WorldWideScience

Sample records for fuel cell codes

  1. Safety standards, legislation and codes of practice for fuel cell manufacture and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, C.P.

    1999-07-01

    This report examines safety standards, legislation and codes of practice for fuel cell manufacture and operation in the UK, Europe and internationally. Management of health and safety in the UK is discussed, and the characteristics of phosphoric acid (PAFC), proton exchange membrane (PEM), molten carbonate (MCFC), solid oxide (SOFC) fuel cells are described. Fuel cell power plant standards and manufacture in the UK, design and operational considerations, end of life disposal, automotive fuel cell system, and fuelling and vehicular concerns are explored, and standards, legislation and codes of practice are explained in the appendix.

  2. Computer simulation of variform fuel assemblies using Dragon code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Haitao; Wu Hongchun; Yao Dong

    2005-01-01

    The DRAGON is a cell code that developed for the CANDU reactor by the Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal of CANADA. Although, the DRAGON is mainly used to simulate the CANDU super-cell fuel assembly, it has an ability to simulate other geometries of the fuel assembly. However, only NEACRP benchmark problem of the BWR lattice cell was analyzed until now except for the CANDU reactor. We also need to develop the code to simulate the variform fuel assemblies, especially, for design of the advanced reactor. We validated that the cell code DRAGON is useful for simulating various kinds of the fuel assembly by analyzing the rod-shape fuel assembly of the PWR and the MTR plate-shape fuel assembly. Some other kinds of geometry of geometry were computed. Computational results show that the DRAGON is able to analyze variform fuel assembly problems and the precision is high. (authors)

  3. Fuel performance analysis code 'FAIR'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swami Prasad, P.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1994-01-01

    For modelling nuclear reactor fuel rod behaviour of water cooled reactors under severe power maneuvering and high burnups, a mechanistic fuel performance analysis code FAIR has been developed. The code incorporates finite element based thermomechanical module, physically based fission gas release module and relevant models for modelling fuel related phenomena, such as, pellet cracking, densification and swelling, radial flux redistribution across the pellet due to the build up of plutonium near the pellet surface, pellet clad mechanical interaction/stress corrosion cracking (PCMI/SSC) failure of sheath etc. The code follows the established principles of fuel rod analysis programmes, such as coupling of thermal and mechanical solutions along with the fission gas release calculations, analysing different axial segments of fuel rod simultaneously, providing means for performing local analysis such as clad ridging analysis etc. The modular nature of the code offers flexibility in affecting modifications easily to the code for modelling MOX fuels and thorium based fuels. For performing analysis of fuel rods subjected to very long power histories within a reasonable amount of time, the code has been parallelised and is commissioned on the ANUPAM parallel processing system developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC). (author). 37 refs

  4. NULIF: neutron spectrum generator, few-group constant calculator, and fuel depletion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittkopf, W.A.; Tilford, J.M.; Andrews, J.B. II; Kirschner, G.; Hassan, N.M.; Colpo, P.N.

    1977-02-01

    The NULIF code generates a microgroup neutron spectrum and calculates spectrum-weighted few-group parameters for use in a spatial diffusion code. A wide variety of fuel cells, non-fuel cells, and fuel lattices, typical of PWR (or BWR) lattices, are treated. A fuel depletion routine and change card capability allow a broad range of problems to be studied. Coefficient variation with fuel burnup, fuel temperature change, moderator temperature change, soluble boron concentration change, burnable poison variation, and control rod insertion are readily obtained. Heterogeneous effects, including resonance shielding and thermal flux depressions, are treated. Coefficients are obtained for one thermal group and up to three epithermal groups. A special output routine writes the few-group coefficient data in specified format on an output tape for automated fitting in the PDQ07-HARMONY system of spatial diffusion-depletion codes

  5. LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberman, Ben [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States); Martinez-Baca, Carlos [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States); Rush, Greg [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States)

    2013-05-31

    This report presents a summary of the work performed by LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. during the project LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development (DOE Award Number: DE-FE0000773) which commenced on October 1, 2009 and was completed on March 31, 2013. The aim of this project is for LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (formerly known as Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc.) (LGFCS) to develop a multi-physics solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) computer code (MPC) for performance calculations of the LGFCS fuel cell structure to support fuel cell product design and development. A summary of the initial stages of the project is provided which describes the MPC requirements that were developed and the selection of a candidate code, STAR-CCM+ (CD-adapco). This is followed by a detailed description of the subsequent work program including code enhancement and model verification and validation activities. Details of the code enhancements that were implemented to facilitate MPC SOFC simulations are provided along with a description of the models that were built using the MPC and validated against experimental data. The modeling work described in this report represents a level of calculation detail that has not been previously available within LGFCS.

  6. Structure of fuel performance audit code for SFR metal fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Hyo Chan [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hye Dong; Shin, An Dong; Suh, Nam Duk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    A Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) is a promising option to solve the spent fuel problems, but, there are still much technical issues to commercialize a SFR. One of issues is a development of advanced fuel which can solve the safety and the economic issues at the same time. Since a nuclear fuel is the first barrier to protect radioactive isotope release, the fuel's integrity must be secured. In Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS), the new project has been started to develop the regulatory technology for SFR system including a fuel area. To evaluate the fuel integrity and safety during an irradiation, the fuel performance code must be used for audit calculation. To develop the new code system, the code structure design and its requirements need to be studied. Various performance models and code systems are reviewed and their characteristics are analyzed in this paper. Based on this study, the fundamental performance models are deduced and basic code requirements and structure are established.

  7. Development of a fuel depletion sensitivity calculation module for multi-cell problems in a deterministic reactor physics code system CBZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Go; Kawamoto, Yosuke; Narabayashi, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new functionality of fuel depletion sensitivity calculations is developed in a code system CBZ. • This is based on the generalized perturbation theory for fuel depletion problems. • The theory with a multi-layer depletion step division scheme is described. • Numerical techniques employed in actual implementation are also provided. - Abstract: A new functionality of fuel depletion sensitivity calculations is developed as one module in a deterministic reactor physics code system CBZ. This is based on the generalized perturbation theory for fuel depletion problems. The theory for fuel depletion problems with a multi-layer depletion step division scheme is described in detail. Numerical techniques employed in actual implementation are also provided. Verification calculations are carried out for a 3 × 3 multi-cell problem consisting of two different types of fuel pins. It is shown that the sensitivities of nuclide number densities after fuel depletion with respect to the nuclear data calculated by the new module agree well with reference sensitivities calculated by direct numerical differentiation. To demonstrate the usefulness of the new module, fuel depletion sensitivities in different multi-cell arrangements are compared and non-negligible differences are observed. Nuclear data-induced uncertainties of nuclide number densities obtained with the calculated sensitivities are also compared.

  8. Matlab Source Code for Species Transport through Nafion Membranes in Direct Ethanol, Direct Methanol, and Direct Glucose Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    JH, Summerfield; MW, Manley

    2016-01-01

    A simple simulation of chemical species movement is presented. The species traverse a Nafion membrane in a fuel cell. Three cells are examined: direct methanol, direct ethanol, and direct glucose. The species are tracked using excess proton concentration, electric field strength, and voltage. The Matlab computer code is provided.

  9. Study of slab fuel cell models for reactor core neutronic calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claro, Luiz H.; Ono, Shizuca; Nascimento, Jamil A.; Vieira, Wilson J.; Caldeira, Alexandre D.; Dias, Artur Flavio

    2005-01-01

    In this work some models for a slab cell of a nuclear reactor are studied. Two methodologies are used: the deterministic through WIMS code, and the probabilistic one through MCNP code. The objective is to define the best geometric model for a fuel cell to be applied in a cell calculation to be carried through the WIMS code and to use the MCNP code as reference. The results had indicated that for the one-dimensional model the slab fuel cell with only three regions is the best option with a fuel region, a cladding region and a moderator region. (author)

  10. Fuel management codes for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicard, B.; Coulon, P.; Mougniot, J.C.; Gouriou, A.; Pontier, M.; Skok, J.; Carnoy, M.; Martin, J.

    The CAPHE code is used for managing and following up fuel subassemblies in the Phenix fast neutron reactor; the principal experimental results obtained since this reactor was commissioned are analyzed with this code. They are mainly concerned with following up fuel subassembly powers and core reactivity variations observed up to the beginning of the fifth Phenix working cycle (3/75). Characteristics of Phenix irradiated fuel subassemblies calculated by the CAPHE code are detailed as at April 1, 1975 (burn-up steel damage)

  11. Subchannel analysis code development for CANDU fuel channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. H.; Suk, H. C.; Jun, J. S.; Oh, D. J.; Hwang, D. H.; Yoo, Y. J.

    1998-07-01

    Since there are several subchannel codes such as COBRA and TORC codes for a PWR fuel channel but not for a CANDU fuel channel in our country, the subchannel analysis code for a CANDU fuel channel was developed for the prediction of flow conditions on the subchannels, for the accurate assessment of the thermal margin, the effect of appendages, and radial/axial power profile of fuel bundles on flow conditions and CHF and so on. In order to develop the subchannel analysis code for a CANDU fuel channel, subchannel analysis methodology and its applicability/pertinence for a fuel channel were reviewed from the CANDU fuel channel point of view. Several thermalhydraulic and numerical models for the subchannel analysis on a CANDU fuel channel were developed. The experimental data of the CANDU fuel channel were collected, analyzed and used for validation of a subchannel analysis code developed in this work. (author). 11 refs., 3 tabs., 50 figs

  12. A benchmark comparison of the Canadian Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) 64-element fuel lattice cell parameters using various computer codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, J.; Salaun, F.; Hummel, D.; Moghrabi, A., E-mail: sharpejr@mcmaster.ca [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Nowak, M. [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, Phelma, Grenoble (France); Pencer, J. [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON, (Canada); Novog, D.; Buijs, A. [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Discrepancies in key lattice physics parameters have been observed between various deterministic (e.g. DRAGON and WIMS-AECL) and stochastic (MCNP, KENO) neutron transport codes in modeling previous versions of the Canadian SCWR lattice cell. Further, inconsistencies in these parameters have also been observed when using different nuclear data libraries. In this work, the predictions of k∞, various reactivity coefficients, and relative ring-averaged pin powers have been re-evaluated using these codes and libraries with the most recent 64-element fuel assembly geometry. A benchmark problem has been defined to quantify the dissimilarities between code results for a number of responses along the fuel channel under prescribed hot full power (HFP), hot zero power (HZP) and cold zero power (CZP) conditions and at several fuel burnups (0, 25 and 50 MW·d·kg{sup -1} [HM]). Results from deterministic (TRITON, DRAGON) and stochastic codes (MCNP6, KENO V.a and KENO-VI) are presented. (author)

  13. A benchmark comparison of the Canadian Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) 64-element fuel lattice cell parameters using various computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, J.; Salaun, F.; Hummel, D.; Moghrabi, A.; Nowak, M.; Pencer, J.; Novog, D.; Buijs, A.

    2015-01-01

    Discrepancies in key lattice physics parameters have been observed between various deterministic (e.g. DRAGON and WIMS-AECL) and stochastic (MCNP, KENO) neutron transport codes in modeling previous versions of the Canadian SCWR lattice cell. Further, inconsistencies in these parameters have also been observed when using different nuclear data libraries. In this work, the predictions of k∞, various reactivity coefficients, and relative ring-averaged pin powers have been re-evaluated using these codes and libraries with the most recent 64-element fuel assembly geometry. A benchmark problem has been defined to quantify the dissimilarities between code results for a number of responses along the fuel channel under prescribed hot full power (HFP), hot zero power (HZP) and cold zero power (CZP) conditions and at several fuel burnups (0, 25 and 50 MW·d·kg"-"1 [HM]). Results from deterministic (TRITON, DRAGON) and stochastic codes (MCNP6, KENO V.a and KENO-VI) are presented. (author)

  14. The sphere-PAC fuel code 'SPHERE-3'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, H.

    2000-01-01

    Sphere-PAC fuel is an advanced nuclear fuel, in which the cladding tube is filled with small fuel spheres instead of the more usual fuel pellets. At PSI, the irradiation behaviour of sphere-PAC fuel is calculated using the computer code SPHERE-3. The paper describes the present status of the SPHERE-3 code, and some results of the qualification process against experimental data. (author)

  15. The sphere-pac fuel code 'SPHERE-3'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, H.; Nordstroem, L.A.; Hellwig, C.

    2001-01-01

    Sphere-pac fuel is an advanced nuclear fuel, in which the cladding tube is filled with small fuel spheres instead of the more usual fuel pellets. At PSI, the irradiation behaviour of sphere-pac fuel is calculated using the computer code SPHERE-3. The paper describes the present status of the SPHERE-3 code, and some results of the qualification process against experimental data. (author)

  16. Preliminary investigation study of code of developed country for developing Korean fuel cycle code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Ko, Won Il; Lee, Ho Hee; Cho, Dong Keun; Park, Chang Je

    2012-01-01

    In order to develop Korean fuel cycle code, the analyses has been performed with the fuel cycle codes which are used in advanced country. Also, recommendations were proposed for future development. The fuel cycle codes are AS FLOOWS: VISTA which has been developed by IAEA, DANESS code which developed by ANL and LISTO, and VISION developed by INL for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) system analysis. The recommended items were proposed for software, program scheme, material flow model, isotope decay model, environmental impact analysis model, and economics analysis model. The described things will be used for development of Korean nuclear fuel cycle code in future

  17. State of art in FE-based fuel performance codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Fuel performance codes approximate this complex behavior using an axisymmetric, axially-stacked, one-dimensional radial representation to save computation cost. However, the need for improved modeling of PCMI and, particularly, the importance of multidimensional capability for accurate fuel performance simulation has been identified as safety margin decreases. Finite element (FE) method that is reliable and proven solution in mechanical field has been introduced into fuel performance codes for multidimensional analysis. The present state of the art in numerical simulation of FE-based fuel performance predominantly involves 2-D axisymmetric model and 3-D volumetric model. The FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN own 1.5-D and 2-D FE model to simulate PCMI and cladding ballooning. In 2-D simulation, the FALCON code, developed by EPRI, is a 2-D (R-Z and R-θ) fully thermal-mechanically coupled steady-state and transient FE-based fuel behavior code. The French codes TOUTATIS and ALCYONE which are 3-D, and typically used to investigate localized behavior. In 2008, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing multidimensional (2-D and 3-D) nuclear fuel performance code called BISON. In this paper, the current state of FE-based fuel performance code and their models are presented. Based on investigation into the codes, requirements and direction of development for new FE-based fuel performance code can be discussed. Based on comparison of models in FE-based fuel performance code, status of art in the codes can be discussed. A new FE-based fuel performance code should include typical pellet and cladding models which all codes own. In particular, specified pellet and cladding model such as gaseous swelling and high burnup structure (HBS) model should be developed to improve accuracy of code as well as consider AC condition. To reduce computation cost, the approximated gap and the optimized contact model should be also developed

  18. MISER-I: a computer code for JOYO fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Yoshioki

    1976-06-01

    A computer code ''MISER-I'' is for a nuclear fuel management of Japan Experimental Fast Breeder Reactor JOYO. The nuclear fuel management in JOYO can be regarded as a fuel assembly management because a handling unit of fuel in JOYO plant is a fuel subassembly (core and blanket subassembly), and so the recording of material balance in computer code is made with each subassembly. The input information into computer code is given with each subassembly for a transfer operation, or with one reactor cycle and every one month for a burn-up in reactor core. The output information of MISER-I code is the fuel assembly storage record, fuel storage weight record in each material balance subarea at any specified day, and fuel subassembly transfer history record. Change of nuclear fuel composition and weight due to a burn-up is calculated with JOYO-Monitoring Code by off-line computation system. MISER-I code is written in FORTRAN-IV language for FACOM 230-48 computer. (auth.)

  19. State of art in FE-based fuel performance codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Finite element (FE) method that is reliable and proven solution in mechanical field has been introduced into fuel performance codes for multidimensional analysis. The present state of the art in numerical simulation of FE-based fuel performance predominantly involves 2-D axisymmetric model and 3-D volumetric model. The FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN own 1.5-D and 2-D FE model to simulate PCMI and cladding ballooning. In 2-D simulation, the FALCON code, developed by EPRI, is a 2-D (R-Z and R-θ) fully thermal-mechanically coupled steady-state and transient FE-based fuel behavior code. The French codes TOUTATIS and ALCYONE which are 3-D, and typically used to investigate localized behavior. In 2008, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing multidimensional (2-D and 3-D) nuclear fuel performance code called BISON. In this paper, the current state of FE-based fuel performance code and their models are presented. Based on investigation into the codes, requirements and direction of development for new FE-based fuel performance code can be discussed. Based on comparison of models in FE-based fuel performance code, status of art in the codes can be discussed. A new FE-based fuel performance code should include typical pellet and cladding models which all codes own. In particular, specified pellet and cladding model such as gaseous swelling and high burnup structure (HBS) model should be developed to improve accuracy of code as well as consider AC condition. To reduce computation cost, the approximated gap and the optimized contact model should be also developed. Nuclear fuel operates in an extreme environment that induces complex multiphysics phenomena, occurring over distances ranging from inter-atomic spacing to meters, and times scales ranging from microseconds to years. This multiphysics behavior is often tightly coupled, a well known example being the thermomechanical behavior. Adding to this complexity, important aspects of fuel behavior are inherently

  20. Reforming options for hydrogen production from fossil fuels for PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersoz, Atilla; Olgun, Hayati [TUBITAK Marmara Research Center, Institute of Energy, Gebze, 41470 Kocaeli (Turkey); Ozdogan, Sibel [Marmara University Faculty of Engineering, Goztepe, 81040 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-03-09

    PEM fuel cell systems are considered as a sustainable option for the future transport sector in the future. There is great interest in converting current hydrocarbon based transportation fuels into hydrogen rich gases acceptable by PEM fuel cells on-board of vehicles. In this paper, we compare the results of our simulation studies for 100kW PEM fuel cell systems utilizing three different major reforming technologies, namely steam reforming (SREF), partial oxidation (POX) and autothermal reforming (ATR). Natural gas, gasoline and diesel are the selected hydrocarbon fuels. It is desired to investigate the effect of the selected fuel reforming options on the overall fuel cell system efficiency, which depends on the fuel processing, PEM fuel cell and auxiliary system efficiencies. The Aspen-HYSYS 3.1 code has been used for simulation purposes. Process parameters of fuel preparation steps have been determined considering the limitations set by the catalysts and hydrocarbons involved. Results indicate that fuel properties, fuel processing system and its operation parameters, and PEM fuel cell characteristics all affect the overall system efficiencies. Steam reforming appears as the most efficient fuel preparation option for all investigated fuels. Natural gas with steam reforming shows the highest fuel cell system efficiency. Good heat integration within the fuel cell system is absolutely necessary to achieve acceptable overall system efficiencies. (author)

  1. Reforming options for hydrogen production from fossil fuels for PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoz, Atilla; Olgun, Hayati; Ozdogan, Sibel

    PEM fuel cell systems are considered as a sustainable option for the future transport sector in the future. There is great interest in converting current hydrocarbon based transportation fuels into hydrogen rich gases acceptable by PEM fuel cells on-board of vehicles. In this paper, we compare the results of our simulation studies for 100 kW PEM fuel cell systems utilizing three different major reforming technologies, namely steam reforming (SREF), partial oxidation (POX) and autothermal reforming (ATR). Natural gas, gasoline and diesel are the selected hydrocarbon fuels. It is desired to investigate the effect of the selected fuel reforming options on the overall fuel cell system efficiency, which depends on the fuel processing, PEM fuel cell and auxiliary system efficiencies. The Aspen-HYSYS 3.1 code has been used for simulation purposes. Process parameters of fuel preparation steps have been determined considering the limitations set by the catalysts and hydrocarbons involved. Results indicate that fuel properties, fuel processing system and its operation parameters, and PEM fuel cell characteristics all affect the overall system efficiencies. Steam reforming appears as the most efficient fuel preparation option for all investigated fuels. Natural gas with steam reforming shows the highest fuel cell system efficiency. Good heat integration within the fuel cell system is absolutely necessary to achieve acceptable overall system efficiencies.

  2. Developments of fuel performance analysis codes in KEPCO NF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, H. T.; Choi, J. M.; Jung, C. D.; Yoo, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    The KEPCO NF has developed fuel performance analysis and design code named as ROPER, and utility codes of XGCOL and XDNB in order to perform fuel rod design evaluation for Korean nuclear power plants. The ROPER code intends to cover full range of fuel performance evaluation. The XGCOL code is for the clad flattening evaluation and the XDNB code is for the extensive DNB propagation evaluation. In addition to these, the KEPCO NF is now in the developing stage for 3-dimensional fuel performance analysis code, named as OPER3D, using 3-dimensional FEM for the nest generation within the joint project CANDU ENERGY in order to analyze PCMI behavior and fuel performance under load following operation. Of these, the ROPER code is now in the stage of licensing activities by Korean regulatory body and the other two are almost in the final developing stage. After finishing the developing, licensing activities are to be performed. These activities are intending to acquire competitiveness, originality, vendor-free ownership of fuel performance codes in the KEPCO NF

  3. Development of LWR fuel performance code FEMAXI-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe

    2006-01-01

    LWR fuel performance code: FEMAXI-6 (Finite Element Method in AXIs-symmetric system) is a representative fuel analysis code in Japan. Development history, background, design idea, features of model, and future are stated. Characteristic performance of LWR fuel and analysis code, what is model, development history of FEMAXI, use of FEMAXI code, fuel model, and a special feature of FEMAXI model is described. As examples of analysis, PCMI (Pellet-Clad Mechanical Interaction), fission gas release, gap bonding, and fission gas bubble swelling are reported. Thermal analysis and dynamic analysis system of FEMAXI-6, function block at one time step of FEMAXI-6, analytical example of PCMI in the output increase test by FEMAXI-III, analysis of fission gas release in Halden reactor by FEMAXI-V, comparison of the center temperature of fuel in Halden reactor, and analysis of change of diameter of fuel rod in high burn up BWR fuel are shown. (S.Y.)

  4. Code package to analyse behavior of the WWER fuel rods in normal operation: TOPRA's code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheglov, A.; Proselkov, V.

    2001-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the code package intended for analysis of WWER fuel rod characteristics. The package includes two computer codes: TOPRA-1 and TOPRA-2 for full-scale fuel rod analyses; MRZ and MKK codes for analyzing the separate sections of fuel rods in r-z and r-j geometry. The TOPRA's codes are developed on the base of PIN-mod2 version and verified against experimental results obtained in MR, MIR and Halden research reactors (in the framework of SOFIT, FGR-2 and FUMEX experimental programs). Comparative analysis of calculation results and results from post-reactor examination of the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 fuel rod are also made as additional verification of these codes. To avoid the enlarging of uncertainties in fuel behavior prediction as a result of simplifying of the fuel geometry, MKK and MRZ codes are developed on the basis of the finite element method with use of the three nodal finite elements. Results obtained in the course of the code verification indicate the possibility for application of the method and TOPRA's code for simplified engineering calculations of WWER fuel rods thermal-physical parameters. An analysis of maximum relative errors for predicting of the fuel rod characteristics in the range of the accepted parameter values is also presented in the paper

  5. Hydrogen and fuel cell research: Institute for Integrated Energy Systems (IESVic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitt, L.

    2006-01-01

    Vision: IESVic's mission is to chart feasible paths to sustainable energy. Current research areas of investigation: 1. Energy system analysis 2. Computational fuel cell engineering; Fuel cell parameter measurement; Microscale fuel cells 3. Hydrogen dispersion studies for safety codes 4. Active magnetic refrigeration for hydrogen liquifaction and heat transfer in metal hydrides 5. Hydrogen and fuel cell system integration (author)

  6. Survey of nuclear fuel-cycle codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C.R.; de Saussure, G.; Marable, J.H.

    1981-04-01

    A two-month survey of nuclear fuel-cycle models was undertaken. This report presents the information forthcoming from the survey. Of the nearly thirty codes reviewed in the survey, fifteen of these codes have been identified as potentially useful in fulfilling the tasks of the Nuclear Energy Analysis Division (NEAD) as defined in their FY 1981-1982 Program Plan. Six of the fifteen codes are given individual reviews. The individual reviews address such items as the funding agency, the author and organization, the date of completion of the code, adequacy of documentation, computer requirements, history of use, variables that are input and forecast, type of reactors considered, part of fuel cycle modeled and scope of the code (international or domestic, long-term or short-term, regional or national). The report recommends that the Model Evaluation Team perform an evaluation of the EUREKA uranium mining and milling code

  7. Fuel cell design using a new heuristic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perusquia, R.; Montes T, J. L.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Castillo M, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper a new method for the pre-design of a typical fuel cell with a structural array of 10 x 10 fuel elements for a BWR is presented. The method is based on principles of maximum dispersion and minimum peaks of local power within the array of fuel elements. The pre-design of the fuel cells is made by simulation in two dimensions (2-D) through the cells physics code CASMO-4. For this purpose of pre-design the search process is guided by an objective function which is a combination of the main neutronic parameters of the fuel cell. The results show that the method is a promising tool that could be used for the design of fuel cells for use in a nuclear plant BWR. (Author)

  8. Safety analysis of MOX fuels by fuel performance code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    Performance of plutonium rick mixed oxide fuels specified for the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) has been analysed by modified fuel performance code. Thermodynamic properties of these fuels up to 120 GWd/t burnup have not been measured and estimated using existing uranium fuel models. Fission product release, pressure rise inside fuel rods and mechanical loads of fuel cans due to internal pressure have been preliminarily assessed based on assumed axial power distribution history, which show the integrity of fuel performance. Detailed evaluation of fuel-cladding interactions due to thermal expansion or swelling of fuel pellets due to high burnup will be required for safety analysis of mixed oxide fuels. Thermal conductivity and swelling of plutonium rich mixed oxide fuels shall be taken into consideration. (T. Tanaka)

  9. The METEOR/TRANSURANUS fuel performance code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struzik, C.; Guerin, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The first calculations for the FUMEX exercise were performed using version 1.1 of the METEOR/TRANSURANUS code. Since then, important improvements have been implemented on several models. In its present state, the code describes fuel rod behaviour in standard PWR conditions. Its validity extends to UO 2 and MOX fuels clad in Zircaloy-4. Power transient calculations for UO 2 and Gd doped fuel calculations are possible, but further developments are in progress, and the applications will be fully qualified in version 2.0. A considerable effort is made to replace semi-empirical models with models that have a sounder physical basis. (authors). 14 refs

  10. A fuel performance code TRUST VIc and its validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, M; Kogai, T [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co. Ltd., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes a fuel performance code TRUST V1c developed to analyze thermal and mechanical behavior of LWR fuel rod. Submodels in the code include FP gas models depicting gaseous swelling, gas release from pellet and axial gas mixing. The code has FEM-based structure to handle interaction between thermal and mechanical submodels brought by the gas models. The code is validated against irradiation data of fuel centerline temperature, FGR, pellet porosity and cladding deformation. (author). 9 refs, 8 figs.

  11. A fuel performance code TRUST VIc and its validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, M.; Kogai, T.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a fuel performance code TRUST V1c developed to analyze thermal and mechanical behavior of LWR fuel rod. Submodels in the code include FP gas models depicting gaseous swelling, gas release from pellet and axial gas mixing. The code has FEM-based structure to handle interaction between thermal and mechanical submodels brought by the gas models. The code is validated against irradiation data of fuel centerline temperature, FGR, pellet porosity and cladding deformation. (author). 9 refs, 8 figs

  12. RIA Fuel Codes Benchmark - Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, Olivier; Georgenthum, Vincent; Petit, Marc; Udagawa, Yutaka; Nagase, Fumihisa; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Arffman, Asko; Cherubini, Marco; Dostal, Martin; Klouzal, Jan; Geelhood, Kenneth; Gorzel, Andreas; Holt, Lars; Jernkvist, Lars Olof; Khvostov, Grigori; Maertens, Dietmar; Spykman, Gerold; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Nechaeva, Olga; Panka, Istvan; Rey Gayo, Jose M.; Sagrado Garcia, Inmaculada C.; Shin, An-Dong; Sonnenburg, Heinz Guenther; Umidova, Zeynab; Zhang, Jinzhao; Voglewede, John

    2013-01-01

    Reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) fuel rod codes have been developed for a significant period of time and they all have shown their ability to reproduce some experimental results with a certain degree of adequacy. However, they sometimes rely on different specific modelling assumptions the influence of which on the final results of the calculations is difficult to evaluate. The NEA Working Group on Fuel Safety (WGFS) is tasked with advancing the understanding of fuel safety issues by assessing the technical basis for current safety criteria and their applicability to high burnup and to new fuel designs and materials. The group aims at facilitating international convergence in this area, including the review of experimental approaches as well as the interpretation and use of experimental data relevant for safety. As a contribution to this task, WGFS conducted a RIA code benchmark based on RIA tests performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor in Tokai, Japan and tests performed or planned in CABRI reactor in Cadarache, France. Emphasis was on assessment of different modelling options for RIA fuel rod codes in terms of reproducing experimental results as well as extrapolating to typical reactor conditions. This report provides a summary of the results of this task. (authors)

  13. Fuel analysis code FAIR and its high burnup modelling capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, P.S.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1995-01-01

    A computer code FAIR has been developed for analysing performance of water cooled reactor fuel pins. It is capable of analysing high burnup fuels. This code has recently been used for analysing ten high burnup fuel rods irradiated at Halden reactor. In the present paper, the code FAIR and its various high burnup models are described. The performance of code FAIR in analysing high burnup fuels and its other applications are highlighted. (author). 21 refs., 12 figs

  14. An economic analysis code used for PWR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dingqin

    1989-01-01

    An economic analysis code used for PWR fuel cycle is developed. This economic code includes 12 subroutines representing vavious processes for entire PWR fuel cycle, and indicates the influence of the fuel cost on the cost of the electricity generation and the influence of individual process on the sensitivity of the fuel cycle cost

  15. The sphere-PAC fuel code 'SPHERE-3'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallin, H

    2000-07-01

    Sphere-PAC fuel is an advanced nuclear fuel, in which the cladding tube is filled with small fuel spheres instead of the more usual fuel pellets. At PSI, the irradiation behaviour of sphere-PAC fuel is calculated using the computer code SPHERE-3. The paper describes the present status of the SPHERE-3 code, and some results of the qualification process against experimental data. (author)

  16. Code Package to Analyze Parameters of the WWER Fuel Rod. TOPRA-2 Code - Verification Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheglov, A.; Proselkov, V.; Passage, G.; Stefanova, S.

    2009-01-01

    Presented are the data for computer codes to analyze WWER fuel rods, used in the WWER department of RRC 'Kurchatov Institute'. Presented is the description of TOPRA-2 code intended for the engineering analysis of thermophysical and strength parameters of the WWER fuel rod - temperature distributions along the fuel radius, gas pressures under the cladding, stresses in the cladding, etc. for the reactor operation in normal conditions. Presented are some results of the code verification against test problems and the data obtained in the experimental programs. Presented are comparison results of the calculations with TOPRA-2 and TRANSURANUS (V1M1J06) codes. Results obtained in the course of verification demonstrate possibility of application of the methodology and TOPRA-2 code for the engineering analysis of the WWER fuel rods

  17. Computer code TOBUNRAD for PWR fuel bundle heat-up calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimooke, Takanori; Yoshida, Kazuo

    1979-05-01

    The computer code TOBUNRAD developed is for analysis of ''fuel-bundle'' heat-up phenomena in a loss-of-coolant accident of PWR. The fuel bundle consists of fuel pins in square lattice; its behavior is different from that of individual pins during heat-up. The code is based on the existing TOODEE2 code which analyzes heat-up phenomena of single fuel pins, so that the basic models of heat conduction and transfer and coolant flow are the same as the TOODEE2's. In addition to the TOODEE2 features, unheated rods are modeled and radiation heat loss is considered between fuel pins, a fuel pin and other heat sinks. The TOBUNRAD code is developed by a new FORTRAN technique which makes it possible to interrupt a flow of program controls wherever desired, thereby attaching several subprograms to the main code. Users' manual for TOBUNRAD is presented: The basic program-structure by interruption method, physical and computational model in each sub-code, usage of the code and sample problems. (author)

  18. A comparison of thermal algorithms of fuel rod performance code systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C. J.; Park, J. H.; Kang, K. H.; Ryu, H. J.; Moon, J. S.; Jeong, I. H.; Lee, C. Y.; Song, K. C.

    2003-11-01

    The goal of the fuel rod performance is to identify the robustness of a fuel rod with cladding material. Computer simulation of the fuel rod performance becomes one of important parts to designed and evaluate new nuclear fuels and claddings. To construct a computing code system for the fuel rod performance, several algorithms of the existing fuel rod performance code systems are compared and are summarized as a preliminary work. Among several code systems, FRAPCON, and FEMAXI for LWR, ELESTRES for CANDU reactor, and LIFE for fast reactor are reviewed. Thermal algorithms of the above codes are investigated including methodologies and subroutines. This work will be utilized to construct a computing code system for dry process fuel rod performance

  19. A comparison of thermal algorithms of fuel rod performance code systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C. J.; Park, J. H.; Kang, K. H.; Ryu, H. J.; Moon, J. S.; Jeong, I. H.; Lee, C. Y.; Song, K. C

    2003-11-01

    The goal of the fuel rod performance is to identify the robustness of a fuel rod with cladding material. Computer simulation of the fuel rod performance becomes one of important parts to designed and evaluate new nuclear fuels and claddings. To construct a computing code system for the fuel rod performance, several algorithms of the existing fuel rod performance code systems are compared and are summarized as a preliminary work. Among several code systems, FRAPCON, and FEMAXI for LWR, ELESTRES for CANDU reactor, and LIFE for fast reactor are reviewed. Thermal algorithms of the above codes are investigated including methodologies and subroutines. This work will be utilized to construct a computing code system for dry process fuel rod performance.

  20. The fuel performance code future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchi, C.; Van de Laar, J.

    1988-01-01

    The paper describes the LWR version of the fuel performance code FUTURE, which was recently developed to calculate the fuel response (swelling, cladding deformation, release) to reactor transient conditions, starting from a broad-based description of the processes of major concern. The main physical models assumed are presented together with the scheme of the computer program

  1. Development of code SFINEL (Spent fuel integrity evaluator)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Soo; Min, Chin Young; Ohk, Young Kil; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dong Ju; Kim, Nam Ku [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    SFINEL code, an integrated computer program for predicting the spent fuel rod integrity based on burn-up history and major degradation mechanisms, has been developed through this project. This code can sufficiently simulate the power history of a fuel rod during the reactor operation and estimate the degree of deterioration of spent fuel cladding using the recently-developed models on the degradation mechanisms. SFINEL code has been thoroughly benchmarked against the collected in-pile data and operating experiences: deformation and rupture, and cladding oxidation, rod internal pressure creep, then comprehensive whole degradation process. (author). 75 refs., 51 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Update on the Vancouver Fuel Cell Vehicle Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, B.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The Vancouver Fuel Cell Vehicle Program (VFCVP) is a $5.8 million initiative designed to test four Ford Focus Fuel Cell Vehicles for three years in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. The project is the first of its kind in Canada and is led by Fuel Cells Canada (FCC), the Ford Motor Company (Ford), and the Governments of Canada and British Columbia. This presentation will provide program details and an update on activities leading up to currently planned delivery to Vancouver in November 2004. The VFCVP will test the performance, durability and reliability of the Ford fuel cell vehicle cars in real-world conditions and will examine fuelling issues and solutions, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and public acceptance of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The program will generate data to help evolve the technology and develop international codes and standards E cents Epnd the implementation and adoption of fuel cell technology. (author)

  3. Fuel behavior modeling using the MARS computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faya, S.C.S.; Faya, A.J.G.

    1983-01-01

    The fuel behaviour modeling code MARS against experimental data, was evaluated. Two cases were selected: an early comercial PWR rod (Maine Yankee rod) and an experimental rod from the Canadian BWR program (Canadian rod). The MARS predictions are compared with experimental data and predictions made by other fuel modeling codes. Improvements are suggested for some fuel behaviour models. Mars results are satisfactory based on the data available. (Author) [pt

  4. Modeling RERTR experimental fuel plates using the PLATE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.L.; Meyer, M.K.; Hofman, G.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Brazener, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Modeling results using the PLATE dispersion fuel performance code are presented for the U-Mo/Al experimental fuel plates from the RERTR-1, -2, -3 and -5 irradiation tests. Agreement of the calculations with experimental data obtained in post-irradiation examinations of these fuels, where available, is shown to be good. Use of the code to perform a series of parametric evaluations highlights the sensitivity of U-Mo dispersion fuel performance to fabrication variables, especially fuel particle shape and size distributions. (author)

  5. The verification of PWR-fuel code for PWR in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surian Pinem; Tagor M Sembiring; Tukiran

    2015-01-01

    In-core fuel management for PWR is not easy because of the number of fuel assemblies in the core as much as 192 assemblies so many possibilities for placement of the fuel in the core. Configuration of fuel assemblies in the core must be precise and accurate so that the reactor operates safely and economically. It is necessary for verification of PWR-FUEL code that will be used in-core fuel management for PWR. PWR-FUEL code based on neutron transport theory and solved with the approach of multi-dimensional nodal diffusion method many groups and diffusion finite difference method (FDM). The goal is to check whether the program works fine, especially for the design and in-core fuel management for PWR. Verification is done with equilibrium core search model at three conditions that boron free, 1000 ppm boron concentration and critical boron concentration. The result of the average burn up fuel assemblies distribution and power distribution at BOC and EOC showed a consistent trend where the fuel with high power at BOC will produce a high burn up in the EOC. On the core without boron is obtained a high multiplication factor because absence of boron in the core and the effect of fission products on the core around 3.8 %. Reactivity effect at 1000 ppm boron solution of BOC and EOC is 6.44 % and 1.703 % respectively. Distribution neutron flux and power density using NODAL and FDM methods have the same result. The results show that the verification PWR-FUEL code work properly, especially for core design and in-core fuel management for PWR. (author)

  6. Fuel Cycle Requirements Code (FLYER). Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gift, E.H.; Goode, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    Planning for, and the analysis of, the fuel requirements of the nuclear industry requires the ability to evaluate contingencies in many areas of the nuclear fuel cycle. The areas of nuclear fuel utilization, both uranium and plutonium, and of separative work requirements are of particular interest. The Fuel Cycle Requirements (FLYER) model has been developed to provide a flexible, easily managed tool for obtaining a comprehensive analysis of the nuclear fuel cycle. The model allows analysis of the interactions among the nuclear capacity growth rate, reactor technology and mix, and uranium and plutonium recycling capabilities. The model was initially developed as a means of analyzing nuclear growth contingencies with particular emphasis on the uranium feed and separative work requirements. It served to provide the planning group with analyses similar to the OPA's NUFUEL code which has only recently become available for general use. The model has recently been modified to account for some features of the fuel cycle in a more explicit manner than the NUFUEL code. For instance, the uranium requirements for all reactors installed in a given year are calculated for the total lifetime of those reactors. These values are cumulated in order to indicate the total uranium committed for reactors installed by any given year of the campaign. Similarly, the interactions in the back end of the fuel cycle are handled specifically, such as, the impacts resulting from limitations on the industrial capacity for reprocessing and mixed oxide fabrication of both light water reactor and breeder fuels. The principal features of the modified FLYER code are presented in summary form

  7. Sensibility analysis of fuel depletion using different nuclear fuel depletion codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, F.; Velasquez, C.E.; Castro, V.F.; Pereira, C.; Silva, C. A. Mello da, E-mail: felipmartins94@gmail.com, E-mail: carlosvelcab@hotmail.com, E-mail: victorfariascastro@gmail.com, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: clarysson@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, the utilization of different nuclear codes to perform the depletion and criticality calculations has been used to simulated nuclear reactors problems. Therefore, the goal is to analyze the sensibility of the fuel depletion of a PWR assembly using three different nuclear fuel depletion codes. The burnup calculations are performed using the codes MCNP5/ORIGEN2.1 (MONTEBURNS), KENO-VI/ORIGEN-S (TRITONSCALE6.0) and MCNPX (MCNPX/CINDER90). Each nuclear code performs the burnup using different depletion codes. Each depletion code works with collapsed energies from a master library in 1, 3 and 63 groups, respectively. Besides, each code uses different ways to obtain neutron flux that influences the depletions calculation. The results present a comparison of the neutronic parameters and isotopes composition such as criticality and nuclides build-up, the deviation in results are going to be assigned to features of the depletion code in use, such as the different radioactive decay internal libraries and the numerical method involved in solving the coupled differential depletion equations. It is also seen that the longer the period is and the more time steps are chosen, the larger the deviation become. (author)

  8. Sensibility analysis of fuel depletion using different nuclear fuel depletion codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, F.; Velasquez, C.E.; Castro, V.F.; Pereira, C.; Silva, C. A. Mello da

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the utilization of different nuclear codes to perform the depletion and criticality calculations has been used to simulated nuclear reactors problems. Therefore, the goal is to analyze the sensibility of the fuel depletion of a PWR assembly using three different nuclear fuel depletion codes. The burnup calculations are performed using the codes MCNP5/ORIGEN2.1 (MONTEBURNS), KENO-VI/ORIGEN-S (TRITONSCALE6.0) and MCNPX (MCNPX/CINDER90). Each nuclear code performs the burnup using different depletion codes. Each depletion code works with collapsed energies from a master library in 1, 3 and 63 groups, respectively. Besides, each code uses different ways to obtain neutron flux that influences the depletions calculation. The results present a comparison of the neutronic parameters and isotopes composition such as criticality and nuclides build-up, the deviation in results are going to be assigned to features of the depletion code in use, such as the different radioactive decay internal libraries and the numerical method involved in solving the coupled differential depletion equations. It is also seen that the longer the period is and the more time steps are chosen, the larger the deviation become. (author)

  9. Current Status of the LIFE Fast Reactors Fuel Performance Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacout, A.M.; Billone, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    The LIFE-4 (Rev. 1) code was calibrated and validated using data from (U,Pu)O2 mixed-oxide fuel pins and UO2 blanket rods which were irradiation tested under steady-state and transient conditions. – It integrates a broad material and fuel-pin irradiation database into a consistent framework for use and extrapolation of the database to reactor design applications. – The code is available and running on different computer platforms (UNIX & PC) – Detailed documentations of the code’s models, routines, calibration and validation data sets are available. LIFE-METAL code is based on LIFE4 with modifications to include key phenomena applicable to metallic fuel, and metallic fuel properties – Calibrated with large database from irradiations in EBR-II – Further effort for calibration and detailed documentation. Recent activities with the codes are related to reactor design studies and support of licensing efforts for 4S and KAERI SFR designs. Future activities are related to re-assessment of the codes calibration and validation and inclusion of models for advanced fuels (transmutation fuels)

  10. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-12-23

    The 2015 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2015 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; and market transformation.

  11. Fuel cell generator with fuel electrodes that control on-cell fuel reformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruka, Roswell J [Pittsburgh, PA; Basel, Richard A [Pittsburgh, PA; Zhang, Gong [Murrysville, PA

    2011-10-25

    A fuel cell for a fuel cell generator including a housing including a gas flow path for receiving a fuel from a fuel source and directing the fuel across the fuel cell. The fuel cell includes an elongate member including opposing first and second ends and defining an interior cathode portion and an exterior anode portion. The interior cathode portion includes an electrode in contact with an oxidant flow path. The exterior anode portion includes an electrode in contact with the fuel in the gas flow path. The anode portion includes a catalyst material for effecting fuel reformation along the fuel cell between the opposing ends. A fuel reformation control layer is applied over the catalyst material for reducing a rate of fuel reformation on the fuel cell. The control layer effects a variable reformation rate along the length of the fuel cell.

  12. Modeling of PHWR fuel elements using FUDA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, Rahul Mani; Soni, Rakesh; Prasad, P.N.; Pandarinathan, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    The computer code FUDA (Fuel Design Analysis) is used for modeling PHWR fuel bundle operation history and carry out fuel element thermo-mechanical analysis. The radial temperature profile across fuel and sheath, fission gas release, internal gas pressure, sheath stress and strains during the life of fuel bundle are estimated

  13. Validating the BISON fuel performance code to integral LWR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, R.L., E-mail: Richard.Williamson@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Gamble, K.A., E-mail: Kyle.Gamble@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Perez, D.M., E-mail: Danielle.Perez@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Novascone, S.R., E-mail: Stephen.Novascone@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Pastore, G., E-mail: Giovanni.Pastore@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Gardner, R.J., E-mail: Russell.Gardner@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Hales, J.D., E-mail: Jason.Hales@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Liu, W., E-mail: Wenfeng.Liu@anatech.com [ANATECH Corporation, 5435 Oberlin Dr., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Mai, A., E-mail: Anh.Mai@anatech.com [ANATECH Corporation, 5435 Oberlin Dr., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The BISON multidimensional fuel performance code is being validated to integral LWR experiments. • Code and solution verification are necessary prerequisites to validation. • Fuel centerline temperature comparisons through all phases of fuel life are very reasonable. • Accuracy in predicting fission gas release is consistent with state-of-the-art modeling and the involved uncertainties. • Rod diameter comparisons are not satisfactory and further investigation is underway. - Abstract: BISON is a modern finite element-based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behavior and has been used to analyze a variety of fuel forms in 1D spherical, 2D axisymmetric, or 3D geometries. Code validation is underway and is the subject of this study. A brief overview of BISON's computational framework, governing equations, and general material and behavioral models is provided. BISON code and solution verification procedures are described, followed by a summary of the experimental data used to date for validation of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. Validation comparisons focus on fuel centerline temperature, fission gas release, and rod diameter both before and following fuel-clad mechanical contact. Comparisons for 35 LWR rods are consolidated to provide an overall view of how the code is predicting physical behavior, with a few select validation cases discussed in greater detail. Results demonstrate that (1) fuel centerline temperature comparisons through all phases of fuel life are very reasonable with deviations between predictions and experimental data within ±10% for early life through high burnup fuel and only slightly out of these bounds for power ramp experiments, (2) accuracy in predicting fission gas release appears to be consistent with state-of-the-art modeling and with the involved uncertainties and (3) comparison

  14. Transmutation Fuel Performance Code Thermal Model Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory K. Miller; Pavel G. Medvedev

    2007-09-01

    FRAPCON fuel performance code is being modified to be able to model performance of the nuclear fuels of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). The present report documents the effort for verification of the FRAPCON thermal model. It was found that, with minor modifications, FRAPCON thermal model temperature calculation agrees with that of the commercial software ABAQUS (Version 6.4-4). This report outlines the methodology of the verification, code input, and calculation results.

  15. Code on the safety of civilian nuclear fuel cycle installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The 'Code' was promulgated by the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NSSA) on June 17, 1993, which is applicable to civilian nuclear fuel fabrication, processing, storage and reprocessing installations, not including the safety requirements for the use of nuclear fuel in reactors. The contents of the 'Code' involve siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of fuel cycle installation. The NNSA shall be responsible for the interpretation of this 'Code'

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    resources linked below help project developers and code officials prepare and review code-compliant projects , storage, and infrastructure. The following charts show the SDOs responsible for these alternative fuel codes and standards. Biodiesel Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart Electric Vehicle and

  17. RBMK fuel channel blockage analysis by MCNP5, DRAGON and RELAP5-3D codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parisi, C.; D'Auria, F.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to perform precise criticality analyses by Monte-Carlo code MCNP5 for a Fuel Channel (FC) flow blockage accident, considering as calculation domain a single FC and a 3x3 lattice of RBMK cells. Boundary conditions for MCNP5 input were derived by a previous transient calculation by state-of-the-art codes HELIOS/RELAP5-3D. In a preliminary phase, suitable MCNP5 models of a single cell and of a small lattice of RBMK cells were set-up; criticality analyses were performed at reference conditions for 2.0% and 2.4% enriched fuel. These analyses were compared with results obtained by University of Pisa (UNIPI) using deterministic transport code DRAGON and with results obtained by NIKIET Institute using MCNP4C. Then, the changes of the main physical parameters (e.g. fuel and water/steam temperature, water density, graphite temperature) at different time intervals of the FC blockage transient were evaluated by a RELAP5-3D calculation. This information was used to set up further MCNP5 inputs. Criticality analyses were performed for different systems (single channel and lattice) at those transient' states, obtaining global criticality versus transient time. Finally the weight of each parameter's change (fuel overheating and channel voiding) on global criticality was assessed. The results showed that reactivity of a blocked FC is always negative; nevertheless, when considering the effect of neighboring channels, the global reactivity trend reverts, becoming slightly positive or not changing at all, depending in inverse relation to the fuel enrichment. (author)

  18. Input/output manual of light water reactor fuel performance code FEMAXI-7 and its related codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Nagase, Fumihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Saitou, Hiroaki [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in normal conditions and in anticipated transient conditions. Numerous functional improvements and extensions have been incorporated in FEMAXI-7, which has been fully disclosed in the code model description published recently as JAEA-Data/Code 2010-035. The present manual, which is the counterpart of this description, gives detailed explanations of operation method of FEMAXI-7 code and its related codes, methods of Input/Output, methods of source code modification, features of subroutine modules, and internal variables in a specific manner in order to facilitate users to perform a fuel analysis with FEMAXI-7. This report includes some descriptions which are modified from the original contents of JAEA-Data/Code 2010-035. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (author)

  19. Input/output manual of light water reactor fuel performance code FEMAXI-7 and its related codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Nagase, Fumihisa; Saitou, Hiroaki

    2012-07-01

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in normal conditions and in anticipated transient conditions. Numerous functional improvements and extensions have been incorporated in FEMAXI-7, which has been fully disclosed in the code model description published recently as JAEA-Data/Code 2010-035. The present manual, which is the counterpart of this description, gives detailed explanations of operation method of FEMAXI-7 code and its related codes, methods of Input/Output, methods of source code modification, features of subroutine modules, and internal variables in a specific manner in order to facilitate users to perform a fuel analysis with FEMAXI-7. This report includes some descriptions which are modified from the original contents of JAEA-Data/Code 2010-035. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (author)

  20. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi [Department of Fusion Engineering Research, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1999-02-01

    A dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during 2 days pulse operation cycles. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the fuel burn and the function of exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using this code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  1. Input/output manual of light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 and its related codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Nagase, Fumihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Saitou, Hiroaki [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed, as an extended version from the former version FEMAXI-6, for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in normal conditions and in anticipated transient conditions. Numerous functional improvements and extensions have been incorporated in FEMAXI-7, which are fully disclosed in the code model description published in the form of another JAEA-Data/Code report. The present manual, which is the very counterpart of this description document, gives detailed explanations of files and operation method of FEMAXI-7 code and its related codes, methods of input/output, sample Input/Output, methods of source code modification, subroutine structure, and internal variables in a specific manner in order to facilitate users to perform fuel analysis by FEMAXI-7. (author)

  2. Input/output manual of light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 and its related codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Nagase, Fumihisa; Saitou, Hiroaki

    2013-10-01

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed, as an extended version from the former version FEMAXI-6, for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in normal conditions and in anticipated transient conditions. Numerous functional improvements and extensions have been incorporated in FEMAXI-7, which are fully disclosed in the code model description published in the form of another JAEA-Data/Code report. The present manual, which is the very counterpart of this description document, gives detailed explanations of files and operation method of FEMAXI-7 code and its related codes, methods of input/output, sample Input/Output, methods of source code modification, subroutine structure, and internal variables in a specific manner in order to facilitate users to perform fuel analysis by FEMAXI-7. (author)

  3. Modelling of the spent fuel heat-up in the spent fuel pools using one-dimensional system codes and CFD codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazevicius, Audrius; Kaliatka, Algirdas [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania). Lab. of Nuclear Installation Safety

    2017-07-15

    The main functions of spent fuel pools are to remove the residual heat from spent fuel assemblies and to perform the function of biological shielding. In the case of loss of heat removal from spent fuel pool, the fuel rods and pool water temperatures would increase continuously. After the saturated temperature is reached, due to evaporation of water the pool water level would drop, eventually causing the uncover of spent fuel assemblies, fuel overheating and fuel rods failure. This paper presents an analysis of loss of heat removal accident in spent fuel pool of BWR 4 and a comparison of two different modelling approaches. The one-dimensional system thermal-hydraulic computer code RELAP5 and CFD tool ANSYS Fluent were used for the analysis. The results are similar, but the local effects cannot be simulated using a one-dimensional code. The ANSYS Fluent calculation demonstrated that this three-dimensional treatment allows to avoid the need for many one-dimensional modelling assumptions in the pool modelling and enables to reduce the uncertainties associated with natural circulation flow calculation.

