gain an understanding of the TMI-2 accident. As a result of these overall efforts, a general scenario of the response of the core components has been established. In this paper we will describe the microstructure and micro-chemistry of debris from the lower plenum of the reactor and relate these data to a segment of the general scenario dealing with the relocation of this material. The primary tools used at ANL for the examination of material from the TMI-2 core were optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, and Scanning Auger Spectroscopy. In some cases these techniques were augmented by the use of gamma spectroscopy, autoradiography, and X-ray diffraction analysis

  12. A study for fuel reloading strategy in pebble bed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong Chul

    2012-02-01

    A fuel reloading analysis system for pebble bed reactor was developed by using a Monte Carlo code. The kinematic model was modified to improve the accuracy of the pebble velocity profile and to develop the model so that the diffusion coefficient is not changed by the geometry of the core. In addition, the point kernel method was employed to solve an equation derived in this study. Then, the analysis system for the pebble bed reactor was developed to accommodate the double heterogeneity, pebble velocity, and pebble refueling features using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The batch-tracking method was employed to simulate the movement of the pebbles and an automation system was written in the C programming language to implement it. The proposed analysis system can be utilized to verify new core analysis codes, deep-burn studies, various sensitivity studies, and other analysis tools available for the application of new fuel reloading strategies. It is noted that the proposed algorithm for the optimum fuel reloading pattern differs from other optimization methods using sensitivity analysis. In this algorithm, the reloading strategy, including the loading of fresh fuel and the reloading positions of the fresh and reloaded fuels, is determined by the interrelations of the criticality, the nuclear material inventories in the extracted fuel, and the power density. The devised algorithm was applied to the PBMR and NHDD-PBR200. The results show that the proposed algorithm can apply to satisfy the nuclear characteristics such as the criticality or power density since the pebble bed core has the characteristics that the fuels are reloaded every day

  13. Basal interstitial water pressure in laboratory debris flows over a rigid bed in an open channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hotta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the interstitial water pressure of debris flows under various conditions gives essential information on the flow stress structure. This study measured the basal interstitial water pressure during debris flow routing experiments in a laboratory flume. Because a sensitive pressure gauge is required to measure the interstitial water pressure in shallow laboratory debris flows, a differential gas pressure gauge with an attached diaphragm was used. Although this system required calibration before and after each experiment, it showed a linear behavior and a sufficiently high temporal resolution for measuring the interstitial water pressure of debris flows. The values of the interstitial water pressure were low. However, an excess of pressure beyond the hydrostatic pressure was observed with increasing sediment particle size. The measured excess pressure corresponded to the theoretical excess interstitial water pressure, derived as a Reynolds stress in the interstitial water of boulder debris flows. Turbulence was thought to induce a strong shear in the interstitial space of sediment particles. The interstitial water pressure in boulder debris flows should be affected by the fine sediment concentration and the phase transition from laminar to turbulent debris flow; this should be the subject of future studies.

  14. SPOUTED BED DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR COATED NUCLEAR FUEL PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Douglas W.

    2017-07-01

    High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are fueled with tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated nuclear fuel particles embedded in a carbon-graphite fuel body. TRISO coatings consist of four layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide that are deposited on uranium ceramic fuel kernels (350µm – 500µm diameters) in a concatenated series of batch depositions. Each layer has dedicated functions such that the finished fuel particle has its own integral containment to minimize and control the release of fission products into the fuel body and reactor core. The TRISO coatings are the primary containment structure in the HTGR reactor and must have very high uniformity and integrity. To ensure high quality TRISO coatings, the four layers are deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using high purity precursors and are applied in a concatenated succession of batch operations before the finished product is unloaded from the coating furnace. These depositions take place at temperatures ranging from 1230°C to 1550°C and use three different gas compositions, while the fuel particle diameters double, their density drops from 11.1 g/cm3 to 3.0 g/cm3, and the bed volume increases more than 8-fold. All this is accomplished without the aid of sight ports or internal instrumentation that could cause chemical contamination within the layers or mechanical damage to thin layers in the early stages of each layer deposition. The converging section of the furnace retort was specifically designed to prevent bed stagnation that would lead to unacceptably high defect fractions and facilitate bed circulation to avoid large variability in coating layer dimensions and properties. The gas injection nozzle was designed to protect precursor gases from becoming overheated prior to injection, to induce bed spouting and preclude bed stagnation in the bottom of the retort. Furthermore, the retort and injection nozzle designs minimize buildup of pyrocarbon and silicon carbide on the

  15. Debris removal system for a nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, F.W. Jr.; Dailey, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    A system is described for working on an elongated nuclear fuel assembly suspended vertically and submerged in a spent fuel pool having fuel assembly racks at the bottom. The system comprises a work platform disposable in the pool and adapted to be supported on the fuel assembly racks. The platform has an opening disposed in registry with a selected one of the underlying racks; guide means carried by the platform for guiding the suspended fuel assembly into the opening and the selected rack to accommodate vertical movement of the fuel assembly into and out of the rack to make different portions of the fuel assembly accessible from the platform; and tool manipulating apparatus disposable on the platform adjacent to the opening, the tool manipulating apparatus including a tool carriage. Tool holders for respectively holding associated tools. Each of the tool holders is mounted on the tool carriage for reciprocating movement with respect along a predetermined axis between extended and retracted conditions

  16. Pebble Bed Reactor: core physics and fuel cycle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.; Worley, B.A.

    1979-10-01

    The Pebble Bed Reactor is a gas-cooled, graphite-moderated high-temperature reactor that is continuously fueled with small spherical fuel elements. The projected performance was studied over a broad range of reactor applicability. Calculations were done for a burner on a throwaway cycle, a converter with recycle, a prebreeder and breeder. The thorium fuel cycle was considered using low, medium (denatured), and highly enriched uranium. The base calculations were carried out for electrical energy generation in a 1200 MW/sub e/ plant. A steady-state, continuous-fueling model was developed and one- and two-dimensional calculations were used to characterize performance. Treating a single point in time effects considerable savings in computer time as opposed to following a long reactor history, permitting evaluation of reactor performance over a broad range of design parameters and operating modes.

  17. Direction on characterization of fuel debris for defueling process in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Kimihiko; Kitagaki, Toru; Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Wakui, Ryohei; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Kaji, Naoya; Koizumi, Kenji; Washiya, Tadahiro

    2013-01-01

    For the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), defueling of the fuel debris in the reactor core of Units 1-3 is planned to start within 10 years. Preferential items in the characterization of the fuel debris were identified for this work, in which the procedure and handling tools were assumed on the basis of information on 1F and experience after the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. The candidates for defueling tools for 1F were selected from among the TMI- 2 defueling tools. It was found that they could be categorized into six groups according to their operating principles. The important properties of the fuel debris for defueling were selected considering the effect of the target materials on the tool performance. The selected properties are shape, size, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, melting point, hardness, elastic modulus, and fracture toughness. Of these properties, the mechanical properties (hardness, elastic modulus, fracture toughness) were identified as preferential items, because too few data on these characteristics of fuel debris are available in past severe accident studies. (authors)

  18. An examination of flame shape related to convection heat transfer in deep-fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara M. Yedinak; Jack D. Cohen; Jason M. Forthofer; Mark A. Finney

    2010-01-01

    Fire spread through a fuel bed produces an observable curved combustion interface. This shape has been schematically represented largely without consideration for fire spread processes. The shape and dynamics of the flame profile within the fuel bed likely reflect the mechanisms of heat transfer necessary for the pre-heating and ignition of the fuel during fire spread....

  19. Assessment of capability of models for prediction of pressure drop and dryout heat flux in a heat generating particulate debris bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, P.P.; Nayak, A.K.; Rashid, M.; Kulenovic, R.

    2009-01-01

    During a severe accident in a light water reactor, the core can melt and be relocated to the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel. There it can form a particulate debris bed due to the possible presence of water. This bed, if not quenched in time, can lead to the failure of the pressure vessel because of the insufficient heat removal of decay heat in the debris bed. Therefore, addressing the issue of coolability behaviour of heat generating particulate debris bed is of prime importance in the framework of severe accident management strategies, particularly in case of above mentioned late phase scenario of an accident. In order to investigate the coolability behaviour of particulate debris bed, experiments were carried out at IKE test facility 'DEBRIS' on particle beds of irregularly shaped particles mixed with spheres under top- and bottom-flooding condition. The pressure drop and dryout heat flux (DHF) were measured for top- and bottom-flooding conditions. For top-flooding conditions, it was found that the pressure gradients are all smaller than the hydrostatic pressure gradient of water, indicating an important role of the counter-current interfacial shear stress of the two-phase flow. For bottom-flooding with a relatively high liquid inflow velocity, the pressure gradient increases consistently with the vapour velocity and the fluid-particle drags become important. Also, with additional forced liquid inflow from the bottom, the DHF increases dramatically. In all the cases, it was found that the DHF is significantly larger with bottom-flooding condition compared to top-flooding condition. Different models such as Lipinski, Reed, Tung and Dhir, Hu and Theophanous, and Schulenberg and Mueller have been used to predict the pressure drop characteristics and the DHF of heat generating particulate debris beds. Comparison is made among above mentioned models and experimental results for DHF and pressure drop characteristics. Considering the overall trend in

  20. Nondestructive techniques for assaying fuel debris in piping at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.; McIsaac, C.V.; Beller, L.S.; Isaacson, L.; Mandler, J.W.; Hobbins, R.R. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Four major categories of nondestructive techniques - ultrasonic, passive gamma ray, infrared detection, and remote video examination - have been determined to be feasible for assaying fuel debris in the primary coolant system of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Reactor. Passive gamma ray detection is the most suitable technique for the TMI-2 piping; however, further development of this technique is needed for specific application to TMI-2

  1. Simulation and uncertainties of the heat transfer from a heat-generating DEBRIS bed in the lower plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, K.; Trambauer, K.

    1999-01-01

    The findings of the TMI-2 post-accident analyses indicated that internal cooling mechanisms may have a considerable potential to sustain the vessel integrity after a relocation of core material to the lower plenum, provided that water is continuously available in the RPV. Numerous analytical and experimental research activities are currently underway in this respect. This paper illustrates some major findings of the experimental work on internal cooling mechanisms and describes the limitations and the uncertainties in the simulation of the heat transfer processes. Reference is made especially to the joint German DEBRIS/ RPV research program, which encompasses the experimental investigation of the thermal-hydraulics in gaps, of the heat transfer within a particulate debris bed, and of the high temperature performance of vessel steel, as well as the development of simulation models for the heat transfer in the lower head and the structural response of the RPV. In particular, the results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses are presented, which have been carried out at GRS using an integral model that describes the major phenomena governing the long-term integrity of the reactor vessel. The investigation of a large-scale relocation indicated that the verification of a gap cooling mechanism as an inherent mechanism is questionable in terms of a stringent probabilistic uncertainty criterion, as long as the formation of a large molten pool cannot be excluded. (author)

  2. Power Peaking Effect of OTTO Fuel Scheme Pebble Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiadipura, T.; Suwoto; Zuhair; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) type of Hight Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a very interesting nuclear reactor design to fulfill the growing electricity and heat demand with a superior passive safety features. Effort to introduce the PBR design to the market can be strengthen by simplifying its system with the Once-through-then-out (OTTO) cycle PBR in which the pebble fuel only pass the core once. Important challenge in the OTTO fuel scheme is the power peaking effect which limit the maximum nominal power or burnup of the design. Parametric survey is perform in this study to investigate the contribution of different design parameters to power peaking effect of OTTO cycle PBR. PEBBED code is utilized in this study to perform the equilibrium PBR core analysis for different design parameter and fuel scheme. The parameters include its core diameter, height-per-diameter (H/D), power density, and core nominal power. Results of this study show that diameter and H/D effectsare stronger compare to the power density and nominal core power. Results of this study might become an importance guidance for design optimization of OTTO fuel scheme PBR.

  3. Method of burning sulfur-containing fuels in a fluidized bed boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian C.

    1982-01-01

    A method of burning a sulfur-containing fuel in a fluidized bed of sulfur oxide sorbent wherein the overall utilization of sulfur oxide sorbent is increased by comminuting the bed drain solids to a smaller average particle size, preferably on the order of 50 microns, and reinjecting the comminuted bed drain solids into the bed. In comminuting the bed drain solids, particles of spent sulfur sorbent contained therein are fractured thereby exposing unreacted sorbent surface. Upon reinjecting the comminuted bed drain solids into the bed, the newly-exposed unreacted sorbent surface is available for sulfur oxide sorption, thereby increasing overall sorbent utilization.

  4. A new method to quantify fluidized bed agglomeration in the combustion of biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehman, M. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    The present licentiate thesis is a summary and discussion of four papers, dealing with the development, evaluation and use of a new method to quantify bed agglomeration tendencies for biomass fuels. An increased utilization of biomass related fuels has many environmental benefits, but also requires careful studies of potential new problems associated with these fuels such as bed agglomeration/defluidization during combustion and gasification in fluidized beds. From a thorough literature survey, no suitable methods to determine bed agglomeration tendencies of different fuels, fuel combinations or fuels with additives appeared to be available. It therefore seemed of considerable interest to develop a new method for the quantification of fluidized bed agglomeration tendencies for different fuels. A bench scale fluidized bed reactor (5 kW), specially designed to obtain a homogeneous isothermal bed temperature, is used. The method is based on controlled increase of the bed temperature by applying external heat to the primary air and to the bed section walls. The initial agglomeration temperature is determined by on- or off-line principal component analysis of the variations in measured bed temperatures and differential pressures. Samples of ash and bed material for evaluation of agglomeration mechanisms may also be collected throughout the operation. To determine potential effects of all the process related variables on the determined fuel specific bed agglomeration temperature, an extensive sensitivity analysis was performed according to a statistical experimental design. The results showed that the process variables had only relatively small effects on the agglomeration temperature, which could be determined to 899 deg C with a reproducibility of {+-} 5 deg C (STD). The inaccuracy was determined to be {+-} 30 deg C (STD). The method was also used to study the mechanism of both bed agglomeration using two biomass fuels and prevention of bed agglomeration by co

  5. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thy, Peter; Jenkins, Brian; Williams, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and ru...

  6. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thy, P.; Jenkins, B.M.; Williams, R.B.; Lesher, C.E.; Bakker, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run durations

  7. Drying tests conducted on Three Mile Island fuel canisters containing simulated debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Drying tests were conducted on TMI-2 fuel canisters filled with simulated core debris. During these tests, canisters were dried by heating externally by a heating blanket while simultaneously purging the canisters' interior with hot, dry nitrogen. Canister drying was found to be dominated by moisture retention properties of a concrete filler material (LICON) used for geometry control. This material extends the drying process 10 days or more beyond what would be required were it not there. The LICON resides in a nonpurgeable chamber separate from the core debris, and because of this configuration, dew point measurements on the exhaust stream do not provide a good indication of the dew point in the canisters. If the canisters are not dried, but rather just dewatered, 140-240 lb of water (not including the LICON water of hydration) will remain in each canister, approximately 50-110 lb of which is pore water in the LICON and the remainder unbound water

  8. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thy, Peter; Jenkins, Brian; Williams, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run...... areas between bed particles, ultimately led to bed agglomeration. The interfaces and the presence of gas bubbles in the cement suggest a bonding material with a high surface tension and a liquid state. The cement films originate by filling of irregularities on individual and partially agglomerated bed...

  9. Evolution of Fine-Grained Channel Margin Deposits behind Large Woody Debris in an Experimental Gravel-Bed Flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeill, B.; Marks, S.; Skalak, K.; Puleo, J. A.; Wilcock, P. R.; Pizzuto, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Fine grained channel margin (FGCM) deposits of the South River, Virginia sequester a substantial volume of fine-grained sediment behind large woody debris (LWD). FGCM deposits were created in a laboratory setting meant to simulate the South River environment using a recirculating flume (15m long by 0.6m wide) with a fixed gravel bed and adjustable slope (set to 0.0067) to determine how fine sediment is transported and deposited behind LWD. Two model LWD structures were placed 3.7 m apart on opposite sides of the flume. A wire mesh screen with attached wooden dowels simulated LWD with an upstream facing rootwad. Six experiments with three different discharge rates, each with low and high sediment concentrations, were run. Suspended sediment was very fine grained (median grain size of 3 phi) and well sorted (0.45 phi) sand. Upstream of the wood, water depths averaged about 0.08m, velocities averaged about 0.3 m/s, and Froude numbers averaged around 0.3. Downstream of the first LWD structure, velocities were reduced tenfold. Small amounts of sediment passed through the rootwad and fell out of suspension in the area of reduced flow behind LWD, but most of the sediment was carried around the LWD by the main flow and then behind the LWD by a recirculating eddy current. Upstream migrating dunes formed behind LWD due to recirculating flow, similar to reattachment bars documented in bedrock canyon rivers partially obstructed by debouching debris fans. These upstream migrating dunes began at the reattachment point and merged with deposits formed from sediment transported through the rootwad. Downstream migrating dunes formed along the channel margin behind the LWD, downstream of the reattachment point. FGCM deposits were about 3 m long, with average widths of about 0.8 m. Greater sediment concentration created thicker FGCM deposits, and higher flows eroded the sides of the deposits, reducing their widths.

  10. An SEM/EDX study of bed agglomerates formed during fluidized bed combustion of three biomass fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scala, Fabrizio; Chirone, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    The agglomeration behaviour of three biomass fuels (exhausted and virgin olive husk and pine seed shells) during fluidized bed combustion in a lab-scale reactor was studied by means of SEM/EDX analysis of bed agglomerate samples. The effect of the fuel ash composition, bed temperature and sand particle size on agglomeration was investigated. The study was focused on the main fuel ash components and on their interaction with the bed sand particles. Agglomeration was favoured by high temperature, small sand size, a high fraction of K and Na and a low fraction of Ca and Mg in the fuel ash. An initial fuel ash composition close to the low-melting point eutectic composition appears to enhance agglomeration. The agglomerates examined by SEM showed a hollow structure, with an internal region enriched in K and Na where extensive melting is evident and an external one where sand particles are only attached by a limited number of fused necks. Non-molten or partially molten ash structures deposited on the sand surface and enriched in Ca and Mg were also observed. These results support an ash deposition-melting mechanism: the ash released by burning char particles inside the agglomerates is quantitatively deposited on the sand surface and then gradually embedded in the melt. The low-melting point compounds in the ash migrate towards the sand surface enriching the outermost layer, while the ash structure is progressively depleted of these compounds

  11. Solid fuel feed system for a fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian C.

    1982-01-01

    A fluidized bed for the combustion of coal, with limestone, is replenished with crushed coal from a system discharging the coal laterally from a station below the surface level of the bed. A compartment, or feed box, is mounted at one side of the bed and its interior separated from the bed by a weir plate beneath which the coal flows laterally into the bed while bed material is received into the compartment above the plate to maintain a predetermined minimum level of material in the compartment.

  12. Experimental study and large eddy simulation of effect of terrain slope on marginal burning in shrub fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangyang Zhou; Shankar Mahalingam; David Weise

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a combined study of laboratory scale fire spread experiments and a three-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) to analyze the effect of terrain slope on marginal burning behavior in live chaparral shrub fuel beds. Line fire was initiated in single species fuel beds of four common chaparral plants under various fuel bed configurations and ambient...

  13. Impact on burnup performance of coated particle fuel design in pebble bed reactor with ROX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Hai Quan; Obara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The pebble bed reactor (PBR), a kind of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is expected to be among the next generation of nuclear reactors as it has excellent passive safety features, as well as online refueling and high thermal efficiency. Rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel has been studied at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as a new once-through type fuel concept. Rock-like oxide used as fuel in a PBR can be expected to achieve high burnup and improve chemical stabilities. In the once-through fuel concept, the main challenge is to achieve as high a burnup as possible without failure of the spent fuel. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact on burnup performance of different coated fuel particle (CFP) designs in a PBR with ROX fuel. In the study, the AGR-1 Coated Particle design and Deep-Burn Coated Particle design were used to make the burnup performance comparison. Criticality and core burnup calculations were performed by MCPBR code using the JENDL-4.0 library. Results at equilibrium showed that the two reactors utilizing AGR-1 Coated Particle and Deep-Burn Coated Particle designs could be critical with almost the same multiplication factor k eff . However, the power peaking factor and maximum power per fuel ball in the AGR-1 coated particle design was lower than that of Deep-Burn coated particle design. The AGR-1 design also showed an advantage in fissions per initial fissile atoms (FIFA); the AGR-1 coated particle design produced a higher FIFA than the Deep-Burn coated particle design. These results suggest that the difference in coated particle fuel design can have an effect on the burnup performance in ROX fuel. (author)

  14. Fuel debris characterization and treatment technologies development for TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. 2012 annual research and development report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-03-01

    Since March 11, 2011, severe accidents occurred at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F NPS), the Government of Japan and Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and all Japan's companies have been worked on the remediation. The first meeting of 'Government and TEPCO's Mid-to-Long Term Countermeasure Meeting' was held on December 16, 2011, and then' the Council for the Decommissioning of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station' was established on February 8, 2013, and 19 research and development projects and Working team / Sub working team were launched. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Fukushima Project Teams in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Laboratories and Nuclear Science Research Institute are belonging to the projects of 'Fuel debris characterization (2-(3)-1)', 'Analysis of fuel debris (2-(3)-2)' and 'Treatment technology development of fuel debris (2-(3)-3)'. In the 2012 JFY, we carried out research and development on the 'Fuel debris characterization (2-(3)-1)' and 'Treatment technology development of fuel debris (2-(3)-3)', and obtained some results on the debris properties and debris treatment technologies. This document report annual research and development results of above two projects in 2012 JFY. In the Project of 'Fuel debris characterization (2-(3)-1)', the debris chemical form, phase state and composition were estimated by thermodynamic calculation with referring sever accident code results and the fuel debris properties which needed for developing the methods/devices for defueling was identified with information of Three Mile Island and sever accident study. As for investigation of reaction and products specific to 1F accident, fundamental data on the debris such as mechanical properties i.e. hardness, and effects of sea water, B 4 C, ratio of Zr content and O/M, and thermal properties as melting points, thermal conductivity, etc. were obtained by

  15. Experimental measurements and numerical modeling of marginal burning in live chaparral fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    X. Zhou; D.R. Weise; S Mahalingam

    2005-01-01

    An extensive experimental and numerical study was completed to analyze the marginal burning behavior of live chaparral shrub fuels that grow in the mountains of southern California. Laboratory fire spread experiments were carried out to determine the effects of wind, slope, moisture content, and fuel characteristics on marginal burning in fuel beds of common...

  16. A review of oxy-fuel combustion in fluidized bed reactors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathekga, HI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Presently, there is no detailed review that summarizes the current knowledge status on oxy-fuel combustion in fluidized bed combustors. This paper reviewed the existing literature in heat transfer, char combustion and pollutant emissions oxy...

  17. Burnup performance of rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel in small pebble bed reactor with accumulative fuel loading scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanullang, Irwan Liapto; Obara, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Burnup performance using ROX fuel in PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme was analyzed. • Initial excess reactivity was suppressed by reducing 235 U enrichment in the startup condition. • Negative temperature coefficient was achieved in all condition of PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme using ROX fuel. • Core lifetime of PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme using ROX fuel was shorter than with UO 2 fuel. • In PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme using ROX fuel, achieved discharged burnup can be as high as that for UO 2 fuel. - Abstract: The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has proposed rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel as a new, once-through type fuel concept. Here, burnup performance using ROX fuel was simulated in a pebble bed reactor with an accumulative fuel loading scheme. The MVP-BURN code was used to simulate the burnup calculation. Fuel of 5 g-HM/pebble with 20% 235 U enrichment was selected as the optimum composition. Discharged burnup could reach up to 218 GWd/t, with a core lifetime of about 8.4 years. However, high excess reactivity occurred in the initial condition. Initial fuel enrichment was therefore reduced from 20% to 4.65% to counter the initial excess reactivity. The operation period was reduced by the decrease of initial fuel enrichment, but the maximum discharged burnup was 198 GWd/t. Burnup performance of ROX fuel in this reactor concept was compared with that of UO 2 fuel obtained previously. Discharged burnup for ROX fuel in the PBR with an accumulative fuel loading scheme was as high as UO 2 fuel. Maximum power density could be lowered by introducing ROX fuel compared to UO 2 fuel. However, PBR core lifetime was shorter with ROX fuel than with UO 2 fuel. A negative temperature coefficient was achieved for both UO 2 and ROX fuels throughout the operation period.

  18. Study of treatment scenarios for fuel debris removed from Fukushima Daiichi NPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washiya, Tadahiro; Yano, Kimihiko; Kaji, Naoya; Yamada, Seiya; Kamiya, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    On March 11, 2011, a severe nuclear accident occurred at Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO)’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (hereinafter called as F1). After the accident, the Council for the Decommissioning was established, mainly by the government and TEPCO, and a road map for the F1 decommissioning was drawn up. In the road map, the fuel debris removal from the reactors is scheduled to launch around 2020. In this study, the characteristics and technological issues of each potential treatment scenario were extracted, and the scenarios were prioritized in advance of formal evaluations in the future. The preliminary evaluation results show that long term storage and direct disposal have more positive aspects in terms of economic efficiency and radioactive waste generation. On the other hand, stabilizing processing, aqueous processing, and pyrochemical processing have been estimated to have more disadvantages in such aspects. (author)

  19. Burnup performance of OTTO cycle pebble bed reactors with ROX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Hai Quan; Obara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 300 MW t Small Pebble Bed Reactor with Rock-like oxide fuel is proposed. • Using ROX fuel can achieve high discharged burnup of spent fuel. • High geological stability can be expected in direct disposal of the spent ROX fuel. • The Pebble Bed Reactor with ROX fuel can be critical at steady state operation. • All the reactor designs have a negative temperature coefficient. - Abstract: A pebble bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (PBR) with rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel was designed to achieve high discharged burnup and improve the integrity of the spent fuel in geological disposal. The MCPBR code with a JENDL-4.0 library, which developed the analysis of the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle in PBR, was used to perform the criticality and burnup analysis. Burnup calculations for eight cases were carried out for both ROX fuel and a UO 2 fuel reactor with different heavy-metal loading conditions. The effective multiplication factor of all cases approximately equalled unity in the equilibrium condition. The ROX fuel reactor showed lower FIFA than the UO 2 fuel reactor at the same heavy-metal loading, about 5–15%. However, the power peaking factor and maximum power per fuel ball in the ROX fuel core were lower than that of UO 2 fuel core. This effect makes it possible to compensate for the lower-FIFA disadvantage in a ROX fuel core. All reactor designs had a negative temperature coefficient that is needed for the passive safety features of a pebble bed reactor

  20. A new design method for fluidized bed conversion of largely heterogeneous binary fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szentannai Pal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Binary fuels of a fluidized bed combustor or gasifier are solids composed of two groups of particles. Their optimal handling in the same bed becomes rather difficult if their hydrodynamic properties differ by two orders of magnitude or more. Both of these fuel classes are directly fed into the reactor in most cases but the rather homogeneous fuel originally fed switches into a binary character inside the reactor in some others. A typical example of the latter case is the thermal utilization of rubber wastes. A novel design is proposed in the present paper by setting up a non-mixing, non-elutriated binary bed. Design criteria and procedure are formulated as well. One of the known calculation methods is proposed to be applied for assuring a segregated bed by means of choosing the bed components, geometry, and gas velocity conveniently. Cold model experiments are proposed to be applied for assuring no elutriation of the fine fuel particles and no sinking of the coarse fuel particles in the same time. A simple experiment is proposed for determining the common minimum fluidization velocity of the binary bed because known calculation methods can not be applied here.

  1. Improved drying rate diagnostics for saturated fuel debris at the INEEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, K.; Christensen, A.

    1999-01-01

    A fuel canning station (FCS) has been operated for ∼2 yr to prepare for the dry storage of a variety of spent reactor fuels stored in pools at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The FCS dewaters the fuel and then passivates possibly pyrophoric components in the fuel. Fuel-loaded canisters are placed into a heated insert, the canister is connected to a vacuum system, and the fuel is heated under a vacuum to remove the water. The dewatering system must also verify that the water was removed. The dryness criteria state that the canister pressure shall not exceed a defined pressure for a specified isolation time. Dewatering did not work well for defected TRIGA elements that had corroded in pool storage, leaving the intact fuel meat mixed with a bed of fines from metal oxides and from sludge that continuously accumulated within the pool. Dewatering these cans proved to be very time consuming. Fueled canisters were heated to 60 C and evacuated between 5 and 10 torr. At these conditions, intact fuels were rapidly dried (<10 h). TRIGA drying periods extended to 9 days. Dryness was qualitatively monitored using the canister pressure-control valve position. The valve closes as the gas flow rate declines, providing an indication that drying is complete. However, the valve remained open when drying TRIGA fuel, leaving no indication of dryness. In addition, dryness could not be verified because the canister pressure exceeded the defined pressure during isolation. Air leakage into the evacuated canister prevented the dryness from being verified. Air in-leakage and water vapor cannot easily be discriminated by the aforementioned procedures. Because the canister design does not seal above atmospheric pressure, a drying temperature that yielded a vapor pressure less than atmospheric pressure was chosen. A sufficiently long isolation test could then determine if air was accumulating in the canister; however, the low temperature reduced the drying

  2. Fluidized combustion of beds of large, dense particles in reprocessing HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, D.T.

    1977-03-01

    Fluidized bed combustion of graphite fuel elements and carbon external to fuel particles is required in reprocessing high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) cores for recovery of uranium. This burning process requires combustion of beds containing both large particles and very dense particles as well as combustion of fine graphite particles which elutriate from the bed. Equipment must be designed for optimum simplicity and reliability as ultimate operation will occur in a limited access ''hot cell'' environment. Results reported in this paper indicate that successful long-term operation of fuel element burning with complete combustion of all graphite fines leading to a fuel particle product containing <1% external carbon can be performed on equipment developed in this program

  3. Bed models for solid fuel conversion process in grate-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, M.; Massarotti, N.; Indrizzi, V.

    2013-01-01

    -chemical processes are divided in two successive sections: drying and conversion (which includes pyrolysis, gasification and combustion). The second model is an empirical 1D approach. The two models need input data such as composition, temperature and feeding rate of biomass and primary air. Temperature, species...... to describe the thermo-chemical conversion process of a solid fuel bed in a grate-fired boiler is presented. In this work both models consider the incoming solid fuel as subjected to drying, pyrolysis, gasification and combustion. In the first approach the biomass bed is treated as a 0D system, but the thermo...... concentrations and velocity of the producer gas leaving the fuel bed provided by the two models are compared. A sensitivity analysis with respect to mass flow rate of the primary air is also performed, as well as a further comparison regarding the dependence of the producer gas properties on the initial moisture...

  4. Emission performance and combustion efficiency of a conical fluidized-bed combustor firing various biomass fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permchart, W.; Kouprianov, V.I.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study on combustion of three distinct biomass fuels (sawdust, rice husk and pre-dried sugar cane bagasse) in a single fluidized-bed combustor (FBC) with a conical bed using silica sand as the inert bed material. Temperature, CO, NO and O 2 concentrations along the combustor height as well as in flue (stack) gas were measured in the experimental tests. The effects of fuel properties and operating conditions (load and excess air) on these variables were investigated. Both CO and NO axial profiles were found to have a maximum whose location divides conventionally the combustor volume into formation (lower) and reduction (upper) regions for these pollutants. Based on CO emission and unburned carbon content in fly ash, the combustion efficiency of the conical FBC was quantified for the selected biomass fuels fired under different operating conditions. (Author)

  5. Physical-Mathematical Model for Fixed-Bed Solid Fuel Gasification Process Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slyusarskiy Konstantin V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phycial-mathmatical model for fixed-bed coal gasification process simulation is proposed. The heterogeneous carbon oxidation chemical reactions were simulated via Arrhenius equation while homogeneous reactions in gas phase were calculated using Gibbs free energy minimization procedure. The syngas component concentration field and fuel conversion distribution as well as syngas final temperature and composition were defined for fixed bed gasification of T-grade coal of Kuznetskiy deposit. The optimal fuel residence time and gasifyer specific productivity were defined. The prevail reactions in oxidizing and reduction zones together with its height were defined.

  6. Fluidized bed combustion with the use of Greek solid fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakaras Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is an overview of the results obtained up to date from the combustion and co-combustion activities with Greek brown coal in different installations, both in semi-industrial and laboratory scale. Combustion tests with Greek lignite were realized in three different Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (CFBC facilities. Low rank lignite was burned in a pilot scale facility of approx. 100kW thermal capacity, located in Athens (NTUA and a semi-industrial scale of 1.2 MW thermal capacity, located at RWE's power station Niederaussem in Germany. Co-combustion tests with Greek xylitic lignite and waste wood were carried out in the 1 MWth CFBC installation of AE&E, in Austria. Lab-scale co-combustion tests of Greek pre-dried lignite with biomass were accomplished in a bubbling fluidized bed in order to investigate ash melting problems. The obtained results of all aforementioned activities showed that fluidized bed is the appropriate combustion technology to efficiently exploit the low quality Greek brown coal either alone or in conjunction with biomass species.

  7. Numerical simulation of non-conventional liquid fuels feeding in a bubbling fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Milica R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the development of mathematical models for detailed simulation of lateral jet penetration into the fluidized bed (FB, primarily from the aspect of feeding of gaseous and liquid fuels into FB furnaces. For that purpose a series of comparisons has been performed between the results of in-house developed procedure- fluid-porous medium numerical simulation of gaseous jet penetration into the fluidized bed, Fluent’s two-fluid Euler-Euler FB simulation model, and experimental results (from the literature of gaseous jet penetration into the 2D FB. The calculation results, using both models, and experimental data are in good agreement. The developed simulation procedures of jet penetration into the FB are applied to the analysis of the effects, which are registered during the experiments on a fluidized pilot furnace with feeding of liquid waste fuels into the bed, and brief description of the experiments is also presented in the paper. Registered effect suggests that the water in the fuel improved mixing of fuel and oxidizer in the FB furnace, by increasing jet penetration into the FB due to sudden evaporation of water at the entry into the furnace. In order to clarify this effect, numerical simulations of jet penetration into the FB with three-phase systems: gas (fuel, oxidizer, and water vapour, bed particles and water, have been carried out. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR33042: Improvement of the industrial fluidized bed facility, in scope of technology for energy efficient and environmentally feasible combustion of various waste materials in the fluidized bed

  8. Biomass fueled fluidized bed combustion: atmospheric emissions, emission control devices and environmental regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass, S.W.; Jenkins, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustors have become the technological choice for power generation from biomass fuels in California. Atmospheric emission data obtained during compliance tests are compared for five operating 18 to 32 MW fluidized bed combustion power plants. The discussion focuses on the impact of fuel properties and boiler design criteria on the emission of pollutants, the efficiency of pollution control devices, and regulations affecting atmospheric emissions. Stack NO x emission factors are shown not to vary substantially among the five plants which burn fuels with nitrogen concentrations between 0.3 and 1.1% dry weight. All facilities use at least one particular control device, but not all use limestone injection or other control techniques for sulfur and chlorine. The lack of control for chlorine suggests the potential for emission of toxic species due to favorable temperature conditions existing in the particulate control devices, particularly when burning fuels containing high concentrations of chlorine. (Author)

  9. Advanced circulating fluidised bed technology (CFB) for large-scale solid biomass fuel firing power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaentti, Timo; Zabetta, Edgardo Coda; Nuortimo, Kalle [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Varkaus (Finland)

    2013-04-01

    Worldwide the nations are taking initiatives to counteract global warming by reducing their greenhouse gas emissions. Efforts to increase boiler efficiency and the use of biomass and other solid renewable fuels are well in line with these objectives. Circulating fluidised bed boilers (CFB) are ideal for efficient power generation, capable to fire a broad variety of solid biomass fuels from small CHP plants to large utility power plants. Relevant boiler references in commercial operation are made for Finland and Poland.

  10. State of the art and the future fuel portfolio of fluidized bed combustion systems; Status und kuenftiges Brennstoffportfolio bei Wirbelschichtfeuerungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szentannai, Pal; Friebert, Arpad; Winter, Franz [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Inst. fuer Verfahrens-, Umwelttechnik und technische Biowissenschaften

    2008-07-01

    Coal, biomass and substitute fuels energetically can be used efficiently and with low pollution in fluidized bed plants. In comparison to biomass there are significant differences between the circulating and stationary fluidized bed technology. The stationary fluidised bed is fed predominantly with biomasses and residual substances. Coal usually is the basis fuel in the circulating fluidised bed. Biomass and residual substances frequently are course-fired. The state of the art is the employment of a broad fuel mixture in small and large fluidized-bed combustion systems. Future developments present an increased use of sewage sludge, fluidized bed combustion systems with wood as a basis fuel, utilization of household waste and the gas production.

  11. A laboratory-scale comparison of rate of spread model predictions using chaparral fuel beds – preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.R. Weise; E. Koo; X. Zhou; S. Mahalingam

    2011-01-01

    Observed fire spread rates from 240 laboratory fires in horizontally-oriented single-species live fuel beds were compared to predictions from various implementations and modifications of the Rothermel rate of spread model and a physical fire spread model developed by Pagni and Koo. Packing ratio of the laboratory fuel beds was generally greater than that observed in...

  12. Gas Turbine High Temperature Gas (Helium) Reactor Using Pebble Bed Fuel Derived from Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    Project goals: Build on the $1B investment spent during the NGNP Project for the only true Inherently Safe Small Modular Reactor Design – the only SMR design that can make this claim due to negative temperature coefficient of reactivity - no containment required – less construction cost. NPMC in Partnership with Pebble Bed Modular Group, a fully owned subsidiary of Eskom, RSA to Factory Build Complete Plant in Modular Sections at Factory Site in Oswego, NY for transport to site by rail or shipping for world wide export. NPMC will provide Project and Construction Management of all new builds from plant sites through construction, commissioning and startup using local labor. License and Construct ion of spent fuel processing facility in both NY and South Africa using Proven Technology. Ultimate goals of project: 1. Award of the 2013 US DOE Innovative SMR $452M cost share grant for US NRC License Certification 2.Build Full Scale Demonstration Plant at Koeburg, RSA with World Bank Funding managed by NPMC in collaboration with our legal firm, Haynes and Boone LLP 3. Take Plant Orders Immediately (10% Down Payment) 4. Form Strategic Alliance with Domestic and/or International Utility

  13. Fabrication of the fuel elements cladding for utilization in the fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffer, L.; Sefidvash, F.

    1986-01-01

    A method for the fabrication of cladding of the spherical fuel elements for the utilization in the fluidized bed nuclear reactor is presented. Some prelimminary experiments were performed to adopt a method which adapt itself to mass production with the desired high quality. Still methods for cladding fabrication are under study. (Author) [pt

  14. Combustion of Liquid Bio-Fuels in an Internal Circulating Fluidized Bed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miccio, F.; Kalisz, S.; Baxter, D.; Svoboda, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 143, 1-3 (2008), s. 172-179 ISSN 1385-8947 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : internal circulating fluidized bed * liquid fuel * combustion Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.813, year: 2008

  15. Anaerobic biodegradation of diesel fuel-contaminated wastewater in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, M Alvarez; Vezuli, J; Lohi, A; Upreti, S R

    2006-06-01

    Diesel fuel spills have a major impact on the quality of groundwater. In this work, the performance of an Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Reactor (AFBR) treating synthetic wastewater is experimentally evaluated. The wastewater comprises tap water containing 100, 200 and 300 mg/L of diesel fuel and nutrients. Granular, inert, activated carbon particles are employed to provide support for biomass inside the reactor where diesel fuel is the sole source of carbon for anaerobic microorganisms. For different rates of organic loading, the AFBR performance is evaluated in terms of the removal of diesel fuel as well as chemical oxygen demand (COD) from wastewater. For the aforementioned diesel fuel concentrations and a wastewater flow rate of 1,200 L/day, the COD removal ranges between 61.9 and 84.1%. The concentration of diesel fuel in the effluent is less than 50 mg/L, and meets the Level II groundwater standards of the MUST guidelines of Alberta.

  16. Dynamic analysis and application of fuel elements pneumatic transportation in a pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hongbing; Du, Dong; Han, Zandong; Zou, Yirong; Pan, Jiluan

    2015-01-01

    Almost 10,000 spherical fuel elements are transported pneumatically one by one in the pipeline outside the core of a pebble bed reactor every day. Any failure in the transportation will lead to the shutdown of the reactor, even safety accidents. In order to ensure a stable and reliable transportation, it's of great importance to analyze the motion and force condition of the fuel element. In this paper, we focus on the dynamic analysis of the pneumatic transportation of the fuel element and derive kinetic equations. Then we introduce the design of the transportation pipeline. On this basis we calculate some important data such as the velocity of the fuel element, the force between the fuel element and the pipeline and the efficiency of the pneumatic transportation. Then we analyze these results and provide some suggestions for the design of the pipeline. The experiment was carried out on an experimental platform. The velocities of the fuel elements were measured. The experimental results were consistent with and validated the theoretical analysis. The research may offer the basis for the design of the transportation pipeline and the optimization of the fuel elements transportation in a pebble bed reactor. - Highlights: • The kinetic equations of the fuel element in pneumatic transportation are derived. • The dynamic characteristics of the fuel element are analyzed. • Some important parameters are calculated based on the kinetic equations. • The experimental results were consistent with the analysis and verified the analysis. • This paper may offer an important guide to the research of a pebble bed reactor

  17. Soil Characterization by Large Scale Sampling of Soil Mixed with Buried Construction Debris at a Former Uranium Fuel Fabrication Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, A.J.; Lamantia, L.

    2009-01-01

    Recent soil excavation activities on a site identified the presence of buried uranium contaminated building construction debris. The site previously was the location of a low enriched uranium fuel fabrication facility. This resulted in the collection of excavated materials from the two locations where contaminated subsurface debris was identified. The excavated material was temporarily stored in two piles on the site until a determination could be made as to the appropriate disposition of the material. Characterization of the excavated material was undertaken in a manner that involved the collection of large scale samples of the excavated material in 1 cubic meter Super Sacks. Twenty bags were filled with excavated material that consisted of the mixture of both the construction debris and the associated soil. In order to obtain information on the level of activity associated with the construction debris, ten additional bags were filled with construction debris that had been separated, to the extent possible, from the associated soil. Radiological surveys were conducted of the resulting bags of collected materials and the soil associated with the waste mixture. The 30 large samples, collected as bags, were counted using an In-Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) unit to determine the average concentration of U-235 present in each bag. The soil fraction was sampled by the collection of 40 samples of soil for analysis in an on-site laboratory. A fraction of these samples were also sent to an off-site laboratory for additional analysis. This project provided the necessary soil characterization information to allow consideration of alternate options for disposition of the material. The identified contaminant was verified to be low enriched uranium. Concentrations of uranium in the waste were found to be lower than the calculated site specific derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) but higher than the NRC's screening values. The methods and results are presented

  18. Packed-fluidized-bed blanket concept for a thorium-fueled commercial tokamak hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, J.W.H.; Miller, J.W.; Karbowski, J.S.; Chapin, D.L.; Kelly, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    A preliminary design of a thorium blanket was carried out as a part of the Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR) study. A fixed fuel blanket concept was developed as the reference CTHR blanket with uranium carbide fuel and helium coolant. A fixed fuel blanket was initially evaluated for the thorium blanket study. Subsequently, a new type of hybrid blanket, a packed-fluidized bed (PFB), was conceived. The PFB blanket concept has a number of unique features that may solve some of the problems encountered in the design of tokamak hybrid reactor blankets. This report documents the thorium blanket study and describes the feasibility assessment of the PFB blanket concept

  19. Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report. Pebble bed reactor fuel cycle evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Nuclear fuel cycles were evaluated for the Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor under development in the Federal Republic of Germany. The basic fuel cycle specified for the HTR-K and PNP is well qualified and will meet the requirements of these reactors. Twenty alternate fuel cycles are described, including high-conversion cycles, net-breeding cycles, and proliferation-resistant cycles. High-conversion cycles, which have a high probability of being successfully developed, promise a significant improvement in resource utilization. Proliferation-resistant cycles, also with a high probability of successful development, compare very favorably with those for other types of reactors. Most of the advanced cycles could be adapted to first-generation pebble bed reactors with no significant modifications

  20. Factors affecting the amounts of emissions arising from fluidized bed combustion of solid fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbaj, P.