  4. Development and validation of a fuel performance analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majalee, Aaditya V.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2015-01-01

    CAD has been developing a computer code 'FRAVIZ' for calculation of steady-state thermomechanical behaviour of nuclear reactor fuel rods. It contains four major modules viz., Thermal module, Fission Gas Release module, Material Properties module and Mechanical module. All these four modules are coupled to each other and feedback from each module is fed back to others to get a self-consistent evolution in time. The computer code has been checked against two FUMEX benchmarks. Modelling fuel performance in Advance Heavy Water Reactor would require additional inputs related to the fuel and some modification in the code.(author)

  5. The DIT nuclear fuel assembly physics design code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, A.

    1988-01-01

    The DIT code is the Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) nuclear fuel assembly design code. It belongs to a class of codes, all similar in structure and strategy, that may be characterized by the spectrum and spatial calculations being performed in two dimensions and in a single job step for the entire assembly. The forerunner of this class of codes is the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority WIMS code, the first version of which was completed 25 yr ago. The structure and strategy of assembly spectrum codes have remained remarkably similar to the original concept thus proving its usefulness. As other organizations, including C-E, have developed their own versions of the concept, many important variations have been added that significantly influence the accuracy and performance of the resulting computational tool. Those features, which are unique to the DIT code and which might be of interest to the community of fuel assembly physics design code users and developers, are described and discussed

  6. An Open-Source Toolbox for PEM Fuel Cell Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Kone

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an open-source toolbox that can be used to accurately predict the distribution of the major physical quantities that are transported within a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell is presented. The toolbox has been developed using the Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM platform, which is an open-source computational fluid dynamics (CFD code. The base case results for the distribution of velocity, pressure, chemical species, Nernst potential, current density, and temperature are as expected. The plotted polarization curve was compared to the results from a numerical model and experimental data taken from the literature. The conducted simulations have generated a significant amount of data and information about the transport processes that are involved in the operation of a PEM fuel cell. The key role played by the concentration constant in shaping the cell polarization curve has been explored. The development of the present toolbox is in line with the objectives outlined in the International Energy Agency (IEA, Paris, France Advanced Fuel Cell Annex 37 that is devoted to developing open-source computational tools to facilitate fuel cell technologies. The work therefore serves as a basis for devising additional features that are not always feasible with a commercial code.

  7. Assessment of neutron transport codes for application to CANDU fuel lattices analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok

    1999-08-01

    In order to assess the applicability of WIMS-AECL and HELIOS code to the CANDU fuel lattice analysis, the physics calculations has been carried out for the standard CANDU fuel and DUPIC fuel lattices, and the results were compared with those of Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B. In this study, in order to consider the full isotopic composition and the temperature effect, new MCNP libraries have been generated from ENDF/B-VI release 3 and validated for typical benchmark problems. The TRX-1,2,BAPL-1,2,3 pin -cell lattices and KENO criticality safety benchmark calculations have been performed for the new MCNP libraries, and the results have shown that the new MCNP library has sufficient accuracy to be used for physics calculation. Then, the lattice codes have been benchmarked by the MCNP code for the major physics parameters such as the burnup reactivity, void reactivity, relative pin power and Doppler coefficient, etc. for the standard CANDU fuel and DUPIC fuel lattices. For the standard CANDU fuel lattice, it was found that the results of WIMS-AECL calculations are consistent with those of MCNP. For the DUPIC fuel lattice, however, the results of WIMS-AECL calculations with ENDF/B-V library have shown that the discrepancy from the results of MCNP calculations increases when the fuel burnup is relatively high. The burnup reactivities of WIMS-ACEL calculations with ENDF/B-VI library have shown excellent agreements with those of MCNP calculation for both the standard CANDU and DUPIC fuel lattices. However, the Doppler coefficient have relatively large discrepancies compared with MCNP calculations, and the difference increases as the fuel burns. On the other hand, the results of HELIOS calculation are consistent with those of MCNP even though the discrepancy is slightly larger compared with the case of the standard CANDU fuel lattice. this study has shown that the WIMS-AECL products reliable results for the natural uranium fuel. However, it is recommended that the WIMS

  8. 2016 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-03-09

    The 2016 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2016 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; market transformation; and Small Business Innovation Research projects.

  9. Oxide fuel pin transient performance analysis and design with the TEMECH code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bard, F.E.; Dutt, S.P.; Hinman, C.A.; Hunter, C.W.; Pitner, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The TEMECH code is a fast-running, thermal-mechanical-hydraulic, analytical program used to evaluate the transient performance of LMR oxide fuel pins. The code calculates pin deformation and failure probability due to fuel-cladding differential thermal expansion, expansion of fuel upon melting, and fission gas pressurization. The mechanistic fuel model in the code accounts for fuel cracking, crack closure, porosity decrease, and the temperature dependence of fuel creep through the course of the transient. Modeling emphasis has been placed on results obtained from Fuel Cladding Transient Test (FCTT) testing, Transient Fuel Deformation (TFD) tests and TREAT integral fuel pin experiments

  10. Fuel Exhaling Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Varhade, Swapnil; Gautam, Manu; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-01-18

    State-of-the-art proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) anodically inhale H 2 fuel and cathodically expel water molecules. We show an unprecedented fuel cell concept exhibiting cathodic fuel exhalation capability of anodically inhaled fuel, driven by the neutralization energy on decoupling the direct acid-base chemistry. The fuel exhaling fuel cell delivered a peak power density of 70 mW/cm 2 at a peak current density of 160 mA/cm 2 with a cathodic H 2 output of ∼80 mL in 1 h. We illustrate that the energy benefits from the same fuel stream can at least be doubled by directing it through proposed neutralization electrochemical cell prior to PEMFC in a tandem configuration.

  11. The hydrogen village: building hydrogen and fuel cell opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.

    2006-01-01

    The presentation addressed the progress the Hydrogen Village Program has made in its first 24 months of existence and will provide an understanding of the development of new markets for emerging Hydrogen and Fuel Cell technologies based on first hand, real world experience. The Hydrogen Village (H2V) is an End User driven, Market Development Program designed to accelerate the sustainable commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies through awareness, education and early deployments throughout the greater Toronto area (GTA). The program is a collaborative public-private partnership of some 35 companies from a broad cross section of industry administered through Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Canada and funded by the Governments of Canada and Ontario. The intent of the H2V is to develop markets for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell technologies that benefit the local and global community. The following aspects of market development are specifically targeted: 1) Deployments: of near market technologies in all aspects of community life (stationary and mobile). All applications must be placed within the community and contact peoples in their day-to-day activity. End user involvement is critical to ensure that the applications chosen have a commercial justification and contribute to the complementary growth of the market. 2) Development: of a coordinated hydrogen delivery and equipment service infrastructure. The infrastructure will develop following the principles of conservation and sustainability. 3) Human and societal factors: - Public and Corporate policy, public education, Codes/ Standards/ Regulations - Opportunity for real world implementation and feedback on developing codes and standards - Build awareness among regulatory groups, public, and the media. The GTA Hydrogen Village is already well under way with strategically located projects covering a wide range of hydrogen and fuel cell applications including: Residential heat and power generation using solid oxide

  12. TRANSURANUS: A fuel rod analysis code ready for use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassmann, K; O` Carroll, C; Van de Laar, J [Commission of the European Communities, Karlsruhe (Germany). European Inst. for Transuranium Elements; Ott, C [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    The basic concepts of fuel rod performance codes are discussed. The TRANSURANUS code developed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (GE) is presented. It is a quasi two-dimensional (1{sub 1/2}-D) code designed for treatment of a whole fuel rod for any type of reactor and any situation. The fuel rods found in the majority of test- or power reactors can be analyzed for very different situations (normal, off-normal and accidental). The time scale of the problems to be treated may range from milliseconds to years. The TRANSURANUS code consists of a clearly defined mechanical/mathematical framework into which physical models can easily be incorporated. This framework has been extensively tested and the programming very clearly reflects this structure. The code is well structured and easy to understand. It has a comprehensive material data bank for different fuels, claddings, coolants and their properties. The code can be employed in a deterministic and a statistical version. It is written in standard FORTRAN 77. The code system includes: 2 preprocessor programs (MAKROH and AXORDER) for setting up new data cases; the post-processor URPLOT for plotting all important quantities as a function of the radius, the axial coordinate or the time; the post-processor URSTART evaluating statistical analyses. The TRANSURANUS code exhibits short running times. A new WINDOWS-based interactive interface is under development. The code is now in use in various European institutions and is available to all interested parties. 7 figs., 15 refs.

  13. The Dit nuclear fuel assembly physics design code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, A.

    1987-01-01

    DIT is the Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) nuclear fuel assembly design code. It belongs to a class of codes, all similar in structure and strategy, which may be characterized by the spectrum and spatial calculations being performed in 2D and in a single job step for the entire assembly. The forerunner of this class of codes is the U.K.A.E.A. WIMS code, the first version of which was completed 25 years ago. The structure and strategy of assembly spectrum codes have remained remarkably similar to the original concept thus proving its usefulness. As other organizations, including C-E, have developed their own versions of the concept, many important variations have been added which significantly influence the accuracy and performance of the resulting computational tool. This paper describes and discusses those features which are unique to the DIT code and which might be of interest to the community of fuel assembly physics design code users and developers

  14. Development and verifications of fast reactor fuel design code ''Ceptar''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, T.; Nakazawa, H.; Abe, T.

    2001-01-01

    The annular fuel is very beneficial for fast reactors, because it is available for both high power and high burn-up. Concerning the irradiation behavior of the annular fuel, most of annular pellets irradiated up to high burn-up showed shrinkage of the central hole due to deformation and restructuring of the pellets. It is needed to predict precisely the shrinkage of the central hole during irradiation, because it has a great influence on power-to-melt. In this paper, outline of CEPTAR code (Calculation code to Evaluate fuel pin stability for annular fuel design) developed to meet this need is presented. In this code, the radial profile of fuel density can be computed by using the void migration model, and law of conservation of mass defines the inner diameter. For the mechanical analysis, the fuel and cladding deformation caused by the thermal expansion, swelling and creep is computed by the stress-strain analysis using the approximation of plane-strain. In addition, CEPTAR can also take into account the effect of Joint-Oxide-Gain (JOG) which is observed in fuel-cladding gap of high burn-up fuel. JOG has an effect to decrease the fuel swelling and to improve the gap conductance due to deposition of solid fission product. Based on post-irradiation data on PFR annular fuel, we developed an empirical model for JOG. For code verifications, the thermal and mechanical data obtained from various irradiation tests and post-irradiation examinations were compared with the predictions of this code. In this study, INTA (instrumented test assembly) test in JOYO, PTM (power-to-melt) test in JOYO, EBR-II, FFTF and MTR in Harwell laboratory, and post-irradiation examinations on a number of PFR fuels, were used as verification data. (author)

  15. Development and validation of the ENIGMA code for MOX fuel performance modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, I.; Rossiter, G.; White, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The ENIGMA fuel performance code has been under development in the UK since the mid-1980s with contributions made by both the fuel vendor (BNFL) and the utility (British Energy). In recent years it has become the principal code for UO 2 fuel licensing for both PWR and AGR reactor systems in the UK and has also been used by BNFL in support of overseas UO 2 and MOX fuel business. A significant new programme of work has recently been initiated by BNFL to further develop the code specifically for MOX fuel application. Model development is proceeding hand in hand with a major programme of MOX fuel testing and PIE studies, with the objective of producing a fuel modelling code suitable for mechanistic analysis, as well as for licensing applications. This paper gives an overview of the model developments being undertaken and of the experimental data being used to underpin and to validate the code. The paper provides a summary of the code development programme together with specific examples of new models produced. (author)

  16. Radial optimization of a BWR fuel cell using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin del Campo M, C.; Carmona H, R.; Oropeza C, I.P.

    2006-01-01

    The development of the application of the Genetic Algorithms (GA) to the optimization of the radial distribution of enrichment in a cell of fuel of a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The optimization process it was ties to the HELIOS simulator, which is a transport code of neutron simulation of fuel cells that has been validated for the calculation of nuclear banks for BWRs. With heterogeneous radial designs can improve the radial distribution of the power, for what the radial design of fuel has a strong influence in the global design of fuel recharges. The optimum radial distribution of fuel bars is looked for with different enrichments of U 235 and contents of consumable poison. For it is necessary to define the representation of the solution, the objective function and the implementation of the specific optimization process to the solution of the problem. The optimization process it was coded in 'C' language, it was automated the creation of the entrances to the simulator, the execution of the simulator and the extraction, in the exit of the simulator, of the parameters that intervene in the objective function. The objective function includes four parameters: average enrichment of the cell, average gadolinia concentration of the cell, peak factor of radial power and k-infinite multiplication factor. To be able to calculate the parameters that intervene in the objective function, the one evaluation process of GA was ties to the HELIOS code executed in a Compaq Alpha workstation. It was applied to the design of a fuel cell of 10 x 10 that it can be employee in the fuel assemble designs that are used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. Its were considered 10 different fuel compositions which four contain gadolinia. Three heuristic rules that consist in prohibiting the placement of bars with gadolinia in the ends of the cell, to place the compositions with the smallest enrichment in the corners of the cell and to fix the placement of

  17. Application of fuel management calculation codes for CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Haitao; Wu Hongchun

    2003-01-01

    Qinshan Phase III Nuclear Power Plant adopts CANDU-6 reactors. It is the first time for China to introduce this heavy water pressure tube reactor. In order to meet the demands of the fuel management calculation, DRAGON/DONJON code is developed in this paper. Some initial fuel management calculations about CANDU-6 reactor of Qinshan Phase III are carried out using DRAGON/DONJON code. The results indicate that DRAGON/DONJON can be used for the fuel management calculation for Qinshan Phase III

  18. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi; Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1999-02-01

    A dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during 2 days pulse operation cycles. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the fuel burn and the function of exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using this code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  19. TEMP: a computer code to calculate fuel pin temperatures during a transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bard, F.E.; Christensen, B.Y.; Gneiting, B.C.

    1980-04-01

    The computer code TEMP calculates fuel pin temperatures during a transient. It was developed to accommodate temperature calculations in any system of axi-symmetric concentric cylinders. When used to calculate fuel pin temperatures, the code will handle a fuel pin as simple as a solid cylinder or as complex as a central void surrounded by fuel that is broken into three regions by two circumferential cracks. Any fuel situation between these two extremes can be analyzed along with additional cladding, heat sink, coolant or capsule regions surrounding the fuel. The one-region version of the code accurately calculates the solution to two problems having closed-form solutions. The code uses an implicit method, an explicit method and a Crank-Nicolson (implicit-explicit) method

  20. Application of advanced validation concepts to oxide fuel performance codes: LIFE-4 fast-reactor and FRAPCON thermal-reactor fuel performance codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, C., E-mail: cu@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Williams, B.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Yacout, A. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Higdon, D.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The application of advanced validation techniques (sensitivity, calibration and prediction) to nuclear performance codes FRAPCON and LIFE-4 is the focus of the paper. ► A sensitivity ranking methodology narrows down the number of selected modeling parameters from 61 to 24 for FRAPCON and from 69 to 35 for LIFE-4. ► Fuel creep, fuel thermal conductivity, fission gas transport/release, crack/boundary, and fuel gap conductivity models of LIFE-4 are identified for improvements. ► FRAPCON sensitivity results indicated the importance of the fuel thermal conduction and the fission gas release models. -- Abstract: Evolving nuclear energy programs expect to use enhanced modeling and simulation (M and S) capabilities, using multiscale, multiphysics modeling approaches, to reduce both cost and time from the design through the licensing phases. Interest in the development of the multiscale, multiphysics approach has increased in the last decade because of the need for predictive tools for complex interacting processes as a means of eliminating the limited use of empirically based model development. Complex interacting processes cannot be predicted by analyzing each individual component in isolation. In most cases, the mathematical models of complex processes and their boundary conditions are nonlinear. As a result, the solutions of these mathematical models often require high-performance computing capabilities and resources. The use of multiscale, multiphysics (MS/MP) models in conjunction with high-performance computational software and hardware introduces challenges in validating these predictive tools—traditional methodologies will have to be modified to address these challenges. The advanced MS/MP codes for nuclear fuels and reactors are being developed within the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) – Nuclear Energy (NE). This paper does not directly address challenges in calibration

  1. The in-core fuel management code system for VVER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cada, R.; Krysl, V.; Mikolas, P.; Sustek, J.; Svarny, J.

    2004-01-01

    The structure and methodology of a fuel management system for NPP VVER 1000 (NPP Temelin) and VVER 440 (NPP Dukovany) is described. It is under development in SKODA JS a.s. and is followed by practical applications. The general objectives of the system are maximization of end of cycle reactivity, the minimization of fresh fuel inventory for the minimization of fed enrichment and minimization of burnable poisons (BPs) inventory. They are also safety related constraints in witch minimization of power peaking plays a dominant role. General structure of the system consists in preparation of input data for macrocode calculation, algorithms (codes) for optimization of fuel loading, calculation of fuel enrichment and BPs assignment. At present core loading can be calculated (optimized) by Tabu search algorithm (code ATHENA), genetic algorithm (code Gen1) and hybrid algorithm - simplex procedure with application of Tabu search algorithm on binary shuffling (code OPAL B ). Enrichment search is realized by the application of simplex algorithm (OPAL B code) and BPs assignment by module BPASS and simplex algorithm in OPAL B code. Calculations of the real core loadings are presented and a comparison of different optimization methods is provided. (author)

  2. Sensitivity assessment of fuel performance codes for LOCA accident scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Alfredo; Gomes, Daniel; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Muniz, Rafael O.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo, E-mail: ayabe@ipen.br, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (LABRISCO/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Análise, Avaliação e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2017-07-01

    FRAPCON code predicts fuel rod performance in LWR (Light Water Reactor) by modeling fuel responses under normal operating conditions and anticipated operational occurrences; FRAPTRAN code is applied for fuel transient under fast transient and accident conditions. The codes are well known and applied for different purposes and one of the use is to address sensitivity analysis considering fuel design parameters associated to fabrication, moreover can address the effect of physical models bias. The objective of this work was to perform an assessment of fuel manufacturing parameters tolerances and fuel models bias using FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN codes for Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario. The preliminary analysis considered direct approach taken into account most relevant manufacturing tolerances (lower and upper bounds) related to design parameters and physical models bias without considering their statistical distribution. The simulations were carried out using the data available in the open literature related to the series of LOCA experiment performed at the Halden reactor (specifically IFA-650.5). The manufacturing tolerances associated to design parameters considered in this paper were: enrichment, cladding thickness, pellet diameter, pellet density, and filling gas pressure. The physical models considered were: fuel thermal expansion, fission gas release, fuel swelling, irradiation creep, cladding thermal expansion, cladding corrosion, and cladding hydrogen pickup. The results obtained from sensitivity analysis addressed the impact of manufacturing tolerances and physical models in the fuel cladding burst time observed for the IFA-650.5 experiment. (author)

  3. Sensitivity assessment of fuel performance codes for LOCA accident scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Alfredo; Gomes, Daniel; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    FRAPCON code predicts fuel rod performance in LWR (Light Water Reactor) by modeling fuel responses under normal operating conditions and anticipated operational occurrences; FRAPTRAN code is applied for fuel transient under fast transient and accident conditions. The codes are well known and applied for different purposes and one of the use is to address sensitivity analysis considering fuel design parameters associated to fabrication, moreover can address the effect of physical models bias. The objective of this work was to perform an assessment of fuel manufacturing parameters tolerances and fuel models bias using FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN codes for Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario. The preliminary analysis considered direct approach taken into account most relevant manufacturing tolerances (lower and upper bounds) related to design parameters and physical models bias without considering their statistical distribution. The simulations were carried out using the data available in the open literature related to the series of LOCA experiment performed at the Halden reactor (specifically IFA-650.5). The manufacturing tolerances associated to design parameters considered in this paper were: enrichment, cladding thickness, pellet diameter, pellet density, and filling gas pressure. The physical models considered were: fuel thermal expansion, fission gas release, fuel swelling, irradiation creep, cladding thermal expansion, cladding corrosion, and cladding hydrogen pickup. The results obtained from sensitivity analysis addressed the impact of manufacturing tolerances and physical models in the fuel cladding burst time observed for the IFA-650.5 experiment. (author)

  4. Simulation of the burnup in cell calculation using the WIMSD-5B Code considering different nuclear data libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Desirée Yael de Sena; Silva, Adilson Costa da; Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes to implement the cell calculation considering the fuel burning using the WIMSD-5B code. The cell calculation procedure allows to determine the nuclear parameters present in the multi-group neutron diffusion equation and for this purpose the neutron transport theory is used in a problem with dimensional reduction, but in contrast is considered a large number of groups associated with the neutron spectrum. There are a variety of reactor physics codes that determine the nuclear parameters by solving the neutron transport equation applied to an equivalent cell representing a fuel element. The WIMSD-5B code is a deterministic code that solves the transport equation using collision probability method. The simulation of fuel burning in the cell calculation took into account different nuclear data libraries. The WIMSD-5B code supports several nuclear data libraries and in the present work the following libraries were used: IAEA, ENDFB-VII.1, JENDL3.2, JEFF3.1 and JEF2.2, all formatted for 69 energy groups. (author)

  5. Simulation of the burnup in cell calculation using the WIMSD-5B Code considering different nuclear data libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Desirée Yael de Sena; Silva, Adilson Costa da; Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de, E-mail: zelmolima@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    This work proposes to implement the cell calculation considering the fuel burning using the WIMSD-5B code. The cell calculation procedure allows to determine the nuclear parameters present in the multi-group neutron diffusion equation and for this purpose the neutron transport theory is used in a problem with dimensional reduction, but in contrast is considered a large number of groups associated with the neutron spectrum. There are a variety of reactor physics codes that determine the nuclear parameters by solving the neutron transport equation applied to an equivalent cell representing a fuel element. The WIMSD-5B code is a deterministic code that solves the transport equation using collision probability method. The simulation of fuel burning in the cell calculation took into account different nuclear data libraries. The WIMSD-5B code supports several nuclear data libraries and in the present work the following libraries were used: IAEA, ENDFB-VII.1, JENDL3.2, JEFF3.1 and JEF2.2, all formatted for 69 energy groups. (author)

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of FEAST-Metal Fuel Performance Code: Initial Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, Paul Guy; Williams, Brian J.; Unal, Cetin; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2012-01-01

    This memo documents the completion of the LANL milestone, M3FT-12LA0202041, describing methodologies and initial results using FEAST-Metal. The FEAST-Metal code calculations for this work are being conducted at LANL in support of on-going activities related to sensitivity analysis of fuel performance codes. The objective is to identify important macroscopic parameters of interest to modeling and simulation of metallic fuel performance. This report summarizes our preliminary results for the sensitivity analysis using 6 calibration datasets for metallic fuel developed at ANL for EBR-II experiments. Sensitivity ranking methodology was deployed to narrow down the selected parameters for the current study. There are approximately 84 calibration parameters in the FEAST-Metal code, of which 32 were ultimately used in Phase II of this study. Preliminary results of this sensitivity analysis led to the following ranking of FEAST models for future calibration and improvements: fuel conductivity, fission gas transport/release, fuel creep, and precipitation kinetics. More validation data is needed to validate calibrated parameter distributions for future uncertainty quantification studies with FEAST-Metal. Results of this study also served to point out some code deficiencies and possible errors, and these are being investigated in order to determine root causes and to improve upon the existing code models.

  7. The failure mechanisms of HTR coated particle fuel and computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lin; Liu Bing; Shao Youlin; Liang Tongxiang; Tang Chunhe

    2010-01-01

    The basic constituent unit of fuel element in HTR is ceramic coated particle fuel. And the performance of coated particle fuel determines the safety of HTR. In addition to the traditional detection of radiation experiments, establishing computer code is of great significance to the research. This paper mainly introduces the structure and the failure mechanism of TRISO-coated particle fuel, as well as a few basic assumptions,principles and characteristics of some existed main overseas codes. Meanwhile, this paper has proposed direction of future research by comparing the advantages and disadvantages of several computer codes. (authors)

  8. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation The NREL technology validation team works on validating hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles; hydrogen fueling infrastructure; hydrogen system components; and fuel cell use in early market applications such as

  9. In-core fuel management code package validation for BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The main goal of the present CRP (Coordinated Research Programme) was to develop benchmarks which are appropriate to check and improve the fuel management computer code packages and their procedures. Therefore, benchmark specifications were established which included a set of realistic data for running in-core fuel management codes. Secondly, the results of measurements and/or operating data were also provided to verify and compare with these parameters as calculated by the in-core fuel management codes or code packages. For the BWR it was established that the Mexican Laguna Verde 1 BWR would serve as the model for providing data on the benchmark specifications. It was decided to provide results for the first 2 cycles of Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde reactor. The analyses of the above benchmarks are performed in two stages. In the first stage, the lattice parameters are generated as a function of burnup at different voids and with and without control rod. These lattice parameters form the input for 3-dimensional diffusion theory codes for over-all reactor analysis. The lattice calculations were performed using different methods, such as, Monte Carlo, 2-D integral transport theory methods. Supercell Model and transport-diffusion model with proper correction for burnable absorber. Thus the variety of results should provide adequate information for any institute or organization to develop competence to analyze In-core fuel management codes. 15 refs, figs and tabs

  10. A code for structural analysis of fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, I.M.V.; Perrotta, J.A.

    1988-08-01

    It's presented the code ELCOM for the matrix analysis of tubular structures coupled by rigid spacers, typical of PWR's fuel elements. The code ELCOM makes a static structural analysis, where the displacements and internal forces are obtained for each tubular structure at the joints with the spacers, and also, the natural frequencies and vibrational modes of an equilavent integrated structure are obtained. The ELCOM result is compared to a PWR fuel element structural analysis obtained in published paper. (author) [pt

  11. Implementation of a dry process fuel cycle model into the DYMOND code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joo Hwan; Jeong, Chang Joon; Choi, Hang Bok

    2004-01-01

    For the analysis of a dry process fuel cycle, new modules were implemented into the fuel cycle analysis code DYMOND, which was developed by the Argonne National Laboratory. The modifications were made to the energy demand prediction model, a Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactor, direct use of spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel in CANDU reactors (DUPIC) fuel cycle model, the fuel cycle calculation module, and the input/output modules. The performance of the modified DYMOND code was assessed for the postulated once-through fuel cycle models including both the PWR and CANDU reactor. This paper presents modifications of the DYMOND code and the results of sample calculations for the PWR once-through and DUPIC fuel cycles

  12. CRACKEL: a computer code for CFR fuel management calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burstall, R.F.; Ball, M.A.; Thornton, D.E.J.

    1975-12-01

    The CRACKLE computer code is designed to perform rapid fuel management surveys of CFR systems. The code calculates overall features such as reactivity, power distributions and breeding gain, and also calculates for each sub-assembly plutonium content and power output. A number of alternative options are built into the code, in order to permit different fuel management strategies to be calculated, and to perform more detailed calculations when necessary. A brief description is given of the methods of calculation, and the input facilities of CRACKLE, with examples. (author)

  13. Fuel behaviour calculations with version 2.0 of the code FUROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulacsy, K.

    2011-01-01

    The fuel modelling code FUROM (FUel ROd Model), suitable for calculating the normal operation condition behaviour of PWR and WWER fuels, has been developed at AEKI for several years. In 2010 the new version of the code, FUROM-2.0 was released. Calculations performed with this version and results are presented. (author)

  14. PAPIRUS - a computer code for FBR fuel performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Tsuboi, Y.; Sogame, M.

    1991-01-01

    The FBR fuel performance analysis code PAPIRUS has been developed to design fuels for demonstration and future commercial reactors. A pellet structural model was developed to describe the generation, depletion and transport of vacancies and atomic elements in unified fashion. PAPIRUS results in comparison with the power - to - melt test data from HEDL showed validity of the code at the initial reactor startup. (author)

  15. Development of PEM fuel cell technology at international fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The PEM technology has not developed to the level of phosphoric acid fuel cells. Several factors have held the technology development back such as high membrane cost, sensitivity of PEM fuel cells to low level of carbon monoxide impurities, the requirement to maintain full humidification of the cell, and the need to pressurize the fuel cell in order to achieve the performance targets. International Fuel Cells has identified a hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell concept that leverages recent research advances to overcome major economic and technical obstacles.

  16. A Deformation Analysis Code of CANDU Fuel under the Postulated Accident: ELOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joo Hwan; Jung, Jong Yeob

    2006-11-15

    Deformations of the fuel element or fuel channel might be the main cause of the fuel failure. Therefore, the accurate prediction of the deformation and the analysis capabilities are closely related to the increase of the safety margin of the reactor. In this report, among the performance analysis or the transient behavior prediction computer codes, the analysis codes for deformation such as the ELOCA, HOTSPOT, CONTACT-1, and PTDFORM are briefly introduced and each code's objectives, applicability, and relations are explained. Especially, the user manual for ELOCA code which is the analysis code for the fuel deformation and the release of fission product during the transient period after the postulated accidents is provided so that it can be the guidance to the potential users of the code and save the time and economic loss by reducing the trial and err000.

  17. A Deformation Analysis Code of CANDU Fuel under the Postulated Accident: ELOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joo Hwan; Jung, Jong Yeob

    2006-11-01

    Deformations of the fuel element or fuel channel might be the main cause of the fuel failure. Therefore, the accurate prediction of the deformation and the analysis capabilities are closely related to the increase of the safety margin of the reactor. In this report, among the performance analysis or the transient behavior prediction computer codes, the analysis codes for deformation such as the ELOCA, HOTSPOT, CONTACT-1, and PTDFORM are briefly introduced and each code's objectives, applicability, and relations are explained. Especially, the user manual for ELOCA code which is the analysis code for the fuel deformation and the release of fission product during the transient period after the postulated accidents is provided so that it can be the guidance to the potential users of the code and save the time and economic loss by reducing the trial and error

  18. Use of advanced simulations in fuel performance codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Uffelen, P.

    2015-01-01

    The simulation of the cylindrical fuel rod behaviour in a reactor or a storage pool for spent fuel requires a fuel performance code. Such tool solves the equations for the heat transfer, the stresses and strains in fuel and cladding, the evolution of several isotopes and the behaviour of various fission products in the fuel rod. The main equations along with their limitations are briefly described. The current approaches adopted for overcoming these limitations and the perspectives are also outlined. (author)

  19. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Through its Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program, NREL researches, develops, analyzes, and validates fuel cell and hydrogen production, delivery, and storage technologies for transportation

  20. Fuel Cell Electric Bus Evaluations | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus Evaluations Fuel Cell Electric Bus Evaluations NREL's technology validation team evaluates fuel cell electric buses (FCEBs) to provide comprehensive, unbiased evaluation results of fuel cell bus early transportation applications for fuel cell technology. Buses operate in congested areas where

  1. Fuel Cell Manufacturing Research and Development | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    | NREL Fuel Cell Manufacturing Research and Development Fuel Cell Manufacturing Research and Development NREL's fuel cell manufacturing R&D focuses on improving quality-inspection practices for high costs. A researcher monitoring web-line equipment in the Manufacturing Laboratory Many fuel cell

  2. Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Status Analysis Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Get Involved Fuel cell developers interested in collaborating with NREL on fuel cell technology status analysis should send an email to NREL's Technology Validation Team at techval@nrel.gov. NREL's analysis of fuel cell technology provides objective

  3. Transient and fuel performance analysis with VTT's coupled code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daavittila, A.; Hamalainen, A.; Raty, H.

    2005-01-01

    VTT (technical research center of Finland) maintains and further develops a comprehensive safety analysis code system ranging from the basic neutronic libraries to 3-dimensional transient analysis and fuel behaviour analysis codes. The code system is based on various types of couplings between the relevant physical phenomena. The main tools for analyses of reactor transients are presently the 3-dimensional reactor dynamics code HEXTRAN for cores with a hexagonal fuel assembly geometry and TRAB-3D for cores with a quadratic fuel assembly geometry. HEXTRAN has been applied to safety analyses of VVER type reactors since early 1990's. TRAB-3D is the latest addition to the code system, and has been applied to BWR and PWR analyses in recent years. In this paper it is shown that TRAB-3D has calculated accurately the power distribution during the Olkiluoto-1 load rejection test. The results from the 3-dimensional analysis can be used as boundary conditions for more detailed fuel rod analysis. For this purpose a general flow model GENFLO, developed at VTT, has been coupled with USNRC's FRAPTRAN fuel accident behaviour model. The example case for FRAPTRAN-GENFLO is for an ATWS at a BWR plant. The basis for the analysis is an oscillation incident in the Olkiluoto-1 BWR during reactor startup on February 22, 1987. It is shown that the new coupled code FRAPTRAN/GENFLO is quite a promising tool that can handle flow situations and give a detailed analysis of reactor transients

  4. A NEM diffusion code for fuel management and time average core calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Surendra; Ray, Sherly; Kumar, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    A computer code based on Nodal expansion method has been developed for solving two groups three dimensional diffusion equation. This code can be used for fuel management and time average core calculation. Explicit Xenon and fuel temperature estimation are also incorporated in this code. TAPP-4 phase-B physics experimental results were analyzed using this code and a code based on FD method. This paper gives the comparison of the observed data and the results obtained with this code and FD code. (author)

  5. The development of the fuel rod transient performance analysis code FTPAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Zhijie; Ji Songtao

    2014-01-01

    Fuel rod behavior, especially the integrity of cladding, played an important role in fuel safety research during reactor transient and hypothetical accidents conditions. In order to study fuel rod performance under transient accidents, FTPAC (Fuel Transient Performance Analysis Code) has been developed for simulating light water reactor fuel rod transient behavior when power or coolant boundary conditions are rapidly changing. It is composed of temperature, mechanical deformation, cladding oxidation and gas pressure model. The assessment was performed by comparing FTPAC code analysis result to experiments data and FRAPTRAN code calculations. Comparison shows that, the FTPAC gives reasonable agreement in temperature, deformation and gas pressure prediction. And the application of slip coefficient is more suitable for simulating the sliding between pellet and cladding when the gap is closed. (authors)

  6. A user input manual for single fuel rod behaviour analysis code FEMAXI-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Hiroaki; Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Fujita, Misao.

    1983-03-01

    Principal objectives of Safety related research in connection with lighr water reactor fuel rods under normal operating condition are mainly addressed 1) to assess fuel integrity under steady state condition and 2) to generate initial condition under hypothetical accident. These assessments have to be relied principally upon steady state fuel behaviour computing code that is able to calculate fuel conditions to tbe occurred in a various manner. To achieve these objectives, efforts have been made to develope analytical computer code that calculates in-reactor fuel rod behaviour in best estimate manner. The computer code developed for the prediction of the long-term burnup response of single fuel rod under light water reactor condition is the third in a series of code versions:FEMAMI-III. The code calculates temperature, rod internal gas pressure, fission gas release and pellet-cladding interaction related rod deformation as a function of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. This document serves as a user input manual for the code FEMAMI-III which has opened to the public in year of 1982. A general description of the code input and output are included together with typical examples of input data. A detailed description of structures, analytical submodels and solution schemes in the code shall be given in the separate document to be published. (author)

  7. CONDOR: neutronic code for fuel elements calculation with rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarino, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    CONDOR neutronic code is used for the calculation of fuel elements formed by fuel rods. The method employed to obtain the neutronic flux is that of collision probabilities in a multigroup scheme on two-dimensional geometry. This code utilizes new calculation algorithms and normalization of such collision probabilities. Burn-up calculations can be made before the alternative of applying variational methods for response flux calculations or those corresponding to collision normalization. (Author) [es

  8. Current status of the transient integral fuel element performance code URANUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preusser, T.; Lassmann, K.

    1983-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of fuel pins during normal and off-normal operation, the integral fuel rod code URANUS has been extended to include a transient version. The paper describes the current status of the program system including a presentation of newly developed models for hypothetical accident investigation. The main objective of current development work is to improve the modelling of fuel and clad material behavior during fast transients. URANUS allows detailed analysis of experiments until the onset of strong material transport phenomena. Transient fission gas analysis is carried out due to the coupling with a special version of the LANGZEIT-KURZZEIT-code (KfK). Fuel restructuring and grain growth kinetics models have been improved recently to better characterize pre-experimental steady-state operation; transient models are under development. Extensive verification of the new version has been carried out by comparison with analytical solutions, experimental evidence, and code-to-code evaluation studies. URANUS, with all these improvements, has been successfully applied to difficult fast breeder fuel rod analysis including TOP, LOF, TUCOP, local coolant blockage and specific carbide fuel experiments. Objective of further studies is the description of transient PCMI. It is expected that the results of these developments will contribute significantly to the understanding of fuel element structural behavior during severe transients. (orig.)

  9. LASER-R a computer code for reactor cell and burnup calculations in neutron transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristian, I.; Cirstoiu, B.; Dumitrache, I.; Cepraga, D.

    1976-04-01

    The LASER-R code is an IBM 370/135 version of the Westinghouse code, LASER, based on the THERMOS and MUFT codes developped by Poncelet. It can be used to perform thermal reactor cell calculations and burnup calculations. The cell exhibits 3-4 concentric areas: fuel, cladding, moderator and scattering ring. Besides directions for use, a short description of the physical model, numerical methods and output is presented

  10. Fuel cells 101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, B.

    2003-06-01

    A capsule history of fuel cells is given, beginning with the first discovery in 1839 by William Grove, a Welsh judge who, when experimenting with electrolysis discovered that by re-combining the two components of electrolysis (water and oxygen) an electric charge was produced. A century later, in 1958, Francis Thomas Bacon, a British scientist demonstrated the first working fuel cell stack, a technology which was licensed and used in the Apollo spacecraft. In Canada, early research on the development of fuel cells was carried out at the University of Toronto, the Defence Research Establishment and the National Research Council. Most of the early work concentrated on alkaline and phosphoric acid fuel cells. In 1983, Ballard Research began the development of the electrolyte membrane fuel cell, which marked the beginning of Canada becoming a world leader in fuel cell technology development. The paper provides a brief account of how fuel cells work, describes the distinguishing characteristics of the various types of fuel cells (alkaline, phosphoric acid, molten-carbonate, solid oxide, and proton exchange membrane types) and their principal benefits. The emphasis is on proton exchange membrane fuel cells because they are the only fuel cell technology that is appropriate for providing primary propulsion power onboard a vehicle. Since vehicles are by far the greatest consumers of fossil fuels, it follows that proton exchange membrane fuel cells will have the greatest potential impact on both environmental matters and on our reliance on oil as our primary fuel. Various on-going and planned fuel cell demonstration projects are also described. 1 fig.

  11. Development of Monte Carlo-based pebble bed reactor fuel management code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiadipura, Topan; Obara, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new Monte Carlo-based fuel management code for OTTO cycle pebble bed reactor was developed. • The double-heterogeneity was modeled using statistical method in MVP-BURN code. • The code can perform analysis of equilibrium and non-equilibrium phase. • Code-to-code comparisons for Once-Through-Then-Out case were investigated. • Ability of the code to accommodate the void cavity was confirmed. - Abstract: A fuel management code for pebble bed reactors (PBRs) based on the Monte Carlo method has been developed in this study. The code, named Monte Carlo burnup analysis code for PBR (MCPBR), enables a simulation of the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle of a PBR from the running-in phase to the equilibrium condition. In MCPBR, a burnup calculation based on a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, MVP-BURN, is coupled with an additional utility code to be able to simulate the OTTO cycle of PBR. MCPBR has several advantages in modeling PBRs, namely its Monte Carlo neutron transport modeling, its capability of explicitly modeling the double heterogeneity of the PBR core, and its ability to model different axial fuel speeds in the PBR core. Analysis at the equilibrium condition of the simplified PBR was used as the validation test of MCPBR. The calculation results of the code were compared with the results of diffusion-based fuel management PBR codes, namely the VSOP and PEBBED codes. Using JENDL-4.0 nuclide library, MCPBR gave a 4.15% and 3.32% lower k eff value compared to VSOP and PEBBED, respectively. While using JENDL-3.3, MCPBR gave a 2.22% and 3.11% higher k eff value compared to VSOP and PEBBED, respectively. The ability of MCPBR to analyze neutron transport in the top void of the PBR core and its effects was also confirmed

  12. Development of a Computer Code for the Estimation of Fuel Rod Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, I.H.; Ahn, H.J. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Much research has already been performed to obtain the information on the degree of failed fuel rods from the primary coolant activities of operating PWRs in the last few decades. The computer codes that are currently in use for domestic nuclear power plants, such as CADE code and ABB-CE codes developed by Westinghouse and ABB-CE, respectively, still give significant overall errors in estimating the failed fuel rods. In addition, with the CADE code, it is difficult to predict the degree of fuel rod failures during the transient period of nuclear reactor operation, where as the ABB-CE codes are relatively more difficult to use for end-users. In particular, the rapid progresses made recently in the area of the computer hardware and software systems that their computer programs be more versatile and user-friendly. While the MS windows system that is centered on the graphic user interface and multitasking is now in widespread use, the computer codes currently employed at the nuclear power plants, such as CADE and ABB-CE codes, can only be run on the DOS system. Moreover, it is desirable to have a computer code for the fuel rod failure estimation that can directly use the radioactivity data obtained from the on-line monitoring system of the primary coolant activity. The main purpose of this study is, therefore, to develop a Windows computer code that can predict the location, the number of failed fuel rods,and the degree of failures using the radioactivity data obtained from the primary coolant activity for PWRs. Another objective is to combine this computer code with the on-line monitoring system of the primary coolant radioactivity at Kori 3 and 4 operating nuclear power plants and enable their combined use for on-line evaluation of the number and degree of fuel rod failures. (author). 49 refs., 85 figs., 30 tabs.

  13. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7; model and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Saitou, Hiroaki

    2011-03-01

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in both normal conditions and anticipated transient conditions. This code is an advanced version which has been produced by incorporating the former version FEMAXI-6 with numerous functional improvements and extensions. In FEMAXI-7, many new models have been added and parameters have been clearly arranged. Also, to facilitate effective maintenance and accessibility of the code, modularization of subroutines and functions have been attained, and quality comment descriptions of variables or physical quantities have been incorporated in the source code. With these advancements, the FEMAXI-7 code has been upgraded to a versatile analytical tool for high burnup fuel behavior analyses. This report describes in detail the design, basic theory and structure, models and numerical method, and improvements and extensions. (author)

  14. The ELOCA fuel modelling code: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    ELOCA is the Industry Standard Toolset (IST) computer code for modelling CANDU fuel under the transient coolant conditions typical of an accident scenario. Since its original inception in the early 1970's, the code has undergone continual development and improvement. The code now embodies much of the knowledge and experience of fuel behaviour gained by the Canadian nuclear industry over this period. ELOCA has proven to be a valuable tool for the safety analyst, and continues to be used extensively to support the licensing cases of CANDU reactors. This paper provides a brief and much simplified view of this development history, its current status, and plans for future development. (author)

  15. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-V (Ver.1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe

    2000-09-01

    A light water fuel analysis code FEMAXI-V is an advanced version which has been produced by integrating FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2), high burn-up fuel code EXBURN-I, and a number of functional improvements and extensions, to predict fuel rod behavior in normal and transient (not accident) conditions. The present report describes in detail the basic theories and structure, models and numerical solutions applied, improvements and extensions, and the material properties adopted in FEMAXI-V(Ver.1). FEMAXI-V deals with a single fuel rod. It predicts thermal and mechanical response of fuel rod to irradiation, including FP gas release. The thermal analysis predicts rod temperature distribution on the basis of pellet heat generation, changes in pellet thermal conductivity and gap thermal conductance, (transient) change in surface heat transfer to coolant, using radial one-dimensional geometry. The heat generation density profile of pellet can be determined by adopting the calculated results of burning analysis code. The mechanical analysis performs elastic/plastic, creep and PCMI calculations by FEM. The FP gas release model calculates diffusion of FP gas atoms and accumulation in bubbles, release and increase in internal pressure of rod. In every analysis, it is possible to allow some materials properties and empirical equations to depend on the local burnup or heat flux, which enables particularly analysis of high burnup fuel behavior and boiling transient of BWR rod. In order to facilitate effective and wide-ranging application of the code, formats and methods of input/output of the code are also described, and a sample output in an actual form is included. (author)

  16. Development of a detailed core flow analysis code for prismatic fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    The detailed analysis of the core flow distribution in prismatic fuel reactors is of interest for modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) design and safety analyses. Such analyses involve the steady-state flow of helium through highly cross-connected flow paths in and around the prismatic fuel elements. Several computer codes have been developed for this purpose. However, since they are proprietary codes, they are not generally available for independent MHTGR design confirmation. The previously developed codes do not consider the exchange or diversion of flow between individual bypass gaps with much detail. Such a capability could be important in the analysis of potential fuel block motion, such as occurred in the Fort St. Vrain reactor, or for the analysis of the conditions around a flow blockage or misloaded fuel block. This work develops a computer code with fairly general-purpose capabilities for modeling the flow in regions of prismatic fuel cores. The code, called BYPASS solves a finite difference control volume formulation of the compressible, steady-state fluid flow in highly cross-connected flow paths typical of the MHTGR

  17. Optimization of Fuel Cell System Operating Conditions for Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology for use in fuel cell vehicles and other applications has been intensively developed in recent decades. Besides the fuel cell stack, air and fuel control and thermal and water management are major challenges in the development of the fuel cell for vehicle applications. The air supply system can have a major impact on overall system efficiency. In this paper a fuel cell system model for optimizing system operating conditions was developed wh...

  18. Burnup code for fuel assembly by Monte Carlo code. MKENO-BURN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya; Masukawa, Fumihiro; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Kurosawa, Masayoshi; Kaneko, Toshiyuki.

    1996-12-01

    The evaluation of neutron spectrum is so important for burnup calculation of the heterogeneous geometry like recent BWR fuel assembly. MKENO-BURN is a multi dimensional burnup code that based on the three dimensional monte carlo neutron transport code 'MULTI-KENO' and the routine for the burnup calculation of the one dimensional burnup code 'UNITBURN'. MKENO-BURN analyzes the burnup problem of arbitrary regions after evaluating the neutron spectrum and making one group cross section in three dimensional geometry with MULTI-KENO. It enables us to do three dimensional burnup calculation. This report consists of general description of MKENO-BURN and the input data. (author)

  19. Burnup code for fuel assembly by Monte Carlo code. MKENO-BURN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya; Masukawa, Fumihiro; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Kurosawa, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kaneko, Toshiyuki

    1996-12-01

    The evaluation of neutron spectrum is so important for burnup calculation of the heterogeneous geometry like recent BWR fuel assembly. MKENO-BURN is a multi dimensional burnup code that based on the three dimensional monte carlo neutron transport code `MULTI-KENO` and the routine for the burnup calculation of the one dimensional burnup code `UNITBURN`. MKENO-BURN analyzes the burnup problem of arbitrary regions after evaluating the neutron spectrum and making one group cross section in three dimensional geometry with MULTI-KENO. It enables us to do three dimensional burnup calculation. This report consists of general description of MKENO-BURN and the input data. (author)

  20. CERDEC Fuel Cell Team: Military Transitions for Soldier Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-27

    Fuel Cell (DMFC) (PEO Soldier) Samsung: 20W DMFC (CRADA) General Atomics & Jadoo: 50W Ammonia Borane Fueled PEMFC Current Fuel Cell Team Efforts...Continued Ardica: 20W Wearable PEMFC operating on Chemical Hydrides Spectrum Brands w/ Rayovac: Hydrogen Generators and Alkaline Fuel Cells for AA...100W Ammonia Borane fueled PEMFC Ultralife: 150W sodium borohydride fueled PEMFC Protonex: 250W RMFC and Power Manager (ARO) NanoDynamics: 250W SOFC

  1. Development and Validation of A Nuclear Fuel Cycle Analysis Tool: A FUTURE Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. K.; Ko, W. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoon Hee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This paper presents the development and validation methods of the FUTURE (FUel cycle analysis Tool for nUcleaR Energy) code, which was developed for a dynamic material flow evaluation and economic analysis of the nuclear fuel cycle. This code enables an evaluation of a nuclear material flow and its economy for diverse nuclear fuel cycles based on a predictable scenario. The most notable virtue of this FUTURE code, which was developed using C and MICROSOFT SQL DBMS, is that a program user can design a nuclear fuel cycle process easily using a standard process on the canvas screen through a drag-and-drop method. From the user's point of view, this code is very easy to use thanks to its high flexibility. In addition, the new code also enables the maintenance of data integrity by constructing a database environment of the results of the nuclear fuel cycle analyses.

  2. SATURN-FS 1: A computer code for thermo-mechanical fuel rod analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritzhaupt-Kleissl, H.J.; Heck, M.

    1993-09-01

    The SATURN-FS code was written as a general revision of the SATURN-2 code. SATURN-FS is capable to perform a complete thermomechanical analysis of a fuel pin, with all thermal, mechanical and irradiation-based effects. Analysis is possible for LWR and for LMFBR fuel pins. The thermal analysis consists of calculations of the temperature profile in fuel, gap and in the cladding. Pore migration, stoichiometry change of oxide fuel, gas release and diffusion effects are taken into account. The mechanical modeling allows the non steady-state analysis of elastic and nonelastic fuel pin behaviour, such as creep, strain hardening, recovery and stress relaxation. Fuel cracking and healing is taken into account as well as contact and friction between fuel and cladding. The modeling of the irradiation effects comprises swelling and fission gas production, Pu-migration and irradiation induced creep. The code structure, the models and the requirements for running the code are described in the report. Recommendations for the application are given. Program runs for verification and typical examples of application are given in the last part of this report. (orig.) [de

  3. Assessment of US NRC fuel rod behavior codes to extended burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.; Croucher, D.W.; Haggag, F.M.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the status of assessing the capabilities of the NRC fuel rod performance codes for calculating extended burnup rod behavior. As part of this effort, a large spectrum of fuel rod behavior phenomena was examined, and the phenomena deemed as being influential during extended burnup operation were identified. Then, the experiment data base addressing these identified phenomena was examined for availability and completeness at extended burnups. Calculational capabilities of the NRC's steady state FRAPCON-2 and transient FRAP-T6 fuel rod behavior codes were examined for each of the identified phenomenon. Parameters calculated by the codes were compared with the available data base, and judgments were made regarding model performance. Overall, the FRAPCON-2 code was found to be moderately well assessed to extended burnups, but the FRAP-T6 code cannot be adequately assessed until more transient high burnup data are available

  4. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7. Model and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Nagase, Fumihisa; Saitou, Hiroaki

    2013-07-01

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in both normal conditions and anticipated transient conditions. This code is an advanced version which has been produced by incorporating the former version FEMAXI-6 with numerous functional improvements and extensions. In FEMAXI-7, many new models have been added and parameters have been clearly arranged. Also, to facilitate effective maintenance and accessibility of the code, modularization of subroutines and functions have been attained, and quality comment descriptions of variables or physical quantities have been incorporated in the source code. With these advancements, the FEMAXI-7 code has been upgraded to a versatile analytical tool for high burnup fuel behavior analyses. This report describes in detail the design, basic theory and structure, models and numerical method of FEMAXI-7, and its improvements and extensions. (author)

  5. WWER-440 fuel rod performance analysis with PIN-Micro and TRANSURANUS codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitkova, M.; Manolova, M.; Stefanova, S.; Simeonova, V.; Passage, G.; Lassmann, K.

    1994-01-01

    PIN-micro and TRANSURANUS codes were used to analyse the WWER-440 fuel rod behaviour at normal operation conditions. Two highest loaded fuel rods of the fuel assemblies irradiated in WWER-440 with different power histories were selected. A set of the most probable average values of all geometrical and technological parameters were used. A comparison between PIN-micro and TRANSURANUS codes was performed using identical input data. The results for inner gas pressure, gap size, local linear heat rate, fuel central temperature and fission gas release as a function of time calculated for the selected fuel rods are presented. The following conclusions were drawn: 1) The PIN-micro code predicts adequately the thermal and mechanical behaviour of the two fuel rods; 2) The comparison of the results obtained by PIN-micro and TRANSURANUS shows a reasonable agreement and the discrepancies could be explained by the lack of thoroughly WWER oriented verification of TRANSURANUS; 3) The advanced TRANSURANUS code could be successfully applied for WWER fuel rod thermal and mechanical analysis after incorporation of all necessary WWER specific material properties and models for the Zr+1%Nb cladding, for the fuel rod as a whole and after validation against WWER experimental and operational data. 1 tab., 10 figs., 10 refs

  6. WWER-440 fuel rod performance analysis with PIN-Micro and TRANSURANUS codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitkova, M; Manolova, M; Stefanova, S; Simeonova, V; Passage, G [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. za Yadrena Izsledvaniya i Yadrena Energetika; Kharalampieva, Ts [Kombinat Atomna Energetika, Kozloduj (Bulgaria); Lassmann, K [European Atomic Energy Community, Karlsruhe (Germany). European Inst. for Transuranium Elements

    1994-12-31

    PIN-micro and TRANSURANUS codes were used to analyse the WWER-440 fuel rod behaviour at normal operation conditions. Two highest loaded fuel rods of the fuel assemblies irradiated in WWER-440 with different power histories were selected. A set of the most probable average values of all geometrical and technological parameters were used. A comparison between PIN-micro and TRANSURANUS codes was performed using identical input data. The results for inner gas pressure, gap size, local linear heat rate, fuel central temperature and fission gas release as a function of time calculated for the selected fuel rods are presented. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) The PIN-micro code predicts adequately the thermal and mechanical behaviour of the two fuel rods; (2) The comparison of the results obtained by PIN-micro and TRANSURANUS shows a reasonable agreement and the discrepancies could be explained by the lack of thoroughly WWER oriented verification of TRANSURANUS; (3) The advanced TRANSURANUS code could be successfully applied for WWER fuel rod thermal and mechanical analysis after incorporation of all necessary WWER specific material properties and models for the Zr+1%Nb cladding, for the fuel rod as a whole and after validation against WWER experimental and operational data. 1 tab., 10 figs., 10 refs.

  7. Coded aperture imaging system for nuclear fuel motion detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalker, K.T.; Kelly, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    A Coded Aperature Imaging System (CAIS) has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to image the motion of nuclear fuel rods undergoing tests simulating accident conditions within a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. The tests require that the motion of the test fuel be monitored while it is immersed in a liquid sodium coolant precluding the use of normal optical means of imaging. However, using the fission gamma rays emitted by the fuel itself and coded aperture techniques, images with 1.5 mm radial and 5 mm axial resolution have been attained. Using an electro-optical detection system coupled to a high speed motion picture camera a time resolution of one millisecond can be achieved. This paper will discuss the application of coded aperture imaging to the problem, including the design of the one-dimensional Fresnel zone plate apertures used and the special problems arising from the reactor environment and use of high energy gamma ray photons to form the coded image. Also to be discussed will be the reconstruction techniques employed and the effect of various noise sources on system performance. Finally, some experimental results obtained using the system will be presented

  8. Study of multiplication factor sensitivity to the spread of WWER spent fuel isotopics calculated by different codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markova, L.

    2001-01-01

    As a sensitivity study the impact on the system reactivity was studied in the case that different calculational methodologies of spent fuel isotopic concentrations were used for WWER spent fuel inventory computations. The sets of isotopic concentrations obtained by calculations with different codes and libraries as a result of the CB2 international benchmark focused on WWER-440 burnup credit were used to show the spread of the calculated spent fuel system reactivity. Using the MCNP 4B code and changing the isotopics input data, the multiplication factor of an infinite array of the WWER-440 fuel pin cells was calculated. The evaluation of the results shows the sensitivity of the calculated reactivity to different calculational methodologies used for the spent fuel inventory computation. In the studied cases of the CB2 benchmark, the spread of the reference k-results relative to the mean was found less or about ±1% in spite of the fact that the data of isotopic concentrations were spread much more. (author)

  9. Nanofluidic fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-11-01

    Fuel cells are gaining momentum as a critical component in the renewable energy mix for stationary, transportation, and portable power applications. State-of-the-art fuel cell technology benefits greatly from nanotechnology applied to nanostructured membranes, catalysts, and electrodes. However, the potential of utilizing nanofluidics for fuel cells has not yet been explored, despite the significant opportunity of harnessing rapid nanoscale reactant transport in close proximity to the reactive sites. In the present article, a nanofluidic fuel cell that utilizes fluid flow through nanoporous media is conceptualized and demonstrated for the first time. This transformative concept captures the advantages of recently developed membraneless and catalyst-free fuel cell architectures paired with the enhanced interfacial contact area enabled by nanofluidics. When compared to previously reported microfluidic fuel cells, the prototype nanofluidic fuel cell demonstrates increased surface area, reduced activation overpotential, superior kinetic characteristics, and moderately enhanced fuel cell performance in the high cell voltage regime with up to 14% higher power density. However, the expected mass transport benefits in the high current density regime were constrained by high ohmic cell resistance, which could likely be resolved through future optimization studies.

  10. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE ANALYSIS TOOL: A FUTURE CODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. KIM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and validation methods of the FUTURE (FUel cycle analysis Tool for nUcleaR Energy code, which was developed for a dynamic material flow evaluation and economic analysis of the nuclear fuel cycle. This code enables an evaluation of a nuclear material flow and its economy for diverse nuclear fuel cycles based on a predictable scenario. The most notable virtue of this FUTURE code, which was developed using C# and MICROSOFT SQL DBMS, is that a program user can design a nuclear fuel cycle process easily using a standard process on the canvas screen through a drag-and-drop method. From the user's point of view, this code is very easy to use thanks to its high flexibility. In addition, the new code also enables the maintenance of data integrity by constructing a database environment of the results of the nuclear fuel cycle analyses.

  11. Steady State and Transient Fuel Rod Performance Analyses by Pad and Transuranus Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slyeptsov, O.; Slyeptsov, S.; Kulish, G.; Ostapov, A.; Chernov, I.

    2013-01-01

    The report performed under IAEA research contract No.15370/L2 describes the analysis results of WWER and PWR fuel rod performance at steady state operation and transients by means of PAD and TRANSURANUS codes. The code TRANSURANUS v1m1j09 developed by Institute for of Transuranium Elements (ITU) was used based on the Licensing Agreement N31302. The code PAD 4.0 developed by Westinghouse Electric Company was utilized in the frame of the Ukraine Nuclear Fuel Qualification Project for safety substantiation for the use of Westinghouse fuel assemblies in the mixed core of WWER-1000 reactor. The experimental data for the Russian fuel rod behavior obtained during the steady-state operation in the WWER-440 core of reactor Kola-3 and during the power transients in the core of MIR research reactor were taken from the IFPE database of the OECD/NEA and utilized for assessing the codes themselves during simulation of such properties as fuel burnup, fuel centerline temperature (FCT), fuel swelling, cladding strain, fission gas release (FGR) and rod internal pressure (RIP) in the rod burnup range of (41 - 60) GWD/MTU. The experimental data of fuel behavior at steady-state operation during seven reactor cycles presented by AREVA for the standard PWR fuel rod design were used to examine the code FGR model in the fuel burnup range of (37 - 81) GWD/MTU. (author)

  12. Bringing fuel cells to reality and reality to fuel cells: A systems perspective on the use of fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxe, Maria

    2008-10-01

    The hopes and expectations on fuel cells are high and sometimes unrealistically positive. However, as an emerging technology, much remains to be proven and the proper use of the technology in terms of suitable applications, integration with society and extent of use is still under debate. This thesis is a contribution to the debate, presenting results from two fuel cell demonstration projects, looking into the introduction of fuel cells on the market, discussing the prospects and concerns for the near-term future and commenting on the potential use in a future sustainable energy system. Bringing fuel cells to reality implies finding near-term niche applications and markets where fuel cell systems may be competitive. In a sense fuel cells are already a reality as they have been demonstrated in various applications world-wide. However, in many of the envisioned applications fuel cells are far from being competitive and sometimes also the environmental benefit of using fuel cells in a given application may be questioned. Bringing reality to fuel cells implies emphasising the need for realistic expectations and pointing out that the first markets have to be based on the currently available technology and not the visions of what fuel cells could be in the future. The results from the demonstration projects show that further development and research on especially the durability for fuel cell systems is crucial and a general recommendation is to design the systems for high reliability and durability rather than striving towards higher energy efficiencies. When sufficient reliability and durability are achieved, fuel cell systems may be introduced in niche markets where the added values presented by the technology compensate for the initial high cost

  13. Code structure for U-Mo fuel performance analysis in high performance research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gwan Yoon; Cho, Tae Won; Lee, Chul Min; Sohn, Dong Seong [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyu Hong; Park, Jong Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A performance analysis modeling applicable to research reactor fuel is being developed with available models describing fuel performance phenomena observed from in-pile tests. We established the calculation algorithm and scheme to best predict fuel performance using radio-thermo-mechanically coupled system to consider fuel swelling, interaction layer growth, pore formation in the fuel meat, and creep fuel deformation and mass relocation, etc. In this paper, we present a general structure of the performance analysis code for typical research reactor fuel and advanced features such as a model to predict fuel failure induced by combination of breakaway swelling and pore growth in the fuel meat. Thermo-mechanical code dedicated to the modeling of U-Mo dispersion fuel plates is being under development in Korea to satisfy a demand for advanced performance analysis and safe assessment of the plates. The major physical phenomena during irradiation are considered in the code such that interaction layer formation by fuel-matrix interdiffusion, fission induced swelling of fuel particle, mass relocation by fission induced stress, and pore formation at the interface between the reaction product and Al matrix.

  14. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Evaluations | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electric Vehicle Evaluations Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Evaluations NREL's technology validation team analyzes hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) operating in a real-world setting to include commercial FCEVs for the first time. Current fuel cell electric vehicle evaluations build on the

  15. Probabilistic evaluation of fuel element performance by the combined use of a fast running simplistic and a detailed deterministic fuel performance code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misfeldt, I.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of fuel element performance requires a probabilistic fuel code supported by a well bench-marked deterministic code. This paper presents an analysis of a SGHWR ramp experiment, where the probabilistic fuel code FRP is utilized in combination with the deterministic fuel models FFRS and SLEUTH/SEER. The statistical methods employed in FRP are Monte Carlo simulation or a low-order Taylor approximation. The fast-running simplistic fuel code FFRS is used for the deterministic simulations, whereas simulations with SLEUTH/SEER are used to verify the predictions of FFRS. The ramp test was performed with a SGHWR fuel element, where 9 of the 36 fuel pins failed. There seemed to be good agreement between the deterministic simulations and the experiment, but the statistical evaluation shows that the uncertainty on the important performance parameters is too large for this ''nice'' result. The analysis does therefore indicate a discrepancy between the experiment and the deterministic code predictions. Possible explanations for this disagreement are discussed. (author)

  16. Heterogeneous fuels for minor actinides transmutation: Fuel performance codes predictions in the EFIT case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabrese, R., E-mail: rolando.calabrese@enea.i [ENEA, Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycle Closure Division, via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Vettraino, F.; Artioli, C. [ENEA, Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycle Closure Division, via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Sobolev, V. [SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Thetford, R. [Serco Technical and Assurance Services, 150 Harwell Business Centre, Didcot OX11 0QB (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Plutonium recycling in new-generation fast reactors coupled with minor actinides (MA) transmutation in dedicated nuclear systems could achieve a decrease of nuclear waste long-term radiotoxicity by two orders of magnitude in comparison with current once-through strategy. In a double-strata scenario, purpose-built accelerator-driven systems (ADS) could transmute minor actinides. The innovative nuclear fuel conceived for such systems demands significant R and D efforts in order to meet the safety and technical performance of current fuel systems. The Integrated Project EUROTRANS (EUROpean research programme for the TRANSmutation of high level nuclear waste in ADS), part of the EURATOM Framework Programme 6 (FP6), undertook some of this research. EUROTRANS developed from the FP5 research programmes on ADS (PDS-XADS) and on fuels dedicated to MA transmutation (FUTURE, CONFIRM). One of its main objectives is the conceptual design of a small sub-critical nuclear system loaded with uranium-free fuel to provide high MA transmutation efficiency. These principles guided the design of EFIT (European Facility for Industrial Transmutation) in the domain DESIGN of IP EUROTRANS. The domain AFTRA (Advanced Fuels for TRAnsmutation system) identified two composite fuel systems: a ceramic-ceramic (CERCER) where fuel particles are dispersed in a magnesia matrix, and a ceramic-metallic (CERMET) with a molybdenum matrix in the place of MgO matrix to host a ceramic fissile phase. The EFIT fuel is composed of plutonium and MA oxides in solid solution with isotopic vectors typical of LWR spent fuel with 45 MWd/kg{sub HM} discharge burnup and 30 years interim storage before reprocessing. This paper is focused on the thermomechanical state of the hottest fuel pins of two EFIT cores of 400 MW{sub (th)} loaded with either CERCER or CERMET fuels. For calculations three fuel performance codes were used: FEMALE, TRAFIC and TRANSURANUS. The analysis was performed at the beginning of fuel life

  17. FEMAXI-III, a computer code for fuel rod performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, K.; Iwano, Y.; Ichikawa, M.; Okubo, T.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a method of fuel rod thermal-mechanical performance analysis used in the FEMAXI-III code. The code incorporates the models describing thermal-mechanical processes such as pellet-cladding thermal expansion, pellet irradiation swelling, densification, relocation and fission gas release as they affect pellet-cladding gap thermal conductance. The code performs the thermal behavior analysis of a full-length fuel rod within the framework of one-dimensional multi-zone modeling. The mechanical effects including ridge deformation is rigorously analyzed by applying the axisymmetric finite element method. The finite element geometrical model is confined to a half-pellet-height region with the assumption that pellet-pellet interaction is symmetrical. The 8-node quadratic isoparametric ring elements are adopted for obtaining accurate finite element solutions. The Newton-Raphson iteration with an implicit algorithm is applied to perform the analysis of non-linear material behaviors accurately and stably. The pellet-cladding interaction mechanism is exactly treated using the nodal continuity conditions. The code is applicable to the thermal-mechanical analysis of water reactor fuel rods experiencing variable power histories. (orig.)

  18. Constant strength fuel-fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaseen, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical apparatus composed of both a nonconsumable anode and cathode; and electrolyte, fuel oxidant and controls. This invention guarantees the constant transfer of hydrogen atoms and their respective electrons, thus a constant flow of power by submergence of the negative electrode in a constant strength hydrogen furnishing fuel; when said fuel is an aqueous absorbed hydrocarbon, such as and similar to ethanol or methnol. The objective is accomplished by recirculation of the liquid fuel, as depleted in the cell through specific type membranes which pass water molecules and reject the fuel molecules; thus concentrating them for recycle use

  19. Fuels processing for transportation fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.

    Fuel cells primarily use hydrogen as the fuel. This hydrogen must be produced from other fuels such as natural gas or methanol. The fuel processor requirements are affected by the fuel to be converted, the type of fuel cell to be supplied, and the fuel cell application. The conventional fuel processing technology has been reexamined to determine how it must be adapted for use in demanding applications such as transportation. The two major fuel conversion processes are steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming. The former is established practice for stationary applications; the latter offers certain advantages for mobile systems and is presently in various stages of development. This paper discusses these fuel processing technologies and the more recent developments for fuel cell systems used in transportation. The need for new materials in fuels processing, particularly in the area of reforming catalysis and hydrogen purification, is discussed.

  20. Fuel cells for electricity generation from carbonaceous fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledjeff-Hey, K; Formanski, V; Roes, J [Gerhard-Mercator- Universitaet - Gesamthochschule Duisburg, Fachbereich Maschinenbau/Fachgebiet Energietechnik, Duisburg (Germany); Heinzel, A [Fraunhofer Inst. for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Freiburg (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Fuel cells, which are electrochemical systems converting chemical energy directly into electrical energy with water and heat as by-products, are of interest as a means of generating electricity which is environmentally friendly, clean and highly efficient. They are classified according to the electrolyte used. The main types of cell in order of operating temperature are described. These are: alkaline fuel cells, the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC); the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC); the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC); the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Applications depend on the type of cell and may range from power generation on a large scale to mobile application in cars or portable systems. One of the most promising options is the PEM-fuel cell stack where there has been significant improvement in power density in recent years. The production from carbonaceous fuels and purification of the cell fuel, hydrogen, is considered. Of the purification methods available, hydrogen separation by means of palladium alloy membranes seems particular effective in reducing CO concentrations to the low levels required for PEM cells. (UK)

  1. Development of Fuel ROd Behavior Analysis code (FROBA) and its application to AP1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Hongxing; Tian, Wenxi; Yang, Zhen; SU, G.H.; Qiu, Suizheng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A Fuel ROd Behavior Analysis code (FROBA) has been developed. ► The effects irradiation and burnup has been considered in FROBA. ► The comparison with INL’s results shows a good agreement. ► The FROBA code was applied to AP1000. ► Peak fuel temperature, gap width, hoop strain, etc. were obtained. -- Abstract: The reliable prediction of nuclear fuel rod behavior is of great importance for safety evaluation of nuclear reactors. In the present study, a thermo-mechanical coupling code FROBA (Fuel ROd Behavior Analysis) has been independently developed with consideration of irradiation and burnup effects. The thermodynamic, geometrical and mechanical behaviors have been predicted and were compared with the results obtained by Idaho National Laboratory to validate the reliability and accuracy of the FROBA code. The validated code was applied to analyze the fuel behavior of AP1000 at different burnup levels. The thermal results show that the predicted peak fuel temperature experiences three stages in the fuel lifetime. The mechanical results indicate that hoop strain at high power is greater than that at low power, which means that gap closure phenomenon will occur earlier at high power rates. The maximum cladding stress meets the requirement of yield strength limitation in the entire fuel lifetime. All results show that there are enough safety margins for fuel rod behavior of AP1000 at rated operation conditions. The FROBA code is expected to be applied to deal with more complicated fuel rod scenarios after some modifications.

  2. Development of a general coupling interface for the fuel performance code TRANSURANUS – Tested with the reactor dynamics code DYN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, L.; Rohde, U.; Seidl, M.; Schubert, A.; Van Uffelen, P.; Macián-Juan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A general coupling interface was developed for couplings of the TRANSURANUS code. • With this new tool simplified fuel behavior models in codes can be replaced. • Applicable e.g. for several reactor types and from normal operation up to DBA. • The general coupling interface was applied to the reactor dynamics code DYN3D. • The new coupled code system DYN3D–TRANSURANUS was successfully tested for RIA. - Abstract: A general interface is presented for coupling the TRANSURANUS fuel performance code with thermal hydraulics system, sub-channel thermal hydraulics, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or reactor dynamics codes. As first application the reactor dynamics code DYN3D was coupled at assembly level in order to describe the fuel behavior in more detail. In the coupling, DYN3D provides process time, time-dependent rod power and thermal hydraulics conditions to TRANSURANUS, which in case of the two-way coupling approach transfers parameters like fuel temperature and cladding temperature back to DYN3D. Results of the coupled code system are presented for the reactivity transient scenario, initiated by control rod ejection. More precisely, the two-way coupling approach systematically calculates higher maximum values for the node fuel enthalpy. These differences can be explained thanks to the greater detail in fuel behavior modeling. The numerical performance for DYN3D–TRANSURANUS was proved to be fast and stable. The coupled code system can therefore improve the assessment of safety criteria, at a reasonable computational cost

  3. Fuel cell opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, K. [Hydrogenics Corporation, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The opportunities for fuel cell development are discussed. Fuel cells are highly efficient, reliable and require little maintenance. They also produce virtually zero emissions. The author stated that there are some complicated issues to resolve before fuel cells can be widely used. These include hydrogen availability and infrastructure. While the cost of fuel cells is currently very high, these costs are constantly coming down. The industry is still in the early stages of development. The driving forces for the development of fuel cells are: deregulation of energy markets, growing expectations for distributed power generation, discontinuity between energy supply and demand, and environmental concerns. 12 figs.

  4. 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  5. 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 9-13, 2011, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  6. 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 13-17, 2013, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  7. 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 16-20, 2014, in Washington, DC. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  8. 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 14-18, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  9. Major design issues of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    In addition to the stack, a fuel cell power generation unit requires fuel desulfurization and reforming, fuel and oxidant preheating, process heat removal, waste heat recovery, steam generation, oxidant supply, power conditioning, water supply and treatment, purge gas supply, instrument air supply, and system control. These support facilities add considerable cost and system complexity. Bechtel, as a system integrator of M-C Power`s molten carbonate fuel cell development team, has spent substantial effort to simplify and minimize these supporting facilities to meet cost and reliability goals for commercialization. Similiar to other fuels cells, MCFC faces design challenge of how to comply with codes and standards, achieve high efficiency and part load performance, and meanwhile minimize utility requirements, weight, plot area, and cost. However, MCFC has several unique design issues due to its high operating temperature, use of molten electrolyte, and the requirement of CO2 recycle.

  10. Code-B-1 for stress/strain calculation for TRISO fuel particle (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aihara, Jun; Ueta, Shohei; Shibata, Taiju; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2011-12-01

    We have developed Code-B-1 for the prediction of the failure probabilities of the coated fuel particles for the high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) under operation by modification of an existing code. A finite element method (FEM) is employed for the stress calculation part and Code-B-1 can treat the plastic deformation of the coating layer of the coated fuel particles which the existing code cannot treat. (author)

  11. Fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederdoeckl, J.

    2001-01-01

    Europe has at present big hopes on the fuel cells technology, in comparison with other energy conversion technologies, this technology has important advantages, for example: high efficiency, very low pollution and parallel use of electric and thermal energy. Preliminary works for fuel cells developing and its commercial exploitation are at full speed; until now the European Union has invested approx. 1.7 billion Schillings, 60 relevant projects are being executed. The Austrian industry is interested in applying this technique to drives, thermal power stations and the miniature fuel cells as replacement of batteries in electronic products (Notebooks, mobile telephones, etc.). A general description of the historic development of fuel cells including the main types is given as well as what is the situation in Austria. (nevyjel)

  12. Fuel Cell Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Brun

    2006-09-15

    In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance

  13. SCANAIR: A transient fuel performance code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moal, Alain; Georgenthum, Vincent; Marchand, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Since the early 1990s, the code SCANAIR is developed at IRSN. • The software focuses on studying fast transients such as RIA in light water reactors. • The fuel rod modelling is based on a 1.5D approach. • Thermal and thermal-hydraulics, mechanical and gas behaviour resolutions are coupled. • The code is used for safety assessment and integral tests analysis. - Abstract: Since the early 1990s, the French “Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire” (IRSN) has developed the SCANAIR computer code with the view to analysing pressurised water reactor (PWR) safety. This software specifically focuses on studying fast transients such as reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA) caused by possible ejection of control rods. The code aims at improving the global understanding of the physical mechanisms governing the thermal-mechanical behaviour of a single rod. It is currently used to analyse integral tests performed in CABRI and NSRR experimental reactors. The resulting validated code is used to carry out studies required to evaluate margins in relation to criteria for different types of fuel rods used in nuclear power plants. Because phenomena occurring during fast power transients are complex, the simulation in SCANAIR is based on a close coupling between several modules aimed at modelling thermal, thermal-hydraulics, mechanical and gas behaviour. During the first stage of fast power transients, clad deformation is mainly governed by the pellet–clad mechanical interaction (PCMI). At the later stage, heat transfers from pellet to clad bring the cladding material to such high temperatures that the boiling crisis might occurs. The significant over-pressurisation of the rod and the fact of maintaining the cladding material at elevated temperatures during a fairly long period can lead to ballooning and possible clad failure. A brief introduction describes the context, the historical background and recalls the main phenomena involved under

  14. SCANAIR: A transient fuel performance code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moal, Alain, E-mail: alain.moal@irsn.fr; Georgenthum, Vincent; Marchand, Olivier

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Since the early 1990s, the code SCANAIR is developed at IRSN. • The software focuses on studying fast transients such as RIA in light water reactors. • The fuel rod modelling is based on a 1.5D approach. • Thermal and thermal-hydraulics, mechanical and gas behaviour resolutions are coupled. • The code is used for safety assessment and integral tests analysis. - Abstract: Since the early 1990s, the French “Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire” (IRSN) has developed the SCANAIR computer code with the view to analysing pressurised water reactor (PWR) safety. This software specifically focuses on studying fast transients such as reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA) caused by possible ejection of control rods. The code aims at improving the global understanding of the physical mechanisms governing the thermal-mechanical behaviour of a single rod. It is currently used to analyse integral tests performed in CABRI and NSRR experimental reactors. The resulting validated code is used to carry out studies required to evaluate margins in relation to criteria for different types of fuel rods used in nuclear power plants. Because phenomena occurring during fast power transients are complex, the simulation in SCANAIR is based on a close coupling between several modules aimed at modelling thermal, thermal-hydraulics, mechanical and gas behaviour. During the first stage of fast power transients, clad deformation is mainly governed by the pellet–clad mechanical interaction (PCMI). At the later stage, heat transfers from pellet to clad bring the cladding material to such high temperatures that the boiling crisis might occurs. The significant over-pressurisation of the rod and the fact of maintaining the cladding material at elevated temperatures during a fairly long period can lead to ballooning and possible clad failure. A brief introduction describes the context, the historical background and recalls the main phenomena involved under

  15. Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells have been the subject of intense research and development efforts for the past decades. Even so, the technology has not had its commercial breakthrough yet. This entry gives an overview of the technological challenges and status of fuel cells and discusses the most promising applications...... of the different types of fuel cells. Finally, their role in a future energy supply with a large share of fluctuating sustainable power sources, e.g., solar or wind, is surveyed....

  16. Modification in the FUDA computer code to predict fuel performance at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, M; Arunakumar, B V; Prasad, P N [Nuclear Power Corp., Mumbai (India)

    1997-08-01

    The computer code FUDA (FUel Design Analysis) participated in the blind exercises organized by the IAEA CRP (Co-ordinated Research Programme) on FUMEX (Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup). While the code prediction compared well with the experiments at Halden under various parametric and operating conditions, the fission gas release and fission gas pressure were found to be slightly over-predicted, particularly at high burnups. In view of the results of 6 FUMEX cases, the main models and submodels of the code were reviewed and necessary improvements were made. The new version of the code FUDA MOD 2 is now able to predict fuel performance parameter for burn-ups up to 50000 MWD/TeU. The validation field of the code has been extended to prediction of thorium oxide fuel performance. An analysis of local deformations at pellet interfaces and near the end caps is carried out considering the hourglassing of the pellet by finite element technique. (author). 15 refs, 1 fig.

  17. Modification in the FUDA computer code to predict fuel performance at high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, M.; Arunakumar, B.V.; Prasad, P.N.

    1997-01-01

    The computer code FUDA (FUel Design Analysis) participated in the blind exercises organized by the IAEA CRP (Co-ordinated Research Programme) on FUMEX (Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup). While the code prediction compared well with the experiments at Halden under various parametric and operating conditions, the fission gas release and fission gas pressure were found to be slightly over-predicted, particularly at high burnups. In view of the results of 6 FUMEX cases, the main models and submodels of the code were reviewed and necessary improvements were made. The new version of the code FUDA MOD 2 is now able to predict fuel performance parameter for burn-ups up to 50000 MWD/TeU. The validation field of the code has been extended to prediction of thorium oxide fuel performance. An analysis of local deformations at pellet interfaces and near the end caps is carried out considering the hourglassing of the pellet by finite element technique. (author). 15 refs, 1 fig

  18. The Light-Water-Reactor Version of the URANUS Integral fuel-rod code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labmann, K; Moreno, A

    1977-07-01

    The LWR version of the URANUS code, a digital computer programme for the thermal and mechanical analysis of fuel rods, is presented. Material properties are discussed and their effect on integral fuel rod behaviour elaborated via URANUS results for some carefully selected reference experiments. The numerical results do not represent post-irradiation analyses of in-pile experiments, they illustrate rather typical and diverse URANUS capabilities. The performance test shows that URANUS is reliable and efficient, thus the code is a most valuable tool in fuel rod analysis work. K. LaBmann developed the LWR version of the URANUS code, material properties were reviewed and supplied by A. Moreno. (Author) 41 refs.

  19. The light-water-reactor version of the Uranus integral fuel-rod code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, A.; Lassmann, K.

    1977-01-01

    The LWR of the Uranus code, a digital computer programme for the thermal and mechanical analysis of fuel rods, is presented. Material properties are discussed and their effect on integral fuel rod behaviour elaborated via Uranus results for some carefully selected reference experiments. The numerical results do not represent post-irradiation analysis of in-pile experiments, they illustrate rather typical and diverse Uranus capabilities. The performance test shows that Uranus is reliable and efficient, thus the code is a most valuable tool in fuel fod analysis work. K. Lassmann developed the LWR version of the Uranus code, material properties were reviewed and supplied by A. Moreno. (author)

  20. High fidelity analysis of BWR fuel assembly with COBRA-TF/PARCS and trace codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarca, A.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.; Soler, A.

    2013-01-01

    The growing importance of detailed reactor core and fuel assembly description for light water reactors (LWRs) as well as the sub-channel safety analysis requires high fidelity models and coupled neutronic/thermalhydraulic codes. Hand in hand with advances in the computer technology, the nuclear safety analysis is beginning to use a more detailed thermal hydraulics and neutronics. Previously, a PWR core and a 16 by 16 fuel assembly models were developed to test and validate our COBRA-TF/PARCS v2.7 (CTF/PARCS) coupled code. In this work, a comparison of the modeling and simulation advantages and disadvantages of modern 10 by 10 BWR fuel assembly with CTF/PARCS and TRACE codes has been done. The objective of the comparison is making known the main advantages of using the sub-channel codes to perform high resolution nuclear safety analysis. The sub-channel codes, like CTF, permits obtain accurate predictions, in two flow regime, of the thermalhydraulic parameters important to safety with high local resolution. The modeled BWR fuel assembly has 91 fuel rods (81 full length and 10 partial length fuel rods) and a big square central water rod. This assembly has been modeled with high level of detail with CTF code and using the BWR modeling parameters provided by TRACE. The same neutronic PARCS's model has been used for the simulation with both codes. To compare the codes a coupled steady state has be performed. (author)

  1. Predictive Bias and Sensitivity in NRC Fuel Performance Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geelhood, Kenneth J.; Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.; Lanning, Donald D.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2009-10-01

    The latest versions of the fuel performance codes, FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN were examined to determine if the codes are intrinsically conservative. Each individual model and type of code prediction was examined and compared to the data that was used to develop the model. In addition, a brief literature search was performed to determine if more recent data have become available since the original model development for model comparison.

  2. Handbook of fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, T.G.; Camara, E.H.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1980-05-01

    The intent of this document is to provide a description of fuel cells, their performances and operating conditions, and the relationship between fuel processors and fuel cells. This information will enable fuel cell engineers to know which fuel processing schemes are most compatible with which fuel cells and to predict the performance of a fuel cell integrated with any fuel processor. The data and estimates presented are for the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells because they are closer to commercialization than other types of fuel cells. Performance of the cells is shown as a function of operating temperature, pressure, fuel conversion (utilization), and oxidant utilization. The effect of oxidant composition (for example, air versus O/sub 2/) as well as fuel composition is examined because fuels provided by some of the more advanced fuel processing schemes such as coal conversion will contain varying amounts of H/sub 2/, CO, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/O, and sulfur and nitrogen compounds. A brief description of fuel cells and their application to industrial, commercial, and residential power generation is given. The electrochemical aspects of fuel cells are reviewed. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is discussed, including how it is affected by operating conditions; and the molten carbonate fuel cell is discussed. The equations developed will help systems engineers to evaluate the application of the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells to commercial, utility, and industrial power generation and waste heat utilization. A detailed discussion of fuel cell efficiency, and examples of fuel cell systems are given.

  3. Ammonia as a Suitable Fuel for Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia, an important basic chemical, is produced at a scale of 150 million tons per year. Half of hydrogen produced in chemical industry is used for ammonia production. Ammonia containing 17.5 wt% hydrogen is an ideal carbon-free fuel for fuel cells. Compared to hydrogen, ammonia has many advantages. In this mini-review, the suitability of ammonia as fuel for fuel cells, the development of different types of fuel cells using ammonia as the fuel and the potential applications of ammonia fuel cells are briefly reviewed.

  4. Modelling of LOCA Tests with the BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    BISON is a modern finite-element based, multidimensional nuclear fuel performance code that is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (USA). Recent advances of BISON include the extension of the code to the analysis of LWR fuel rod behaviour during loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). In this work, BISON models for the phenomena relevant to LWR cladding behaviour during LOCAs are described, followed by presentation of code results for the simulation of LOCA tests. Analysed experiments include separate effects tests of cladding ballooning and burst, as well as the Halden IFA-650.2 fuel rod test. Two-dimensional modelling of the experiments is performed, and calculations are compared to available experimental data. Comparisons include cladding burst pressure and temperature in separate effects tests, as well as the evolution of fuel rod inner pressure during ballooning and time to cladding burst. Furthermore, BISON three-dimensional simulations of separate effects tests are performed, which demonstrate the capability to reproduce the effect of azimuthal temperature variations in the cladding. The work has been carried out in the frame of the collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and Halden Reactor Project, and the IAEA Coordinated Research Project FUMAC.

  5. Development of a general coupling interface for the fuel performance code transuranus tested with the reactor dynamic code DYN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, L.; Rohde, U.; Seidl, M.; Schubert, A.; Van Uffelen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Several institutions plan to couple the fuel performance code TRANSURANUS developed by the European Institute for Transuranium Elements with their own codes. One of these codes is the reactor dynamic code DYN3D maintained by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf. DYN3D was developed originally for VVER type reactors and was extended later to western type reactors. Usually, the fuel rod behavior is modeled in thermal hydraulics and neutronic codes in a simplified manner. The main idea of this coupling is to describe the fuel rod behavior in the frame of core safety analysis in a more detailed way, e.g. including the influence of the high burn-up structure, geometry changes and fission gas release. It allows to take benefit from the improved computational power and software achieved over the last two decades. The coupling interface was developed in a general way from the beginning. Thence it can be easily used also by other codes for a coupling with TRANSURANUS. The user can choose between a one-way as well as a two-way online coupling option. For a one-way online coupling, DYN3D provides only the time-dependent rod power and thermal hydraulics conditions to TRANSURANUS, but the fuel performance code doesn’t transfer any variable back to DYN3D. In a two-way online coupling, TRANSURANUS in addition transfers parameters like fuel temperature and cladding temperature back to DYN3D. This list of variables can be extended easily by geometric and further variables of interest. First results of the code system DYN3D-TRANSURANUS will be presented for a control rod ejection transient in a modern western type reactor. Pre-analyses show already that a detailed fuel rod behavior modeling will influence the thermal hydraulics and thence also the neutronics due to the Doppler reactivity effect of the fuel temperature. The coupled code system has therefore a potential to improve the assessment of safety criteria. The developed code system DYN3D-TRANSURANUS can be used also

  6. Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    In proposed fuel-cell system, methanol converted to hydrogen in two places. External fuel processor converts only part of methanol. Remaining methanol converted in fuel cell itself, in reaction at anode. As result, size of fuel processor reduced, system efficiency increased, and cost lowered.

  7. Fuel economy of hybrid fuel-cell vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Wang, X.; Rousseau, A.

    The potential improvement in fuel economy of a mid-size fuel-cell vehicle by combining it with an energy storage system has been assessed. An energy management strategy is developed and used to operate the direct hydrogen, pressurized fuel-cell system in a load-following mode and the energy storage system in a charge-sustaining mode. The strategy places highest priority on maintaining the energy storage system in a state where it can supply unanticipated boost power when the fuel-cell system alone cannot meet the power demand. It is found that downsizing a fuel-cell system decreases its efficiency on a drive cycle which is compensated by partial regenerative capture of braking energy. On a highway cycle with limited braking energy the increase in fuel economy with hybridization is small but on the stop-and-go urban cycle the fuel economy can improve by 27%. On the combined highway and urban drive cycles the fuel economy of the fuel-cell vehicle is estimated to increase by up to 15% by hybridizing it with an energy storage system.

  8. BCG: a computer code for calculating neutron spectra and criticality in cells of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, S.B.; Caldeira, A.D.; Garcia, R.D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The BCG code for determining the space and energy neutron flux distribution and criticality of fast reactor cylindrical cells is discussed. The code solves the unidimensional neutron transport equation together with interface current relations at each energy point in an unionized energy grid prepared for the cell and at an arbitrary number of spatial zones. While the spatial resolution is user specified, the energy dependence of the flux distribution is resolved according to the degree of variation in the reconstruced total microscopic cross sections of the atomic species in the cell. Results for a simplified fuel cell illustrate the high resolution and accuracy that can be obtained with the code. (author) [pt

  9. Fuel cells : a viable fossil fuel alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paduada, M.

    2007-02-15

    This article presented a program initiated by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) to develop proof-of-concept of underground mining vehicles powered by fuel cells in order to eliminate emissions. Recent studies on American and Canadian underground mines provided the basis for estimating the operational cost savings of switching from diesel to fuel cells. For the Canadian mines evaluated, the estimated ventilation system operating cost reductions ranged from 29 per cent to 75 per cent. In order to demonstrate the viability of a fuel cell-powered vehicle, NRCan has designed a modified Caterpillar R1300 loader with a 160 kW hybrid power plant in which 3 stacks of fuel cells deliver up to 90 kW continuously, and a nickel-metal hydride battery provides up to 70 kW. The battery subsystem transiently boosts output to meet peak power requirements and also accommodates regenerative braking. Traction for the loader is provided by a brushless permanent magnet traction motor. The hydraulic pump motor is capable of a 55 kW load continuously. The loader's hydraulic and traction systems are operated independently. Future fuel cell-powered vehicles designed by the program may include a locomotive and a utility vehicle. Future mines running their operations with hydrogen-fueled equipment may also gain advantages by employing fuel cells in the operation of handheld equipment such as radios, flashlights, and headlamps. However, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells used in the project are prohibitively expensive. The catalytic content of a fuel cell can add hundreds of dollars per kW of electric output. Production of catalytic precious metals will be strongly connected to the scale of use and acceptance of fuel cells in vehicles. In addition, the efficiency of hydrogen production and delivery is significantly lower than the well-to-tank efficiency of many conventional fuels. It was concluded that an adequate hydrogen infrastructure will be required for the mining industry

  10. Ammonia as a suitable fuel for fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong eLan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia, an important basic chemical, is produced at a scale of 150 million tons per year. Half of hydrogen produced in chemical industry is used for ammonia production. Ammonia containing 17.5wt% hydrogen is an ideal carbon-free fuel for fuel cells. Compared to hydrogen, ammonia has many advantages. In this mini-review, the suitability of ammonia as fuel for fuel cells, the development of different types of fuel cells using ammonia as the fuel and the potential applications of ammonia fuel cells are briefly reviewed.

  11. Modeling approach for annular-fuel elements using the ASSERT-PV subchannel code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, A.N.; Rao, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The internally and externally cooled annular fuel (hereafter called annular fuel) is under consideration for a new high burn-up fuel bundle design in Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) for its current, and its Generation IV reactor. An assessment of different options to model a bundle fuelled with annular fuel elements is presented. Two options are discussed: 1) Modify the subchannel code ASSERT-PV to handle multiple types of elements in the same bundle, and 2) coupling ASSERT-PV with an external application. Based on this assessment, the selected option is to couple ASSERT-PV with the thermalhydraulic system code CATHENA. (author)

  12. Application of the DART Code for the Assessment of Advanced Fuel Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.; Totev, T.

    2007-01-01

    The Dispersion Analysis Research Tool (DART) code is a dispersion fuel analysis code that contains mechanistically-based fuel and reaction-product swelling models, a one dimensional heat transfer analysis, and mechanical deformation models. DART has been used to simulate the irradiation behavior of uranium oxide, uranium silicide, and uranium molybdenum aluminum dispersion fuels, as well as their monolithic counterparts. The thermal-mechanical DART code has been validated against RERTR tests performed in the ATR for irradiation data on interaction thickness, fuel, matrix, and reaction product volume fractions, and plate thickness changes. The DART fission gas behavior model has been validated against UO 2 fission gas release data as well as measured fission gas-bubble size distributions. Here DART is utilized to analyze various aspects of the observed bubble growth in U-Mo/Al interaction product. (authors)

  13. Failed fuel diagnosis during WWER reactor operation using the RTOP-CA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhanskii, V.; Afanasieva, E.; Sorokin, A.; Evdokimov, I.; Kanukova, V.; Khromov, A.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanistic code RTOP-CA is developed for objectives of failed fuel diagnosis during WWER reactor operation. The RTOP-CA code enables to solve a direct problem: modelling the failed fuel behavior and prediction of primary coolant activity if characteristics of failures in the reactor core are known. Results of verification of the RTOP-CA code are presented. Separate physical models were verified on small-scale in-pile and out-of-pile experiments. Integral verification cases included data obtained at research reactors and at nuclear power plants. The RTOP-CA code is used for development of a neural-network approach to the inverse problem: detection of failure characteristics on the base of data on primary coolant activity during reactor operation. Preliminary results of application of the neural-network approach for evaluation of fuel failure characteristics are presented. (authors)

  14. Isotopic modelling using the ENIGMA-B fuel performance code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossiter, G.D.; Cook, P.M.A.; Weston, R.

    2001-01-01

    A number of experimental programmes by BNFL and other MOX fabricators have now shown that the in-pile performance of MOX fuel is generally similar to that of conventional UO 2 fuel. Models based on UO 2 fuel experience form a good basis for a description of MOX fuel behaviour. However, an area where the performance of MOX fuel is sufficiently different from that of UO 2 to warrant model changes is in the radial power and burnup profile. The differences in radial power and burnup profile arise from the presence of significant concentrations of plutonium in MOX fuel, at beginning of life, and their subsequent evolution with burnup. Amongst other effects, plutonium has a greater neutron absorption cross-section than uranium. This paper focuses on the development of a new model for the radial power and burnup profile within a UO 2 or MOX fuel rod, in which the underlying fissile isotope concentration distributions are tracked during irradiation. The new model has been incorporated into the ENIGMA-B fuel performance code and has been extended to track the isotopic concentrations of the fission gases, xenon and krypton. The calculated distributions have been validated against results from rod puncture measurements and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) linescans, performed during the M501 post irradiation examination (PIE) programme. The predicted gas inventory of the fuel/clad gap is compared with the isotopic composition measured during rod puncture and the measured radial distributions of burnup (from neodymium measurements) and plutonium in the fuel are compared with the calculated distributions. It is shown that there is good agreement between the code predictions and the measurements. (author)

  15. Development of a graphical interface computer code for reactor fuel reloading optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do Quang Binh; Nguyen Phuoc Lan; Bui Xuan Huy

    2007-01-01

    This report represents the results of the project performed in 2007. The aim of this project is to develop a graphical interface computer code that allows refueling engineers to design fuel reloading patterns for research reactor using simulated graphical model of reactor core. Besides, this code can perform refueling optimization calculations based on genetic algorithms as well as simulated annealing. The computer code was verified based on a sample problem, which relies on operational and experimental data of Dalat research reactor. This code can play a significant role in in-core fuel management practice at nuclear research reactor centers and in training. (author)

  16. Inclusion of models to describe severe accident conditions in the fuel simulation code DIONISIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemes, Martín; Soba, Alejandro [Sección Códigos y Modelos, Gerencia Ciclo del Combustible Nuclear, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Daverio, Hernando [Gerencia Reactores y Centrales Nucleares, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Denis, Alicia [Sección Códigos y Modelos, Gerencia Ciclo del Combustible Nuclear, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2017-04-15

    The simulation of fuel rod behavior is a complex task that demands not only accurate models to describe the numerous phenomena occurring in the pellet, cladding and internal rod atmosphere but also an adequate interconnection between them. In the last years several models have been incorporated to the DIONISIO code with the purpose of increasing its precision and reliability. After the regrettable events at Fukushima, the need for codes capable of simulating nuclear fuels under accident conditions has come forth. Heat removal occurs in a quite different way than during normal operation and this fact determines a completely new set of conditions for the fuel materials. A detailed description of the different regimes the coolant may exhibit in such a wide variety of scenarios requires a thermal-hydraulic formulation not suitable to be included in a fuel performance code. Moreover, there exist a number of reliable and famous codes that perform this task. Nevertheless, and keeping in mind the purpose of building a code focused on the fuel behavior, a subroutine was developed for the DIONISIO code that performs a simplified analysis of the coolant in a PWR, restricted to the more representative situations and provides to the fuel simulation the boundary conditions necessary to reproduce accidental situations. In the present work this subroutine is described and the results of different comparisons with experimental data and with thermal-hydraulic codes are offered. It is verified that, in spite of its comparative simplicity, the predictions of this module of DIONISIO do not differ significantly from those of the specific, complex codes.