    1996-01-01

    The factors affecting the amounts of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and sulfur oxides (SO x , i.e. SO 2 + SO 3 ) formed during fluidized bed combustion of fossil fuels are analyzed using both theoretical concepts and experimental data. The factors treated include temperature, excess air, fuel parameters, pressure, degree of combustion gas recycling, combustion distribution along the combustion chamber height, and sulfur trapping processes for NO x , and the Ca/S ratio, fluidized layer height and fluidization rate, granulometry and absorbent type, fluidized layer temperature, and pressure during combustion for SO x . It is concluded that fluidized bed boilers are promising power generating facilities, mitigating the environmental burden arising from fossil fuel combustion. (P.A.). 12 figs., 9 refs

  1. The combustion of low calorific value fuels (oil shale) by using fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzam, S M

    1994-12-31

    The present work reports an experimental data for combustion of oil-shale in a fluidized bed combustor. The experimental set up was designed for the combustion of low calorific value fuel such as oil-shale to facilitate the variation of many parameters over a wide operating range. A cold run was firstly conducted to study the fluidization parameters. Fluidization experiment were made with different sized quartiz particles. Minimum fluidization velocities and other fluidization characteristics were determined at room temperature. Secondary a hot run was started, first studying the combustion of `LPG` in a fluidized bed as a starting process, then studying the combustion if oil-shale with different flow rates. The experimetal results are promising and give rise to hopes that this valuable deposit can be used as a fuel source and can be burned sucessfully in a fluidized bed combustor. This study had prooved that utilization of oil-shale a fuel source is no more a complicated technical problem, this opens the way for power generation using fluidized bed combustors. (author). 17 refs., 32 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. The combustion of low calorific value fuels (oil shale) by using fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzam, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The present work reports an experimental data for combustion of oil-shale in a fluidized bed combustor. The experimental set up was designed for the combustion of low calorific value fuel such as oil-shale to facilitate the variation of many parameters over a wide operating range. A cold run was firstly conducted to study the fluidization parameters. Fluidization experiment were made with different sized quartiz particles. Minimum fluidization velocities and other fluidization characteristics were determined at room temperature. Secondary a hot run was started, first studying the combustion of 'LPG' in a fluidized bed as a starting process, then studying the combustion if oil-shale with different flow rates. The experimetal results are promising and give rise to hopes that this valuable deposit can be used as a fuel source and can be burned sucessfully in a fluidized bed combustor. This study had prooved that utilization of oil-shale a fuel source is no more a complicated technical problem, this opens the way for power generation using fluidized bed combustors. (author). 17 refs., 32 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Comparison of coal/solid recovered fuel (SRF) with coal/refuse derived fuel (RDF) in a fluidised bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagland, S.T.; Kilgallon, P.; Coveney, R.; Garg, A.; Smith, R.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T.; Simms, N.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to compare the differences between municipal solid waste (MSW) derived solid recovered fuel (SRF) (complying with CEN standards) and refuse derived fuel (RDF). Both fuels were co-combusted with coal in a 50 kW fluidised bed combustor and the metal emissions were compared. Synthetic SRF was prepared in the laboratory by grinding major constituents of MSW such as paper, plastic, textile and wood. RDF was obtained from a local mechanical treatment plant. Heavy metal emissions in flue gas and ash samples from the (coal + 10% SRF) fuel mixture were found to be within the acceptable range and were generally lower than that obtained for coal + 10% RDF fuel mixture. The relative distribution of heavy metals in ash components and the flue gas stream shows the presence of a large fraction (up to 98%) of most of the metals in the ash (except Hg and As). Thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis of SRF constituents was performed to understand the behaviour of fuel mixtures in the absence and presence of air. The results obtained from the experimental study will enhance the confidence of fuel users towards using MSW-derived SRF as an alternative fuel.

  4. Feasibility of Thorium Fuel Cycles in a Very High Temperature Pebble-Bed Hybrid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Rodriguez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear energy presents key challenges to be successful as a sustainable energy source. Currently, the viability of the use thorium-based fuel cycles in an innovative nuclear energy generation system is being investigated in order to solve these key challenges. In this work, the feasibility of three thorium-based fuel cycles (232Th-233U, 232Th-239Pu, and 232Th-U in a hybrid system formed by a Very High Temperature Pebble-Bed Reactor (VHTR and two Pebble-Bed Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs was evaluated using parameters related to the neutronic behavior such as nuclear fuel breeding, minor actinide stockpile, the energetic contribution of each fissile isotope, and the radiotoxicity of the long lived wastes. These parameters were used to compare the fuel cycles using the well-known MCNPX ver. 2.6e computational code. The results obtained confirm that the 232Th-233U fuel cycle is the best cycle for minimizing the production of plutonium isotopes and minor actinides. Moreover, the inclusion of the second stage in the ADSs demonstrated the possibility of extending the burnup cycle duration and reducing the radiotoxicity of the discharged fuel from the VHTR.

  5. Improvement of burnup analysis for pebble bed reactors with an accumulative fuel loading scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanullang, Irwan Liapto; Obara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Given the limitations of natural uranium resources, innovative nuclear power plant concepts that increase the efficiency of nuclear fuel utilization are needed. The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) shows some potential to achieve high efficiency in natural uranium utilization. To simplify the PBR concept, PBR with an accumulation fuel loading scheme was introduced and the Fuel Handling System (FHS) removed. In this concept, the pebble balls are added little by little into the reactor core until the pebble balls reach the top of the reactor core, and all pebble balls are discharged from the core at the end of the operation period. A code based on the MVP/MVP-BURN method has been developed to perform an analysis of a PBR with the accumulative fuel loading scheme. The optimum fuel composition was found using the code for high burnup performance. Previous efforts provided several motivations to improve the burnup performance: First, some errors in the input code were corrected. This correction, and an overall simplification of the input code, was implemented for easier analysis of a PBR with the accumulative fuel loading scheme. Second, the optimum fuel design had been obtained in the infinite geometry. To improve the optimum fuel composition, a parametric survey was obtained by varying the amount of Heavy Metal (HM) uranium per pebble and the degree of uranium enrichment. Moreover, an entire analysis of the parametric survey was obtained in the finite geometry. The results show that improvements in the fuel composition can lead to more accurate analysis with the code. (author)

  6. Status of Research on Pebble Bed HTR Fuel Fabrication Technology in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachmawati, M.; Sarjono; Ridwan; Langenati, R.

    2014-01-01

    Research on pebble bed HTR fuel fabrication is conducted in Indonesia. One of the aims is to build a knowledge base on pebble bed HTR fuel element fabrication technology for fuel procurement. The steps of research strategies are firstly to understand the basic design research of TRISO fuel, properties, and requirements, and secondly to understand the TRISO fuel manufacturing technology, which comprises fabrication and quality control, including its facility. Both steps are adopted from research and experiences of the countries with HTR fuel element fabrication technology. From the knowledge gained in the research, an experimental design of the process and a set of prototype process equipment for fabrication are developed, namely kernels production using external gelation process, TRISO coating of the kernel, and pebble compacting. Experiments using the prototypes have been conducted. Characterization of the kernel product, i.e. diameter, sphericity, density and O/U ratio, shows that the kernel product is still not in compliance with the specification requirements. These are deemed to be caused mainly by the selected vibrating system and the viscosity adjustment. Another major cause is the selected NH3 and air feeding method for both NH3 and air layer in the preparation for spherical droplets of liquid. The FB-CVD TRISO coating of the kernel has been experimented but unsuccessful by using an FB-CVD once‐through continuous coating process. For the pebble compacting, the process is still in the early stage of setting-up compaction equipment. This paper summarizes the current status of research on HTR fuel fabrication technology in Indonesia, the proposed process and its equipment setting-up for improvement of the kernel production. The knowledge and lessons learned gained from the research is useful and can be an assistance in planning for fuel development laboratory facilities procurement, formulating User Requirement Document and Bid Invitation Specification for

  7. Numerical simulations of fire spread in a Pinus pinaster needles fuel bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menage, D; Chetehouna, K; Mell, W

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to extend the cases of WFDS model validation by comparing its predictions to literature data on a ground fire spreading in a Pinus pinaster needles fuel bed. This comparison is based on the experimental results of Mendes-Lopes and co-workers. This study is performed using the same domain as in the experiments (3.0m×1.2m×0.9m) with a mesh of 49,280 cells. We investigate the influence of wind (varied between 0 and 2 m/s) and moisture content (10 and 18%) on the rate of spread. The WFDS rate of spread is determined using a cross-correlation function of ground temperature profiles. The simulated rate of spread, as well as temperature, compared favourably to experimental values and show the WFDS model capacity to predict ground fires in Pinus Pinaster fuel beds.

  8. Numerical simulations of fire spread in a Pinus pinaster needles fuel bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menage, D.; Chetehouna, K.; Mell, W.

    2012-11-01

    The main aim of this paper is to extend the cases of WFDS model validation by comparing its predictions to literature data on a ground fire spreading in a Pinus pinaster needles fuel bed. This comparison is based on the experimental results of Mendes-Lopes and co-workers. This study is performed using the same domain as in the experiments (3.0m×1.2m×0.9m) with a mesh of 49,280 cells. We investigate the influence of wind (varied between 0 and 2 m/s) and moisture content (10 and 18%) on the rate of spread. The WFDS rate of spread is determined using a cross-correlation function of ground temperature profiles. The simulated rate of spread, as well as temperature, compared favourably to experimental values and show the WFDS model capacity to predict ground fires in Pinus Pinaster fuel beds.

  9. CO-COMBUSTION OF REFUSE DERIVED FUEL WITH COAL IN A FLUIDISED BED COMBUSTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. WAN AB KARIM GHANI

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Power generation from biomass is an attractive technology which utilizes municipal solid waste-based refused derived fuel. In order to explain the behavior of biomass-fired fluidized bed incinerator, biomass sources from refuse derived fuel was co-fired with coal in a 0.15 m diameter and 2.3 m high fluidized bed combustor. The combustion efficiency and carbon monoxide emissions were studied and compared with those from pure coal combustion. This study proved that the blending effect had increased the carbon combustion efficiency up to 12% as compared to single MSW-based RDF. Carbon monoxide levels fluctuated between 200-1600 ppm were observed when coal is added. It is evident from this research that efficient co-firing of biomass with coal can be achieved with minimum modification of existing coal-fired boilers.

  10. Thermoelastic analyses of spent fuel repositories in bedded and dome salt. Technical memorandum report RSI-0054

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, G.D.; Ratigan, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Global thermoelastic analyses of bedded and dome salt models showed a slight preference for the bedded salt model through the range of thermal loading conditions. Spent fuel thermal loadings should be less than 75 kW/acre of the repository pending more accurate material modeling. One should first limit the study to one or two spent fuel thermal loading (i.e. 75 kW/acre and/or 50 kW/acre) analyses up to a maximum time of approximately 2000 years. Parametric thermoelastic type analyses could then be readily obtained to determine the influence of the thermomechanical properties. Recommendations for further study include parametric analyses, plasticity analyses, consideration of the material interfaces as joints, and possibly consideration of a global joint pattern (i.e. jointed at the same orientation everywhere) for the non-salt materials. Subsequently, the viscoelastic analyses could be performed

  11. Production Of Bio fuel Starter From Biomass Waste Using Rocking Kiln Fluidized Bed System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Azman Che Mat Isa; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus; Zulkafli Ghazali; Mohd Zaid Mohamed; Phongsakorn, P.T.; Mohamad Puad Abu

    2014-01-01

    The biggest biomass source in Malaysia comes from oil palm industry. According to the statistic in 2010, Malaysia produced 40 million tones per year of biomass of which 30 million tones of biomass originated from the oil palm industries. The biomass waste such as palm kernel shell can be used to produce activated carbon and bio fuel starter. A new type of rotary kiln, called Rocking Kiln Fluidized Bed (RKFB) was developed in Nuclear Malaysia to utilize the large amount of the biomass to produce high value added products. This system is capable to process biomass with complete combustion to produce bio fuel starter. With this system, the produced charcoal has calorific value, 33MJ/ kg that is better than bituminous coal with calorific value, 25-30 MJ/ kg. In this research, the charcoals produced were further used to produce the bio fuel starter. This paper will elaborate the experimental set-up of the Rocking Kiln Fluidized Bed (RKFB) for bio fuel starter production and the quality of the produced bio fuel starter. (author)

  12. Pebble bed modular reactor fuel enrichment discrimination using delayed neutrons - HTR2008-58133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoda, R.; Rataj, J.; Uhera, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature nuclear power reactor which utilise fuel in form of spheres that are randomly loaded and continuously circulated through the core until they reach their prescribed end-of-life burn-up limit. When the reactor is started up for the first time, the lower-enriched start-up fuel is used, mixed with graphite spheres, to bring the core to criticality. As the core criticality is established and the start-up fuel is burned-in, the graphite spheres are progressively removed and replaced with more start-up fuel. Once it becomes necessary for maintaining power output, the higher enriched equilibrium fuel is introduced to the reactor and the start-up fuel is removed. During the initial run of the reactor it is important to discriminate between the irradiated startup fuel and the irradiated equilibrium fuel to ensure that only the equilibrium fuel is returned to the reactor. There is therefore a need for an on-line enrichment discrimination device that can discriminate between irradiated start-up fuel spheres and irradiated equilibrium fuel spheres. The device must also not be confused by the presence of any remaining graphite spheres. Due to it's on-line nature the device must accomplish the discrimination within tight time limits. Theoretical calculations and experiments show that Fuel Enrichment Discrimination based on delayed neutrons detection is possible. The paper presents calculations and experiments showing viability of the method. (authors)

  13. Advanced Core Design And Fuel Management For Pebble-Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

    2004-10-01

    A method for designing and optimizing recirculating pebble-bed reactor cores is presented. At the heart of the method is a new reactor physics computer code, PEBBED, which accurately and efficiently computes the neutronic and material properties of the asymptotic (equilibrium) fuel cycle. This core state is shown to be unique for a given core geometry, power level, discharge burnup, and fuel circulation policy. Fuel circulation in the pebble-bed can be described in terms of a few well?defined parameters and expressed as a recirculation matrix. The implementation of a few heat?transfer relations suitable for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors allows for the rapid estimation of thermal properties critical for safe operation. Thus, modeling and design optimization of a given pebble-bed core can be performed quickly and efficiently via the manipulation of a limited number key parameters. Automation of the optimization process is achieved by manipulation of these parameters using a genetic algorithm. The end result is an economical, passively safe, proliferation-resistant nuclear power plant.

  14. Optimized Core Design and Fuel Management of a Pebble-Bed Type Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) has been selected by the international Generation IV research initiative as one of the six most promising nuclear reactor concepts that are expected to enter service in the second half of the 21st century. The VHTR is characterized by a high plant efficiency and a high fuel discharge burnup level. More specifically, the (pebble-bed type) High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is known for its inherently safe characteristics, coming from a negative temperature reactivity feedback, a low power density and a large thermal inertia of the core. The core of a pebble-bed reactor consists of graphite spheres (pebbles) that form a randomly packed porous bed, which is cooled by high pressure helium. The pebbles contain thousands of fuel particles, which are coated with several pyrocarbon and silicon carbon layers that are designed to contain the fission products that are formed during operation of the reactor. The inherent safety concept has been demonstrated in small pebble-bed reactors in practice, but an increase in the reactor size and power is required for cost-effective power production. An increase of the power density in order to increase the helium coolant outlet temperature is attractive with regard to the efficiency and possible process heat applications. However, this increase leads in general to higher fuel temperatures, which could lead to a consequent increase of the fuel coating failure probability. This thesis deals with the pebble-bed type VHTR that aims at an increased coolant outlet temperature of 1000 degrees C and beyond. For the simulation of the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor the DALTON-THERMIX coupled code system has been developed and has been validated against experiments performed in the AVR and HTR-10 reactors. An analysis of the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) design shows that the inherent safety concept that has been demonstrated in practice in the smaller AVR and HTR-10

  15. Effect of fuel particles' size variations on multiplication factor in pebble-bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoj, L.; Ravnik, M.

    2005-01-01

    The pebble-bed reactor (Pbr) spherical fuel element consists of two radial zones: the inner zone, in which the fissile material in form of the so-called TRISO particles is uniformly dispersed in graphite matrix and the outer zone, a shell of pure graphite. A TRISO particle is composed of a fissile kernel (UO 2 ) and several layers of carbon composites. The effect of TRISO particles' size variations and distance between them on PBR multiplication factor is studied using MCNP code. Fuel element is modelled in approximation of a cubical unit cell with periodic boundary condition. The multiplication factor of the fuel element depends on the size of the TRISO particles due to resonance self-shielding effect and on the inter-particle distance due to inter-kernel shadowing. (author)

  16. Preliminary analysis on in-core fuel management optimization of molten salt pebble-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Bing; Jing Xingqing; Xu Xiaolin; Lv Yingzhong

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Hot Spring (NHS) is a molten salt pebble-bed reactor featured by full power natural circulation. The unique horizontal coolant flow of the NHS demands the fuel recycling schemes based on radial zoning refueling and the corresponding method of fuel management optimization. The local searching algorithm (LSA) and the simulated annealing algorithm (SAA), the stochastic optimization methods widely used in the refueling optimization problems in LWRs, were applied to the analysis of refueling optimization of the NHS. The analysis results indicate that, compared with the LSA, the SAA can survive the traps of local optimized solutions and reach the global optimized solution, and the quality of optimization of the SAA is independent of the choice of the initial solution. The optimization result gives excellent effects on the in-core power flattening and the suppression of fuel center temperature. For the one-dimensional zoning refueling schemes of the NHS, the SAA is an appropriate optimization method. (authors)

  17. A fiber optics system for monitoring utilization of ZnO adsorbent beds during desulfurization for logistic fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujan, Achintya; Yang, Hongyun; Dimick, Paul; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    2016-05-01

    An in-situ fiber optic based technique for direct measurement of capacity utilization of ZnO adsorbent beds by monitoring bed color changes during desulfurization for fuel cell systems is presented. Adsorbents composed of bulk metal oxides (ZnO) and supported metal oxides (ZnO/SiO2 and Cusbnd ZnO/SiO2) for H2S removal at 22 °C are examined. Adsorbent bed utilization at breakthrough is determined by the optical sensor as the maximum derivative of area under UV-vis spectrum from 250 to 800 nm observed as a function of service time. Since the response time of the sensor due to bed color change is close to bed breakthrough time, a series of probes along the bed predicts utilization of the portion of bed prior to H2S breakthrough. The efficacy of the optical sensor is evaluated as a function of inlet H2S concentration, H2S flow rate and desulfurization in presence of CO, CO2 and moisture in feed. A 6 mm optical probe is employed to measure utilization of a 3/16 inch ZnO extrudate bed for H2S removal. It is envisioned that with the application of the optical sensor, desulfurization can be carried out at high adsorbent utilization and low operational costs during on-board miniaturized fuel processing for logistic fuel cell power systems.

  18. Mathematical modelling of sewage sludge incineration in a bubbling fluidised bed with special consideration for thermally-thick fuel particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao Bin; Sharifi, Vida; Swithenbank, Jim

    2008-11-01

    Fluidised bed combustor (FBC) is one of the key technologies for sewage sludge incineration. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed for the simulation of a large-scale sewage sludge incineration plant. The model assumes the bed consisting of a fast-gas phase, an emulsion phase and a fuel particle phase with specific consideration for thermally-thick fuel particles. The model further improves over previous works by taking into account throughflow inside the bubbles as well as the floating and random movement of the fuel particles inside the bed. Validation against both previous lab-scale experiments and operational data of a large-scale industrial plant was made. Calculation results indicate that combustion split between the bed and the freeboard can range from 60/40 to 90/10 depending on the fuel particle distribution across the bed height under the specific conditions. The bed performance is heavily affected by the variation in sludge moisture level. The response time to variation in feeding rate is different for different parameters, from 6 min for outlet H2O, 10 min for O2, to 34 min for bed temperature.

  19. CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND CLB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thein; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan; Senthil Arumugam; Kevin Heflin

    2003-08-28

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain-diet diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. The manure could be used as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in an existing coal suspension fired combustion systems. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Reburn is a process where a small percentage of fuel called reburn fuel is injected above the NO{sub x} producing, conventional coal fired burners in order to reduce NO{sub x}. The manure could also be used as reburn fuel for reducing NO{sub x} in coal fired plants. An alternate approach of using animal waste is to adopt the gasification process using a fixed bed gasifier and then use the gases for firing in gas turbine combustors. In this report, the cattle manure is referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) and chicken manure as litter biomass (LB). The report generates data on FB and LB fuel characteristics. Co-firing, reburn, and gasification tests of coal, FB, LB, coal: FB blends, and coal: LB blends and modeling on cofiring, reburn systems and economics of use of FB and LB have also been conducted. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, lower in heat content, higher in moisture, and higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution) compared to coal. Small-scale cofiring experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} emissions will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when

  20. Separation of harmful impurities from refuse derived fuels (RDF) by a fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, B; Mrotzek, A; Wirtz, S

    2014-02-01

    In firing systems of cement production plants and coal-fired power plants, regular fossil fuels are increasingly substituted by alternative fuels. Rising energy prices and ambitious CO2-reduction goals promote the use of alternative fuels as a significant contribution to efficient energy recovery. One possibility to protect energy resources are refuse-derived fuels (RDF), which are produced during the treatment of municipal solid, commercial and industrial waste. The waste fractions suitable for RDF have a high calorific value and are often not suitable for material recycling. With current treatment processes, RDF still contains components which impede the utilization in firing systems or limit the degree of substitution. The content of these undesired components may amount to 4 wt%. These, in most cases incombustible particles which consist of mineral, ceramic and metallic materials can cause damages in the conveying systems (e. g. rotary feeder) or result in contaminations of the products (e. g. cement, chalk). Up-to-date separation processes (sieve machine, magnet separator or air classifier) have individual weaknesses that could hamper a secure separation of these particles. This article describes a new technology for the separation of impurities from refuse derived fuels based on a rotating fluidized bed. In this concept a rotating motion of the particle bed is obtained by the tangential injection of the fluidization gas in a static geometry. The RDF-particles experience a centrifugal force which fluidized the bed radially. The technical principle allows tearing up of particle clusters to single particles. Radially inwards the vertical velocity is much lower thus particles of every description can fall down there. For the subsequent separation of the particles by form and density an additionally cone shaped plate was installed in the centre. Impurities have a higher density and a compact form compared to combustible particles and can be separated with a high

  1. Engineering bed models for solid fuel conversion process in grate-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, M.; Massarotti, N.; Indrizzi, V.

    2014-01-01

    of the syngas predicted by the two models is equal to about 7%. The application to different types of biomass shows that the difference in the predictions increases as the carbon content grows. The phenomenological model, in fact, generally considers higher conversion rates of this element to volatiles......A comparison between two numerical models describing the thermo-chemical conversion process of a solid fuel bed in a grate-fired boiler is presented. Both models consider the incoming biomass as subjected to drying, pyrolysis, gasification and combustion. In the first approach the biomass bed...... is treated as a 0D system, where the thermo-chemical processes are divided in two successive sections: drying and conversion. Phenomenological laws are written to characterize the syngas release as a function of the main governing parameters. The second model is an empirical 1D approach. Temperature, species...

  2. SO3 Formation and the Effect of Fly Ash in a Bubbling Fluidised Bed under Oxy-Fuel Combustion Conditions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sarbassov, Y.; Duan, L.; Jeremiáš, Michal; Manovic, V.; Anthony, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 167, DEC 1 (2017), s. 314-321 ISSN 0378-3820 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : SO3 formation * oxy-fuel combustion * fluidised bed Subject RIV: JE - Non-nuclear Energetics, Energy Consumption ; Use OBOR OECD: Energy and fuels Impact factor: 3.752, year: 2016

  3. SO3 Formation and the Effect of Fly Ash in a Bubbling Fluidised Bed under Oxy-Fuel Combustion Conditions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sarbassov, Y.; Duan, L.; Jeremiáš, Michal; Manovic, V.; Anthony, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 167, DEC 1 (2017), s. 314-321 ISSN 0378-3820 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : SO3 formation * oxy- fuel combustion * fluidised bed Subject RIV: JE - Non-nuclear Energetics, Energy Consumption ; Use OBOR OECD: Energy and fuel s Impact factor: 3.752, year: 2016

  4. Disentangling effects of key coarse woody debris fuel properties on its combustion, consumption and carbon gas emissions during experimental laboratory fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Weiwei; van Logtestijn, Richard S.P.; van der Werf, Guido R.; van Hal, Jurgen R.; Cornelissen, Johannes H.C.

    2018-01-01

    Coarse woody debris is a key terrestrial carbon pool, and its turnover through fire plays a fundamental role in global carbon cycling. Coarse dead wood fuel properties, which vary between tree species and wood decay stages, might affect its combustion, consumption and carbon gas emissions during

  5. Development of debris-resistant bottom end piece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Dong Seong; Lee, Jae Kyung; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Yim, Jung Sik; Song, Kee Nam; Oh, Dong Seok; Im, Hyun Tae

    1993-01-01

    Debris-related fuel failures has been identified to be one of the major causes of fuel failures recently occured in nuclear power plants. In order to reduce the possibility of debris-related fuel failures, it is necessary to prevent the debris from reaching to fuel rods. In this regard, it is important to develop Debris-Resistant Bottom End Piece. (Author)

  6. Discussion on 'Solar detoxification of fuel-contaminated groundwater using fixed-bed photocatalysts'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, Joseph B.

    1997-03-15

    In a discussion of the 1997 paper by J. C. Crittenden et al. on the solar detoxification of fuel-contaminated groundwater using fixed-bed photocatalysts, the writer indicates a number of problems with the interpretation of the data and invites the authors to speculate on the reaction mechanism in the photocatalytic destruction of BTEX compounds in groundwater. In reply, Crittenden points out that it is not easy to speculate on the reaction mechanism because there are many compounds other than BTEX compounds contained in the water matrix, as well as many unknown compounds and by-products.

  7. Structure and influence factors of fuel cycle costs of pebble bed HTRs with OTTO-fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacke, S.

    1975-06-15

    The study in this paper can be divided into two parts. The first part deals with the analysis of the structure of the fuel cycle costs of today in 1974. A comparison is made between two pebble bed HTRs with OTTO-refueling-management (once-through) and a LWR of the type Biblis A. The two HTRs use different fuels: The one low-enriched Uranium (LOTTO), the other high-enriched Uranium and Thorium (TOTTO). The analysis of the structure of the fuel cycle costs consists of a discussion of the most important input parameters, and a comparison of each cost item. This study was made without adjustment of the core design to the changing market conditions. It is quite natural that an adaptation of the moderation ratio, of the conversion ratio, of the enrichment level, and of the burn-up may lower the fuel cycle costs. But the differences cannot be very important, and the results of this examination may remain valid, even on best adjustment conditions.

  8. Bed agglomeration risk related to combustion of cultivated fuels (wheat straw, red canary grass, industrial hemp) in commercial bed materials; Baeddagglomereringsrisk vid foerbraenning av odlade braenslen (hampa, roerflen, halm) i kommersiella baeddmaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erhardsson, Thomas; Oehman, Marcus; Geyter, Sigrid de; Oehrstroem, Anna

    2006-12-15

    The market of forest products is expanding and thus resulting in more expensive biomass fuels. Therefore research within the combustion industry for alternative fuels is needed, for example cultivated fuels. Combustion and gasification research on these cultivated fuels are limited. The objectives of this work was to increase the general knowledge of silicon rich cultivated fuels by study the agglomeration characteristics for wheat straw, reed canary grass and industrial hemp in combination with commercial bed materials. Controlled fluidized bed agglomeration tests was conducted in a 5 kW, bench-scale, bubbling fluidized bed reactor. The tendencies of agglomeration were determined with the three cultivated fuels in combination with various minerals present in natural sand (quarts, plagioclase and potassium feldspar) and an alternative bed material (olivine). During the experiments bed samples and formed agglomerates were collected for further analyses with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and with X-ray microanalysis (EDS). Wheat straw had the highest agglomeration tendency of the studied fuels followed by reed canary grass and industrial hemp. No significant layer formation was found around the different bed particles. Instead, the ash forming matter were found as individual ash sticky (partial melted) particles in the bed. The bed material mineralogical composition had no influence of the agglomeration process because of the non layer formation propensities of the used silicon rich fuels.

  9. Development of Monte Carlo-based pebble bed reactor fuel management code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiadipura, Topan; Obara, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new Monte Carlo-based fuel management code for OTTO cycle pebble bed reactor was developed. • The double-heterogeneity was modeled using statistical method in MVP-BURN code. • The code can perform analysis of equilibrium and non-equilibrium phase. • Code-to-code comparisons for Once-Through-Then-Out case were investigated. • Ability of the code to accommodate the void cavity was confirmed. - Abstract: A fuel management code for pebble bed reactors (PBRs) based on the Monte Carlo method has been developed in this study. The code, named Monte Carlo burnup analysis code for PBR (MCPBR), enables a simulation of the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle of a PBR from the running-in phase to the equilibrium condition. In MCPBR, a burnup calculation based on a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, MVP-BURN, is coupled with an additional utility code to be able to simulate the OTTO cycle of PBR. MCPBR has several advantages in modeling PBRs, namely its Monte Carlo neutron transport modeling, its capability of explicitly modeling the double heterogeneity of the PBR core, and its ability to model different axial fuel speeds in the PBR core. Analysis at the equilibrium condition of the simplified PBR was used as the validation test of MCPBR. The calculation results of the code were compared with the results of diffusion-based fuel management PBR codes, namely the VSOP and PEBBED codes. Using JENDL-4.0 nuclide library, MCPBR gave a 4.15% and 3.32% lower k eff value compared to VSOP and PEBBED, respectively. While using JENDL-3.3, MCPBR gave a 2.22% and 3.11% higher k eff value compared to VSOP and PEBBED, respectively. The ability of MCPBR to analyze neutron transport in the top void of the PBR core and its effects was also confirmed

  10. Numerical simulations of the industrial circulating fluidized bed boiler under air- and oxy-fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamczyk, Wojciech P.; Kozołub, Paweł; Klimanek, Adam; Białecki, Ryszard A.; Andrzejczyk, Marek; Klajny, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Measured and numerical results of air-fuel combustion process within large scale industrial circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler is presented in this paper. For numerical simulations the industrial compact CFB boiler was selected. Numerical simulations were carried out using three-dimensional model where the dense particulate transport phenomenon was simultaneously modelled with combustion process. The fluidization process was modelled using the hybrid Euler-Lagrange approach. The impact of the geometrical model simplification on predicted mass distribution and temperature profiles over CFB boiler combustion chamber two kinds of geometrical models were used, namely the complete model which consist of combustion chamber, solid separators, external solid super-heaters and simplified boiler geometry which was reduced to the combustion chamber. The evaluated temperature and pressure profiles during numerical simulations were compared against measured data collected during boiler air-fuel operation. Collected data was also used for validating numerical model of the oxy-fuel combustion model. Stability of the model and its sensitivity on changes of several input parameters were studied. The comparison of the pressure and temperature profiles for all considered cases gave comparable trends in contrary to measured data. Moreover, some additional test was carried out the check the influence of radiative heat transfer on predicted temperature profile within the CFB boiler. - Highlights: • Hybrid Euler-Lagrange approach was used for modelling particle transport, air- and oxy-fuel combustion process. • Numerical results were validated against measured data. • The influence of different boiler operating conditions on calculated temperature profile was investigated. • New strategy for resolving particle transport in circulating fluidized bed was shown

  11. Occurrence of bromine in fluidised bed combustion of solid recovered fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainikka, P.

    2011-12-15

    Corrosive ash species are the single most important factor limiting the electric efficiency of steam boiler plants fired with waste or biomass. Chlorine has been found to have a central role in the chemistry involved as it reduces the melting temperature of ash, forms corrosive vapour and gas species in the furnace and halogenated deposits on boiler heat transfer surfaces. In this context chlorine has been extensively researched. At the time of writing this thesis there was hardly any published data available on the occurrence of bromine (Br) in the aforementioned context. The objective of this work was to review the occurrence of bromine in solid fuels and characterise the behaviour of bromine in full-scale fluidised bed combustion. The review on the occurrence of bromine in solid fuels revealed that in anthropogenic wastes bromine is mainly found in connection to flame retarded substances. Several weight percentages of bromine can be found in plastics treated with brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Bromine is typically found some 100-200 mg kg-1 in mixed municipal solid wastes (MSW). Bromine may be enriched in fuels with high share of plastics, such as solid recovered fuel (SRF) or refuse derived fuel (RDF). Up to 2000 mg kg-1 was found as a monthly average in SRF, typical levels being 20-200 mg kg-1. Wastewater sludge from paper mills may contain bromine 20-100 mg kg-1 due the use of bromine based biocides. In other fuels bromine may be found in significant amounts in marine influenced coal deposits and peat as well as in biomass treated with brominated pesticides. In the experimental part SRF, spruce bark and wastewater sludge from a paper mill were co-fired in a full- scale bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) boiler, and the collected fuels, aerosols and waterwall deposits were analysed with the focus on the fate of bromine. Bromine was mainly found to form water soluble high vapour pressure alkali metal halides in the furnace - in the form of KBr(g) and NaBr(g) as

  12. Tracing the contribution of debris flow-dominated channels to gravel-bed torrential river channel: implementing pit-tags in the upper Guil River (French Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud-Fassetta, Gilles; Lissak, Candide; Fort, Monique; Bétard, François; Carlier, Benoit; Cossart, Etienne; Madelin, Malika; Viel, Vincent; Charnay, Bérengère; Bletterie, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Morel (20 pit-tags), Bouchouse (40 pit-tags), Peyronnelle (100 pit-tags). All pit-tags were installed high upstream enough in each catchment to avoid their loss and/or burying, and permit their monitoring over several years. The grain size (D50 = 30-220 cm) of the selected blocks reflects the average size of the bed load. Smaller blocks were discarded to avoid losing their track from the first event. The blocks were positioned according to two logics: (i) Longitudinally, we implemented every 20-30 m a series of nested blocks into the channel; (ii) Transversally, we selected blocks placed in low and high position to quantify the transport dynamics during events of low (torrential) and high (debris flow) magnitude. The sites were mapped at high resolution, and blocks were spotted thanks to fluorescent painting, GPS surveys and detailed photographs. We emplaced the pit-tags in September 2013, before expected avalanches and debris flows during winter and spring 2014. Pit-tags detection, Lidar and photogrammetric surveys are planned for early summer 2014, during which we expect quantifying movement, distance and sorting of blocks along the thalwegs during "ordinary" snowmelt runoff. We intend to continue this monitoring long enough to put observed current and future dynamics in relation to short-term climatic changes.

  13. Fuel Design for Particle-Bed Reactors for Thermal Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husser, Dewayne L.; Evans, Robert S.; Jensen, Russell R.; Kerr, John M.

    1994-07-01

    The design of particle bed reactor (PBR) fuels is an iterative process involving close coordination of design and manufacturing operations. The process starts with the generation of an initial particle design, based on a knowledge of the system requirements and interfaces (such as, fissile loading requirements, coolant type, exit gas temperatures, operation time, number of cycles, contacting materials, etc.). The designer must consider materials property data, heat-transfer and thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the particle and particle bed, and available (or anticipated) manufacturing technology. The design process also uses parametric studies to identify the influences of composition, size, and coating thickness on fuel performance. This resulting design is then used to provide a target manufacturing specification against which initial manufacturing development can be assessed and which provides the framework for manufacturing and testing derived feedback that can be incorporated into the subsequent particle design modifications. In this paper, an example of this design process for a hypothetical particle using a (U,Zr)C kernel and a NbC outer coating designed for a thermal propulsion application is given.

  14. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesterinen, R.; Kallio, M.; Kirjalainen, T.; Kolsi, A.; Merta, M.

    1997-01-01

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  15. CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

    2002-01-01

    result as the levels of N are higher in the biomass fuel than in coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process to reduce NO(sub x) emissions. Since crushing costs of biomass fuels may be prohibitive, stoker firing may be cost effective; in order simulate such a firing, future work will investigate the performance of a gasifier when fired with larger sized coal and biomass. It will be a fixed bed gasifier, and will evaluate blends, coal, and biomass. Computer simulations were performed using the PCGC-2 code supplied by BYU and modified by A and M with three mixture fractions for handling animal based biomass fuels in order to include an improved moisture model for handling wet fuels and phosphorus oxidation. Finally the results of the economic analysis show that considerable savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings will be reduced, due to increased transportation costs. A spreadsheet program was created to analyze the fuel savings for a variety of different moisture levels, ash levels, and power plant operating parameters

  16. CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

    2002-01-15

    result as the levels of N are higher in the biomass fuel than in coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Since crushing costs of biomass fuels may be prohibitive, stoker firing may be cost effective; in order simulate such a firing, future work will investigate the performance of a gasifier when fired with larger sized coal and biomass. It will be a fixed bed gasifier, and will evaluate blends, coal, and biomass. Computer simulations were performed using the PCGC-2 code supplied by BYU and modified by A&M with three mixture fractions for handling animal based biomass fuels in order to include an improved moisture model for handling wet fuels and phosphorus oxidation. Finally the results of the economic analysis show that considerable savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings will be reduced, due to increased transportation costs. A spreadsheet program was created to analyze the fuel savings for a variety of different moisture levels, ash levels, and power plant operating parameters.

  17. US/FRG joint report on the pebble bed high temperature reactor resource conservation potential and associated fuel cycle costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teuchert, E.; Ruetten, H.J.; Worley, B.A.; Vondy, D.R.

    1979-11-01

    Independent analyses at ORNL and KFA have led to the general conclusion that the flexibility in design and operation of a high-temperature gas-cooled pebble-bed reactor (PBR) can result in favorable ore utilization and fuel costs in comparison with other reactor types, in particular, with light-water reactors (LWRs). Fuel reprocessign and recycle show considerable promise for reducing ore consumption, and even the PBR throwaway cycle is competitive with fuel recycle in an LWR. The best performance results from the use of highly enriched fuel. Proliferation-resistant measures can be taken using medium-enriched fuel at a modest ore penalty, while use of low-enriched fuel would incur further ore penalty. Breeding is possible but net generation of fuel at a significant rate would be expensive, becoming more feasible as ore costs increase substantially. The 233 U inventory for a breeder could be produced by prebreeders using 235 U fuel

  18. The influence of fine char particles burnout on bed agglomeration during the fluidized bed combustion of a biomass fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, Fabrizio; Chirone, Riccardo [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione, CNR, P.le V. Tecchio, 80-80125 Naples (Italy); Salatino, Piero [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, P.le V. Tecchio, 80-80125 Naples (Italy)

    2003-11-15

    The combustion of biomass char in a bubbling fluidized bed is hereby addressed, with specific reference to the influence that the combustion of fine char particles may exert on ash deposition and bed agglomeration phenomena. Experiments of steady fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of powdered biomass were carried out with the aim of mimicking the postcombustion of attrited char fines generated in the fluidized bed combustion of coarse char. Experimental results showed that the char elutriation rate is much smaller than expected on the basis of the average size of the biomass powder and of the carbon loading in the combustor. Samples of bed material collected after prolonged operation of the combustor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-EDX analysis and revealed the formation of relatively coarse sand-ash-carbon aggregates. The phenomenology is consistent with the establishment of a char phase attached to the bed material as a consequence of adhesion of char fines onto the sand particles. Combustion under sound-assisted fluidization conditions was also tested. As expected, enhancement of fines adhesion on bed material and further reduction of the elutriation rate were observed. Experimental results are interpreted in the light of a simple model which accounts for elutriation of free fines, adhesion of free fines onto bed material and detachment of attached fines by attrition of char-sand aggregates. Combustion of both free and attached char fines is considered. The parameters of the model are assessed on the basis of the measured carbon loadings and elutriation rates. Model computations are directed to estimate the effective size and the peak temperature of char-sand aggregates. The theoretical estimates of the effective aggregate size match fairly well those observed in the experiments.

  19. Development of a method for detecting nuclear fuel debris and water leaks at a nuclear reactor/containment vessel by flow visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Shuichi; Tanaka, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    It is the important issue to fill up each nuclear reactor/containment vessel with water and to take out debris of damaged fuel from them for decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants. It is necessary to detect the debris and water leaks at a nuclear reactor/containment vessel for the purpose. However, the method is not completely developed in the present stage. Accordingly, we have developed a method for detecting debris and water leaks at a nuclear reactor/containment vessel by flow visualization. Experiments of the flow visualization were conducted using two types of water tanks. An optical fiber and a collimator lens were employed for modifying a straight laser beam into a sheet projection. Some visualized images were obtained through the experiments. Particle Image Velocimetry, i.e. PIV, analysis was applied to the images for quantitative flow rate analysis. Consequently, it is considered that the flow visualization method has a possibility for the practical use. (author)

  20. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in 235 U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 μm and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core

  1. Sulphation of calcium-based sorbents in circulating fluidised beds under oxy-fuel combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco Garcia-Labiano; Luis F. de Diego; Alberto Abad; Pilar Gayan; Margarita de las Obras-Loscertales; Aranzazu Rufas; Juan Adanez [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. Energy and Environment

    2009-07-01

    Sulphur Retention (SR) by calcium-based sorbents is a process highly dependent on the temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. In circulating fluidised beds combustors (CFBC's) operating under oxy-fuel conditions, the sulphation process takes place in atmospheres enriched in CO{sub 2} with bed concentrations that can vary from 40 to 95%. Under so high CO{sub 2} concentrations, very different from that in conventional coal combustion atmosphere with air, the calcination and sulphation behaviour of the sorbent must be defined to optimise the SR process in the combustor. The objective of this work was to determine the SO{sub 2} retention capacity of a Spanish limestone at typical oxy-fuel conditions in CFBC's. Long term duration tests of sulphation (up to 24 h), to simulate the residence time of sorbents in CFBC's, were carried out by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Clear behaviour differences were found under calcining and non-calcining conditions. Especially relevant was the result obtained at calcining conditions but close to the thermodynamic temperature given for sorbent calcination. This situation must be avoided in CFBC's because the CO{sub 2} produced inside the particle during calcination can destroy the particles if a non-porous sulphate product layer has been formed around the particle. The effect of the main variables on the sorbent sulphation such as SO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and particle size were analysed in the long term TGA tests. These data were also used to determine the kinetic parameters for the sulphation under oxy-fuel combustion conditions, which were able to adequately predict the sulphation conversion values in a wide range of operating conditions. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Material effect in the fuel-coolant interaction: structural characterization of the steam explosion debris and solidification mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrpekl, V.

    2012-01-01

    This work has been performed under joint supervision between Charles University in Prague (Czech Republic) and Strasbourg University (France). It also profited from the background and cooperation of Institute of Inorganic Chemistry Academy of Science of the Czech Republic and French Commission for Atomic and Alternative energies (CEA Cadarache). Results of the work contribute to the OECD/NEA project Serena 2 (Program on Steam Explosion Resolution for Nuclear Applications). Presented thesis can be classed in the scientific field of nuclear safety and material science. It is aimed on the so-called 'molten nuclear Fuel - Coolant Interaction' (FCI) that belongs among the recent issues of the nuclear reactor severe accident R and D. During the nuclear reactor melt down accident the melted reactor load can interact with the coolant (light water). This interaction can be located inside the vessel or outside in the case of vessel break-up. These two scenarios are commonly called in- and ex-vessel FCI and they differ in the conditions such as initial pressure of the system, water sub-cooling etc. The Molten fuel - coolant interaction can progress into thermal detonation called 'steam explosion' that can challenge the reactor or containment integrity. Recent experiments have shown that the melt composition has a major effect on the occurrence and yield of such explosion. In particular, different behaviors have been observed between simulant material (alumina), which has important explosion efficiency, and some prototypic corium compositions (80 w. % UO 2 , 20% w. % ZrO 2 . This 'material effect' has launched a new interest in the post-test analyses of FCI debris in order to estimate the processes occurring during these extremely rapid phenomena. The thesis is organized in nine chapters. The chapter 1 gives the general introduction and context of the nuclear reactor accident. Major nuclear accidents (Three Miles Island 1979, Chernobyl 1986 and Fukushima 2011) are briefly

  3. Carbon conversion predictor for fluidized bed gasification of biomass fuels - from TGA measurements to char gasification particle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konttinen, J.T. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Chemistry, Renewable Energy Programme, POB 35, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Moilanen, A. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, POB 1000, Espoo (Finland); Martini, N. de; Hupa, M. [Abo Akademi University, Process Chemistry Centre, Combustion and Materials Chemistry, Turku (Finland)

    2012-09-15

    When a solid fuel particle is injected into a hot fluidized bed, the reactivity of fuel char in gasification reactions (between char carbon and steam and CO{sub 2}) plays a significant role for reaching a good carbon conversion. In this paper, the gasification reactivity data of some solid waste recovered fuels (SRF) obtained from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments is presented. Gas mixtures (H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO), were used in the experiments to find the inhibitive effects of CO and H{sub 2}. Average char gasification reactivity values are determined from the TGA results. Kinetic parameters for char carbon gasification reactivity correlations are determined from this data. The Uniform Conversion model is used to account for the change of gasification reaction rate as function of carbon conversion. Some discrepancies, due to complicated ash-carbon interactions, are subjects of further research. In the carbon conversion predictor, laboratory measured reactivity numbers are converted into carbon conversion numbers in a real-scale fluidized bed gasifier. The predictor is a relatively simple and transparent tool for the comparison of the gasification reactivity of different fuels in fluidized bed gasification. The residence times for solid fuels in fluidized bed gasifiers are simulated. Simulations against some pilot-scale results show reasonable agreement. (orig.)