  17. Fuel quality issues in stationary fuel cell systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadias, D.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

    2012-02-07

    Fuel cell systems are being deployed in stationary applications for the generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen. These systems use a variety of fuel cell types, ranging from the low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) to the high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Depending on the application and location, these systems are being designed to operate on reformate or syngas produced from various fuels that include natural gas, biogas, coal gas, etc. All of these fuels contain species that can potentially damage the fuel cell anode or other unit operations and processes that precede the fuel cell stack. These detrimental effects include loss in performance or durability, and attenuating these effects requires additional components to reduce the impurity concentrations to tolerable levels, if not eliminate the impurity entirely. These impurity management components increase the complexity of the fuel cell system, and they add to the system's capital and operating costs (such as regeneration, replacement and disposal of spent material and maintenance). This project reviewed the public domain information available on the impurities encountered in stationary fuel cell systems, and the effects of the impurities on the fuel cells. A database has been set up that classifies the impurities, especially in renewable fuels, such as landfill gas and anaerobic digester gas. It documents the known deleterious effects on fuel cells, and the maximum allowable concentrations of select impurities suggested by manufacturers and researchers. The literature review helped to identify the impurity removal strategies that are available, and their effectiveness, capacity, and cost. A generic model of a stationary fuel-cell based power plant operating on digester and landfill gas has been developed; it includes a gas processing unit, followed by a fuel cell system. The model includes the key impurity removal steps to enable predictions of impurity breakthrough

  18. Fuel Cell Handbook, Fifth Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Energy and Environmental Solutions

    2000-10-31

    Progress continues in fuel cell technology since the previous edition of the Fuel Cell Handbook was published in November 1998. Uppermost, polymer electrolyte fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and solid oxide fuel cells have been demonstrated at commercial size in power plants. The previously demonstrated phosphoric acid fuel cells have entered the marketplace with more than 220 power plants delivered. Highlighting this commercial entry, the phosphoric acid power plant fleet has demonstrated 95+% availability and several units have passed 40,000 hours of operation. One unit has operated over 49,000 hours. Early expectations of very low emissions and relatively high efficiencies have been met in power plants with each type of fuel cell. Fuel flexibility has been demonstrated using natural gas, propane, landfill gas, anaerobic digester gas, military logistic fuels, and coal gas, greatly expanding market opportunities. Transportation markets worldwide have shown remarkable interest in fuel cells; nearly every major vehicle manufacturer in the U.S., Europe, and the Far East is supporting development. This Handbook provides a foundation in fuel cells for persons wanting a better understanding of the technology, its benefits, and the systems issues that influence its application. Trends in technology are discussed, including next-generation concepts that promise ultrahigh efficiency and low cost, while providing exceptionally clean power plant systems. Section 1 summarizes fuel cell progress since the last edition and includes existing power plant nameplate data. Section 2 addresses the thermodynamics of fuel cells to provide an understanding of fuel cell operation at two levels (basic and advanced). Sections 3 through 8 describe the six major fuel cell types and their performance based on cell operating conditions. Alkaline and intermediate solid state fuel cells were added to this edition of the Handbook. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed

  19. 2009 Fuel Cell Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, Bill [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Gangi, Jennifer [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Curtin, Sandra [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Delmont, Elizabeth [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general.

  20. Multi-Dimensional Simulation of LWR Fuel Behavior in the BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, R. L.; Capps, N. A.; Liu, W.; Rashid, Y. R.; Wirth, B. D.

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear fuel operates in an extreme environment that induces complex multiphysics phenomena occurring over distances ranging from inter-atomic spacing to meters, and times scales ranging from microseconds to years. To simulate this behavior requires a wide variety of material models that are often complex and nonlinear. The recently developed BISON code represents a powerful fuel performance simulation tool based on its material and physical behavior capabilities, finite-element versatility of spatial representation, and use of parallel computing. The code can operate in full three dimensional (3D) mode, as well as in reduced two dimensional (2D) modes, e.g., axisymmetric radial-axial ( R- Z) or plane radial-circumferential ( R- θ), to suit the application and to allow treatment of global and local effects. A BISON case study was used to illustrate analysis of Pellet Clad Mechanical Interaction failures from manufacturing defects using combined 2D and 3D analyses. The analysis involved commercial fuel rods and demonstrated successful computation of metrics of interest to fuel failures, including cladding peak hoop stress and strain energy density. In comparison with a failure threshold derived from power ramp tests, results corroborate industry analyses of the root cause of the pellet-clad interaction failures and illustrate the importance of modeling 3D local effects around fuel pellet defects, which can produce complex effects including cold spots in the cladding, stress concentrations, and hot spots in the fuel that can lead to enhanced cladding degradation such as hydriding, oxidation, CRUD formation, and stress corrosion cracking.

  1. Development of a FBR fuel bundle-duct interaction analysis code-BAMBOO. Analysis model and verification by Phenix high burn-up fuel subassemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Ukai, Shigeharu

    2005-01-01

    The bundle-duct interaction analysis code ''BAMBOO'' has been developed for the purpose of predicting deformation of a wire-wrapped fuel pin bundle of a fast breeder reactor (FBR). The BAMBOO code calculates helical bowing and oval-distortion of all the fuel pins in a fuel subassembly. We developed deformation models in order to precisely analyze the irradiation induced deformation by the code: a model to analyze fuel pin self-bowing induced by circumferential gradient of void swelling as well as thermal expansion, and a model to analyze dispersion of the orderly arrangement of a fuel pin bundle. We made deformation analyses of high burn-up fuel subassemblies in Phenix reactor and compared the calculated results with the post irradiation examination data of these subassemblies for the verification of these models. From the comparison we confirmed that the calculated values of the oval-distortion and bowing reasonably agreed with the PIE results if these models were used in the analysis of the code. (author)

  2. Application of the BISON Fuel Performance Code of the FUMEX-III Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, R.L.; Novascone, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Since 1981, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has sponsored a series of Coordinated Research Projects (CRP) in the area of nuclear fuel modeling. These projects have typically lasted 3-5 years and have had broad international participation. The objectives of the projects have been to assess the maturity and predictive capability of fuel performance codes, support interaction and information exchange between countries with code development and application needs, build a database of well- defined experiments suitable for code validation, transfer a mature fuel modeling code to developing countries, and provide guidelines for code quality assurance and code application to fuel licensing. The fourth and latest of these projects, known as FUMEX-III1 (FUel Modeling at EXtended Burnup- III), began in 2008 and ended in December of 2011. FUMEX-III was the first of this series of fuel modeling CRP's in which the INL participated. Participants met at the beginning of the project to discuss and select a set of experiments ('priority cases') for consideration during the project. These priority cases were of broad interest to the participants and included reasonably well-documented and reliable data. A meeting was held midway through the project for participants to present and discuss progress on modeling the priority cases. A final meeting was held at close of the project to present and discuss final results and provide input for a final report. Also in 2008, the INL initiated development of a new multidimensional (2D and 3D) multiphysics nuclear fuel performance code called BISON, with code development progressing steadily during the three-year FUMEX-III project. Interactions with international fuel modeling researchers via FUMEX-III played a significant role in the BISON evolution, particularly influencing the selection of material and behavioral models which are now included in the code. The FUMEX-III cases are generally integral fuel rod experiments occurring

  3. FRAPCON-2: A Computer Code for the Calculation of Steady State Thermal-Mechanical Behavior of Oxide Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, G. A; Bohn, M. P.; Rausch, W. N.; Williford, R. E.; Lanning, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    FRAPCON-2 is a FORTRAN IV computer code that calculates the steady state response of light Mater reactor fuel rods during long-term burnup. The code calculates the temperature, pressure, deformation, and tai lure histories of a fuel rod as functions of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. The phenomena modeled by the code include (a) heat conduction through the fuel and cladding, (b) cladding elastic and plastic deformation, (c) fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, (d) fission gas release, (e} fuel rod internal gas pressure, (f) heat transfer between fuel and cladding, (g) cladding oxidation, and (h) heat transfer from cladding to coolant. The code contains necessary material properties, water properties, and heat transfer correlations. FRAPCON-2 is programmed for use on the CDC Cyber 175 and 176 computers. The FRAPCON-2 code Is designed to generate initial conditions for transient fuel rod analysis by either the FRAP-T6 computer code or the thermal-hydraulic code, RELAP4/MOD7 Version 2.

  4. Development, verification and validation of the fuel channel behaviour computer code FACTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbye, C J; Brito, A C; MacKinnon, J C; Sills, H E; Langman, V J [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    FACTAR (Fuel And Channel Temperature And Response) is a computer code developed to simulate the transient thermal and mechanical behaviour of 37-element or 28-element fuel bundles within a single CANDU fuel channel for moderate loss of coolant accident conditions including transition and large break LOCA`s (loss of coolant accidents) with emergency coolant injection assumed available. FACTAR`s predictions of fuel temperature and sheath failure times are used to subsequent assessment of fission product releases and fuel string expansion. This paper discusses the origin and development history of FACTAR, presents the mathematical models and solution technique, the detailed quality assurance procedures that are followed during development, and reports the future development of the code. (author). 27 refs., 3 figs.

  5. DRAGON analysis of MOX fueled VVER cell benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marleau, G.; Foissac, F.

    2002-01-01

    The computational unit-cell benchmarks problems for LEU and MOX fueled VVER-1000 ('water-water energetic reactor') have been analyzed using the code DRAGON with ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI based WIMS-AECL cross section libraries. The results obtained were compared with those generated using the SAS2H module of the SCALE-4.3 computational code system and with the code HELIOS. Good agreements between DRAGON and HELIOS were obtained when the ENDF/B-VI based library was considered while the ENDF/B-V DRAGON results were generally closer to those obtained using SAS2H. This study was useful for the verification of the DRAGON code and confirms that HELIOS and DRAGON have a similar behavior when compatible cross sections library are used. (author)

  6. Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics Researchers are developing fuel cells that can be silver four-door sedan being driven on a roadway and containing the words "hydrogen fuel cell electric" across the front and rear doors. This prototype hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle was

  7. Fuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    logo, Direct FuelCell and “DFC” are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. Applications •On-site self generation of combined heat... of FuelCell Energy, Inc. Fuels Resources for DFC • Natural Gas and LNG • Propane • Biogas (by Anaerobicnaerobic Digestion) - Municipal Waste...FUEL RESOURCES z NATURAL GAS z PROPANE z DFC H2 (50-60%) z ETHANOL zWASTE METHANE z BIOGAS z COAL GAS Diversity of Fuels plus High Efficiency

  8. RODSWELL: a computer code for the thermomechanical analysis of fuel rods under LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadei, F.; Laval, H.; Donea, J.; Jones, P.M.; Colombo, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present report is the user's manual for the computer code RODSWELL developed at the JRC-Ispra for the thermomechanical analysis of LWR fuel rods under simulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The code calculates the variation in space and time of all significant fuel rod variables, including fuel, gap and cladding temperature, fuel and cladding deformation, cladding oxidation and rod internal pressure. The essential characteristics of the code are briefly outlined here. The model is particularly designed to perform a full thermal and mechanical analysis in both the azimuthal and radial directions. Thus, azimuthal temperature gradients arising from pellet eccentricity, flux tilt, arbitrary distribution of heat sources in the fuel and the cladding and azimuthal variation of coolant conditions can be treated. The code combines a transient 2-dimensional heat conduction code and a 1-dimentional mechanical model for the cladding deformation. The fuel rod is divided into a number of axial sections and a detailed thermomechanical analysis is performed within each section in radial and azimuthal directions. In the following sections, instructions are given for the definition of the data files and the semi-variable dimensions. Then follows a complete description of the input data. Finally, the restart option is described

  9. Usage of burnt fuel isotopic compositions from engineering codes in Monte-Carlo code calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshin, Sergey S.; Gorodkov, Sergey S.; Shcherenko, Anna I.

    2015-01-01

    A burn-up calculation of VVER's cores by Monte-Carlo code is complex process and requires large computational costs. This fact makes Monte-Carlo codes usage complicated for project and operating calculations. Previously prepared isotopic compositions are proposed to use for the Monte-Carlo code (MCU) calculations of different states of VVER's core with burnt fuel. Isotopic compositions are proposed to calculate by an approximation method. The approximation method is based on usage of a spectral functionality and reference isotopic compositions, that are calculated by engineering codes (TVS-M, PERMAK-A). The multiplication factors and power distributions of FA and VVER with infinite height are calculated in this work by the Monte-Carlo code MCU using earlier prepared isotopic compositions. The MCU calculation data were compared with the data which were obtained by engineering codes.

  10. 2013 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2013 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  11. 2014 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2014 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  12. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyapal, Sunita [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2011 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  13. Reactivity Insertion Accident (RIA) Capability Status in the BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Richard L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Folsom, Charles Pearson [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Veeraraghavan, Swetha [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-05-01

    One of the Challenge Problems being considered within CASL relates to modelling and simulation of Light Water Reactor LWR) fuel under Reactivity Insertion Accident (RIA) conditions. BISON is the fuel performance code used within CASL for LWR fuel under both normal operating and accident conditions, and thus must be capable of addressing the RIA challenge problem. This report outlines required BISON capabilities for RIAs and describes the current status of the code. Information on recent accident capability enhancements, application of BISON to a RIA benchmark exercise, and plans for validation to RIA behavior are included.

  14. Fuel cells - a perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biegler, T.

    2005-01-01

    Unfortunately, fuel cell publicity conveys expectations and hopes that are often based on uncritical interpretations of the underlying science. The aim here is to use that science to analyse how the technology has developed and what can realistically be delivered by fuel cells. There have been great achievements in fuel cell technology over the past decade, with most types reaching an advanced stage of engineering development. But there has been some muddled thinking about one critical aspect, fuel cell energy efficiency. The 'Carnot cycle' argument, that fuel cells must be much more efficient than heat engines, is a red herring, of no help in predicting real efficiencies. In practice, fuel cells are not always particularly efficient and there are good scientific reasons for this. Cost reduction is a big issue for fuel cells. They are not in principle especially simple devices. Better engineering and mass production will presumably bring costs down, but because of their inherent complexity there is no reason to expect them to be cheap. It is fair to conclude that predictions of fuel cells as commonplace components of energy systems (including a hydrogen economy) need to be treated with caution, at least until major improvements eventuate. However, one type, the direct methanol fuel cell, is aimed at a clear existing market in consumer electronics

  15. Fuel management and core design code systems for pressurized water reactor neutronic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnert, C.; Arayones, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    A package of connected code systems for the neutronic calculations relevant in fuel management and core design has been developed and applied for validation to the startup tests and first operating cycle of a 900MW (electric) PWR. The package includes the MARIA code system for the modeling of the different types of PWR fuel assemblies, the CARMEN code system for detailed few group diffusion calculations for PWR cores at operating and burnup conditions, and the LOLA code system for core simulation using onegroup nodal theory parameters explicitly calculated from the detailed solutions

  16. Fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van J.A.R.; Janssen, F.J.J.G.; Santen, van R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The principles and present-day embodiments of fuel cells are discussed. Nearly all cells are hydrogen/oxygen ones, where the hydrogen fuel is usually obtained on-site from the reforming of methane or methanol. There exists a tension between the promise of high efficiency in the conversion of

  17. Fuel cell cassette with compliant seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Haltiner, Jr. J.; Anthony, Derose J.; Klotzbach, Darasack C.; Schneider, Jonathan R.

    2017-11-07

    A fuel cell cassette for forming a fuel cell stack along a fuel cell axis includes a cell retainer, a plate positioned axially to the cell retainer and defining a space axially with the cell retainer, and a fuel cell having an anode layer and a cathode layer separated by an electrolyte layer. The outer perimeter of the fuel cell is positioned in the space between the plate and the cell retainer, thereby retaining the fuel cell and defining a cavity between the cell retainer, the fuel cell, and the plate. The fuel cell cassette also includes a seal disposed within the cavity for sealing the edge of the fuel cell. The seal is compliant at operational temperatures of the fuel cell, thereby allowing lateral expansion and contraction of the fuel cell within the cavity while maintaining sealing at the edge of the fuel cell.

  18. Thermoeconomic analysis of a fuel cell hybrid power system from the fuel cell experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Tomas [Endesa Generacion, Ribera del Loira, 60, 28042 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: talvarez@endesa.es; Valero, Antonio [Fundacion CIRCE, Centro Politecnico Superior, Maria de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Montes, Jose M. [ETSIMM-Universidad Politecnica de.Madrid, Rios Rosas, 21, 28003 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-08-15

    An innovative configuration of fuel cell technology is proposed based on a hybrid fuel cell system that integrates a turbogenerator to overcome the intrinsic limitations of fuel cells in conventional operation. An analysis is done of the application of molten carbonate fuel cell technology at the Guadalix Fuel Cell Test Facility, for the assessment of the performance of the fuel cell prototype to be integrated in the Hybrid Fuel Cell System. This is completed with a thermoeconomic analysis of the 100 kW cogeneration fuel cell power plant which was subsequently built. The operational results and design limitations are evaluated, together with the operational limits and thermodynamic inefficiencies (exergy destruction and losses) of the 100 kW fuel cell. This leads to the design of a hybrid system in order to demonstrate the possibilities and benefits of the new hybrid configuration. The results are quantified through a thermoeconomic analysis in order to get the most cost-effective plant configuration. One promising configuration is the MCFC topper where the fuel cell in the power plant behaves as a combustor for the turbogenerator. The latter behaves as the balance of plant for the fuel cell. The combined efficiency increased to 57% and NOx emissions are essentially eliminated. The synergy of the fuel cell/turbine hybrids lies mainly in the use of the rejected thermal energy and residual fuel from the fuel cell to drive the turbogenerator in a 500 kW hybrid system.

  19. Fuel cell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotevski, Darko

    2003-01-01

    Fuel cell systems are an entirely different approach to the production of electricity than traditional technologies. They are similar to the batteries in that both produce direct current through electrochemical process. There are six types of fuel cells each with a different type of electrolyte, but they all share certain important characteristics: high electrical efficiency, low environmental impact and fuel flexibility. Fuel cells serve a variety of applications: stationary power plants, transport vehicles and portable power. That is why world wide efforts are addressed to improvement of this technology. (Original)

  20. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  1. Investigation and proposal of the system to affect nuclear fuel type authorization and analysis code certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    In order to develop the system to affect more advanced and rational regulations of nuclear fuels and earlier introduction of new technologies in nuclear power plants, domestic and overseas safety regulation systems and state of their implementation for water cooled reactor fuel and safety analysis code had been investigated and new regulation system to affect nuclear fuel type authorization and analysis code certification was proposed. Topical report system for common parts related with nuclear fuel type authorization and analysis code certification was firstly proposed for knowledge base. Maintaining consistent safety examination supported by experts, introduction of domestic efficient system for lead irradiation test fuel, and analysis code certification and quality assurance were also proposed. (T. Tanaka)

  2. SAFE: A computer code for the steady-state and transient thermal analysis of LMR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.L.

    1993-12-01

    SAFE is a computer code developed for both the steady-state and transient thermal analysis of single LMR fuel elements. The code employs a two-dimensional control-volume based finite difference methodology with fully implicit time marching to calculate the temperatures throughout a fuel element and its associated coolant channel for both the steady-state and transient events. The code makes no structural calculations or predictions whatsoever. It does, however, accept as input structural parameters within the fuel such as the distributions of porosity and fuel composition, as well as heat generation, to allow a thermal analysis to be performed on a user-specified fuel structure. The code was developed with ease of use in mind. An interactive input file generator and material property correlations internal to the code are available to expedite analyses using SAFE. This report serves as a complete design description of the code as well as a user's manual. A sample calculation made with SAFE is included to highlight some of the code's features. Complete input and output files for the sample problem are provided

  3. Fuel cells for commercial energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppmann, Gerhard; Weisse, Eckart; Bischoff, Manfred

    1990-04-01

    The development of various types of fuel cells is described. Advantges and drawbacks are considered for alkaline fuel cells, phosphoric acid fuel cells, and molten carbonate fuel cells. It is shown that their modular construction is particularly adapted to power heat systems. A comparison which is largely in favor of fuel cells, is made between coal, oil, natural gas power stations, and fuel cells. Safety risks in operation are also compared with those of conventional power stations. Fuel cells are particularly suited for dwellings, shopping centers, swimming pools, other sporting installations, and research facilities, whose high current and heat requirements can be covered by power heat coupling.

  4. Analysis of the Behavior of CAREM-25 Fuel Rods Using Computer Code BACO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevez, Esteban; Markiewicz, Mario; Marino, Armando

    2000-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical behavior of a fuel rod subjected to irradiation is a complex process, on which a great quantity of interrelated physical-chemical phenomena are coupled.The code BACO simulates the thermo-mechanical behavior and the evolution of fission gases of a cylindrical rod in operation.The power history of fuel rods, arising from neutronic calculations, is the program input.The code calculates, among others, the temperature distribution and the principal stresses in the pellet and cladding, changes in the porosity and restructuring of pellet, the fission gases release, evolution of the internal gas pressure.In this work some of design limits of CAREM-25's fuel rods are analyzed by means of the computer code BACO.The main variables directly related with the integrity of the fuel rod are: Maximum temperature of pellet; Cladding hoop stresses; Gases pressure in the fuel rod; Cladding axial and radial strains, etc.The analysis of results indicates that, under normal operation conditions, the maximum fuel pellet temperature, cladding stresses, pressure of gases at end of life, etc, are below the design limits considered for the fuel rod of CAREM-25 reactor

  5. Identification and Analysis of Critical Gaps in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Codes Required by the SINEMA Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miron, Adrian; Valentine, Joshua; Christenson, John; Hawwari, Majd; Bhatt, Santosh; Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Lineberry, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The current state of the art in nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) modeling is an eclectic mixture of codes with various levels of applicability, flexibility, and availability. In support of the advanced fuel cycle systems analyses, especially those by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), University of Cincinnati in collaboration with Idaho State University carried out a detailed review of the existing codes describing various aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and identified the research and development needs required for a comprehensive model of the global nuclear energy infrastructure and the associated nuclear fuel cycles. Relevant information obtained on the NFC codes was compiled into a relational database that allows easy access to various codes' properties. Additionally, the research analyzed the gaps in the NFC computer codes with respect to their potential integration into programs that perform comprehensive NFC analysis.

  6. Identification and Analysis of Critical Gaps in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Codes Required by the SINEMA Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrian Miron; Joshua Valentine; John Christenson; Majd Hawwari; Santosh Bhatt; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar: Michael Lineberry

    2009-10-01

    The current state of the art in nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) modeling is an eclectic mixture of codes with various levels of applicability, flexibility, and availability. In support of the advanced fuel cycle systems analyses, especially those by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), Unviery of Cincinnati in collaboration with Idaho State University carried out a detailed review of the existing codes describing various aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and identified the research and development needs required for a comprehensive model of the global nuclear energy infrastructure and the associated nuclear fuel cycles. Relevant information obtained on the NFC codes was compiled into a relational database that allows easy access to various codes' properties. Additionally, the research analyzed the gaps in the NFC computer codes with respect to their potential integration into programs that perform comprehensive NFC analysis.

  7. Assessment of the prediction capability of the TRANSURANUS fuel performance code on the basis of power ramp tested LWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastore, G.; Botazzoli, P.; Di Marcello, V.; Luzzi, L.

    2009-01-01

    The present work is aimed at assessing the prediction capability of the TRANSURANUS code for the performance analysis of LWR fuel rods under power ramp conditions. The analysis refers to all the power ramp tested fuel rods belonging to the Studsvik PWR Super-Ramp and BWR Inter-Ramp Irradiation Projects, and is focused on some integral quantities (i.e., burn-up, fission gas release, cladding creep-down and failure due to pellet cladding interaction) through a systematic comparison between the code predictions and the experimental data. To this end, a suitable setup of the code is established on the basis of previous works. Besides, with reference to literature indications, a sensitivity study is carried out, which considers the 'ITU model' for fission gas burst release and modifications in the treatment of the fuel solid swelling and the cladding stress corrosion cracking. The performed analyses allow to individuate some issues, which could be useful for the future development of the code. Keywords: Light Water Reactors, Fuel Rod Performance, Power Ramps, Fission Gas Burst Release, Fuel Swelling, Pellet Cladding Interaction, Stress Corrosion Cracking

  8. Fuel cell sub-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chang V.

    1983-01-01

    A fuel cell sub-assembly comprising a plurality of fuel cells, a first section of a cooling means disposed at an end of the assembly and means for connecting the fuel cells and first section together to form a unitary structure.

  9. Fuel cell hardware-in-loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, R.M.; Randolf, G.; Virji, M. [University of Hawaii, Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (United States); Hauer, K.H. [Xcellvision (Germany)

    2006-11-08

    Hardware-in-loop (HiL) methodology is well established in the automotive industry. One typical application is the development and validation of control algorithms for drive systems by simulating the vehicle plus the vehicle environment in combination with specific control hardware as the HiL component. This paper introduces the use of a fuel cell HiL methodology for fuel cell and fuel cell system design and evaluation-where the fuel cell (or stack) is the unique HiL component that requires evaluation and development within the context of a fuel cell system designed for a specific application (e.g., a fuel cell vehicle) in a typical use pattern (e.g., a standard drive cycle). Initial experimental results are presented for the example of a fuel cell within a fuel cell vehicle simulation under a dynamic drive cycle. (author)

  10. San Onofre PWR Data for Code Validation of MOX Fuel Depletion Analyses - Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, O.W.

    2000-01-01

    The isotopic composition of mixed-oxide fuel (fabricated with both uranium and plutonium isotopes) discharged from reactors is of interest to the Fissile Material Disposition Program. The validation of depletion codes used to predict isotopic compositions of MOX fuel, similar to studies concerning uranium-only fueled reactors, thus, is very important. The EEI-Westinghouse Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program was conducted to examine the use of MOX fuel in the San Onofre PWR, Unit I, during cycles 2 and 3. The data, usually required as input to depletion codes, either one-dimensional or lattice codes, were taken from various sources and compiled into this report. Where data were either lacking or determined inadequate, the appropriate data were supplied from other references. The scope of the reactor operations and design data, in addition to the isotopic analyses, was considered to be of sufficient quality for depletion code validation

  11. Behaviour of the reactivity for BWR fuel cells; Comportamiento de la reactividad para celdas de combustible BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Alonso, G.; Delfin, A.; Vargas, S. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Del Valle G, E., E-mail: galonso@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In this work the behaviour of the reactivity of a fuel assembly type BWR was studied, the objective is to obtain some expressions that consider the average enrichment of U-235 and the gadolinium concentration like a function of the fuel cells burnt. Also, the applicability of the lineal reactivity model was analyzed for fuel cells type BWR. The analysis was carried out with the CASMO-4 code. (Author)

  12. Randomly dispersed particle fuel model in the PSG Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leppaenen, J.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels are composed of thousands of microscopic fuel particles, randomly dispersed in a graphite matrix. The modelling of such geometry is complicated, especially using continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes, which are unable to apply any deterministic corrections in the calculation. This paper presents the geometry routine developed for modelling randomly dispersed particle fuels using the PSG Monte Carlo reactor physics code. The model is based on the delta-tracking method, and it takes into account the spatial self-shielding effects and the random dispersion of the fuel particles. The calculation routine is validated by comparing the results to reference MCNP4C calculations using uranium and plutonium based fuels. (authors)

  13. Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NETL

    2004-11-01

    Provides an overview of fuel cell technology and research projects. Discusses the basic workings of fuel cells and their system components, main fuel cell types, their characteristics, and their development status, as well as a discussion of potential fuel cell applications.

  14. Materials for fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haile, Sossina M

    2003-01-01

    Because of their potential to reduce the environmental impact and geopolitical consequences of the use of fossil fuels, fuel cells have emerged as tantalizing alternatives to combustion engines. Like a combustion engine, a fuel cell uses some sort of chemical fuel as its energy source but, like a battery, the chemical energy is directly converted to electrical energy, without an often messy and relatively inefficient combustion step. In addition to high efficiency and low emissions, fuel cell...

  15. Limitations of Commercializing Fuel Cell Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Normayati

    2010-06-01

    Fuel cell is the technology that, nowadays, is deemed having a great potential to be used in supplying energy. Basically, fuel cells can be categorized particularly by the kind of employed electrolyte. Several fuel cells types which are currently identified having huge potential to be utilized, namely, Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC), Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (MCFC), Alkaline Fuel Cells (AFC), Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells (PAFC), Polymer Electron Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC), Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) and Regenerative Fuel Cells (RFC). In general, each of these fuel cells types has their own characteristics and specifications which assign the capability and suitability of them to be utilized for any particular applications. Stationary power generations and transport applications are the two most significant applications currently aimed for the fuel cell market. It is generally accepted that there are lots of advantages if fuel cells can be excessively commercialized primarily in context of environmental concerns and energy security. Nevertheless, this is a demanding task to be accomplished, as there is some gap in fuel cells technology itself which needs a major enhancement. It can be concluded, from the previous study, cost, durability and performance are identified as the main limitations to be firstly overcome in enabling fuel cells technology become viable for the market.

  16. A dynamic, dependent type system for nuclear fuel cycle code generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scopatz, A. [The University of Chicago 5754 S. Ellis Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle may be interpreted as a network or graph, thus allowing methods from formal graph theory to be used. Nodes are often idealized as nuclear fuel cycle facilities (reactors, enrichment cascades, deep geologic repositories). With the advent of modern object-oriented programming languages - and fuel cycle simulators implemented in these languages - it is natural to define a class hierarchy of facility types. Bright is a quasi-static simulator, meaning that the number of material passes through a facility is tracked rather than natural time. Bright is implemented as a C++ library that models many canonical components such as reactors, storage facilities, and more. Cyclus is a discrete time simulator, meaning that natural time is tracked through out the simulation. Therefore a robust, dependent type system was developed to enable inter-operability between Bright and Cyclus. This system is capable of representing any fuel cycle facility. Types declared in this system can then be used to automatically generate code which binds a facility implementation to a simulator front end. Facility model wrappers may be used either internally to a fuel cycle simulator or as a mechanism for inter-operating multiple simulators. While such a tool has many potential use cases it has two main purposes: enabling easy performance of code-to-code comparisons and the verification and the validation of user input.

  17. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amornpitoksuk, P.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC is a kind of fuel cell using methanol as a fuel for electric producing. Methanol is low cost chemical substance and it is less harmful than that of hydrogen fuel. From these reasons it can be commercial product. The electrocatalytic reaction of methanol fuel uses Pt-Ru metals as the most efficient catalyst. In addition, the property of membrane and system designation are also effect to the fuel cell efficient. Because of low power of methanol fuel cell therefore, direct methanol fuel cell is proper to use for the energy source of small electrical devices and vehicles etc.

  18. Serpent: an alternative for the nuclear fuel cells analysis of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva A, L.; Del Valle G, E.; Gomez T, A. M.

    2013-10-01

    In the last ten years the diverse research groups in nuclear engineering of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and Instituto Politecnico Nacional (UNAM, IPN), as of research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, ININ) as well as the personnel of the Nuclear Plant Management of the Comision Federal de Electricidad have been using the codes Helios and /or CASMO-4 in the generation of cross sections (X S) of nuclear fuel cells of the cores corresponding to the Units 1 and 2 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Both codes belong to the Studsvik-Scandpower Company who receives the payment for the use and their respective maintenance. In recent years, the code Serpent appears among the nuclear community distributed by the OECD/Nea which does not has cost neither in its use neither in its maintenance. The code is based on the Monte Carlo method and makes use of the processing in parallel. In the Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of the IPN, the personnel has accumulated certain experience in the use of Serpent under the direction of personal of the ININ; of this experience have been obtained for diverse fuel burned, the infinite multiplication factor for three cells of nuclear fuel, without control bar and with control bar for a known thermodynamic state fixed by: a) the fuel temperature (T f ), b) the moderator temperature (T m ) and c) the vacuums fraction (α). Although was not realized any comparison with the X S that the codes Helios and CASMO-4 generate, the results obtained for the infinite multiplication factor show the prospective tendencies with regard to the fuel burned so much in the case in that is not present the control bar like when it is. The results are encouraging and motivate to the study group to continue with the X S generation of a core in order to build the respective library of nuclear data as a following step and this can be used for the codes PARCS, of USA NRC, DYN3D of HZDR, or others developed locally in the

  19. Fuel cell with internal flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Venkiteswaran, Arun [Karnataka, IN

    2012-06-12

    A fuel cell stack is provided with a plurality of fuel cell cassettes where each fuel cell cassette has a fuel cell with an anode and cathode. The fuel cell stack includes an anode supply chimney for supplying fuel to the anode of each fuel cell cassette, an anode return chimney for removing anode exhaust from the anode of each fuel cell cassette, a cathode supply chimney for supplying oxidant to the cathode of each fuel cell cassette, and a cathode return chimney for removing cathode exhaust from the cathode of each fuel cell cassette. A first fuel cell cassette includes a flow control member disposed between the anode supply chimney and the anode return chimney or between the cathode supply chimney and the cathode return chimney such that the flow control member provides a flow restriction different from at least one other fuel cell cassettes.

  20. Development and application of the BISON fuel performance code to the analysis of fission gas behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastore, G.; Hales, J.D.; Novascone, S.R.; Perez, D.M.; Spencer, B.W.; Williamson, R.L.

    2014-01-01

    BISON is a modern finite-element based, multidimensional nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at Idaho National Laboratory (USA) since 2009. The capabilities of BISON comprise implicit solution of the fully coupled thermo-mechanics and diffusion equations, applicability to a variety of fuel forms, and simulation of both steady-state and transient conditions. The code includes multiphysics constitutive behavior for both fuel and cladding materials, and is designed for efficient use on highly parallel computers. This paper describes the main features of BISON, with emphasis on recent developments in modelling of fission gas behaviour in LWR-UO 2 fuel. The code is applied to the simulation of fuel rod irradiation experiments from the OECD/NEA International Fuel Performance Experiments Database. The comparison of the results with the available experimental data of fuel temperature, fission gas release, and cladding diametrical strain during pellet-cladding mechanical interaction is presented, pointing out a promising potential of the BISON code with the new fission gas behaviour model. (authors)

  1. Mechanistic modelling of gaseous fission product behaviour in UO2 fuel by Rtop code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanukova, V.D.; Khoruzhii, O.V.; Kourtchatov, S.Y.; Likhanskii, V.V.; Matveew, L.V.

    2002-01-01

    The current status of a mechanistic modelling by the RTOP code of the fission product behaviour in polycrystalline UO 2 fuel is described. An outline of the code and implemented physical models is presented. The general approach to code validation is discussed. It is exemplified by the results of validation of the models of fuel oxidation and grain growth. The different models of intragranular and intergranular gas bubble behaviour have been tested and the sensitivity of the code in the framework of these models has been analysed. An analysis of available models of the resolution of grain face bubbles is also presented. The possibilities of the RTOP code are presented through the example of modelling behaviour of WWER fuel over the course of a comparative WWER-PWR experiment performed at Halden and by comparison with Yanagisawa experiments. (author)

  2. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of fusion reactor. 1. Single pulse operation simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1997-11-01

    A dynamic simulation code for the fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during a single pulse operation. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the function of fuel burn, exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for the steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using the code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  3. Analyses with the FSTATE code: fuel performance in destructive in-pile experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T.H.; Meek, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal-mechanical analysis of a fuel pin is an essential part of the evaluation of fuel behavior during hypothetical accident transients. The FSTATE code has been developed to provide this required computational ability in situations lacking azimuthal symmetry about the fuel-pin axis by performing 2-dimensional thermal, mechanical, and fission gas release and redistribution computations for a wide range of possible transient conditions. In this paper recent code developments are described and application is made to in-pile experiments undertaken to study fast-reactor fuel under accident conditions. Three accident simulations, including a fast and slow ramp-rate overpower as well as a loss-of-cooling accident sequence, are used as representative examples, and the interpretation of STATE computations relative to experimental observations is made

  4. Burn of actinides in MOX fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G.

    2017-09-01

    The spent fuel from nuclear reactors is stored temporarily in dry repositories in many countries of the world. However, the main problem of spent fuel, which is its high radio-toxicity in the long term, is not solved. A new strategy is required to close the nuclear fuel cycle and for the sustain ability of nuclear power generation, this strategy could be the recycling of plutonium to obtain more energy and recycle the actinides generated during the irradiation of the fuel to transmute them in less radioactive radionuclides. In this work we evaluate the quantities of actinides generated in different fuels and the quantities of actinides that are generated after their recycling in a thermal reactor. First, we make a reference calculation with a regular enriched uranium fuel, and then is changed to a MOX fuel, varying the plutonium concentrations and determining the quantities of actinides generated. Finally, different amounts of actinides are introduced into a new fuel and the amount of actinides generated at the end of the fuel burn is calculated, in order to determine the reduction of minor actinides obtained. The results show that if the concentration of plutonium in the fuel is high, then the production of minor actinides is also high. The calculations were made using the cell code CASMO-4 and the results obtained are shown in section 6 of this work. (Author)

  5. Fuel cells:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil and nucl......A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil...... and nuclear fuel-based energy technologies....

  6. Materials for low-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ladewig, Bradley; Yan, Yushan; Lu, Max

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in Low-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in low-temperature fuel cells. A related book will cover key materials in high-temperature fuel cells. The two books form part

  7. Materials for high-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, San Ping; Lu, Max

    2013-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in High-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in high-temperature fuel cells with emphasis on the most important solid oxide fuel cells. A related book will cover key mater

  8. Three dimensional analysis of planar solid oxide fuel cell stack considering radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Inui, Y.; Urata, A.; Kanno, T. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2007-05-15

    The authors have been engaged in numerical simulations of the planar type solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to make clear the dependence of the cell performance on its operating conditions. Up to now, the authors have already developed the simulation codes for the one channel region and the single cell plate in its cell stack. To calculate accurately the effect of radiation heat transfer from the cell stack surfaces, however, a code that can treat the whole cell stack is necessary. In the present study, therefore, the authors newly develop a three dimensional simulation code of the planar SOFC stack, and the detailed effect of the radiation heat transfer is investigated. It is made clear that the conventional codes are sufficiently accurate, and the newly developed whole cell stack code is not inevitable to predict the maximum cell temperature. This is because the thermal conductivity of the cell materials made of ceramics is very small, and the central part of the cell stack is almost free from the influence of radiation heat transfer. On the other hand, the stack simulation is needed to calculate accurately the cell voltage because the radiation heat transfer reduces it when the ambient temperature is low. The bad influence of low ambient temperature on the voltage is, however, small and relatively high voltage is obtained even when the ambient temperature is very low. (author)

  9. HTPEM Fuel Cell Impedance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Jakob Rabjerg

    As part of the process to create a fossil free Denmark by 2050, there is a need for the development of new energy technologies with higher efficiencies than the current technologies. Fuel cells, that can generate electricity at higher efficiencies than conventional combustion engines, can...... potentially play an important role in the energy system of the future. One of the fuel cell technologies, that receives much attention from the Danish scientific community is high temperature proton exchange membrane (HTPEM) fuel cells based on polybenzimidazole (PBI) with phosphoric acid as proton conductor....... This type of fuel cell operates at higher temperature than comparable fuel cell types and they distinguish themselves by high CO tolerance. Platinum based catalysts have their efficiency reduced by CO and the effect is more pronounced at low temperature. This Ph.D. Thesis investigates this type of fuel...

  10. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...... increasing focus. Activity of the catalyst is important, but stability is essential. In the presented perspective paper, we review recent efforts to investigate fuel cell catalysts ex-situ in electrochemical half-cell measurements. Due to the amount of different studies, this review has no intention to give...

  11. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  12. Calculation of Single Cell and Fuel Assembly IRIS Benchmarks Using WIMSD5B and GNOMER Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pevec, D.; Grgic, D.; Jecmenica, R.

    2002-01-01

    IRIS reactor (an acronym for International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral, light water cooled, small to medium power (100-335 MWe/module) reactor, which addresses the requirements defined by the United States Department of Energy for Generation IV nuclear energy systems, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, improved economics, and waste reduction. An international consortium led by Westinghouse/BNFL was created for development of IRIS reactor; it includes universities, institutes, commercial companies, and utilities. Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb joined the consortium in year 2001, with the aim to take part in IRIS neutronics design and safety analyses of IRIS transients. A set of neutronic benchmarks for IRIS reactor was defined with the objective to compare results of all participants with exactly the same assumptions. In this paper a calculation of Benchmark 44 for IRIS reactor is described. Benchmark 44 is defined as a core depletion benchmark problem for specified IRIS reactor operating conditions (e.g., temperatures, moderator density) without feedback. Enriched boron, inhomogeneously distributed in axial direction, is used as an integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA). The aim of this benchmark was to enable a more direct comparison of results of different code systems. Calculations of Benchmark 44 were performed using the modified CORD-2 code package. The CORD-2 code package consists of WIMSD and GNOMER codes. WIMSD is a well-known lattice spectrum calculation code. GNOMER solves the neutron diffusion equation in three-dimensional Cartesian geometry by the Green's function nodal method. The following parameters were obtained in Benchmark 44 analysis: effective multiplication factor as a function of burnup, nuclear peaking factor as a function of burnup, axial offset as a function of burnup, core-average axial power profile, core radial power profile, axial power profile for selected

  13. Physical model of the nuclear fuel cycle simulation code SITON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brolly, Á.; Halász, M.; Szieberth, M.; Nagy, L.; Fehér, S.

    2017-01-01

    Finding answers to main challenges of nuclear energy, like resource utilisation or waste minimisation, calls for transient fuel cycle modelling. This motivation led to the development of SITON v2.0 a dynamic, discrete facilities/discrete materials and also discrete events fuel cycle simulation code. The physical model of the code includes the most important fuel cycle facilities. Facilities can be connected flexibly; their number is not limited. Material transfer between facilities is tracked by taking into account 52 nuclides. Composition of discharged fuel is determined using burnup tables except for the 2400 MW thermal power design of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR2400). For the GFR2400 the FITXS method is used, which fits one-group microscopic cross-sections as polynomial functions of the fuel composition. This method is accurate and fast enough to be used in fuel cycle simulations. Operation of the fuel cycle, i.e. material requests and transfers, is described by discrete events. In advance of the simulation reactors and plants formulate their requests as events; triggered requests are tracked. After that, the events are simulated, i.e. the requests are fulfilled and composition of the material flow between facilities is calculated. To demonstrate capabilities of SITON v2.0, a hypothetical transient fuel cycle is presented in which a 4-unit VVER-440 reactor park was replaced by one GFR2400 that recycled its own spent fuel. It is found that the GFR2400 can be started if the cooling time of its spent fuel is 2 years. However, if the cooling time is 5 years it needs an additional plutonium feed, which can be covered from the spent fuel of a Generation III light water reactor.

  14. Modelling of the Gadolinium Fuel Test IFA-681 using the BISON Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    In this work, application of Idaho National Laboratory’s fuel performance code BISON to modelling of fuel rods from the Halden IFA-681 gadolinium fuel test is presented. First, an overview is given of BISON models, focusing on UO2/UO2-Gd2O3 fuel and Zircaloy cladding. Then, BISON analyses of selected fuel rods from the IFA-681 test are performed. For the first time in a BISON application to integral fuel rod simulations, the analysis is informed by detailed neutronics calculations in order to accurately capture the radial power profile throughout the fuel, which is strongly affected by the complex evolution of absorber Gd isotopes. In particular, radial power profiles calculated at IFE–Halden Reactor Project with the HELIOS code are used. The work has been carried out in the frame of the collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and Halden Reactor Project. Some slide have been added as an Appendix to present the newly developed PolyPole-1 algorithm for modeling of intra-granular fission gas release.

  15. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7. Model and structure [Revised edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Amaya, Masaki; Saitou, Hiroaki

    2014-03-01

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in both normal conditions and anticipated transient conditions. This code is an advanced version which has been produced by incorporating the former version FEMAXI-6 with numerous functional improvements and extensions. In FEMAXI-7, many new models have been added and parameters have been clearly arranged. Also, to facilitate effective maintenance and accessibility of the code, modularization of subroutines and functions have been attained, and quality comment descriptions of variables or physical quantities have been incorporated in the source code. With these advancements, the FEMAXI-7 code has been upgraded to a versatile analytical tool for high burnup fuel behavior analyses. This report is the revised edition of the first one which describes in detail the design, basic theory and structure, models and numerical method, and improvements and extensions. The first edition, JAEA-Data/Code 2010-035, was published in 2010. The first edition was extended by orderly addition and disposition of explanations of models and organized as the revised edition after three years interval. (author)

  16. Fuel rod computations. The COMETHE code in its CEA version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenepveu, Dominique.

    1976-01-01

    The COMETHE code (COde d'evolution MEcanique et THermique) is intended for computing the irradiation behavior of water reactor fuel pins. It is concerned with steadily operated cylindrical pins, containing fuel pellet stacks (UO 2 or PuO 2 ). The pin consists in five different axial zones: two expansion chambers, two blankets, and a central core that may be divided into several stacks parted by plugs. As far as computation is concerned, the pin is divided into slices (maximum 15) in turn divided into rings (maximum 50). Information are obtained for each slice: the radial temperature distribution, heat transfer coefficients, thermal flux at the pin surface, changes in geometry according to temperature conditions, and specific burn-up. The physical models involved take account for: heat transfer, fission gas release, fuel expansion, and creep of the can. Results computed with COMETHE are compared with those from ELP and EPEL irradiation experiments [fr

  17. Aircraft Fuel Cell Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Robert

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, fuel cells have been explored for use in aircraft. While the weight and size of fuel cells allows only the smallest of aircraft to use fuel cells for their primary engines, fuel cells have showed promise for use as auxiliary power units (APUs), which power aircraft accessories and serve as an electrical backup in case of an engine failure. Fuel cell MUS are both more efficient and emit fewer pollutants. However, sea-level fuel cells need modifications to be properly used in aircraft applications. At high altitudes, the ambient air has a much lower pressure than at sea level, which makes it much more difficult to get air into the fuel cell to react and produce electricity. Compressors can be used to pressurize the air, but this leads to added weight, volume, and power usage, all of which are undesirable things. Another problem is that fuel cells require hydrogen to create electricity, and ever since the Hindenburg burst into flames, aircraft carrying large quantities of hydrogen have not been in high demand. However, jet fuel is a hydrocarbon, so it is possible to reform it into hydrogen. Since jet fuel is already used to power conventional APUs, it is very convenient to use this to generate the hydrogen for fuel-cell-based APUs. Fuel cells also tend to get large and heavy when used for applications that require a large amount of power. Reducing the size and weight becomes especially beneficial when it comes to fuel cells for aircraft. My goal this summer is to work on several aspects of Aircraft Fuel Cell Power System project. My first goal is to perform checks on a newly built injector rig designed to test different catalysts to determine the best setup for reforming Jet-A fuel into hydrogen. These checks include testing various thermocouples, transmitters, and transducers, as well making sure that the rig was actually built to the design specifications. These checks will help to ensure that the rig will operate properly and give correct results

  18. Commercialization of fuel-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S.S.; Appleby, A.J.; Baker, B.S.; Bates, J.L.; Buss, L.B.; Dollard, W.J.; Farris, P.J.; Gillis, E.A.; Gunsher, J.A.; Khandkar, A.; Krumpelt, M.; O' Sullivan, J.B.; Runte, G.; Savinell, R.F.; Selman, J.R.; Shores, D.A.; Tarman, P.

    1995-03-01

    This report is an abbreviated version of the ''Report of the DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Commercialization Working Group (AFC2WG),'' released January 1995. We describe fuel-cell commercialization for stationary power applications of phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide, and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  19. Thermal-hydraulic code for estimating safety limits of nuclear reactors with plate type fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos, Duvan A.; Moreira, João L.; Maiorino, Jose R.; Rossi, Pedro R.; Carajilescov, Pedro, E-mail: duvan.castellanos@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joao.moreira@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joserubens.maiorino@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: pedro.rossi@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: pedro.carajilescov10@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo André, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharias, Modelagem e Ciências Sociais Aplicadas

    2017-07-01

    To ensure the normal and safe operation of PWR type nuclear reactors is necessary the knowledge of nuclear and heat transfer properties of the fuel, coolant and structural materials. The thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors yields parameters such as the distribution of fuel and coolant temperatures, and the departure from nucleated boiling ratio. Usually computational codes are used to analyze the safety performance of the core. This research work presents a computer code for performing thermal-hydraulic analyses of nuclear reactors with plate-type fuel elements operating at low pressure and temperature (research reactors) or high temperature and pressure (naval propulsion or small power reactors). The code uses the sub-channel method based on geometric and thermal-hydraulic conditions. In order to solve the conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy, each sub-channel is divided into control volumes in the axial direction. The mass flow distribution for each fuel element of core is obtained. Analysis of critical heat flux is performed in the hottest channel. The code considers the radial symmetry and the chain or cascade method for two steps in order to facilitate the whole analysis. In the first step, we divide the core into channels with size equivalent to a fuel assembly. >From this analysis, the channel with the largest enthalpy is identified as the hot assembly. In the second step, we divide the hottest fuel assembly into sub-channels with size equivalent to one actual coolant channel. As in the previous step, the sub-channel with largest final enthalpy is identified as the hottest sub-channel. For the code validation, we considered results from the chinese CARR research reactor. The code reproduced well the CARR reactor results, yielding detailed information such as static pressure in the channel, mass flow rate distribution among the fuel channels, coolant, clad and centerline fuel temperatures, quality and local heat and critical heat

  20. Thermal-hydraulic code for estimating safety limits of nuclear reactors with plate type fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos, Duvan A.; Moreira, João L.; Maiorino, Jose R.; Rossi, Pedro R.; Carajilescov, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    To ensure the normal and safe operation of PWR type nuclear reactors is necessary the knowledge of nuclear and heat transfer properties of the fuel, coolant and structural materials. The thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors yields parameters such as the distribution of fuel and coolant temperatures, and the departure from nucleated boiling ratio. Usually computational codes are used to analyze the safety performance of the core. This research work presents a computer code for performing thermal-hydraulic analyses of nuclear reactors with plate-type fuel elements operating at low pressure and temperature (research reactors) or high temperature and pressure (naval propulsion or small power reactors). The code uses the sub-channel method based on geometric and thermal-hydraulic conditions. In order to solve the conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy, each sub-channel is divided into control volumes in the axial direction. The mass flow distribution for each fuel element of core is obtained. Analysis of critical heat flux is performed in the hottest channel. The code considers the radial symmetry and the chain or cascade method for two steps in order to facilitate the whole analysis. In the first step, we divide the core into channels with size equivalent to a fuel assembly. >From this analysis, the channel with the largest enthalpy is identified as the hot assembly. In the second step, we divide the hottest fuel assembly into sub-channels with size equivalent to one actual coolant channel. As in the previous step, the sub-channel with largest final enthalpy is identified as the hottest sub-channel. For the code validation, we considered results from the chinese CARR research reactor. The code reproduced well the CARR reactor results, yielding detailed information such as static pressure in the channel, mass flow rate distribution among the fuel channels, coolant, clad and centerline fuel temperatures, quality and local heat and critical heat

  1. Fuel cell design using a new heuristic method; Diseno de celdas de combustible mediante un nuevo metodo heuristico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia, R.; Montes T, J. L.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Castillo M, A., E-mail: joseluis.montes@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper a new method for the pre-design of a typical fuel cell with a structural array of 10 x 10 fuel elements for a BWR is presented. The method is based on principles of maximum dispersion and minimum peaks of local power within the array of fuel elements. The pre-design of the fuel cells is made by simulation in two dimensions (2-D) through the cells physics code CASMO-4. For this purpose of pre-design the search process is guided by an objective function which is a combination of the main neutronic parameters of the fuel cell. The results show that the method is a promising tool that could be used for the design of fuel cells for use in a nuclear plant BWR. (Author)

  2. Potential of the MCNP computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyncl, J.

    1995-01-01

    The MCNP code is designed for numerical solution of neutron, photon, and electron transport problems by the Monte Carlo method. The code is based on the linear transport theory of behavior of the differential flux of the particles. The code directly uses data from the cross section point data library for input. Experience is outlined, gained in the application of the code to the calculation of the effective parameters of fuel assemblies and of the entire reactor core, to the determination of the effective parameters of the elementary fuel cell, and to the numerical solution of neutron diffusion and/or transport problems of the fuel assembly. The agreement between the calculated and observed data gives evidence that the MCNP code can be used with advantage for calculations involving WWER type fuel assemblies. (J.B.). 4 figs., 6 refs

  3. User manual for the probabilistic fuel performance code FRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friis Jensen, J.; Misfeldt, I.