  4. The effect of bed non-uniformities and porosity of particles on dryout in boiling particle beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.; Mogford, D.J.; Willshire, S.J.

    1988-03-01

    This report relates to an on-going experimental programme concerned with the coolability of beds of reactor core debris or rubble immersed in a liquid coolant, as might occur in an accident situation. The objectives are to develop experimental techniques, improve the understanding of bed cooling mechanisms, determine dry-out limitations of various bed configurations and particle shapes and sizes and devise ways of improving bed coolability. The report concentrates on a recently discovered effect on bed coolability of particle porosity, such as exists in fragmented UO 2 fuel pellets. It is shown that porosity can lower bed dry-out powers by a factor of 4 or 5. A mechanism which explains the effect is presented. The report also gives results of bed non-uniformities obtained by mixing glass particles with the dielectrically heated 'ferrite' particles used in the experiments. (author)

  5. Suggestion of typical phases of in-vessel fuel-debris by thermodynamic calculation for decommissioning technology of Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Yano, Kimihiko; Kaji, Naoya; Washiya, Tadahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan); Kondo, Yoshikazu; Noguchi, Yoshikazu [PESCO Co.Ltd. (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    For the decommissioning of the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), the characterization of fuel-debris in cores of Units 1-3 is necessary. In this study, typical phases of the in-vessel fuel-debris were estimated using a thermodynamic equilibrium (TDE) calculation. The FactSage program and NUCLEA database were applied to estimate the phase equilibria of debris. It was confirmed that the TDE calculation using the database can reproduce the phase separation behavior of debris observed in the Three Mile Island accident. In the TDE calculation of 1F, the oxygen potential [G(O{sub 2})] was assumed to be a variable. At low G(O{sub 2}) where metallic zirconium remains, (U,Zr)O{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2} were found as oxides, and oxygen-dispersed Zr, Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U), and Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2} were found as metals. With an increase in zirconium oxidation, the mass of those metals, especially Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2}, decreased, but the other phases of metals hardly changed qualitatively. Consequently, (U,Zr)O{sub 2} is suggested as a typical phase of oxide, and Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U) is suggested as that of metal. However, a more detailed estimation is necessary to consider the distribution of Fe in the reactor pressure vessel through core-melt progression. (authors)

  6. Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part I: Pebble Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-03-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept [ ] focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor (LWR) fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into tri-isotopic (TRISO) coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400) [ ]. Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (FY) (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking, and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a standard, UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. Regarding the coated particle performance, the FY 2009 investigations showed that no

  7. Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part I: Pebble Bed Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, Brian; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2011-01-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor (LWR) fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into tri-isotopic (TRISO) coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (FY) (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking, and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a standard, UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. Regarding the coated particle performance, the FY 2009 investigations showed that no significant

  8. Computational Investigation of On-Line Interrogation of Pebble Bed Reactor Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawari, A. I.; Chen, Jianwei

    2005-10-01

    Pebble bed reactors are characterized by multipass fuel systems in which spherical fuel pebbles are circulated through the core until they reach a proposed burnup limit (80000-100000 MWD/MTU). For such reactors, the fuel is assayed on-line to ensure that the burnup limit is not breached. We considered assaying the fuel using an HPGe detector to perform passive gamma-ray spectrometry of fission products. Since neither fresh nor irradiated fuel is readily available, computer simulations were utilized to identify the radionuclides that can be used as burnup indicators, and to visualize the gamma-ray spectra at various levels of burnup. Specifically, we used the ORIGEN-MONTEBURNS-MCNP code system. This allowed the establishment of the burnup dependent one-group gas reactor cross-sections for the radionuclides of interest. Subsequently, ORIGEN was used to simulate in-core pebble depletion to establish the irradiated pebble isotopics. Finally, the codes MCNP and SYNTH were used to simulate the response of the HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer. The results show that absolute and relative indicators can be used on-line to determine unambiguously the enrichment and burnup on a pebble-by-pebble basis. The activity of Cs-137 or the activity ratio of Co-60/Cs-134 can be combined with the activity ratio of Np-239/I-132 to yield the enrichment and burnup information. To use the relative indicators, a relative efficiency calibration of the gamma-ray spectrometer can be performed using the La-140 gamma lines that are emitted by the irradiated pebble. I-132, Cs-134, Cs-137, La-140, and Np-239 are produced upon the irradiation of the fuel. Co-60 is produced by doping the fuel with a small amount (/spl sim/100 ppm) of Co-59. Using this approach, the uncertainty in burnup determination due to factors such as power history variation, detector efficiency calibration, and counting statistics is expected to remain in the range of /spl plusmn/5% to /spl plusmn/10%.

  9. Demonstration of laser processing technique combined with water jet technique for retrieval of fuel debris at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanari, Toshihide; Takebe, Toshihiko; Yamada, Tomonori; Daido, Hiroyuki; Ishizuka, Ippei; Ohmori, Shinya; Kurosawa, Koichi; Sasaki, Go; Nakada, Masahiro; Sakai, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    In decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, a retrieval process of fuel debris in the Primary Containment Vessel by a remote operation is one of the key issues. In this process, prevention of spreading radioactive materials is one of the important considerations. Furthermore, an applicable technique to the process requires keeping of reasonable processing-efficiency. We propose to use the combined technique including a laser light and a water jet as a retrieval technique of the fuel debris. The laser processing technique combined with a repetitive pulsed water jet could perform an efficient retrieval processing. Our experimental result encourages us to promote further development of the technique towards a real application at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. (author)

  10. Scoping study of flowpath of simulated fission products during secondary burning of crushed HTGR fuel in a quartz fluidized-bed burner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rindfleisch, J.A.; Barnes, V.H.

    1976-04-01

    The results of four experimental runs in which isotopic tracers were used to simulate fission products during fluidized bed secondary burning of HTGR fuel were studied. The experimental tests provided insight relative to the flow path of fission products during fluidized-bed burning of HTGR fuel

  11. Fuel conversion efficiency and energy balance of a 400 kW{sub t} fluidized bed straw gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erguedenler, A.; Ghaly, A.E.; Hamdullahpur, F. [Technical Univ. of Nova Scotia, Halifax (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    A 400 kW (thermal) dual-distributor type fluidized bed gasifier developed for the energy recovery from cereal straw was used to investigate the effects of equivalence ratio (actual air-fuel ratio: stoichiometric air-fuel ratio), fluidization velocity and bed height on the fuel conversion efficiency from wheat straw. The energy balance was also performed on the system under those operating conditions. The results indicated that the equivalence ratio was the most significant parameter affecting the fuel conversion efficiency and the energy recovered from the straw in the form of gas. Both the fuel conversion efficiency and the energy recovery increased with increases in the equivalence ratio. The fluidization velocity and bed height had minimal effects on these parameters. A fuel conversion efficiency as high as 98% was obtained at the equivalence ratio of 0.35. The energy recovered in the form of gas and the sensible heat of the produced gas were in the ranges of 40--70% and 9--17%, respectively. Unaccounted losses showed a dramatic increase at lower equivalence ratios and were in the range of 6--53% depending on the operating condition.

  12. Experimental studies of the influence of fuel properties and operational conditions on stoking when combusting fuels in a fixed-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Fabiana; Kolb, T.; Seifert, H.; Gehrmann, Hans-Joachim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Technical Chemistry (ITC)

    2013-09-01

    Besides from knowledge about pollutant emission, knowledge of the combustion behavior of fuels plays a major role in the operation and optimization of combustion plants for waste and biomass. If the fuel is exchanged partly or completely in existing or newly designed grate-type combustion plants, adaptation of technical parameters is usually based on purely empirical studies. In the KLEAA fixed-bed reactor of KIT, Institute for Technical Chemistry (ITC), quantitative data on the combustion behavior can be determined from experimental investigations on the laboratory scale. Based on the characteristics obtained, the combustion behavior on a continuous grate can be estimated, This estimation is based on the assumption that no back mixing of the fuel occurs on the grate. Depending on the type of grate, however, stoking and back mixing play an important role. To improve the quality of the characteristics determined in KLEAA and enhance their transferability to the continuous process, it is necessary to determine the influence of fuel properties and operation conditions on stoking. Work is aimed at further developing the characteristics model taking into account a stoking factor describing the combustion behavior of a non-stoked fixed bed compared to a stoked fixed bed. The main task is to make a systematic study of the major parameters influencing stoking (e.g. stroke length, stroke frequency, geometry of the stoking unit, and fuel properties) in a fixed-bed reactor. The results shall be presented in the form of a semi-empirical equation. It is recommended to first study a model fuel, whose fuel properties are defined exactly and can be adjusted variably. Then, a stoking factor shall be derived from the studies. Possibly, a dimension analysis may be helpful. Finally, the results obtained are to be verified for residue-derived fuel. (orig.)

  13. Characterization of ashes from a 100 kWth pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed with oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.H.; Wang, C.B.; Tan, Y.W.; Jia, L.F.; Anthony, E.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Oxy-fuel combustion experiments have been carried out on an oxygen-fired 100 kW(th) mini-circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) facility. Coal and petroleum coke were used as fuel together with different limestones (and fixed Ca:S molar ratios) premixed with the fuel, for in situ SO{sub 2} capture. The bed ash (BA) and fly ash (FA) samples produced from this unit were collected and characterized to obtain physical and chemical properties of the ash samples. The characterization methods used included X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), char carbon and free lime analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and surface analysis. The main purpose of this work is to characterize the CFBC ashes from oxy-fuel firing to obtain a better understanding of the combustion process, and to identify any significant differences from the ash generated by a conventional air-fired CFBC. The primary difference in the sulfur capture mechanism between atmospheric air-fired and oxy-fuel FBC, at typical FBC temperatures (similar to 850{sup o}C), is that, in the air-fired case the limestone sorbents calcine, whereas the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} in oxy-fuel FBC is high enough to prevent calcination, and hence the sulfation process should mimic that seen in pressurized FBC (PFBC). Here, the char carbon content in the fly ash was much higher than that in the bed ash, and was also high by comparison with ash obtained from conventional commercial air-firing CFBC units. In addition, measurements of the free lime content in the bed and fly ash showed that the unreacted Ca sorbent was present primarily as CaCO{sub 3}, indicating that sulfur capture in the oxy-fuel combustor occurred via direct sulfation.

  14. Comparative evaluation of pebble-bed and prismatic fueled high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Bartine, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative evaluation has been performed of the HTGR and the Federal Republic of Germany's Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) for potential commercial applications in the US. The evaluation considered two reactor sizes (1000 and 3000 MW(t)) and three process applications (steam cycle, direct cycle, and process heat, with outlet coolant temperatures of 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C, respectively). The primary criterion for the comparison was the levelized (15-year) cost of producing electricity or process heat. Emphasis was placed on the cost impact of differences between the prismatic-type HTGR core, which requires periodic refuelings during reactor shutdowns, and the pebble bed PBR core, which is refueled continuously during reactor operations. Detailed studies of key technical issues using reference HTGR and PBR designs revealed that two cost components contributing to the levelized power costs are higher for the PBR: capital costs and operation and maintenance costs. A third cost component, associated with nonavailability penalties, tended to be higher for the PBR except for the process heat application, for which there is a large uncertainty in the HTGR nonavailability penalty at the 950/sup 0/C outlet coolant temperature. A fourth cost component, fuel cycle costs, is lower for the PBR, but not sufficiently lower to offset the capital cost component. Thus the HTGR appears to be slightly superior to the PBR in economic performance. Because of the advanced development of the HTGR concept, large HTGRs could also be commercialized in the US with lower R and D costs and shorter lead times than could large PBRs. It is recommended that the US gas-cooled thermal reactor program continue giving primary support to the HTGR, while also maintaining its cooperative PBR program with FRG.

  15. Comparative evaluation of pebble-bed and prismatic fueled high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.; Bartine, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative evaluation has been performed of the HTGR and the Federal Republic of Germany's Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) for potential commercial applications in the US. The evaluation considered two reactor sizes [1000 and 3000 MW(t)] and three process applications (steam cycle, direct cycle, and process heat, with outlet coolant temperatures of 750, 850, and 950 0 C, respectively). The primary criterion for the comparison was the levelized (15-year) cost of producing electricity or process heat. Emphasis was placed on the cost impact of differences between the prismatic-type HTGR core, which requires periodic refuelings during reactor shutdowns, and the pebble bed PBR core, which is refueled continuously during reactor operations. Detailed studies of key technical issues using reference HTGR and PBR designs revealed that two cost components contributing to the levelized power costs are higher for the PBR: capital costs and operation and maintenance costs. A third cost component, associated with nonavailability penalties, tended to be higher for the PBR except for the process heat application, for which there is a large uncertainty in the HTGR nonavailability penalty at the 950 0 C outlet coolant temperature. A fourth cost component, fuel cycle costs, is lower for the PBR, but not sufficiently lower to offset the capital cost component. Thus the HTGR appears to be slightly superior to the PBR in economic performance. Because of the advanced development of the HTGR concept, large HTGRs could also be commercialized in the US with lower R and D costs and shorter lead times than could large PBRs. It is recommended that the US gas-cooled thermal reactor program continue giving primary support to the HTGR, while also maintaining its cooperative PBR program with FRG

  16. Process development and modeling of fluidized-bed reactor with coimmobilized biocatalyst for fuel ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, May Yongmei

    This research focuses on two steps of commercial fuel ethanol production processes: the hydrolysis starch process and the fermentation process. The goal of this research is to evaluate the performance of co-immobilized biocatalysts in a fluidized bed reactor with emphasis on economic and engineering aspects and to develop a predictive mathematical model for this system. The productivity of an FBR is higher than productivity of a traditional batch reactor or CSTR. Fluidized beds offer great advantages over packed beds for immobilized cells when small particles are used or when the reactant feed contains suspended solids. Plugging problems, excessive pressure drops (and thus attrition), or crushing risks may be avoided. No mechanical stirring is required as mixing occurs due to the natural turbulence in the fluidized process. Both enzyme and microorganism are immobilized in one catalyst bead which is called co-immobilization. Inside this biocatalyst matrix, starch is hydrolyzed by the enzyme glucoamylase to form glucose and then converted to ethanol and carbon dioxide by microorganisms. Two biocatalysts were evaluated: (1) co-immobilized yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae and glucoamylase. (2) co-immobilized Zymomonas mobilis and glucoamylase. A co-immobilized biocatalyst accomplishes the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF process). When compared to a two-step process involving separate saccharification and fermentation stages, the SSF process has productivity values twice that given by the pre-saccharified process when the time required for pre-saccharification (15--25 h) was taken into account. The SSF process should also save capital cost. The information about productivity, fermentation yield, concentration profiles along the bed, ethanol inhibition, et al., was obtained from the experimental data. For the yeast system, experimental results showed that: no apparent decrease of productivity occurred after two and half months, the productivity

  17. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology - KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2007-01-15

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in {sup 235}U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 {mu}m and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core.

  18. Interim report on core physics and fuel cycle analysis of the pebble bed reactor power plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1977-12-01

    Calculations were made to predict the performance of a pebble bed reactor operated in a mode to produce fissile fuel (high conversion or breeding). Both a one pebble design and a design involving large primary feed pebbles and small fertile pebbles were considered. A relatively short residence time of the primary pebbles loaded with 233 U fuel was found to be necessary to achieve a high breeding ratio, but this leads to relatively high fuel costs. A high fissile inventory is associated with a low C/Th ratio and a high thorium loading, causing the doubling time to be long, even though the breeding ratio is high, and the fuel cost of electrical product to be high. Production of 233 U fuel from 235 U feed was studied and performances of the converter and breeder reactor concepts were examined varying the key parameters

  19. Effect of limestone addition on chlorine compound emissions in grate and fluidized-bed combustion of recovered fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesterinen, R.; Ruuskanen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The aim was to verify the positive results of laboratory experiments concerning the reducing effect of limestone addition on emissions of organic chlorine compounds and acidifying compounds (HCl, HF, SO 2 ) in grate and fluidized-bed combustion of recovered fuels in commercial boilers. The final aim is to develop a cheap and practical way of reducing emissions of organic chlorine compounds in co-combustion of recovered fuels. Pellets produced from the mixture of recovered fuel and limestone is a product ready for use in plants without any need of additional employees or equipment for limestone feed. Pellets produced by Ewapower Oy are used as recovered fuel and Gotland limestone of Partek Nordkalk Oyj Abp as limestone. Ewapower Oy produces pellets by feeding a certain proportion of limestone among recovered fuel at the production stage. Experiments are carried out in one grate-combustion plant and in one or two fluidized-bed plants. The first experiments were carried out in a 3 MWth BioGrate boiler at the new heating station of Pielavesi municipality in autumn 1999. The flue gases are cleaned with a cyclone (FinCleaner). The main fuel was a mixture of bark and sawdust (3:1) from a sawmill. Ewapower pellets with an addition of Gotland limestone were used as recovered fuel. The experiments were carried out at about 2 MW boiler output. Temperatures of the furnace and flue gas, pressure and fuel gas composition were measured continuously. For determining the composition of gas, O 2 , CO, CO 2 , hydrocarbons and N 2 O(FTIR), NO x and SO 2 were measured continuously. HCl, heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Zn), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorobenzenes, chlorophenols and PCB were measured as one-shot determinations. Fuel and ash samples were also collected during the experiments. The organic compounds were analyzed by the Department of Environmental Science of the University of Kuopio, which is

  20. A Brief Review of Past INL Work Assessing Radionuclide Content in TMI-2 Melted Fuel Debris: The Use of 144Ce as a Surrogate for Pu Accountancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. L. Chichester; S. J. Thompson

    2013-09-01

    This report serves as a literature review of prior work performed at Idaho National Laboratory, and its predecessor organizations Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), studying radionuclide partitioning within the melted fuel debris of the reactor of the Three Mile Island 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant. The purpose of this review is to document prior published work that provides supporting evidence of the utility of using 144Ce as a surrogate for plutonium within melted fuel debris. When the TMI-2 accident occurred no quantitative nondestructive analysis (NDA) techniques existed that could assay plutonium in the unconventional wastes from the reactor. However, unpublished work performed at INL by D. W. Akers in the late 1980s through the 1990s demonstrated that passive gamma-ray spectrometry of 144Ce could potentially be used to develop a semi-quantitative correlation for estimating plutonium content in these materials. The fate and transport of radioisotopes in fuel from different regions of the core, including uranium, fission products, and actinides, appear to be well characterized based on the maximum temperature reached by fuel in different parts of the core and the melting point, boiling point, and volatility of those radioisotopes. Also, the chemical interactions between fuel, fuel cladding, control elements, and core structural components appears to have played a large role in determining when and how fuel relocation occurred in the core; perhaps the most important of these reaction appears to be related to the formation of mixed-material alloys, eutectics, in the fuel cladding. Because of its high melting point, low volatility, and similar chemical behavior to plutonium, the element cerium appears to have behaved similarly to plutonium during the evolution of the TMI-2 accident. Anecdotal evidence extrapolated from open-source literature strengthens this logical feasibility for

  1. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Hot-Spot Fuel Temperature in Pebble Bed and Prismatic Modular Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, W. K.; Lee, S. W.; Lim, H. S.; Lee, W. J.

    2006-01-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors(HTGR) have been reviewed as potential sources for future energy needs, particularly for a hydrogen production. Among the HTGRs, the pebble bed reactor(PBR) and a prismatic modular reactor(PMR) are considered as the nuclear heat source in Korea's nuclear hydrogen development and demonstration project. PBR uses coated fuel particles embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the core during an operation. PMR uses graphite fuel blocks which contain cylindrical fuel compacts consisting of the fuel particles. The fuel blocks also contain coolant passages and locations for absorber and control material. The maximum fuel temperature in the core hot spot is one of the important design parameters for both a PBR and a PMR. The objective of this study is to predict the hot-spot fuel temperature distributions in a PBR and a PMR at a steady state. The computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code, CFX-10 is used to perform the three-dimensional analysis. The latest design data was used here based on the reference reactor designs, PBMR400 and GTMHR60

  2. Estimates of relative areas for the disposal in bedded salt of LWR wastes from alternative fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lincoln, R.C.; Larson, D.W.; Sisson, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    The relative mine-level areas (land use requirements) which would be required for the disposal of light-water reactor (LWR) radioactive wastes in a hypothetical bedded-salt formation have been estimated. Five waste types from alternative fuel cycles have been considered. The relative thermal response of each of five different site conditions to each waste type has been determined. The fuel cycles considered are the once-through (no recycle), the uranium-only recycle, and the uranium and plutonium recycle. The waste types which were considered include (1) unreprocessed spent reactor fuel, (2) solidified waste derived from reprocessing uranium oxide fuel, (3) plutonium recovered from reprocessing spent reactor fuel and doped with 1.5% of the accompanying waste from reprocessing uranium oxide fuel, (4) waste derived from reprocessing mixed uranium/plutonium oxide fuel in the third recycle, and (5) unreprocessed spent fuel after three recycles of mixed uranium/plutonium oxide fuels. The relative waste-disposal areas were determined from a calculated value of maximum thermal energy (MTE) content of the geologic formations. Results are presented for each geologic site condition in terms of area ratios. Disposal area requirements for each waste type are expressed as ratios relative to the smallest area requirement (for waste type No. 2 above). For the reference geologic site condition, the estimated mine-level disposal area ratios are 4.9 for waste type No. 1, 4.3 for No. 3, 2.6 for No. 4, and 11 for No. 5

  3. Solar detoxification of fuel-contaminated groundwater using fixed-bed photocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crittenden, J. C. [Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan (United States); Zhang, Y.; Hand, D. W.; Perram, D. L.; Marchand, E. G.

    1996-05-15

    A field test of a solar photocatalytic process for detoxification of water was conducted at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, where benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) compounds were found in the fuel-contaminated groundwater. Platinized titanium dioxide supported on silica gel is packed in tubular photoreactors and used for single-pass operations. Catalyst fouling, destruction inhibition, and water pretreatment are investigated in addition to BTEX destruction. Ionic species were found to be primarily responsible for photocatalyst fouling and destruction inhibition. A simple pretreatment unit was developed for removing turbidity, adding oxidant, and ionic species. By using pretreatment, the reactor system operated efficiently, and no loss in catalyst photoactivity was found during the month-long test. On a rainy day, BTEX compounds of a total influent concentration of more than 2 mg/L were destroyed within 6.5 minutes of empty-bed contact time. Test results with various flow rates, reactor diameters, influent concentrations, solar irradiances, and weather conditions confirm the application potential of the process.

  4. Solar detoxification of fuel-contaminated groundwater using fixed-bed photocatalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crittenden, J.C.; Zhang, Y.; Hand, D.W.; Perram, D.L.; Marchand, E.G.

    1996-01-01

    A field test of a solar photocatalytic process for detoxification of water was conducted at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, where benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) compounds were found in the fuel-contaminated groundwater. Platinized titanium dioxide supported on silica gel is packed in tubular photoreactors and used for single-pass operations. Catalyst fouling, destruction inhibition, and water pretreatment are investigated in addition to BTEX destruction. Ionic species were found to be primarily responsible for photocatalyst fouling and destruction inhibition. A simple pretreatment unit was developed for removing turbidity, adding oxidant, and ionic species. By using pretreatment, the reactor system operated efficiently, and no loss in catalyst photoactivity was found during the month-long test. On a rainy day, BTEX compounds of a total influent concentration of more than 2 mg/L were destroyed within 6.5 minutes of empty-bed contact time. Test results with various flow rates, reactor diameters, influent concentrations, solar irradiances, and weather conditions confirm the application potential of the process

  5. Flow instability tests for a particle bed reactor nuclear thermal rocket fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Timothy J.

    1993-05-01

    Recent analyses have focused on the flow stability characteristics of a particle bed reactor (PBR). These laminar flow instabilities may exist in reactors with parallel paths and are caused by the heating of the gas at low Reynolds numbers. This phenomena can be described as follows: several parallel channels are connected at the plenum regions and are stabilized by some inlet temperature and pressure; a perturbation in one channel causes the temperature to rise and increases the gas viscosity and reduces the gas density; the pressure drop is fixed by the plenum regions, therefore, the mass flow rate in the channel would decrease; the decrease in flow reduces the ability to remove the energy added and the temperature increases; and finally, this process could continue until the fuel element fails. Several analyses based on different methods have derived similar curves to show that these instabilities may exist at low Reynolds numbers and high phi's ((Tfinal Tinitial)/Tinitial). These analyses need to be experimentally verified.

  6. Power generation by packed-bed air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2013-08-01

    Catalysts and catalyst binders are significant portions of the cost of microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. Many materials have been tested as aqueous cathodes, but air-cathodes are needed to avoid energy demands for water aeration. Packed-bed air-cathodes were constructed without expensive binders or diffusion layers using four inexpensive carbon-based materials. Cathodes made from activated carbon produced the largest maximum power density of 676±93mW/m2, followed by semi-coke (376±47mW/m2), graphite (122±14mW/m2) and carbon felt (60±43mW/m2). Increasing the mass of activated carbon and semi-coke from 5 to ≥15g significantly reduced power generation because of a reduction in oxygen transfer due to a thicker water layer in the cathode (~3 or ~6cm). These results indicate that a thin packed layer of activated carbon or semi-coke can be used to make inexpensive air-cathodes for MFCs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. On-line interrogation of pebble bed reactor fuel using passive gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwei

    The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature nuclear power reactor. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multipass fuel cycle in which graphite fuel pebbles (of varying enrichment) are randomly loaded and continuously circulated through the core until they reach their prescribed end-of-life burnup limit (˜80,000--100,000 MWD/MTU). Unlike the situation with conventional light water reactors (LWRs), depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management will be highly inaccurate. As a result, an on-line measurement approach becomes the only accurate method to assess whether a particular pebble has reached its end-of-life burnup limit. In this work, an investigation was performed to assess the feasibility of passive gamma-ray spectrometry assay as an approach for on-line interrogation of PBR fuel for the simultaneous determination of burnup and enrichment on a pebble-by-pebble basis. Due to the unavailability of irradiated or fresh pebbles, Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the gamma-ray spectra of the PBR fuel at various levels of burnup. A pebble depletion calculation was performed using the ORIGEN code, which yielded the gamma-ray source term that was introduced into the input of an MCNP simulation. The MCNP simulation assumed the use of a high-purity coaxial germanium detector. Due to the lack of one-group high temperature reactor cross sections for ORIGEN, a heterogeneous MCNP model was developed to describe a typical PBR core. Subsequently, the code MONTEBURNS was used to couple the MCNP model and ORIGEN. This approach allowed the development of the burnup-dependent, one-group spectral-averaged PBR cross sections to be used in the ORIGEN pebble depletion calculation. Based on the above studies, a relative approach for performing the measurements was established. The approach is based on using the relative activities of Np-239/I-132 in combination

  8. Liquid transportation fuels via large-scale fluidised-bed gasification of lignocellulosic biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannula, I.; Kurkela, E.

    2013-04-15

    With the objective of gaining a better understanding of the system design trade-offs and economics that pertain to biomass-to-liquids processes, 20 individual BTL plant designs were evaluated based on their technical and economic performance. The investigation was focused on gasification-based processes that enable the conversion of biomass to methanol, dimethyl ether, Fischer-Tropsch liquids or synthetic gasoline at a large (300 MWth of biomass) scale. The biomass conversion technology was based on pressurised steam/O2-blown fluidised-bed gasification, followed by hot-gas filtration and catalytic conversion of hydrocarbons and tars. This technology has seen extensive development and demonstration activities in Finland during the recent years and newly generated experimental data has also been used in our simulation models. Our study included conceptual design issues, process descriptions, mass and energy balances and production cost estimates. Several studies exist that discuss the overall efficiency and economics of biomass conversion to transportation liquids, but very few studies have presented a detailed comparison between various syntheses using consistent process designs and uniform cost database. In addition, no studies exist that examine and compare BTL plant designs using the same front-end configuration as described in this work. Our analysis shows that it is possible to produce sustainable low-carbon fuels from lignocellulosic biomass with first-law efficiency in the range of 49.6-66.7% depending on the end-product and process conditions. Production cost estimates were calculated assuming Nth plant economics and without public investment support, CO2 credits or tax assumptions. They are 58-65 euro/MWh for methanol, 58-66 euro/MWh for DME, 64-75 euro/MWh for Fischer-Tropsch liquids and 68-78 euro/MWh for synthetic gasoline. (orig.)

  9. TMI-2 core debris analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.A.; Carlson, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    One of the ongoing examination tasks for the damaged TMI-2 reactor is analysis of samples of debris obtained from the debris bed presently at the top of the core. This paper summarizes the results reported in the TMI-2 Core Debris Grab Sample Examination and Analysis Report, which will be available early in 1986. The sampling and analysis procedures are presented, and information is provided on the key results as they relate to the present core condition, peak temperatures during the transient, temperature history, chemical interactions, and core relocation. The results are then summarized

  10. Defluidization in fluidized bed gasifiers using high-alkali content fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narayan, Vikas; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2016-01-01

    samples,agglomeration could be attributed to viscous silicate melts formed from reaction of inorganic alkalineand alkali earth species with silica from the bed particles. A mathematical model that addresses the defluidization behavior of alkali-rich samples was developed based on the experiments performed...... and calcium, which may form viscous melts that adhere on the surface of the colliding bed particles and bind them to form agglomerates. In this paper, studies were made to understand the behavior of inorganic elements (mainly K, Si and Ca) on agglomeration and de-fluidization of alkali rich bed...... in the bench-scale fluidized bed reactor as well as on results from literature. The model was then used topredict the de-fluidization behavior of alkali-rich bed material in a large-scale LTCFB gasifier....

  11. Analysis of the impact of random summing on passive assay of pebble bed reactor fuel using gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Hawari, A. I.

    2007-08-01

    Pebble bed reactors (PBR) are characterized by multi-pass fuel systems in which spherical fuel pebbles are circulated through the core until they reach a proposed burnup limit. The fuel is assayed on-line to ensure that the burnup limit is not breached. However, random summing effects can impact the response of the burnup measurement system and result in distortions that degrade the accuracy of the assay results. Monte Carlo analysis was performed to estimate the magnitude and effect of random summing on the absolute and relative indicators that have been identified as usable in on-line assay. For a throughput rate of 10 5 counts/s and trapezoidal pulse shaping of the signals, the results show that absolute indicators suffer from severe distortions due to this effect. Relative indicators are found to be resistant to random summing with the deviation in the ratio of peak areas remaining less than 5-15% depending on pulse width.

  12. KUGEL: a thermal, hydraulic, fuel performance, and gaseous fission product release code for pebble bed reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamasundar, B.I.; Fehrenbach, M.E.

    1981-05-01

    The KUGEL computer code is designed to perform thermal/hydraulic analysis and coated-fuel particle performance calculations for axisymmetric pebble bed reactor (PBR) cores. This computer code was developed as part of a Department of Energy (DOE)-funded study designed to verify the published core performance data on PBRs. The KUGEL code is designed to interface directly with the 2DB code, a two-dimensional neutron diffusion code, to obtain distributions of thermal power, fission rate, fuel burnup, and fast neutron fluence, which are needed for thermal/hydraulic and fuel performance calculations. The code is variably dimensioned so that problem size can be easily varied. An interpolation routine allows variable mesh size to be used between the 2DB output and the two-dimensional thermal/hydraulic calculations

  13. Applicability of AWJ technique for dismantling reactor of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Cutting test of imitation of fuel debris and optimization of the cutting condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Shin-ichiro; Watatani, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Based on findings during recovery works that followed the accident at Three Mile Island Station 2, it is assumed that the reactor internals at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F) have complex geometries intermixed with melted fuel and confined in limited spaces. Accordingly, abrasive water jet (AWJ) cutting method is considered to be a promising technique that can be safely and reasonably used for cutting and removing reactor internals. The authors conducted tests to examine the possibility of application and to solve the problems of this technique. In the tests imitation of fuel debris and optimization of the cutting condition is used. The test result made the measures for some of the associated issues clear, and demonstrated that AWJ cutting method is assumed as one of the promising techniques for removing reactor internals. (author)

  14. Storage capacity assessment of liquid fuels production by solar gasification in a packed bed reactor using a dynamic process model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniyal, Ashok A.; Eyk, Philip J. van; Nathan, Graham J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • First analysis to assess storage requirements of a stand-alone packed bed, batch process solar gasifier. • 35 days of storage required for stand-alone solar system, whereas 8 h of storage required for hybrid system. • Sensitivity of storage requirement to reactor operation, solar region and solar multiple evaluated. - Abstract: The first multi-day performance analysis of the feasibility of integrating a packed bed, indirectly irradiated solar gasification reactor with a downstream FT liquids production facility is reported. Two fuel-loading scenarios were assessed. In one, the residual unconverted fuel at the end of a day is reused, while in the second, the residual fuel is discarded. To estimate a full year time-series of operation, a simplified statistical model was developed from short-period simulations of the 1-D heat transfer, devolatilisation and gasification chemistry model of a 150 kW th packed bed reactor (based on the authors’ earlier work). The short time-series cover a variety of solar conditions to represent seasonal, diurnal and cloud-induced solar transience. Also assessed was the influence of increasing the solar flux incident at the emitter plate of the packed bed reactor on syngas production. The combination of the annual time-series and daily model of syngas production was found to represent reasonably the seasonal transience in syngas production. It was then used to estimate the minimum syngas storage volume required to maintain a stable flow-rate and composition of syngas to a FT reactor over a full year of operation. This found that, for an assumed heliostat field collection area of 1000 m 2 , at least 64 days of storage is required, under both the Residual Fuel Re-Use and Discard scenarios. This figure was not sensitive to the two solar sites assessed, Farmington, New Mexico or Tonopah Airport, Nevada. Increasing the heliostat field collection area from 1000 to 1500 m 2 , led to an increase in the calculated daily rate

  15. Woody debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donna B. Scheungrab; Carl C. Trettin; Russ Lea; Martin F. Jurgensen

    2000-01-01

    Woody debris can be defined as any dead, woody plant material, including logs, branches, standing dead trees, and root wads. Woody debris is an important part of forest and stream ecosystems because it has a role in carbon budgets and nutrient cycling, is a source of energy for aquatic ecosystems, provides habitat for terrestrial and aquatic organisms, and contributes...

  16. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1972-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures

  17. Perchlorate remediation using packed-bed bioreactors and electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Booki

    Two pilot-scale fixed bed bioreactors were operated in continuous mode in order to treat groundwater contaminated by perchlorate. The bioreactors were constructed and operated side-by-side at the Texas Street Well Facility in Redlands, California. Each reactor was packed with either sand or plastic media. A perchlorate-reducing bacterium, Dechlorosoma sp. KJ, was used to inoculate the bioreactors. Perchlorate was successfully removed down to a non-detectable level (microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which were run either in batch or continuous mode. In batch experiments, both a pure culture (Geobactor metallireducens) and a mixed culture (wastewater inoculum) were used as the biocatalyst, and acetate was added as substrate in the anode chamber of the MFC. Power output in a membrane MFC with either inoculum was essentially the same, with 40 +/- 1 mW/m2 for G. metallireducens and 38 +/- 1 mW/m2 for mixed culture. A different type of the MFC containing a salt bridge instead of a membrane system was examined to generate power using the same substrate and pure culture as used in the membrane MFC. Power output in the salt bridge MFC was 2.2 mW/m 2. It was found that the lower power output was directly attributed to the higher internal resistance of the salt bridge system (19920 +/- 50 O) in comparison with that of the membrane system (1286 +/- 1 O). Continuous electricity generation was examined in a flat plate microbial fuel cell (FPMFC) using domestic wastewater and specific organic substrates. The FPMFC, containing a combined electrode/proton exchange membrane (PEM), was initially acclimated for one month to domestic wastewater, and then was operated as a plug flow reactor system. Power density using domestic wastewater as a substrate was 72 +/- 1 mW/m2 at a liquid flow rate of 0.39 mL/min (1.1 hr hydraulic retention time, HRT), and COD removal was 42%. At a longer HRT of 4.0 hr, the COD removal increased to 79%, and power density was 43 mW/m2. Several organic compounds

  18. CPFD simulations of an industrial-sized dual fluidized bed steam gasification system of biomass with 8 MW fuel input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, Stephan; Kirnbauer, Friedrich; Hofbauer, Hermann

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We simulated an 8 MWth steam gasification system with the CPFD code Barracuda. • The prediction of the hydrodynamics depends strongly upon the chosen drag law. • The EMMS drag law predicted best the bed material recirculation and pressure drops. • The model of the DFB plant is able to predict the operation accurately. - Abstract: Dual fluidized bed (DFB) systems for biomass gasification consist of two connected fluidized beds with a circulating bed material in between. Inside such reactor systems, rough conditions occur due to the high temperatures and the movement of the bed material. Computational fluid dynamics calculations are a useful tool for investigating fluid dynamics inside such a reactor system. In this study, an industrial-sized DFB system was simulated with the commercial code CPFD Barracuda. The DFB system is part of the combined heat and power (CHP) plant at Güssing, situated in Austria, and has a total fuel input of 8 MW_t_h. The model was set up according to geometry and operating data which allows a realistic description of the hot system in the simulation environment. Furthermore, a conversion model for the biomass particles was implemented which covers the drying and devolatilization processes. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions were considered. Since drag models have an important influence on fluidization behavior, four drag models were tested. It was found that the EMMS drag model fits best, with an error of below 20%, whereas the other drag models produced much larger errors. Based on this drag law, further simulations were conducted. The simulation model correctly predicts the different fluidization regimes and pressure drops in the reactor system. It is also able to predict the compositions of the product and flue gas, as well as the temperatures inside the reactor, with reasonable accuracy. Due to the results obtained, Barracuda seems suitable for further investigations regarding the fluid mechanics of such

  19. Preliminary experiments for the fabrication of clad for a spherical fuel for a research fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, L.A.A.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary experiments using 1100 aluminum 0,5mm thick hemispheres welded on 10mm diameter steel and ceramic spheres in order to determine a method to clad spherical fuel for a research fluidized bed nuclear reactor were studied. The processes of hot press, T.I.G. and resistance we use for welding. A qualitative compression and metalographic tests of welded pieces are performed. By the analysis of the results of the tests we conclude that the resistance welding was the best. The experimental methods and the results with their analysis are presented in the paper. (Author) [pt

  20. Optimization of process parameters in flash pyrolysis of waste tyres to liquid and gaseous fuel in a fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwin Raj, R.; Robert Kennedy, Z.; Pillai, B.C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Non-recyclable, hazards, under-utilized waste tyre was converted to useful fuel. ► Design of experiment was used to optimize the process parameters. ► Fuel compatibility for IC engines was tested by standard fuel testing procedures. ► Optimized process parameters were tested and the empirical model validated. - Abstract: Pyrolysis process offers solution to utilize huge quantity of worn out automobile tyres to produce fuel for energy needs. Shredded tyre wastes were subjected to pyrolysis at atmospheric pressure under inert gas atmosphere in a fluidized bed combustion setup. The shredded tyre particle size, the feed rate of the feed stock, and the pyrolysis temperature were varied systematically as per the designed experiment to study their influence on product yield. Maximizing the oil yield and subduing the gas and char yield is the objective to optimize the process parameters. A low pyrolysis temperature of 440 °C with low feed rate increases the residence time in the combustion reactor yielding maximum oil. The physical properties of raw pyrolysis oil, distilled oil and the evolved gases were done to find its suitability to utilize them as alternatives to the conventional fuels

  1. Modeling of marginal burning state of fire spread in live chaparral shrub fuel bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    X. Zhou; S. Mahalingam; D. Weise

    2005-01-01

    Prescribed burning in chaparral, currently used to manage wildland fuels and reduce wildfire hazard, is often conducted under marginal burning conditions. The relative importance of the fuel and environmental variables that determine fire spread success in chaparral fuels is not quantitatively understood. Based on extensive experimental study, a two-dimensional...

  2. Fire spread probabilities for experimental beds composed of mixedwood boreal forest fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.B. Dickinson; E.A. Johnson; R. Artiaga

    2013-01-01

    Although fuel characteristics are assumed to have an important impact on fire regimes through their effects on extinction dynamics, limited capabilities exist for predicting whether a fire will spread in mixedwood boreal forest surface fuels. To improve predictive capabilities, we conducted 347 no-wind, laboratory test burns in surface fuels collected from the mixed-...

  3. Effects of operating conditions and fuel properties on emission performance and combustion efficiency of a swirling fluidized-bed combustor fired with a biomass fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprianov, Vladimir I.; Kaewklum, Rachadaporn; Chakritthakul, Songpol

    2011-01-01

    This work reports an experimental study on firing 80 kg/h rice husk in a swirling fluidized-bed combustor (SFBC) using an annular air distributor as the swirl generator. Two NO x emission control techniques were investigated in this work: (1) air staging of the combustion process, and (2) firing rice husk as moisturized fuel. In the first test series for the air-staged combustion, CO, NO and C x H y emissions and combustion efficiency were determined for burning 'as-received' rice husk at fixed excess air of 40%, while secondary-to-primary air ratio (SA/PA) was ranged from 0.26 to 0.75. The effects of SA/PA on CO and NO emissions from the combustor were found to be quite weak, whereas C x H y emissions exhibited an apparent influence of air staging. In the second test series, rice husks with the fuel-moisture content of 8.4% to 35% were fired at excess air varied from 20% to 80%, while the flow rate of secondary air was fixed. Radial and axial temperature and gas concentration (O 2 , CO, NO) profiles in the reactor, as well as CO and NO emissions, are discussed for the selected operating conditions. The temperature and gas concentration profiles for variable fuel quality exhibited significant effects of both fuel-moisture and excess air. As revealed by experimental results, the emission of NO from this SFBC can be substantially reduced through moisturizing rice husk, while CO is effectively mitigated by injection of secondary air into the bed splash zone, resulting in a rather low emission of CO and high (over 99%) combustion efficiency of the combustor for the ranges of operating conditions and fuel properties.

  4. Modeling and Application of Pneumatic Conveying for Spherical Fuel Element in Pebble-Bed Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shuyong; Wang Junsan; Wang Yuding; Cai Ruizhong; Zhang Xuan; Cao Jianting

    2014-01-01

    The fuel handling system is an important system for on-load refueling in pebble-bed modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. A dynamic model of pneumatic conveying for spherical fuel element in fuel handling system was established to describe the pneumatically conveying process. The motion characteristics of fuel elements in pipeline and the effect of fuel elements on gas velocity were studied using the model. The results show that the theoretical analyses are consistent with the experimental. The research has been used in developing full scope simulator for pebble-bed modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, also provides references for the design and optimization of the fuel handling system. (author)

  5. [Fire behavior of Mongolian oak leaves fuel bed under no-wind and zero-slope conditions. II. Analysis of the factors affecting flame length and residence time and related prediction models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Li; Liu, Bo-Fei; Di, Xue-Ying; Chu, Teng-Fei; Jin, Sen

    2012-11-01

    Taking fuel moisture content, fuel loading, and fuel bed depth as controlling factors, the fuel beds of Mongolian oak leaves in Maoershan region of Northeast China in field were simulated, and a total of one hundred experimental burnings under no-wind and zero-slope conditions were conducted in laboratory, with the effects of the fuel moisture content, fuel loading, and fuel bed depth on the flame length and its residence time analyzed and the multivariate linear prediction models constructed. The results indicated that fuel moisture content had a significant negative liner correlation with flame length, but less correlation with flame residence time. Both the fuel loading and the fuel bed depth were significantly positively correlated with flame length and its residence time. The interactions of fuel bed depth with fuel moisture content and fuel loading had significant effects on the flame length, while the interactions of fuel moisture content with fuel loading and fuel bed depth affected the flame residence time significantly. The prediction model of flame length had better prediction effect, which could explain 83.3% of variance, with a mean absolute error of 7.8 cm and a mean relative error of 16.2%, while the prediction model of flame residence time was not good enough, which could only explain 54% of variance, with a mean absolute error of 9.2 s and a mean relative error of 18.6%.

  6. Research on removal technologies of fuel debris and in-vessel structures using laser light (1). Research plan and research activities on FY2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu; Yamada, Tomonori; Hanari, Toshihide; Takebe, Toshihiko; Matsunaga, Yukihiro

    2013-08-01

    In decommissioning works of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants, it is required that fuel debris solidifying mixed materials of fuels and in-vessel structures should be removed. The fuel debris is considered to have characteristics, such as indefinite shapes, porous bodies, multi-compositions, higher hardness, etc. from the knowledge in decommissioning process of the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant. Laser lights are characterized by higher power density, local processability, remote controllability, etc. and can be performed thermal cutting and crushing-up for various materials which does not depend on fracture toughness. This report describes a research program and research activities in FY2012 aiming at developing removal system of fuel debris by the use of laser lights. Main results obtained from research activities in FY2012 are as follows: (1) Improvements of experimental infrastructures. A beam switching unit for an existing fiber laser system, an x-y-z tri-axes robot system to investigate remote control performances, and a particle image velocimetry (PIV) system for quantitation of assist gas flow characteristics were introduced to the experimental laboratory of our Applied Laser Technology Institute in Tsuruga. (2) Laser cutting performances for thick metal plates. To quantify laser cutting performance for thick metal plates of in-vessel structures, after the evaluation of the relationship between the kerf depth and amount of laser irradiation energy to the metal test piece, we evaluated for heat transfer behavior due to temperature measurement of thick metal plate on the laser cutting process. It is suggested that the heat diffusion into the cutting object can affect the heat input efficiency of the laser irradiation energy to kerf front. On the viewpoint of suppressing this thermal diffusion, it was found that it is important in improving the laser cutting performance to increase the ejection of molten metal by the assist gas, and to optimize

  7. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of an annular fuel element: The Achilles' heel of the particle bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dibben, M.J.; Tuttle, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The low pressure nuclear thermal propulsion (LPNTP) concept offers significant improvements in rocket engine specific impulse over rockets employment chemical propulsion. This study investigated a parametric thermal-hydraulic analysis of an annular fueld element, also referred to as a fuel pipe, using the computer code ATHENA (Advanced Thermal Hydraulic Energy Network Analyzer). The fuelpipe is an annular particle bed fuel element of the reactor with radially inward flow of hydrogen through the element. In this study, the outlet temperature of the hydrogen is parametrically related to key effects, including the reactor power at two different pressure drops, the effect of power coupling for in-core testing, and the effect of hydrogen flow rates. Results show that the temperature is linearly related to the reactor power, but not to pressure drop, and that cross flow inside the fuelpipe occurs at approximately 0.3 percent of the radial flow rates

  8. Fluidized-bed combustion of refuse-derived fuels; Verbrennung von Ersatzbrennstoff in der Wirbelschicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbrecht, D.; Wolff, H.-J.; Matzmohr, R. [Universitaet Rostock (Germany). Institut fuer Energie und Umwelttechnik

    2004-07-01

    The experiments in the SWSF DN 400 test facility were to prove that combustion in a stationary, bubbling fluidized bed is an economically and ecologically feasible technology for treating the high-calorific fractions of waste materials conditioned in a mechanical and biological treatment system. This comprised the following tasks: Proof of the long-term suitability and availability of the selected fluidized-bed process; Reduction or prevention of emissions by primary, in-process measures in accordance with the specifications of the German Nuisance Control Ordinance (17. BImSchV); No secondary (additive) off-gas purification stages apart from a mechanical dedusting stage. The combustion off-gas of the fluidized-bed combustor were used for heat and power generation in a steam generator connected in series with the furnace. (orig.)

  9. Fluidized-bed calcination of LWR fuel-reprocessing HLLW: requirements and potential for off-gas cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Fluidized-bed solidification (calcination) was developed on a pilot scale for a variety of simulated LWR high-level liquid-waste (HLLW) and blended high-level and intermediate-level liquid-waste (ILLW) compositions. It has also been demonstrated with ICPP fuel-reprocessing waste since 1963 in the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at gross feed rates of 5 to 12 m 3 /day. A fluidized-bed calciner produces a relatively large volume of off-gas. A calciner solidifying 6 m 3 /day of liquid waste would generate about 13 standard m 3 /min of off-gas containing 10 to 20 g of entrained solids per standard m 3 of off-gas. Use of an off-gas system similar to that of the WCF could provide an overall process decontamination factor for particulates of about 2 x 10 10 . A potential advantage of fluidized-bed calcination over other solidification methods is the ability to control ruthenium volatilization from the calciner at less than 0.01% by calcining at 500 0 C or above. Use of an off-gas system similar to that of the WCF would provide an overall process decontamination factor for volatile ruthenium of greater than 1.6 x 10 7

  10. Preliminary design study of pebble bed reactor HTR-PM base using once-through-then-out fuel recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topan Setiadipura; Jupiter S Pane; Zuhair

    2016-01-01

    Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is one of the advanced reactor type implementing strong passive safety feature. In this type of design has the potential to do a cogeneration useful for the treatment of various minerals in various islands in Indonesia. The operation of the PBR can be simplified by implementing once-through-then-out (OTTO) fuel recirculation scheme in which pebble fuel only pass the core once time. The purpose of this research is to understand quantitative influence of the changing of fuel element recirculation on the PBR core performance and to find preliminary optimization design of PBR type reactor with OTTO recirculation scheme. PEBBED software was used to find PBR equilibrium core. The calculation result gives quantitative data on the impact of implementing a different fuel recirculation, especially using OTTO scheme. Furthermore, an early optimized PBR design based on HTR-PM using OTTO scheme was obtained where the power must be downgraded into 115 MWt in order to preserve the safety feature. The simplicity of the reactor operation and the reduction of reactor component with OTTO scheme still make this early optimized design an interesting alternative design, despite its power reduction from the reference design. (author)

  11. Optimized core design and fuel management of a pebble-bed type nuclear reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, B.

    2009-01-01

    The core design of a pebble-bed type Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is optimized, aiming for an increase of the coolant outlet temperature to 1000 C, while retaining its inherent safety features. The VHTR has been selected by the international Generation IV research initiative as one of the

  12. Space Debris & its Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Sourabh; Arora, Nishant

    2012-07-01

    : In this technique we will use the nano tubes. We will create a mesh that will act as a touch panel of the touch screen cell phone. When any small or tiny particle will come on this mesh and touch it then the mesh will act as a touch panel and so that the corresponding processor or sensor will come to know the co-ordinates of it then further by using Destructive laser beam we can destroy that particle. B. Use of the Nano tubes and Nano Bots for the collection of the Space Debris: In this method also we will use a nano mesh which is made up of the nano tubes and the corresponding arrangement will be done so that that mesh will act as a touch panel same as that of the touch screen phones. So when tiny particles will dash on the nano mesh then the Nano Bots which will be at the specific co-ordinates collect the particles and store them into the garbage storage. C. Further the space Debris can be use for the other purposes too:- As we know that the space debris can be any tiny particle in the space. So instead of decomposing that particles or destroying it we can use those particles for the purpose of energy production by using the fuel cells, but for this the one condition is that the particle material should be capable of forming the ionize liquid or solution which can be successfully use in the fuel cell for energy production. But this is useful for only the big projects where in smallest amount of energy has also the great demand or value. D. RECYCLING OF SPACE DEBRIS The general idea of making space structures by recycling space debris is to capture the aluminum of the upper stages, melt it, and form it into new aluminum structures, perhaps by coating the inside of inflatable balloons, to make very large structures of thin aluminum shells. CONCLUSION Space debris has become the topic of great concern in recent years. Space debris creation can't be stopped completely but it can be minimized by adopting some measures. Many methods of space debris mitigation have been

  13. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels; Kloorattujen orgaanisten yhdisteiden muodostuminen kierraetyspolttoaineiden leijukerrospoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesterinen, R.; Kallio, M.; Kirjalainen, T.; Kolsi, A.; Merta, M. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  14. Reduced bed temperature at thermo-chemical conversion of difficult fuels; Saenkt baeddtemperatur vid termokemisk omvandling av svaara braenslen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niklasson, Fredrik; Haraldsson, Conny; Johansson, Andreas; Claesson, Frida; Baefver, Linda; Ryde, Daniel

    2010-05-15

    This work investigates the prospect of reducing the concentrations of alkali chlorides in the flue gas by lowering the temperature in the bottom zone of a fluidized bed (FB) furnace below the often used 850 deg C. The directive of a retention time of at least two seconds above 850 deg C is fulfilled by the raise of the flue gas temperature that follows the combustion of unburned gases at the point of injection of secondary and tertiary air, above the bottom bed zone. The aim of the present experiments is to determine the dependency between the temperature and the amount of alkali metals leaving the bottom bed for some selected waste and biomass fuels. The results are intended for plant owners as well as boiler manufacturers. The experiments were performed in an FB-reactor, which was externally heated to specific temperatures between 550 and 850 deg C. The reactor is made of a quartz glass tube with an inner diameter of 60 mm and a length of 1.2 m. The fluidized bed rests upon a porous plate of sintered quartz. The bed material used was 180 gram purified sea sand with particle sizes between 0.1 and 0.3 mm. The fluidizing gas was a mixture of nitrogen and air, introduced in the bottom of the reactor by mass flow controllers. At the outlet of the reactor, the flue gas was divided between conventional gas analyzers and an ICP-MS instrument. The gas flow to the ICP-MS instrument was cooled before a slip stream was sucked out via a capillary to a nebulizer from which the sample gas was led to the ICP-MS instrument. The function of the nebulizer is normally to form an aerosol of liquids, but here it was used solely as a pump. In addition, a known flow of krypton was added into the nebulizer to be used as an internal standard. The novel technique to measure the amount of alkali metals on-line from a batch fired FB-reactor has been shown to work in practice and to provide interesting results, which so far is qualitative only. Further development and calibration work is

  15. Fluidized bed furnace for coating nuclear fuel and/or breeder material cores. Wirbelschichtofen zur Beschichtung von nuklearen Brennstoff- und/oder Brutstoffkernen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnert, E; Ringel, H; Schmitz, H; Zimmer, E

    1982-10-21

    The insulation of the fluidized bed chamber is divided into two parts, where the inner part can have a mechanical load on it, while the outer part has a low thermal conductivity. The latter makes it possible to use cooling gases, instead of water, for cooling the fluidized bed furnace. The cooling gas has no effect on the critical mass to be taken into account in dimensioning the volume of the fluidized bed, and the quantity of fuel and/or breeder material can be increased by about 20 times in the fluidized bed chamber, compared with the water-cooled fluidized bed furnace. For safety reasons, particularly in order to reduce the fire danger if there is a fault, inert gases, for example nitrogen, carbon dioxide etc. are preferred as cooling gases.

  16. Application of fluidized bed combustor for use of low grade and waste fuels in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wert, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    In a span of less that 15 years, CFB combustion technology has progressed from a concept to a demonstrated capability of providing clean, reliable energy from low-cost, low-grade fuels. In fact, one of the major advantages of CFB technology is its ability to burn fuels with high moisture, high ash and high sulfur levels, allowing the users the option of using inexpensive open-quotes opportunityclose quotes fuels. CFB technology has demonstrated reliable operation while burning low-grade, easily available fuels which other combustion technologies, preclude or cannot easily accommodate (such as peat, waste coals, sludges, municipal wastes and lignite). The CFB units can be designed to burn a wide range of different fuels, alone or in combination. This capability allows the user to take advantage of various fuel supplies to lower operating costs while still complying with ever increasing environmental regulations. This paper will review the evolution and experience of CFB technology and discuss the operating history of the first culm-fired (anthracite mine tailings) power plant. The development of opportunity-fueled power plants has been associated with the establishment of the Independent Power Industry in the United States. Traditional utilities have relied on premium fuels (oil, natural gas, coal and nuclear) due to availability and the ability to pass fuel costs through to consumers. With the development of privatized power plants, more emphasis has been placed on fixing fuel costs over the life of the plant to minimize investor risk. An analogy can be drawn between the growth of the Independent Power Industry in the United States over the last ten years with the need for capacity in many Developing Countries today

  17. Three phase Eulerian-granular model applied on numerical simulation of non-conventional liquid fuels combustion in a bubbling fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemoda Stevan Đ.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a two-dimensional CFD model of liquid fuel combustion in bubbling fluidized bed. The numerical procedure is based on the two-fluid Euler-Euler approach, where the velocity field of the gas and particles are modeled in analogy to the kinetic gas theory. The model is taking into account also the third - liquid phase, as well as its interaction with the solid and gas phase. The proposed numerical model comprise energy equations for all three phases, as well as the transport equations of chemical components with source terms originated from the component conversion. In the frame of the proposed model, user sub-models were developed for heterogenic fluidized bed combustion of liquid fuels, with or without water. The results of the calculation were compared with experiments on a pilot-facility (power up to 100 kW, combusting, among other fuels, oil. The temperature profiles along the combustion chamber were compared for the two basic cases: combustion with or without water. On the basis of numerical experiments, influence of the fluid-dynamic characteristics of the fluidized bed on the combustion efficiency was analyzed, as well as the influence of the fuel characteristics (reactivity, water content on the intensive combustion zone. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR33042: Improvement of the industrial fluidized bed facility, in scope of technology for energy efficient and environmentally feasible combustion of various waste materials in fluidized bed

  18. Risk analysis methodology for unreprocessed spent fuel disposal in bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepping, R.E.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Cranwell, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    In accordance with the decision to defer the reprocessing of commercially generated spent fuel, we are investigating the implications on risk of direct disposal of spent fuel assemblies. To the extent possible, we are using the methodology developed at Sandia for the NRC to evaluate risks from the disposal of wastes from reprocessing of spent fuel. This allows direct comparison of the risks calculated for the two waste forms. A number of differences between the two waste forms with implications on risk have been identified and investigation of their effects has begun. Among these are the presence of gases and additional plutonium and uranium isotopes, the potential for differing leach behavior, and the difference in the decay heat source which determines the overall thermomechanical response of the host media. We have analyzed a number of scenarios for a hypothetical geologic repository that have been identified as important contributors to risk from the disposal of both reprocessed and unreprocessed spent fuel. For each scenario, we employ the Groundwater Transport, Pathways to Man, and Dosimetry and Health Effects models of the High Level Waste Methodology. Risks are compared for the reprocessed and unreprocessed spent fuel wastes and the effects of uncertainty in the parameters of the various models are compared

  19. Retrieval system for emplaced spent unreprocessed fuel (SURF) in salt bed depository. Baseline concept criteria specifications and mechanical failure probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, E.E.; McCleery, J.E.

    1979-05-01

    One of the integral elements of the Nuclear Waste Management Program is the material handling task of retrieving Canisters containing spent unreprocessed fuel from their emplacement in a deep geologic salt bed Depository. A study of the retrieval concept data base predicated this report. In this report, alternative concepts for the tasks are illustrated and critiqued, a baseline concept in scenario form is derived and basic retrieval subsystem specifications are presented with cyclic failure probabilities predicted. The report is based on the following assumptions: (a) during retrieval, a temporary radiation seal is placed over each Canister emplacement; (b) a sleeve, surrounding the Canister, was initially installed during the original emplacement; (c) the emplacement room's physical and environmental conditions established in this report are maintained while the task is performed

  20. Improving fuel quality by whole crude oil hydrotreating: A kinetic model for hydrodeasphaltenization in a trickle bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarullah, A.T.; Mujtaba, I.M.; Wood, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Asphaltene contaminant must be removed to a large extent from the fuel to meet the regulatory demand. ► Kinetics for hydrodeasphaltenization are estimated via experimentation and modeling. ► Using the kinetic parameters, a full process model for the trickle bed reactor (TBR) is developed. ► The model is used for simulating the behavior of the TBR to get further insight of the process. ► The influences of operating conditions in the hydrodeasphaltenization process are reported. -- Abstract: Fossil fuel is still a predominant source of the global energy requirement. Hydrotreating of whole crude oil has the ability to increase the productivity of middle distillate fractions and improve the fuel quality by simultaneously reducing contaminants such as sulfur, nitrogen, vanadium, nickel and asphaltene to the levels required by the regulatory bodies. Hydrotreating is usually carried out in a trickle bed reactor (TBR) where hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), hydrodemetallization (HDM) and hydrodeasphaltenization (HDAs) reactions take place simultaneously. To develop a detailed and a validated TBR process model which can be used for design and optimization of the hydrotreating process, it is essential to develop kinetic models for each of these reactions. Most recently, the authors have developed kinetic models for all of these chemical reactions except that of HDAs. In this work, a kinetic model (in terms of kinetic parameters) for the HDAs reaction in the TBR is developed. A three phase TBR process model incorporating the HDAs reactions with unknown kinetic parameters is developed. Also, a series of experiments has been conducted in an isothermal TBR under different operating conditions affecting the removal of asphaltene. The unknown kinetic parameters are then obtained by applying a parameter estimation technique based on minimization of the sum of square errors (SSEs) between the experimental and predicted concentrations of

  1. Advanced air staging techniques to improve fuel flexibility, reliability and emissions in fluidized bed co-combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aamand, Lars-Erik; Leckner, Bo [Chalmers Technical Univ., Goeteborg (Sweden); Luecke, Karsten; Werther, Joachim [Technical Univ. of Hamburg-Harburg (Germany)

    2001-12-01

    A joint research project between the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg and Chalmers Technical University. For operation under co-combustion the following results should be considered: The high ash content of the sewage sludge results in significantly increased ash flows. Although high alkali metal concentrations are found in the sewage sludge ash, no critical concentrations were reached and tendencies to fouling were not observed. The trace metal input rises with increased sludge fraction. However, emissions of metal compounds were well below legal limits. The trace metals tend to accumulate on the fly ash. In general, very low fuel nitrogen conversions to NO and N{sub 2}O of 2 - 4 % are achievable. With coal as a base fuel alternative air staging with secondary air supply after solids separation attains even lower NO emissions than normal staging without strongly affecting CO and SO{sub 2} emissions. Alternative staging also reduces N{sub 2}O emissions. An optimum for the excess air ratio in the riser of 1.05 was found for a total excess air ratio of 1.2. The higher the volatile content of the fuel is, the less effective the NO reduction due to air staging becomes. The measurements suggest that the optimum gas residence time regarding the emissions in CFB combustors is around 6 to 7 s. These times are achieved in commercial scale plants due to their large cyclones that perhaps partly can replace a large afterburner chamber. The circulating fluidized bed boiler can be operated in a very flexible way with various fuel mixtures up to an energy fraction of sludge of 25% without exceeding legal emission limits.

  2. Development and application of an actively controlled hybrid proton exchange membrane fuel cell - Lithium-ion battery laboratory test-bed based on off-the-shelf components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yufit, V.; Brandon, N.P. [Dept. Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    The use of commercially available components enables rapid prototyping and assembling of laboratory scale hybrid test-bed systems, which can be used to evaluate new hybrid configurations. The development of such a test-bed using an off-the-shelf PEM fuel cell, lithium-ion battery and DC/DC converter is presented here, and its application to a hybrid configuration appropriate for an unmanned underwater vehicle is explored. A control algorithm was implemented to regulate the power share between the fuel cell and the battery with a graphical interface to control, record and analyze the electrochemical and thermal parameters of the system. The results demonstrate the applicability of the test-bed and control algorithm for this application, and provide data on the dynamic electrical and thermal behaviour of the hybrid system. (author)

  3. Development of debris resistant bottom end piece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Kyung; Sohn, Dong Seong; Yim, Jeong Sik; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Song, Kee Nam; Oh, Dong Seok; Rhu, Ho Sik; Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Seong Soo; Oh, Jong Myung

    1993-12-01

    Debris-related fuel failures have been identified as one of the major causes of fuel failures. In order to reduce the possibility of debris-related fuel failures, it is necessary to develop Debris-Resistant Bottom End Piece. For this development, mechanical strength test and pressure drop test were performed, and the test results were analyzed. And the laser cutting, laser welding and electron beam welding technology, which were the core manufacturing technology of DRBEP, were developed. Final design were performed, and the final drawing and specifications were prepared. The prototype of DRBEP was manufactured according to the developed munufacturing procedure. (Author)

  4. Preconceptual design of a packed fluidized bed blanket for a fission suppressed thorium-fueled CTHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, J.W.H.; Karbowski, J.S.; Chapin, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a thorium-fueled PFB blanket concept for a Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor. A preliminary mechanical concept is presented and the results of neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and economics analyses are discussed. Futher work needed to design and advance the concept is recommended

  5. Nitrogen compounds in pressurised fluidised bed gasification of biomass and fossil fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, W.

    2005-01-01

    Fossil fuels still dominate the energy supply in modern societies. The resources, however, are depleting. Therefore, other energy sources are to be exploited further within this century. Biomass is one of the practically CO2 neutral, renewable contributors to the future energy production. Nowadays

  6. Design of adiabatic fixed-bed reactors for the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas. Application to production of methanol and hydrogen-for-fuel-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smet, de C.R.H.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Berger, R.J.; Marin, G.B.M.M.; Schouten, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Adiabatic fixed-bed reactors for the catalytic partial oxidn. (CPO) of methane to synthesis gas were designed at conditions suitable for the prodn. of methanol and hydrogen-for-fuel-cells. A steady-state, one-dimensional heterogeneous reactor model was applied in the simulations. Intra-particle

  7. Development of a system for rapid discharge of spherical fuel elements as a diversitary afterheat removal system for pebble-bed HTR-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phlippen, P.W.

    1982-07-01

    Owing to its spherical fuel elements the pebble bed high temperature reactor provides the possibility to remove these fuel elements rapidly from the reactor for the purpose of after-heat removal and cooling in situations of danger and to collect them in easily cooled tanks. The paper investigates and represents fields of problems such as critically behaviour of core and fuel element collecting tanks, emission time of the core, thermodynamics in the vessel etc. by example of the PNP-500 reactor concept. A selection for the construction proposal was made from the performance possibilities of the three necessary main components prestressed-concrete vessel closure, fuel element guide and fuel element storage with cooling system. The proposal includes a prestressed concrete vessel closure opening by hydraulics as well as three annular fuel element storage modules cooled with the containment air by natural convection. (orig.) [de

  8. National waste terminal storage repository in a bedded salt formation for spent unreprocessed fuel. Volume I. Conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    In February 1976, the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), now the Department of Energy (DOE), established a National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. As a part of this program, two parallel conceptual design efforts were initiated in January 1977. One was for deep geologic storage, in domed salt, of high level waste resulting from the reprocessing of spent fuel. The other was for deep geologic storage of unreprocessed spent fuel in bedded salt. These two concepts are identified as NWTS Repository 1 and Repository 2, respectively. Repository 2 (NWTSR2) is the concept which is covered by this Conceptual Design Report. Volume I of the conceptual design report contains the following information: physical description of the report; project purpose and justification; principal safety, fire, and health hazards; environmental impact considerations; quality assurance considerations; assessment of operational interfaces; assessment of research and development interfaces; project schedule; proposed method of accomplishment; summary cost estimate; and outline specifications. The conceptual design for Repository 2 was developed in sufficient detail to permit determination of scope, engineering feasibility, schedule, and cost estimates, all of which are necessary for planning and budgeting the project

  9. Biodiesel fuel production with solid amorphous-zirconia catalysis in fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Satoshi; Matsuhashi, Hiromi; Arata, Kazushi

    2006-01-01

    Amorphous zirconia catalysts, titanium-, aluminum-, and potassium-doped zirconias, were prepared and evaluated in the transesterification of soybean oil with methanol at 250 deg. C, and the esterification of n-octanoic acid with methanol at 175-200 deg. C. Titanium- and aluminum-doped zirconias are promising solid catalysts for the production of biodiesel fuels from soybean oil because of their high performance, with over 95% conversion in both of the esterifications

  10. Fluidized bed combustion of refuse-derived fuel in presence of protective coal ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer, Eduardo [CIRCE, Universidad de Zaragoza, Maria de Luna, 3, Zaragoza (Spain); Aho, Martti [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1603, 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Silvennoinen, Jaani; Nurminen, Riku-Ville [Kvaerner Power, P.O.Box 109, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2005-12-15

    Combustion of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) alone or together with other biomass leads to superheater fouling and corrosion in efficient power plants (with high steam values) due to vaporization and condensation of alkali chlorides. In this study, means were found to raise the portion of RDF to 40% enb without risk to boilers. This was done by co-firing RDF with coal and optimizing coal quality. Free aluminum silicate in coal captured alkalies from vaporized alkali chlorides preventing Cl condensation to superheaters. Strong fouling and corrosion were simultaneously averted. Results from 100 kW and 4 MW CFB reactors are reported. (author)

  11. Research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated in a test-bed bus. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-30

    This project, the research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated into test-bed buses, began as a multi-phase U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project in 1989. Phase I had a goal of developing two competing half-scale (25 kW) brassboard phosphoric acid fuel cell systems. An air-cooled and a liquid-cooled fuel cell system were developed and tested to verify the concept of using a fuel cell and a battery in a hybrid configuration wherein the fuel cell supplies the average power required for operating the vehicle and a battery supplies the `surge` or excess power required for acceleration and hill-climbing. Work done in Phase I determined that the liquid-cooled system offered higher efficiency.

  12. Results concerning a clean co-combustion technology of waste biomass with fossil fuel, in a pilot fluidised bed combustion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionel, Ioana; Trif-Tordai, Gavril; Ungureanu, Corneliu; Popescu, Francisc; Lontis, Nicolae [Politehnica Univ. Timisoara (Romania). Faculty for Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The research focuses on a facility, the experimental results, interpretation and future plans concerning a new developed technology of using waste renewable energy by applying the cocombustion of waste biomass with coal, in a fluidised bed system. The experimental facility is working entirely in accordance to the allowed limits for the exhaust flue gas concentration, with special concern for typical pollutants. The experiments conclude that the technology is cleaner, has as main advantage the possibility to reduce both the SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} exhaust in comparison to standard fossil fuel combustion, under comparable circumstances. The combustion is occurring in a stable fluidised bed. (orig.)

  13. Governing equations for heat and mass transfer in heat-generating porous beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, T.C.; Pedersen, D.R.; Minkowycz, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Upon dryout of the bed, the dominant modes of heat transfer are conduction and radiation. Radiation is modeled through the Rosseland approximation. The melting of stainless-steel particulate imbedded in the fuel is modeled by assuming the bed to be a continuum with conduction and radiation as the dominant modes of heat transfer. The molten steel, after it drains to the bottom of the bed, is assumed to disappear into cracks and mortar joints of the MgO bricks. The melting of fuel in the interior of the bed is modeled identically to the steel particulate, except for the bed settling which is more pronounced in the case of fuel melting and is assumed to be instantaneous owing to the significant weight of overlying bed and sodium pool. The molten layer of fuel, as it collects at the bottom of the bed, causes the heatup of the MgO lining to the eutectic temperature (2280 0 C), and the MgO lining begins to dissolve. The density gradient caused by the dissolution of MgO leads to natural convection and mixing in the molten layer. The submerged fuel particulate also begins to dissolve in the molten solution and ultimately leads to the conversion of debris to a molten pool of fuel and MgO. The process of penetration of the MgO lining continues until the mixing process lowers the concentration of fuel in the volume of the pool to the level where the internal heat rate per unit volume is not enough to keep the body of the pool molten and leads to freezing in the cooler part of the pool. As the molten pool reaches a frozen or a quiescent state, the MgO brick lining thickness provided is deemed 'safe' for a given bed loading and the external rate of cooling. (author)

  14. Study on the Calculation of Pebble-Bed Reactor Multiplication Factor As a Function of Fuel Kernel Radius at Various Enrichments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuhair; Suwoto

    2009-01-01

    Main characteristics of PBR comes from utilization of coated particle fuels dispersed in pebble fuels . Because of vibration, fuel kernel can be grouped into cluster and in these cases, neutronic characteristics of pebble fuel significantly changes . In this study, cluster is modeled structural form consisting of uniform cubic cells with eight neighborhood TRISO particles . Neutronic characteristics was investigated by calculating pebble-bed reactor multiplication factor as a function of fuel kernel radius at various enrichments . The calculation results using MCNP5 code with ENDF/BVI neutron library show that k eff value depends on the average fuel radius and reaches its minimum when all kernels have the same radius, i.e. 0.0280 cm . With this radius, the total kernel surface area achieves maximum value . The dependence of k eff on fuel kernel radius decreases in relation to the increase in uranium enrichment . However, k eff value is not affected by fuel kernel radius when the uranium is 100% enriched . From these result, it can be concluded that, exception of uranium enrichment, the selection of fuel kernel radius should be considered thoroughly in designing a PBR, since this parameter provides significant influences on neutronic characteristics of the reactor. (author)

  15. Preliminary studies of lignocellulosics and waste fuels for fixed bed gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olgun, H [Marmara Research Center, Kocaeli (Turkey). Energy Systems and Environmental Research Institute; Dogru, M; Howarth, C R [University of Newcastle (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical and Process Engineering; Malik, A A [University of Northumbria, Newcastle (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical and Life Science

    2001-07-01

    This study was carried out to understand the decomposition behaviour of a range of biofuel and waste feedstock during gasification in a downdraft gasifier. A laboratory scale large sample thermogravimetric analyser (LSTA) is used which allows the data on burn-out characteristics of different fuel particles to be measured under agitated conditions. The conditions chosen simulate the combustion behaviour in a gasifier for a range of biofuels and wastes, namely hazelnut, pistachio, and peanut shells, wood chips and sewage sludge pellets. From this data the activation energy is calculated for a heating rate of 20{sup o}C/min. It was found that, as the weight loss increases, the activation energy decreases. In addition the influence of a range of gasification air/N{sub 2} levels on constituents of the gas released during hazelnut shell decomposition was observed. It was found that the composition of the product gases consisted of CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. This was analysed as function of time for hazelnut shells showing that the primary products are H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}. (author)

  16. National waste terminal storage repository in a bedded salt formation for spent unreprocessed fuel. Quality assurance program for licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    A National Waste Terminal Storage Repository, in bedded salt, for spent unreprocessed fuel is the subject of a conceptual design project which began in January 1977. This volume presents a preliminary quality assurance program to guide the license applicant in developing a detailed program that will be compatible with anticipated National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTSR2) contracting arrangements and provide the documentation required by regulatory bodies. This QA program is designed to provide confidence that the quality-related activities pertaining to safety-related structures, systems, and components will be identified and controlled. Specific responsibilities for quality-related activities are documented and assigned to personnel and organizations for the major phases of facility design and construction. These responsibilities encompass a broad range of activities and are addressed in this preliminary program. The quality assurance program elements are organized and discussed herein as follows: (1) quality assurance during design and construction; (2) the applicant (DOE); (3) siting contractor; (4) architect/engineer; (5) project field management; and (6) operations contractor

  17. Process for dosing fuels, especially baking fuels, into a fluidized-bed reactor, and process for operating such a device. Verfahren zur Dosierung von, insbesondere backenden, Brennstoffen in einen Wirbelschichtreaktor sowie Verfahren zum Betreiben einer solchen Vorrichtung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, W.; Juengten, H.; Heek, K.H. van; Kirchhoff, R.; Wagener, H.

    1983-03-24

    A device for the controlled addition of fuels especially baking fuels into a fluidized-bed reactor is equipped with a jet pipe for the fuel transport which ends within the fluidized-bed reactor in a jet nozzle and is sheathed by a jacket pipe which ends in a cap jet and is filled with a fluid (jacket fluid); the jacket pipe is interrupted by the jet cap and the interruption is bypassed by a heat exchanger pipe (heat exchanger) which is preferably arranged within the fluidized-bed reactor. The part of the jet pipe which is near the jet nozzle can be surrounded by an annular gap nozzle for the jacket fluid bypassing the interruption in direction of the heat exchanger. In a mixing chamber loading materials for the fuel can be introduced and dissolved in the jacket fluid before it enters the cap jet. The fuel transport can be clock-controlled, e.g. by a control triangle. (orig.).

  18. Cofiring of difficult fuels: The effect of Ca-based sorbents on the gas chemistry in fluidised bed combustion; Kalsiumpohjaisten lisaeaineiden vaikutus leijukerrospolton kaasukemiaan vaikeiden polttoaineiden sekapoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeijaelae, M.; Partanen, J.; Fabritius, M.; Elo, T.; Virta, A.K. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this project is to establish the effects of Ca-based sorbents on sulphur, halogen and alkaline chemistry in fluidised bed combustion of difficult fuels, and to find out any restrictions on the use of these sorbents. The aim is to acquire sufficient knowledge to ensure the operational reliability of power plants and to minimise the emissions and costs of flue gas cleaning. The results enable the owner to anticipate necessary changes associated with slagging, fouling and emission control in the existing power plants, when there are plans to increase the range of fuels used. (orig.)

  19. Burnup analysis of a peu a peu fuel-loading scheme in a pebble bed reactor using the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwanto, Dwi; Obara, Toru

    2010-01-01

    The design of a pebble bed reactor can be simplified by removing the unloading device from the system. For this reactor design, a suitable fuel-loading scheme is the peu a peu (little by little) fueling scheme. In the peu a peu mode, there is no unloading device; as such, the fuels are never discharged and remain at the bottom of the core during reactor operation. This means that the burnup cycle and reactivity is controlled by the addition of fuel. In this study, the Monte Carlo method is used to perform calculations with high accuracy. However, the calculation procedures for the peu a peu mode using the Monte Carlo method require lot of steps. Therefore, a computer code to automate the process of the peu a peu fuel-loading scheme based on the Monte Carlo MVP/MVP-BURN code has been developed using Fortran. Using the method developed in this study, burnup characteristics for a reference design of a small 20-MW pebble bed reactor with the peu a peu concept were analyzed. (author)

  20. Experimental study on fuel oil combustion in circulating fluidized bed; Estudio experimental sobre la combustion de combustoleo en lecho fluidizado circulante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Rangel, Ricardo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    The Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) developed a circulating fluidized bed combustor of 0.5 thermal MW unique in its type in Latin America. The Bachelor`s thesis entitled ``Experimental Study on Fuel Oil Combustion in Circulating Fluidized Bed`` was performed operating this combustor with the purpose of determining the feasibility of burning heavy fuel oil in a stable and sustained form, as well as the effect of the addition of calcium carbonate to the combustor. The results of the experimental trials showed heavy fuel oil can be burned in a circulating fluidized bed, with low sulfur dioxide emissions. During the conduction of the experiments a sulfur retention of 43% was achieved with a Ca/S relationship of 4.5. [Espanol] El Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) desarrollo un combustor de lecho fluidizado circulante de 0.5 MW termicos de potencia, unico en su tipo en Latinoamerica. La tesis de licenciatura titulada Estudio Experimental sobre la Combustion de Combustoleo en Lecho Fluidizado Circulante se realizo operando dicho combustor, con el proposito de determinar la factibilidad de quemar combustoleo pesado en forma estable y autosostenida, asi como la influencia que tiene la adicion de carbonato de calcio al lecho. Los resultados de los ensayos experimentales mostraron que se puede quemar combustoleo pesado en un lecho fluidizado circulante, con bajas emisiones de bioxido de azufre. Durante la experimentacion se logro una retencion de azufre del 43%, con una relacion Ca/S de 4.5.

  1. Experimental study on fuel oil combustion in circulating fluidized bed; Estudio experimental sobre la combustion de combustoleo en lecho fluidizado circulante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Rangel, Ricardo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    The Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) developed a circulating fluidized bed combustor of 0.5 thermal MW unique in its type in Latin America. The Bachelor`s thesis entitled ``Experimental Study on Fuel Oil Combustion in Circulating Fluidized Bed`` was performed operating this combustor with the purpose of determining the feasibility of burning heavy fuel oil in a stable and sustained form, as well as the effect of the addition of calcium carbonate to the combustor. The results of the experimental trials showed heavy fuel oil can be burned in a circulating fluidized bed, with low sulfur dioxide emissions. During the conduction of the experiments a sulfur retention of 43% was achieved with a Ca/S relationship of 4.5. [Espanol] El Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) desarrollo un combustor de lecho fluidizado circulante de 0.5 MW termicos de potencia, unico en su tipo en Latinoamerica. La tesis de licenciatura titulada Estudio Experimental sobre la Combustion de Combustoleo en Lecho Fluidizado Circulante se realizo operando dicho combustor, con el proposito de determinar la factibilidad de quemar combustoleo pesado en forma estable y autosostenida, asi como la influencia que tiene la adicion de carbonato de calcio al lecho. Los resultados de los ensayos experimentales mostraron que se puede quemar combustoleo pesado en un lecho fluidizado circulante, con bajas emisiones de bioxido de azufre. Durante la experimentacion se logro una retencion de azufre del 43%, con una relacion Ca/S de 4.5.

  2. Research of Heat Rates Effect on the Process Of Fuel-Bed Gasification Of “Balakhtinskoe”, “Osinnikovskoe”, “Krasnogorskoe” and “Borodinskoe” Coal Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenkov Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research of fuel-bed gasification at different heating rates was conducted. Release of four gases (CO, NO, H2O, CO2 was determined. Optimal heating rate mode for this method of gasification was established.

  3. Microscale packed bed reactor for controlled hydrogen peroxide decomposition as a fuel cell oxidant aboard unmanned undersea vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennon, E.; Ocampo, M.; Besser, R.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Stevens Institute of Technology, Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States); Burke, A.A. [Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Newport, RI 02841 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The multiphase catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen is notoriously susceptible to thermal runaway (heat of reaction: -98 kJ mol{sup -1}). The high surface area to volume ratio (S/V) in a microscale packed bed (MPB) reactor (radius 0.5 mm) was investigated for reducing the risk of thermal runaway during hydrogen peroxide decomposition to oxygen intended as a fuel cell oxidant aboard an unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV). A microscale reactor channel with a S/V of {proportional_to}2 x 10{sup 3} m{sup 2} m{sup -3} simulated under convective cooling generated a significant heat rise (T rise {proportional_to} 100 K), whereas a microreactor with a higher S/V ({proportional_to}200 x 10{sup 3} m{sup 2} m{sup -3}) achieved thermal control (T rise < 10 K) over the simulated reaction zone. Although thermal management was successfully accomplished using the higher S/V, experimental conversions of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen (5-18%) measured from the outlet were lower than simulated conversions (38-63%). Simulation assumptions, such as homogeneously dispersed flow and perfect catalyst interaction among other factors, contributed to the discrepancies between the simulated and experimental degrees of peroxide conversion to oxygen. Even though thermal control of the MPB was achieved, this work indicates that mass transfer limitations are a factor in the MPB reactor during a multiphase reaction, like decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water, and suggests means to overcome them even on the microscale level. (author)

  4. Debris Flows and Related Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancey, C.

    Torrential floods are a major natural hazard, claiming thousands of lives and millions of dollars in lost property each year in almost all mountain areas on the Earth. After a catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helen in the USA in May 1980, water from melting snow, torrential rains from the eruption cloud, and water displaced from Spirit Lake mixed with deposited ash and debris to produce very large debris flows and cause extensive damage and loss of life [1]. During the 1985 eruption of Nevado del Ruiz in Colombia, more than 20,000 people perished when a large debris flow triggered by the rapid melting of snow and ice at the volcano summit, swept through the town of Armero [2]. In 1991, the eruption of Pinatubo volcano in the Philippines disperses more than 5 cubic kilometres of volcanic ash into surrounding valleys. Much of that sediment has subsequently been mobilised as debris flows by typhoon rains and has devastated more than 300 square kilometres of agricultural land. Even, in Eur opean countries, recent events that torrential floods may have very destructive effects (Sarno and Quindici in southern Italy in May 1998, where approximately 200 people were killed). The catastrophic character of these floods in mountainous watersheds is a consequence of significant transport of materials associated with water flows. Two limiting flow regimes can be distinguished. Bed load and suspension refer to dilute transport of sediments within water. This means that water is the main agent in the flow dynamics and that the particle concentration does not exceed a few percent. Such flows are typically two-phase flows. In contrast, debris flows are mas s movements of concentrated slurries of water, fine solids, rocks and boulders. As a first approximation, debris flows can be treated as one-phase flows and their flow properties can be studied using classical rheological methods. The study of debris flows is a very exciting albeit immature science, made up of disparate elements

  5. Co-firing a pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system with coal and refuse derived fuels and/or sludges. Task 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLallo, M.; Zaharchuk, R.

    1994-01-01

    The co-firing of waste materials with coal in utility scale power plants has emerged as an effective approach to produce energy and manage municipal waste. Leading this approach, the atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) has demonstrated its commercial acceptance in the utility market as a reliable source of power burning a variety of waste and alternative fuels. The fluidized bed, with its stability of combustion, reduces the amount of thermochemical transients and provides for easier process control. The application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) technology, although relatively new, can provide significant enhancements to the efficient production of electricity while maintaining the waste management benefits of AFBC. A study was undertaken to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of co-firing a PFBC with coal and municipal and industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in central power station and distributed locations. Wastes considered for co-firing include municipal solid waste (MSW), tire-derived fuel (TDF), sewage sludge, and industrial de-inking sludge. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. This paper describes the results of this investigation, presents conclusions on the key issues, and provides recommendations for further evaluation.

  6. Improved combustion performance of waste-fired FB-boilers -The influence of the dynamics of the bed on the air-/fuel interaction; Foerbaettrad foerbraenningsprestanda vid avfallsfoerbraenning i FB-pannor -Baeddynamikens inverkan paa luft-/braensleomblandningen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Johanna (Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden)); Pallares, David; Thunman, Henrik; Johnsson, Filip (Chalmers (Sweden)); Andersson, Bengt-Aake (E.on/Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden)); Victoren, Anders (Metso Power AB (Sweden)); Johansson, Andreas (SP, Boraas (Sweden))

    2010-07-01

    One of the key benefits of fluidized bed combustion is that the bed - through mixing of fuel and air and accumulated heat - facilitates combustion at low stoichiometry and with low emissions. Even so, it is not unusual that waste-fired FB-boilers are operated at 6-8% oxygen that corresponds to 30-40% higher flows of gas than theoretically needed. In addition to that and in comparison to grate furnaces, FB-boiler can cause high pressure drop losses because of the fluidization of the bottom bed, which in turn are associated with high costs for power (fans). This work aims therefore at increasing the knowledge for how the dynamics of the bed affects the air and fuel mixture. Methods to explain and characterize the phenomenon have been derived within this work showing: - Distribution of air in a bed for various cases and the influence of pressure drop, bed height and fluidization velocity - A semi-empiric method to calculate an even bubble distribution - The relation between fluidization and fuel distribution for various fluidization flows and fuels - Dispersion rates for various fuels - Volatilization rates for waste in relation to biomass The result can be useful when optimizing units, for instance through finding as low pressure drops as possible with an even bubble distribution, low risk for sintering and unwanted emissions. The work has thereby reached its ultimate goal of increasing the generic knowledge about waste combustion in FB-boiler

  7. Thoron Mitigation System based on charcoal bed for applications in thorium fuel cycle facilities (part 2): Development, characterization, and performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudeep Kumara, K; Sahoo, B K; Gaware, J J; Sapra, B K; Mayya, Y S; Karunakara, N

    2017-06-01

    Exposure due to thoron ( 220 Rn) gas and its decay products in a thorium fuel cycle facility handling thorium or 232 U/ 233 U mixture compounds is an important issue of radiological concern requiring control and mitigation. Adsorption in a flow-through charcoal bed offers an excellent method of alleviating the release of 220 Rn into occupational and public domain. In this paper, we present the design, development, and characterization of a Thoron Mitigation System (TMS) for industrial application. Systematic experiments were conducted in the TMS for examining the 220 Rn mitigation characteristics with respect to a host of parameters such as flow rate, pressure drop, charcoal grain size, charcoal mass and bed depth, water content, and heat of the carrier gas. An analysis of the experimental data shows that 220 Rn attenuation in a flow through charcoal bed is not exponential with respect to the residence time, L/U a (L: bed depth; U a : superficial velocity), but follows a power law behaviour, which can be attributed to the occurrence of large voids due to wall channeling in a flow through bed. The study demonstrates the regeneration of charcoal adsorption capacity degraded due to moisture adsorption, by hot air blowing technique. It is found that the mitigation factor (MF), which is the ratio of the inlet 220 Rn concentration (C in ) to the outlet 220 Rn concentration (C out ), of more than 10 4 for the TMS is easily achievable during continuous operation (>1000 h) at a flow rate of 40 L min -1 with negligible (evaluated for its long-term performance and overall effectiveness in mitigating 220 Rn levels in the workplace. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Orbital debris: a technical assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Space Debris, National Research Council

    ..., and other debris created as a byproduct of space operations. Orbital Debris examines the methods we can use to characterize orbital debris, estimates the magnitude of the debris population, and assesses the hazard that this population poses to spacecraft...