    1980-10-01

    This report describes the use of the probabilistic fuel performance code FRP. Detailed description of both input to and output from the program are given. The use of the program is illustrated by an example. (author)

  4. Fuel cells for naval aviation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satzberg, S.; Field, S.; Abu-Ali, M.

    2003-01-01

    Recent advances in fuel cell technology have occurred which make fuel cells increasingly attractive for electric power generation on future naval and commercial aircraft applications. These advances include significant increases in power density, the development of compact fuel reformers, and cost reductions due to commercialization efforts. The Navy's interest in aircraft fuel cells stems from their high energy efficiency (up to 40-60% for simple cycle; 60-70% for combined gas turbine/fuel cell hybrid cycles), and their negligible NOx and hydrocarbon emissions compared to conventional generators. While the U.S. Navy has been involved with fuel cell research and development as early as the 1960s, many of the early programs were for special warfare or undersea applications. In 1997, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) initiated a program to marinize commercial fuel cell technology for future Navy shipboard applications. The power density of fuel cell power systems is approaching the levels necessary for serious consideration for aircraft suitability. ONR and Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) are initiating a program to develop a fuel cell power system suitable for future Navy aircraft applications, utilizing as much commercially-available technology as possible. (author)

  5. Fuel Cell Powered Lift Truck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulden, Steve [Sysco Food Service, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-08-20

    This project, entitled “Recovery Act: Fuel Cell-Powered Lift Truck Sysco (Houston) Fleet Deployment”, was in response to DOE funding opportunity announcement DE-PS36-08GO98009, Topic 7B, which promotes the deployment of fuel cell powered material handling equipment in large, multi-shift distribution centers. This project promoted large-volume commercialdeployments and helped to create a market pull for material handling equipment (MHE) powered fuel cell systems. Specific outcomes and benefits involved the proliferation of fuel cell systems in 5-to 20-kW lift trucks at a high-profile, real-world site that demonstrated the benefits of fuel cell technology and served as a focal point for other nascent customers. The project allowed for the creation of expertise in providing service and support for MHE fuel cell powered systems, growth of existing product manufacturing expertise, and promoted existing fuel cell system and component companies. The project also stimulated other MHE fleet conversions helping to speed the adoption of fuel cell systems and hydrogen fueling technology. This document also contains the lessons learned during the project in order to communicate the successes and difficulties experienced, which could potentially assist others planning similar projects.

  6. Performance testing of thermal analysis codes for nuclear fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    In 1982 Sandia National Laboratories held the First Industry/Government Joint Thermal and Structural Codes Information Exchange and presented the initial stages of an investigation of thermal analysis computer codes for use in the design of nuclear fuel shipping casks. The objective of the investigation was to (1) document publicly available computer codes, (2) assess code capabilities as determined from their user's manuals, and (3) assess code performance on cask-like model problems. Computer codes are required to handle the thermal phenomena of conduction, convection and radiation. Several of the available thermal computer codes were tested on a set of model problems to assess performance on cask-like problems. Solutions obtained with the computer codes for steady-state thermal analysis were in good agreement and the solutions for transient thermal analysis differed slightly among the computer codes due to modeling differences

  7. 2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE

    2010-06-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general business strategy and market focus, as well as, financial information for select publicly-traded companies.

  8. 2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, B. [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-06-30

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general business strategy and market focus, as well as, financial information for select publicly-traded companies.

  9. Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuvera Fuel Cells

    2005-04-15

    The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel

  10. Development and application of a system analysis code for liquid fueled molten salt reactors based on RELAP5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Chengbin [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cheng, Maosong, E-mail: mscheng@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Liu, Guimin [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • New point kinetics and thermo-hydraulics models as well as a numerical method are added into RELAP5 code to be suitable for liquid fueled molten salt reactor. • The extended REALP5 code is verified by the experimental benchmarks of MSRE. • The different transient scenarios of the MSBR are simulated to evaluate performance during the transients. - Abstract: The molten salt reactor (MSR) is one of the six advanced reactor concepts declared by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), which can be characterized by attractive attributes as inherent safety, economical efficiency, natural resource protection, sustainable development and nuclear non-proliferation. It is important to make system safety analysis for nuclear power plant of MSR. In this paper, in order to developing a system analysis code suitable for liquid fueled molten salt reactors, the point kinetics and thermo-hydraulic models as well as the numerical method in thermal–hydraulic transient code Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program (RELAP5) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are extended and verified by Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) experimental benchmarks. And then, four transient scenarios including the load demand change, the primary flow transient, the secondary flow transient and the reactivity transient of the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) are modeled and simulated so as to evaluate the performance of the reactor during the anticipated transient events using the extended RELAP5 code. The results indicate the extended RELAP5 code is effective and well suited to the liquid fueled molten salt reactor, and the MSBR has strong inherent safety characteristics because of its large negative reactivity coefficient. In the future, the extended RELAP5 code will be used to perform transient safety analysis for a liquid fueled thorium molten salt reactor named TMSR-LF developed by the Center

  11. Development and application of a system analysis code for liquid fueled molten salt reactors based on RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Chengbin; Cheng, Maosong; Liu, Guimin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • New point kinetics and thermo-hydraulics models as well as a numerical method are added into RELAP5 code to be suitable for liquid fueled molten salt reactor. • The extended REALP5 code is verified by the experimental benchmarks of MSRE. • The different transient scenarios of the MSBR are simulated to evaluate performance during the transients. - Abstract: The molten salt reactor (MSR) is one of the six advanced reactor concepts declared by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), which can be characterized by attractive attributes as inherent safety, economical efficiency, natural resource protection, sustainable development and nuclear non-proliferation. It is important to make system safety analysis for nuclear power plant of MSR. In this paper, in order to developing a system analysis code suitable for liquid fueled molten salt reactors, the point kinetics and thermo-hydraulic models as well as the numerical method in thermal–hydraulic transient code Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program (RELAP5) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are extended and verified by Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) experimental benchmarks. And then, four transient scenarios including the load demand change, the primary flow transient, the secondary flow transient and the reactivity transient of the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) are modeled and simulated so as to evaluate the performance of the reactor during the anticipated transient events using the extended RELAP5 code. The results indicate the extended RELAP5 code is effective and well suited to the liquid fueled molten salt reactor, and the MSBR has strong inherent safety characteristics because of its large negative reactivity coefficient. In the future, the extended RELAP5 code will be used to perform transient safety analysis for a liquid fueled thorium molten salt reactor named TMSR-LF developed by the Center

  12. Fission product release from nuclear fuel I. Physical modelling in the ASTEC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brillant, G.; Marchetto, C.; Plumecocq, W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Physical modeling of FP and SM release in ASTEC is presented. • The release is described as solid state diffusion within fuel for high volatile FP. • The release is described as FP vaporisation for semi volatile FP. • The release is described as fuel vaporisation for low volatile FP. • ASTEC validation is presented in the second paper. - Abstract: This article is the first of a series of two articles dedicated to the mechanisms of fission product release from a degraded core as they are modelled in the ASTEC code. The ASTEC code aims at simulating severe accidents in nuclear reactors from the initiating event up to the radiological consequences on the environment. This code is used for several applications such as nuclear plant safety evaluation including probabilistic studies and emergency preparedness. To cope with the requirements of robustness and low calculation time, the code is based on a semi-empirical approach and only the main limiting phenomena that govern the release from intact rods and from debris beds are considered. For solid fuel, fission products are classified into three groups, depending on their degree of volatility. The kinetics of volatile fission products release depend on the rate-limiting process of solid-state diffusion through fuel grains. For semi-volatile fission products, the release from the open fuel porosities is assumed to be governed by vaporisation and mass transfer processes. The key phenomenon for the release of low volatile fission products is supposed to be fuel volatilisation. A similar approach is used for the release of fission products from a rubble bed. An in-depth validation of the code including both analytical and integral experiments is the subject of the second article

  13. Spent reactor fuel benchmark composition data for code validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierman, S.R.

    1991-09-01

    To establish criticality safety margins utilizing burnup credit in the storage and transport of spent reactor fuels requires a knowledge of the uncertainty in the calculated fuel composition used in making the reactivity assessment. To provide data for validating such calculated burnup fuel compositions, radiochemical assays are being obtained as part of the United States Department of Energy From-Reactor Cask Development Program. Destructive assay data are being obtained from representative reactor fuels having experienced irradiation exposures up to about 55 GWD/MTM. Assay results and associated operating histories on the initial three samples analyzed in this effort are presented. The three samples were taken from different axial regions of the same fuel rod and represent radiation exposures of about 27, 37, and 44 GWD/MTM. The data are presented in a benchmark type format to facilitate identification/referencing and computer code input

  14. Development of 3-D Flow Analysis Code for Fuel Assembly using Unstructured Grid System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myong, Hyon Kook; Kim, Jong Eun; Ahn, Jong Ki; Yang, Seung Yong [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    The flow through a nuclear rod bundle with mixing vanes are very complex and required a suitable turbulence model to be predicted accurately. Final objective of this study is to develop a CFD code for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system. In order to develop a CFD code for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system, the following researches are made: - Development of numerical algorithm for CFD code's solver - Grid and geometric connectivity data - Development of software(PowerCFD code) for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system - Modulation of software(PowerCFD code) - Development of turbulence model - Development of analysis module of RANS/LES hybrid models - Analysis of turbulent flow and heat transfer - Basic study on LES analysis - Development of main frame on pre/post processors based on GUI - Algorithm for fully-developed flow.

  15. Development of 3-D Flow Analysis Code for Fuel Assembly using Unstructured Grid System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myong, Hyon Kook; Kim, Jong Eun; Ahn, Jong Ki; Yang, Seung Yong

    2007-03-01

    The flow through a nuclear rod bundle with mixing vanes are very complex and required a suitable turbulence model to be predicted accurately. Final objective of this study is to develop a CFD code for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system. In order to develop a CFD code for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system, the following researches are made: - Development of numerical algorithm for CFD code's solver - Grid and geometric connectivity data - Development of software(PowerCFD code) for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system - Modulation of software(PowerCFD code) - Development of turbulence model - Development of analysis module of RANS/LES hybrid models - Analysis of turbulent flow and heat transfer - Basic study on LES analysis - Development of main frame on pre/post processors based on GUI - Algorithm for fully-developed flow

  16. Modification of fuel performance code to evaluate iron-based alloy behavior under LOCA scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo Ramos, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br, E-mail: mrmartin@usp.br [Laboratorio de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco (LabRisco/POLI/USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Abe, Alfredo; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e, E-mail: ayabe@ipen.br, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixiera@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Accident tolerant fuels (ATF) has been studied since the Fukushima Daiichi accident in the research efforts to develop new materials which under accident scenarios could maintain the fuel rod integrity for a longer period compared to the cladding and fuel system usually utilized in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The efforts have been focused on new materials applied as cladding, then iron-base alloys appear as a possible candidate. The aim of this paper is to implement modifications in a fuel performance code to evaluate the behavior of iron based alloys under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario. For this, initially the properties related to the thermal and mechanical behavior of iron-based alloys were obtained from the literature, appropriately adapted and introduced in the fuel performance code subroutines. The adopted approach was step by step modifications, where different versions of the code were created. The assessment of the implemented modification was carried out simulating an experiment available in the open literature (IFA-650.5) related to zirconium-based alloy fuel rods submitted to LOCA conditions. The obtained results for the iron-based alloy were compared to those obtained using the regular version of the fuel performance code for zircaloy-4. The obtained results have shown that the most important properties to be changed are those from the subroutines related to the mechanical properties of the cladding. The results obtained have shown that the burst is observed at a longer time for fuel rods with iron-based alloy, indicating the potentiality of this material to be used as cladding with ATF purposes. (author)

  17. Modification of fuel performance code to evaluate iron-based alloy behavior under LOCA scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo Ramos; Abe, Alfredo; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e

    2017-01-01

    Accident tolerant fuels (ATF) has been studied since the Fukushima Daiichi accident in the research efforts to develop new materials which under accident scenarios could maintain the fuel rod integrity for a longer period compared to the cladding and fuel system usually utilized in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The efforts have been focused on new materials applied as cladding, then iron-base alloys appear as a possible candidate. The aim of this paper is to implement modifications in a fuel performance code to evaluate the behavior of iron based alloys under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario. For this, initially the properties related to the thermal and mechanical behavior of iron-based alloys were obtained from the literature, appropriately adapted and introduced in the fuel performance code subroutines. The adopted approach was step by step modifications, where different versions of the code were created. The assessment of the implemented modification was carried out simulating an experiment available in the open literature (IFA-650.5) related to zirconium-based alloy fuel rods submitted to LOCA conditions. The obtained results for the iron-based alloy were compared to those obtained using the regular version of the fuel performance code for zircaloy-4. The obtained results have shown that the most important properties to be changed are those from the subroutines related to the mechanical properties of the cladding. The results obtained have shown that the burst is observed at a longer time for fuel rods with iron-based alloy, indicating the potentiality of this material to be used as cladding with ATF purposes. (author)

  18. Fuel cells: Trends in research and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, A. J.

    Various aspects of fuel cells are discussed. The subjects addressed include: fuel cells for electric power production; phosphoric acid fuel cells; long-term testing of an air-cooled 2.5 kW PAFC stack in Italy; status of fuel cell research and technology in the Netherlands, Bulgaria, PRC, UK, Sweden, India, Japan, and Brazil; fuel cells from the manufacturer's viewpoint; and fuel cells using biomass-derived fuels. Also examined are: solid oxide electrolye fuel cells; aluminum-air batteries with neutral chloride electrolyte; materials research for advanced solid-state fuel cells at the Energy Research Laboratory in Denmark; molten carbonate fuel cells; the impact of the Siemens program; fuel cells at Sorapec; impact of fuel cells on the electric power generation systems in industrial and developing countries; and application of fuel cells to large vehicles.

  19. NASA fuel cell applications for space: Endurance test results on alkaline fuel cell electrolyzer components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheibley, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    Fuel cells continue to play a major role in manned spacecraft power generation. The Gemini and Apollo programs used fuel cell power plants as the primary source of mission electrical power, with batteries as the backup. The current NASA use for fuel cells is in the Orbiter program. Here, low temperature alkaline fuel cells provide all of the on-board power with no backup power source. Three power plants per shipset are utilized; the original power plant contained 32-cell substacks connected in parallel. For extended life and better power performance, each power plant now contains three 32-cell substacks connected in parallel. One of the possible future applications for fuel cells will be for the proposed manned Space Station in low earth orbit (LEO)(1, 2, 3). By integrating a water electrolysis capability with a fuel cell (a regenerative fuel cell system), a multikilowatt energy storage capability ranging from 35 kW to 250 kW can be achieved. Previous development work on fuel cell and electrolysis systems would tend to minimize the development cost of this energy storage system. Trade studies supporting initial Space Station concept development clearly show regenerative fuel cell (RFC) storage to be superior to nickel-cadmium and nickel-hydrogen batteries with regard to subsystem weight, flexibility in design, and integration with other spacecraft systems when compared for an initial station power level ranging from 60 kW to 75 kW. The possibility of scavenging residual O 2 and H 2 from the Shuttle external tank for use in fuel cells for producing power also exists

  20. COUPLED SIMULATION OF GAS COOLED FAST REACTOR FUEL ASSEMBLY WITH NESTLE CODE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Osusky

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on coupled calculation of the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor. The proper modelling of coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics is the corner stone for future safety assessment of the control and emergency systems. Nowadays, the system and channel thermal-hydraulic codes are accepted by the national regulatory authorities in European Union for license purposes, therefore the code NESTLE was used for the simulation. The NESTLE code is a coupled multigroup neutron diffusion code with thermal-hydraulic sub-channel code. In the paper, the validation of NESTLE code 5.2.1 installation is presented. The processing of fuel assembly homogeneous parametric cross-section library for NESTLE code simulation is made by the sequence TRITON of SCALE code package system. The simulated case in the NESTLE code is one fuel assembly of GFR2400 concept with reflective boundary condition in radial direction and zero flux boundary condition in axial direction. The results of coupled calculation are presented and are consistent with the GFR2400 study of the GoFastR project.

  1. Biological fuel cells and their applications

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, AK; Suresh, P; Berchmans, S; Rajendran, A

    2004-01-01

    One type of genuine fuel cell that does hold promise in the long-term is the biological fuel cell. Unlike conventional fuel cells, which employ hydrogen, ethanol and methanol as fuel, biological fuel cells use organic products produced by metabolic processes or use organic electron donors utilized in the growth processes as fuels for current generation. A distinctive feature of biological fuel cells is that the electrode reactions are controlled by biocatalysts, i.e. the biological redox-reac...

  2. FRAP-T1: a computer code for the transient analysis of oxide fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearien, J.A.; Miller, R.L.; Hobbins, R.R.; Siefken, L.J.; Baston, V.F.; Coleman, D.R.

    1977-02-01

    FRAP-T is a FORTRAN IV computer code which can be used to solve for the transient response of a light water reactor (LWR) fuel rod during accident transients such as loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) or a power-cooling-mismatch (PCM). The coupled effects of mechanical, thermal, internal gas, and material property response on the behavior of the fuel rod are considered. FRAP-T is a modular code with each major computational model isolated within the code and coupled to the main code by subroutine calls and data transfer through argument lists. FRAP-T is coupled to a materials properties subcode (MATPRO) which is used to provide gas, fuel, and cladding properties to the FRAP-T computational subcodes. No material properties need be supplied by the code user. The needed water properties are stored in tables built into the code. Critical heat flux (CHF) and heat transfer correlations for a wide range of coolant conditions are contained in modular subroutines. FRAP-T has been evaluated by making extensive comparisons between predictions of the code and experimental data. Comparison of predicted and experimental results are presented for a range of FRAP-T calculated parameters. The code is presently programmed and running on an IBM-360/75 and a CDC 7600 computer

  3. Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction (IFCI 6.0) code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, F.J.; Young, M.F.

    1994-04-01

    The integrated Fuel-Coolant interaction (IFCI) computer code is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) problem at large scale using a two-dimensional, four-field hydrodynamic framework and physically based models. IFCI will be capable of treating all major FCI processes in an integrated manner. This document is a product of the effort to generate a stand-alone version of IFCI, IFCI 6.0. The User's Manual describes in detail the hydrodynamic method and physical models used in IFCI 6.0. Appendix A is an input manual, provided for the creation of working decks

  4. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Phase 1: Multi-fuel reformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

  5. Numerical simulation of mass and energy transport phenomena in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpino, F. [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Strutture, Ambiente e Territorio (DiMSAT), University of Cassino, via Di Biasio 43, Cassino (Italy); Massarotti, N. [Dipertimento per le Tecnologie (DiT), University of Naples ' ' Parthenope' ' , Centro Direzionale, isola C4, 80143 Napoli (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) represent a very promising technology for near future energy conversion thanks to a number of advantages, including the possibility of using different fuels. In this paper, a detailed numerical model, based on a general mathematical description and on a finite element Characteristic based Split (CBS) algorithm code is employed to simulate mass and energy transport phenomena in SOFCs. The model predicts the thermodynamic quantity of interest in the fuel cell. Full details of the numerical solution obtained are presented both in terms of heat and mass transfer in the cell and in terms of electro-chemical reactions that occur in the system considered. The results obtained with the present algorithm is compared with the experimental data available in the literature for validation, showing an excellent agreement. (author)

  6. Comparative static simulations of a CANDU6 cell using different transport codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahjoub, M.; Koclas, J., E-mail: mehdi.mahjoub@polymtl.ca [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The solution of the time dependent Boltzmann equation remains quite a challenge. We are in the process of developing such a method using the stochastic Monte Carlo approach for two reasons: First, at the cell level, we will be able to obtain time dependent homogenized cross sections for use in full core diffusion calculations. Second, the Monte Carlo methods are scalable to perform full core if and when appropriate computer resources become available. The Time dependent approach will be concretized a new module that will be added to an existing Monte Carlo code. As a first step towards this goal, we need to choose the initial Monte Carlo code to be used as start point. For this reason, we have compared results concerning the void reactivity of a fresh fuel CANDU6 cell, using two Monte Carlo codes, namely VTT developed SERPENT and MIT developed OpenMC together with the deterministic DRAGON code. Several libraries are used in this comparison. We conclude that OpenMC is a good candidate for implementation of a time dependent simulation. (author)

  7. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Composite Data Products | Hydrogen and Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cells | NREL Vehicle Composite Data Products Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Composite Data Products The following composite data products (CDPs) focus on current fuel cell electric vehicle evaluations Cell Operation Hour Groups CDP FCEV 39, 2/19/16 Comparison of Fuel Cell Stack Operation Hours and Miles

  8. OPT-TWO: Calculation code for two-dimensional MOX fuel models in the optimum concentration distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shohei; Okuno, Hiroshi; Sakai, Tomohiro

    2007-08-01

    OPT-TWO is a calculation code which calculates the optimum concentration distribution, i.e., the most conservative concentration distribution in the aspect of nuclear criticality safety, of MOX (mixed uranium and plutonium oxide) fuels in the two-dimensional system. To achieve the optimum concentration distribution, we apply the principle of flattened fuel importance distribution with which the fuel system has the highest reactivity. Based on this principle, OPT-TWO takes the following 3 calculation steps iteratively to achieve the optimum concentration distribution with flattened fuel importance: (1) the forward and adjoint neutron fluxes, and the neutron multiplication factor, with TWOTRAN code which is a two-dimensional neutron transport code based on the SN method, (2) the fuel importance, and (3) the quantity of the transferring fuel. In OPT-TWO, the components of MOX fuel are MOX powder, uranium dioxide powder and additive. This report describes the content of the calculation, the computational method, and the installation method of the OPT-TWO, and also describes the application method of the criticality calculation of OPT-TWO. (author)

  9. Uniqueness of magnetotomography for fuel cells and fuel cell stacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lustfeld, H; Hirschfeld, J; Reissel, M; Steffen, B

    2009-01-01

    The criterion for the applicability of any tomographic method is its ability to construct the desired inner structure of a system from external measurements, i.e. to solve the inverse problem. Magnetotomography applied to fuel cells and fuel cell stacks aims at determining the inner current densities from measurements of the external magnetic field. This is an interesting idea since in those systems the inner electric current densities are large, several hundred mA per cm 2 and therefore relatively high external magnetic fields can be expected. Still the question remains how uniquely the inverse problem can be solved. Here we present a proof that by exploiting Maxwell's equations extensively the inverse problem of magnetotomography becomes unique under rather mild assumptions and we show that these assumptions are fulfilled in fuel cells and fuel cell stacks. Moreover, our proof holds true for any other device fulfilling the assumptions listed here. Admittedly, our proof has one caveat: it does not contain an estimate of the precision requirements the measurements need to fulfil for enabling reconstruction of the inner current densities from external magnetic fields.

  10. Improvement of Computer Codes Used for Fuel Behaviour Simulation (FUMEX-III). Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2008-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    It is fundamental to the future of nuclear power that reactors can be run safely and economically to compete with other forms of power generation. As a consequence, it is essential to develop the understanding of fuel performance and to embody that knowledge in codes to provide best estimate predictions of fuel behaviour. This in turn leads to a better understanding of fuel performance, a reduction in operating margins, flexibility in fuel management and improved operating economics. The IAEA has therefore embarked on a series of programmes addressing different aspects of fuel behaviour modelling with the following objectives: - To assess the maturity and prediction capabilities of fuel performance codes, and to support interaction and information exchange between countries with code development and application needs (FUMEX series); - To build a database of well defined experiments suitable for code validation in association with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA); - To transfer a mature fuel modelling code to developing countries, to support teams in these countries in their efforts to adapt the code to the requirements of particular reactors, and to provide guidance on applying the code to reactor operation and safety assessments; - To provide guidelines for code quality assurance, code licensing and code application to fuel licensing. This report describes the results of the coordinated research project on the ''Improvement of computer codes used for fuel behaviour simulation (FUMEX-III)''. This programme was initiated in 2008 and completed in 2012. It followed previous programmes on fuel modelling: D-COM 1982-1984, FUMEX 1993-1996 and FUMEX-II 2002-2006. The participants used a mixture of data derived from commercial and experimental irradiation histories, in particular data designed to investigate the mechanical interactions occurring in fuel during normal, transient and severe transient operation. All participants carried out calculations on priority

  11. Commercializing fuel cells: managing risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Peter B.

    Commercialization of fuel cells, like any other product, entails both financial and technical risks. Most of the fuel cell literature has focussed upon technical risks, however, the most significant risks during commercialization may well be associated with the financial funding requirements of this process. Successful commercialization requires an integrated management of these risks. Like any developing technology, fuel cells face the typical 'Catch-22' of commercialization: "to enter the market, the production costs must come down, however, to lower these costs, the cumulative production must be greatly increased, i.e. significant market penetration must occur". Unless explicit steps are taken to address this dilemma, fuel cell commercialization will remain slow and require large subsidies for market entry. To successfully address this commercialization dilemma, it is necessary to follow a market-driven commercialization strategy that identifies high-value entry markets while minimizing the financial and technical risks of market entry. The financial and technical risks of fuel cell commercialization are minimized, both for vendors and end-users, with the initial market entry of small-scale systems into high-value stationary applications. Small-scale systems, in the order of 1-40 kW, benefit from economies of production — as opposed to economies to scale — to attain rapid cost reductions from production learning and continuous technological innovation. These capital costs reductions will accelerate their commercialization through market pull as the fuel cell systems become progressively more viable, starting with various high-value stationary and, eventually, for high-volume mobile applications. To facilitate market penetration via market pull, fuel cell systems must meet market-derived economic and technical specifications and be compatible with existing market and fuels infrastructures. Compatibility with the fuels infrastructure is facilitated by a

  12. MICROBIAL FUEL CELL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A novel microbial fuel cell construction for the generation of electrical energy. The microbial fuel cell comprises: (i) an anode electrode, (ii) a cathode chamber, said cathode chamber comprising an in let through which an influent enters the cathode chamber, an outlet through which an effluent...

  13. Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I [Champaign, IL; Zhu, Yimin [Urbana, IL; Kahn, Zakia [Palatine, IL; Man, Malcolm [Vancouver, CA

    2009-11-17

    A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

  14. Application Of WIMS Code To Calculation Kartini Reactor Parameters By Pin-Cell And Cluster Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumarsono, Bambang; Tjiptono, T.W.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis UZrH fuel element parameters calculation in Kartini Reactor by WIMS Code has been done. The analysis is done by pin cell and cluster method. The pin cell method is done as a function percent burn-up and by 8 group 3 region analysis and cluster method by 8 group 12 region analysis. From analysis and calculation resulted K ∼ = 1.3687 by pin cell method and K ∼ = 1.3162 by cluster method and so deviation is 3.83%. By pin cell analysis as a function percent burn-up at the percent burn-up greater than 59.50%, the multiplication factor is less than one (k ∼ < 1) it is mean that the fuel element reactivity is negative

  15. A French fuel cell prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    A French prototype of a fuel cell based on the PEM (proton exchange membrane) technology has been designed by Helion, a branch of Technicatome, this fuel cell delivers 300 kW and will be used in naval applications and terrestrial transport. The main advantages of fuel cell are: 1) no contamination, even if the fuel used is natural gas the quantities of CO 2 and CO emitted are respectively 17 and 75 times as little as the maximal quantities allowed by European regulations, 2) efficiency, the electric yield is up to 60 % and can reach 80 % if we include the recovery of heat, 3) silent, the fuel cell itself does not make noise. The present price of fuel cell is the main reason that hampers its industrial development, this price is in fact strongly dependant on the cost of its different components: catalyzers, membranes, bipolar plates and the hydrogen supply. This article gives the technical characteristics of the Helion's fuel cell. (A.C.)

  16. Simulation study of a PEM fuel cell system fed by hydrogen produced by partial oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdogan, S [Marmara University, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul (Turkey); Ersoz, A; Olgun, H [TUBITAK Marmara Research Center, Energy Systems and Environmental Research Institute, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2003-09-01

    Within the frame of sustainable development, efficient and clean, if possible zero emission energy production technologies are of utmost importance in various sectors such as utilities, industry, households and transportation. Low-temperature fuel cell systems are suitable for powering transportation systems such as automobiles and trucks in an efficient and low-emitting manner. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems constitute the most promising low temperature fuel cell option being developed globally. PEM fuel cells generate electric power from air and hydrogen or from a hydrogen rich gas via electrochemical reactions. Water and waste heat are the only by-products of PEM fuel cells. There is great interest in converting current hydrocarbon based common transportation fuels such as gasoline and diesel into hydrogen rich gases acceptable by PEM fuel cells. Hydrogen rich gases can be produced from conventional transportation fuels via various reforming technologies. Steam reforming, partial oxidation and auto-thermal reforming are the three major reforming technologies. In this paper, we discuss the results of a simulation study for a PEM fuel cell with partial oxidation. The Aspen HYSYS 3.1 code has been used for simulation purposes. Two liquid hydrocarbon fuels have been selected to investigate the effect of average molecular weights of hydrocarbons, on the fuel processing efficiency. The overall system efficiency depends on the fuel preparation and fuel cell efficiencies as well as on the heat integration within the system. It is desired to investigate the overall system efficiencies for net electrical power production at 100 kW considering bigger scale transport applications. Results indicate that fuel properties, fuel preparation system operating parameters and PEM fuel cell polarization curve characteristics all affect the overall system efficiency. (authors)

  17. Photoactivated Fuel Cells (PhotoFuelCells. An alternative source of renewable energy with environmental benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavroula Sfaelou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work is a short review of Photoactivated Fuel Cells, that is, photoelectrochemical cells which consume an organic or inorganic fuel to produce renewable electricity or hydrogen. The work presents the basic features of photoactivated fuel cells, their modes of operation, the materials, which are frequently used for their construction and some ideas of cell design both for electricity and solar hydrogen production. Water splitting is treated as a special case of photoactivated fuel cell operation.

  18. Opportunities for PEM fuel cell commercialization : fuel cell electric vehicle demonstration in Shanghai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Z.F. [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    The research and development activities devoted to the development of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) were discussed with reference to its application in the fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV). In the past decade, PEMFC technology has been successfully applied in both the automobile and residential sector worldwide. In China, more than one billion RMB yuan has been granted by the Chinese government to develop PEM fuel cell technology over the past 5 years, particularly for commercialization of the fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV). The City of Shanghai has played a significant role in the FCEV demonstration with involvement by Shanghai Auto Industrial Company (SAIC), Tongji University, Shanghai Jiaotong University, and Shanghai Shenli High Tech Co. Ltd. These participants were involved in the development and integration of the following components into the FCEV: fuel cell engines, batteries, FCEV electric control systems, and primary materials for the fuel cell stack. During the course of the next five year-plan (2006-2010), Shanghai will promote the commercialization of FCEV. More than one thousand FCEVs will be manufactured and an FCEV fleet will be in operation throughout Shanghai City by 2010.

  19. Fuel cell cooler-humidifier plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Nicholas G.; Jones, Daniel O.

    2000-01-01

    A cooler-humidifier plate for use in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack assembly is provided. The cooler-humidifier plate combines functions of cooling and humidification within the fuel cell stack assembly, thereby providing a more compact structure, simpler manifolding, and reduced reject heat from the fuel cell. Coolant on the cooler side of the plate removes heat generated within the fuel cell assembly. Heat is also removed by the humidifier side of the plate for use in evaporating the humidification water. On the humidifier side of the plate, evaporating water humidifies reactant gas flowing over a moistened wick. After exiting the humidifier side of the plate, humidified reactant gas provides needed moisture to the proton exchange membranes used in the fuel cell stack assembly. The invention also provides a fuel cell plate that maximizes structural support within the fuel cell by ensuring that the ribs that form the boundaries of channels on one side of the plate have ends at locations that substantially correspond to the locations of ribs on the opposite side of the plate.

  20. A new code for predicting the thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic fuels in sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahan, Aydin, E-mail: karahan@mit.ed [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Buongiorno, Jacopo [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

    2010-01-31

    An engineering code to predict the irradiation behavior of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr metallic alloy fuel pins and UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named Fuel Engineering and Structural analysis Tool (FEAST). FEAST has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe fission gas release and fuel swelling, fuel chemistry and restructuring, temperature distribution, fuel-clad chemical interaction, and fuel and clad mechanical analysis including transient creep-fracture for the clad. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST can analyze fuel and clad thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis (non-disruptive) transient scenarios. FEAST was written in FORTRAN-90 and has a simple input file similar to that of the LWR fuel code FRAPCON. The metal-fuel version is called FEAST-METAL, and is described in this paper. The oxide-fuel version, FEAST-OXIDE is described in a companion paper. With respect to the old Argonne National Laboratory code LIFE-METAL and other same-generation codes, FEAST-METAL emphasizes more mechanistic, less empirical models, whenever available. Specifically, fission gas release and swelling are modeled with the GRSIS algorithm, which is based on detailed tracking of fission gas bubbles within the metal fuel. Migration of the fuel constituents is modeled by means of thermo-transport theory. Fuel-clad chemical interaction models based on precipitation kinetics were developed for steady-state operation and transients. Finally, a transient intergranular creep-fracture model for the clad, which tracks the nucleation and growth of the cavities at the grain boundaries, was developed for and implemented in the code. Reducing the empiricism in the constitutive models should make it more acceptable to extrapolate FEAST-METAL to new fuel compositions and higher burnup, as envisioned in advanced sodium

  1. A new code for predicting the thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic fuels in sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karahan, Aydin; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2010-01-01

    An engineering code to predict the irradiation behavior of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr metallic alloy fuel pins and UO 2 -PuO 2 mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named Fuel Engineering and Structural analysis Tool (FEAST). FEAST has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe fission gas release and fuel swelling, fuel chemistry and restructuring, temperature distribution, fuel-clad chemical interaction, and fuel and clad mechanical analysis including transient creep-fracture for the clad. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST can analyze fuel and clad thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis (non-disruptive) transient scenarios. FEAST was written in FORTRAN-90 and has a simple input file similar to that of the LWR fuel code FRAPCON. The metal-fuel version is called FEAST-METAL, and is described in this paper. The oxide-fuel version, FEAST-OXIDE is described in a companion paper. With respect to the old Argonne National Laboratory code LIFE-METAL and other same-generation codes, FEAST-METAL emphasizes more mechanistic, less empirical models, whenever available. Specifically, fission gas release and swelling are modeled with the GRSIS algorithm, which is based on detailed tracking of fission gas bubbles within the metal fuel. Migration of the fuel constituents is modeled by means of thermo-transport theory. Fuel-clad chemical interaction models based on precipitation kinetics were developed for steady-state operation and transients. Finally, a transient intergranular creep-fracture model for the clad, which tracks the nucleation and growth of the cavities at the grain boundaries, was developed for and implemented in the code. Reducing the empiricism in the constitutive models should make it more acceptable to extrapolate FEAST-METAL to new fuel compositions and higher burnup, as envisioned in advanced sodium reactors

  2. Assessment of stainless steel 348 fuel rod performance against literature available data using TRANSURANUS code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovedi Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early pressurized water reactors were originally designed to operate using stainless steel as cladding material, but during their lifetime this material was replaced by zirconium-based alloys. However, after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the problems related to the zirconium-based alloys due to the hydrogen production and explosion under severe accident brought the importance to assess different materials. In this sense, initiatives as ATF (Accident Tolerant Fuel program are considering different material as fuel cladding and, one candidate is iron-based alloy. In order to assess the fuel performance of fuel rods manufactured using iron-based alloy as cladding material, it was necessary to select a specific stainless steel (type 348 and modify properly conventional fuel performance codes developed in the last decades. Then, 348 stainless steel mechanical and physics properties were introduced in the TRANSURANUS code. The aim of this paper is to present the obtained results concerning the verification of the modified TRANSURANUS code version against data collected from the open literature, related to reactors which operated using stainless steel as cladding. Considering that some data were not available, some assumptions had to be made. Important differences related to the conventional fuel rods were taken into account. Obtained results regarding the cladding behavior are in agreement with available information. This constitutes an evidence of the modified TRANSURANUS code capabilities to perform fuel rod investigation of fuel rods manufactured using 348 stainless steel as cladding material.

  3. On the development of LWR fuel analysis code (1). Analysis of the FEMAXI code and proposal of a new model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemehov, Sergei; Suzuki, Motoe

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the review on the modeling features of FEMAXI code and proposal of a new theoretical equation model of clad creep on the basis of irradiation-induced microstructure change. It was pointed out that plutonium build-up in fuel matrix and non-uniform radial power profile at high burn-up affect significantly fuel behavior through the interconnected effects with such phenomena as clad irradiation-induced creep, fission gas release, fuel thermal conductivity degradation, rim porous band formation and associated fuel swelling. Therefore, these combined effects should be properly incorporated into the models of the FEMAXI code so that the code can carry out numerical analysis at the level of accuracy and elaboration that modern experimental data obtained in test reactors have. Also, the proposed new mechanistic clad creep model has a general formalism which allows the model to be flexibly applied for clad behavior analysis under normal operation conditions and power transients as well for Zr-based clad materials by the use of established out-of-pile mechanical properties. The model has been tested against experimental data, while further verification is needed with specific emphasis on power ramps and transients. (author)

  4. Liquid fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorii L. Soloveichik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of liquid fuel cells (LFCs over conventional hydrogen–oxygen fuel cells include a higher theoretical energy density and efficiency, a more convenient handling of the streams, and enhanced safety. This review focuses on the use of different types of organic fuels as an anode material for LFCs. An overview of the current state of the art and recent trends in the development of LFC and the challenges of their practical implementation are presented.

  5. Modeling fuel cell stack systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J H [Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lalk, T R [Dept. of Mech. Eng., Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1998-06-15

    A technique for modeling fuel cell stacks is presented along with the results from an investigation designed to test the validity of the technique. The technique was specifically designed so that models developed using it can be used to determine the fundamental thermal-physical behavior of a fuel cell stack for any operating and design configuration. Such models would be useful tools for investigating fuel cell power system parameters. The modeling technique can be applied to any type of fuel cell stack for which performance data is available for a laboratory scale single cell. Use of the technique is demonstrated by generating sample results for a model of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) stack consisting of 125 cells each with an active area of 150 cm{sup 2}. A PEMFC stack was also used in the verification investigation. This stack consisted of four cells, each with an active area of 50 cm{sup 2}. Results from the verification investigation indicate that models developed using the technique are capable of accurately predicting fuel cell stack performance. (orig.)

  6. Verification of Serpent code for the fuel analysis of a PBMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastida O, G. E.; Francois L, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the models and simulations with the Monte Carlo code Serpent are presented, as well as the obtained results of the different analyzed cases in order to verify the suitability or reliability of the use of this code to ensure favorable results in the realization of a neutronic analysis of fuel for a Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Comparisons were made with the results reported in a report by the OECD/Nea relative to a high temperature reactor of spheres bed with plutonium reactor grade as fuel. The results show that the use of Serpent is appropriate, as these results are comparable with those reported in the report. (Author)

  7. Validation of a new continuous Monte Carlo burnup code using a Mox fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El bakkari, B.; El Bardouni, T.; Merroun, O.; El Younoussi, C.; Boulaich, Y.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, E.

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity of nuclear fuel decreases with irradiation (or burnup) due to the transformation of heavy nuclides and the formation of fission products. Burnup credit studies aim at accounting for fuel irradiation in criticality studies of the nuclear fuel cycle (transport, storage, etc...). The principal objective of this study is to evaluate the potential capabilities of a newly developed burnup code called 'BUCAL1'. BUCAL1 differs in comparison with other burnup codes as it does not use the calculated neutron flux as input to other computer codes to generate the nuclide inventory for the next time step. Instead, BUCAL1 directly uses the neutron reaction tally information generated by MCNP for each nuclide of interest to determine the new nuclides inventory. This allows the full capabilities of MCNP to be incorporated into the calculation and a more accurate and robust analysis to be performed. Validation of BUCAL1 was processed by code-to-code comparisons using predictions of several codes from the NEA/OCED. Infinite multiplication factors (k ∞ ) and important fission product and actinide concentrations were compared for a MOX core benchmark exercise. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  8. Calibration of the enigma code for Finnish reactor fuel with support from experimental irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelppe, S; Ranta-Puska, K [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-08-01

    Assessment by VTT of the ENIGMA fuel performance code, the original version by Nuclear Electric plc of the UK amended by a set of WWER specific materials correlations, is described. The given examples of results include analyses for BWR 9 x 9 fuel, BWR fuel irradiated in the reinstrumented test of an international Riso project, pre-characterized commercial WWER fuel irradiated in Loviisa reactor in Finland, and instrumented WWER test fuel irradiations in the MR reactor in Russia. The effects of power uncertainty and some model parameters are discussed. Considering the fact that the described cases all mean prototypic application of the code, the results are well encouraging. The importance of the accuracy in temperature calculations is emphasized. (author). 2 refs, 12 figs, 1 tab.

  9. Validation of the ORIGEN-S code for predicting radionuclide inventories in used CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, J.C.; Gauld, I.; Kerr, A.H.

    1995-01-01

    The safety assessment being conducted by AECL Research for the concept of deep geological disposal of used CANDU UO 2 fuel requires the calculation of radionuclide inventories in the fuel to provide source terms for radionuclide release. This report discusses the validation of selected actinide and fission-product inventories calculated using the ORIGEN-S code coupled with the WIMS-AECL lattice code, using data from analytical measurements of radioisotope inventories in Pickering CANDU reactor fuel. The recent processing of new ENDF/B-VI cross-section data has allowed the ORIGEN-S calculations to be performed using the most up-to-date nuclear data available. The results indicate that the code is reliably predicting actinide and the majority of fission-product inventories to within the analytical uncertainty. ((orig.))

  10. Fuel economy and life-cycle cost analysis of a fuel cell hybrid vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kwi Seong; Oh, Byeong Soo

    The most promising vehicle engine that can overcome the problem of present internal combustion is the hydrogen fuel cell. Fuel cells are devices that change chemical energy directly into electrical energy without combustion. Pure fuel cell vehicles and fuel cell hybrid vehicles (i.e. a combination of fuel cell and battery) as energy sources are studied. Considerations of efficiency, fuel economy, and the characteristics of power output in hybridization of fuel cell vehicle are necessary. In the case of Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) cycle simulation, hybridization is more efficient than a pure fuel cell vehicle. The reason is that it is possible to capture regenerative braking energy and to operate the fuel cell system within a more efficient range by using battery. Life-cycle cost is largely affected by the fuel cell size, fuel cell cost, and hydrogen cost. When the cost of fuel cell is high, hybridization is profitable, but when the cost of fuel cell is less than 400 US$/kW, a pure fuel cell vehicle is more profitable.

  11. GSPEL - Fuel Cell Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fuel Cell Lab (FCL)Established to investigate, integrate, testand verifyperformance and technology readiness offuel cell systems and fuel reformers for use with...

  12. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-07-08

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  13. Asymptotic equivalence of Dancoff factors in cylindrical and square fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Leticia Jenisch; Leite, Sergio de Queiroz Bogado; Vilhena, Marco Tullio de

    2009-01-01

    In its classical formulation, the Dancoff factor for a perfectly absorbing fuel rod is defined as the relative reduction in the incurrent of resonance neutrons into the rod in the presence of neighboring rods, as compared to the incurrent into a single fuel rod immersed in an infinite moderator. Alternatively, this factor can be viewed as the probability that a neutron emerging from the surface of a fuel rod will enter another fuel rod without any collision in the moderator or cladding. For perfectly absorbing fuel these definitions are equivalent. In the last years, several works appeared in literature reporting improvements in the calculation of Dancoff factors, using both the classical and the collision probability definitions. So far, collision probabilities have been determined in the WIMS (Winfrith Improved Multi-group Scheme) code by numerical integration of the third order Bickley functions, for cells with both cylindrical and square outer boundaries. In this work, we step further reporting Dancoff factors for perfectly absorbing (Black) and partially absorbing (Grey) fuel rods calculated by the collision probability method, in cluster cells with square outer boundaries. In order to validate the results, comparisons are made with the equivalent cylindricalized cell in hypothetical test cases. The calculation is performed considering specularly reflecting boundary conditions for the square lattice and diffusive reflecting boundary conditions for the cylindrical geometry. The results show the expected asymptotic behavior of the solution with increasing cell sizes. (author)

  14. Introduction and preparation of the nuclear fuel cycle facility risk analysis code: STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasushi

    1990-09-01

    STAR code is a computer program, by which one can perform the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for the nuclear fuel cycle facility in both the normal and the accidental event of environmental radioactive material release. This code was originally developed by NUKEM GmbH in West Germany as a fruit of the PSE (Projekt Sicherheitsstudien Entsorgung) aiming at R and D of safety analysis methods for use in nuclear fuel cycle facilities such as reprocessing plants. In JAERI, efforts have been made to research and develop safety assessment methods applicable to the accidental situations assumed to happen in the reprocessing plants. In this line of objectives, the STAR code was introduced from NUKEM GmbH in 1986 and, since then, has been improved and prepared to add an ability to analyze public radiation exposure by released activities from the plants. At the first stage of this code preparation, the program conversion was made to adapt the STAR code, originally operative on IBM-compatible PC's and Hewlett Packard 7550A plotters, to NEC PC 9801RX and NEC PR 602R page printers installed in the Fuel Cycle Safety Assessment Laboratory of JAERI. This report describes calculational performances of the STAR code, results of the improvement and preparation works together with input/output data format in illustration of a sample HALW (High Activity Liquid Waste) tank PSA problem, thus making a users' manual for the STAR code. (author)

  15. STAT, GAPS, STRAIN, DRWDIM: a system of computer codes for analyzing HTGR fuel test element metrology data. User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurwein, J.J.

    1977-08-01

    A system of computer codes has been developed to statistically reduce Peach Bottom fuel test element metrology data and to compare the material strains and fuel rod-fuel hole gaps computed from these data with HTGR design code predictions. The codes included in this system are STAT, STRAIN, GAPS, and DRWDIM. STAT statistically evaluates test element metrology data yielding fuel rod, fuel body, and sleeve irradiation-induced strains; fuel rod anisotropy; and additional data characterizing each analyzed fuel element. STRAIN compares test element fuel rod and fuel body irradiation-induced strains computed from metrology data with the corresponding design code predictions. GAPS compares test element fuel rod, fuel hole heat transfer gaps computed from metrology data with the corresponding design code predictions. DRWDIM plots the measured and predicted gaps and strains. Although specifically developed to expedite the analysis of Peach Bottom fuel test elements, this system can be applied, without extensive modification, to the analysis of Fort St. Vrain or other HTGR-type fuel test elements.

  16. Hybrid Fuel Cell Technology Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None available

    2001-05-31

    For the purpose of this STI product and unless otherwise stated, hybrid fuel cell systems are power generation systems in which a high temperature fuel cell is combined with another power generating technology. The resulting system exhibits a synergism in which the combination performs with an efficiency far greater than can be provided by either system alone. Hybrid fuel cell designs under development include fuel cell with gas turbine, fuel cell with reciprocating (piston) engine, and designs that combine different fuel cell technologies. Hybrid systems have been extensively analyzed and studied over the past five years by the Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and others. These efforts have revealed that this combination is capable of providing remarkably high efficiencies. This attribute, combined with an inherent low level of pollutant emission, suggests that hybrid systems are likely to serve as the next generation of advanced power generation systems.

  17. What Happens Inside a Fuel Cell? Developing an Experimental Functional Map of Fuel Cell Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Brett, Daniel J. L.

    2010-08-20

    Fuel cell performance is determined by the complex interplay of mass transport, energy transfer and electrochemical processes. The convolution of these processes leads to spatial heterogeneity in the way that fuel cells perform, particularly due to reactant consumption, water management and the design of fluid-flow plates. It is therefore unlikely that any bulk measurement made on a fuel cell will accurately represent performance at all parts of the cell. The ability to make spatially resolved measurements in a fuel cell provides one of the most useful ways in which to monitor and optimise performance. This Minireview explores a range of in situ techniques being used to study fuel cells and describes the use of novel experimental techniques that the authors have used to develop an \\'experimental functional map\\' of fuel cell performance. These techniques include the mapping of current density, electrochemical impedance, electrolyte conductivity, contact resistance and CO poisoning distribution within working PEFCs, as well as mapping the flow of reactant in gas channels using laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). For the high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), temperature mapping, reference electrode placement and the use of Raman spectroscopy are described along with methods to map the microstructural features of electrodes. The combination of these techniques, applied across a range of fuel cell operating conditions, allows a unique picture of the internal workings of fuel cells to be obtained and have been used to validate both numerical and analytical models. © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH& Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Enhancing the ABAQUS Thermomechanics Code to Simulate Steady and Transient Fuel Rod Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, R.L.; Knoll, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    A powerful multidimensional fuels performance capability, applicable to both steady and transient fuel behavior, is developed based on enhancements to the commercially available ABAQUS general-purpose thermomechanics code. Enhanced capabilities are described, including: UO2 temperature and burnup dependent thermal properties, solid and gaseous fission product swelling, fuel densification, fission gas release, cladding thermal and irradiation creep, cladding irradiation growth, gap heat transfer, and gap/plenum gas behavior during irradiation. The various modeling capabilities are demonstrated using a 2D axisymmetric analysis of the upper section of a simplified multi-pellet fuel rod, during both steady and transient operation. Computational results demonstrate the importance of a multidimensional fully-coupled thermomechanics treatment. Interestingly, many of the inherent deficiencies in existing fuel performance codes (e.g., 1D thermomechanics, loose thermo-mechanical coupling, separate steady and transient analysis, cumbersome pre- and post-processing) are, in fact, ABAQUS strengths.