  9. Experimental study of head loss and filtration for LOCA debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D.V.; Souto, F.J.

    1996-02-01

    A series of controlled experiments were conducted to obtain head loss and filtration characteristics of debris beds formed of NUKON trademark fibrous fragments, and obtain data to validate the semi-theoretical head loss model developed in NUREG/CR-6224. A thermally insulated closed-loop test set-up was used to conduct experiments using beds formed of fibers only and fibers intermixed with particulate debris. A total of three particulate mixes were used to simulate the particulate debris. The head loss data were obtained for theoretical fiber bed thicknesses of 0.125 inches to 4.0 inches; approach velocities of 0.15 to 1.5 ft/s; temperatures of 75 F and 125 F; and sludge-to-fiber nominal concentration ratios of 0 to 60. Concentration measurements obtained during the first flushing cycle were used to estimate the filtration efficiencies of the debris beds. For test conditions where the beds are fairly uniform, the head loss data were predictable within an acceptable accuracy range by the semi-theoretical model. The model was equally applicable for both pure fiber beds and the mixed beds. Typically the model over-predicted the head losses for very thin beds and for thin beds at high sludge-to-fiber mass ratios. This is attributable to the non-uniformity of such debris beds. In this range the correlation can be interpreted to provide upper bound estimates of head loss. This is pertinent for loss of coolant accidents in boiling water reactors

  10. Retrieval system for emplaced spent unreprocessed fuel (SURF) in salt bed depository: accident event analysis and mechanical failure probabilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskaran, G.; McCleery, J.E.

    1979-10-01

    This report provides support in developing an accident prediction event tree diagram, with an analysis of the baseline design concept for the retrieval of emplaced spent unreprocessed fuel (SURF) contained in a degraded Canister. The report contains an evaluation check list, accident logic diagrams, accident event tables, fault trees/event trees and discussions of failure probabilities for the following subsystems as potential contributors to a failure: (a) Canister extraction, including the core and ram units; (b) Canister transfer at the hoist area; and (c) Canister hoisting. This report is the second volume of a series. It continues and expands upon the report Retrieval System for Emplaced Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) in Salt Bed Depository: Baseline Concept Criteria Specifications and Mechanical Failure Probabilities. This report draws upon the baseline conceptual specifications contained in the first report

  11. Validation of new empirical model for self-leveling behavior of cylindrical particle beds based on experimental database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Koji; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Taketa, Shohei; Nishi, Shinpei; Cheng, Songbai; Suzuki, Tohru; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    During a material relocation phase of core disruptive accidents (CDAs) in sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs), debris beds can be formed in the lower plenum region due to rapid quenching and fragmentation of molten core materials. Heat removal from debris beds is crucial to achieve so called in-vessel retention (IVR) of degraded core materials. Coolant boiling in the beds may lead to leveling of their mound shape, and then changes coolability of the beds with decay heat as well as neutronic characteristics. To clarify the mechanisms underlying this self-leveling behavior, several series of experiments using simulant materials has been performed in collaboration between Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and Kyushu University in Japan. In the present study, experiments in a cylindrical system were employed to develop experimental data on self-leveling process of particle beds. In the experiments, to simulate the coolant boiling due to the decay heat in fuel, nitrogen gas was percolated uniformly through the bottom of the particle bed with a conical shape mound using a gas injection method. Time variations in bed height during the self-leveling process were measured for key experimental parameters on particle size, density and sphericity, and gas flow rate. Using a dimensional analysis approach, a new model was proposed to correlate the experimental data on transient bed height with an empirical equation using a characteristic time of self-leveling development and a terminal equilibrium height of the bed. It was demonstrated that the proposed model predicts self-leveling development of particle beds with reasonable accuracy in the present ranges of experimental conditions. (author)

  12. Reactivity considerations for the on-line refuelling of a pebble bed modular reactor—Illustrating safety for the most reactive core fuel load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    In the multi-pass fuel management scheme employed for the pebble bed modular reactor the fuel pebbles are re-circulated until they reach the target burn-up. The rate at which fresh fuel is loaded and burned fuel is discharged is a result of the core neutronics cycle analysis but in practice (on the plant) this has to be controlled and managed by the fuel handling and storage system and use of the burnup measurement system. The excess reactivity is the additional reactivity available in the core during operating conditions that is the result of loading a fuel mixture in the core that is more reactive (less burned) than what is required to keep the reactor critical at full power operational conditions. The excess reactivity is balanced by the insertion of the control rods to keep the reactor critical. The excess reactivity allows flexibility in operations, for example to overcome the xenon build up when power is decreased as part of load follow. In order to limit reactivity excursions and to ensure safe shutdown the excess reactivity and thus the insertion depth of the control rods at normal operating conditions has to be managed. One way to do this is by operational procedures. The reactivity effect of long-term operation with the control rods inserted deeper than the design point is investigated and a control rod insertion limit is proposed that will not limit normal operations. The effects of other phenomena that can increase the power defect, such as higher-than-expected fuel temperatures, are also introduced. All of these cases are then evaluated by ensuring cold shutdown is still achievable and where appropriate by reactivity insertion accident analysis. These aspects are investigated on the PBMR 400 MW design.

  13. Lower end fitting debris collector and end cap spacer grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor having fuel assemblies including an upper end fitting and spaced nuclear fuel rod spacer grids for supporting and spacing a plurality of elongated nuclear fuel rods. Each includes a hollow active portion of nuclear fuel filled cladding intermediate the rod ends and tapering end cap of solid material with a circumferential groove on the rod end which first encounters reactor coolant flow, a lower end filtering debris collector and end cap spacer grid for capturing and retaining deleterious debris carried by reactor coolant before it enters the active region of a fuel assembly and creates fuel rod cladding damage

  14. Pre-treatment of waste fuel with low-speed shredding and screening for fluidized bed incineration; Foerbehandling av avfallsbraensle foer fluidbaeddpannor med laangsamtgaaende valskross och saekerhetssiktning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, Sven; Victoren, Anders; Niklasson, Fredrik; Jones, Frida

    2013-09-01

    approximate cost of 104-118 SEK/tonne (12-14 /tonne) treated waste, which is the same as for the larger FB plant shredder system. The cost for the hammer mill system was determined to 155-185 SEK/tonne (18-22 /tonne) treated waste. The higher cost for the hammer mill system rely on the estimated higher maintenance and electricity consumption costs. The analysis of the particle size distribution of the fuel treated with lowspeed shredding and screening shows that the fuel satisfy the demands stipu-lated for combustion in smaller FB furnaces. Furthermore, the combustion trials show no obvious differences in operation quality, compared to the normal hammer milled fuel; no significant differences in level or stability in power, bed temperature or emission levels could be found. Nor was the frequency of spikes of CO of NO{sub x} increased, nor the frequency of violation of the stipulated 24-hrs, halv-hour, or ten-minute stipulated emission limits increased. In summary, the study gives initial support for the thesis that shedding and screening is just as feasible for fuel pre-treatment in smaller FB furnaces with one single fuel supply conveyor as traditional hammer milling systems. Furthermore, it is cheaper. Lowspeed shreddning should, therefore, be concidered as pre-treatment method for both larger as well as smaller FB incineration plants. Beyond the parameters that have been investigated within the scope of this project, availability and safety are important factors that speek for lowspeed shedders. However, these are questions that have to be further investigated.

  15. Fission product release as a function of chemistry and fuel morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbins, R.R.; Osetek, D.J.; Petti, D.A.; Hagrman, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of the consequences of severe reactor accidents requires knowledge of the location and chemical form of fission products throughout the accident sequence. Two factors that strongly influence the location and chemical form of fission products are the chemistry within the core and the morphology of the fuel or fuel-bearing debris. This paper reviews the current understanding of the these factors garnered from integral and separate effect experiments and the TMI-2 accident, and provides perspective on the significance of contributing phenomena for the analysis of severe accidents, particularly during the in-vessel phase. Information has been obtained recently on phenomena affecting the release of fission products from fuel and the reactor vessel during the in-vessel melt progression phase of a severe accident. The influence of a number of these phenomena will be reviewed, including fuel chemistry, H 2 /H 2 O ratio, fuel liquefaction, molten pools, and debris beds. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevent, identify, and treat bed bug infestations using EPA’s step-by-step guides, based on IPM principles. Find pesticides approved for bed bug control, check out the information clearinghouse, and dispel bed bug myths.

  17. Governing equations for heat and mass transfer in heat-generating porous beds-II. Particulate melting and substrate penetration by dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawla, T C; Minkowycz, W J; Pedersen, D R

    1985-11-01

    Upon dryout of the bed, the dominant modes of heat transfer are conduction and radiation. Radiation is modeled through the Rosseland approximation. The melting of stainless-steel particulate imbedded in the fuel is modeled by assuming the bed to be a continuum with conduction and radiatio as the dominant modes of heat transfer. The molten steel, after it drains to the bottom of the bed, is assumed to disappear into cracks and mortar joints of the MgO bricks. The melting of fuel in the interior of the bed is modeled identically to the steel particulate, except for the bed settling which is more pronounced in the case of fuel melting and is assumed to be instantaneous owing to the significant weight of overlying bed and sodium pool. The molten layer of fuel, as it collects at the bottom of the bed, causes the heatup of the MgO lining to the eutectic temperature (2280/sup 0/C), and the MgO lining begins to dissolve. The density gradient caused by the dissolution of MgO leads to natural convection and mixing in the molten layer. The submerged fuel particulate also begins to dissolve in the molten solution and ultimately leads to the conversion of debris to a molten pool of fuel and MgO. The process of penetration of the MgO lining continues until the mixing process lowers the concentration of fuel in the volume of the pool to the level where the internal heat rate per unit volume is not enough to keep the body of the pool molten and leads to freezing in the cooler part of the pool. A the molten pool reaches a frozen or a quiescent state, the MgO brick lining thickness provided is deemed ''safe'' for a given bed loading and the external rate of cooling.

  18. Risk analysis methodology for spent fuel repositories in bedded salt: methodlogy summary and differences between spent fuel and high level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepping, R.E.; Chu, M.S.

    1981-06-01

    In the absence of spent fuel reprocessing plans, unreprocessed spent fuel has become a candidate waste form for geologic disposal. In order to understand the public health risks from such disposal and to gain insights into the factors that influence them, a methodology is needed to combine the effects of site geology and hydrology, physical and chemical properties of the waste form, and the details of the engineering design. This report outlines such a methodology which the authors currently are applying to the analysis of unreprocessed spent fuel disposal. The methodology is the same methodology as was developed to describe the risks from geologic disposal of wastes from reprocessed spent fuel. The difference between spent fuel wastes and wastes from reprocessing that may affect the applicability of the methodology are highlighted

  19. Feasibility study of passive gamma spectrometry of molten core material from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station unit 1, 2, and 3 cores for special nuclear material accountancy - low-volatile FP and special nuclear material inventory analysis and fundamental characteristics of gamma-rays from fuel debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagara, Hiroshi; Tomikawa, Hirofumi; Watahiki, Masaru; Kuno, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    The technologies applied to the analysis of the Three Mile Island accident were examined in a feasibility study of gamma spectrometry of molten core material from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station unit 1, 2, and 3 cores for special nuclear material accountancy. The focus is on low-volatile fission products and heavy metal inventory analysis, and the fundamental characteristics of gamma-rays from fuel debris with respect to passive measurements. The inventory ratios of the low-volatile lanthanides, "1"5"4Eu and "1"4"4Ce, to special nuclear materials were evaluated by the entire core inventories in units 1, 2, and 3 with an estimated uncertainty of 9%-13% at the 1σ level for homogenized molten fuel material. The uncertainty is expected to be larger locally owing to the use of the irradiation cycle averaging approach. The ratios were also evaluated as a function of burnup for specific fuel debris with an estimated uncertainty of 13%-25% at the 1σ level for units 1 and 2, and most of the fuels in unit 3, although the uncertainty regarding the separated mixed oxide fuel in unit 3 would be significantly higher owing to the burnup dependence approach. Source photon spectra were also examined and cooling-time-dependent data sets were prepared. The fundamental characteristics of high-energy gamma-rays from fuel debris were investigated by a bare-sphere model transport calculation. Mass attenuation coefficients of fuel debris were evaluated to be insensitive to its possible composition in a high-energy region. The leakage photon ratio was evaluated using a variety of parameters, and a significant impact was confirmed for a certain size of fuel debris. Its correlation was summarized with respect to the leakage photopeak ratio of source "1"5"4Eu. Finally, a preliminary study using a hypothetical canister model of fuel debris based on the experience at Three Mile Island was presented, and future plans were introduced. (author)

  20. TMI-2 core debris grab samples: Examination and analysis: Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, D.W.; Carlson, E.R.; Cook, B.A.; Ploger, S.A.; Carlson, J.O.

    1986-09-01

    Six samples of particulate debris were removed from the TMI-2 core rubble bed during September and October 1983, and five more samples were obtained in March 1984. The samples (up to 174 g each) were obtained at two locations in the core: H8 (center) and E9 (mid-radius). Ten of the eleven samples were examined at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to obtain data on the physical and chemical nature of the debris and the postaccident condition of the core. Portions of the samples also were subjected to differential thermal analysis at Rockwell Hanford Operations and metallurgical and chemical examinations at Argonne National Laboratories. This report presents results of the examination of the core debris grab samples, including physical, metallurgical, chemical, and radiochemical analyses. The results indicate that temperatures in the core reached at least 3100 K during the TMI-2 accident, fuel melting and significant mixing of core structural material occurred, and large fractions of some radionuclides (e.g., 90 Sr and 144 Ce) were retained in the core

  1. Detection system for location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongbing, E-mail: liuhb07@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education P. R. China, Beijing 100084 (China); Du, Dong, E-mail: dudong@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education P. R. China, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, An; Chang, Baohua; Han, Zandong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education P. R. China, Beijing 100084 (China); He, Ayada [Shanghai Electric Power Generation Group Shanghai Generator Works, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A detection system for locations of pebbles transported in pipes is introduced. • The detection system is based on vibration signal processing, which is original. • The characteristics of the vibration signals of the pipe are analyzed. • The experiment shows that the detection results are accurate. • The research provides an important basis for the design of the reactor. - Abstract: Pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors have many advantages such as inherent safety, high efficiency, etc., and have been considered as a candidate for Generation IV nuclear reactors. During the operation of the reactor, there are thousands of fuel pebbles transported in the pipes outside the core by gravity and helium flow. The pattern of the pipes which consist of straight and arc sections is very complex. When a fuel pebble is transported, it will constantly collide with the pipes, especially in the arc sections. The collisions will lead to the vibration of the pipes. This paper aims to provide a detection system for the location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing. Before the reactor is running, the system acquires the vibration signals of several key sections by sensors. Then the frequency characteristics of the signals are obtained by joint time–frequency analysis. When the reactor is running, the system detects the signals and processes them based on their frequency characteristics in real time. According to the results of the processing, the system can correctly judge whether the fuel pebble has passed through the section and records the time of the passing. The experiment validates the accuracy and reliability of the detection results. In this way, the operational condition of the reactor can be monitored so that the normal running of the reactor can be ensured. Additionally, the detection data are of great significance to the evaluation and optimization of the reactor performance

  2. Detection system for location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hongbing; Du, Dong; Huang, An; Chang, Baohua; Han, Zandong; He, Ayada

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A detection system for locations of pebbles transported in pipes is introduced. • The detection system is based on vibration signal processing, which is original. • The characteristics of the vibration signals of the pipe are analyzed. • The experiment shows that the detection results are accurate. • The research provides an important basis for the design of the reactor. - Abstract: Pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors have many advantages such as inherent safety, high efficiency, etc., and have been considered as a candidate for Generation IV nuclear reactors. During the operation of the reactor, there are thousands of fuel pebbles transported in the pipes outside the core by gravity and helium flow. The pattern of the pipes which consist of straight and arc sections is very complex. When a fuel pebble is transported, it will constantly collide with the pipes, especially in the arc sections. The collisions will lead to the vibration of the pipes. This paper aims to provide a detection system for the location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing. Before the reactor is running, the system acquires the vibration signals of several key sections by sensors. Then the frequency characteristics of the signals are obtained by joint time–frequency analysis. When the reactor is running, the system detects the signals and processes them based on their frequency characteristics in real time. According to the results of the processing, the system can correctly judge whether the fuel pebble has passed through the section and records the time of the passing. The experiment validates the accuracy and reliability of the detection results. In this way, the operational condition of the reactor can be monitored so that the normal running of the reactor can be ensured. Additionally, the detection data are of great significance to the evaluation and optimization of the reactor performance

  3. Use of plutonium and minor actinides as fuel in high temperature pebble bed reactors for waste minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, Astrid; Bernnat, Wolfgang; Lohnert, Guenther

    2009-01-01

    Energy production by nuclear fission gives rise to longlived radionuclides, such as plutonium and americium. The ''PuMA'' (Plutonium and Minor Actinides Waste Management) research project within the 6th Framework Program of the European Union serves to minimize waste arisings and transmute plutonium and minor actinides from spent LWR fuel elements by means of modular high-temperature reactors (HTR). Coating the fuel, which consists of kernels approx. 250 μm in radius and surrounded by graphite as the moderator material, allows very high operating and accident temperatures and very high burnups. One point examined is whether the inherent safety characteristics known for uranium oxide also exist for (PuO 2 + MAO 2 ) fuel. On the basis of a reference reactor similar to the South African PBMR-400, various loading strategies at maximum burnup are considered with a view to the inherent safety of the HTR. (orig.)

  4. Comparison of the thorium- and low-enriched uranium fuel cycle in the OTTO pebble bed HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuchert, E; Maly, V

    1973-03-15

    From the study of the physical, technical and economical properties of the LOTTO and TOTTO fuel cycle the authors draw the conclusion that no fundamental reason can be found for a definite preference of one of the two cycles. Either of them can be developed to become a very attractive concept. The flexibility of this reactor allows the design performance in that way that the reactor becomes a safe system with reasonable economy. The decision for the preference of the LOTTO or TOTTO can be allowed to be governed by the requirements of the outer fuel cycle or by politics.

  5. Proceedings of the Workshop on in-vessel core debris retention and coolability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This conference on in-vessel core debris retention and coolability is composed of 37 papers grouped in three sessions: session 1 (Keynote papers: Key phenomena of late phase core melt progression, accident management strategies and status quo of severe fuel damage codes, In-vessel retention as a severe accident management scheme, GAREC analyses in support of in-vessel retention concept, Latest findings of RASPLAV project); session 2 - Experiments and model development with five sub-sessions: sub-session 1 (Debris bed heat transfer: Debris and Pool Formation/Heat Transfer in FARO-LWR: Experiments and Analyses, Evaporation and Flow of Coolant at the Bottom of a Particle-Bed modelling Relocated Debris, Investigations on the Coolability of Debris in the Lower Head with WABE-2D and MESOCO-2D, Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis of the Heat Transfer Mechanisms in the Lower Head, Simulation of the Arrival and Evolution of Debris in a PWR Lower Head with the SFD ICARE2 code), sub-session 2 (Corium properties, molten pool natural convection, and crust formation: Physico-chemistry and corium properties for in-vessel retention, Experimental data on heat flux distribution from volumetrically heated pool with frozen boundaries, Thermal hydraulic phenomena in corium pools - numerical simulation with TOLBIAC and experimental validation with BALI, TOLBIAC code simulations of some molten salt RASPLAV experiments, SIMECO experiments on in-vessel melt pool formation and heat transfer with and without a metallic layer, Numerical investigation of turbulent natural convection heat transfer in an internally-heated melt pool and metallic layer, Current status and validation of CON2D and 3D code, Free convection of heat-generating fluid in a constrained during experimental simulation of heat transfer in slice geometry), sub-session 3 (Gap formation and gap cooling: Quench of molten aluminum oxide associated with in-vessel debris retention by RPV internal water, Experimental investigations

  6. Characteristics of debris in the lower head of a BWR in different severe accident scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phung, Viet-Anh; Galushin, Sergey; Raub, Sebastian; Goronovski, Andrei; Villanueva, Walter; Kööp, Kaspar; Grishchenko, Dmitry; Kudinov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Station blackout scenario with delayed recovery of safety systems in a Nordic BWR is considered. • Genetic algorithm and random sampling methods are used to explore accident scenario domain. • Main groups of scenarios are identified. • Ranges and distributions of characteristics of debris bed in the lower head are determined. - Abstract: Nordic boiling water reactors (BWRs) adopt ex-vessel debris cooling to terminate severe accident progression. Core melt released from the vessel into a deep pool of water is expected to fragment and form a coolable debris bed. Characteristics of corium melt ejection from the vessel determine conditions for molten fuel–coolant interactions (FCI) and debris bed formation. Non-coolable debris bed or steam explosion can threaten containment integrity. Vessel failure and melt ejection mode are determined by the in-vessel accident progression. Characteristics (such as mass, composition, thermal properties, timing of relocation, and decay heat) of the debris bed formed in the process of core relocation into the vessel lower plenum define conditions for the debris reheating, remelting, melt-vessel structure interactions, vessel failure and melt release. Thus core degradation and relocation are important sources of uncertainty for the success of the ex-vessel accident mitigation strategy. The goal of this work is improve understanding how accident scenario parameters, such as timing of failure and recovery of different safety systems can affect characteristics of the debris in the lower plenum. Station blackout scenario with delayed power recovery in a Nordic BWR is considered using MELCOR code. The recovery timing and capacity of safety systems were varied using genetic algorithm (GA) and random sampling methods to identify two main groups of scenarios: with relatively small ( 100 tons) amount of relocated debris. The domains are separated by the transition regions, in which relatively small variations of the input

  7. Characteristics of debris in the lower head of a BWR in different severe accident scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phung, Viet-Anh, E-mail: vaphung@kth.se; Galushin, Sergey, E-mail: galushin@kth.se; Raub, Sebastian, E-mail: raub@kth.se; Goronovski, Andrei, E-mail: andreig@kth.se; Villanueva, Walter, E-mail: walterv@kth.se; Kööp, Kaspar, E-mail: kaspar@safety.sci.kth.se; Grishchenko, Dmitry, E-mail: dmitry@safety.sci.kth.se; Kudinov, Pavel, E-mail: pavel@safety.sci.kth.se

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Station blackout scenario with delayed recovery of safety systems in a Nordic BWR is considered. • Genetic algorithm and random sampling methods are used to explore accident scenario domain. • Main groups of scenarios are identified. • Ranges and distributions of characteristics of debris bed in the lower head are determined. - Abstract: Nordic boiling water reactors (BWRs) adopt ex-vessel debris cooling to terminate severe accident progression. Core melt released from the vessel into a deep pool of water is expected to fragment and form a coolable debris bed. Characteristics of corium melt ejection from the vessel determine conditions for molten fuel–coolant interactions (FCI) and debris bed formation. Non-coolable debris bed or steam explosion can threaten containment integrity. Vessel failure and melt ejection mode are determined by the in-vessel accident progression. Characteristics (such as mass, composition, thermal properties, timing of relocation, and decay heat) of the debris bed formed in the process of core relocation into the vessel lower plenum define conditions for the debris reheating, remelting, melt-vessel structure interactions, vessel failure and melt release. Thus core degradation and relocation are important sources of uncertainty for the success of the ex-vessel accident mitigation strategy. The goal of this work is improve understanding how accident scenario parameters, such as timing of failure and recovery of different safety systems can affect characteristics of the debris in the lower plenum. Station blackout scenario with delayed power recovery in a Nordic BWR is considered using MELCOR code. The recovery timing and capacity of safety systems were varied using genetic algorithm (GA) and random sampling methods to identify two main groups of scenarios: with relatively small (<20 tons) and large (>100 tons) amount of relocated debris. The domains are separated by the transition regions, in which relatively small

  8. Engineering solutions for a reflector change concept in the high-temperature reactor with pebble bed core and OTTO-fueling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, K.J.

    1975-06-01

    In the field of reactor engineering an increasing tendency is visible towards a 'repairable reactor'. In the construction of the HTR with spherical fuel elements this fact should already be taken into account at an early stage. Additionally it is possible that in connection with the OTTO-fueling load conditions for the graphite reflector could result which are locally not far away from limiting values. Therefore the removability of the reflector is included in the reactor construction as an accompanying technical step of the physical lay-out of the core. The core arrangements, realized for HTR until recently, are discussed as well as the properties of the graphites used and the operating conditions in the reactors are stated. At the example of the PR 3,000 proposals are offered for the construction of a removable side and top reflector for a pebble bed reactor. Hereby a solution was found which, on one hand allows the changing of the reflector and on the other hand requires no significant increase of the costs for the reactor assembly. Moreover the requirements of reactor operation and of repairability are satisfied in an optimal manner. (orig.) [de

  9. Debris thickness patterns on debris-covered glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Leif S.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2018-06-01

    Many debris-covered glaciers have broadly similar debris thickness patterns: surface debris thickens and tends to transition from convex- to concave-up-down glacier. We explain this pattern using theory (analytical and numerical models) paired with empirical observations. Down glacier debris thickening results from the conveyor-belt-like nature of the glacier surface in the ablation zone (debris can typically only be added but not removed) and from the inevitable decline in ice surface velocity toward the terminus. Down-glacier thickening of debris leads to the reduction of sub-debris melt and debris emergence toward the terminus. Convex-up debris thickness patterns occur near the up-glacier end of debris covers where debris emergence dominates (ablation controlled). Concave-up debris thickness patterns occur toward glacier termini where declining surface velocities dominate (velocity controlled). A convex-concave debris thickness profile inevitably results from the transition between ablation-control and velocity-control down-glacier. Debris thickness patterns deviating from this longitudinal shape are most likely caused by changes in hillslope debris supply through time. By establishing this expected debris thickness pattern, the effects of climate change on debris cover can be better identified.

  10. Producer gas production of Indonesian biomass in fixed-bed downdraft gasifier as an alternative fuels for internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanjuntak, J. P.; Lisyanto; Daryanto, E.; Tambunan, B. H.

    2018-03-01

    downdraft biomass gasification reactors, coupled with reciprocating internal combustion engines (ICE) are a viable technology for small scale heat and power generation. The direct use of producer gas as fuel subtitution in an ICE could be of great interest since Indonesia has significant land area in different forest types that could be used to produce bioenergy and convert forest materials to bioenergy for use in energy production and the versatility of this engine. This paper will look into the aspect of biomass energie as a contributor to energy mix in Indonesia. This work also contains information gathered from numerous previews study on the downdraft gasifier based on experimental or simulation study on the ability of producer gas as fuels for internal combustion engines aplication. All data will be used to complement the preliminary work on biomass gasification using downdraft to produce producer gas and its application to engines.

  11. Techno-economic analysis of sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming in a fixed bed reactor network integrated with fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diglio, Giuseppe; Hanak, Dawid P.; Bareschino, Piero; Mancusi, Erasmo; Pepe, Francesco; Montagnaro, Fabio; Manovic, Vasilije

    2017-10-01

    Sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming (SE-SMR) is a promising alternative for H2 production with inherent CO2 capture. This study evaluates the techno-economic performance of SE-SMR in a network of fixed beds and its integration with a solid oxide fuel cell (SE-SMR-SOFC) for power generation. The analysis revealed that both proposed systems are characterised by better economic performance than the reference systems. In particular, for SE-SMR the levelised cost of hydrogen is 1.6 €ṡkg-1 and the cost of CO2 avoided is 29.9 €ṡtCO2-1 (2.4 €ṡkg-1 and 50 €ṡtCO2-1, respectively, for SMR with CO2 capture) while for SE-SMR-SOFC the levelised cost of electricity is 0.078 €ṡkWh-1 and the cost of CO2 avoided is 36.9 €ṡtCO2-1 (0.080 €ṡkWh-1 and 80 €ṡtCO2-1, respectively, for natural gas-fired power plant with carbon capture). The sensitivity analysis showed that the specific cost of fuel and the capital cost of fuel cell mainly affect the economic performance of SE-SMR and SE-SMR-SOFC, respectively. The daily revenue of the SE-SMR-SOFC system is higher than that of the natural gas-fired power plant if the difference between the carbon tax and the CO2 transport and storage cost is > 6 €ṡtCO2-1.

  12. Analyses on ex-vessel debris formation and coolability in SARNET frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlner, G.; Buck, M.; Meignen, R.; Kudinov, P.; Ma, W.; Polidoro, F.; Takasuo, E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Melt outflow varies from dripping melt outflow to molten corium jets of variable size. • Experiments show clear trend of producing particles in size range 2-4 mm. • Code calculations show complete solidification of particles, yielding formation of fragmented debris beds. • Limits of debris bed cooling and coolability margins are analysed. - Abstract: The major aim of work in the SARNET2 European project on ex-vessel debris formation and coolability was to get an overall perspective on coolability of melt released from a failed reactor pressure vessel and falling into a water-filled cavity. Especially, accident management concepts for BWRs, dealing with deep water pools below the reactor vessel, are addressed, but also shallower pools in existing PWRs, with questions about partial cooling and time delay of molten corium concrete interaction. The subject can be divided into three main topics: (i) Debris bed formation by breakup of melt, (ii) Coolability of debris and (iii) Coupled treatment of the processes. Accompanied by joint collaborations of the partners, the performed work comprises theoretical, experimental and modelling activities. Theoretical work was done by KTH on the melt outflow conditions from a RPV and on the quantification of the probability of yielding a non-coolable ex-vessel bed by use of probabilistic assessment. IKE introduced a theoretical concept to improve debris bed coolability. A large amount of experimental work was done by partners (KTH, VTT, IKE) on the coolability of debris beds using different bed geometries, particles, heating methods and water feeds, yielding a valuable base for code validation. Modelling work was mainly done by IKE, IRSN, RSE and VTT concerning jet breakup and/or debris bed formation and cooling in 2D and 3D geometries. A benchmark for the DEFOR-A experiment of KTH was performed. Important progress was reached for several tasks and aspects and important insights are given, enabling to focus the

  13. Fluidized bed calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    A unique way to convert radioactive scrap into useful nuclear fuel products was developed for the Department of Energy at Hanford. An advanced, fluidized bed calciner is used to convert metallic nitrate scrap or waste solutions into benign, solid and gaseous products. There are broad potential applications of this concept beyond those in the nuclear industry

  14. Experiments and simulation of a net closing mechanism for tether-net capture of space debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharf, Inna; Thomsen, Benjamin; Botta, Eleonora M.; Misra, Arun K.

    2017-10-01

    This research addresses the design and testing of a debris containment system for use in a tether-net approach to space debris removal. The tether-net active debris removal involves the ejection of a net from a spacecraft by applying impulses to masses on the net, subsequent expansion of the net, the envelopment and capture of the debris target, and the de-orbiting of the debris via a tether to the chaser spacecraft. To ensure a debris removal mission's success, it is important that the debris be successfully captured and then, secured within the net. To this end, we present a concept for a net closing mechanism, which we believe will permit consistently successful debris capture via a simple and unobtrusive design. This net closing system functions by extending the main tether connecting the chaser spacecraft and the net vertex to the perimeter and around the perimeter of the net, allowing the tether to actuate closure of the net in a manner similar to a cinch cord. A particular embodiment of the design in a laboratory test-bed is described: the test-bed itself is comprised of a scaled-down tether-net, a supporting frame and a mock-up debris. Experiments conducted with the facility demonstrate the practicality of the net closing system. A model of the net closure concept has been integrated into the previously developed dynamics simulator of the chaser/tether-net/debris system. Simulations under tether tensioning conditions demonstrate the effectiveness of the closure concept for debris containment, in the gravity-free environment of space, for a realistic debris target. The on-ground experimental test-bed is also used to showcase its utility for validating the dynamics simulation of the net deployment, and a full-scale automated setup would make possible a range of validation studies of other aspects of a tether-net debris capture mission.

  15. Experimental investigation of particulate debris spreading in a pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, A., E-mail: kono@kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) , Roslagstullsbacken 21, Stockholm 106 91 (Sweden); Basso, S., E-mail: simoneb@kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) , Roslagstullsbacken 21, Stockholm 106 91 (Sweden); Kudinov, P., E-mail: pkudinov@kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) , Roslagstullsbacken 21, Stockholm 106 91 (Sweden); Yakush, S.E., E-mail: yakush@ipmnet.ru [Institute for Problems in Mechanics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ave. Vernadskogo 101 Bldg 1, Moscow 119526 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Termination of severe accident progression by core debris cooling in a deep pool of water under reactor vessel is considered in several designs of light water reactors. However, success of this accident mitigation strategy is contingent upon the effectiveness of heat removal by natural circulation from the debris bed. It is assumed that a porous bed will be formed in the pool in the process of core melt fragmentation and quenching. Debris bed coolability depends on its properties and system conditions. The properties of the bed, including its geometry are the outcomes of the debris bed formation process. Spreading of the debris particles in the pool by two-phase turbulent flows induced by the heat generated in the bed can affect the shape of the bed and thus influence its coolability. The goal of this work is to provide experimental data on spreading of solid particles in the pool by large-scale two-phase flow. The aim is to provide data necessary for understanding of separate effects and for development and validation of models and codes. Validated codes can be then used for prediction of debris bed formation under prototypic severe accident conditions. In PDS-P (Particulate Debris Spreading in the Pool) experiments, air injection at the bottom of the test section is employed as a means to create large-scale flow in the pool in isothermal conditions. The test section is a rectangular tank with a 2D slice geometry, it has fixed width (72 mm), adjustable length (up to 1.5 m) and allows water filling to the depth of up to 1 m. Variable pool length and depth allows studying two-phase circulating flows of different characteristic sizes and patterns. The average void fraction in the pool is determined by video recording and subsequent image processing. Particles are supplied from the top of the facility above the water surface. Results of several series of PDS-P experiments are reported in this paper. The influence of the gas flow rate, pool dimensions, particle density

  16. Modelling debris flows down general channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Pudasaini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an extension of the single-phase cohesionless dry granular avalanche model over curved and twisted channels proposed by Pudasaini and Hutter (2003. It is a generalisation of the Savage and Hutter (1989, 1991 equations based on simple channel topography to a two-phase fluid-solid mixture of debris material. Important terms emerging from the correct treatment of the kinematic and dynamic boundary condition, and the variable basal topography are systematically taken into account. For vanishing fluid contribution and torsion-free channel topography our new model equations exactly degenerate to the previous Savage-Hutter model equations while such a degeneration was not possible by the Iverson and Denlinger (2001 model, which, in fact, also aimed to extend the Savage and Hutter model. The model equations of this paper have been rigorously derived; they include the effects of the curvature and torsion of the topography, generally for arbitrarily curved and twisted channels of variable channel width. The equations are put into a standard conservative form of partial differential equations. From these one can easily infer the importance and influence of the pore-fluid-pressure distribution in debris flow dynamics. The solid-phase is modelled by applying a Coulomb dry friction law whereas the fluid phase is assumed to be an incompressible Newtonian fluid. Input parameters of the equations are the internal and bed friction angles of the solid particles, the viscosity and volume fraction of the fluid, the total mixture density and the pore pressure distribution of the fluid at the bed. Given the bed topography and initial geometry and the initial velocity profile of the debris mixture, the model equations are able to describe the dynamics of the depth profile and bed parallel depth-averaged velocity distribution from the initial position to the final deposit. A shock capturing, total variation diminishing numerical scheme is implemented to

  17. LEGACY - EOP Marine Debris

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data contains towed diver surveys of and weights of marine debris removed from the near shore environments of the NWHI.

  18. A two-stage microbial fuel cell and anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (MFC-AFMBR) system for effective domestic wastewater treatment.

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao; Ahn, Yongtae; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising technology for energy-efficient domestic wastewater treatment, but the effluent quality has typically not been sufficient for discharge without further treatment. A two-stage laboratory-scale combined treatment process, consisting of microbial fuel cells and an anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (MFC-AFMBR), was examined here to produce high quality effluent with minimal energy demands. The combined system was operated continuously for 50 days at room temperature (∼25 °C) with domestic wastewater having a total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD) of 210 ± 11 mg/L. At a combined hydraulic retention time (HRT) for both processes of 9 h, the effluent tCOD was reduced to 16 ± 3 mg/L (92.5% removal), and there was nearly complete removal of total suspended solids (TSS; from 45 ± 10 mg/L to <1 mg/L). The AFMBR was operated at a constant high permeate flux of 16 L/m(2)/h over 50 days, without the need or use of any membrane cleaning or backwashing. Total electrical energy required for the operation of the MFC-AFMBR system was 0.0186 kWh/m(3), which was slightly less than the electrical energy produced by the MFCs (0.0197 kWh/m(3)). The energy in the methane produced in the AFMBR was comparatively negligible (0.005 kWh/m(3)). These results show that a combined MFC-AFMBR system could be used to effectively treat domestic primary effluent at ambient temperatures, producing high effluent quality with low energy requirements.

  19. A two-stage microbial fuel cell and anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (MFC-AFMBR) system for effective domestic wastewater treatment.

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao

    2014-03-10

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising technology for energy-efficient domestic wastewater treatment, but the effluent quality has typically not been sufficient for discharge without further treatment. A two-stage laboratory-scale combined treatment process, consisting of microbial fuel cells and an anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (MFC-AFMBR), was examined here to produce high quality effluent with minimal energy demands. The combined system was operated continuously for 50 days at room temperature (∼25 °C) with domestic wastewater having a total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD) of 210 ± 11 mg/L. At a combined hydraulic retention time (HRT) for both processes of 9 h, the effluent tCOD was reduced to 16 ± 3 mg/L (92.5% removal), and there was nearly complete removal of total suspended solids (TSS; from 45 ± 10 mg/L to <1 mg/L). The AFMBR was operated at a constant high permeate flux of 16 L/m(2)/h over 50 days, without the need or use of any membrane cleaning or backwashing. Total electrical energy required for the operation of the MFC-AFMBR system was 0.0186 kWh/m(3), which was slightly less than the electrical energy produced by the MFCs (0.0197 kWh/m(3)). The energy in the methane produced in the AFMBR was comparatively negligible (0.005 kWh/m(3)). These results show that a combined MFC-AFMBR system could be used to effectively treat domestic primary effluent at ambient temperatures, producing high effluent quality with low energy requirements.

  20. National waste terminal storage repository in a bedded salt formation for spent unreprocessed fuel. Special study No. 1. 25-year retrievability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    National Waste Terminal Storage Repository 2 (NWTSR2), in bedded salt, for spent unreprocessed fuel is the subject of a conceptual design project which began in January 1977. In the base conceptual design the spent fuel is to be stored in a retrievable mode for 5 years. This report presents the results of a separate study on 25-year retrievability with open storage rooms. Drawings prepared for 25-year retrievability are only those which differ from the companion 5-year retrievability drawings which comprise Volume II of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR). NWTSR2 capital facilities originally were to be constructed in phases. Phase I was to include those facilities required for the first 5 years of operation, which were hypothesized to be from 1985 through 1990; Phase II was to include facilities required from 1991 until the capacity of the 2000-acre mine was reached. These dates are used as the basis for conceptual design and for Special Study No. 1 but do not represent actual schedule dates for the repository. The terms Phase I and Phase II are used throughout the drawings and test, so they need to be understood. However, it is not now intended to phase the capital construction because of the relatively small effort represented by Phase II surface construction. An optional future expansion of the mine, Phase III, would add 1000 acres on the end of the mine opposite the shaft pillar. The optional Phase III expansion would commence operation upon completion of Phase II operations. The drawings and design comparisons for Phase III mine operations appear only in this report

  1. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  2. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2012-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  3. Modelling of HTR (High Temperature Reactor Pebble-Bed 10 MW to Determine Criticality as A Variations of Enrichment and Radius of the Fuel (Kernel With the Monte Carlo Code MCNP4C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammam Oktajianto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas-cooled nuclear reactor is a Generation IV reactor which has been receiving significant attention due to many desired characteristics such as inherent safety, modularity, relatively low cost, short construction period, and easy financing. High temperature reactor (HTR pebble-bed as one of type of gas-cooled reactor concept is getting attention. In HTR pebble-bed design, radius and enrichment of the fuel kernel are the key parameter that can be chosen freely to determine the desired value of criticality. This paper models HTR pebble-bed 10 MW and determines an effective of enrichment and radius of the fuel (Kernel to get criticality value of reactor. The TRISO particle coated fuel particle which was modelled explicitly and distributed in the fuelled region of the fuel pebbles using a Simple-Cubic (SC lattice. The pebble-bed balls and moderator balls distributed in the core zone using a Body-Centred Cubic lattice with assumption of a fresh fuel by the fuel enrichment was 7-17% at 1% range and the size of the fuel radius was 175-300 µm at 25 µm ranges. The geometrical model of the full reactor is obtained by using lattice and universe facilities provided by MCNP4C. The details of model are discussed with necessary simplifications. Criticality calculations were conducted by Monte Carlo transport code MCNP4C and continuous energy nuclear data library ENDF/B-VI. From calculation results can be concluded that an effective of enrichment and radius of fuel (Kernel to achieve a critical condition was the enrichment of 15-17% at a radius of 200 µm, the enrichment of 13-17% at a radius of 225 µm, the enrichments of 12-15% at radius of 250 µm, the enrichments of 11-14% at a radius of 275 µm and the enrichment of 10-13% at a radius of 300 µm, so that the effective of enrichments and radii of fuel (Kernel can be considered in the HTR 10 MW. Keywords—MCNP4C, HTR, enrichment, radius, criticality 

  4. National waste terminal storage repository in a bedded salt formation for spent unreprocessed fuel. Special study No. 1. Twenty-five-year retrievability, decommissioning cost estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This estimate covers decommissioning costs of facilities for the receipt, handling, and storage in bedded salt of canistered spent fuel assemblies from both BWR and PWR commercial power plants. The estimate includes all decommissioning costs for a repository, based on 25-year retrievability, constructed in accordance with the design shown in Conceptual Design Report (CDR), as modified by Special Study No. 1 (KE Report No. 78-60-RE) and decommissioned in accordance with the program outlined in the Conceptual Design Description Report, KE Report No. 78-58-R. Costs for Operating Contractor personnel on the site at this time are included in this report and not in the Operating Cost Estimate (KE Report 78-63-RE). The operating cost estimates end with the completion of storage room backfilling. The three major elements of decommissioning are: demolition of surface facilities, backfilling of main entries and airways, and shaft liner removal and shaft plugging. EDIT, ECON, and DELOX computer programs and a chart of accounts were furnished by UCC-ND under direction of the Government and the line item-capital-cost estimate was prepared according to the prescribed format. The decommissioning cost estimate referenced herein is in the same format as its companion line item-capital-cost estimate KE Report 78-62-RE

  5. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Test case release consequence analysis for a spent fuel repository in bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, J.R.; Bond, F.W.; Cole, C.R.; Nelson, R.W.; Reisenauer, A.E.; Washburn, J.F.; Norman, N.A.; Mote, P.A.; Segol, G.

    1980-01-01

    Geologic and geohydrologic data for the Paradox Basin have been used to simulate movement of ground water and radioacrtive contaminants from a hypothetical nuclear reactor spent fuel repository after an assumed accidental release. The pathlines, travel times and velocity of the ground water from the repository to the discharge locale (river) were determined after the disruptive event by use of a two-dimensional finite difference hydrologic model. The concentration of radioactive contaminants in the ground water was calculated along a series of flow tubes by use of a one-dimensional mass transport model which takes into account convection, dispersion, contaminant/media interactions and radioactive decay. For the hypothetical site location and specific parameters used in this demonstration, it is found that Iodine-129 (I-129) is tthe only isotope reaching the Colorado River in significant concentration. This concentration occurs about 8.0 x 10 5 years after the repository has been breached. This I-129 ground-water concentration is about 0.3 of the drinking water standard for uncontrolled use. The groundwater concentration would then be diluted by the Colorado River. None of the actinide elements reach more than half the distance from the repository to the Colorado River in the two-million year model run time. This exercise demonstrates that the WISAP model system is applicable for analysis of contaminant transport. The results presented in this report, however, are valid only for one particular set of parameters. A complete sensitivity analysis must be performed to evaluate the range of effects from the release of contaminants from a breached repository

  6. Technical assessment of a micro-cogeneration system based on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell and fluidized bed autothermal reformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Marcoberardino, Gioele; Roses, Leonardo; Manzolini, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Performances of an ATR membrane reactor within a PEM FC micro-CHP system of 5 kWel. • Analysis of two different options for the H_2 permeate side: sweep and vacuum pump. • Optimization of operating conditions in terms of efficiency and membrane area. • Distribution of power and thermal consumptions and losses were discussed in detail. • A sensitivity analysis highlights the relevant design parameters of the CHP system. - Abstract: This work investigates the integration of an autothermal membrane reformer within a micro-CHP system of 5 kWel based on PEM fuel cell. The system modeled is based on a prototype developed within Reforcell European project. The optimization of the micro-CHP system is performed from a thermodynamic point of view aiming at the target of 40% of net electric efficiency and 90% of total system efficiency comparing different configuration and operating conditions. In particular, two hydrogen permeate side options as vacuum or sweep steam are evaluated together with different combination of feed temperature and pressures. A good compromise between electric efficiency (40%) and membrane surface area (0.3 m"2) was obtained for the sweep gas case at reaction side conditions of 8 bar, 600 °C and S/C of 2.5. Higher electric efficiency (40.5%) could be achieved by increasing the membrane surface area. The adoption of a vacuum pump simplifies the reactor design and manufacturing, but reduces the net electric efficiency by about 2% points with a membrane surface area of 0.15 m"2. Finally, the sensitivity analysis highlighted the influence of the main parameters and the design criteria for the definition of the CHP system.

  7. Experimental simulation of fragmentation and stratification of core debris on the core catcher of a fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Dipin S.; Vignesh, R. [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Sudha, A. Jasmin, E-mail: jasmin@igcar.gov.in [Safety Engineering Division, Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India); Pushpavanam, S.; Sundararajan, T. [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P. [Safety Engineering Division, Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Fragmentation of two simultaneous metals jets in a bulk coolant analysed. • Particle size from experiments compared with theoretical analysis. • Jet breakup modes explained using dimensionless numbers. • Settling aspects of aluminium and lead debris on collector plate studied. • Results analysed in light of core debris settling on core catcher in a FBR. - Abstract: The complex and coupled phenomena of two simultaneous molten metal jets fragmenting inside a quiescent liquid pool and settling on a collector plate are experimentally analysed in the context of safety analysis of a fast breeder reactor (FBR) in the post accident heat removal phase. Following a hypothetical core melt down accident in a FBR, a major portion of molten nuclear fuel and clad/structural material which are collectively termed as ‘corium’ undergoes fragmentation in the bulk coolant sodium in the lower plenum of the reactor main vessel and settles on the core catcher plate. The coolability of this decay heat generating debris bed is dependent on the particle size distribution and its layering i.e., stratification. Experiments have been conducted with two immiscible molten metals of different densities poured inside a coolant medium to understand their fragmentation behaviour and to assess the possibility of formation of a stratified debris bed. Molten aluminium and lead have been used as simulants in place of molten stainless steel and nuclear fuel to facilitate easy handling. This paper summarizes the major findings from these experiments. The fragmentation of the two molten metals are explained in the light of relevant dimensionless numbers such as Reynolds number and Weber Number. The mass median diameter of the fragmented debris is predicted from nonlinear stability analysis of slender jets for lead jet and using Rayleigh's classical theory of jet breakup for aluminium jet. The agreement of the predicted values with the experimental results is good. These

  8. HTR-proteus pebble bed experimental program core 4: random packing with a 1:1 moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sterbentz, James W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Briggs, J. Blair [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Snoj, Luka [Jozef Stefan Inst. (IJS), Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lengar, Igor [Jozef Stefan Inst. (IJS), Ljubljana (Slovenia); Koberl, Oliver [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2014-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  9. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  10. Prediction of mass fraction of agglomerated debris in a LWR severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudinov, P.; Davydov, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ex-vessel termination of accident progression in Swedish type Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is contingent upon efficacy of melt fragmentation and solidification in a deep pool of water below reactor vessel. When liquid melt reaches the bottom of the pool it can create agglomerated debris and “cake” regions that increase hydraulic resistance of the bed and affect coolability of the bed. This paper discusses development and application of a conservative-mechanistic approach to quantify mass fractions of agglomerated debris. Experimental data from the DEFOR-A (Debris Bed Formation and Agglomeration) tests with high superheat of binary oxidic simulant material melt is used for validation of the methods. Application of the approach to plant accident analysis suggests that melt superheat has less significant influence on agglomeration of the debris than jet penetration depth. The paper also discusses the impact of the uncertainty in the jet disintegration and penetration behavior on the agglomeration mode map. (author)

  11. On the influence of water subcooling and melt jet parameters on debris formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manickam, Louis, E-mail: louis@safety.sci.kth.se; Kudinov, Pavel; Ma, Weimin; Bechta, Sevostian; Grishchenko, Dmitry

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Melt and water configuration effects on debris formation is studied experimentally. • Melt superheat and water subcooling are most influential compared to jet size. • Melt-water configuration and material properties influence particle fracture rate. • Results are compared with large scale experiments to study effect of spatial scales. - Abstract: Breakup of melt jet and formation of a porous debris bed at the base-mat of a flooded reactor cavity is expected during the late stages of a severe accident in light water reactors. Debris bed coolability is determined by the bed properties including particle size, morphology, bed height and shape as well as decay heat. Therefore understanding of the debris formation phenomena is important for assessment of debris bed coolability. A series of experiments was conducted in MISTEE-Jet facility by discharging binary-oxide mixtures of WO{sub 3}–Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and WO{sub 3}–ZrO{sub 2} into water in order to investigate properties of resulting debris. The effect of water subcooling, nozzle diameter and melt superheat was addressed in the tests. Experimental results reveal significant influence of water subcooling and melt superheat on debris size and morphology. Significant differences in size and morphology of the debris at different melt release conditions is attributed to the competition between hydrodynamic fragmentation of liquid melt and thermal fracture of the solidifying melt droplets. The particle fracture rate increases with increased subcooling. Further the results are compared with the data from larger scale experiments to discern the effects of spatial scales. The present work provides data that can be useful for validation of the codes used for the prediction of debris formation phenomena.

  12. SCDAP/RELAP5 modeling of movement of melted material through porous debris in lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L. J.; Harvego, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    A model is described for the movement of melted metallic material through a ceramic porous debris bed. The model is designed for the analysis of severe accidents in LWRs, wherein melted core plate material may slump onto the top of a porous bed of relocated core material supported by the lower head. The permeation of the melted core plate material into the porous debris bed influences the heatup of the debris bed and the heatup of the lower head supporting the debris. A model for mass transport of melted metallic material is applied that includes terms for viscosity and turbulence but neglects inertial and capillary terms because of their small value relative to gravity and viscous terms in the momentum equation. The relative permeability and passability of the porous debris are calculated as functions of debris porosity, particle size, and effective saturation. An iterative numerical solution is used to solve the set of nonlinear equations for mass transport. The effective thermal conductivity of the debris is calculated as a function of porosity, particle size, and saturation. The model integrates the equations for mass transport with a model for the two-dimensional conduction of heat through porous debris. The integrated model has been implemented into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for the analysis of the integrity of LWR lower heads during severe accidents. The results of the model indicate that melted core plate material may permeate to near the bottom of a 1m deep hot porous debris bed supported by the lower head. The presence of the relocated core plate material was calculated to cause a 12% increase in the heat flux on the external surface of the lower head

  13. Transient debris freezing and potential wall melting during a severe reactivity initiated accident experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Moore, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    It is important to light water reactor (LWR) safety analysis to understand the transient freezing of molten core debris on cold structures following a hypothetical core meltdown accident. The purpose of this paper is to (a) present the results of a severe reactivity initiated accident (RIA) in-pile experiment with regard to molten debris distribution and freezing following test fuel rod failure, (b) analyze the transient freezing of molten debris (primarily a mixture of UO/sub 2/ fuel and Zircaloy cladding) deposited on the inner surface of the test shroud wall upon rod failure, and (c) assess the potential for wall melting upon being contacted by the molten debris. 26 refs

  14. The characteristics of bed agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaivatamaset, Pawin; Tia, Suvit

    2015-01-01

    The bed agglomeration behaviors were investigated experimentally when eucalyptus bark was burning tested in a laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor. The focuses of this work were the influences of operating conditions and bed materials on the bed agglomeration tendency and the elucidation in the behaviors of fuel inorganic elements and the governing mode of the agglomeration. It was found that the defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was clearly detectable from the decrease in measured bed pressure. The growth of bed particle and accumulation of agglomerates during combustion provided the partial to complete defluidization. The defluidization was promoted by the increase of bed temperature and bed particle size, and the decrease of fluidizing air velocity. The SEM-EDS analyses revealed that the bed agglomeration was mainly attributed to the formation of potassium silicate compounds as liquid phase during the combustion. This was initiated by the chemical reaction between the bed particle and the released ash constituents. In this study, the inorganic migration from fuel particle to bed particle was likely dominated by the condensation/reaction. The thermodynamic examination by ternary phase diagram analysis corroborated that the liquid phase formation of the ash derived materials controlled the agglomeration. The alumina sand prevented the bed agglomeration since it was inactive in the formation of viscous molten substances during combustion at the observed temperatures. - Highlights: • The behaviors of bed agglomeration were studied during the fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark. • The increase in bed temperature and sand size, and the decrease of air velocity promoted bed defluidization. • The formation of molten potassium silicate compounds conduced to the bed agglomeration. • Condensation/reaction was the dominant inorganic migration mechanism from fuel particle to bed particle. • The alumina sand prevented effectively the bed

  15. The use of dielectric heating in particulate bed dryout experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.F.; Willshire, S.J.

    1984-09-01

    Decay-heated, liquid-saturated debris beds arise in hypothetical severe accidents with LMFBR and PWR, and a large international effort is currently engaged in experimental studies of the cooling limitations of such beds. Dryout is one of the important cooling limitations. Dielectric heating offers a means of closely simulating decay heating in beds of irregular particles, and is under development at AEE Winfrith for application to experimental studies of dryout. This report describes progress to date. (author)

  16. Refined model for the coolability of core debris with flow entry from the bottom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, T.; Mueller, U.

    1986-01-01

    Within the context of a hypothetical severe accident in light water reactors also heat generating debris beds of a coarse particle size are discussed. A refined model for two-phase flow in particle beds is presented. Compared to previous models this model takes into account the effect of interfacial drag forces between liquid and vapor. These effects are important in coarse debris beds. The model is based on the momentum equations for separated flow, which are closed by empirical relations for the wall shear stress and the interfacial drag. When the refined model is applied to LWR severe accident scenarios an increased dryout heat flux is predicted for debris beds with flow entry from the bottom driven by a moderate downcomer head

  17. Gasification of secondary fuels in a circulating fluidized bed for energetic use in cement production; Vergasung von Sekundaerbrennstoffen in der zirkulierenden Wirbelschicht zur energetischen Nutzung fuer die Zementherstellung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, J; Gafron, B [Lurgi Umwelt GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Scur, P; Wirthwein, R [Ruedersdorfer Zement GmbH (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Ruedersforf cement factory was commissioned a century ago as one of the first in Germany. After the plant was taken over by Readymix AG, a comprehensive sanitation concept was carried through. The plant has a production capacity of 8000 t/d of cement clinkers which are produced in a new kiln with a capacity of 6000 t/d and two modernized kilns each with a capacity of 1000 t/d. Reduction of energy consumption was the main goal of modernisation, with fuel gas generation in a circulating fluidized bed as a key element. The unit provides 40 % of the energy consumed by the clinker production process and is also used for selective ash production up to 25 t/h. The ash is used as a raw material for cement production. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Bereits vor 100 Jahren wurde eine der ersten Zementfabriken in Deutschland am Standort Ruedersdorf in Betrieb genommen. Zum Erhalt der Wettbewerbsfaehigkeit wurde nach der Uebernahme des Werkes Ruedersdorf durch die Readymix AG ein umfangreiches Sanierungskonzept in die Wege geleitet. Bei einer Produktionskapazitaet von ca. 8 000 t Klinker pro Tag werden eine neue Ofenanlage mit einer Kapazitaet von 6 000 t/Tag sowie 2 sanierte kleine Anlagen zu je 1000 t/Tag betrieben. In der neuen Ofenanlage werden alle Moeglichkeiten genutzt, den Energiebedarf fuer die Klinkerproduktion zu senken. Eine wesentliche neue innovative Komponente ist dabei eine Brenngaserzeugung in einer Zirkulierenden Wirbelschicht, ueber die im folgenden berichtet werden soll. Die Anlage kann bis zu 40% des Energiebedarfes des Zementprozesses liefern. Weiterhin wird mit der ZWS eine gezielte Ascheproduktion, bis zu 25 t/h, betrieben. Diese Aschen sind Teil der Rohstoffrezeptur an der Rohmuehle. (orig./SR)

  18. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Landfills

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Disaster Debris Recovery Database (DDRD) promotes the proper recovery, recycling, and disposal of disaster debris for emergency responders at the federal,...

  19. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Recovery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Disaster Debris Recovery Database (DDRD) promotes the proper recovery, recycling, and disposal of disaster debris for emergency responders at the federal,...

  20. 2D model for melt progression through rods and debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichot, F.

    2001-01-01

    During the degradation of a nuclear core in a severe accident scenario, the high temperatures reached lead to the melting of materials. The formation of liquid mixtures at various elevations is followed by the flow of molten materials through the core. Liquid mixture may flow under several configurations: axial relocation along the rods, horizontal motion over a plane surface such as the core support plate or a blockage of material, 2D relocation through a debris bed, etc.. The two-dimensional relocation of molten material through a porous debris bed, implemented for the simulation of late degradation phases, has opened a new way to the elaboration of the relocation model for the flow of liquid mixture along the rods. It is based on a volume averaging method, where wall friction and capillary effects are taken into account by introducing effective coefficients to characterize the solid matrix (rods, grids, debris, etc.). A local description of the liquid flow is necessary to derive the effective coefficients. Heat transfers are modelled in a similar way. The derivation of the conservation equations for the liquid mixture falling flow (momentum) in two directions (axial and radial-horizontal) and for the heat exchanges (energy) are the main points of this new model for simulating melt progression. In this presentation, the full model for the relocation and solidification of liquid materials through a rod bundle or a debris bed is described. It is implemented in the ICARE/CATHARE code, developed by IPSN in Cadarache. The main improvements and advantages of the new model are: A single formulation for liquid mixture relocation, in 2D, either through a rod bundle or a porous debris bed, Extensions to complex structures (grids, by-pass, etc..), The modeling of relocation of a liquid mixture over plane surfaces. (author)

  1. Pebble-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohnert, G.; Mueller-Frank, U.; Heil, J.

    1976-01-01

    A pebble-bed nuclear reactor of large power rating comprises a container having a funnel-shaped bottom forming a pebble run-out having a centrally positioned outlet. A bed of downwardly-flowing substantially spherical nuclear fuel pebbles is positioned in the container and forms a reactive nuclear core maintained by feeding unused pebbles to the bed's top surface while used or burned-out pebbles run out and discharge through the outlet. A substantially conical body with its apex pointing upwardly and its periphery spaced from the periphery of the container spreads the bottom of the bed outwardly to provide an annular flow down the funnel-shaped bottom forming the runout, to the discharge outlet. This provides a largely constant downward velocity of the spheres throughout the diameter of the bed throughout a substantial portion of the down travel, so that all spheres reach about the same burned-out condition when they leave the core, after a single pass through the core area

  2. Numerical investigations of the fuel cycle for a 10 GW(TH)-OTTO-pebble-bed reactor with regard to high conversion ratio under special consideration of U-236 disconnexion through isotope-separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, H.

    1976-12-01

    A conversion ratio of near 1.0 can be achieved in a pebble-bed reactor using the OTTO (once through then out) loading scheme, having an economic burn-up of the fuel, an economic power density and a moderation ratio, which is considered realistically for the future. The flexibility of the reactor concept and of the fuel element design allows to recycle the fuel during full-power operation. In the present report first the criteria are shown, which are necessary to reach a high conversion ratio. Further it is presented that the conversion ratio increases considerably by closing the fuel cycle in consequence of the building-up of U-233. In this way the fuel inventory and the fuel consumption can considerably be diminished. It is demonstrated that the building-up and the accumulation of U-236 effects an important deterioration of the neutron economy. By taking the reprocessed uranium through an isotope separation (for example: ultra-gas-centrifugation) and by separation of U-236 from the other uranium isotopes it is possible to reduce the fuel consumption considerably. The expenditure and the cost which are necessary for the isotope separation are presented. (orig.) [de

  3. Space Debris Mitigation Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of national and international space debris mitigation guides is to promote the preservation of near-Earth space for applications and exploration missions far into the future. To accomplish this objective, the accumulation of objects, particularly in long-lived orbits, must be eliminated or curtailed.

  4. Experimental investigation of the oxy-fuel combustion of hard coal in a circulating fluidized-bed combustion; Experimentelle Untersuchung der Oxy-Fuel-Verbrennung von Steinkohle in einer zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtfeuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofbauer, Gerrit Arne

    2017-03-16

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992 first illustrated the social, economic and politic focus being placed on combating climate change caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gases. From there onwards research and development efforts have particularly centred on the reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in the production of electrical power through the use of carbonaceous fossil fuels. The long-term goal is a conversion to sustainable and CO{sub 2} free means of producing power, utilizing in the main part renewable forms of energy such as solar, wind and hydro power. Currently, such renewable ways of creating electricity only represent a small percentage of global energy production. The technological and economic hurdles that are associated with a substantial increase of renewable energy production have greatly slowed their increased implementation. However, the goal of keeping the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration below 450 ppm requires a significantly faster reduction in the amount of greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, considerations are being given to bridge technologies which would be able to capture and store the CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fired power plants. These technologies are referred to as CCS (carbon capture and storage). Oxy-fuel combustion, combustion with pure oxygen instead of air, is one of those technologies and forms the focus of investigation of this work. The Institute of Combustion and Power Plant Technology in Stuttgart, Germany, have researched this matter, carrying out combustion experiments in its 150 kW{sub th} circulating fluidized bed pilot facility. The experiments were aimed at investigating the influence of excess oxygen, combustion temperature and inlet oxygen concentration on the combustion process and comparing air to oxy-fuel combustion. These results were compared to the results of fundamental investigations and combustion experiments carried out by other research groups. The relationship

  5. Simulations of a Circulating Fluidized Bed Chemical Looping Combustion System Utilizing Gaseous Fuel; Simulation de la combustion en boucle chimique d'une charge gazeuse dans un lit fluidise circulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahalatkar, K.; Kuhlman, J. [West Virginia University, Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Morgantown, WV, 26506 (United States); Mahalatkar, K. [ANSYS Inc., 3647 Collins Ferry Road Suite A, Morgantown, WV, 26505 (United States); Kuhlman, J.; Huckaby, E.D.; O' Brien, T. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV, 26507 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Numerical studies using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) have been carried out for a complete circulating fluidized bed chemical looping combustor described in the literature (Abad et al., 2006 Fuel 85, 1174-1185). There have been extensive experimental studies in Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC), however CFD simulations of this concept are quite limited. The CLC experiments that were simulated used methane as fuel. A 2-D continuum model was used to describe both the gas and solid phases. Detailed sub-models to account for fluid-particle and particle-particle interaction forces were included. Global models of fuel and carrier chemistry were utilized. The results obtained from CFD were compared with experimental outlet species concentrations, solid circulation rates, solid mass distribution in the reactors, and leakage and dilution rates. The transient CFD simulations provided a reasonable match with the reported experimental data. (authors)

  6. Fuel Load (FL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan C. Lutes; Robert E. Keane

    2006-01-01

    The Fuel Load method (FL) is used to sample dead and down woody debris, determine depth of the duff/ litter profile, estimate the proportion of litter in the profile, and estimate total vegetative cover and dead vegetative cover. Down woody debris (DWD) is sampled using the planar intercept technique based on the methodology developed by Brown (1974). Pieces of dead...

  7. SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Movement of Melted Material Through Porous Debris in Lower Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    Designs are described for implementing models for calculating the movement of melted material through the interstices in a matrix of porous debris in the lower head of a reactor vessel. The COUPLE model in SCDAP/RELAP5 represents both the porous and nonporous debris that results from core material slumping into the lower head during a severe accident in a Light Water Reactor. Currently, the COUPLE model has no capability to model the movement of material that melts within a matrix of porous material. The COUPLE model also does not have the capability to model the movement of liquefied core plate material that slumps onto a porous debris bed in the lower head. In order to advance beyond the assumption the liquefied material always remains stationary, designs are developed for calculations of the movement of liquefied material through the interstices in a matrix of porous material. Correlations are identified for calculating the permeability of the porous debris and for calculating the rate of flow of liquefied material through the interstices in the debris bed. Correlations are also identified for calculating the relocation of solid debris that has a large amount of cavities due to the flowing away of melted material. Equations are defined for calculating the effect on the temperature distribution in the debris bed of heat transported by moving material and for changes in effective thermal conductivity and heat capacity due to the movement of material. The implementation of these models is expected to improve the calculation of the material distribution and temperature distribution of debris in the lower head for cases in which the debris is porous and liquefied material is present within the porous debris

  8. Energy balance, carbon emissions, and costs of sortyard debris disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC), with funding from Natural Resources Canada, conducted this study to determine the main environmental and energy use issues regarding the landfilling, burning or processing of dryland sortyard debris accumulated in the wood products industry. The wood residues that are generated when logs are processed, sorted and remanufactured, have traditionally been burned or landfilled. This is no longer appropriate. Converting the large woody debris into usable products such as hog fuel or compost requires grinding, smashing or chipping into small pieces to facilitate transportation. In order to make smart decisions about alternative methods of handling sortyard debris, information is needed about the comparative amount of fuel used and carbon dioxide produced. This study compared the treatment alternatives with respect to fuel consumption, net energy balance, carbon dioxide emissions and environmental impact. Recommendations were then presented for the treatment of debris from the point of view of net energy balance and environmental impact. Life cycle techniques were used to determine the environmental impact of alternatives for managing sortyard debris. It was determined that wood wastes are valuable as hog fuel for power generation. Burning hog fuel to recover its energy offsets the need to supply energy from other sources such as natural gas. This reduces the total carbon emissions by the amount of debris that would have been burned as waste. Annual carbon emissions can be reduced by nearly half by switching from a maximize burn strategy to a maximize hog strategy that combines composting of fine materials. 2 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  9. Potentials of Selected Malaysian Biomasses as Co-Gasification Fuels with Oil Palm Fronds in a Fixed-Bed Downdraft Gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moni Mohamad Nazmi Zaidi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oil palm frond (OPF has been successfully gasified to produce syngas and has since deemed as a potential source of biomass fuel in Malaysia. However, if OPF is to be utilized as a main fuel for industrial-scale firing/gasification plant, interruption in fuel supply may occur due to numerous reasons, for instance inefficient fuel processing and ineffective transportation. A secondary supporting solid fuel is therefore necessary as a partial component to the main fuel in such cases, where the secondary fuel is combusted with the main fuel to adhere to main fuel shortage. Gasification of two fuels together, known as co-gasification, is practiced worldwide, some in industrial scale. However, current practice utilizes biomass fuel as the secondary fuel to coal in co-gasification. This investigation explores into the feasibility of co-gasifying two biomass fuels together to produce syngas. OPF was chosen as the primary fuel and a selection of Malaysian biomasses were studied to discover their compatibility with OPF in co-gasification. Biomass selection was made using score-and-rank method and their selection criteria are concisely discussed.

  10. Experimental observations of granular debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilardi, P.

    2003-04-01

    Various tests are run using two different laboratory flumes with rectangular cross section and transparent walls. The grains used in a single experiment have an almost constant grain sizes; mean diameter ranges from 5 mm to 20 mm. In each test various measurements are taken: hydrograms, velocity distribution near the transparent walls and on the free surface, average flow concentration. Concentration values are measured taking samples. Velocity distributions are obtained from movies recorded by high speed video cameras capable of 350 frames per second; flow rates and depth hydrograms are computed from the same velocity distributions. A gate is installed at the beginning of one of the flumes; this gate slides normally to the bed and opens very quickly, reproducing a dam-break. Several tests are run using this device, varying channel slope, sediment concentration, initial mixture thickness before the gate. Velocity distribution in the flume is almost constant from left to right, except for the flow sections near the front. The observed discharges and velocities are less than those given by a classic dam break formula, and depend on sediment concentration. The other flume is fed by a mixture with constant discharge and concentration, and is mainly used for measuring velocity distributions when the flow is uniform, with both rigid and granular bed, and to study erosion/deposition processes near debris flow dams or other mitigation devices. The equilibrium slope of the granular bed is very close to that given by the classical equilibrium formulas for debris flow. Different deposition processes are observed depending on mixture concentration and channel geometry.

  11. TMI-2 core debris analytical methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, D.W.; Cook, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    A series of six grab samples was taken from the debris bed of the TMI-2 core in early September 1983. Five of these samples were sent to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for analysis. Presented is the analysis strategy for the samples and some of the data obtained from the early stages of examination of the samples (i.e., particle size-analysis, gamma spectrometry results, and fissile/fertile material analysis)

  12. Response of a Brook Trout Population and Instream Habitat to a Catastrophic Flood and Debris Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criag N. Roghair; C. Andrew Dolloff; Martin K. Underwood

    2002-01-01

    In June 1995, a massive flood and debris flow impacted fish and habitat along the lower 1.9 km of the Staunton River, a headwater stream located in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. In the area affected by debris flow, the stream bed was scoured and new substrate materials were deposited, trees were removed from a 30-m-wide band in the riparian area, and all fish...

  13. Persistent marine debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the distribution of persistent marine debris, adrift on world oceans and stranded on beaches globally, is reviewed and related to the known inputs and transport by the major surface currents. Since naturally occurring processes eventually degrade petroleum in the environment, international measures to reduce the inputs have been largely successful in alleviating oil pollution on a global, if not on a local, scale. Many plastics, however, are so resistant to natural degradation that merely controlling inputs will be insufficient, and more drastic and costly measures will be needed to cope with the emerging global problem posed by these materials

  14. Impact Forces from Tsunami-Driven Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, H.; Cox, D. T.; Riggs, H.; Naito, C. J.; Kobayashi, M. H.; Piran Aghl, P.

    2012-12-01

    Debris driven by tsunami inundation flow has been known to be a significant threat to structures, yet we lack the constitutive equations necessary to predict debris impact force. The objective of this research project is to improve our understanding of, and predictive capabilities for, tsunami-driven debris impact forces on structures. Of special interest are shipping containers, which are virtually everywhere and which will float even when fully loaded. The forces from such debris hitting structures, for example evacuation shelters and critical port facilities such as fuel storage tanks, are currently not known. This research project focuses on the impact by flexible shipping containers on rigid columns and investigated using large-scale laboratory testing. Full-scale in-air collision experiments were conducted at Lehigh University with 20 ft shipping containers to experimentally quantify the nonlinear behavior of full scale shipping containers as they collide into structural elements. The results from the full scale experiments were used to calibrate computer models and used to design a series of simpler, 1:5 scale wave flume experiments at Oregon State University. Scaled in-air collision tests were conducted using 1:5 scale idealized containers to mimic the container behavior observed in the full scale tests and to provide a direct comparison to the hydraulic model tests. Two specimens were constructed using different materials (aluminum, acrylic) to vary the stiffness. The collision tests showed that at higher speeds, the collision became inelastic as the slope of maximum impact force/velocity decreased with increasing velocity. Hydraulic model tests were conducted using the 1:5 scaled shipping containers to measure the impact load by the containers on a rigid column. The column was instrumented with a load cell to measure impact forces, strain gages to measure the column deflection, and a video camera was used to provide the debris orientation and speed. The

  15. Feature test report for the Small Debris Collection and Packaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbin, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Equipment Engineering group performed feature testing of the Small Debris Collection and Packaging System (SDCPS) in the 305 Cold Test Facility from January 30, 1995, to February 1, 1995. Feature testing of the Small Debris Collection and Packaging System (SDCPS) was performed for the following reasons: To assess the feasibility of using ''drop-out'' vessels to collect small debris (<2.5 cm) in MK-II fuel canisters while transferring sludge to the Weasel Pit. To evaluate system performance under conditions similar to those in the K-Basins (e.g. submerged under 4.9 meters of water and operated with long handled tools) while using a surrogate sludge mixed with debris. To determine if canister weight could be used to predict the volume of sludge and/or debris contained within the canisters during system operation

  16. Particle bed reactor modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  17. In situ measurements of post-fire debris flows in southern California: Comparisons of the timing and magnitude of 24 debris-flow events with rainfall and soil moisture conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, J.W.; Staley, D.M.; Cannon, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Debris flows often occur in burned steeplands of southern California, sometimes causing property damage and loss of life. In an effort to better understand the hydrologic controls on post-fire debris-flow initiation, timing and magnitude, we measured the flow stage, rainfall, channel bed pore fluid pressure and hillslope soil-moisture accompanying 24 debris flows recorded in five different watersheds burned in the 2009 Station and Jesusita Fires (San Gabriel and Santa Ynez Mountains). The measurements show substantial differences in debris-flow dynamics between sites and between sequential events at the same site. Despite these differences, the timing and magnitude of all events were consistently associated with local peaks in short duration (landslides. By identifying the storm characteristics most closely associated with post-fire debris flows, these measurements provide valuable guidance for warning operations and important constraints for developing and testing models of post-fire debris flows. copyright. 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Making the most of South Africa’s low-quality coal: Converting high-ash coal to fuel gas using bubbling fluidised bed gasifiers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Engelbrecht, AD

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available for process heating or for power generation using the IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) process. A high-ash coal from the Waterberg coalfield was tested in a bubbling fluidised bed gasifier using various gasification agents and operating conditions...

  19. Extensions to SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD2 debris analysis models for the severe accident analysis of Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L.J.; Moore, R.L.

    1989-06-01

    Proposed extensions to the debris analysis model in the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to perform severe accident analyses of Savannah River Plant reactors are described. Designs are presented for the following areas of development: (a) calculating convective and radiative heat transfer at the surfaces of a debris region; (b) calculating heatup of a structure and supported debris that interfaces with several fluid control volumes; (c) modeling the addition of transported material to the surfaces of any structure represented by the debris analysis model; (d) calculating the two-dimensional heatup of an arbitrary number of structures in the reactor system; (e) modeling the effect of natural convection of liquefied material on heat transfer in a debris bed; and (f) modeling fission product release and aerosol generation in a debris bed. 11 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs

  20. Wholesale debris removal from LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Eugene; Pearson, Jerome; Carroll, Joseph

    2012-04-01

    Recent advances in electrodynamic propulsion make it possible to seriously consider wholesale removal of large debris from LEO for the first time since the beginning of the space era. Cumulative ranking of large groups of the LEO debris population and general limitations of passive drag devices and rocket-based removal systems are analyzed. A candidate electrodynamic debris removal system is discussed that can affordably remove all debris objects over 2 kg from LEO in 7 years. That means removing more than 99% of the collision-generated debris potential in LEO. Removal is performed by a dozen 100-kg propellantless vehicles that react against the Earth's magnetic field. The debris objects are dragged down and released into short-lived orbits below ISS. As an alternative to deorbit, some of them can be collected for storage and possible in-orbit recycling. The estimated cost per kilogram of debris removed is a small fraction of typical launch costs per kilogram. These rates are low enough to open commercial opportunities and create a governing framework for wholesale removal of large debris objects from LEO.

  1. Experimental investigations on the coolability of prototypical particle beds with respect to reactor safety; Experimentelle Untersuchungen der Kuehlbarkeit prototypischer Schuettungskonfigurationen unter dem Aspekt der Reaktorsicherheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leininger, Simon

    2017-02-22

    In case of a severe accident in a light water reactor, continuous unavailability of cooling water to the reactor core may result in overheating of the fuel elements and finally the loss of core integrity. Under such conditions, a structure of heat-releasing particles of different size and shape may be formed by fragmentation of molten core material in several stages of the accident. The long-term coolability of such beds is of prime im-portance to avoid any damage to the reactor pressure vessel or even a release of fission products to the environment. In the frame of this work, specific experiments were con-ducted under prototypical conditions employing the existing DEBRIS test facility in order to gain further knowledge about the thermohydraulic behavior of such beds. In steady state boiling experiments, the pressure gradients in particle beds were meas-ured both for one- and multi-dimensional cooling water flow conditions and compared with one another in order to assess the flow behavior inside the bed. For these different flow conditions as well as for stratified bed configurations, the maximum removable heat flux densities were determined in the dryout experiments. E. g., it was found that an axial stratification of the permeability can significantly reduce the bed's coolability. For the first time, the quenching behavior of dry, superheated beds was investigated at elevated system pressure up to 0.5 MPa. In these experiments, the effect of system pressure on the coolability was quantified by means of the quenching time (time period to cool down the bed to saturation temperature). The investigated particle beds mainly consisted of non-spherical particles with well-defined geometry (cylinders and screws). It was shown that the effect of the particles geometry on the flow in a particle bed can be best estimated by using an equivalent particle diameter calculated for monodisperse particle beds from the product of the Sauter diameter and a shape factor and for

  2. Space debris: modeling and detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, C.; Lorenz, J.; Radtke, J.; Kebschull, C.; Horstmann, A.; Stoll, E.

    2017-01-01

    High precision orbit determination is required for the detection and removal of space debris. Knowledge of the distribution of debris objects in orbit is necessary for orbit determination by active or passive sensors. The results can be used to investigate the orbits on which objects of a certain size at a certain frequency can be found. The knowledge of the orbital distribution of the objects as well as their properties in accordance with sensor performance models provide the basis for estimating the expected detection rates. Comprehensive modeling of the space debris environment is required for this. This paper provides an overview of the current state of knowledge about the space debris environment. In particular non-cataloged small objects are evaluated. Furthermore, improvements concerning the update of the current space debris model are addressed. The model of the space debris environment is based on the simulation of historical events, such as fragmentations due to explosions and collisions that actually occurred in Earth orbits. The orbital distribution of debris is simulated by propagating the orbits considering all perturbing forces up to a reference epoch. The modeled object population is compared with measured data and validated. The model provides a statistical distribution of space objects, according to their size and number. This distribution is based on the correct consideration of orbital mechanics. This allows for a realistic description of the space debris environment. Subsequently, a realistic prediction can be provided concerning the question, how many pieces of debris can be expected on certain orbits. To validate the model, a software tool has been developed which allows the simulation of the observation behavior of ground-based or space-based sensors. Thus, it is possible to compare the results of published measurement data with simulated detections. This tool can also be used for the simulation of sensor measurement campaigns. It is

  3. Fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, T.; Kudjoi, A.; Hippinen, I.; Heinolainen, A.; Suominen, M.; Lu Yong [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab of Energy Economics and Power Plant Engineering

    1996-12-01

    Partial gasification processes have been presented as possibilities for future power production. In the processes, the solid materials removed from a gasifier (i.e. fly ash and bed material) contain unburnt fuel and the fuel conversion is increased by burning this gasification residue either in an atmospheric or a pressurised fluidised-bed. In this project, which is a part of European JOULE 2 EXTENSION research programme, the main research objectives are the behaviour of calcium and sulphur compounds in solids and the emissions of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O) in pressurised fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residues. (author)

  4. Simulation of the arrival and evolution of debris in a PWR lower head with the SFD ICARE2 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichot, F.; Babik, F.; Zabiego, M.; Barrachin, M.; Chatelard, P.; Lefevre, B.

    1999-01-01

    In a severe accident scenario, the prediction of vessel failure is related to the prediction of the behaviour of solid and liquid debris which have fallen into the lower plenum. One of the difficulties is to define the initial debris bed conditions. They will depend on the presence of water or not in the lower plenum. They will also depend on the rate and composition of the falling debris. In this context, IPSN performs calculations using the ICARE2 code in order to predict the core degradation in a scenario similar to TMI-2, and to estimate the so-called initial conditions of the debris bed, i.e. the history of the debris falling into the lower plenum and the evolution of this debris bed. The latest version of ICARE2 (V3mod0) which deals with molten pools and debris bed allows to follow the materials from their early melting in the core region to their later relocation into the lower plenum. A description of the modeling of the debris bed and molten pool formation is provided in this paper. The debris bed modeling is based on a porous medium approach. Mass and energy conservation equations for each of the three phases and momentum conservation equations for the liquid and gas phases are solved. Up to now, due to the lack of knowledge, no model has been developed to estimate the debris size distribution. It is chosen by the user at the beginning of the calculation. As the temperature increases in the debris bed, a molten pool appears and starts to grow. Thermal effects of the natural convection movements in the pool are taken into account using classical correlations. The present study corresponds to a first application of the new capabilities of ICARE2. However it shows the interest of such an approach for a problem where the behaviour in the vessel is closely related to the previous events that occurred in the core region. Improvements are foreseen, especially for the natural convection, crust formation and interaction with water. (authors)

  5. Health and Safety Considerations Associated with Sodium-Cooled Experimental Nuclear Fuel Dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvo, Alan E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Between the mid-1970s and the mid-1980s Sandia National Laboratory constructed eleven experimental assemblies to simulate debris beds formed in a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. All but one of the assemblies were irradiated. The experimental assemblies were transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2007 and 2008 for storage, dismantlement, recovery of the uranium for reuse in the nuclear fuel cycle, and disposal of unneeded materials. This paper addresses the effort to dismantle the assemblies down to the primary containment vessel and repackage them for temporary storage until such time as equipment necessary for sodium separation is in place.

  6. Problems of Small Debris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Zelentsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the exploration of outer space (as of 1/1 2011 6853 was launched spacecraft (SC are successful 6264, representing 95% of the total number of starts. The most intensively exploited space Russia (USSR (3701 starts, 94% successful, USA (2774 starts, 90% successful, China (234 starts, 96% successful and India (89 starts, 90% successful. A small part of running the spacecraft returned to Earth (manned spacecraft and transport, and the rest remained in orbit. Some of them are descended from orbit and burned up in the atmosphere, the rest remained in the OCP and turned into space debris (SD.The composition of the Cabinet is diverse: finish the job spacecraft; boosters and the last stage of launch vehicles left in orbit after SC injection; technological waste arising during the opening drop-down structures and fragments of the destroyed spacecraft. The resulting explosion orbital SD forms ellipsoidal region which orbits blasted object. Then, as a result of precession, is the distribution of objects in orbit explosion exploding spacecraft.The whole Cabinet is divided into two factions: the observed (larger than 100 mm and not observed (less than 100 mm. Observed debris katalogalizirovan and 0.2% of the total number of SD, there was no SD is the bulk - 99.8%.SC meeting working with a fragment observed SD predictable and due to changes in altitude spacecraft avoids a possible meeting. Contact spacecraft with large fragment lead to disaster (which took place at a meeting of the Russian communications satellite "Cosmos-2251" and the American machine "Iridium". Meeting with small SD is not predictable, especially if it was formed by an explosion or collision fragments together. Orbit that KM is not predictable, and the speed can be up to 10 km / s. Meeting with small particle SD no less dangerous for the spacecraft. The impact speed of spacecraft with space debris particles can reach up to 10 ... 15 km / s at such speeds the breakdown probability thin

  7. Sana experiments for self-acting removal of the after-heat in reactors with pebble bed fuel and their interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niessen, H.F.; Stoecker, Bernd; Amoignon, Olivier; Zuying, Gao; Jie, Liu

    1997-01-01

    For the confirmation of self-acting afterheat removal under hypothetical accident conditions from pebble bed reactors at the Research Center Juelich a test facility with an electrical heating input up to 30kW was erected and operated. A description of the test facility is given. Within the different tests the pebble diameter, the pebble material, the gas in the pebble bed, the heating-power and the arrangement of the heating were changed. Parts of the data were used within an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Program as benchmark problems for the code validation. All computer codes could simulate the test results with a sufficient good agreement, when the tests were executed with helium. For the tests with nitrogen the natural convection has to be taken into account. (author)

  8. Runoff-generated debris flows: observations and modeling of surge initiation, magnitude, and frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Jason W.; McCoy, Scott W.; Tucker, Gregory E.; Staley, Dennis M.; Coe, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Runoff during intense rainstorms plays a major role in generating debris flows in many alpine areas and burned steeplands. Yet compared to debris flow initiation from shallow landslides, the mechanics by which runoff generates a debris flow are less understood. To better understand debris flow initiation by surface water runoff, we monitored flow stage and rainfall associated with debris flows in the headwaters of two small catchments: a bedrock-dominated alpine basin in central Colorado (0.06 km2) and a recently burned area in southern California (0.01 km2). We also obtained video footage of debris flow initiation and flow dynamics from three cameras at the Colorado site. Stage observations at both sites display distinct patterns in debris flow surge characteristics relative to rainfall intensity (I). We observe small, quasiperiodic surges at low I; large, quasiperiodic surges at intermediate I; and a single large surge followed by small-amplitude fluctuations about a more steady high flow at high I. Video observations of surge formation lead us to the hypothesis that these flow patterns are controlled by upstream variations in channel slope, in which low-gradient sections act as “sediment capacitors,” temporarily storing incoming bed load transported by water flow and periodically releasing the accumulated sediment as a debris flow surge. To explore this hypothesis, we develop a simple one-dimensional morphodynamic model of a sediment capacitor that consists of a system of coupled equations for water flow, bed load transport, slope stability, and mass flow. This model reproduces the essential patterns in surge magnitude and frequency with rainfall intensity observed at the two field sites and provides a new framework for predicting the runoff threshold for debris flow initiation in a burned or alpine setting.

  9. JSC Orbital Debris Website Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The website provides information about the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office at JSC, which is the lead NASA center for orbital debris research. It is recognized world-wide for its leadership in addressing orbital debris issues. The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has taken the international lead in conducting measurements of the environment and in developing the technical consensus for adopting mitigation measures to protect users of the orbital environment. Work at the center continues with developing an improved understanding of the orbital debris environment and measures that can be taken to control its growth. Major Contents: Orbital Debris research is divided into the following five broad efforts. Each area of research contains specific information as follows: 1) Modeling - NASA scientists continue to develop and upgrade orbital debris models to describe and characterize the current and future debris environment. Evolutionary and engineering models are described in detail. Downloadable items include a document in PDF format and executable software. 2) Measurements - Measurements of near-Earth orbital debris are accomplished by conducting ground-based and space-based observations of the orbital debris environment. The data from these sources provide validation of the environment models and identify the presence of new sources. Radar, optical and surface examinations are described. External links to related topics are provided. 3) Protection - Orbital debris protection involves conducting hypervelocity impact measurements to assess the risk presented by orbital debris to operating spacecraft and developing new materials and new designs to provide better protection from the environment with less weight penalty. The data from this work provides the link between the environment defined by the models and the risk presented by that environment to operating spacecraft and provides recommendations on design and operations procedures to reduce the risk as

  10. Active Space Debris Removal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele GUERRA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the space era, more than 5000 launches have been carried out, each carrying satellites for many disparate uses, such as Earth observation or communication. Thus, the space environment has become congested and the problem of space debris is now generating some concerns in the space community due to our long-lived belief that “space is big”. In the last few years, solutions to this problem have been proposed, one of those is Active Space Debris Removal: this method will reduce the increasing debris growth and permit future sustainable space activities. The main idea of the method proposed below is a drag augmentation system: use a system capable of putting an expanded foam on a debris which will increase the area-to-mass ratio to increase the natural atmospheric drag and solar pressure. The drag augmentation system proposed here requires a docking system; the debris will be pushed to its release height and then, after un-docking, an uncontrolled re-entry takes place ending with a burn up of the object and the foam in the atmosphere within a given time frame. The method requires an efficient way to change the orbit between two debris. The present paper analyses such a system in combination with an Electric Propulsion system, and emphasizes the choice of using two satellites to remove five effective rockets bodies debris within a year.