  19. A comparative study of fission gas behaviour in UO2 and MOX fuels using the meteor fuel performance code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struzik, C.; Garcia, Ph.; Noirot, L.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews some of the fission-gas-related differences observed between MOX MIMAS AUC fuels and homogeneous UO 2 fuels. Under steady-state conditions, the apparently higher fractional release in MOX fuels is interpreted with the METEOR fuel performance code as a consequence of their lower thermal conductivity and the higher linear heat rates to which MOX fuel rods are subjected. Although more fundamental diffusion properties are needed, the apparently greater swelling of MOX fuel rods at higher linear heat rates can be ascribed to enhanced diffusion properties. (authors)

  20. Power assisted fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, L P; Atwater, T B; Plichta, E J; Cygan, P J [US Army CECOM, Fort Monmouth, NJ (United States). Research Development and Engineering Center

    1998-02-01

    A hybrid fuel cell demonstrated pulse power capability at pulse power load simulations synonymous with electronics and communications equipment. The hybrid consisted of a 25.0 W Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) stack in parallel with a two-cell lead-acid battery. Performance of the hybrid PEMFC was superior to either the battery or fuel cell stack alone at the 18.0 W load. The hybrid delivered a flat discharge voltage profile of about 4.0 V over a 5 h radio continuous transmit mode of 18.0 W. (orig.)

  1. SRAC-95, Cell Calculation with Burnup, Fuel Management for Thermal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, K.; Ishiguro, Y.; Kaneko, K.; Ido, M.

    2004-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: General neutronics calculation including cell calculation with burn-up, core calculation for any type of thermal reactor. Core burn-up calculation and fuel management by an auxiliary code. 2 - Method of solution: Collision probability method, 1D and 2D Sn for cell calculation; 1D, 2D and 3D diffusion for core calculation. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: 20 regions for a continuous energy resonance absorption calculation and 16 steps for cell burn-up

  2. IAMBUS, a computer code for the design and performance prediction of fast breeder fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toebbe, H.

    1990-05-01

    IAMBUS is a computer code for the thermal and mechanical design, in-pile performance prediction and post-irradiation analysis of fast breeder fuel rods. The code deals with steady, non-steady and transient operating conditions and enables to predict in-pile behavior of fuel rods in power reactors as well as in experimental rigs. Great effort went into the development of a realistic account of non-steady fuel rod operating conditions. The main emphasis is placed on characterizing the mechanical interaction taking place between the cladding tube and the fuel as a result of contact pressure and friction forces, with due consideration of axial and radial crack configuration within the fuel as well as the gradual transition at the elastic/plastic interface in respect to fuel behavior. IAMBUS can be readily adapted to various fuel and cladding materials. The specific models and material correlations of the reference version deal with the actual in-pile behavior and physical properties of the KNK II and SNR 300 related fuel rod design, confirmed by comparison of the fuel performance model with post-irradiation data. The comparison comprises steady, non-steady and transient irradiation experiments within the German/Belgian fuel rod irradiation program. The code is further validated by comparison of model predictions with post-irradiation data of standard fuel and breeder rods of Phenix and PFR as well as selected LWR fuel rods in non-steady operating conditions

  3. The added value of international benchmarks for fuel performance codes: an illustration on the basis of TRANSURANUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Uffelen, P.; Schubert, A.; Gyeori, C.; Van De Laar, J.

    2009-01-01

    Safety authorities and fuel designers, as well as nuclear research centers rely heavily on fuel performance codes for predicting the behaviour and life-time of fuel rods. The simulation tools are developed and validated on the basis of experimental results, some of which is in the public domain such as the International Fuel Performance Experiments database of the OECD/NEA and IAEA. Publicly available data constitute an excellent basis for assessing codes themselves, but also to compare codes that are being developed by independent teams. The present report summarises the advantages for the TRANSURANUS code by taking part in previous benchmarks organised by the IAEA, and outlines the preliminary results along with the perspectives of our participation in the current coordinated research project FUMEXIII

  4. Modelling of WWER-440 fuel rod behaviour under operational conditions with the PIN-micro code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, S.; Vitkova, M.; Simeonova, V.; Passage, G.; Manolova, M.; Haralampieva, Z.; Scheglov, A.; Proselkov, V.

    1997-01-01

    The report summarizes the first practical experience obtained by fuel rod performance modelling at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The results of application of the PIN-micro code and the code modification PINB1 for thermomechanical analysis of WWER-440 fuel assemblies (FAs) are presented. The aim of this analysis is to study the fuel rod behaviour of the operating WWER reactors. The performance of two FAs with maximal linear power and varying geometrical and technological parameters is analyzed. On the basis of recent publications on WWER fuel performance modelling at extended burnup, a modified PINB1 version of the standard PIN-micro code is shortly described and applied for the selected FAs. Comparison of the calculated results is performed. The PINB1 version predicts higher fuel temperatures and more adequate FGR rate, accounting for the extended burnup. The results presented in this paper prove the existence of sufficient safety margins, for the fuel performance limiting parameters during the whole considered period of core operation. (author). 8 refs, 16 figs, 1 tab

  5. Modelling of WWER-440 fuel rod behaviour under operational conditions with the PIN-micro code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanova, S; Vitkova, M; Simeonova, V; Passage, G; Manolova, M [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Haralampieva, Z [National Electric Company Ltd., Kozloduy (Bulgaria); Scheglov, A; Proselkov, V [Institute of Nuclear Reactors, RSC Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-08-01

    The report summarizes the first practical experience obtained by fuel rod performance modelling at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The results of application of the PIN-micro code and the code modification PINB1 for thermomechanical analysis of WWER-440 fuel assemblies (FAs) are presented. The aim of this analysis is to study the fuel rod behaviour of the operating WWER reactors. The performance of two FAs with maximal linear power and varying geometrical and technological parameters is analyzed. On the basis of recent publications on WWER fuel performance modelling at extended burnup, a modified PINB1 version of the standard PIN-micro code is shortly described and applied for the selected FAs. Comparison of the calculated results is performed. The PINB1 version predicts higher fuel temperatures and more adequate FGR rate, accounting for the extended burnup. The results presented in this paper prove the existence of sufficient safety margins, for the fuel performance limiting parameters during the whole considered period of core operation. (author). 8 refs, 16 figs, 1 tab.

  6. PLACA/DPLACA: a code to simulate the behavior of a monolithic/dispersed plate type fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alicia; Soba, Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    The PLACA code was originally built to simulate monolithic plate fuels contained in a metallic cladding, with a gap in between. The international program of high density fuels was recently oriented to the development of a plate-type fuel of a uranium rich alloy with a molybdenum content between 6 to 10 w %, without gap and with a Zircaloy cladding. To give account of these fuels, the DPLACA code was elaborated as a modification of the original code. The extension of the calculation tool to disperse fuels involves a detailed study of the properties and models (still in progress). Of special interest is the material formed by U Mo particles dispersed in an Al matrix. This material has appeared as a candidate fuel for high flux research reactors. However, the interaction layer that grows around the particles has a deleterious effect on the material performance in operation conditions and may represent a limit for its applicability. A number of recent experiments carried out on this material provide abundant information that allows testing of the numerical models. (author)

  7. The next generation fuel cells: anion exchange membrane fuel cells (AEMFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauqir, A.; Zahoor, S.

    2013-01-01

    Many environmentally friendly alternatives (solar, wind, hydroelectric, and geothermal power) can only be used in particular environments. In contrast, fuel cells can have near-zero emissions, are quiet and efficient, and can work in any environment where the temperature is lower than the cell's operating temperature. Among various types of fuel cells, the AEMFC is the most recent one and has advantages such as excellent performance compared to other candidate fuel cells due to its active O/sub 2/ electrode kinetics and flexibility to use a wide range of electro-catalysts such as silver and nickels contrary to expensive one (Platinum) required for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Anion exchange membrane (AEM) is a crucial part in AEMFC, determining durability and electrochemical performances of membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The role of an AEM is to conduct hydroxyl ions from cathode to anode. If this conduction is not sufficiently high and selective, the corresponding fuel cell will not find any practical application. One of the major problems associated with AEMFC is much lower conductivities of anion compare to proton conductivity in PEMFCs, even upon similar working condition. Thus AEMs is only practical, if it is chemically and mechanically stable against severe basic operation conditions and highly hydroxyl ions conductive. The conventional AEMs based on animated aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon or even fluorinated polymers tend to be attacked by hydroxyl ions, causing the degradation during operation is strongly basic conditions. (author)

  8. Fuel economy and range estimates for fuel cell powered automobiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbugler, M.; Ogden, J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    While a number of automotive fuel cell applications have been demonstrated, including a golf cart, buses, and a van, these systems and others that have been proposed have utilized differing configurations ranging from direct hydrogen fuel cell-only power plants to fuel cell/battery hybrids operating on reformed methanol. To date there is no clear consensus on which configuration, from among the possible combinations of fuel cell, peaking device, and fuel type, is the most likely to be successfully commercialized. System simplicity favors direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, but infrastructure is lacking. Infrastructure favors a system using a liquid fuel with a fuel processor, but system integration and performance issues remain. A number of studies have analyzed particular configurations on either a system or vehicle scale. The objective of this work is to estimate, within a consistent framework, fuel economies and ranges for a variety of configurations using flexible models with the goal of identifying the most promising configurations and the most important areas for further research and development.

  9. FEMAXI-III: a computer code for the analysis of thermal and mechanical behavior of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Ichikawa, Michio; Iwano, Yoshihiko; Ito, Kenichi; Saito, Hiroaki; Kashima, Koichi; Kinoshita, Motoyasu; Okubo, Tadatsune.

    1985-12-01

    FEMAXI-III is a computer code to predict the thermal and mechanical behavior of a light water fuel rod during its irradiation life. It can analyze the integral behavior of a whole fuel rod throughout its life, as well as the localized behavior of a small part of fuel rod. The localized mechanical behavior such as the cladding ridge deformation is analyzed by the two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method. FEMAXI-III calculates, in particular, the temperature distribution, the radial deformation, the fission gas release, and the inner gas pressure as a function of irradiation time and axial position, and the stresses and strains in the fuel and cladding at a small part of fuel rod as a function of irradiation time. For this purpose, Elasto-plasticity, creep, thermal expansion, fuel cracking and crack healing, relocation, densification, swelling, hot pressing, heat generation distribution, fission gas release, and fuel-cladding mechanical interaction are modelled and their interconnected effects are considered in the code. Efforts have been made to improve the accuracy and stability of finite element solution and to minimize the computer memory and running time. This report describes the outline of the code and the basic models involved, and also includes the application of the code and its input manual. (author)

  10. 1986 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1986-10-01

    Ninety nine brief papers are arranged under the following session headings: gas industry's 40 kw program, solid oxide fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell technology, molten carbonate fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell systems, power plants technology, fuel cell power plant designs, unconventional fuels, fuel cell application and economic assessments, and plans for commerical development. The papers are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  11. Hydrogen and fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the hydrogen and fuel cells. It presents the hydrogen technology from the production to the distribution and storage, the issues as motor fuel and fuel cells, the challenge for vehicles applications and the Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  12. DELOCA, a code for simulation of CANDU fuel channel in thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalache, M.; Florea, Silviu; Ionescu, V.; Pavelescu, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In certain LOCA scenarios into the CANDU fuel channel, the ballooning of the pressure tube and the contact with the calandria tube can occur. After the contact moment, a radial heat transfer from cooling fluid to moderator arises through the contact area. If the temperature of channel walls increases, the contact area is drying, the heat transfer becomes inefficiently and the fuel channel could lose its integrity. DELOCA code was developed to simulate the mechanical behaviour of pressure tube during pre-contact transition, and mechanical and thermal behaviour of pressure tube and calandria tube after the contact between the two tubes. The code contains a few models: the creep of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy, the heat transfer by conduction through the cylindrical walls, channel failure criteria and calculus of heat transfer at the calandria tube - moderator interface. This code evaluates the contact and channel failure moments. This code was systematically verified by Contact1 and Cathena codes. This paper presents the results obtained at different temperature increasing rates. In addition, the contact moment for a RIH 5% postulated accident was calculated. The Cathena thermo-hydraulic code provided the input data. (authors)

  13. DELOCA, a code for simulation of CANDU fuel channel in thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalache, M.; Florea, Silviu; Ionescu, V.; Pavelescu, M.

    2005-01-01

    In certain LOCA scenarios into the CANDU fuel channel, the ballooning of the pressure tube and the contact with the calandria tube can occur. After the contact moment, a radial heat transfer from cooling fluid to moderator arises through the contact area. If the temperature of channel walls increases, the contact area is drying, the heat transfer becomes inefficiently and the fuel channel could lose its integrity. DELOCA code was developed to simulate the mechanical behaviour of pressure tube during pre-contact transition, and mechanical and thermal behaviour of pressure tube and calandria tube after the contact between the two tubes. The code contains a few models: the creep of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy, the heat transfer by conduction through the cylindrical walls, channel failure criteria and calculus of heat transfer at the calandria tube - moderator interface. This code evaluates the contact and channel failure moments. This code was systematically verified by Contact1 and Cathena codes. This paper presents the results obtained at different temperature increasing rates. In addition, the contact moment for a RIH 5% postulated accident was calculated. The Cathena thermo-hydraulic code provided the input data. (authors)

  14. Ansaldo programs on fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcenaro, B.G.; Federici, F. [Ansaldo Ricerche Srl, Genova (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    The growth in traffic and the importance of maintaining a stable ecology at the global scale, particularly with regard to atmospheric pollution, raises the necessity to realize a new generation of vehicles which are more efficient, more economical and compatible with the environment. At European level, the Car of Tomorrow task force has identified fuel cells as a promising alternative propulsion system. Ansaldo Ricerche has been involved in the development of fuel cell vehicles since the early nineties. Current ongoing programs relates to: (1) Fuel cell bus demonstrator (EQHEPP BUS) Test in 1996 (2) Fuel cell boat demonstrator (EQHHPP BOAT) Test in 1997 (3) Fuel cell passenger car prototype (FEVER) Test in 1997 (4) 2nd generation Fuel cell bus (FCBUS) 1996-1999 (5) 2nd generation Fuel cell passenger car (HYDRO-GEN) 1996-1999.

  15. COBRA-SFS [Spent Fuel Storage]: A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 2, User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rector, D.R.; Cuta, J.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1986-11-01

    COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations; however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume contains the input instructions for COBRA-SFS and an auxiliary radiation exchange factor code, RADX-1. It is intended to aid the user in becoming familiar with the capabilities and modeling conventions of the code

  16. 2009 Fuel Cell Market Report, November 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-11-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general.

  17. Orbiter fuel cell improvement assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.E.

    1981-08-01

    The history of fuel cells and the theory of fuel cells is given. Expressions for thermodynamic and electrical efficiencies are developed. The voltage losses due to electrode activation, ohmic resistance and ionic diffusion are discussed. Present limitations of the Orbiter Fuel Cell, as well as proposed enhancements, are given. These enhancements are then evaluated and recommendations are given for fuel cell enhancement both for short-range as well as long-range performance improvement. Estimates of reliability and cost savings are given for enhancements where possible

  18. Massachusetts Fuel Cell Bus Project: Demonstrating a Total Transit Solution for Fuel Cell Electric Buses in Boston

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-05-22

    The Federal Transit Administration's National Fuel Cell Bus Program focuses on developing commercially viable fuel cell bus technologies. Nuvera is leading the Massachusetts Fuel Cell Bus project to demonstrate a complete transit solution for fuel cell electric buses that includes one bus and an on-site hydrogen generation station for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA). A team consisting of ElDorado National, BAE Systems, and Ballard Power Systems built the fuel cell electric bus, and Nuvera is providing its PowerTap on-site hydrogen generator to provide fuel for the bus.

  19. Validation of the ORIGEN-S code for predicting radionuclide inventories in used CANDU Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, J.C.; Gauld, I.; Kerr, A.H.

    1994-10-01

    The safety assessment being conducted by AECL Research for the concept of deep geological disposal of used CANDU UO 2 fuel requires the calculation of radionuclide inventories in the fuel to provide source terms for radionuclide release. This report discusses the validation of selected actinide and fission-product inventories calculated using the ORIGEN-S code coupled with the WIMS-AECL lattice code, using data from analytical measurements of radioisotope inventories in Pickering CANDU reactor fuel. The recent processing of new ENDF/B-VI cross-section data has allowed the ORIGEN-S calculations to be performed using the most up-to-date nuclear data available. The results indicate that the code is reliably predicting actinide and the majority of fission-product inventories to within the analytical uncertainty. 38 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Fuel penetration of intersubassembly gaps in LMFBRs: a calculational method with the SIMMER-II code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVault, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    Early fuel removal from the active core of a liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) undergoing a core-disruptive accident may reduce the potential for large energetics resulting from recriticalities. A possible avenue for early fuel removal in heterogeneous core LMFBRs is the failure of duct walls in disrupted driver subassemblies followed by fuel penetration into the gaps between blanket subassemblies. The SIMMER-II code was modified to simulate flow between subassembly gaps. Calculations with the modified SIMMER-II code indicate the capabilities of the method and the potential for fuel mass reduction in the active core

  1. A comparison of sodium borohydride as a fuel for proton exchange membrane fuel cells and for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Jung-Ho

    Two types of fuel cell systems using NaBH 4 aqueous solution as a fuel are possible: the hydrogen/air proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) which uses onsite H 2 generated via the NaBH 4 hydrolysis reaction (B-PEMFC) at the anode and the direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) system which directly uses NaBH 4 aqueous solution at the anode and air at the cathode. Recently, research on these two types of fuel cells has begun to attract interest due to the various benefits of this liquid fuel for fuel cell systems for portable applications. It might therefore be relevant at this stage to evaluate the relative competitiveness of the two fuel cells. Considering their current technologies and the high price of NaBH 4, this paper evaluated and analyzed the factors influencing the relative favorability of each type of fuel cell. Their relative competitiveness was strongly dependent on the extent of the NaBH 4 crossover. When considering the crossover in DBFC systems, the total costs of the B-PEMFC system were the most competitive among the fuel cell systems. On the other hand, if the crossover problem were to be completely overcome, the total cost of the DBFC system generating six electrons (6e-DBFC) would be very similar to that of the B-PEMFC system. The DBFC system generating eight electrons (8e-DBFC) became even more competitive if the problem of crossover can be overcome. However, in this case, the volume of NaBH 4 aqueous solution consumed by the DBFC was larger than that consumed by the B-PEMFC.

  2. Safety, codes and standards for hydrogen installations. Metrics development and benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Aaron P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dedrick, Daniel E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); LaFleur, Angela Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); San Marchi, Christopher W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Automakers and fuel providers have made public commitments to commercialize light duty fuel cell electric vehicles and fueling infrastructure in select US regions beginning in 2014. The development, implementation, and advancement of meaningful codes and standards is critical to enable the effective deployment of clean and efficient fuel cell and hydrogen solutions in the energy technology marketplace. Metrics pertaining to the development and implementation of safety knowledge, codes, and standards are important to communicate progress and inform future R&D investments. This document describes the development and benchmarking of metrics specific to the development of hydrogen specific codes relevant for hydrogen refueling stations. These metrics will be most useful as the hydrogen fuel market transitions from pre-commercial to early-commercial phases. The target regions in California will serve as benchmarking case studies to quantify the success of past investments in research and development supporting safety codes and standards R&D.

  3. Third International Fuel Cell Conference. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-30

    The Third International Fuel Cell Conference was held on November 30 to December 3, 1999 in City of Nagoya. A total of 139 papers, including those for plenary, sectional and poster cessions, were presented. In the plenary session, US's DOE presented fuel cell power plant development in the United States, EC fuel cells in perspective and fifth European framework programme, and Japan overview of the New Sunshine Program. In the polymer electrolyte fuel cells sessions, 23 papers were presented, including current status of commercialization and PEMFC systems developed by Toshiba. In the phosphoric acid fuel cells session, 6 papers were presented, including field test results and market developments. In the molten carbonate fuel cells session, 24 papers were presented, including development of 1,000kW MCFC power plant. In the solid oxide fuel cells session, 20 papers were presented, including 100kW SOFC field test results. The other topics include market analysis and fuel processes. (NEDO)

  4. Third International Fuel Cell Conference. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-30

    The Third International Fuel Cell Conference was held on November 30 to December 3, 1999 in City of Nagoya. A total of 139 papers, including those for plenary, sectional and poster cessions, were presented. In the plenary session, US's DOE presented fuel cell power plant development in the United States, EC fuel cells in perspective and fifth European framework programme, and Japan overview of the New Sunshine Program. In the polymer electrolyte fuel cells sessions, 23 papers were presented, including current status of commercialization and PEMFC systems developed by Toshiba. In the phosphoric acid fuel cells session, 6 papers were presented, including field test results and market developments. In the molten carbonate fuel cells session, 24 papers were presented, including development of 1,000kW MCFC power plant. In the solid oxide fuel cells session, 20 papers were presented, including 100kW SOFC field test results. The other topics include market analysis and fuel processes. (NEDO)

  5. The birth of the fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prohaska, Don

    2001-12-01

    Everyone knows that Thomas Alva Edison invented the light bulb, Alexander Graham Bell the telephone and that the Otto and Diesel engines were invented by two Germans bearing those names. But who invented the fuel cell? Fuel cells generate electricity with virtually zero pollution by combining gaseous fuels and air. There are different types generally described as high temperature or low temperature fuel cells. Here, Don Prohaska delves into a recently published book: The Birth of the Fuel Cell, by a descendant of one of the fathers of the fuel cell, and sheds new light on the early days of this technology. (Author)

  6. Fuel cell water transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E.; Hedstrom, James C.

    1990-01-01

    The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

  7. Highly durable, coking and sulfur tolerant, fuel-flexible protonic ceramic fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Chuancheng; Kee, Robert J; Zhu, Huayang; Karakaya, Canan; Chen, Yachao; Ricote, Sandrine; Jarry, Angelique; Crumlin, Ethan J; Hook, David; Braun, Robert; Sullivan, Neal P; O'Hayre, Ryan

    2018-05-01

    Protonic ceramic fuel cells, like their higher-temperature solid-oxide fuel cell counterparts, can directly use both hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels to produce electricity at potentially more than 50 per cent efficiency 1,2 . Most previous direct-hydrocarbon fuel cell research has focused on solid-oxide fuel cells based on oxygen-ion-conducting electrolytes, but carbon deposition (coking) and sulfur poisoning typically occur when such fuel cells are directly operated on hydrocarbon- and/or sulfur-containing fuels, resulting in severe performance degradation over time 3-6 . Despite studies suggesting good performance and anti-coking resistance in hydrocarbon-fuelled protonic ceramic fuel cells 2,7,8 , there have been no systematic studies of long-term durability. Here we present results from long-term testing of protonic ceramic fuel cells using a total of 11 different fuels (hydrogen, methane, domestic natural gas (with and without hydrogen sulfide), propane, n-butane, i-butane, iso-octane, methanol, ethanol and ammonia) at temperatures between 500 and 600 degrees Celsius. Several cells have been tested for over 6,000 hours, and we demonstrate excellent performance and exceptional durability (less than 1.5 per cent degradation per 1,000 hours in most cases) across all fuels without any modifications in the cell composition or architecture. Large fluctuations in temperature are tolerated, and coking is not observed even after thousands of hours of continuous operation. Finally, sulfur, a notorious poison for both low-temperature and high-temperature fuel cells, does not seem to affect the performance of protonic ceramic fuel cells when supplied at levels consistent with commercial fuels. The fuel flexibility and long-term durability demonstrated by the protonic ceramic fuel cell devices highlight the promise of this technology and its potential for commercial application.

  8. Novel materials for fuel cells operating on liquid fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. C. Sequeira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Towards commercialization of fuel cell products in the coming years, the fuel cell systems are being redefined by means of lowering costs of basic elements, such as electrolytes and membranes, electrode and catalyst materials, as well as of increasing power density and long-term stability. Among different kinds of fuel cells, low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs are of major importance, but their problems related to hydrogen storage and distribution are forcing the development of liquid fuels such as methanol, ethanol, sodium borohydride and ammonia. In respect to hydrogen, methanol is cheaper, easier to handle, transport and store, and has a high theoretical energy density. The second most studied liquid fuel is ethanol, but it is necessary to note that the highest theoretically energy conversion efficiency should be reached in a cell operating on sodium borohydride alkaline solution. It is clear that proper solutions need to be developed, by using novel catalysts, namely nanostructured single phase and composite materials, oxidant enrichment technologies and catalytic activity increasing. In this paper these main directions will be considered.

  9. 14 CFR 31.45 - Fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel cells. 31.45 Section 31.45 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.45 Fuel cells. If fuel cells are used, the fuel cells, their attachments, and related supporting structure must be shown by tests to be capable of...

  10. FARST: A computer code for the evaluation of FBR fuel rod behavior under steady-state/transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, M.; Sakagami, M.

    1984-01-01

    FARST, a computer code for the evaluation of fuel rod thermal and mechanical behavior under steady-state/transient conditions has been developed. The code characteristics are summarized as follows: (I) FARST evaluates the fuel rod behavior under the transient conditions. The code analyzes thermal and mechanical phenomena within a fuel rod, taking into account the temperature change in coolant surrounding the fuel rod. (II) Permanent strains such as plastic, creep and swelling strains as well as thermoelastic deformations can be analyzed by using the strain increment method. (III) Axial force and contact pressure which act on the fuel stack and cladding are analyzed based on the stick/slip conditions. (IV) FARST used a pellet swelling model which depends on the contact pressure between pellet and cladding, and an empirical pellet relocation model, designated as 'jump relocation model'. The code was successfully applied to analyses of the fuel rod irradiation data from pulse reactor for nuclear safety research in Cadarache (CABRI) and pulse reactor for nuclear safety research in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (NSRR). The code was further applied to stress analysis of a 1000 MW class large FBR plant fuel rod during transient conditions. The steady-state model which was used so far gave the conservative results for cladding stress during overpower transient, but underestimated the results for cladding stress during a rapid temperature decrease of coolant. (orig.)

  11. Status and promise of fuel cell technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M.C. [National Energy Technology Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Energy

    2001-09-01

    The niche or early entry market penetration by ONSI and its phosphoric acid fuel cell technology has proven that fuel cells are reliable and suitable for premium power and other opportunity fuel niche market applications. Now, new fuel cell technologies - solid oxide fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and polymer electrolyte fuel cells - are being developed for near-term distributed generation shortly after 2003. Some of the evolving fuel cell systems are incorporating gas turbines in hybrid configurations. The combination of the gas turbine with the fuel cell promises to lower system costs and increase efficiency to enhance market penetration. Market estimates indicate that significant early entry markets exist to sustain the initially high cost of some distributed generation technologies. However, distributed generation technologies must have low introductory first cost, low installation cost, and high system reliability to be viable options in competitive commercial and industrial markets. In the long-term, solid state fuel cell technology with stack costs under $100/kilowatt (kW) promises deeper and wider market penetration in a range of applications including a residential, auxillary power, and the mature distributed generation markets. The solid state energy conversion alliance (SECA) with its vision for fuel cells in 2010 was recently formed to commercialize solid state fuel cells and realize the full potential of the fuel cell technology. Ultimately, the SECA concept could lead to megawatt-size fuel-cell systems for commercial and industrial applications and Vision 21 fuel cell turbine hybrid energy plants in 2015. (orig.)

  12. COMTA - a computer code for fuel mechanical and thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, S.; Sawhney, S.S.; Anand, A.K.; Anantharaman, K.; Mehta, S.K.

    1979-01-01

    COMTA is a generalized computer code for integrity analysis of the free standing fuel cladding, with natural UO 2 or mixed oxide fuel pellets. Thermal and Mechanical analysis is done simultaneously for any power history of the fuel pin. For analysis, the fuel cladding is assumed to be axisymmetric and is subjected to axisymmetric load due to contact pressure, gas pressure, coolant pressure and thermal loads. Axial variation of load is neglected and creep and plasticity are assumed to occur at constant volume. The pellet is assumed to be made of concentric annuli. The fission gas release integral is dependent on the temperature and the power produced in each annulus. To calculate the temperature distribution in the fuel pin, the variation of bulk coolant temperature is given as an input to the code. Gap conductance is calculated at every time step, considering fuel densification, fuel relocation and gap closure, filler gas dilution by released fission gas, gap closure by expansion and irradiation swelling. Overall gap conductance is contributed by heat transfer due to the three modes; conduction convection and radiation as per modified Ross and Stoute model. Equilibrium equations, compatibility equations, stress strain relationships (including thermal strains and permanent strains due to creep and plasticity) are used to obtain triaxial stresses and strains. Thermal strain is assumed to be zero at hot zero power conditions. The boundary conditions are obtained for radial stresses at outside and inside surfaces by making these equal to coolant pressure and internal pressure respectively. A multi-mechanism creep model which accounts for thermal and irradiation creep is used to calculate the overall creep rate. Effective plastic strain is a function of effective stress and material constants. (orig.)

  13. Criticality calculations of a generic fuel container for fuel assemblies PWR, by means of the code MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas E, S.; Esquivel E, J.; Ramirez S, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the concept of burned consideration (Burn-up credit) is determining the capacity of the calculation codes, as well as of the nuclear data associates to predict the isotopic composition and the corresponding neutrons effective multiplication factor in a generic container of spent fuel during some time of relevant storage. The present work has as objective determining this capacity of the calculation code MCNP in the prediction of the neutrons effective multiplication factor for a fuel assemblies arrangement type PWR inside a container of generic storage. The calculations are divided in two parts, the first, in the decay calculations with specified nuclide concentrations by the reference for a pressure water reactor (PWR) with enriched fuel to 4.5% and a discharge burned of 50 GW d/Mtu. The second, in criticality calculations with isotopic compositions dependent of the time for actinides and important fission products, taking 30 time steps, for two actinide groups and fission products. (Author)

  14. Numerical Tests for the Problem of U-Pu Fuel Burnup in Fuel Rod and Polycell Models Using the MCNP Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratov, V. G.; Lopatkin, A. V.

    An important aspect in the verification of the engineering techniques used in the safety analysis of MOX-fuelled reactors, is the preparation of test calculations to determine nuclide composition variations under irradiation and analysis of burnup problem errors resulting from various factors, such as, for instance, the effect of nuclear data uncertainties on nuclide concentration calculations. So far, no universally recognized tests have been devised. A calculation technique has been developed for solving the problem using the up-to-date calculation tools and the latest versions of nuclear libraries. Initially, in 1997, a code was drawn up in an effort under ISTC Project No. 116 to calculate the burnup in one VVER-1000 fuel rod, using the MCNP Code. Later on, the authors developed a computation technique which allows calculating fuel burnup in models of a fuel rod, or a fuel assembly, or the whole reactor. It became possible to apply it to fuel burnup in all types of nuclear reactors and subcritical blankets.

  15. Fuel cells fuelled by Saccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechner, P.; Mor, L.; Sabag, N.; Rubin, Z.; Bubis, E.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text:Saccharides, like glucose, fructose and lactose, are ideal renewable fuels. They have high energy content, are safe, transportable, easy to store, non-flammable, non poisonous, non-volatile, odorless, easy to produce anywhere and abundant. Fuel Cells are electro-chemical devices capable to convert chemical energy into electrical energy from fuels, with theoretical efficiencies higher than 0.8 at room temperatures and with low pollutant emissions. Fuel Cells that can produce electricity form saccharides will be able to replace batteries, power electrical plants from biomass wastes, and serve as engines for transportation. In spite of these advantages, saccharide fuelled fuel cells are no available yet. Two obstacles hinder the feasibility of this potentially revolutionary device. The first is the high stability of the saccharides, which requires a good catalyst to extract the electrons from the saccharide fuel. The second is related to the nature of the Fuel Cells: the physical process takes place at the interface surface between the fuel and the electrode. In order to obtain high densities, materials with high surface to volume ratio are needed. Efforts to overcome these obstacles will be described. The use of saccharides as a fuel was treated from the thermodynamic point of view and compared with other common fuels currently used in fuel cells. We summarize measurements performed in a membrane less Alkaline Fuel Cell, using glucose as a fuel and KOH as electrolyte. The anode has incorporated platinum particles and operated at room temperature. Measurements were done, at different concentrations of glucose, of the Open Circuit Voltage, Polarization Curves and Power Density as function of the Current Density. The maximum Power Density reached was 0.61 mW/cm 2 when the Current density was 2.13 mA/cm 2 and the measured Open Circuit Voltage was 0.771 V

  16. Solid electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, H. S.

    Progress in the development of functioning solid electrolyte fuel cells is summarized. The solid electrolyte cells perform at 1000 C, a temperature elevated enough to indicate high efficiencies are available, especially if the cell is combined with a steam generator/turbine system. The system is noted to be sulfur tolerant, so coal containing significant amounts of sulfur is expected to yield satisfactory performances with low parasitic losses for gasification and purification. Solid oxide systems are electrically reversible, and are usable in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes. Employing zirconium and yttrium in the electrolyte provides component stability with time, a feature not present with other fuel cells. The chemical reactions producing the cell current are reviewed, along with materials choices for the cathodes, anodes, and interconnections.

  17. Fuel choices for fuel-cell vehicles : well-to-wheel energy and emission impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, M.

    2002-01-01

    Because of their high energy efficiencies and low emissions, fuel-cell vehicles (FCVs) are undergoing extensive research and development. While hydrogen will likely be the ultimate fuel to power fuel-cell vehicles, because of current infrastructure constraints, hydrogen-carrying fuels are being investigated as transitional fuel-cell fuels. A complete well-to-wheels (WTW) evaluation of fuel-cell vehicle energy and emission effects that examines (1) energy feedstock recovery and transportation; (2) fuel production, transportation, and distribution; and (3) vehicle operation must be conducted to assist decision makers in selecting the fuel-cell fuels that achieve the greatest energy and emission benefits. A fuel-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--called the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model--was used to evaluate well-to-wheels energy and emission impacts of various fuel-cell fuels. The results show that different fuel-cell fuels can have significantly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects. Therefore, if fuel-cell vehicles are to achieve the envisioned energy and emission reduction benefits, pathways for producing the fuels that power them must be carefully examined.

  18. Prediction of the local power factor in BWR fuel cells by means of a multilayer neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Perusquia C, R.; Francois, J.L.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2007-01-01

    To the beginning of a new operation cycle in a BWR reactor the reactivity of this it increases by means of the introduction of fresh fuel, the one denominated reload fuel. The problem of the definition of the characteristics of this reload fuel represents a combinatory optimization problem that requires significantly a great quantity of CPU time for their determination. This situation has motivated to study the possibility to substitute the Helios code, the one which is used to generate the new cells of the reload fuel parameters, by an artificial neuronal network, with the purpose of predicting the parameters of the fuel reload cell of a BWR reactor. In this work the results of the one training of a multilayer neuronal net that can predict the local power factor (LPPF) in such fuel cells are presented. The prediction of the LPPF is carried out in those condition of beginning of the life of the cell (0.0 MWD/T, to 40% of holes in the one moderator, temperature of 793 K in the fuel and a moderator temperature of 560 K. The cells considered in the present study consist of an arrangement of 10x10 bars, of those which 92 contains U 235 , some of these bars also contain a concentration of Gd 2 O 3 and 8 of them contain only water. The axial location inside the one assembles of recharge of these cells it is exactly up of the cells that contain natural uranium in the base of the reactor core. The training of the neuronal net is carried out by means of a retro-propagation algorithm that uses a space of training formed starting from previous evaluations of cells by means of the Helios code. They are also presented the results of the application of the neuronal net found for the prediction of the LPPF of some cells used in the real operation of the Unit One of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power station. (Author)

  19. Development and application of Siton, a new fuel cycle simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brolly, Aron; Szieberth, Mate; Halasz, Mate; Nagy, Lajos; Feher, Sandor

    2015-01-01

    As the result of the co-operation between the Centre for Energy Research (EK) and the Institute of Nuclear Techniques (NTI) a new fuel cycle simulation code called SITON was developed. Physical model of the code takes into account six facilities of the nuclear fuel cycle namely material stocks, spent fuel interim storages, plants for uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel reprocessing and reactors. Facilities can be linked in a flexible manner and their number is not limited. Lag time of the facilities and cooling time of the spent fuel, which are the two main parameters to introduce lag time into the fuel cycle, are taken into account. Material transfer between the facilities is modelled in a discrete manner tracking 52 nuclides and their short-lived decay daughters. Composition of the discharged fuel is determined by means of burn-up tables except for the 2400 MWth design of gas cooled fast reactor (GFR2400) which has a separate burn-up module developed at the NTI. To demonstrate the capabilities of SITON introduction of a GFR2400 into the Hungarian reactor park using the legacy spent fuel of the four presently operating VVER-440 units was simulated. 2040 was assumed as the commissioning date of the GFR2400 and recycling of its fuel was started as soon as possible. It was found that the plutonium content of the legacy spent fuel is sufficient to the start-up of only one GFR2400. There is an intermediate period between the commissioning of the reactor and the recycling of its first discharged fuel. Plutonium need of this period can be covered by the legacy spent fuel if the cooling time of the spent GFR2400 fuel is 2 years. If the cooling time is 5 years there will be a lack of plutonium in this period. To counterbalance this lack an EPR was started before the GFR2400 and its spent fuel was accumulated and reprocessed. Cooling time of the spent EPR fuel was also varied. Finally, an EPR only scenario is presented using two EPRs as a reference case

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of biofuels as fuels for high temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Jarosław; Bujalski, Wojciech; Lewandowski, Janusz

    2013-02-01

    Based on mathematical modeling and numerical simulations, applicativity of various biofuels on high temperature fuel cell performance are presented. Governing equations of high temperature fuel cell modeling are given. Adequate simulators of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) have been done and described. Performance of these fuel cells with different biofuels is shown. Some characteristics are given and described. Advantages and disadvantages of various biofuels from the system performance point of view are pointed out. An analysis of various biofuels as potential fuels for SOFC and MCFC is presented. The results are compared with both methane and hydrogen as the reference fuels. The biofuels are characterized by both lower efficiency and lower fuel utilization factors compared with methane. The presented results are based on a 0D mathematical model in the design point calculation. The governing equations of the model are also presented. Technical and financial analysis of high temperature fuel cells (SOFC and MCFC) are shown. High temperature fuel cells can be fed by biofuels like: biogas, bioethanol, and biomethanol. Operational costs and possible incomes of those installation types were estimated and analyzed. A comparison against classic power generation units is shown. A basic indicator net present value (NPV) for projects was estimated and commented.

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of biofuels as fuels for high temperature fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milewski Jarosław

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on mathematical modeling and numerical simulations, applicativity of various biofuels on high temperature fuel cell performance are presented. Governing equations of high temperature fuel cell modeling are given. Adequate simulators of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC have been done and described. Performance of these fuel cells with different biofuels is shown. Some characteristics are given and described. Advantages and disadvantages of various biofuels from the system performance point of view are pointed out. An analysis of various biofuels as potential fuels for SOFC and MCFC is presented. The results are compared with both methane and hydrogen as the reference fuels. The biofuels are characterized by both lower efficiency and lower fuel utilization factors compared with methane. The presented results are based on a 0D mathematical model in the design point calculation. The governing equations of the model are also presented. Technical and financial analysis of high temperature fuel cells (SOFC and MCFC are shown. High temperature fuel cells can be fed by biofuels like: biogas, bioethanol, and biomethanol. Operational costs and possible incomes of those installation types were estimated and analyzed. A comparison against classic power generation units is shown. A basic indicator net present value (NPV for projects was estimated and commented.

  2. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  3. Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2008-10-21

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: How Do Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    vehicles. Hydrogen car image Key Components of a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Car Battery (auxiliary): In an Using Hydrogen? Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Work Using Hydrogen? to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: How Do Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Work Using Hydrogen? on Facebook Tweet about

  5. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  6. Arrangement of fuel cell system for TNRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, Takehiro; Yasuda, Ryo; Iikura, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takuro; Matsubayashi, Masahito; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Hayashida, Hirotoshi

    2012-02-01

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cells (fuel cells) can be potentially employed as sources of clean energy because they discharge only water as by-products. Fuel cells generate electricity with supply of oxygen and hydrogen gases. However, the water produced by the fuel cells blocks the gas supply, thereby degrading their performances. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of the water produced by the fuel cells in order to facilitate their development. Neutron radiography is a useful tool for visualizing the distribution of water in fuel cells. We have designed fuel cell operation system for TNRF (Thermal Neutron Radiography Facility) at JRR-3. The fuel cell operation system consists of various components such as gas flow and humidification systems, hydrogen-diluting system, purge system, and safety system for hydrogen gas. We tested this system using a Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI) standard cell. The system performed stably and efficiently. In addition, neutron radiography tests were carried out to visualize the water distribution. The water produced by the fuel cell was observed during the fuel cell operation. (author)

  7. Fuel Production from Seawater and Fuel Cells Using Seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo

    2017-11-23

    Seawater is the most abundant resource on our planet and fuel production from seawater has the notable advantage that it would not compete with growing demands for pure water. This Review focuses on the production of fuels from seawater and their direct use in fuel cells. Electrolysis of seawater under appropriate conditions affords hydrogen and dioxygen with 100 % faradaic efficiency without oxidation of chloride. Photoelectrocatalytic production of hydrogen from seawater provides a promising way to produce hydrogen with low cost and high efficiency. Microbial solar cells (MSCs) that use biofilms produced in seawater can generate electricity from sunlight without additional fuel because the products of photosynthesis can be utilized as electrode reactants, whereas the electrode products can be utilized as photosynthetic reactants. Another important source for hydrogen is hydrogen sulfide, which is abundantly found in Black Sea deep water. Hydrogen produced by electrolysis of Black Sea deep water can also be used in hydrogen fuel cells. Production of a fuel and its direct use in a fuel cell has been made possible for the first time by a combination of photocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide from seawater and dioxygen in the air and its direct use in one-compartment hydrogen peroxide fuel cells to obtain electric power. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Fuel cells principles, design, and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Revankar, Shripad T

    2014-01-01

    ""This book covers all essential themes of fuel cells ranging from fundamentals to applications. It includes key advanced topics important for understanding correctly the underlying multi-science phenomena of fuel cell processes. The book does not only cope with traditional fuel cells but also discusses the future concepts of fuel cells. The book is rich on examples and solutions important for applying the theory into practical use.""-Peter Lund, Aalto University, Helsinki""A good introduction to the range of disciplines needed to design, build and test fuel cells.""-Nigel Brandon, Imperial Co

  9. Methanol fuel processor and PEM fuel cell modeling for mobile application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrenko, Daniela [ISAT, University of Burgundy, Rue Mlle Bourgoise, 58000 Nevers (France); Gao, Fei; Blunier, Benjamin; Bouquain, David; Miraoui, Abdellatif [Transport and Systems Laboratory (SeT) - EA 3317/UTBM, Fuel cell Laboratory (FCLAB), University of Technology of Belfort-Montbeliard, Rue Thierry Mieg 90010, Belfort Cedex (France)

    2010-07-15

    The use of hydrocarbon fed fuel cell systems including a fuel processor can be an entry market for this emerging technology avoiding the problem of hydrogen infrastructure. This article presents a 1 kW low temperature PEM fuel cell system with fuel processor, the system is fueled by a mixture of methanol and water that is converted into hydrogen rich gas using a steam reformer. A complete system model including a fluidic fuel processor model containing evaporation, steam reformer, hydrogen filter, combustion, as well as a multi-domain fuel cell model is introduced. Experiments are performed with an IDATECH FCS1200 trademark fuel cell system. The results of modeling and experimentation show good results, namely with regard to fuel cell current and voltage as well as hydrogen production and pressure. The system is auto sufficient and shows an efficiency of 25.12%. The presented work is a step towards a complete system model, needed to develop a well adapted system control assuring optimized system efficiency. (author)

  10. Fuel cells: Project Volta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vellone, R.; Di Mario, F.

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses research and development in the field of fuel cell power plants. Reference is made to the Italian research Project Volta. Problems related to research program financing and fuel cell power plant marketing are discussed.

  11. Fuel handling machine and auxiliary systems for a fuel handling cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suikki, M.

    2013-10-01

    This working report is an update for as well as a supplement to an earlier fuel handling machine design (Kukkola and Roennqvist 2006). A focus in the earlier design proposal was primarily on the selection of a mechanical structure and operating principle for the fuel handling machine. This report introduces not only a fuel handling machine design but also auxiliary fuel handling cell equipment and its operation. An objective of the design work was to verify the operating principles of and space allocations for fuel handling cell equipment. The fuel handling machine is a remote controlled apparatus capable of handling intensely radiating fuel assemblies in the fuel handling cell of an encapsulation plant. The fuel handling cell is air tight space radiation-shielded with massive concrete walls. The fuel handling machine is based on a bridge crane capable of traveling in the handling cell along wall tracks. The bridge crane has its carriage provided with a carousel type turntable having mounted thereon both fixed and telescopic masts. The fixed mast has a gripper movable on linear guides for the transfer of fuel assemblies. The telescopic mast has a manipulator arm capable of maneuvering equipment present in the fuel handling cell, as well as conducting necessary maintenance and cleaning operations or rectifying possible fault conditions. The auxiliary fuel handling cell systems consist of several subsystems. The subsystems include a service manipulator, a tool carrier for manipulators, a material hatch, assisting winches, a vacuum cleaner, as well as a hose reel. With the exception of the vacuum cleaner, the devices included in the fuel handling cell's auxiliary system are only used when the actual encapsulation process is not ongoing. The malfunctions of mechanisms or actuators responsible for the motion actions of a fuel handling machine preclude in a worst case scenario the bringing of the fuel handling cell and related systems to a condition appropriate for

  12. Fuel handling machine and auxiliary systems for a fuel handling cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suikki, M. [Optimik Oy, Turku (Finland)

    2013-10-15

    This working report is an update for as well as a supplement to an earlier fuel handling machine design (Kukkola and Roennqvist 2006). A focus in the earlier design proposal was primarily on the selection of a mechanical structure and operating principle for the fuel handling machine. This report introduces not only a fuel handling machine design but also auxiliary fuel handling cell equipment and its operation. An objective of the design work was to verify the operating principles of and space allocations for fuel handling cell equipment. The fuel handling machine is a remote controlled apparatus capable of handling intensely radiating fuel assemblies in the fuel handling cell of an encapsulation plant. The fuel handling cell is air tight space radiation-shielded with massive concrete walls. The fuel handling machine is based on a bridge crane capable of traveling in the handling cell along wall tracks. The bridge crane has its carriage provided with a carousel type turntable having mounted thereon both fixed and telescopic masts. The fixed mast has a gripper movable on linear guides for the transfer of fuel assemblies. The telescopic mast has a manipulator arm capable of maneuvering equipment present in the fuel handling cell, as well as conducting necessary maintenance and cleaning operations or rectifying possible fault conditions. The auxiliary fuel handling cell systems consist of several subsystems. The subsystems include a service manipulator, a tool carrier for manipulators, a material hatch, assisting winches, a vacuum cleaner, as well as a hose reel. With the exception of the vacuum cleaner, the devices included in the fuel handling cell's auxiliary system are only used when the actual encapsulation process is not ongoing. The malfunctions of mechanisms or actuators responsible for the motion actions of a fuel handling machine preclude in a worst case scenario the bringing of the fuel handling cell and related systems to a condition appropriate for

  13. Development of a coded aperture fuel motion diagnostics system for the ACPR (UPGRADE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.G.; Stalker, K.T.

    1979-01-01

    As part of Sandia Laboratories' program to study simulated core disruptive accidents in reactor safety research, a fuel motion detection system based on coded aperture imaging is being developed for the Annular Core Pulsed Reactor (ACPR). Although fuel motion has been observed at the TREAT by the fast neutron hodoscope and with a Vidicon pinhole camera technique, the coded aperture system offers a potential for lower cost, higher spatial resolution, three dimensional imaging, and higher frame rates at lower fluences than either of the other techniques

  14. Strategies for fuel cell product development. Developing fuel cell products in the technology supply chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the high cost of research and development and the broad spectrum of knowledge and competences required to develop fuel cell products, many product-developing firms outsource fuel cell technology, either partly or completely. This article addresses the inter-firm process of fuel cell product development from an Industrial Design Engineering perspective. The fuel cell product development can currently be characterised by a high degree of economic and technical uncertainty. Regarding the technology uncertainty: product-developing firms are more often then not unfamiliar with fuel cell technology technology. Yet there is a high interface complexity between the technology supplied and the product in which it is to be incorporated. In this paper the information exchange in three current fuel cell product development projects is analysed to determine the information required by a product designer to develop a fuel cell product. Technology transfer literature suggests that transfer effectiveness is greatest when the type of technology (technology uncertainty) and the type of relationship between the technology supplier and the recipient are carefully matched. In this line of thinking this paper proposes that the information required by a designer, determined by the design strategy and product/system volume, should be met by an appropriate level of communication interactivity with a technology specialist. (author)

  15. Fuel Cell/Electrochemical Cell Voltage Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a new fuel cell individual-cell-voltage monitor that can be directly connected to a multi-cell fuel cell stack for direct substack power provisioning. It can also provide voltage isolation for applications in high-voltage fuel cell stacks. The technology consists of basic modules, each with an 8- to 16-cell input electrical measurement connection port. For each basic module, a power input connection would be provided for direct connection to a sub-stack of fuel cells in series within the larger stack. This power connection would allow for module power to be available in the range of 9-15 volts DC. The relatively low voltage differences that the module would encounter from the input electrical measurement connection port, coupled with the fact that the module's operating power is supplied by the same substack voltage input (and so will be at similar voltage), provides for elimination of high-commonmode voltage issues within each module. Within each module, there would be options for analog-to-digital conversion and data transfer schemes. Each module would also include a data-output/communication port. Each of these ports would be required to be either non-electrical (e.g., optically isolated) or electrically isolated. This is necessary to account for the fact that the plurality of modules attached to the stack will normally be at a range of voltages approaching the full range of the fuel cell stack operating voltages. A communications/ data bus could interface with the several basic modules. Options have been identified for command inputs from the spacecraft vehicle controller, and for output-status/data feeds to the vehicle.