  11. Debris Removal Project K West Canister Cleaning System Performance Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FARWICK, C.C.

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 2,300 metric tons Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) are currently stored within two water filled pools, the 105 K East (KE) fuel storage basin and the 105 K West (KW) fuel storage basin, at the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The SNF Project is responsible for operation of the K Basins and for the materials within them. A subproject to the SNF Project is the Debris Removal Subproject, which is responsible for removal of empty canisters and lids from the basins. Design criteria for a Canister Cleaning System to be installed in the KW Basin. This documents the requirements for design and installation of the system

  12. Space Debris Mitigation CONOPS Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    literature search and review a lone article was found with any discussion of it. As with any net, the concept is to catch space debris objects in the net...travel along the track of the orbit and collect debris along its path. The lone article found contends that the idea “does not work”. Bonnal and...100,000 pieces of debris orbiting the planet , [as] NASA estimated -- 2,600 of them more than [four] inches across. [NASA] called the breakup of the

  13. Fluidized bed heat exchanger utilizing angularly extending heat exchange tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmud, Fred M.; Garcia-Mallol, Juan-Antonio

    1980-01-01

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel disposed in a housing. A steam/water natural circulation system is provided and includes a steam drum disposed adjacent the fluidized bed and a series of tubes connected at one end to the steam drum. A portion of the tubes are connected to a water drum and in the path of the air and the gaseous products of combustion exiting from the bed. Another portion of the tubes pass through the bed and extend at an angle to the upper surface of the bed.

  14. Internal dust recirculation system for a fluidized bed heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Robert L.; Garcia-Mallol, Juan A.

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel disposed in a housing. A steam/water natural circulation system is provided in a heat exchange relation to the bed and includes a steam drum disposed adjacent the bed and a tube bank extending between the steam drum and a water drum. The tube bank is located in the path of the effluent gases exiting from the bed and a baffle system is provided to separate the solid particulate matter from the effluent gases. The particulate matter is collected and injected back into the fluidized bed.

  15. Thoron Mitigation System based on charcoal bed for applications in thorium fuel cycle facilities (part 1): Development of theoretical models for design considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, B K; Sudeep Kumara, K; Karunakara, N; Gaware, J J; Sapra, B K; Mayya, Y S

    2017-06-01

    Regulating the environmental discharge of 220 Rn (historically known as thoron) and its decay products from thorium processing facilities is important for protection of environment and general public living in the vicinities. Activated charcoal provides an effective solution to this problem because of its high adsorption capacity to gaseous element like radon. In order to design and develop a charcoal based Thoron Mitigation System, a mathematical model has been developed in the present work for studying the 220 Rn transport and adsorption in a flow through charcoal bed and estimating the 220 Rn mitigation factor (MF) as a function of system and operating parameters. The model accounts for inter- and intra-grain diffusion, advection, radioactive decay and adsorption processes. Also, the effects of large void fluctuation and wall channeling on the mitigation factor have been included through a statistical model. Closed form solution has been provided for the MF in terms of adsorption coefficient, system dimensions, grain size, flow rate and void fluctuation exponent. It is shown that the delay effects due to intra grain diffusion plays a significant role thereby rendering external equilibrium assumptions unsuitable. Also, the application of the statistical model clearly demonstrates the transition from the exponential MF to a power-law form and shows how the occurrence of channels with low probability can lower mitigation factor by several orders of magnitude. As a part of aiding design, the model is further extended to optimise the bed dimensions in respect of pressure drop and MF. The application of the results for the design and development of a practically useful charcoal bed is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of the influence of fuel load and slope on a fire spreading across a bed of pine needles by using oxygen consumption calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tihay, V.; Morandini, F.; Santoni, P. A.; Perez-Ramirez, Y.; Barboni, T.

    2012-11-01

    A set of experiments using a Large Scale Heat Release Rate Calorimeter was conducted to test the effects of slope and fuel load on the fire dynamics. Different parameters such as the geometry of the flame front, the rate of spread, the mass loss rate and the heat release rate were investigated. Increasing the fuel load or the slope modifies the fire behaviour. As expected, the flame length and the rate of spread increase when fuel load or slope increases. The heat release rate does not reach a quasi-steady state when the propagation takes place with a slope of 20° and a high fuel load. This is due to an increase of the length of the fire front leading to an increase of fuel consumed. These considerations have shown that the heat release can be estimated with the mass loss rate by considering the effective heat of combustion. This approach can be a good alternative to estimate accurately the fireline intensity when the measure of oxygen consumption is not possible.

  17. Study of the influence of fuel load and slope on a fire spreading across a bed of pine needles by using oxygen consumption calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tihay, V; Morandini, F; Santoni, P A; Perez-Ramirez, Y; Barboni, T

    2012-01-01

    A set of experiments using a Large Scale Heat Release Rate Calorimeter was conducted to test the effects of slope and fuel load on the fire dynamics. Different parameters such as the geometry of the flame front, the rate of spread, the mass loss rate and the heat release rate were investigated. Increasing the fuel load or the slope modifies the fire behaviour. As expected, the flame length and the rate of spread increase when fuel load or slope increases. The heat release rate does not reach a quasi-steady state when the propagation takes place with a slope of 20° and a high fuel load. This is due to an increase of the length of the fire front leading to an increase of fuel consumed. These considerations have shown that the heat release can be estimated with the mass loss rate by considering the effective heat of combustion. This approach can be a good alternative to estimate accurately the fireline intensity when the measure of oxygen consumption is not possible.

  18. NASA Orbital Debris Baseline Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has created high fidelity populations of the debris environment. The populations include objects of 1 cm and larger in Low Earth Orbit through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. They were designed for the purpose of assisting debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment is derived directly from the newest ORDEM model populations which include a background derived from LEGEND, as well as specific events such as the Chinese ASAT test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, the RORSAT sodium-potassium droplet releases, and other miscellaneous events. It is the most realistic ODPO debris population to date. In this paper we present the populations in chart form. We describe derivations of the background population and the specific populations added on. We validate our 1 cm and larger Low Earth Orbit population against SSN, Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  19. Fluid dynamic simulation of the fluidized bed using propane-air fuel; Simulacao dinamica de um combustor de leito fluidizado utilizando como combustivel o ar-propanado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Junior, L.P.; Lucena, S.; Silva, D.J. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: limajun@br.inter.net

    2004-07-01

    This paper has for purpose to present the modeling and simulation of the homogeneous combustion of the mixture of propane-air in a combustor of fluidized bed with inert particles, basing on a stationary model with phases in series, being taken into account the thermal changes and mass changes among the phases and it changes thermal with the wall for radiation. Computational methods are used for such simulation and CFX 4.4 as dynamic flowing computation software (CFD), kindred of more proximity with the real aspects. Being studied like this dynamic and kinetic flowing parameters of the involved components. (author)

  20. DebriSat Laboratory Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-05

    droplets. Fluorine from Teflon wire insulation was also common in the SEM stub and witness plates deposits. Nano droplets of metallic materials...and Debris-LV debris. Aluminum was from the Al honeycomb, nadir and zenith panels, structural core and COPV liner. Aluminum oxide particles were...three pieces: Outer Nylon shell (sabot) with 2 part hollow aluminum insert. • ~600 grams, 8.6 cm diameter X 10.3 cm long – size of a soup can

  1. Backwater development by woody debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertsema, Tjitske; Torfs, Paul; Teuling, Ryan; Hoitink, Ton

    2017-04-01

    Placement of woody debris is a common method for increasing ecological values in river and stream restoration, and is thus widely used in natural environments. Water managers, however, are afraid to introduce wood in channels draining agricultural and urban areas. Upstream, it may create backwater, depending on hydrodynamic characteristics including the obstruction ratio, the Froude number and the surface level gradient. Patches of wood may trigger or counter morphological activity, both laterally, through bank erosion and protection, and vertically, with pool and riffle formation. Also, a permeable construction composed of wood will weather over time. Both morphodynamic activity and weathering cause backwater effects to change in time. The purpose of this study is to quantify the time development of backwater effects caused by woody debris. Hourly water levels gauged upstream and downstream of patches and discharge are collected for five streams in the Netherlands. The water level drop over the woody debris patch relates to discharge in the streams. This relation is characterized by an increasing water level difference for an increasing discharge, up to a maximum. If the discharge increases beyond this level, the water level difference reduces to the value that may represent the situation without woody debris. This reduction depends primarily on the obstruction ratio of the woody debris in the channel cross-section. Morphologic adjustments in the stream and reorientation of the woody material reduce the water level drop over the patches in time. Our results demonstrate that backwater effects can be reduced by optimizing the location where woody debris is placed and manipulating the obstruction ratio. Current efforts are focussed on representing woody debris in a one-dimensional numerical model, aiming to obtain a generic tool to achieve a stream design with woody debris that minimizes backwater.

  2. Debris Disks: Probing Planet Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Wyatt, Mark C.

    2018-01-01

    Debris disks are the dust disks found around ~20% of nearby main sequence stars in far-IR surveys. They can be considered as descendants of protoplanetary disks or components of planetary systems, providing valuable information on circumstellar disk evolution and the outcome of planet formation. The debris disk population can be explained by the steady collisional erosion of planetesimal belts; population models constrain where (10-100au) and in what quantity (>1Mearth) planetesimals (>10km i...

  3. Particle Bed Reactor scaling relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovik, G.; Araj, K.; Horn, F.L.; Ludewig, H.; Benenati, R.

    1987-01-01

    Scaling relationships for Particle Bed Reactors (PBRs) are discussed. The particular applications are short duration systems, i.e., for propulsion or burst power. Particle Bed Reactors can use a wide selection of different moderators and reflectors and be designed for such a wide range of power and bed power densities. Additional design considerations include the effect of varying the number of fuel elements, outlet Mach number in hot gas channel, etc. All of these variables and options result in a wide range of reactor weights and performance. Extremely light weight reactors (approximately 1 kg/MW) are possible with the appropriate choice of moderator/reflector and power density. Such systems are very attractive for propulsion systems where parasitic weight has to be minimized

  4. An Ontological Architecture for Orbital Debris Data

    OpenAIRE

    Rovetto, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    The orbital debris problem presents an opportunity for inter-agency and international cooperation toward the mutually beneficial goals of debris prevention, mitigation, remediation, and improved space situational awareness (SSA). Achieving these goals requires sharing orbital debris and other SSA data. Toward this, I present an ontological architecture for the orbital debris domain, taking steps in the creation of an orbital debris ontology (ODO). The purpose of this ontological system is to ...

  5. Prediction of corium debris characteristics in lower plenum of a nordic BWR in different accident scenarios using MELCOR code - 15367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phung, V.A.; Galushin, S.; Raub, S.; Goronovski, A.; Villanueva, W.; Koeoep, K; Grishchenko, D.; Kudinov, P.

    2015-01-01

    Severe accident management strategy in Nordic boiling water reactors (BWRs) relies on ex-vessel core debris coolability. The mode of corium melt release from the vessel determines conditions for ex-vessel accident progression and threats to containment integrity, e.g., formation of a non-coolable debris bed and possibility of energetic steam explosion. In-vessel core degradation and relocation is an important stage which determines characteristics of corium debris in the vessel lower plenum, such as mass, composition, thermal properties, timing of relocation, and decay heat. These properties affect debris reheating and remelting, melt interactions with the vessel structures, and possibly vessel failure and melt ejection mode. Core degradation and relocation is contingent upon the accident scenario parameters such as recovery time and capacity of safety systems. The goal of this work is to obtain a better understanding of the impact of the accident scenarios and timing of the events on core relocation phenomena and resulting properties of the debris bed in the vessel lower plenum of Nordic BWRs. In this study, severe accidents in a Nordic BWR reference plant are initiated by a station black out event, which is the main contributor to core damage frequency of the reactor. The work focuses on identifying ranges of debris bed characteristics in the lower plenum as functions of the accident scenario with different recovery timing and capacity of safety systems. The severe accident analysis code MELCOR coupled with GA-IDPSA is used in this work. GA-IDPSA is a Genetic Algorithm-based Integrated Deterministic Probabilistic Safety Analysis tool, which has been developed to search uncertain input parameter space. The search is guided by different target functions. Scenario grouping and clustering approach is applied in order to estimate the ranges of debris characteristics and identify scenario regions of core relocation that can lead to significantly different debris bed

  6. The physics of debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    1997-08-01

    Recent advances in theory and experimentation motivate a thorough reassessment of the physics of debris flows. Analyses of flows of dry, granular solids and solid-fluid mixtures provide a foundation for a comprehensive debris flow theory, and experiments provide data that reveal the strengths and limitations of theoretical models. Both debris flow materials and dry granular materials can sustain shear stresses while remaining static; both can deform in a slow, tranquil mode characterized by enduring, frictional grain contacts; and both can flow in a more rapid, agitated mode characterized by brief, inelastic grain collisions. In debris flows, however, pore fluid that is highly viscous and nearly incompressible, composed of water with suspended silt and clay, can strongly mediate intergranular friction and collisions. Grain friction, grain collisions, and viscous fluid flow may transfer significant momentum simultaneously. Both the vibrational kinetic energy of solid grains (measured by a quantity termed the granular temperature) and the pressure of the intervening pore fluid facilitate motion of grains past one another, thereby enhancing debris flow mobility. Granular temperature arises from conversion of flow translational energy to grain vibrational energy, a process that depends on shear rates, grain properties, boundary conditions, and the ambient fluid viscosity and pressure. Pore fluid pressures that exceed static equilibrium pressures result from local or global debris contraction. Like larger, natural debris flows, experimental debris flows of ˜10 m³ of poorly sorted, water-saturated sediment invariably move as an unsteady surge or series of surges. Measurements at the base of experimental flows show that coarse-grained surge fronts have little or no pore fluid pressure. In contrast, finer-grained, thoroughly saturated debris behind surge fronts is nearly liquefied by high pore pressure, which persists owing to the great compressibility and moderate

  7. The physics of debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in theory and experimentation motivate a thorough reassessment of the physics of debris flows. Analyses of flows of dry, granular solids and solid-fluid mixtures provide a foundation for a comprehensive debris flow theory, and experiments provide data that reveal the strengths and limitations of theoretical models. Both debris flow materials and dry granular materials can sustain shear stresses while remaining static; both can deform in a slow, tranquil mode characterized by enduring, frictional grain contacts; and both can flow in a more rapid, agitated mode characterized by brief, inelastic grain collisions. In debris flows, however, pore fluid that is highly viscous and nearly incompressible, composed of water with suspended silt and clay, can strongly mediate intergranular friction and collisions. Grain friction, grain collisions, and viscous fluid flow may transfer significant momentum simultaneously. Both the vibrational kinetic energy of solid grains (measured by a quantity termed the granular temperature) and the pressure of the intervening pore fluid facilitate motion of grains past one another, thereby enhancing debris flow mobility. Granular temperature arises from conversion of flow translational energy to grain vibrational energy, a process that depends on shear rates, grain properties, boundary conditions, and the ambient fluid viscosity and pressure. Pore fluid pressures that exceed static equilibrium pressures result from local or global debris contraction. Like larger, natural debris flows, experimental debris flows of ???10 m3 of poorly sorted, water-saturated sediment invariably move as an unsteady surge or series of surges. Measurements at the base of experimental flows show that coarse-grained surge fronts have little or no pore fluid pressure. In contrast, finer-grained, thoroughly saturated debris behind surge fronts is nearly liquefied by high pore pressure, which persists owing to the great compressibility and moderate

  8. Nuclear fuel pellet loading apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerkey, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    An automatic apparatus for loading a predetermined amount of nuclear fuel pellets into a nuclear fuel element to be used in a nuclear reactor is described. The apparatus consists of a vibratory bed capable of supporting corrugated trays containing rows of nuclear fuel pellets and arranged in alignment with the open ends of several nuclear fuel elements. A sweep mechanism is arranged above the trays and serves to sweep the rows of fuel pellets onto the vibratory bed and into the fuel element. A length detecting system, in conjunction with a pellet stopping mechanism, is also provided to assure that a predetermined amount of nuclear fuel pellets are loaded into each fuel element

  9. Space debris mitigation - engineering strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E.; Hammond, M.

    The problem of space debris pollution is acknowledged to be of growing concern by space agencies, leading to recent activities in the field of space debris mitigation. A review of the current (and near-future) mitigation guidelines, handbooks, standards and licensing procedures has identified a number of areas where further work is required. In order for space debris mitigation to be implemented in spacecraft manufacture and operation, the authors suggest that debris-related criteria need to become design parameters (following the same process as applied to reliability and radiation). To meet these parameters, spacecraft manufacturers and operators will need processes (supported by design tools and databases and implementation standards). A particular aspect of debris mitigation, as compared with conventional requirements (e.g. radiation and reliability) is the current and near-future national and international regulatory framework and associated liability aspects. A framework for these implementation standards is presented, in addition to results of in-house research and development on design tools and databases (including collision avoidance in GTO and SSTO and evaluation of failure criteria on composite and aluminium structures).

  10. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations, landfills and recycling facilities for construction and demolition materials, electronics, household hazardous waste, metals, tires, and vehicles in the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, West Virginia and Wisconsin.In this update, facilities in the 7 states that border the EPA Region 5 states were added to assist interstate disaster debris management. Also, the datasets for composters, construction and demolition recyclers, demolition contractors, and metals recyclers were verified and source information added for each record using these sources: AGC, Biocycle, BMRA, CDRA, ISRI, NDA, USCC, FEMA Debris Removal Contractor Registry, EPA Facility Registry System, and State and local listings.

  11. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations, landfills and recycling facilities for construction and demolition materials, electronics, household hazardous waste, metals, tires, and vehicles in the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, West Virginia and Wisconsin.In this update, facilities in the 7 states that border the EPA Region 5 states were added to assist interstate disaster debris management. Also, the datasets for composters, construction and demolition recyclers, demolition contractors, and metals recyclers were verified and source information added for each record using these sources: AGC, Biocycle, BMRA, CDRA, ISRI, NDA, USCC, FEMA Debris Removal Contractor Registry, EPA Facility Registry System, and State and local listings.

  12. Immobilization of Three-Mile Island core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, J.M.; Miller, R.L.; Flinn, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    The immobilization of Three-Mile Island core debris in iron-enriched basalt (IEB), a fused-cast nuclear waste form, was considered. The amount of zirconium clad UO 2 fuel assemblies that can be dissolved in IEB using the Zr to UO 2 ratio present in the core was bracketed between 25 and 30% at 1500 0 C. The factors controlling the rate of dissolution of fuel pellets and Inconel, a structural component of the core, were investigated. Since the UO 2 dissolved in IEB could be a valuable resource in the future, the recovery of uranium from IEB using conventional ore-dressing and leaching techniques was assessed

  13. Ruedersdorf cement works substitutes raw material and fuel by means of a circulating fluidised bed; Roh- und Brennstoffsubstitution mit einer Zirkulierenden Wirbelschicht im Zementwerk Ruedersdorf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scur, P. [Ruedersdorfer Zement GmbH, Ruedersdorf (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to point out the great potential the cement industry holds for the utilisation of waste materials. There are meanwhile sufficient studies and measuring results to demonstrate the environmental acceptability of the processes and products involved. The solution found for Ruedersdorf cement kiln of using a circulating a fluidised bed for waste utilisation is a good example of the potential still available for conserving natural resources and landfill area. Efficient industrial applications of this kind should become a future mainstay of the waste industry. [Deutsch] In dem vorliegenden Beitrag sollte gezeigt werden, dass die Zementindustrie ueber ein hohes Potential zur thermischen und stofflichen Verwertung von Abfallstoffen verfuegt. Es liegen ausreichende Untersuchungen und konkrete Messergebnisse vor, mit denen die Umweltvertraeglichkeit von Prozess und Produkt nachgewiesen werden kann. Die Loesung zur Abfallverwertung an der Ruedersdorfer Zementofenanlage mit Hilfe einer Zirkulierenden Wirbelschicht ist ein Beispiel fuer die Reserven zur Schonung natuerlicher Ressourcen und zur Einsparung von Deponieraeumen. Derartige sinnvolle industrielle Einsatzmoeglichkeiten sollten ein wichtiges Standbein fuer die zukuenftige Abfallwirtschaft sein. (orig.)

  14. Debris and pool formation/heat transfer in FARO-LWR: experiments and analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magallon, D.; Annunziato, A.; Corradini, M.

    1999-01-01

    The FARO-LWR experiments examine the debris and pool formation from a pour of core melt materials (UO 2 /ZrO 2 and UO 2 /ZrO 2 /Zr) into a pool of water at prototypic accident conditions. The experiments give unique data on the debris bed initial conditions, morphology and heat transfer after the core melt has slump and (partly) quenched into the water of the lower head. Quantities of up to 170 kg of corium melt are poured by gravity into water of depth between 1 and 2 m through a nozzle of diameter 0.1 m at different system pressures. The debris is collected in a flat bottom catcher of diameter 0.66 m. It reaches heights up to 0.2 m depending on the melt quantity. In general, the melt reaches the bottom only partially fragmented. The debris which forms consists of a conglomerate ('cake') in contact with the collecting structure and overlaying fragments (loose debris). The mean particle size of the loose debris is in the range 3.5 - 4.8 mm. The upper surface of the debris is flat. A gap is present between the cake and the bottom plate. The paper reviews the debris formation and heat transfer to the bottom steel structure from these tests and describes the development of a model to predict the debris and pool formation process. Sensitivity analyses have been performed by the COMETA code to study the behaviour of the ratio between the cake mass and the total mass. (authors)

  15. Improvement of Combustion Characteristics in Fluidized Bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.S.; El Sourougy, M.R.; Faik, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation is directed towards the experimental study of the effect of a new design of the bed temperature on the overall thermal efficiency and heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation in gaseous fuel-fluidized bed combustion system. The experiments are performed on a water-cooled fluidized bed model furnace with cylindrical cross-section of 0.25 m diameter and its height is 0.60 m. the fluidising medium used is sand particles with average diameter 1.5 mm. The bed temperature is varied between 700 degree C and 1100 degree C. Measurements f carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and oxygen concentrations are carried out by using water-cooled sampling probe, and infrared and paramagnetic analyzers. The results obtained show that the bed temperature, the total heat transfer to the wall and the bed combustion efficiency increase with the decrease of the air-fuel ratio. It is also found that 91% of the total heat transfer is in the fluidising part of the bed and most of this heat is transferred by convection from hot sand particles to the wall. Two empirical formulae for the calculation of the wall heat transfer coefficient and the particle convective heat transfer coefficient are proposed. A verification of the proposed empirical formulae is made by comparing the calculated values with the experimental results.

  16. Debris filtering efficiency and its effect on long term cooling capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Min-Su; Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Debris filtering efficiencies for two debris filter designs used in PWRs are provided. • Various debris used in the tests are selected to simulate actual debris found in PWRs. • Debris filter efficiency is explained by flow-hole size and grid strap height. • The effect of debris filters on flow blockage during LTC after a LOCA is described. -- Abstract: A cutting-edge debris-filter designs, Protective Grid (P-grid) and Guardian Grid (G-grid) attached to the upper part of bottom nozzle, have been employed for the PWRs in Korea since 2000s to protect the fuel from debris-induced fuel failures. The debris-filter efficiency of the P-grid and G-grid designs is improved by relatively smaller flow areas formed by the grid straps and dimples. The debris-filter efficiency of the P-grid design is further improved by the relatively smaller flow-hole bottom nozzle. The debris-filter flow tests employing eighteen debris types showed that the debris-filter efficiencies of the P-grid and G-grid designs are 91 and 96%, respectively, while that of the SYS80 fuel design having only the standard flow-hole bottom nozzle is 26%. The slightly better debris-filter efficiency of the G-grid design against the P-grid design may be explained by relatively smaller flow areas at the G-grid dimple region as well as by the relatively longer solid end plug and the higher G-grid strap. The P-grid design may capture circular shapes of debris larger than 3.44 mm in diameter at the flow holes formed by the P-grid dimples, whereas the G-grid design may capture circular shapes of debris larger than 2.54 mm in diameter at the flow holes formed by the G-grid dimples. The aforementioned difference in the debris-filter efficiency between the P-grid and G-grid designs may be predicted by the solid modeling technique generating three-dimensional flow paths. Using the minimum flow-hole areas generated by the P-grid and G-grid designs, on the other hand, the effect of debris injected from

  17. Fuel assembly for gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellowlees, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    A fuel assembly is described for gas-cooled nuclear reactor which consists of a wrapper tube within which are positioned a number of spaced apart beds in a stack, with each bed containing spherical coated particles of fuel; each of the beds has a perforated top and bottom plate; gaseous coolant passes successively through each of the beds; through each of the beds also passes a bypass tube; part of the gas travels through the bed and part passes through the bypass tube; the gas coolant which passes through both the bed and the bypass tube mixes in the space on the outlet side of the bed before entering the next bed

  18. Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act legally establishes the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Marine Debris Program. The...

  19. The ecological impacts of marine debris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rochman, Chelsea M.; Browne, Mark Anthony; Underwood, A.J.; Franeker, Van Jan A.; Thompson, Richard C.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic debris contaminates marine habitats globally, leading to several perceived ecological impacts. Here, we critically and systematically review the literature regarding impacts of debris from several scientific fields to understand the weight of evidence regarding the ecological

  20. Space Debris Elimination (SpaDE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The amount of debris in low Earth orbit (LEO) has increased rapidly over the last twenty years. This prevalence of debris increases the likelihood of cascading...

  1. DebriSat Project Update and Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, M.; Krisko, P. H.

    2016-01-01

    DebriSat Reporting Topics: DebriSat Fragment Analysis Calendar; Near-term Fragment Extraction Strategy; Fragment Characterization and Database; HVI (High-Velocity Impact) Considerations; Requirements Document.

  2. Ex-vessel debris coolability test during severe accident (COTELS project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogasawara, H.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of the COTELS project are for severe accident management, to investigate phenomena of ex-vessel fuel-coolant interactions after reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure and to investigate molten core-concrete interaction when coolant is injected onto molten debris. The project has being cooperated with the National Nuclear Center in the Republic of Kazakstan from 1994 to 1997 under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry of Japan. Total programs are composed with the following tests. (1) Test 01 was meant to observe flow mode of falling debris. (2) Test A was meant to investigate phenomena of fuel-coolant interactions when molten debris falls into a coolant pool. (3) Test B/C investigated fuel coolant interactions and molten core-concrete interaction when coolant is injected onto debris. Detail data evaluation is underway. The following results were thus for obtained: (1) It was confirmed in Test 01 series that about 60 kg of UO 2 mixture was completely melted and fallen as a continuous jet. (2) No energetic fuel-coolant interaction was observed both in Test A and B series. (3) Debris in which decay heat was simulated was cooled by water injection in Test C series

  3. HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program cores 9 & 10: columnar hexagonal point-on-point packing with a 1:1 moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  4. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  5. Dryout heat flux experiments with deep heterogeneous particle bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, I.; Holmstroem, S.; Miettinen, J.; Lestinen, V.; Hyvaerinen, J.; Pankakoski, P.; Sjoevall, H.

    2006-01-01

    A test facility has been constructed at Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) to simulate as accurately as possible the ex-vessel core particle bed in the conditions of Olkiluoto nuclear power plant. The STYX particle bed reproduces the anticipated depth of the bed and the size range of particles having irregular shape. The bed is immersed in water, creating top flooding conditions, and internally heated by an array of electrical resistance heating elements. Dryout tests have been successfully conducted at 0.1-0.7 MPa pressure for both uniformly mixed and stratified bed geometries. In all tests, including the stratified ones, the dry zone first formed near the bottom of the bed. The measured dryout heat fluxes increased with increasing pressure, from 232 kW/m 2 at near atmospheric pressure to 451 kW/m 2 at 0.7 MPa pressure. The data show some scatter even for the uniform bed. The tests with the stratified bed indicate a clear reduction of critical power due to the presence of a layer of small particles on top of the uniform bed. Comparison of data with various critical power (dryout heat flux) correlations for porous media shows that the most important parameter in the models is the effective particle diameter. Adiabatic debris bed flow resistance measurements were conducted to determine the most representative particle diameter. This diameter is close, but not equal, to the particle number-weighted average diameter of the bed material. With it, uniform bed data can be calculated to within an accuracy of 3-28% using Lipinski's 0-D model. In the stratified bed experiments, it appears that the top layer was partially fluidized, hence the measured critical power was significantly higher than calculated. Future experiments are being planned with denser top layer material to eliminate non-prototypic fluidization

  6. DebriSat Hypervelocity Impact Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    public release; distribution unlimited.  Targets: Scaled Multishock Shield, DebrisLV, and DebriSat  500-600 g hollow aluminum and nylon projectile... insulation . DebriSat’s internal components were structurally similar to real flight hardware but were nonfunctional. AEDC-TR-15-S-2 6...structures with an AL 5052 honeycomb core and M55J carbon fiber face sheets. The basic system characteristics of the DebriSat are given in Table 1

  7. Effects of combustion temperature on air emissions and support fuel consumption in full scale fluidized bed sludge incineration: with particular focus on nitrogen oxides and total organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löschau, Margit

    2018-04-01

    This article describes a pilot test at a sewage sludge incineration plant and shows its results considering the impacts of reducing the minimum combustion temperature from 850°C to 800°C. The lowering leads to an actual reduction of the average combustion temperature by 25 K and a significant reduction in the fuel oil consumption for support firing. The test shall be used for providing evidence that the changed combustion conditions do not result in higher air pollutant emissions. The analysis focusses on the effects of the combustion temperature on nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and total organic carbon emissions. The evaluation of all continuously monitored emissions shows reduced emission levels compared to the previous years, especially for NO x .

  8. Coolability of volumetrically heated particle beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Muhammad

    2017-03-22

    In case of a severe nuclear reactor accident, with loss of coolant, a particle bed may be formed from the fragmentation of the molten core in the residual water at different stages of the accident. To avoid further propagation of the accident and maintain the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel, the decay heat of the particle bed must be removed. To better understand the various thermo-hydraulic processes within such heat-generating particle beds, the existing DEBRIS test facility at IKE has been modified to be able to perform novel boiling, dryout and quenching experiments. The essential experimental data includes the pressure gradients measured by 8 differential pressure transducers along the bed height as a function of liquid and vapour superficial velocities, the determination of local dryout heat fluxes for different system pressures as well as the local temperature distribution measured by a set of 51 thermocouples installed inside the particle bed. The experiments were carried out for two different particle beds: a polydispersed particle bed which consisted of stainless steel balls (2 mm, 3 mm and 6 mm diameters) and an irregular particle bed which consisted of a mixture of steel balls (3 mm and 6 mm) and irregularly shaped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. Additionally, all experiments were carried out for different flow conditions, such as the reference case of passive 1D top-flooding, 1D bottom flooding (driven by external pumps and different downcomer configurations) and 2D top-/bottom-/lateral flooding with a perforated downcomer. In this work, it has been observed that for both particle beds with downcomer configurations an open downcomer leads to the best coolability (dryout heat flux = 1560 kW/m{sup 2}, polydispersed particle bed, psys = 1 bar) of the particle bed, mainly due to bottom-flow with enhanced natural convection. It has also been shown that a potential lateral flow via a perforation of the downcomer does not bring any further improvements

  9. Coolability of volumetrically heated particle beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    In case of a severe nuclear reactor accident, with loss of coolant, a particle bed may be formed from the fragmentation of the molten core in the residual water at different stages of the accident. To avoid further propagation of the accident and maintain the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel, the decay heat of the particle bed must be removed. To better understand the various thermo-hydraulic processes within such heat-generating particle beds, the existing DEBRIS test facility at IKE has been modified to be able to perform novel boiling, dryout and quenching experiments. The essential experimental data includes the pressure gradients measured by 8 differential pressure transducers along the bed height as a function of liquid and vapour superficial velocities, the determination of local dryout heat fluxes for different system pressures as well as the local temperature distribution measured by a set of 51 thermocouples installed inside the particle bed. The experiments were carried out for two different particle beds: a polydispersed particle bed which consisted of stainless steel balls (2 mm, 3 mm and 6 mm diameters) and an irregular particle bed which consisted of a mixture of steel balls (3 mm and 6 mm) and irregularly shaped Al 2 O 3 particles. Additionally, all experiments were carried out for different flow conditions, such as the reference case of passive 1D top-flooding, 1D bottom flooding (driven by external pumps and different downcomer configurations) and 2D top-/bottom-/lateral flooding with a perforated downcomer. In this work, it has been observed that for both particle beds with downcomer configurations an open downcomer leads to the best coolability (dryout heat flux = 1560 kW/m 2 , polydispersed particle bed, psys = 1 bar) of the particle bed, mainly due to bottom-flow with enhanced natural convection. It has also been shown that a potential lateral flow via a perforation of the downcomer does not bring any further improvements in

  10. Advances in fluidized bed technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutanen, K.

    1992-01-01

    Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) has advanced into industrial cogeneration and utility-scale electric generation. During the 1980's AFBC became the dominant technology in the United States for power generation systems fired with solid fuels. Development of pressurized fluidized bed combustion/gasification (PFB/G) has grown rapidly from small bench-scale rigs to large pilot and demonstration plants. AFBC as large as 160 MWe in capacity are now in operation, while pressurized combustion systems generating 80 MWe have started up two years ago. The major driving forces behind development of fluidized bed technologies are all the time strictening emission control regulations, need for fuel flexibility, repowering of older power plants and need for higher efficiency in electricity generation. Independent power producers (IPP) and cogenerators were the first ones in the United States who accepted AFBC for wide commercial use. Their role will be dominant in the markets of the 1990's also. Developers of AFBC systems are working on designs that reduce investment costs, decrease emissions and offer even higher reliability and availability in utility-scale applications while developers of PFBC/G work on designs that increase plant efficiencies, allow modular construction, decrease emissions further and reduce the cost of generating power. This paper presents technological background, commercial status, boiler performance, emissions and future developments for both AFBC and PFBC/G systems

  11. Vision-based Ground Test for Active Debris Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Min Lim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the continuous space development by mankind, the number of space objects including space debris in orbits around the Earth has increased, and accordingly, difficulties of space development and activities are expected in the near future. In this study, among the stages for space debris removal, the implementation of a vision-based approach technique for approaching space debris from a far-range rendezvous state to a proximity state, and the ground test performance results were described. For the vision-based object tracking, the CAM-shift algorithm with high speed and strong performance, and the Kalman filter were combined and utilized. For measuring the distance to a tracking object, a stereo camera was used. For the construction of a low-cost space environment simulation test bed, a sun simulator was used, and in the case of the platform for approaching, a two-dimensional mobile robot was used. The tracking status was examined while changing the position of the sun simulator, and the results indicated that the CAM-shift showed a tracking rate of about 87% and the relative distance could be measured down to 0.9 m. In addition, considerations for future space environment simulation tests were proposed.

  12. Application of CaO-Based Bed Material for Dual Fluidized Bed Steam Biomass Gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppatz, S.; Pfeifer, C.; Kreuzeder, A.; Soukup, G.; Hofbauer, H.

    Gasification of biomass is a suitable option for decentralized energy supply based on renewable sources in the range of up to 50 MW fuel input. The paper presents the dual fluidized bed (DFB) steam gasification process, which is applied to generate high quality and nitrogen-free product gas. Essential part of the DFB process is the bed material used in the fluidized reactors, which has significant impact on the product gas quality. By the use of catalytically active bed materials the performance of the overall process is increased, since the bed material favors reactions of the steam gasification. In particular, tar reforming reactions are favored. Within the paper, the pilot plant based on the DFB process with 100kW fuel input at Vienna University of Technology, Austria is presented. Actual investigations with focus on CaO-based bed materials (limestone) as well as with natural olivine as bed material were carried out at the pilot plant. The application of CaO-based bed material shows mainly decreased tar content in the product gas in contrast to experiments with olivine as bed material. The paper presents the results of steam gasification experiments with limestone and olivine, whereby the product gas composition as well as the tar content and the tar composition are outlined.

  13. Photometric Studies of GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Horstman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The photometric signature of a debris object can be useful in determining what the physical characteristics of a piece of debris are. We report on optical observations in multiple filters of debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the SMARTS (Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System) 0.9-m at CTIO for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 th magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. At this magnitude the distribution of observed angular rates changes significantly from that of brighter objects. There are two objectives: 1. Estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: brightness (magnitude) and angular rates. 2. Obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. What is the faint debris likely to be? In this paper we report on the photometric results. For a sample of 50 objects, more than 90 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes have been obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could be that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus

  14. Erosion and deposition on a debris-flow fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, A. L.; Schuerch, P.; Rosser, N. J.; McArdell, B. W.

    2011-12-01

    The ability of a debris flow to entrain or deposit sediment controls the downstream evolution of flow volume, and ultimately dictates both the geomorphic impact of the flow and the potential hazard that it represents. Our understanding of the patterns of, and controls on, such flow volume changes remains extremely limited, however, partly due to a poor mechanistic grasp of the interactions between debris flows and their bed and banks. In addition, we lack a good understanding of the cumulative long-term effects of sequences of flows in a single catchment-fan system. Here we begin to address these issues by using repeated terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to characterize the detailed surface change associated with the passage of multiple debris flows on the Illgraben fan, Switzerland. We calculate surface elevation change along a 300 m study reach, and from this derive the downfan rate of flow volume change, or lag rate; for comparison, we also derive the spatially-averaged lag rate over the entire ~2 km length of the fan. Lag rates are broadly comparable over both length scales, indicating that flow behavior does not vary significantly across the fan for most flows, but importantly we find that flow volume at the fan head is a poor predictor of volume at the fan toe. The sign and magnitude of bed elevation change scale with local flow depth; at flow depths 2 m. On the Illgraben fan, this depth corresponds to a basal shear stress of 3-4 kPa. Because flow depth is in part a function of channel cross-sectional topography, which varies strongly both within and between flows, this result indicates that erosion and deposition are likely to be highly dynamic. The dependence of flow volume change on both the channel topography and the flow history may thus complicate efforts to predict debris-flow inundation areas by simple flow routing. We then apply a 2d numerical model of debris-flow fan evolution to explore the key controls on debris-flow routing and topographic

  15. Particle bed reactor nuclear rocket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.

    1991-01-01

    The particle bed reactor nuclear rocket concept consists of fuel particles (in this case (U,Zr)C with an outer coat of zirconium carbide). These particles are packed in an annular bed surrounded by two frits (porous tubes) forming a fuel element; the outer one being a cold frit, the inner one being a hot frit. The fuel element are cooled by hydrogen passing in through the moderator. These elements are assembled in a reactor assembly in a hexagonal pattern. The reactor can be either reflected or not, depending on the design, and either 19 or 37 elements, are used. Propellant enters in the top, passes through the moderator fuel element and out through the nozzle. Beryllium used for the moderator in this particular design to withstand the high radiation exposure implied by the long run times

  16. Ninth annual coal-fueled heat engines, advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion, and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Welcoming address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    The market for retrofit and new capacity in the electric utility is expected to be very large: 250 gigawatt (GW) and 500 GW by the year 2030--an amount which equals the presently installed capacity in the US Overseas, the market is even larger exclamation point This large market will be driven by a number of key ''drivers.'' In order for power generation systems to compete in this market, they will have to satisfy the market drivers. This will lead us inevitably to modular, low cost, super clean, efficient, and reliable products which are fuel flexible and can meet either retrofit, repowering, or new capacity applications. I believe clean coal technologies that we are developing will meet these market demands and will penetrate--and eventually dominate--the power generation market of the next century. But for this market penetration and widespread deployment to take place, the products we are jointly developing must be continuously improved. We must together set our goals on a rapid march down the learning curve from the present high ''projected costs'' of these systems to an acceptable market clearing price on the order of $1000 to $1200 per kilowatt (kw) and with heat rates approaching 7500 Btu per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The projected learning curve for integrated gasification combined cycle systems is a good illustration of the aggressive goals we need to achieve

  17. Disaster Characteristics and Mitigation Measures of Huge Glacial Debris Flows along the Sichuan-Tibet Railway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; You, Yong; Zhang, Guangze; Wang, Dong; Chen, Jiangang; Chen, Huayong

    2017-04-01

    accumulation length is 1.91 km and 1.75 km, and the accumulation width is 4.71 km and 3.68 km for the case of P=0.5% and P=1% respectively. The accumulation depth along the main flow direction is 40˜60m and 25˜35m. Consequently, four plans of railway alignment including passing through the down-stream by tunnel, passing through the gully outlet by tunnel and bridge, passing through the middle-lower part of the accumulation fan by railway bed and bridge, passing through the middle-lower part of the accumulation fan by tunnel were presented. The four plans were compared and related debris flow mitigation measures were provided.

  18. Detecting debris flows using ground vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHusen, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    Debris flows are rapidly flowing mixtures of rock debris, mud, and water that originate on steep slopes. During and following volcanic eruptions, debris flows are among the most destructive and persistent hazards. Debris flows threaten lives and property not only on volcanoes but far downstream in valleys that drain volcanoes where they arrive suddenly and inundate entire valley bottoms. Debris flows can destroy vegetation and structures in their path, including bridges and buildings. Their deposits can cover roads and railways, smother crops, and fill stream channels, thereby reducing their flood-carrying capacity and navigability.

  19. Coupled prediction of flash flood response and debris flow occurrence: Application on an alpine extreme flood event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destro, Elisa; Amponsah, William; Nikolopoulos, Efthymios I.; Marchi, Lorenzo; Marra, Francesco; Zoccatelli, Davide; Borga, Marco

    2018-03-01

    The concurrence of flash floods and debris flows is of particular concern, because it may amplify the hazard corresponding to the individual generative processes. This paper presents a coupled modelling framework for the predictions of flash flood response and of the occurrence of debris flows initiated by channel bed mobilization. The framework combines a spatially distributed flash flood response model and a debris flow initiation model to define a threshold value for the peak flow which permits identification of channelized debris flow initiation. The threshold is defined over the channel network as a function of the upslope area and of the local channel bed slope, and it is based on assumptions concerning the properties of the channel bed material and of the morphology of the channel network. The model is validated using data from an extreme rainstorm that impacted the 140 km2 Vizze basin in the Eastern Italian Alps on August 4-5, 2012. The results show that the proposed methodology has improved skill in identifying the catchments where debris-flows are triggered, compared to the use of simpler thresholds based on rainfall properties.

  20. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Practice Hospital Bed Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... It depends on the complexity of the bed." Safety Tips CDRH offers the following safety tips for ...

  1. Bed Bugs and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bed bugs have long been a pest – feeding on blood, causing itchy bites and generally irritating their human hosts. They are successful hitchhikers, and can move from an infested site to furniture, bedding, baggage, boxes, and clothing.

  2. Colisional Cloud Debris and Propelled Evasive Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L. S.; Jesus, A. D. C.; Carvalho, T. C. F.; Sousa, R. R.

    2017-10-01

    Space debris clouds exist at various altitudes in the environment outside the Earth. Fragmentation of debris and/or collision between the debris of a cloud increases the amount of debris, producing smaller debris. This event also increases significantly the chances of collision with operational vehicles in orbit. In this work we study clouds of debris that are close to a spacecraft in relation to its distance from the center of the Earth. The results show several layers of colliding debris depending on their size over time of evasive maneuvers of the vehicle. In addition, we have tested such maneuvers for propulsion systems with a linear and exponential mass variation model. The results show that the linear propulsion system is more efficient.

  3. Analysis of accelerants and fire debris using aroma detection technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barshick, S.A.

    1997-01-17

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the utility of electronic aroma detection technologies for the detection and identification of accelerant residues in suspected arson debris. Through the analysis of known accelerant residues, a trained neural network was developed for classifying suspected arson samples. Three unknown fire debris samples were classified using this neural network. The item corresponding to diesel fuel was correctly identified every time. For the other two items, wide variations in sample concentration and excessive water content, producing high sample humidities, were shown to influence the sensor response. Sorbent sampling prior to aroma detection was demonstrated to reduce these problems and to allow proper neural network classification of the remaining items corresponding to kerosene and gasoline.

  4. The fast debris evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, H. G.; Swinerd, G. G.; Newland, R. J.; Saunders, A.

    2009-09-01

    The 'particles-in-a-box' (PIB) model introduced by Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] removed the need for computer-intensive Monte Carlo simulation to predict the gross characteristics of an evolving debris environment. The PIB model was described using a differential equation that allows the stability of the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment to be tested by a straightforward analysis of the equation's coefficients. As part of an ongoing research effort to investigate more efficient approaches to evolutionary modelling and to develop a suite of educational tools, a new PIB model has been developed. The model, entitled Fast Debris Evolution (FADE), employs a first-order differential equation to describe the rate at which new objects ⩾10 cm are added and removed from the environment. Whilst Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] based the collision theory for the PIB approach on collisions between gas particles and adopted specific values for the parameters of the model from a number of references, the form and coefficients of the FADE model equations can be inferred from the outputs of future projections produced by high-fidelity models, such as the DAMAGE model. The FADE model has been implemented as a client-side, web-based service using JavaScript embedded within a HTML document. Due to the simple nature of the algorithm, FADE can deliver the results of future projections immediately in a graphical format, with complete user-control over key simulation parameters. Historical and future projections for the ⩾10 cm LEO debris environment under a variety of different scenarios are possible, including business as usual, no future launches, post-mission disposal and remediation. A selection of results is presented with comparisons with predictions made using the DAMAGE environment model

  5. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  6. Fluidized-bed calciner with combustion nozzle and shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielang, J.A.; Palmer, W.B.; Kerr, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    A nozzle employed as a burner within a fluidized bed is coaxially enclosed within a tubular shroud that extends beyond the nozzle length into the fluidized bed. The open-ended shroud portion beyond the nozzle end provides an antechamber for mixture and combustion of atomized fuel with an oxygen-containing gas. The arrangement provides improved combustion efficiency and excludes bed particles from the high-velocity, high-temperature portions of the flame to reduce particle attrition. 4 claims, 2 figures

  7. Update on status of fluidized-bed combustion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stallings, J.; Boyd, T.; Brown, R.

    1992-01-01

    During the 1980s, fluidized-bed combustion technology has become the dominant technology for solid-fuel-fired power generation systems in the United States. Atmospheric fluidized beds as large as 160 MWe in capacity are now in operation, while pressurized systems reaching 80 MWe have started up in the last year. The commercial status, boiler performance, emissions, and future developments for both atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion systems are discussed

  8. Reduced ash related operational problems (slagging, bed agglomeration, corrosion and fouling) by co-combustion biomass with peat; Minskade askrelaterade driftsproblem (belaeggning, slaggning, hoegtemperatur-korrosion, baeddagglomerering) genom inblandning av torv i biobraenslen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehman, Marcus; Boman, Christoffer; Erhardsson, Thomas; Gilbe, Ram; Pommer, Linda; Bostroem, Dan; Nordin, Anders; Samuelsson, Robert; Burvall, Jan

    2006-12-15

    rich straw fuel the slagging tendencies were reduced. All the used peat fuels had relatively high silicon to calcium ratios. Previous research has shown that addition of reactive silicon to silicon-poor fuels significantly increase the slagging tendencies whereas high calcium to silicon ratios in a fuel is preferred if slagging will be avoided. The results from both the fluidized bed- and the burner experiments showed a considerable reduction of the emitted amounts of fine particles when adding peat to the loggings debris and willow fuel already at mixes corresponding to 15-20 weight-% of peat. For the straw fuel proportions higher than 40 weight-% of peat is needed to get a similar reduction. The amount of emitted potassium, chlorine and sulfur found in the fine fraction were significantly reduced in all co-combustion experiments. A reduction in the potassium and chlorine content of the deposits were also detected during peat addition. Previous results have shown that the above mentioned effects both influence deposit formation and chlorine-induced corrosion. The underlying mechanisms for the reduced emission of the potassium and chlorine containing fine particle fraction in the fluidized bed experiments is transfer and/or removing alkali in the gas phase to a less reactive particular form via sorption and/or reaction with reactive peat ash (containing silica, calcium etc.) during which larger particles (>1 {mu}m) are formed. In the case for the burner experiments the underlying reason were alkali sorption and/or reaction with the reactive peat fuel ash during the formation of the fuel particle residual ash.

  9. Warm Debris Disks from WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    "The Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has just completed a sensitive all-sky survey in photometric bands at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 microns. We report on a preliminary investigation of main sequence Hipparcos and Tycho catalog stars with 22 micron emission in excess of photospheric levels. This warm excess emission traces material in the circumstellar region likely to host terrestrial planets and is preferentially found in young systems with ages warm debris disk candidates are detected among FGK stars and a similar number of A stars within 120 pc. We are in the process of obtaining spectra to determine spectral types and activity level of these stars and are using HST, Herschel and Keck to characterize the dust, multiplicity, and substellar companions of these systems. In this contribution, we will discuss source selection methods and individual examples from among the WISE debris disk candidates. "

  10. Behavior of explosion debris clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    In the normal course of events the behavior of debris clouds created by explosions will be of little concern to the atomic energy industry. However, two situations, one of them actual and one postulated, exist where the rise and spread of explosion clouds can affect site operations. The actual occurrence would be the detonation of nuclear weapons and the resultant release and transport of radioactive debris across the various atomic energy installations. Although the activity of the diffusing cloud is not of biological concern, it may still be sufficiently above background to play havoc with the normal readings of sensitive monitoring instruments. If it were not known that these anomalous readings resulted from explosion debris, considerable time and expense might be required for on-site testing and tracing. Fortunately it is usually possible, with the use of meteorological data and forecasts, to predict when individual sites are affected by nuclear weapon debris effects. The formation rise, and diffusion of weapon clouds will be discussed. The explosion of an atomic reactor is the postulated situation. It is common practice in reactor hazard analysis to assume a combination of circumstances which might result in a nuclear incident with a release of material to the atmosphere. It is not within the scope of this report to examine the manifold plausibilities that might lead to an explosion or the possible methods of release of gaseous and/or particulates from such an occurrence. However, if the information of a cloud is assumed and some idea of its energy content is obtainable, estimates of the cloud behavior in the atmosphere can be made

  11. Particle bed reactor scaling relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovik, G.; Araj, K.; Horn, F. L.; Ludewig, H.; Benenati, R.

    The Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) concept can be used in several applications both as part of a power generating system or as a direct propulsion unit. In order to carry out optimization studies of systems involving a PBR, it is necessary to know the variation of the critical mass with pertinent system parameters such as weight, size, power level and thrust level. A parametric study is presented for all the practical combinations of fuel and moderating material. The PBR is described, the practical combinations of materials and dimensions are discussed, and an example is presented.

  12. Space Debris and Observational Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Since the launch of Sputnik 1 in 1957, astronomers have faced an increasing number of artificial objects contaminating their images of the night sky. Currently almost 17000 objects larger than 10 cm are tracked and have current orbits in the public catalog. Active missions are only a small fraction of these objects. Most are inactive satellites, rocket bodies, and fragments of larger objects: all space debris. Several mega-constellations are planned which will increase this number by 20% or more in low Earth orbit (LEO). In terms of observational astronomy, this population of Earth orbiting objects has three implications: 1) the number of streaks and glints from spacecraft will only increase. There are some practical steps that can be taken to minimize the number of such streaks and glints in astronomical imaging data. 2) The risk to damage to orbiting astronomical telescopes will only increase, particularly those in LEO. 3) If you are working on a plan for an orbiting telescope project, then there are specific steps that must be taken to minimize space debris generation during the mission lifetime, and actions to safely dispose of the spacecraft at end of mission to prevent it from becoming space debris and a risk to other missions. These steps may involve sacrifices to mission performance and lifetime, but are essential in today's orbital environment.

  13. Porous debris behavior modeling of QUENCH-02, QUENCH-03 and QUENCH-09 experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisselev, A.E.; Kobelev, G.V.; Strizhov, V.F.; Vasiliev, A.D.

    2006-01-01

    The heat-up, melting, relocation, hydrogen generation phenomena, relevant for high-temperature stages both in a reactor case and small-scale integral tests like QUENCH, are governed in particular by heat and mass transfer in porous debris and molten pools which are formed in the core region. Porous debris formation and behavior in QUENCH experiments (QUENCH-02, QUENCH-03, QUENCH-09) plays a considerable role and its adequate modeling is important for thermal analysis. In particular, the analysis of QUENCH experiments shows that the major hydrogen release takes place in debris and melt regions formed in the upper part of the fuel assembly. The porous debris model was implemented in the Russian best estimate numerical code RATEG/SVECHA/HEFEST developed for modelling thermal hydraulics and severe accident phenomena in a reactor. The original approach for debris evolution is developed in the model from classical principles using a set of parameters including debris porosity; average particle diameter; temperatures and mass fractions of solid, liquid and gas phases; specific interface areas between different phases; effective thermal conductivity of each phase, including radiative heat conductivity; mass and energy fluxes through the interfaces. The debris model is based on the system of continuity, momentum and energy conservation equations, which consider the dynamics of volume-averaged velocities and temperatures of fluid, solid and gaseous phases of porous debris. The model is used for calculation of QUENCH experiments. The results obtained by the model are compared to experimental data concerning different aspects of thermal behavior: thermal hydraulics of porous debris, radiative heat transfer in a porous medium, the generalized melting and refreezing behavior of materials, hydrogen production. (author)

  14. Forest structure and downed woody debris in boreal, temperate, and tropical forest fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, William A; González, Grizelle; Hudak, Andrew T; Hollingsworth, Teresa Nettleton; Hollingsworth, Jamie

    2008-12-01

    Forest fragmentation affects the heterogeneity of accumulated fuels by increasing the diversity of forest types and by increasing forest edges. This heterogeneity has implications in how we manage fuels, fire, and forests. Understanding the relative importance of fragmentation on woody biomass within a single climatic regime, and along climatic gradients, will improve our ability to manage forest fuels and predict fire behavior. In this study we assessed forest fuel characteristics in stands of differing moisture, i.e., dry and moist forests, structure, i.e., open canopy (typically younger) vs. closed canopy (typically older) stands, and size, i.e., small (10-14 ha), medium (33 to 60 ha), and large (100-240 ha) along a climatic gradient of boreal, temperate, and tropical forests. We measured duff, litter, fine and coarse woody debris, standing dead, and live biomass in a series of plots along a transect from outside the forest edge to the fragment interior. The goal was to determine how forest structure and fuel characteristics varied along this transect and whether this variation differed with temperature, moisture, structure, and fragment size. We found nonlinear relationships of coarse woody debris, fine woody debris, standing dead and live tree biomass with mean annual median temperature. Biomass for these variables was greatest in temperate sites. Forest floor fuels (duff and litter) had a linear relationship with temperature and biomass was greatest in boreal sites. In a five-way multivariate analysis of variance we found that temperature, moisture, and age/structure had significant effects on forest floor fuels, downed woody debris, and live tree biomass. Fragment size had an effect on forest floor fuels and live tree biomass. Distance from forest edge had significant effects for only a few subgroups sampled. With some exceptions edges were not distinguishable from interiors in terms of fuels.

  15. Field and flume investigations of the effects of logjams and woody debris on streambed morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, V.; Montgomery, D. R.; McHenry, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Interactions among wood debris, fluid flow and sediment transport in rivers are first-order controls on channel morphodynamics, affecting streambed morphology, sediment transport, sediment storage and aquatic habitat. Woody debris increases the hydraulic and topographic complexity in rivers, leading to a greater diversity of aquatic habitats and an increase in the number of large pools that are important fish habitat and breeding grounds. In the past decade, engineered logjams have become an increasingly used tool in river management for simultaneously decreasing the rate of riverbank migration and improving aquatic habitat. Sediment deposits around woody debris build up riverbanks and counteract bank migration caused by erosion. Previous experiments on flow visualization around model woody debris suggest the amount of sediment scour and deposition are primarily related to the presence of roots and the obstructional area of the woody debris. We present the results of fieldwork and sediment transport experiments of streambed morphology around stationary woody debris. Field surveys on the Hoh River and the Elwha River, WA, measure the local streambed morphology around logjams and individual pieces of woody debris. We quantified the amount of local scour and dam-removal related fine sediment deposition around natural and engineered logjams of varying sizes and construction styles, located in different geomorphic settings. We also quantified the amount of local scour around individual pieces of woody debris of varying sizes, geometries and orientations relative to flow. The flume experiments tested the effects of root geometry and log orientation of individual stationary trees on streambed morphology. The flume contained a deformable sediment bed of medium sand. We find that: 1) the presence of roots on woody debris leads to greater areas of both sediment scour and deposition; and 2) the amount of sediment scour and deposition are related to the wood debris cross

  16. Wildfire impacts on the processes that generate debris flows in burned watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, M.; Cannon, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    Every year, and in many countries worldwide, wildfires cause significant damage and economic losses due to both the direct effects of the fires and the subsequent accelerated runoff, erosion, and debris flow. Wildfires can have profound effects on the hydrologic response of watersheds by changing the infiltration characteristics and erodibility of the soil, which leads to decreased rainfall infiltration, significantly increased overland flow and runoff in channels, and movement of soil. Debris-flow activity is among the most destructive consequences of these changes, often causing extensive damage to human infrastructure. Data from the Mediterranean area and Western United States of America help identify the primary processes that result in debris flows in recently burned areas. Two primary processes for the initiation of fire-related debris flows have been so far identified: (1) runoff-dominated erosion by surface overland flow; and (2) infiltration-triggered failure and mobilization of a discrete landslide mass. The first process is frequently documented immediately post-fire and leads to the generation of debris flows through progressive bulking of storm runoff with sediment eroded from the hillslopes and channels. As sediment is incorporated into water, runoff can convert to debris flow. The conversion to debris flow may be observed at a position within a drainage network that appears to be controlled by threshold values of upslope contributing area and its gradient. At these locations, sufficient eroded material has been incorporated, relative to the volume of contributing surface runoff, to generate debris flows. Debris flows have also been generated from burned basins in response to increased runoff by water cascading over a steep, bedrock cliff, and incorporating material from readily erodible colluvium or channel bed. Post-fire debris flows have also been generated by infiltration-triggered landslide failures which then mobilize into debris flows. However

  17. Effects of episodic sediment supply on bedload transport rate in mountain rivers. Detecting debris flow activity using continuous monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Taro; Sakurai, Wataru; Iuchi, Takuma; Izumiyama, Hiroaki; Borgatti, Lisa; Marcato, Gianluca; Pasuto, Alessandro

    2018-04-01

    Monitoring of sediment transport from hillslopes to channel networks as a consequence of floods with suspended and bedload transport, hyperconcentrated flows, debris and mud flows is essential not only for scientific issues, but also for prevention and mitigation of natural disasters, i.e. for hazard assessment, land use planning and design of torrent control interventions. In steep, potentially unstable terrains, ground-based continuous monitoring of hillslope and hydrological processes is still highly localized and expensive, especially in terms of manpower. In recent years, new seismic and acoustic methods have been developed for continuous bedload monitoring in mountain rivers. Since downstream bedload transport rate is controlled by upstream sediment supply from tributary channels and bed-external sources, continuous bedload monitoring might be an effective tool for detecting the sediments mobilized by debris flow processes in the upper catchment and thus represent an indirect method to monitor slope instability processes at the catchment scale. However, there is poor information about the effects of episodic sediment supply from upstream bed-external sources on downstream bedload transport rate at a single flood time scale. We have examined the effects of sediment supply due to upstream debris flow events on downstream bedload transport rate along the Yotagiri River, central Japan. To do this, we have conducted continuous bedload observations using a hydrophone (Japanese pipe microphone) located 6.4 km downstream the lower end of a tributary affected by debris flows. Two debris flows occurred during the two-years-long observation period. As expected, bedload transport rate for a given flow depth showed to be larger after storms triggering debris flows. That is, although the magnitude of sediment supply from debris flows is not large, their effect on bedload is propagating >6 km downstream at a single flood time scale. This indicates that continuous bedload

  18. RELATION BETWEEN PRECIPITATION AND INITIATION OF DEBRIS FLOWS IN THE JIANGJIA RAVINE,YUNNAN PROVINCE, SOUTHWEST CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zili FENG; Peng CUI; Xiaoqing CHEN; Jie CHEN

    2006-01-01

    In the Jiangjia Ravine, debris flows are often triggered by short-duration rainstorms frequently. To reveal the unique initiation process of debris flows, rainfall and debris flow initiation in an upstream area was continually observed. It is concluded that flash floods resulting from short-duration rainstorms play a key role in the initiation of debris flows. Surface runoff forms flash floods due to special topographic conditions. The flash floods mobilize the sediment deposits in the upper section of the branch gullies,hence, high density viscous debris flows initiate. The initiation of debris flows in the Jiangjia Ravine has a close relation with precipitation. Applying the Takahashi model of debris flow initiation, it is concluded that: to mobilize cohesive deposits in the gully bed the depth of flash floods must exceed a critical depth. This critical depth of floods makes the definition of thresholds of rainfall intensity possible. Considering the change in the initial infiltration rate at different initial water content of bank slopes, and the influence of antecedent precipitation on the initial water content, the relation between the thresholds of rainfall intensity and the antecedent precipitation show good agreement with the empirical relation established by previous research.

  19. FBR and RBR particle bed space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Botts, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    Compact, high-performance nuclear reactor designs based on High-Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) particulate fuel are investigated. The large surface area available with the small-diameter (approx. 500 microns) particulate fuel allows very high power densities (MW's/liter), small temperature differences between fuel and coolant (approx. 10 0 K), high coolant-outlet temperatures (1500 to 3000 0 K, depending on design), and fast reactor startup (approx. 2 to 3 seconds). Two reactor concepts are developed - the Fixed Bed Reactor (FBR), where the fuel particles are packed into a thin annular bed between two porous cylindrical drums, and the Rotating Bed Reactor (RBR), where the fuel particles are held inside a cold rotating (typically approx. 500 rpm) porous cylindrical drum. The FBR can operate steady-state in the closed-cycle He-cooled mode or in the open-cycle H 2 -cooled mode. The RBR will operate only in the open-cycle H 2 -cooled mode

  20. Simulations of a Circulating Fluidized Bed Chemical Looping Combustion System Utilizing Gaseous Fuel Simulation de la combustion en boucle chimique d’une charge gazeuse dans un lit fluidisé circulant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahalatkar K.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerical studies using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD have been carried out for a complete circulating fluidized bed chemical looping combustor described in the literature (Abad et al., 2006 Fuel 85, 1174-1185. There have been extensive experimental studies in Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC, however CFD simulations of this concept are quite limited. The CLC experiments that were simulated used methane as fuel. A 2-D continuum model was used to describe both the gas and solid phases. Detailed sub-models to account for fluid-particle and particleparticle interaction forces were included. Global models of fuel and carrier chemistry were utilized. The results obtained from CFD were compared with experimental outlet species concentrations, solid circulation rates, solid mass distribution in the reactors, and leakage and dilution rates. The transient CFD simulations provided a reasonable match with the reported experimental data. Des études numériques de simulation des écoulements (CFD ont été réalisées sur un lit fluidisé circulant opérant en combustion par boucle chimique (CLC décrit dans la littérature (Abad et al., 2006 Fuel 85, 1174-1185. Si de nombreuses études expérimentales ont été conduites pour étudier le procédé CLC, les études concernant la simulation des écoulements par CFD de ce concept sont très limitées. Le système de combustion en boucle chimique simulé dans cette étude concerne la combustion d’une charge gazeuse (méthane. Un modèle 2-D à deux phases continues a été utilisé pour décrire les phases gaz et solide avec des sous-modèles détaillés pour décrire les forces d’interactions entre fluideparticule et particule-particule. Des modèles cinétiques globaux ont été intégrés pour décrire les réactions de combustion et de transformation du matériau transporteur d’oxygène. Les résultats obtenus par CFD ont été comparés aux concentrations expérimentales mesurées des diff

  1. Experimental investigation and mathematical modelling of the combustion of brown coal, refuse and mixed fuels in a circulating fluidized bed combustor; Experimentelle Untersuchung und mathematische Modellierung der Verbrennung von Braunkohle, Abfallstoffen und Mischbrennstoffen in einer zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtfeuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, W; Brunne, T; Hiller, A [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik; Albrecht, J [Lurgi Umwelt GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Quang, N [Polytechnic Inst., Danang (Viet Nam)

    1998-09-01

    Extensive experiments on combustion of biological materials and residues in fluidized bed combustors and dust combustors have been carried out at the Department of Power Plant Engineering of Dresden University since the early nineties. Particular interest was taken in mixing brown coal with sewage sludge, sugar pulp and waste wood. The experiments were supplemented by modelling in a research project funded jointly by the BMBF and Messrs. Lurgi since early 1997. A combustion cell model designed by Siegen University is being modified for the new mixed fuels, and preliminary investigations were carried out on a batch reactor while the modelling work was continued. (orig.) [Deutsch] An dem Lehrstuhl fuer Kraftwerkstechnik der TU Dresden werden seit Anfang der 90-iger Jahre umfangreiche experimentelle Untersuchungen zur Verbrennung von Bio- und Reststoffen in Wirbelschicht- und Staubfeuerungen durchgefuehrt. Dabei war vor allem die Zufeuerung dieser Stoffe in Waermeerzeugeranlagen auf Braunkohlenbasis von besonderem Interesse. Experimentell konnte nachgewiesen werden, dass sowohl Biobrennstoffe als auch Abfaelle in zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtfeuerungen umweltschonend zur Waermeerzeugung eingesetzt werden koennen. Als Beispiel wird das an Hand von Braunkohle-Klaerschlammgemischen sowie Bagasse- und Holz-Braunkohlegemischen gezeigt. Neben den experimentellen Untersuchungen bietet die Modellierung der Verbrennungsvorgaenge ein geeignetes Mittel um Voraussagen zu anderen Mischungsanteilen sowie anderen geometrischen Abmessungen machen zu koennen. Seit Anfang 1997 wird dazu ein vom BMBF und der Firma Lurgi gefoerdertes Forschungsvorhaben bearbeitet. Ein von der Universitaet Gesamthochschule Siegen fuer die Braunkohleverbrennung konzipiertes Zellenmodell wird auf die neuen Brennstoffgemische erweitert. Da grundsaetzlich andere Stoffzusammensetzungen vorliegen, wurden an einem Batch-Reaktor Voruntersuchungen zum Pyrolyseverhalten der Brennstoffe durchgefuehrt. Erste

  2. Post-accident fuel relocation and heat removal in the LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazimi, M.S.; Tsai, S.S.; Gasser, R.D.

    1976-08-01

    Assessment of the dynamics of post-accident fuel relocation and heat removal is an important aspect of the evaluation of the consequences of a hypothetical accident in an LMFBR. Such an assessment is of particular importance in the evaluation of the post-accident radiological doses around the reactor site. In the present evaluation particular attention is given to the design features of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBR). Fuel relocation and heat removal, assuming certain conditions have resulted in core disruption, are discussed. The discussion of events and phenomena involved in the relocation processes is centered around the resulting patterns of heat source distribution. The factors influencing fuel relocation and distribution in the inlet and outlet plena of the reactor vessel are discussed. The current technology of in-vessel heat removal is applied to the design of the CRBR reactor. Both fuel debris cooling limits and overall coolant flow in the reactor under natural convection conditions are explored. Some of the uncertainties in ex-vessel fuel behavior are addressed. In particular, the effect of melting the cavity bed on the rate of growth of a molten fuel pool is investigated

  3. Small satellites and space debris issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, M.; Kulik, S.; Agapov, V.

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this report is the analysis of the tendencies in designing of small satellites (SS) and the effect of small satellites on space debris population. It is shown that SS to include nano- and pico-satellites should be considered as a particularly dangerous source of space debris when elaborating international standards and legal documents concerning the space debris problem, in particular "International Space Debris Mitigation Standard". These issues are in accordance with the IADC goals in its main activity areas and should be carefully considered within the IADC framework.

  4. Models and correlations of the DEBRIS Late-Phase Melt Progression Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.C.; Gasser, R.D.

    1997-09-01

    The DEBRIS Late Phase Melt Progression Model is an assembly of models, embodied in a computer code, which is designed to treat late-phase melt progression in dry rubble (or debris) regions that can form as a consequence of a severe core uncover accident in a commercial light water nuclear reactor. The approach is fully two-dimensional, and incorporates a porous medium modeling framework together with conservation and constitutive relationships to simulate the time-dependent evolution of such regions as various physical processes act upon the materials. The objective of the code is to accurately model these processes so that the late-phase melt progression that would occur in different hypothetical severe nuclear reactor accidents can be better understood and characterized. In this report the models and correlations incorporated and used within the current version of DEBRIS are described. These include the global conservation equations solved, heat transfer and fission heating models, melting and refreezing models (including material interactions), liquid and solid relocation models, gas flow and pressure field models, and the temperature and compositionally dependent material properties employed. The specific models described here have been used in the experiment design analysis of the Phebus FPT-4 debris-bed fission-product release experiment. An earlier DEBRIS code version was used to analyze the MP-1 and MP-2 late-phase melt progression experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  5. MIT pebble bed reactor project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadak, Andrew C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2007-03-15

    The conceptual design of the MIT modular pebble bed reactor is described. This reactor plant is a 250 Mwth, 120 Mwe indirect cycle plant that is designed to be deployed in the near term using demonstrated helium system components. The primary system is a conventional pebble bed reactor with a dynamic central column with an outlet temperature of 900 C providing helium to an intermediate helium to helium heat exchanger (IHX). The outlet of the IHX is input to a three shaft horizontal Brayton Cycle power conversion system. The design constraint used in sizing the plant is based on a factory modularity principle which allows the plant to be assembled 'Lego' style instead of constructed piece by piece. This principle employs space frames which contain the power conversion system that permits the Lego-like modules to be shipped by truck or train to sites. This paper also describes the research that has been conducted at MIT since 1998 on fuel modeling, silver leakage from coated fuel particles, dynamic simulation, MCNP reactor physics modeling and air ingress analysis.

  6. MIT pebble bed reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadak, Andrew C.

    2007-01-01

    The conceptual design of the MIT modular pebble bed reactor is described. This reactor plant is a 250 Mwth, 120 Mwe indirect cycle plant that is designed to be deployed in the near term using demonstrated helium system components. The primary system is a conventional pebble bed reactor with a dynamic central column with an outlet temperature of 900 C providing helium to an intermediate helium to helium heat exchanger (IHX). The outlet of the IHX is input to a three shaft horizontal Brayton Cycle power conversion system. The design constraint used in sizing the plant is based on a factory modularity principle which allows the plant to be assembled 'Lego' style instead of constructed piece by piece. This principle employs space frames which contain the power conversion system that permits the Lego-like modules to be shipped by truck or train to sites. This paper also describes the research that has been conducted at MIT since 1998 on fuel modeling, silver leakage from coated fuel particles, dynamic simulation, MCNP reactor physics modeling and air ingress analysis

  7. Impact risk assessment for the ATV using ESABASE/DEBRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami Karlezi, P.; Drolshagen, G.; Lambert, M.

    2001-10-01

    The European Space Agency ESA participates in the International Space Station with various programs, one of them being the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). The ATV is an unmanned servicing and logistics vehicle launched on Ariane 5 and designed to fulfil different roles like cargo transport, re-supply of fuel and consumables and orbit re-boost of the International Space Station (ISS). For this reason it is important that the risks imposed on these modules by meteoroids and orbital debris are calculated accurately. Following such calculations the Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Protection System (M/ODPS) can be optimised. This paper presents the results of the risk assessment of meteoroids and space debris for the ATV spacecraft attached to the ISS using different shield configurations. The results are presented as the probability of no penetration (PNP) for each component and each configuration. They are compared to a target PNP requirement of 0.999 for 135 days and the weight penalty produced by the extra shielding is given.

  8. The influence of basal-ice debris on patterns and rates of glacial erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugelvig, Sofie V.; Egholm, David L.

    2018-05-01

    Glaciers have played a key role for shaping much of Earth's high topography during the cold periods of the Late Cenozoic. However, despite of their distinct influence on landscapes, the mechanisms of glacial erosion, and the properties that determine their rate of operation, are still poorly understood. Theoretical models of subglacial erosion generally highlight the influence of basal sliding in setting the pace of erosion, but they also point to a strong influence of other subglacial properties, such as effective bed pressure and basal-ice debris concentration. The latter properties are, however, not easily measured in existing glaciers, and hence their influence cannot readily be confirmed by observations. In order to better connect theoretical models for erosion to measurable properties in glaciers, we used computational landscape evolution experiments to study the expected influence of basal-ice debris concentration for subglacial abrasion at the scale of glaciers. The computational experiments couple the two erosion processes of quarrying and abrasion, and furthermore integrate the flow of ice and transport of debris within the ice, thus allowing for the study of dynamic feedbacks between subglacial erosion and systematic glacier-scale variations in basal-ice debris concentration. The experiments explored several physics-based models for glacial erosion, in combination with different models for basal sliding to elucidate the relationship between sliding speed, erosion rate and basal-ice debris concentration. The results demonstrate how differences in debris concentration can explain large variations in measured rates. The experiments also provide a simple explanation for the observed dependence of glacier-averaged rate of erosion on glacier size: that large glacier uplands feed more debris into their lower-elevation parts, thereby strengthening their erosive power.

  9. An integrated study to evaluate debris flow hazard in alpine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Davide; Crema, Stefano; Cavalli, Marco; Deangeli, Chiara

    2018-05-01

    Debris flows are among the most dangerous natural processes affecting the alpine environment due to their magnitude (volume of transported material) and the long runout. The presence of structures and infrastructures on alluvial fans can lead to severe problems in terms of interactions between debris flows and human activities. Risk mitigation in these areas requires identifying the magnitude, triggers, and propagation of debris flows. Here, we propose an integrated methodology to characterize these phenomena. The methodology consists of three complementary procedures. Firstly, we adopt a classification method based on the propensity of the catchment bedrocks to produce clayey-grained material. The classification allows us to identify the most likely rheology of the process. Secondly, we calculate a sediment connectivity index to estimate the topographic control on the possible coupling between the sediment source areas and the catchment channel network. This step allows for the assessment of the debris supply, which is most likely available for the channelized processes. Finally, with the data obtained in the previous steps, we modelled the propagation and depositional pattern of debris flows with a 3D code based on Cellular Automata. The results of the numerical runs allow us to identify the depositional patterns and the areas potentially involved in the flow processes. This integrated methodology is applied to a test-bed catchment located in Northwestern Alps. The results indicate that this approach can be regarded as a useful tool to estimate debris flow related potential hazard scenarios in an alpine environment in an expeditious way without possessing an exhaustive knowledge of the investigated catchment, including data on historical debris flow events.

  10. An Integrated Study to Evaluate Debris Flow Hazard in Alpine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Tiranti

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Debris flows are among the most dangerous natural processes affecting the alpine environment due to their magnitude (volume of transported material and the long runout. The presence of structures and infrastructures on alluvial fans can lead to severe problems in terms of interactions between debris flows and human activities. Risk mitigation in these areas requires identifying the magnitude, triggers, and propagation of debris flows. Here, we propose an integrated methodology to characterize these phenomena. The methodology consists of three complementary procedures. Firstly, we adopt a classification method based on the propensity of the catchment bedrocks to produce clayey-grained material. The classification allows us to identify the most likely rheology of the process. Secondly, we calculate a sediment connectivity index to estimate the topographic control on the possible coupling between the sediment source areas and the catchment channel network. This step allows for the assessment of the debris supply, which is most likely available for the channelized processes. Finally, with the data obtained in the previous steps, we modeled the propagation and depositional pattern of debris flows with a 3D code based on Cellular Automata. The results of the numerical runs allow us to identify the depositional patterns and the areas potentially involved in the flow processes. This integrated methodology is applied to a test-bed catchment located in Northwestern Alps. The results indicate that this approach can be regarded as a useful tool to estimate debris flow related potential hazard scenarios in an alpine environment in an expeditious way without possessing an exhaustive knowledge of the investigated catchment, including data on historical debris flow events.

  11. Integral analysis of debris material and heat transport in reactor vessel lower plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, K.Y.; Henry, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    An integral, fast-running, two-region model has been developed to characterize the debris material and heat transport in the reactor lower plenum under severe accident conditions. The debris bed is segregated into the oxidic pool and an overlying metallic layer. Debris crusts can develop on three surfaces: the top of the molten pool, the RPV wall, and the internal structures. To account for the decay heat generation, the crust temperature profile is assumed to be parabolic. The oxidic debris pool is homogeneously mixed and has the same material composition, and hence the same thermophysical properties, as the crusts, while the metallic constituents are assumed to rise to the top of the debris pool. Steady-state relationships are used to describe the heat transfer rates, with the assessment of solid or liquid state, and the liquid superheat in the pool being based on the average debris temperature. Natural convection heat transfer from the molten debris pool to the upper, lower and embedded crusts is calculated based on the pool Rayleigh number with the conduction heat transfer from the crusts being determined by the crust temperature profile. The downward heat flux is transferred to the lowest part of the RPV lower head through a crust-to-RPV contact resistance. The sideward heat flux is transferred to the upper regions of the RPV lower head as well as to the internal structures. The upward heat flux goes to the metal layer, water, or available heat sink structures above. Quenching due to water ingression is modeled separately from the energy transfer through the crust. The RPV wall temperature distribution and the primary system pressure are utilized to estimate challenges to the RPV integrity. ((orig.))

  12. Mass and heat transfer between a fluidized bed and a freely moving submerged sphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, W.; Valk, M.

    1995-01-01

    For fluidized bed combustion and gasification of solid fuels, but also for various other fluidized bed processes such as drying, granulation and evaporation, mass and heat transport to (or from) a particle freely moving in the fluidized bed is of great importance. The combustion rate of a

  13. Numerical investigation of debris materials prior to debris flow hazards using satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N.; Matsushima, T.

    2018-05-01

    The volume of debris flows occurred in mountainous areas is mainly affected by the volume of debris materials deposited at the valley bottom. Quantitative evaluation of debris materials prior to debris flow hazards is important to predict and prevent hazards. At midnight on 7th August 2010, two catastrophic debris flows were triggered by the torrential rain from two valleys in the northern part of Zhouqu City, NW China, resulting in 1765 fatalities and huge economic losses. In the present study, a depth-integrated particle method is adopted to simulate the debris materials, based on 2.5 m resolution satellite images. In the simulation scheme, the materials are modeled as dry granular solids, and they travel down from the slopes and are deposited at the valley bottom. The spatial distributions of the debris materials are investigated in terms of location, volume and thickness. Simulation results show good agreement with post-disaster satellite images and field observation data. Additionally, the effect of the spatial distributions of the debris materials on subsequent debris flows is also evaluated. It is found that the spatial distributions of the debris materials strongly influence affected area, runout distance and flow discharge. This study might be useful in hazard assessments prior to debris flow hazards by investigating diverse scenarios in which the debris materials are unknown.

  14. TMI-2 spent fuel shipping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, G.J.; Burton, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    TMI-2 failed fuel will be shipped to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for use in the DOE Core Examination Program. The fuel debris will be loaded into three types of canisters during defueling and dry loaded into a spent fuel shipping cask. The cask design accommodates seven canisters per cask and has two separate containment vessels with ''leaktight'' seals. Shipments are expectd to begin in early 1986

  15. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation on influence of cutting beds on density log in the horizontal wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Huawei; Sun Jianmeng; Li Xiaopeng; Zhang Qiongyao; Li Na

    2009-01-01

    Cuttings debris may be deposited in the bottom of a horizontal hole because of gravity of the earth. It has lower density than the formation, so cuttings beds can have a significant effect on the density log responses. Monte Carlo method was used to study the effect of cuttings bed on the computed log density, with various formation densities and cuttings bed thicknesses of 0-5 cm in the horizontal borehole.In order to guarantee the reliability of results, simulation results were compared to the experimental data. MC simulations show that the density measurement can be corrected using the ridge-rib graph, if the thickness of the cutting bed is less than 2 cm. Otherwise, it is difficulty to correct the effect of the cutting bed on the formation density measurement. Finally, the cuttings beds correction charts and formulas for DSDL-8723 double-detector density logging tool which is in the horizontal borehole are made preliminarily. (authors)

  17. Fluidised bed combustion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion systems that facilitates the maintenance of the depth of the bed are described. A discharge pipe projects upwardly into the bed so that bed material can flow into its upper end and escape downwardly. The end of the pipe is surrounded by an enclosure and air is discharged into the enclosure so that material will enter the pipe from within the enclosure and have been cooled in the enclosure by the air discharged into it. The walls of the enclosure may themselves be cooled

  18. An experimental study on quenching of a radially stratified heated porous bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, Arun K.; Sehgal, Bal Raj; Stepanyan, Armen V.

    2006-01-01

    The quenching characteristics of a volumetrically-heated particulate bed composed of radially stratified sand layers were investigated experimentally in the POMECO facility. The sand bed simulates the corium particulate debris bed which is formed when the molten corium released from the vessel fragments in water and deposits on the cavity floor during a postulated severe accident in a light water reactor (LWR). The electrically-heated bed was quenched by water from a water column established over top of it, and later also with water coming from its bottom, which was circulating from the water overlayer through downcomers. A series of experiments were conducted to reveal the effects of the size of downcomers, and their locations in the bed, on the quenching characteristics of the radially stratified debris beds. The downcomers were found to significantly increase the bed quenching rate. To simulate the non-condensable gases generated during the MCCI, air and argon were injected from the bottom of the bed at different flow rates. The effects of gas flow rate and its properties on the quenching behaviour were observed. The results indicate that the non-condensable gas flows reduce the quenching rate significantly. The gas properties also affect the quenching characteristics

  19. Autogenic dynamics of debris-flow fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Wilco; de Haas, Tjalling; Braat, Lisanne; Kleinhans, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    Alluvial fans develop their semi-conical shape by cyclic avulsion of their geomorphologically active sector from a fixed fan apex. These cyclic avulsions have been attributed to both allogenic and autogenic forcings and processes. Autogenic dynamics have been extensively studied on fluvial fans through physical scale experiments, and are governed by cyclic alternations of aggradation by unconfined sheet flow, fanhead incision leading to channelized flow, channel backfilling and avulsion. On debris-flow fans, however, autogenic dynamics have not yet been directly observed. We experimentally created debris-flow fans under constant extrinsic forcings, and show that autogenic dynamics are a fundamental intrinsic process on debris-flow fans. We found that autogenic cycles on debris-flow fans are driven by sequences of backfilling, avulsion and channelization, similar to the cycles on fluvial fans. However, the processes that govern these sequences are unique for debris-flow fans, and differ fundamentally from the processes that govern autogenic dynamics on fluvial fans. We experimentally observed that backfilling commenced after the debris flows reached their maximum possible extent. The next debris flows then progressively became shorter, driven by feedbacks on fan morphology and flow-dynamics. The progressively decreasing debris-flow length caused in-channel sedimentation, which led to increasing channel overflow and wider debris flows. This reduced the impulse of the liquefied flow body to the flow front, which then further reduced flow velocity and runout length, and induced further in-channel sedimentation. This commenced a positive feedback wherein debris flows became increasingly short and wide, until the channel was completely filled and the apex cross-profile was plano-convex. At this point, there was no preferential transport direction by channelization, and the debris flows progressively avulsed towards the steepest, preferential, flow path. Simultaneously

  20. Sampling supraglacial debris thickness using terrestrial photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Lindsey; Mertes, Jordan

    2017-04-01

    The melt rate of debris-covered ice differs to that of clean ice primarily as a function of debris thickness. The spatial distribution of supraglacial debris thickness must therefore be known in order to understand how it is likely to impact glacier behaviour, and meltwater contribution to local hydrological resources and global sea level rise. However, practical means of determining debris cover thickness remain elusive. In this study we explore the utility of terrestrial photogrammetry to produce high resolution, scaled and texturized digital terrain models of debris cover exposures above ice cliffs as a means of quantifying and characterizing debris thickness. Two Nikon D5000 DSLRs with Tamron 100mm lenses were used to photograph a sample area of the Ngozumpa glacier in the Khumbu Himal of Nepal in April 2016. A Structure from Motion workflow using Agisoft Photoscan software was used to generate a surface models with <10cm resolution. A Trimble Geo7X differential GPS with Zephyr antenna, along with a local base station, was used to precisely measure marked ground control points to scale the photogrammetric surface model. Measurements of debris thickness along the exposed cliffline were made from this scaled model, assuming that the ice surface at the debris-ice boundary is horizontal, and these data are compared to 50 manual point measurements along the same clifftops. We conclude that sufficiently high resolution photogrammetry, with precise scaling information, provides a useful means to determine debris thickness at clifftop exposures. The resolution of the possible measurements depends on image resolution, the accuracy of the ground control points and the computational capacity to generate centimetre scale surface models. Application of such techniques to sufficiently high resolution imagery from UAV-borne cameras may offer a powerful means of determining debris thickness distribution patterns over debris covered glacier termini.

  1. The Fabulous Four Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Michael; Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2004-09-01

    This program is a comprehensive study of the four bright debris disks that were spatially resolved by IRAS: Beta Pictoris, Epsilon Eridani, Fomalhaut, and Vega. All SIRTF instruments and observing modes will be used. The program has three major objectives: (1) Study of the disk spatial structure from MIPS and IRAC imaging; (2) Study of the dust grain composition using the IRS and MIPS SED mode; and (3) companion searches using IRAC. The data from this program should lead to a detailed understanding of these four systems, and will provide a foundation for understanding all of the debris disks to be studied with SIRTF. Images and spectra will be compared with models for disk structure and dust properties. Dynamical features indicative of substellar companions' effects on the disks will be searched for. This program will require supporting observations of PSF stars, some of which have been included explicitly. In the majority of cases, the spectral observations require a preferred orientation to align the slits along the disk position angles. Detector saturation issues are still being worked for this program, and will lead to AOR modifications in subsequent submissions. The results from this program will be analyzed collaboratively by the IRAC, IRS, and MIPS teams and by general GTOs Jura and Werner.

  2. Permeability and compression of fibrous porous media generated from dilute suspensions of fiberglass debris during a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Saya; Abdulsattar, Suhaeb S.; Vaghetto, Rodolfo; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Experimental investigation on fibrous debris buildup was conducted. • Head loss through fibrous media was recorded at different approach velocities. • A head loss model through fibrous media was proposed for high porosity (>0.99). • A compression model of fibrous media was developed. - Abstract: Permeability of fibrous porous media has been studied for decades in various engineering applications, including liquid purifications, air filters, and textiles. In nuclear engineering, fiberglass has been found to be a hazard during a Loss-of-Coolant Accident. The high energy steam jet from a break impinges on surrounding fiberglass insulation materials, producing a large amount of fibrous debris. The fibrous debris is then transported through the reactor containment and reaches the sump strainers. Accumulation of such debris on the surface of the strainers produces a fibrous bed, which is a fibrous porous medium that can undermine reactor core cooling. The present study investigated the buildup of fibrous porous media on two types of perforated plate and the pressure drop through the fibrous porous media without chemical effect. The development of the fibrous bed was visually recorded in order to correlate the pressure drop, the approach velocity, and the thickness of the fibrous porous media. The experimental results were compared to semi-theoretical models and theoretical models proposed by other researchers. Additionally, a compression model was developed to predict the thickness and the local porosity of a fibrous bed as a function of pressure

  3. Parametric study for high conversion pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuchert, E.; Ruetten, H. J.

    1975-06-15

    Tables are presented of fuel cycle costs, conversion ratios and accompanying variations in fuel element designs for a 3,00 MWth high conversion pebble bed reactor with initial high enriched uranium/thorium cycle and subsequent recycling of U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241.

  4. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, S.W.; Tucker, G.E.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.