  16. Analysis of fission gas release in LWR fuel using the BISON code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Pastore; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; D.M. Perez; B.W. Spencer; R.L. Williamson

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in the development of the finite-element based, multidimensional fuel performance code BISON of Idaho National Laboratory are presented. Specifically, the development, implementation and testing of a new model for the analysis of fission gas behavior in LWR-UO2 fuel during irradiation are summarized. While retaining a physics-based description of the relevant mechanisms, the model is characterized by a level of complexity suitable for application to engineering-scale nuclear fuel analysis and consistent with the uncertainties pertaining to some parameters. The treatment includes the fundamental features of fission gas behavior, among which are gas diffusion and precipitation in fuel grains, growth and coalescence of gas bubbles at grain faces, grain growth and grain boundary sweeping effects, thermal, athermal, and transient gas release. The BISON code incorporating the new model is applied to the simulation of irradiation experiments from the OECD/NEA International Fuel Performance Experiments database, also included in the IAEA coordinated research projects FUMEX-II and FUMEX-III. The comparison of the results with the available experimental data at moderate burn-up is presented, pointing out an encouraging predictive accuracy, without any fitting applied to the model parameters.

  17. Catalysis in high-temperature fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föger, K; Ahmed, K

    2005-02-17

    Catalysis plays a critical role in solid oxide fuel cell systems. The electrochemical reactions within the cell--oxygen dissociation on the cathode and electrochemical fuel combustion on the anode--are catalytic reactions. The fuels used in high-temperature fuel cells, for example, natural gas, propane, or liquid hydrocarbons, need to be preprocessed to a form suitable for conversion on the anode-sulfur removal and pre-reforming. The unconverted fuel (economic fuel utilization around 85%) is commonly combusted using a catalytic burner. Ceramic Fuel Cells Ltd. has developed anodes that in addition to having electrochemical activity also are reactive for internal steam reforming of methane. This can simplify fuel preprocessing, but its main advantage is thermal management of the fuel cell stack by endothermic heat removal. Using this approach, the objective of fuel preprocessing is to produce a methane-rich fuel stream but with all higher hydrocarbons removed. Sulfur removal can be achieved by absorption or hydro-desulfurization (HDS). Depending on the system configuration, hydrogen is also required for start-up and shutdown. Reactor operating parameters are strongly tied to fuel cell operational regimes, thus often limiting optimization of the catalytic reactors. In this paper we discuss operation of an authothermal reforming reactor for hydrogen generation for HDS and start-up/shutdown, and development of a pre-reformer for converting propane to a methane-rich fuel stream.

  18. KUGEL: a thermal, hydraulic, fuel performance, and gaseous fission product release code for pebble bed reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamasundar, B.I.; Fehrenbach, M.E.

    1981-05-01

    The KUGEL computer code is designed to perform thermal/hydraulic analysis and coated-fuel particle performance calculations for axisymmetric pebble bed reactor (PBR) cores. This computer code was developed as part of a Department of Energy (DOE)-funded study designed to verify the published core performance data on PBRs. The KUGEL code is designed to interface directly with the 2DB code, a two-dimensional neutron diffusion code, to obtain distributions of thermal power, fission rate, fuel burnup, and fast neutron fluence, which are needed for thermal/hydraulic and fuel performance calculations. The code is variably dimensioned so that problem size can be easily varied. An interpolation routine allows variable mesh size to be used between the 2DB output and the two-dimensional thermal/hydraulic calculations

  19. V.S.O.P. (99/09) computer code system for reactor physics and fuel cycle simulation. Version 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetten, H.J.; Haas, K.A.; Brockmann, H.; Ohlig, U.; Pohl, C.; Scherer, W.

    2010-07-15

    V.S.O.P. (99/ 09) represents the further development of V.S.O.P. (99/ 05). Compared to its precursor, the code system has been improved again in many details. The main motivation for this new code version was to update the basic nuclear libraries used by the code system. Thus, all cross section libraries involved in the code have now been based on ENDF/B-VII. V.S.O.P. is a computer code system for the comprehensive numerical simulation of the physics of thermal reactors. It implies the setup of the reactor and of the fuel element, processing of cross sections, neutron spectrum evaluation, neutron diffusion calculation in two or three dimensions, fuel burnup, fuel shuffling, reactor control, thermal hydraulics and fuel cycle costs. The thermal hydraulics part (steady state and time-dependent) is restricted to gas-cooled reactors and to two spatial dimensions. The code can simulate the reactor operation from the initial core towards the equilibrium core. This latest code version was developed and tested under the WINDOWS-XP - operating system. (orig.)

  20. V.S.O.P. (99/09) computer code system for reactor physics and fuel cycle simulation. Version 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruetten, H.J.; Haas, K.A.; Brockmann, H.; Ohlig, U.; Pohl, C.; Scherer, W.

    2010-07-01

    V.S.O.P. (99/ 09) represents the further development of V.S.O.P. (99/ 05). Compared to its precursor, the code system has been improved again in many details. The main motivation for this new code version was to update the basic nuclear libraries used by the code system. Thus, all cross section libraries involved in the code have now been based on ENDF/B-VII. V.S.O.P. is a computer code system for the comprehensive numerical simulation of the physics of thermal reactors. It implies the setup of the reactor and of the fuel element, processing of cross sections, neutron spectrum evaluation, neutron diffusion calculation in two or three dimensions, fuel burnup, fuel shuffling, reactor control, thermal hydraulics and fuel cycle costs. The thermal hydraulics part (steady state and time-dependent) is restricted to gas-cooled reactors and to two spatial dimensions. The code can simulate the reactor operation from the initial core towards the equilibrium core. This latest code version was developed and tested under the WINDOWS-XP - operating system. (orig.)

  1. Development of simulation code for FBR spent fuel dissolution with rotary drum type continuous dissolver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Yuichi; Katsurai, Kiyomichi; Washiya, Tadahiro; Koizumi, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been studying rotary drum type continuous dissolver for FBR spent fuel dissolution. For estimating the fuel dissolution behavior under several operational conditions in this dissolver, we have been developing the simulation code, PLUM, which mainly consists of 3 modules for calculating chemical reaction, mass transfer and thermal balance in the rotary drum type continuous dissolver. Under the various conditions where dissolution experiments were carried out with the batch-wise dissolver for FBR spent fuel and with the rotary drum type continuous dissolver for UO 2 fuel, it was confirmed that the fuel dissolution behaviors calculated by the PLUM code showed good agreement with the experimental ones. Based on this result, the condition for obtaining the dissolver solution with high HM (heavy metal : U and Pu) concentration (∼500g/L), which is required for the next step, i.e. crystallization process, was also analyzed by this code and appropriate operational conditions with the rotary drum type continuous dissolver, such as feedrate, concentration and temperature of nitric acid, could be clarified. (author)

  2. Fuel starvation. Irreversible degradation mechanisms in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Carmen M.; Silva, R.A.; Travassos, M.A.; Paiva, T.I.; Fernandes, V.R. [LNEG, National Laboratory for Energy and Geology, Lisboa (Portugal). UPCH Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Unit

    2010-07-01

    PEM fuel cell operates under very aggressive conditions in both anode and cathode. Failure modes and mechanism in PEM fuel cells include those related to thermal, chemical or mechanical issues that may constrain stability, power and lifetime. In this work, the case of fuel starvation is examined. The anode potential may rise to levels compatible with the oxidization of water. If water is not available, oxidation of the carbon support will accelerate catalyst sintering. Diagnostics methods used for in-situ and ex-situ analysis of PEM fuel cells are selected in order to better categorize irreversible changes of the cell. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is found instrumental in the identification of fuel cell flooding conditions and membrane dehydration associated to mass transport limitations / reactant starvation and protonic conductivity decrease, respectively. Furthermore, it indicates that water electrolysis might happen at the anode. Cross sections of the membrane catalyst and gas diffusion layers examined by scanning electron microscopy indicate electrode thickness reduction as a result of reactions taking place during hydrogen starvation. Catalyst particles are found to migrate outwards and located on carbon backings. Membrane degradation in fuel cell environment is analyzed in terms of the mechanism for fluoride release which is considered an early predictor of membrane degradation. (orig.)

  3. Light water reactor fuel analysis code. FEMAXI-6 (Ver.1). Detailed structure and user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Saitou, Hiroaki

    2006-02-01

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-6 is an advanced version which has been produced by integrating the former version FEMAXI-V with numerous functional improvements and extensions. In particular, the FEMAXI-6 code has attained a complete coupled solution of thermal analysis and mechanical analysis, enabling an accurate prediction of pellet-clad gap size and PCMI in high burnup fuel rods. Also, such new models have been implemented as pellet-clad bonding and fission gas bubble swelling, and linkage function with detailed burning analysis code has been enhanced. Furthermore, a number of new materials properties and parameters have been introduced. With these advancements, the FEMAXI-6 code has been upgraded to a versatile analytical tool for high burnup fuel behavior not only in the normal operation but also in anticipated transient conditions. This report describes in detail the design, basic theory and structure, models and numerical method, improvements and extensions, and method of model modification. In order to facilitate effective and wide-ranging application of the code, formats and methods of input/output of the code are also described, and a sample output in an actual form is included. (author)

  4. Enhancing the ABAQUS thermomechanics code to simulate multipellet steady and transient LWR fuel rod behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The ABAQUS thermomechanics code is enhanced to enable simulation of nuclear fuel behavior. → Comparisons are made between discrete and smeared fuel pellet analysis. → Multidimensional and multipellet analysis is important for accurate prediction of PCMI. → Fully coupled thermomechanics results in very smooth prediction of fuel-clad gap closure. → A smeared-pellet approximation results in significant underprediction of clad radial displacements and plastic strain. - Abstract: A powerful multidimensional fuels performance analysis capability, applicable to both steady and transient fuel behavior, is developed based on enhancements to the commercially available ABAQUS general-purpose thermomechanics code. Enhanced capabilities are described, including: UO 2 temperature and burnup dependent thermal properties, solid and gaseous fission product swelling, fuel densification, fission gas release, cladding thermal and irradiation creep, cladding irradiation growth, gap heat transfer, and gap/plenum gas behavior during irradiation. This new capability is demonstrated using a 2D axisymmetric analysis of the upper section of a simplified multipellet fuel rod, during both steady and transient operation. Comparisons are made between discrete and smeared-pellet simulations. Computational results demonstrate the importance of a multidimensional, multipellet, fully-coupled thermomechanical approach. Interestingly, many of the inherent deficiencies in existing fuel performance codes (e.g., 1D thermomechanics, loose thermomechanical coupling, separate steady and transient analysis, cumbersome pre- and post-processing) are, in fact, ABAQUS strengths.

  5. A novel direct carbon fuel cell by approach of tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Renzhu; Zhao, Chunhua; Li, Junliang; Zeng, Fanrong; Wang, Shaorong; Wen, Tinglian; Wen, Zhaoyin [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Inorganic Energy Materials and Power Source Engineering Center, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS), 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2010-01-15

    A direct carbon fuel cell based on a conventional anode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cell, which consisted of a NiO-YSZ anode support tube, a NiO-ScSZ anode functional layer, a ScSZ electrolyte film, and a LSM-ScSZ cathode, has been successfully achieved. It used the carbon black as fuel and oxygen as the oxidant, and a preliminary examination of the DCFC has been carried out. The cell generated an acceptable performance with the maximum power densities of 104, 75, and 47 mW cm{sup -2} at 850, 800, and 750 C, respectively. These results demonstrate the feasibility for carbon directly converting to electricity in tubular solid oxide fuel cells. (author)

  6. Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Belard

    2006-09-21

    Verizon is presently operating the largest Distributed Generation Fuel Cell project in the USA. Situated in Long Island, NY, the power plant is composed of seven (7) fuel cells operating in parallel with the Utility grid from the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA). Each fuel cell has an output of 200 kW, for a total of 1.4 mW generated from the on-site plant. The remaining power to meet the facility demand is purchased from LIPA. The fuel cell plant is utilized as a co-generation system. A by-product of the fuel cell electric generation process is high temperature water. The heat content of this water is recovered from the fuel cells and used to drive two absorption chillers in the summer and a steam generator in the winter. Cost savings from the operations of the fuel cells are forecasted to be in excess of $250,000 per year. Annual NOx emissions reductions are equivalent to removing 1020 motor vehicles from roadways. Further, approximately 5.45 million metric tons (5 millions tons) of CO2 per year will not be generated as a result of this clean power generation. The project was partially financed with grants from the New York State Energy R&D Authority (NYSERDA) and from Federal Government Departments of Defense and Energy.

  7. Use of a commercial heat transfer code to predict horizontally oriented spent fuel rod temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Koski, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Radioactive spent fuel assemblies are a source of hazardous waste that will have to be dealt with in the near future. It is anticipated that the spent fuel assemblies will be transported to disposal sites in spent fuel transportation casks. In order to design a reliable and safe transportation cask, the maximum cladding temperature of the spent fuel rod arrays must be calculated. The maximum rod temperature is a limiting factor in the amount of spent fuel that can be loaded in a transportation cask. The scope of this work is to demonstrate that reasonable and conservative spent fuel rod temperature predictions can be made using commercially available thermal analysis codes. The demonstration is accomplished by a comparison between numerical temperature predictions, with a commercially available thermal analysis code, and experimental temperature data for electrical rod heaters simulating a horizontally oriented spent fuel rod bundle

  8. Assessment of the Effects on PCT Evaluation of Enhanced Fuel Model Facilitated by Coupling the MARS Code with the FRAPTRAN Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyong Chol; Lee, Young Jin; Han, Sam Hee [NSE Technology Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The principal objectives of the two safety criteria, peak cladding temperature (PCT) and total oxidation limits, are to ensure that the fuel rod claddings remain sufficiently ductile so that they do not crack and fragment during a LOCA. Another important purpose of the PCT limit is to ensure that the fuel cladding does not enter the regime of runaway oxidation and uncontrollable heat-up. However, even when the PCT limit is satisfied, it is known that cladding failures may still occur in a certain percentage of the fuel rods during a LOCA. This is largely because a 100% fuel failure is assumed for the radiological consequence analysis in the US regulatory practices. In this study, we analyze the effects of cladding failure and other fuel model features on PCT during a LOCA using the MARS-FRAPTRAN coupled code. MARS code has been coupled with FRAPTRAN code to extend fuel modeling capability. The coupling allows feedback of FRAPTRAN results in real time. Because of the significant impact of fuel models on key safety parameters such as PCT, detailed and accurate fuel models should be employed when evaluating PCT in LOCA analysis. It is noteworthy that the ECCS evaluation models laid out in the Appendix K to 10CFR50 require a provision for predicting cladding swelling and rupture and require to assume that the inside of the cladding react with steam after the rupture. The metal-water reaction energy can have significantly large effect on the reflood PCT, especially when fuel failure occurs. Effects of applying an advanced fuel model on the PCT evaluation can be clearly seen when comparing the MARS and the FRAPTRAN results in both the one-way calculation and the feedback calculation. As long as MARS and FRAPTRAN are used respectively in the ranges where they have been validated, the coupled calculation results are expected to be valid and to reveal various aspects of phenomena which have not been discovered in previous uncoupled calculations by MARS or FRAPTRAN.

  9. Portable power applications of fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, M.; Matcham, J.

    2002-07-01

    This report describes the state-of-the-art of fuel cell technology for portable power applications. The study involved a comprehensive literature review. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have attracted much more interest than either direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) or solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). However, issues relating to fuel choice and catalyst design remain with PEMFCs; DMFCs have excellent potential provided issues relating to the conducting membrane can be resolved but the current high temperature of operation and low power density currently makes SOFCs less applicable to portable applications. Available products are listed and the obstacles to market penetration are discussed. The main barriers are cost and the size/weight of fuel cells compared with batteries. Another key problem is the lack of a suitable fuel infrastructure.

  10. Interconnection of bundled solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael; Bessette, II, Norman F; Litka, Anthony F; Schmidt, Douglas S

    2014-01-14

    A system and method for electrically interconnecting a plurality of fuel cells to provide dense packing of the fuel cells. Each one of the plurality of fuel cells has a plurality of discrete electrical connection points along an outer surface. Electrical connections are made directly between the discrete electrical connection points of adjacent fuel cells so that the fuel cells can be packed more densely. Fuel cells have at least one outer electrode and at least one discrete interconnection to an inner electrode, wherein the outer electrode is one of a cathode and and anode and wherein the inner electrode is the other of the cathode and the anode. In tubular solid oxide fuel cells the discrete electrical connection points are spaced along the length of the fuel cell.

  11. Carbon-based Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven S. C. Chuang

    2005-08-31

    The direct use of coal in the solid oxide fuel cell to generate electricity is an innovative concept for power generation. The C-fuel cell (carbon-based fuel cell) could offer significant advantages: (1) minimization of NOx emissions due to its operating temperature range of 700-1000 C, (2) high overall efficiency because of the direct conversion of coal to CO{sub 2}, and (3) the production of a nearly pure CO{sub 2} exhaust stream for the direct CO{sub 2} sequestration. The objective of this project is to determine the technical feasibility of using a highly active anode catalyst in a solid oxide fuel for the direct electrochemical oxidation of coal to produce electricity. Results of this study showed that the electric power generation from Ohio No 5 coal (Lower Kittanning) Seam, Mahoning County, is higher than those of coal gas and pure methane on a solid oxide fuel cell assembly with a promoted metal anode catalyst at 950 C. Further study is needed to test the long term activity, selectivity, and stability of anode catalysts.

  12. Computer code SICHTA-85/MOD 1 for thermohydraulic and mechanical modelling of WWER fuel channel behaviour during LOCA and comparison with original version of the SICHTA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujan, A.; Adamik, V.; Misak, J.

    1986-01-01

    A brief description is presented of the expansion of the SICHTA-83 computer code for the analysis of the thermal history of the fuel channel for large LOCAs by modelling the mechanical behaviour of fuel element cladding. The new version of the code has a more detailed treatment of heat transfer in the fuel-cladding gap because it also respects the mechanical (plastic) deformations of the cladding and the fuel-cladding interaction (magnitude of contact pressure). Also respected is the change in pressure of the gas filling of the fuel element, the mechanical criterion is considered of a failure of the cladding and the degree is considered of the blockage of the through-flow cross section for coolant flow in the fuel channel. The LOCA WWER-440 model computation provides a comparison of the new SICHTA-85/MOD 1 code with the results of the original 83 version of SICHTA. (author)

  13. Fuel cell report to congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2003-02-28

    This report describes the status of fuel cells for Congressional committees. It focuses on the technical and economic barriers to the use of fuel cells in transportation, portable power, stationary, and distributed power generation applications, and describes the need for public-private cooperative programs to demonstrate the use of fuel cells in commercial-scale applications by 2012. (Department of Energy, February 2003).

  14. The TMI regenerable solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Thomas L.

    1995-04-01

    Energy storage and production in space requires rugged, reliable hardware which minimizes weight, volume, and maintenance while maximizing power output and usable energy storage. These systems generally consist of photovoltaic solar arrays which operate during sunlight cycles to provide system power and regenerate fuel (hydrogen) via water electrolysis; during dark cycles, hydrogen is converted by the fuel cell into system. The currently preferred configuration uses two separate systems (fuel cell and electrolyzer) in conjunction with photovoltaic cells. Fuel cell/electrolyzer system simplicity, reliability, and power-to-weight and power-to-volume ratios could be greatly improved if both power production (fuel cell) and power storage (electrolysis) functions can be integrated into a single unit. The Technology Management, Inc. (TMI), solid oxide fuel cell-based system offers the opportunity to both integrate fuel cell and electrolyzer functions into one unit and potentially simplify system requirements. Based an the TMI solid oxide fuel cell (SOPC) technology, the TMI integrated fuel cell/electrolyzer utilizes innovative gas storage and operational concepts and operates like a rechargeable 'hydrogen-oxygen battery'. Preliminary research has been completed on improved H2/H2O electrode (SOFC anode/electrolyzer cathode) materials for solid oxide, regenerative fuel cells. Improved H2/H2O electrode materials showed improved cell performance in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes in reversible cell tests. ln reversible fuel cell/electrolyzer mode, regenerative fuel cell efficiencies (ratio of power out (fuel cell mode) to power in (electrolyzer model)) improved from 50 percent (using conventional electrode materials) to over 80 percent. The new materials will allow the TMI SOFC system to operate as both the electrolyzer and fuel cell in a single unit. Preliminary system designs have also been developed which indicate the technical feasibility of using the TMI SOFC

  15. The DACC system. Code burnup of cell for projection of the fuel elements in the power net work PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepraga, D.; Boeriu, St.; Gheorghiu, E.; Cristian, I.; Patrulescu, I.; Cimporescu, D.; Ciuvica, P.; Velciu, E.

    1975-01-01

    The calculation system DACC-5 is a zero-dimensional reactor physics code used to calculate the criticality and burn-up of light-water reactors. The code requires as input essential extensive reactor parameters (fuel rod radius, water density, etc.). The nuclear constants (intensive parameters) are calculated with a five-group model (2 thermal and 3 fast groups). A fitting procedure is systematically employed to reduce the computation time of the code. Zero-dimensional burn-up calculations are made in an automatic way. Part one of the paper contains the code physical model and computer structure. Part two of the paper will contain tests of DACC-5 credibility for different light-water power lattices

  16. Assessment of MARMOT. A Mesoscale Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, M. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Y. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, X. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fromm, B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yu, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Teague, M. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andersson, D. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    MARMOT is the mesoscale fuel performance code under development as part of the US DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Program. In this report, we provide a high level summary of MARMOT, its capabilities, and its current state of validation. The purpose of MARMOT is to predict the coevolution of microstructure and material properties of nuclear fuel and cladding. It accomplished this using the phase field method coupled to solid mechanics and heat conduction. MARMOT is based on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE), and much of its basic capability in the areas of the phase field method, mechanics, and heat conduction come directly from MOOSE modules. However, additional capability specific to fuel and cladding is available in MARMOT. While some validation of MARMOT has been completed in the areas of fission gas behavior and grain growth, much more validation needs to be conducted. However, new mesoscale data needs to be obtained in order to complete this validation.

  17. The GC computer code for flow sheet simulation of pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.

    1996-01-01

    The GC computer code has been developed for flow sheet simulation of pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel. It utilizes a robust algorithm SLG for analyzing simultaneous chemical reactions between species distributed across many phases. Models have been developed for analysis of the oxide fuel reduction process, salt recovery by electrochemical decomposition of lithium oxide, uranium separation from the reduced fuel by electrorefining, and extraction of fission products into liquid cadmium. The versatility of GC is demonstrated by applying the code to a flow sheet of current interest

  18. Uranium oxide fuel cycle analysis in VVER-1000 with VISTA simulation code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirekhtiary, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Abbasi, Akbar

    2018-02-01

    The VVER-1000 Nuclear power plant generates about 20-25 tons of spent fuel per year. In this research, the fuel transmutation of Uranium Oxide (UOX) fuel was calculated by using of nuclear fuel cycle simulation system (VISTA) code. In this simulation, we evaluated the back end components fuel cycle. The back end component calculations are Spent Fuel (SF), Actinide Inventory (AI) and Fission Product (FP) radioisotopes. The SF, AI and FP values were obtained 23.792178 ton/y, 22.811139 ton/y, 0.981039 ton/y, respectively. The obtained value of spent fuel, major actinide, and minor actinide and fission products were 23.8 ton/year, 22.795 ton/year, 0.024 ton/year and 0.981 ton/year, respectively.

  19. BWROPT: A multi-cycle BWR fuel cycle optimization code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottinger, Keith E.; Maldonado, G. Ivan, E-mail: Ivan.Maldonado@utk.edu

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A multi-cycle BWR fuel cycle optimization algorithm is presented. • New fuel inventory and core loading pattern determination. • The parallel simulated annealing algorithm was used for the optimization. • Variable sampling probabilities were compared to constant sampling probabilities. - Abstract: A new computer code for performing BWR in-core and out-of-core fuel cycle optimization for multiple cycles simultaneously has been developed. Parallel simulated annealing (PSA) is used to optimize the new fuel inventory and placement of new and reload fuel for each cycle considered. Several algorithm improvements were implemented and evaluated. The most significant of these are variable sampling probabilities and sampling new fuel types from an ordered array. A heuristic control rod pattern (CRP) search algorithm was also implemented, which is useful for single CRP determinations, however, this feature requires significant computational resources and is currently not practical for use in a full multi-cycle optimization. The PSA algorithm was demonstrated to be capable of significant objective function reduction and finding candidate loading patterns without constraint violations. The use of variable sampling probabilities was shown to reduce runtime while producing better results compared to using constant sampling probabilities. Sampling new fuel types from an ordered array was shown to have a mixed effect compared to random new fuel type sampling, whereby using both random and ordered sampling produced better results but required longer runtimes.

  20. Optimization of fuel cells for BWR using Path Re linking and flexible strategies of solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo M, J. A.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Torres V, M.; Perusquia del Cueto, R.

    2009-10-01

    In this work are presented the obtained preliminary results to design nuclear fuel cells for boiling water reactors (BWR) using new strategies. To carry out the cells design some of the used rules in the fuel administration were discarded and other were implemented. The above-mentioned with the idea of making a comparative analysis between the used rules and those implemented here, under the hypothesis that it can be possible to design nuclear fuel cells without using all the used rules and executing the security restrictions that are imposed in these cases. To evaluate the quality of the obtained cells it was taken into account the power pick factor and the infinite multiplication factor, in the same sense, to evaluate the proposed configurations and to obtain the mentioned parameters was used the CASMO-4 code. To optimize the design it is uses the combinatorial optimization technique named Path Re linking and the Dispersed Search as local search method. The preliminary results show that it is possible to implement new strategies for the cells design of nuclear fuel following new rules. (Author)

  1. Advances in fuel cell vehicle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Jennifer

    Factors such as global warming, dwindling fossil fuel reserves, and energy security concerns combine to indicate that a replacement for the internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle is needed. Fuel cell vehicles have the potential to address the problems surrounding the ICE vehicle without imposing any significant restrictions on vehicle performance, driving range, or refuelling time. Though there are currently some obstacles to overcome before attaining the widespread commercialization of fuel cell vehicles, such as improvements in fuel cell and battery durability, development of a hydrogen infrastructure, and reduction of high costs, the fundamental concept of the fuel cell vehicle is strong: it is efficient, emits zero harmful emissions, and the hydrogen fuel can be produced from various renewable sources. Therefore, research on fuel cell vehicle design is imperative in order to improve vehicle performance and durability, increase efficiency, and reduce costs. This thesis makes a number of key contributions to the advancement of fuel cell vehicle design within two main research areas: powertrain design and DC/DC converters. With regards to powertrain design, this research first analyzes various powertrain topologies and energy storage system types. Then, a novel fuel cell-battery-ultracapacitor topology is presented which shows reduced mass and cost, and increased efficiency, over other promising topologies found in the literature. A detailed vehicle simulator is created in MATLAB/Simulink in order to simulate and compare the novel topology with other fuel cell vehicle powertrain options. A parametric study is performed to optimize each powertrain and general conclusions for optimal topologies, as well as component types and sizes, for fuel cell vehicles are presented. Next, an analytical method to optimize the novel battery-ultracapacitor energy storage system based on maximizing efficiency, and minimizing cost and mass, is developed. This method can be applied

  2. Cornell Fuel Cell Institute: Materials Discovery to Enable Fuel Cell Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abruna, H.D.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2012-06-29

    The discovery and understanding of new, improved materials to advance fuel cell technology are the objectives of the Cornell Fuel Cell Institute (CFCI) research program. CFCI was initially formed in 2003. This report highlights the accomplishments from 2006-2009. Many of the grand challenges in energy science and technology are based on the need for materials with greatly improved or even revolutionary properties and performance. This is certainly true for fuel cells, which have the promise of being highly efficient in the conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy. Fuel cells offer the possibility of efficiencies perhaps up to 90 % based on the free energy of reaction. Here, the challenges are clearly in the materials used to construct the heart of the fuel cell: the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The MEA consists of two electrodes separated by an ionically conducting membrane. Each electrode is a nanocomposite of electronically conducting catalyst support, ionic conductor and open porosity, that together form three percolation networks that must connect to each catalyst nanoparticle; otherwise the catalyst is inactive. This report highlights the findings of the three years completing the CFCI funding, and incudes developments in materials for electrocatalyts, catalyst supports, materials with structured and functional porosity for electrodes, and novel electrolyte membranes. The report also discusses developments at understanding electrocatalytic mechanisms, especially on novel catalyst surfaces, plus in situ characterization techniques and contributions from theory. Much of the research of the CFCI continues within the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2), a DOE funded, Office of Science Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC).

  3. National fuel cell bus program : proterra fuel cell hybrid bus report, Columbia demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the experience and early results from a fuel cell bus demonstration funded by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) under the National Fuel Cell Bus Program. A team led by the Center for Transportation and the Environment an...

  4. SCANAIR a transient fuel performance code Part two: Assessment of modelling capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgenthum, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.georgenthum@irsn.fr; Moal, Alain; Marchand, Olivier

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The SCANAIR code is devoted to the study of irradiated fuel rod behaviour during RIA. • The paper deals with the status of the code validation for PWR rods. • During the PCMI stage there is a good agreement between calculations and experiments. • The boiling crisis occurrence is rather well predicted. • The code assessment during the boiling crisis has still to be improved. - Abstract: In the frame of their research programmes on fuel safety, the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire develops the SCANAIR code devoted to the study of irradiated fuel rod behaviour during reactivity initiated accident. A first paper was focused on detailed modellings and code description. This second paper deals with the status of the code validation for pressurised water reactor rods performed thanks to the available experimental results. About 60 integral tests carried out in CABRI and NSRR experimental reactors and 24 separated tests performed in the PATRICIA facility (devoted to the thermal-hydraulics study) have been recalculated and compared to experimental data. During the first stage of the transient, the pellet clad mechanical interaction phase, there is a good agreement between calculations and experiments: the clad residual elongation and hoop strain of non failed tests but also the failure occurrence and failure enthalpy of failed tests are correctly calculated. After this first stage, the increase of cladding temperature can lead to the Departure from Nucleate Boiling. During the film boiling regime, the clad temperature can reach a very high temperature (>700 °C). If the boiling crisis occurrence is rather well predicted, the calculation of the clad temperature and the clad hoop strain during this stage have still to be improved.

  5. Fuel rod modelling during transients: The TOUTATIS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentejac, F.; Bourreau, S.; Brochard, J.; Hourdequin, N.; Lansiart, S.

    2001-01-01

    The TOUTATIS code is devoted to the PCI local phenomena simulation, in correlation with the METEOR code for the global behaviour of the fuel rod. More specifically, the TOUTATIS objective is to evaluate the mechanical constraints on the cladding during a power transient thus predicting its behaviour in term of stress corrosion cracking. Based upon the finite element computation code CASTEM 2000, TOUTATIS is a set of modules written in a macro language. The aim of this paper is to present both code modules: The axisymmetric bi-dimensional module, modeling a unique block pellet; The tri dimensional module modeling a radially fragmented pellet. Having shown the boundary conditions and the algorithms used, the application will be illustrated by: A short presentation of the bidimensional axisymmetric modeling performances as well as its limits; The enhancement due to the three dimensional modeling will be displayed by sensitivity studies to the geometry, in this case the pellet height/diameter ratio. Finally, we will show the easiness of the development inherent to the CASTEM 2000 system by depicting the process of a modeling enhancement by adding the possibility of an axial (horizontal) fissuration of the pellet. As conclusion, the future improvements planned for the code are depicted. (author)

  6. The TMI Regenerative Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Thomas L.; Ruhl, Robert C.; Petrik, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Energy storage and production in space requires rugged, reliable hardware which minimizes weight, volume, and maintenance while maximizing power output and usable energy storage. Systems generally consist of photovoltaic solar arrays which operate (during sunlight cycles) to provide system power and regenerate fuel (hydrogen) via water electrolysis and (during dark cycles) fuel cells convert hydrogen into electricity. Common configurations use two separate systems (fuel cell and electrolyzer) in conjunction with photovoltaic cells. Reliability, power to weight and power to volume ratios could be greatly improved if both power production (fuel cells) and power storage (electrolysis) functions can be integrated into a single unit. The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) based design integrates fuel cell and electrolyzer functions and potentially simplifies system requirements. The integrated fuel cell/electrolyzer design also utilizes innovative gas storage concepts and operates like a rechargeable 'hydrogen-oxygen battery'. Preliminary research has been completed on improved H2/H20 electrode (SOFC anode/electrolyzer cathode) materials for regenerative fuel cells. Tests have shown improved cell performance in both fuel and electrolysis modes in reversible fuel cell tests. Regenerative fuel cell efficiencies, ratio of power out (fuel cell mode) to power in (electrolyzer mode), improved from 50 percent using conventional electrode materials to over 80 percent. The new materials will allow a single SOFC system to operate as both the electolyzer and fuel cell. Preliminary system designs have also been developed to show the technical feasibility of using the design for space applications requiring high energy storage efficiencies and high specific energy. Small space systems also have potential for dual-use, terrestrial applications.

  7. FRAPCON-3: A computer code for the calculation of steady-state, thermal-mechanical behavior of oxide fuel rods for high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berna, G.A.; Beyer, G.A.; Davis, K.L.; Lanning, D.D.

    1997-12-01

    FRAPCON-3 is a FORTRAN IV computer code that calculates the steady-state response of light water reactor fuel rods during long-term burnup. The code calculates the temperature, pressure, and deformation of a fuel rod as functions of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. The phenomena modeled by the code include (1) heat conduction through the fuel and cladding, (2) cladding elastic and plastic deformation, (3) fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, (4) fission gas release, (5) fuel rod internal gas pressure, (6) heat transfer between fuel and cladding, (7) cladding oxidation, and (8) heat transfer from cladding to coolant. The code contains necessary material properties, water properties, and heat-transfer correlations. The codes' integral predictions of mechanical behavior have not been assessed against a data base, e.g., cladding strain or failure data. Therefore, it is recommended that the code not be used for analyses of cladding stress or strain. FRAPCON-3 is programmed for use on both mainframe computers and UNIX-based workstations such as DEC 5000 or SUN Sparcstation 10. It is also programmed for personal computers with FORTRAN compiler software and at least 8 to 10 megabytes of random access memory (RAM). The FRAPCON-3 code is designed to generate initial conditions for transient fuel rod analysis by the FRAPTRAN computer code (formerly named FRAP-T6)

  8. PWR fuel physico chemistry. Improvements of the Sage code to compute thermochemical balance in PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, P.; Baron, D.; Piron, J.P.

    1993-02-01

    A physicochemical survey of high burnup fuel has been undertaken in the context of a 3-party action (CEA Cadarache - EDF/DER - FRAMATOME). One of the tasks involved consists in adapting the SAGE code for assessment of the thermochemical equilibria of fission products in solution in the fuel matrix. This paper describes the first stage of this task. Even if other improvements are planned, the oxid oxygen potentials are yet properly reproduced for the simulated burnup. (authors). 63 figs., 4 tabs., 41 refs

  9. Fuel cell APU for commercial aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daggett, D.L. [Boeing Commercial Airplane, Seattle, WA (United States); Lowery, N. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States); Wittmann, J. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The Boeing Company has always sought to improve fuel efficiency in commercial aircraft. An opportunity now exists to explore technology that will allow fuel efficiency improvements to be achieved while simultaneously reducing emissions. Replacing the current aircraft gas turbine-powered Auxiliary Power Unit with a hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell is anticipated to greatly improve fuel efficiency, reduce emissions and noise as well as improve airplane performance. However, there are several technology hurdles that need to be overcome. If SOFC technology is to be matured for the betterment of the earth community, the fuel cell industry, aerospace manufacturers and other end users all need to work together to overcome these challenges. Aviation has many of the same needs in fuel cell technology as other sectors, such as reducing cost and improving reliability and fuel efficiency in order to commercialize the technology. However, there are other distinct aerospace needs that will not necessarily be addressed by the industrial sector. These include development of lightweight materials and small-volume fuel cell systems that can reform hydrocarbon fuels. Aviation also has higher levels of safety requirements. Other transportation modes share the same requirement for vibration and shock tolerant fuel cell stacks. Lastly, as fuel cells are anticipated to be operated in flight, they must be capable of operating over a wide range of atmospheric conditions. By itself, the aviation sector does not appear to offer enough of a potential market to justify the investment required by any one manufacturer to develop fuel cells for APU replacements. Therefore, means must be found to modularize components and make SOFC stacks sufficiently similar to industrial units so that manufacturing economy of scales can be brought to bear. Government R and D and industry support are required to advance the technology. Because aerospace fuel cells will be higher performing units, the benefits of

  10. Electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergus, Jeffrey W.

    The high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), as compared to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), improves tolerance to impurities in the fuel, but also creates challenges in the development of suitable materials for the various fuel cell components. In response to these challenges, intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) are being developed to reduce high-temperature material requirements, which will extend useful lifetime, improve durability and reduce cost, while maintaining good fuel flexibility. A major challenge in reducing the operating temperature of SOFCs is the development of solid electrolyte materials with sufficient conductivity to maintain acceptably low ohmic losses during operation. In this paper, solid electrolytes being developed for solid oxide fuel cells, including zirconia-, ceria- and lanthanum gallate-based materials, are reviewed and compared. The focus is on the conductivity, but other issues, such as compatibility with electrode materials, are also discussed.

  11. Electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fergus, Jeffrey W. [Auburn University, Materials Research and Education Center, 275 Wilmore Laboratories, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2006-11-08

    The high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), as compared to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), improves tolerance to impurities in the fuel, but also creates challenges in the development of suitable materials for the various fuel cell components. In response to these challenges, intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) are being developed to reduce high-temperature material requirements, which will extend useful lifetime, improve durability and reduce cost, while maintaining good fuel flexibility. A major challenge in reducing the operating temperature of SOFCs is the development of solid electrolyte materials with sufficient conductivity to maintain acceptably low ohmic losses during operation. In this paper, solid electrolytes being developed for solid oxide fuel cells, including zirconia-, ceria- and lanthanum gallate-based materials, are reviewed and compared. The focus is on the conductivity, but other issues, such as compatibility with electrode materials, are also discussed. (author)

  12. Analysis of Fuel Cell Driven Ground Source Heat Pump Systems in Community Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Keun Shin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a fuel cell driven ground source heat pump (GSHP system is applied in a community building and heat pump system performance is analyzed by computational methods. Conduction heat transfer between the brine pipe and ground is analyzed by TEACH code in order to predict the performance of the heat pump system. The predicted coefficient of performance (COP of the heat pump system and the energy cost were compared with the variation of the location of the objective building, the water saturation rate of the soil, and the driven powers of the heat pump system. Compared to the late-night electricity driven system, a significant reduction of energy cost can be accomplished by employing the fuel cell driven heat pump system. This is due to the low cost of electricity production of the fuel cell system and to the application of the recovered waste heat generated during the electricity production process to the heating of the community building.

  13. Simplified fuel cell system model identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caux, S.; Fadel, M. [Laboratoire d' Electrotechnique et d' Electronique Industrielle, Toulouse (France); Hankache, W. [Laboratoire d' Electrotechnique et d' Electronique Industrielle, Toulouse (France)]|[Laboratoire de recherche en Electronique, Electrotechnique et Systemes, Belfort (France); Hissel, D. [Laboratoire de recherche en Electronique, Electrotechnique et Systemes, Belfort (France)

    2006-07-01

    This paper discussed a simplified physical fuel cell model used to study fuel cell and supercap energy applications for vehicles. Anode, cathode, membrane, and electrode elements of the cell were modelled. A quasi-static Amphlett model was used to predict voltage responses of the fuel cell as a function of the current, temperature, and partial pressures of the reactive gases. The potential of each cell was multiplied by the number of cells in order to model a fuel cell stack. The model was used to describe the main phenomena associated with current voltage behaviour. Data were then compared with data from laboratory tests conducted on a 20 cell stack subjected to a current and time profile developed using speed data from a vehicle operating in an urban environment. The validated model was used to develop iterative optimization algorithms for an energy management strategy that linked 3 voltage sources with fuel cell parameters. It was concluded that classic state and dynamic measurements using a simple least square algorithm can be used to identify the most important parameters for optimal fuel cell operation. 9 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  14. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  15. Canadian fuel cell commercialization roadmap update : progress of Canada's hydrogen and fuel cell industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filbee, S.; Karlsson, T.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen and fuel cells are considered an essential part of future low-carbon energy systems for transportation and stationary power. In recognition of this, Industry Canada has worked in partnership with public and private stakeholders to provide an update to the 2003 Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap to determine infrastructure requirements for near-term markets. The update includes technology and market developments in terms of cost and performance. This presentation included an overview of global hydrogen and fuel cell markets as background and context for the activities of the Canadian industry. Approaches toward commercial viability and mass market success were also discussed along with possible scenarios and processes by which these mass markets could develop. Hydrogen and fuel cell industry priorities were outlined along with recommendations for building a hydrogen infrastructure

  16. Development of a code and models for high burnup fuel performance analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, M; Kitajima, S [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    First the high burnup LWR fuel behavior is discussed and necessary models for the analysis are reviewed. These aspects of behavior are the changes of power history due to the higher enrichment, the temperature feedback due to fission gas release and resultant degradation of gap conductance, axial fission gas transport in fuel free volume, fuel conductivity degradation due to fission product solution and modification of fuel micro-structure. Models developed for these phenomena, modifications in the code, and the benchmark results mainly based on Risoe fission gas project is presented. Finally the rim effect which is observe only around the fuel periphery will be discussed focusing into the fuel conductivity degradation and swelling due to the porosity development. (author). 18 refs, 13 figs, 3 tabs.

  17. Response of a direct methanol fuel cell to fuel change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leo, T.J. [Dpto de Sistemas Oceanicos y Navales- ETSI Navales, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Avda Arco de la Victoria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Raso, M.A.; de la Blanca, E. Sanchez [Dpto de Quimica Fisica I- Fac. CC. Quimicas, Univ. Complutense de Madrid, Avda Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Navarro, E.; Villanueva, M. [Dpto de Motopropulsion y Termofluidodinamica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Pza Cardenal Cisneros 3, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Moreno, B. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C/Kelsen 5, Campus de la UAM, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    Methanol and ethanol have recently received much attention as liquid fuels particularly as alternative 'energy-vectors' for the future. In this sense, to find a direct alcohol fuel cell that able to interchange the fuel without losing performances in an appreciable way would represent an evident advantage in the field of portable applications. In this work, the response of a in-house direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) to the change of fuel from methanol to ethanol and its behaviour at different ambient temperature values have been investigated. A corrosion study on materials suitable to fabricate the bipolar plates has been carried out and either 316- or 2205-duplex stainless steels have proved to be adequate for using in direct alcohol fuel cells. Polarization curves have been measured at different ambient temperature values, controlled by an experimental setup devised for this purpose. Data have been fitted to a model taking into account the temperature effect. For both fuels, methanol and ethanol, a linear dependence of adjustable parameters with temperature is obtained. Fuel cell performance comparison in terms of open circuit voltage, kinetic and resistance is established. (author)

  18. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous. The fuel cell system also comprises a fuel supplying part including a meter which meters an amount of fuel which is used by the fuel cell, and controls the supply of fuel based on said metering.

  19. Aerosol feed direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improvements to fuel cells include introduction of the fuel as an aerosol of liquid fuel droplets suspended in a gas. The particle size of the liquid fuel droplets may be controlled for optimal fuel cell performance by selection of different aerosol generators or by separating droplets based upon size using a particle size conditioner.

  20. Modeling CANDU type fuel behaviour during extended burnup irradiations using a revised version of the ELESIM code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimescu, V.I.; Richmond, W.R.

    1992-05-01

    The high-burnup database for CANDU fuel, with a variety of cases, offers a good opportunity to check models of fuel behaviour, and to identify areas for improvement. Good agreement of calculated values of fission-gas release, and sheath hoop strain, with experimental data indicates that the global behaviour of the fuel element is adequately simulated by a computer code. Using, the ELESIM computer code, the fission-gas release, swelling, and fuel pellet expansion models were analysed, and changes made for gaseous swelling, and diffusional release of fission-gas atoms to the grain boundaries. Using this revised version of ELESIM, satisfactory agreement between measured values of fission-gas release was found for most of the high-burnup database cases. It is concluded that the revised version of the ELESIM code is able to simulate with reasonable accuracy high-burnup as well as low-burnup CANDU fuel

  1. Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction (IFCI 7.0) Code User's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Michael F.

    1999-01-01

    The integrated fuel-coolant interaction (IFCI) computer code is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) problem at large scale using a two-dimensional, three-field hydrodynamic framework and physically based models. IFCI will be capable of treating all major FCI processes in an integrated manner. This document is a description of IFCI 7.0. The user's manual describes the hydrodynamic method and physical models used in IFCI 7.0. Appendix A is an input manual provided for the creation of working decks

  2. 1990 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains author prepared short resumes of the presentations at the 1990 Fuel Cell Seminar held November 25-28, 1990 in Phoenix, Arizona. Contained herein are 134 short descriptions organized into topic areas entitled An Environmental Overview, Transportation Applications, Technology Advancements for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells, Technology Advancements for Solid Fuel Cells, Component Technologies and Systems Analysis, Stationary Power Applications, Marine and Space Applications, Technology Advancements for Acid Type Fuel Cells, and Technology Advancement for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

  3. Metrology for Fuel Cell Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocker, Michael [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Stanfield, Eric [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2015-02-04

    The project was divided into three subprojects. The first subproject is Fuel Cell Manufacturing Variability and Its Impact on Performance. The objective was to determine if flow field channel dimensional variability has an impact on fuel cell performance. The second subproject is Non-contact Sensor Evaluation for Bipolar Plate Manufacturing Process Control and Smart Assembly of Fuel Cell Stacks. The objective was to enable cost reduction in the manufacture of fuel cell plates by providing a rapid non-contact measurement system for in-line process control. The third subproject is Optical Scatterfield Metrology for Online Catalyst Coating Inspection of PEM Soft Goods. The objective was to evaluate the suitability of Optical Scatterfield Microscopy as a viable measurement tool for in situ process control of catalyst coatings.

  4. CAPRICORN subchannel code for sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla, A. Jr.; Smith, D.E.; O'Dell, L.D.

    1983-01-01

    The CAPRICORN computer code analyzes steady-state and transient, single-phase and boiling problems in LMFBR fuel bundles. CAPRICORN uses the same type of subchannel geometry as the COBRA family of codes and solves a similar system of conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy. However, CAPRICORN uses a different numerical solution method which allows it to handle the full liquid-to-vapor density change for sodium boiling. Results of the initial comparison with data (the W-1 SLSF pipe rupture experiment) are very promising and provide an optimistic basis for proceeding with further development

  5. Platinum Porous Electrodes for Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    Fuel cell energy bears the merits of renewability, cleanness and high efficiency. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising candidates as the power source in the near future. A fine management of different transports and electrochemical reactions in PEM fuel cells...... to a genuine picture of a working PEM fuel cell catalyst layer. These, in turn, enrich the knowledge of Three-Phase-Boundary, provide efficient tool for the electrode selection and eventually will contribute the advancement of PEMFC technology....

  6. Validation of the metal fuel version of the SAS4A accident analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent work directed towards the validation of the metal fuel version of the SAS4A accident analysis code. The SAS4A code system has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory for the simulation of hypothetical severe accidents in Liquid Metal-Cooled Reactors (LMR), designed to operate in a fast neutron spectrum. SAS4A was initially developed for the analysis of oxide-fueled liquid metal-cooled reactors and has played an important role in the simulation and assessment of the energetics potential for postulated severe accidents in these reactors. Due to the current interest in the metal-fueled liquid metal-cooled reactors, a metal fuel version of the SAS4A accident analysis code is being developed in the Integral Fast Reactor program at Argonne. During such postulated accident scenarios as the unprotected (i.e. without scram) loss-of-flow and transient overpower events, a large number of interrelated physical phenomena occur during a relatively short time. These phenomena include transient heat transfer and hydrodynamic events, coolant boiling, and fuel and cladding melting and relocation. Due to strong neutronic feedbacks these events can significantly influence the reactor power history in the accident progression. The paper presents the results of a recent SAS4A simulation of the M7 TREAT experiment. 6 refs., 5 figs

  7. Accelerated testing of fuel cell components in 2 x 2 inch fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, A.J.; Adams, A.A.; Joebstl, J.A.; Walker, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of diagnostic procedures which can be used to predict failure modes and assess the effects of these failures on fuel cell performance. Some straightforward diagnostic techniques have been used to evaluate fuel cells assembled with a variety of matrix and electrode combinations. These techniques included accelerated on-off cycling, thermal cycling with H2/CO mixtures, and automatic polarization measurements. Information has been obtained concerning the effects of electrolyte management and catalyst poisoning on performance and lifetime characteristics of 2 x 2 in. single cells. The use of on-off cycling has shown that short-term fuel cell performance is generally unaffected by load changes and cycle sequence in 2 x 2 in. cells when electrolyte management is adequate. Dynamic polarization curves can be used instead of point by point steady-state plots without any loss in accuracy

  8. Enhancing the ABAQUS Thermomechanics Code to Simulate Multidimensional Steady and Transient Fuel Rod Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, R.L.; Knoll, D.A. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3855 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Important aspects of fuel rod behavior, for example pellet-clad interaction (PCI), fuel fracture, and non-axisymmetric cooling and oxide formation, are inherently 3-D. Current fuel rod simulation codes typically approximate such behavior using a quasi 2D (or 1.5D) approach and, often, separate codes must be used for steady and transient (or accident) conditions. Notable exceptions are the EPRI propriety code FALCON which is 2D and can be applied to steady or transient operation, and TOUTATIS which is 3D. Recent studies have indicated the need for multidimensional fuel rod simulation capability, particularly for accurate predictions of PCI. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is currently developing next-generation capability to model nuclear fuel performance. The goal is to develop a 2D/3D computer code (BISON) which solves the fully coupled thermomechanics equations, includes multi-physics constitutive behavior for both fuel and cladding materials, and is designed for efficient use on highly parallel computers. To provide guidance and a proto-typing environment for this effort, plus provide the INL with near-term fuel modeling capability, the commercially available ABAQUS thermomechanics software has been enhanced to include the fuel behavior phenomena necessary to afford a practical fuel performance simulation capability. This paper details the enhancements which have been implemented in ABAQUS to date, and provides results of a multi-pellet fuel problem which demonstrates the new capability. ABAQUS employs modern finite element methods to solve the nonlinear thermomechanics equations in 1, 2, or 3-D, using linear or quadratic elements. The temperature and displacement fields are solved in a fully-coupled fashion, using sophisticated iteration and time integration error control. The code includes robust contact algorithms, essential for computing multidimensional pellet-pellet or pellet-clad interaction. Extensive constitutive models are available, including

  9. World wide IFC phosphoric acid fuel cell implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.M. Jr

    1996-04-01

    International Fuel Cells, a subsidary of United technologies Corporation, is engaged in research and development of all types of fuel cell technologies and currently manufactures alkaline fuel cell power plants for the U.S. manned space flight program and natural gas fueled stationary power plants using phosphoric acid fuel cells. This paper describes the phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants.

  10. Verification of the depletion capabilities of the MCNPX code on a LWR MOX fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerba, S.; Hrncir, M.; Necas, V.

    2012-01-01

    The study deals with the verification of the depletion capabilities of the MCNPX code, which is a linked Monte-Carlo depletion code. For such a purpose the IV-B phase of the OECD NEA Burnup credit benchmark has been chosen. The mentioned benchmark is a code to code comparison of the multiplication coefficient k eff and the isotopic composition of a LWR MOX fuel assembly at three given burnup levels and after five years of cooling. The benchmark consists of 6 cases, 2 different Pu vectors and 3 geometry models, however in this study only the fuel assembly calculations with two Pu vectors were performed. The aim of this study was to compare the obtained result with data from the participants of the OECD NEA Burnup Credit project and confirm the burnup capability of the MCNPX code. (Authors)

  11. Stationary power fuel cell commercialization status worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M.C. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell technologies for stationary power are set to play a role in power generation applications worldwide. The worldwide fuel cell vision is to provide powerplants for the emerging distributed generation and on-site markets. Progress towards commercialization has occurred in all fuel cell development areas. Around 100 ONSI phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) units have been sold, with significant foreign sales in Europe and Japan. Fuji has apparently overcome its PAFC decay problems. Industry-driven molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) programs in Japan and the U.S. are conducting megawatt (MW)-class demonstrations, which are bringing the MCFC to the verge of commercialization. Westinghouse Electric, the acknowledged world leader in tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology, continues to set performance records and has completed construction of a 4-MW/year manufacturing facility in the U.S. Fuel cells have also taken a major step forward with the conceptual development of ultra-high efficiency fuel cell/gas turbine plants. Many SOFC developers in Japan, Europe, and North America continue to make significant advances.

  12. Probabilistic fuel rod analyses using the TRANSURANUS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassmann, K; O` Carroll, C; Laar, J Van De [CEC Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    After more than 25 years of fuel rod modelling research, the basic concepts are well established and the limitations of the specific approaches are known. However, the widely used mechanistic approach leads in many cases to discrepancies between theoretical predictions and experimental evidence indicating that models are not exact and that some of the physical processes encountered are of stochastic nature. To better understand uncertainties and their consequences, the mechanistic approach must therefore be augmented by statistical analyses. In the present paper the basic probabilistic methods are briefly discussed. Two such probabilistic approaches are included in the fuel rod performance code TRANSURANUS: the Monte Carlo method and the Numerical Noise Analysis. These two techniques are compared and their capabilities are demonstrated. (author). 12 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs.

  13. Fuel Cell Seminar, 1992: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This year`s theme, ``Fuel Cells: Realizing the Potential,`` focuses on progress being made toward commercial manufacture and use of fuel cell products. Fuel cell power plants are competing for market share in some applications and demonstrations of market entry power plants are proceeding for additional applications. Development activity on fuel cells for transportation is also increasing; fuel cell products have potential in energy and transportation industries, with very favorable environmental impacts. This Seminar has the purpose of fostering communication by providing a forum for the international community interested in development, application, and business opportunities related fuel cells. Over 190 technical papers are included, the majority being processed for the data base.

  14. A nodal Grean's function method of reactor core fuel management code, NGCFM2D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dongsheng; Yao Dong.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the mathematical model and program structure of the nodal Green's function method of reactor core fuel management code, NGCFM2D. Computing results of some reactor cores by NGCFM2D are analysed and compared with other codes

  15. The fuel and channel thermal/mechanical behaviour code FACTAR 2.0 (LOCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbye, C.J.; Mackinnon, J.C.; Gu, B.W.

    1996-01-01

    The computer code FACTAR 2.0 (LOCA) models the thermal and mechanical response of components within a single CANDU fuel channel under loss-of-coolant accident conditions. This code version is the successor to the FACTAR 1.x code series, and features many modelling enhancements over its predecessor. In particular, the thermal hydraulic treatment has been extended to model reverse and bi-directional coolant flow, and the axial variation in coolant flow rate. Thermal radiation is calculated by a detailed surface-to-surface model, and the ability to represent a greater range of geometries (including experimental configurations employed in code validation) has been implemented. Details of these new code treatments are described in this paper. (author)

  16. Carbonate fuel cells: Milliwatts to megawatts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, M.; Maru, H. C.

    The carbonate fuel cell power plant is an emerging high efficiency, ultra-clean power generator utilizing a variety of gaseous, liquid, and solid carbonaceous fuels for commercial and industrial applications. The primary mover of this generator is a carbonate fuel cell. The fuel cell uses alkali metal carbonate mixtures as electrolyte and operates at ∼650 °C. Corrosion of the cell hardware and stability of the ceramic components have been important design considerations in the early stages of development. The material and electrolyte choices are founded on extensive fundamental research carried out around the world in the 60s and early 70s. The cell components were developed in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The present day carbonate fuel cell construction employs commonly available stainless steels. The electrodes are based on nickel and well-established manufacturing processes. Manufacturing process development, scale-up, stack tests, and pilot system tests dominated throughout the 1990s. Commercial product development efforts began in late 1990s leading to prototype field tests beginning in the current decade leading to commercial customer applications. Cost reduction has been an integral part of the product effort. Cost-competitive product designs have evolved as a result. Approximately half a dozen teams around the world are pursuing carbonate fuel cell product development. The power plant development efforts to date have mainly focused on several hundred kW (submegawatt) to megawatt-class plants. Almost 40 submegawatt units have been operating at customer sites in the US, Europe, and Asia. Several of these units are operating on renewable bio-fuels. A 1 MW unit is operating on the digester gas from a municipal wastewater treatment plant in Seattle, Washington (US). Presently, there are a total of approximately 10 MW capacity carbonate fuel cell power plants installed around the world. Carbonate fuel cell products are also being developed to operate on

  17. Toward sustainable fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephens, Ifan; Rossmeisl, Jan; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2016-01-01

    to a regular gasoline car. However, current fuel cells require 0.25 g of platinum (Pt) per kilowatt of power (2) as catalysts to drive the electrode reactions. If the entire global annual production of Pt were devoted to fuel cell vehicles, fewer than 10 million vehicles could be produced each year, a mere 10...

  18. Fuel Cell and Battery Powered Forklifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe; Mortensen, Henrik H.; Jensen, Jes Vestervang

    2013-01-01

    A hydrogen-powered materials handling vehicle with a fuel cell combines the advantages of diesel/LPG and battery powered vehicles. Hydrogen provides the same consistent power and fast refueling capability as diesel and LPG, whilst fuel cells provide energy efficient and zero emission Electric...... propulsion similar to batteries. In this paper, the performance of a forklift powered by PEM fuel cells and lead acid batteries as auxiliary energy source is introduced and investigated. In this electromechanical propulsion system with hybrid energy/power sources, fuel cells will deliver average power...

  19. Hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles: A technical and economic comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

    1997-12-31

    All fuel cells currently being developed for near term use in vehicles require hydrogen as a fuel. Hydrogen can be stored directly or produced onboard the vehicle by reforming methanol, ethanol or hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil (e.g., Diesel, gasoline or middle distillates). The vehicle design is simpler with direct hydrogen storage, but requires developing a more complex refueling infrastructure. In this paper, the authors compare three leading options for fuel storage onboard fuel cell vehicles: compressed gas hydrogen storage; onboard steam reforming of methanol; onboard partial oxidation (POX) of hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil. Equilibrium, kinetic and heat integrated system (ASPEN) models have been developed to estimate the performance of onboard steam reforming and POX fuel processors. These results have been incorporated into a fuel cell vehicle model, allowing us to compare the vehicle performance, fuel economy, weight, and cost for various fuel storage choices and driving cycles. A range of technical and economic parameters were considered. The infrastructure requirements are also compared for gaseous hydrogen, methanol and hydrocarbon fuels from crude oil, including the added costs of fuel production, storage, distribution and refueling stations. Considering both vehicle and infrastructure issues, the authors compare hydrogen to other fuel cell vehicle fuels. Technical and economic goals for fuel cell vehicle and hydrogen technologies are discussed. Potential roles for hydrogen in the commercialization of fuel cell vehicles are sketched.

  20. RODSWELL: a computer code for the thermomechanical analysis of fuel rods under LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadei, F.; Laval, H.; Donea, J.; Jones, P.M.; Colombo, A.

    1984-01-01

    The code calculates the variation in space and time of all significant fuel rod variables, including fuel, gap and cladding temperature, fuel and cladding deformation, cladding oxidation and rod internal pressure. The code combines a transient 2-dimensional heat conduction code and a 1-dimensional mechanical model for the cladding deformation. The first sections of this report deal with the heat conduction model and the finite element discretization used for the thermal analysis. The mechanical deformation model is presented next: modelling of creep, phase change and oxidation of the zircaloy cladding is discussed in detail. A model describing the effect of oxidation and oxide cracking on the mechanical strength of the cladding is presented too. Next a mechanical restraint model, which allows the simulation of the presence of the neighbouring rods and is particularly important in assessing the amount of channel blockage during a transient, is presented. A description of the models used for the coolant conditions and for the power generation follows. The heat source can be placed either in the fuel or in the cladding, and direct or indirect clad heating by electrical power can be simulated. Then a section follows, dealing with the steady-state and transient types of calculation and with the automatic variable time step selection during the transient. The last sections deal with presentation of results, graphical output, test problems and an example of general application of the code

  1. Using of the Serpent code based on the Monte-Carlo method for calculation of the VVER-1000 fuel assembly characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Galchenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The description of calculation scheme of fuel assembly for preparation of few-group characteristics is considered with help of Serpent code. This code uses the Monte-Carlo method and energy continuous microscopic data libraries. Serpent code is devoted for calculation of fuel assembly characteristics, burnup calculations and preparation of few-group homogenized macroscopic cross-sections. The results of verification simulations in comparison with other codes (WIMS, HELIOS, NESSEL etc., which are used for neutron-physical analysis of VVER type fuel, are presented.

  2. Automated assembling of single fuel cell units for use in a fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalba, C. K.; Muminovic, A.; Barz, C.; Nasui, V.

    2017-05-01

    The manufacturing of PEMFC stacks (POLYMER ELEKTROLYT MEMBRAN Fuel Cell) is nowadays still done by hand. Over hundreds of identical single components have to be placed accurate together for the construction of a fuel cell stack. Beside logistic problems, higher total costs and disadvantages in weight the high number of components produce a higher statistic interference because of faulty erection or material defects and summation of manufacturing tolerances. The saving of costs is about 20 - 25 %. Furthermore, the total weight of the fuel cells will be reduced because of a new sealing technology. Overall a one minute cycle time has to be aimed per cell at the manufacturing of these single components. The change of the existing sealing concept to a bonded sealing is one of the important requisites to get an automated manufacturing of single cell units. One of the important steps for an automated gluing process is the checking of the glue application by using of an image processing system. After bonding the single fuel cell the sealing and electrical function can be checked, so that only functional and high qualitative cells can get into further manufacturing processes.

  3. Navy fuel cell demonstration project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Billy D.; Akhil, Abbas Ali

    2008-08-01

    This is the final report on a field evaluation by the Department of the Navy of twenty 5-kW PEM fuel cells carried out during 2004 and 2005 at five Navy sites located in New York, California, and Hawaii. The key objective of the effort was to obtain an engineering assessment of their military applications. Particular issues of interest were fuel cell cost, performance, reliability, and the readiness of commercial fuel cells for use as a standalone (grid-independent) power option. Two corollary objectives of the demonstration were to promote technological advances and to improve fuel performance and reliability. From a cost perspective, the capital cost of PEM fuel cells at this stage of their development is high compared to other power generation technologies. Sandia National Laboratories technical recommendation to the Navy is to remain involved in evaluating successive generations of this technology, particularly in locations with greater environmental extremes, and it encourages their increased use by the Navy.

  4. Degradation of solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects in fuels containing sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen is the main fuel for all types of fuel cells except direct methanol fuel cells. Hydrogen can be generated from all manner of fossil fuels, including coal, natural gas, diesel, gasoline, other hydrocarbons, and oxygenates (e.g., methanol, ethanol, butanol, etc.). Impurities in the fuel can cause significant performance problems and sulfur, in particular, can decrease the cell performance of fuel cells, including solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In the SOFC, the high (800-1000°C) operating temperature yields advantages (e.g., internal fuel reforming) and disadvantages (e.g., material selection and degradation problems). Significant progress in reducing the operating temperature of the SOFC from ~1000 ºC to ~750 ºC may allow less expensive metallic materials to be used for interconnects and as balance of plant (BOP) materials. This paper provides insight on the material performance of nickel, ferritic steels, and nickel-based alloys in fuels containing sulfur, primarily in the form of H2S, and seeks to quantify the extent of possible degradation due to sulfur in the gas stream.

  5. Environmental Technology Assessment of Introducing Fuel Cell City Buses. A Case Study of Fuel Cell Buses in Goeteborg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlstroem, Magnus

    2002-07-01

    Over the last several years, fuel cell systems have improved. These advancements have increased the expectations that fuel cells are a feasible option for several applications such as transportation and stationary use. There are several reasons why fuel cell buses in city centres appear to be the most beneficial market niche to begin introducing the technology in. The goal of the report is to compile information about fuel cell buses relevant for city administrators working with public transport and environmental issues. A literature review of the fuel cells in buses is included. This study also consists of an environmental assessment of using fuel cell buses with hydrogen produced in various ways for buses on bus route 60 in Goeteborg by 2006. The fuel cell buses are compared with other bus and fuel alternatives. There are two goals of the case study: 1. The first goal is to describe the technical system, the methodology, and the problem for the intended audience. In the future, this study could help frame future investment decisions. 2. The second goal is to present environmental performance results---emission, health, monetary---relative the alternative bus technologies. The model calculations showed that the social benefits were approximately SEK 910,000 each year if all buses were fuel cell buses compared with developed diesel buses. If the fuel cell buses were compared to natural gas buses, then the benefits were SEK 860,000 each year. The benefits were SEK 1.39/bus/km compared with diesel buses or SEK 1.30/bus/km compared with natural gas buses.

  6. Linking of FRAP-T, FRAPCON and RELAP-4 codes for transient analysis and accidents of light water reactors fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra Neto, A.; Silva, A.T. e; Sabundjian, G.; Freitas, R.L.; Neves Conti, T. das.

    1991-09-01

    The computer codes FRAP-T, FRAPCON and RELAP-4 have been linked for the fuel rod behavior analysis under transients and hypothetical accidents in light water reactors. The results calculated by thermal hydraulic code RELAP-4 give input in file format into the transient fuel analysis code FRAP-T. If the effect of fuel burnup is taken into account, the fuel performance code FRAPCON should provide the initial steady state data for thhe transient analysis. With the thermal hydraulic boundary conditions provided by RELAP-4 (MOD3), FRAP-T6 is used to analyse pressurized water reactor fuel rod behavior during the blowdown phase under large break loss of coolant accident conditions. Two cases have been analysed: without and with initialization from FRAPCON-2 steady state data. (author)

  7. Radial optimization of a BWR fuel cell using genetic algorithms; Optimizacion radial de una celda de combustible BWR usando algoritmos geneticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Campo M, C.; Carmona H, R.; Oropeza C, I.P. [UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: cmcm@fi-b.unam.mx

    2006-07-01

    The development of the application of the Genetic Algorithms (GA) to the optimization of the radial distribution of enrichment in a cell of fuel of a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The optimization process it was ties to the HELIOS simulator, which is a transport code of neutron simulation of fuel cells that has been validated for the calculation of nuclear banks for BWRs. With heterogeneous radial designs can improve the radial distribution of the power, for what the radial design of fuel has a strong influence in the global design of fuel recharges. The optimum radial distribution of fuel bars is looked for with different enrichments of U{sup 235} and contents of consumable poison. For it is necessary to define the representation of the solution, the objective function and the implementation of the specific optimization process to the solution of the problem. The optimization process it was coded in 'C' language, it was automated the creation of the entrances to the simulator, the execution of the simulator and the extraction, in the exit of the simulator, of the parameters that intervene in the objective function. The objective function includes four parameters: average enrichment of the cell, average gadolinia concentration of the cell, peak factor of radial power and k-infinite multiplication factor. To be able to calculate the parameters that intervene in the objective function, the one evaluation process of GA was ties to the HELIOS code executed in a Compaq Alpha workstation. It was applied to the design of a fuel cell of 10 x 10 that it can be employee in the fuel assemble designs that are used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. Its were considered 10 different fuel compositions which four contain gadolinia. Three heuristic rules that consist in prohibiting the placement of bars with gadolinia in the ends of the cell, to place the compositions with the smallest enrichment in the corners of the cell and to fix

  8. Economic feasibility prediction of the commercial fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yan; Karady, George G.; Winston, Anthony; Gilbert, Palomino; Hess, Robert; Pelley, Don

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a prediction method and corresponding Visual Basic program to evaluate the economic feasibility of the commercial fuel cells in utility systems. The economic feasibility of a fuel cell is defined as having a net present value (NPV) greater than zero. The basic process of the method is to combine fuel cell specifications and real energy market data to calculate yearly earning and cost for obtaining the NPV of fuel cells. The Fuel Cell Analysis Software was developed using Visual Basic based on the proposed method. The investigation of a 250 kW molten carbonate fuel cell (FuelCell Energy DFC300A) predicted that, for application specifically in Arizona, United States, no profit would result from the installation of this fuel cell. The analysis results indicated that the efficiency, investment cost, and operation cost are three key factors affecting potential feasibility of the commercial fuel cells

  9. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. Follow up report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    Fuel cell technology continues to grow in the United States, with strong sales in stationary applications and early markets such as data centers, materials handling equipment, and telecommunications sites. New fuel cell customers include Fortune 500 companies Apple, eBay, Coca-Cola, and Walmart, who will use fuel cells to provide reliable power to data centers, stores, and facilities. Some are purchasing multi-megawatt (MW) systems, including three of the largest non-utility purchases of stationary fuel cells in the world by AT and T, Apple and eBay - 17 MW, 10 MW and 6 MW respectively. Others are replacing fleets of battery forklifts with fuel cells. Sysco, the food distributor, has more than 700 fuel cell-powered forklifts operating at seven facilities, with more on order. Mega-retailer Walmart now operates more than 500 fuel cell forklifts at three warehouses, including a freezer facility. Although federal government budget reduction efforts are impacting a wide range of departments and programs, fuel cell and hydrogen technology continues to be funded, albeit at a lower level than in past years. The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently funding fuel cell and hydrogen R and D and has nearly 300 ongoing projects at companies, national labs, and universities/institutes universities. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 and DOE's Market Transformation efforts have acted as a government ''catalyst'' for market success of emerging technologies. Early market deployments of about 1,400 fuel cells under the ARRA have led to more than 5,000 additional fuel cell purchases by industry with no DOE funding. In addition, interest in Congress remains high. Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Chris Coons (D-DE), Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and John Hoeven (R-ND) re-launched the bipartisan Senate Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Caucus in August 2012 to promote the continued development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies

  10. Jet Fuel Based High Pressure Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummalla, Mallika (Inventor); Yamanis, Jean (Inventor); Olsommer, Benoit (Inventor); Dardas, Zissis (Inventor); Bayt, Robert (Inventor); Srinivasan, Hari (Inventor); Dasgupta, Arindam (Inventor); Hardin, Larry (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A power system for an aircraft includes a solid oxide fuel cell system which generates electric power for the aircraft and an exhaust stream; and a heat exchanger for transferring heat from the exhaust stream of the solid oxide fuel cell to a heat requiring system or component of the aircraft. The heat can be transferred to fuel for the primary engine of the aircraft. Further, the same fuel can be used to power both the primary engine and the SOFC. A heat exchanger is positioned to cool reformate before feeding to the fuel cell. SOFC exhaust is treated and used as inerting gas. Finally, oxidant to the SOFC can be obtained from the aircraft cabin, or exterior, or both.

  11. Fuel options for the fuel cell vehicle: hydrogen, methanol or gasoline?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C.E.; James, B.D.; Lomax, F.D. Jr.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Fuel cell vehicles can be powered directly by hydrogen or, with an onboard chemical processor, other liquid fuels such as gasoline or methanol. Most analysts agree that hydrogen is the preferred fuel in terms of reducing vehicle complexity, but one common perception is that the cost of a hydrogen infrastructure would be excessive. According to this conventional wisdom, the automobile industry must therefore develop complex onboard fuel processors to convert methanol, ethanol or gasoline to hydrogen. We show here, however, that the total fuel infrastructure cost to society including onboard fuel processors may be less for hydrogen than for either gasoline or methanol, the primary initial candidates currently under consideration for fuel cell vehicles. We also present the local air pollution and greenhouse gas advantages of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles compared to those powered by gasoline or methanol. (Author)

  12. Cost reductions of fuel cells for transport applications: fuel processing options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teagan, W P; Bentley, J; Barnett, B [Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1998-03-15

    The highly favorable efficiency/environmental characteristics of fuel cell technologies have now been verified by virtue of recent and ongoing field experience. The key issue regarding the timing and extent of fuel cell commercialization is the ability to reduce costs to acceptable levels in both stationary and transport applications. It is increasingly recognized that the fuel processing subsystem can have a major impact on overall system costs, particularly as ongoing R and D efforts result in reduction of the basic cost structure of stacks which currently dominate system costs. The fuel processing subsystem for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, which is the focus of transport applications, includes the reformer, shift reactors, and means for CO reduction. In addition to low cost, transport applications require a fuel processor that is compact and can start rapidly. This paper describes the impact of factors such as fuel choice operating temperature, material selection, catalyst requirements, and controls on the cost of fuel processing systems. There are fuel processor technology paths which manufacturing cost analyses indicate are consistent with fuel processor subsystem costs of under $150/kW in stationary applications and $30/kW in transport applications. As such, the costs of mature fuel processing subsystem technologies should be consistent with their use in commercially viable fuel cell systems in both application categories. (orig.)

  13. European opportunities for fuel cell commercialisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, C. E.; Steel, M. C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The European electricity market is changing. This paper will look at the background to power generation in Europe and highlight the recent factors which have entered the market to promote change. The 1990s seem to offer great possibilities for fuel cell commercialisation. Awareness of environmental problems has never been greater and there is growing belief that fuel cell technology can contribute to solving some of these problems. Issues which have caused the power industry in Europe to re-think its methods of generation include: concern over increasing carbon dioxide emissions and their contribution to the greenhouse effect; increasing SO x and NO x emissions and the damage cause by acid rain; the possibility of adverse effects on health caused by high voltage transmission lines; environmental restrictions to the expansion of hydroelectric schemes; public disenchantment with nuclear power following the Chernobyl accident; avoidance of dependence on imported oil following the Gulf crisis and a desire for fuel flexibility. All these factors are hastening the search for clean, efficient, modular power generators which can be easily sited close to the electricity consumer and operated using a variety of fuels. It is not only the power industry which is changing. A tightening of the legislation concerning emissions from cars is encouraging European auto companies to develop electric vehicles, some of which may be powered by fuel cells. Political changes, such as the opening up of Eastern Europe will also expand the market for low-emission, efficient power plants as attempts are made to develop and clean up that region. Many Europeans organisations are re-awakening their interest, or strengthening their activities, in the area of fuel cells because of the increasing opportunities offered by the European market. While some companies have chosen to buy, test and demonstrate Japanese or American fuel cell stacks with the aim of gaining operational experience and

  14. Thermomechanical DART code improvements for LEU VHD dispersion and monolithic fuel element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboada, H.; Saliba, R.; Moscarda, M.V.; Rest, J.

    2005-01-01

    A collaboration agreement between ANL/US DOE and CNEA Argentina in the area of Low Enriched Uranium Advanced Fuels has been in place since October 16, 1997 under the Implementation Arrangement for Technical Exchange and Cooperation in the Area of Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy. An annex concerning DART code optimization has been operative since February 8, 1999. Previously, as a part of this annex a visual FASTDART version and also a DART THERMAL version were presented during RERTR 2000, 2002 and RERTR 2003 Meetings. During this past year the following activities were completed: Optimization of DART TM code Al diffusion parameters by testing predictions against reliable data from RERTR experiments. Improvements on the 3-D thermo-mechanical version of the code for modeling the irradiation behavior of LEU U-Mo monolithic fuel. Concerning the first point, by means of an optimization of parameters of the Al diffusion through the interaction product theoretical expression, a reasonable agreement between DART temperature calculations with reliable RERTR PIE data was reached. The 3-D thermomechanical code complex is based upon a finite element thermal-elastic code named TERMELAS, and irradiation behavior provided by the DART code. An adequate and progressive process of coupling calculations of both codes at each time step is currently developed. Compatible thermal calculation between both codes was reached. This is the first stage to benchmark and validate against RERTR PIE data the coupling process. (author)

  15. A study of fuel failure behavior in high burnup HTGR fuel. Analysis by STRESS3 and STAPLE codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, David G.; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Ueta, Shouhei; Sumita, Junya

    2001-05-01

    In current high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), Tri-isotropic coated fuel particles are employed as fuel. In safety design of the HTGR fuels, it is important to retain fission products within particles so that their release to primary coolant does not exceed an acceptable level. From this point of view, the basic design criteria for the fuel are to minimize the failure fraction of as-fabricated fuel coating layers and to prevent significant additional fuel failures during operation. This report attempts to model fuel behavior in irradiation tests using the U.K. codes STRESS3 and STAPLE. Test results in 91F-1A and HRB-22 capsules irradiation tests, which were carried out at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor of JAERI and at the High Flux Isotope Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, respectively, were employed in the calculation. The maximum burnup and fast neutron fluence were about 10%FIMA and 3 x 10 25 m -2 , respectively. The fuel for the irradiation tests was called high burnup fuel, whose target burnup and fast neutron fluence were higher than those of the first-loading fuel of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor. The calculation results demonstrated that if only mean fracture stress values of PyC and SiC are used in the calculation it is not possible to predict any particle failures, by which is meant when all three load bearing layers have failed. By contrast, when statistical variations in the fracture stresses and particle specifications are taken into account, as is done in the STAPLE code, failures can be predicted. In the HRB-22 irradiation test, it was concluded that the first two particles which had failed were defective in some way, but that the third and fourth failures can be accounted for by the pressure vessel model. In the 91F-1A irradiation test, the result showed that 1 or 2 particles had failed towards the end of irradiation in the upper capsule and no particles failed in the lower capsule. (author)

  16. The CORSYS neutronics code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caner, M.; Krumbein, A.D.; Saphier, D.; Shapira, M.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to assemble a code package for LWR core physics including coupled neutronics, burnup and thermal hydraulics. The CORSYS system is built around the cell code WIMS (for group microscopic cross section calculations) and 3-dimension diffusion code CITATION (for burnup and fuel management). We are implementing such a system on an IBM RS-6000 workstation. The code was rested with a simplified model of the Zion Unit 2 PWR. (authors). 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tabs

  17. Sliding-Mode Control of PEM Fuel Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kunusch, Cristian; Mayosky, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in catalysis technologies and new materials make fuel cells an economically appealing and clean energy source with massive market potential in portable devices, home power generation and the automotive industry. Among the more promising fuel-cell technologies are proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Sliding-Mode Control of PEM Fuel Cells demonstrates the application of higher-order sliding-mode control to PEMFC dynamics. Fuel-cell dynamics are often highly nonlinear and the text shows the advantages of sliding modes in terms of robustness to external disturbance, modelling error and system-parametric disturbance using higher-order control to reduce chattering. Divided into two parts, the book first introduces the theory of fuel cells and sliding-mode control. It begins by contextualising PEMFCs both in terms of their development and within the hydrogen economy and today’s energy production situation as a whole. The reader is then guided through a discussion of fuel-cell operation pr...

  18. Validation of fuel performance codes at the NRI Rez plc for Temelin and Dukovany NPPs fuel safety evaluations and operation support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valach, M.; Hejna, J.; Zymak, J.

    2003-05-01

    The report summarises the first phase of the FUMEX II related work performed in the period September 2002 - May 2003. An inventory of the PIN and FRAS codes family used and developed during previous years was made in light of their applicability (validity) in the domain of high burn-up and FUMEX II Project Experimental database. KOLA data were chosen as appropriate for the first step of both codes fixing (both tuned for VVER fuel originally). The modern requirements, expressed by adaptation of the UO 2 conductivity degradation from OECD HRP, RIM and FGR (athermal) modelling implementation into the PIN code and a diffusion FGR model development planned for embedding, into this code allow us to reasonably shadow or keep tight contact with top quality models as TRANSURANUS, COPERNIC, CYRANO, FEMAXI, FRAPCON3 or ENIGMA. Testing and validation runs with prepared input KOLA deck were made. FUMEX II exercise propose LOCA and RIA like transients, so we started development of those two codes coupling - denominated as PIN2FRAS code. Principles of the interface were tested, benchmarking on tentative RIA pulses on highly burned KOLA fuel are presented as the first achievement from our work. (author)

  19. DOE perspective on fuel cells in transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kost, R.

    1996-04-01

    Fuel cells are one of the most promising technologies for meeting the rapidly growing demand for transportation services while minimizing adverse energy and environmental impacts. This paper reviews the benefits of introducing fuel cells into the transportation sector; in addition to dramatically reduced vehicle emissions, fuel cells offer the flexibility than use petroleum-based or alternative fuels, have significantly greater energy efficiency than internal combustion engines, and greatly reduce noise levels during operation. The rationale leading to the emphasis on proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells for transportation applications is reviewed as are the development issues requiring resolution to achieve adequate performance, packaging, and cost for use in automobiles. Technical targets for power density, specific power, platinum loading on the electrodes, cost, and other factors that become increasingly more demanding over time have been established. Fuel choice issues and pathways to reduced costs and to a renewable energy future are explored. One such path initially introduces fuel cell vehicles using reformed gasoline while-on-board hydrogen storage technology is developed to the point of allowing adequate range (350 miles) and refueling convenience. This scenario also allows time for renewable hydrogen production technologies and the required supply infrastructure to develop. Finally, the DOE Fuel Cells in Transportation program is described. The program, whose goal is to establish the technology for fuel cell vehicles as rapidly as possible, is being implemented by means of the United States Fuel Cell Alliance, a Government-industry alliance that includes Detroit`s Big Three automakers, fuel cell and other component suppliers, the national laboratories, and universities.

  20. Flow analysis of tubular fuel assembly using CFD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. H.; Park, C.; Chae, H. T.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the experiences of HANARO, a new research reactor is under conceptual design preparing for future needs of research reactor. Considering various aspects such as nuclear physics, thermal-hydraulics, mechanical structure and the applicability of HANARO technology, a tubular type fuel has been considered as that of a new research reactor. Tubular type fuel has several circular fuel layers, and each layer consists of 3 curved fuel plates arranged with constant small gap to build up cooling channels. In the thermal-hydraulic point, it is very important to maintain each channel flow velocity be equal as much as possible, because the small gaps between curved thin fuel plates independently forms separate coolant channels, which may cause a thermal-hydraulic problem in certain conditions. In this study, commercial CFD(Computational Fluid Dynamics) code, Fluent, has been used to investigate flow characteristics of tubular type fuel assembly. According to the computation results for the preliminary conceptual design, there is a serious lack of uniformity of average velocity on the each coolant channel. Some changes for initial conceptual design were done to improve the balance of velocity distribution, and analysis was done again, too. The results for the revised design showed that the uniformity of each channel velocity was improved significantly. The influence of outermost channel gap width on the velocity distribution was also examined

  1. Fuel cells make gains in power generation market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    The ultra-low emission, highly efficient natural gas-fueled fuel cell system is beginning to penetrate the electric power generation market in the US and abroad as the fuel cell industry lowers product costs. And, even as the current market continues to grow, fuel cell companies are developing new technology with even higher levels of energy efficiency. The paper discusses fuel cell efficiency, business opportunities, work to reduce costs, and evolving fuel cell technology

  2. MCTP, a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of a fuel rod of BWR type reactors (Neutron part)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez L, H.; Ortiz V, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of the fuel rods of the BWR type reactors of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde is developed. The code solves the diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates with several energy groups. The code, likewise, calculates the temperature distribution and power distribution in those fuel rods. The code is denominated Multi groups With Temperatures and Power (MCTP). In the code, the energy with which the fission neutrons are emitted it is divided in six groups. They are also considered the produced perturbations by the changes in the temperatures of the materials that constitute the fuel rods, the content of fission products, the uranium consumption and in its case the gadolinium, as well as the plutonium production. In this work there are present preliminary results obtained with the code, using data of operation of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  3. Hydrogen fueling stations in Japan hydrogen and fuel cell demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koseki, K.; Tomuro, J.; Sato, H.; Maruyama, S.

    2004-01-01

    A new national demonstration project of fuel cell vehicles, which is called Japan Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Demonstration Project (JHFC Project), has started in FY2002 on a four-year plan. In this new project, ten hydrogen fueling stations have been constructed in Tokyo and Kanagawa area in FY2002-2003. The ten stations adopt the following different types of fuel and fueling methods: LPG reforming, methanol reforming, naphtha reforming, desulfurized-gasoline reforming, kerosene reforming, natural gas reforming, water electrolysis, liquid hydrogen, by-product hydrogen, and commercially available cylinder hydrogen. Approximately fifty fuel cell passenger cars and a fuel cell bus are running on public roads using these stations. In addition, two hydrogen stations will be constructed in FY2004 in Aichi prefecture where The 2005 World Exposition (EXPO 2005) will be held. The stations will service eight fuel cell buses used as pick-up buses for visitors. We, Engineering Advancement Association of Japan (ENAA), are commissioned to construct and operate a total of twelve stations by Ministry of Economy Trade and Industry (METI). We are executing to demonstrate or identify the energy-saving effect, reduction of the environmental footprint, and issues for facilitating the acceptance of hydrogen stations on the basis of the data obtained from the operation of the stations. (author)

  4. Fuel element thermo-mechanical analysis during transient events using the FMS and FETMA codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Lopez Hector; Hernandez Martinez Jose Luis; Ortiz Villafuerte Javier

    2005-01-01

    In the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares of Mexico, the Fuel Management System (FMS) software package has been used for long time to simulate the operation of a BWR nuclear power plant in steady state, as well as in transient events. To evaluate the fuel element thermo-mechanical performance during transient events, an interface between the FMS codes and our own Fuel Element Thermo Mechanical Analysis (FETMA) code is currently being developed and implemented. In this work, the results of the thermo-mechanical behavior of fuel rods in the hot channel during the simulation of transient events of a BWR nuclear power plant are shown. The transient events considered for this work are a load rejection and a feedwater control failure, which among the most important events that can occur in a BWR. The results showed that conditions leading to fuel rod failure at no time appeared for both events. Also, it is shown that a transient due load rejection is more demanding on terms of safety that the failure of a controller of the feedwater. (authors)

  5. Development of fuel cell systems for aircraft applications based on synthetic fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasel, J.; Samsun, R.C.; Doell, C.; Peters, R.; Stolten, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    At present, in the aviation sector considerable scientific project work deals with the development of fuel cell systems based on synthetic fuels to be integrated in future aircraft. The benefits of fuel cell systems in aircraft are various. They offer the possibility to simplify the aircraft layout. Important systems, i.e. the gas turbine powered auxiliary power unit (APU) for electricity supply, the fuel tank inserting system and the water tank, can be substituted by one single system, the fuel cell system. Additionally, the energy demand for ice protection can be covered assisted by fuel cell systems. These measures reduce the consumption of jet fuel, increase aircraft efficiency and allow the operation at low emissions. Additionally, the costs for aircraft related investments, for aircraft maintenance and operation can be reduced. On the background of regular discussions about environmental concerns (global warming) of kerosene Jet A-1 and its availability, which might be restricted in a few years, the aircraft industry is keen to employ synthetic, sulfur-free fuels such as Fischer-Tropsch fuels. These comprise Bio-To-Liquid and Gas-To-Liquid fuels. Within this field of research the Institute of Energy Research (IEF-3) in Juelich develops complete and compact fuel cell systems based on the autothermal reforming of these kinds of fuels in cooperation with industry. This paper reports about this work. (orig.)

  6. SIEX: a correlated code for the prediction of liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuel thermal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, D.S.; Baker, R.B.

    1975-06-01

    The SIEX computer program is a steady state heat transfer code developed to provide thermal performance calculations for a mixed-oxide fuel element in a fast neutron environment. Fuel restructuring, fuel-cladding heat conduction and fission gas release are modeled to provide assessment of the temperature. Modeling emphasis has been placed on correlations to measurable quantities from EBR-II irradiation tests and the inclusion of these correlations in a physically based computational scheme. SIEX is completely modular in construction allowing the user options for material properties and correlated models. Required code input is limited to geometric and environmental parameters, with a ''consistent'' set of material properties and correlated models provided by the code. 24 references. (U.S.)

  7. Alkaline fuel cell technology in the lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nor, J.K.

    2004-01-01

    The Alkaline Fuel Cell (AFC) was the first fuel cell successfully put into practice, a century after William Grove patented his 'hydrogen battery' in 1839. The space program provided the necessary momentum, and alkaline fuel cells became the power source for both the U.S. and Russian manned space flight. Astris Energi's mission has been to bring this technology down to earth as inexpensive, rugged fuel cells for everyday applications. The early cells, LABCELL 50 and LABCELL 200 were aimed at deployment in research labs, colleges and universities. They served well in technology demonstration projects such as the 1998 Mini Jeep, 2001 Golf Car and a series of portable and stationary fuel cell generators. The present third generation POWERSTACK MC250 poised for commercialization is being offered to AFC system integrators as a building block of fuel cell systems in numerous portable, stationary and transportation applications. It is also used in Astris' own E7 and E8 alkaline fuel cell generators. Astris alkaline technology leads the way toward economical, plentiful fuel cells. The paper highlights the progress achieved at Astris, improvements of performance, durability and simplicity of use, as well as the current and future thrust in technology development and commercialization. (author)

  8. Predictions of the thermomechanical code ''RESTA'' compared with fuel element examinations after irradiation in the BR3 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitgrand, S.

    1980-01-01

    A large number of fuel rods have been irradiated in the small power plant BR3. Many of them have been examined in hot cells after irradiation, giving thus valuable experimental information. On the other hand a thermomechanical code, named RESTA, has been developed by the C.E.A. to describe and predict the behaviour of a fuel pin in a PWR environment and in stationary conditions. The models used in that code derive chiefly from the C.E.A.'s own experience and are briefly reviewed in this paper. The comparison between prediction and experience has been performed for four power history classes: (1) moderate (average linear rating approximately equal to 20 kw m -1 ) and short (approximately equal to 300 days) rating, (2) moderate (approximately equal to 20 kw m -1 ) and long (approximately equal to 600 days) rating, (3) high (25-30 kw m -1 ) and long (approximately equal to 600 days) rating and (4) very high (30-40 kw m -1 ) and long (approximately equal to 600 days) rating. Satisfactory agreement has been found between experimental and calculated results in all cases, concerning fuel structural change, fission gas release, pellet-clad interaction as well as clad permanent strain. (author)

  9. What Happens Inside a Fuel Cell? Developing an Experimental Functional Map of Fuel Cell Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Brett, Daniel J. L.; Kucernak, Anthony R.; Aguiar, Patricia; Atkins, Stephen C.; Brandon, Nigel P.; Clague, Ralph; Cohen, Lesley F.; Hinds, Gareth; Kalyvas, Christos; Offer, Gregory J.; Ladewig, Bradley; Maher, Robert; Marquis, Andrew; Shearing, Paul; Vasileiadis, Nikos; Vesovic, Velisa

    2010-01-01

    Fuel cell performance is determined by the complex interplay of mass transport, energy transfer and electrochemical processes. The convolution of these processes leads to spatial heterogeneity in the way that fuel cells perform, particularly due

  10. Prolonging fuel cell stack lifetime based on Pontryagin's Minimum Principle in fuel cell hybrid vehicles and its economic influence evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, C. H.; Xu, G. Q.; Park, Y. I.; Lim, W. S.; Cha, S. W.

    2014-02-01

    The lifetime of fuel cell stacks is a major issue currently, especially for automotive applications. In order to take into account the lifetime of fuel cell stacks while considering the fuel consumption minimization in fuel cell hybrid vehicles (FCHVs), a Pontryagin's Minimum Principle (PMP)-based power management strategy is proposed in this research. This strategy has the effect of prolonging the lifetime of fuel cell stacks. However, there is a tradeoff between the fuel cell stack lifetime and the fuel consumption when this strategy is applied to an FCHV. Verifying the positive economic influence of this strategy is necessary in order to demonstrate its superiority. In this research, the economic influence of the proposed strategy is assessed according to an evaluating cost which is dependent on the fuel cell stack cost, the hydrogen cost, the fuel cell stack lifetime, and the lifetime prolonging impact on the fuel cell stack. Simulation results derived from the proposed power management strategy are also used to evaluate the economic influence. As a result, the positive economic influence of the proposed PMP-based power management strategy is proved for both current and future FCHVs.

  11. Simulation of a 250 kW diesel fuel processor/PEM fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amphlett, J. C.; Mann, R. F.; Peppley, B. A.; Roberge, P. R.; Rodrigues, A.; Salvador, J. P.

    Polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems offer a potential power source for utility and mobile applications. Practical fuel cell systems use fuel processors for the production of hydrogen-rich gas. Liquid fuels, such as diesel or other related fuels, are attractive options as feeds to a fuel processor. The generation of hydrogen gas for fuel cells, in most cases, becomes the crucial design issue with respect to weight and volume in these applications. Furthermore, these systems will require a gas clean-up system to insure that the fuel quality meets the demands of the cell anode. The endothermic nature of the reformer will have a significant affect on the overall system efficiency. The gas clean-up system may also significantly effect the overall heat balance. To optimize the performance of this integrated system, therefore, waste heat must be used effectively. Previously, we have concentrated on catalytic methanol-steam reforming. A model of a methanol steam reformer has been previously developed and has been used as the basis for a new, higher temperature model for liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Similarly, our fuel cell evaluation program previously led to the development of a steady-state electrochemical fuel cell model (SSEM). The hydrocarbon fuel processor model and the SSEM have now been incorporated in the development of a process simulation of a 250 kW diesel-fueled reformer/fuel cell system using a process simulator. The performance of this system has been investigated for a variety of operating conditions and a preliminary assessment of thermal integration issues has been carried out. This study demonstrates the application of a process simulation model as a design analysis tool for the development of a 250 kW fuel cell system.

  12. Lightweight Stacks of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Valdez, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    An improved design concept for direct methanol fuel cells makes it possible to construct fuel-cell stacks that can weigh as little as one-third as much as do conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks of equal power. The structural-support components of the improved cells and stacks can be made of relatively inexpensive plastics. Moreover, in comparison with conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks, the improved fuel-cell stacks can be assembled, disassembled, and diagnosed for malfunctions more easily. These improvements are expected to bring portable direct methanol fuel cells and stacks closer to commercialization. In a conventional bipolar fuel-cell stack, the cells are interspersed with bipolar plates (also called biplates), which are structural components that serve to interconnect the cells and distribute the reactants (methanol and air). The cells and biplates are sandwiched between metal end plates. Usually, the stack is held together under pressure by tie rods that clamp the end plates. The bipolar stack configuration offers the advantage of very low internal electrical resistance. However, when the power output of a stack is only a few watts, the very low internal resistance of a bipolar stack is not absolutely necessary for keeping the internal power loss acceptably low.

  13. X447 EBR-II Experiment Benchmark for Verification of Audit Code of SFR Metal Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Won; Bae, Moo-Hoon; Shin, Andong; Suh, Namduk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety), to prepare audit calculation of PGSFR licensing review, the project has been started to develop the regulatory technology for SFR system including a fuel area. To evaluate the fuel integrity and safety during an irradiation, the fuel performance code must be used for audit calculation. In this study, to verify the new code system, the benchmark analysis is performed. In the benchmark, X447 EBR-II experiment data are used. Additionally, the sensitivity analysis according to mass flux change of coolant is performed. In case of LWR fuel performance modeling, various and advanced models have been proposed and validated based on sufficient in-reactor test results. However, due to the lack of experience of SFR operation, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. In this study, X447 EBR-II Experiment data are used for benchmark. The fuel composition of X447 assembly is U-10Zr and PGSFR also uses this composition in initial phase. So we select X447 EBR-II experiment for benchmark analysis. Due to the lack of experience of SFR operation and data, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. However, in order to prepare the licensing of PGSFR, regulatory audit technologies of SFR must be secured. So, in this study, to verify the new audit fuel performance analysis code, the benchmark analysis is performed using X447 EBR-II experiment data. Also, the sensitivity analysis with mass flux change of coolant is performed. In terms of verification, it is considered that the results of benchmark and sensitivity analysis are reasonable.

  14. X447 EBR-II Experiment Benchmark for Verification of Audit Code of SFR Metal Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Won; Bae, Moo-Hoon; Shin, Andong; Suh, Namduk

    2016-01-01

    In KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety), to prepare audit calculation of PGSFR licensing review, the project has been started to develop the regulatory technology for SFR system including a fuel area. To evaluate the fuel integrity and safety during an irradiation, the fuel performance code must be used for audit calculation. In this study, to verify the new code system, the benchmark analysis is performed. In the benchmark, X447 EBR-II experiment data are used. Additionally, the sensitivity analysis according to mass flux change of coolant is performed. In case of LWR fuel performance modeling, various and advanced models have been proposed and validated based on sufficient in-reactor test results. However, due to the lack of experience of SFR operation, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. In this study, X447 EBR-II Experiment data are used for benchmark. The fuel composition of X447 assembly is U-10Zr and PGSFR also uses this composition in initial phase. So we select X447 EBR-II experiment for benchmark analysis. Due to the lack of experience of SFR operation and data, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. However, in order to prepare the licensing of PGSFR, regulatory audit technologies of SFR must be secured. So, in this study, to verify the new audit fuel performance analysis code, the benchmark analysis is performed using X447 EBR-II experiment data. Also, the sensitivity analysis with mass flux change of coolant is performed. In terms of verification, it is considered that the results of benchmark and sensitivity analysis are reasonable

  15. MAT-FLX: a simplified code for computing material balances in fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierantoni, F.; Piacentini, F.

    1983-01-01

    This work illustrates a calculation code designed to provide a materials balance for the electro nuclear fuel cycle. The calculation method is simplified but relatively precise and employs a progressive tabulated data approach

  16. An Overview of Stationary Fuel Cell Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR Brown; R Jones

    1999-03-23

    Technology developments occurring in the past few years have resulted in the initial commercialization of phosphoric acid (PA) fuel cells. Ongoing research and development (R and D) promises further improvement in PA fuel cell technology, as well as the development of proton exchange membrane (PEM), molten carbonate (MC), and solid oxide (SO) fuel cell technologies. In the long run, this collection of fuel cell options will be able to serve a wide range of electric power and cogeneration applications. A fuel cell converts the chemical energy of a fuel into electrical energy without the use of a thermal cycle or rotating equipment. In contrast, most electrical generating devices (e.g., steam and gas turbine cycles, reciprocating engines) first convert chemical energy into thermal energy and then mechanical energy before finally generating electricity. Like a battery, a fuel cell is an electrochemical device, but there are important differences. Batteries store chemical energy and convert it into electrical energy on demand, until the chemical energy has been depleted. Depleted secondary batteries may be recharged by applying an external power source, while depleted primary batteries must be replaced. Fuel cells, on the other hand, will operate continuously, as long as they are externally supplied with a fuel and an oxidant.

  17. Development of a lightweight fuel cell vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J. J.; Wang, D. Y.; Shih, N. C.

    This paper described the development of a fuel cell system and its integration into the lightweight vehicle known as the Mingdao hydrogen vehicle (MHV). The fuel cell system consists of a 5-kW proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), a microcontroller and other supported components like a compressed hydrogen cylinder, blower, solenoid valve, pressure regulator, water pump, heat exchanger and sensors. The fuel cell not only propels the vehicle but also powers the supporting components. The MHV performs satisfactorily over a hundred-kilometer drive thus validating the concept of a fuel cell powered zero-emission vehicle. Measurements further show that the fuel cell system has an efficiency of over 30% at the power consumption for vehicle cruise, which is higher than that of a typical internal combustion engine. Tests to improve performance such as speed enhancement, acceleration and fuel efficiency will be conducted in the future work. Such tests will consist of hybridizing with a battery pack.

  18. OECD benchmark a of MOX fueled PWR unit cells using SAS2H, triton and mocup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganda, F.; Greenspan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Three code systems are tested by applying them to calculate the OECD PWR MOX unit cell benchmark A. The codes tested are the SAS2H code sequence of the SCALE5 code package using 44 group library, MOCUP (MCNP4C + ORIGEN2), and the new TRITON depletion sequence of SCALE5 using 238 group cross sections generated using CENTRM with continuous energy cross sections. The burnup-dependent k ∞ and actinides concentration calculated by all three code-systems were found to be in good agreement with the OECD benchmark average results. Limited results were calculated also with the WIMS-ANL code package. WIMS-ANL was found to significantly under-predict k ∞ as well as the concentration of Pu 242 , consistently with the predictions of the WIMS-LWR reported by two of the OECD benchmark participants. Additionally, SAS2H is benchmarked against MOCUP for a hydride fuel containing unit cell, giving very satisfactory agreement. (authors)

  19. Cationic Polymers Developed for Alkaline Fuel Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-20

    into five categories: proton exchange membrane fuel cell ( PEMFC ), alkaline fuel cell (AFC), molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), solid oxide fuel...SOFC and PAFC belong to high temperature fuel cell, which can be applied in stationary power generation. PEMFC and AFC belong to low temperature fuel...function of the polymer electrolyte is to serve as electrolyte to transport ions between electrodes. PEMFC uses a polymer as electrolyte and works

  20. Core analysis during transition from 37-element fuel to CANFLEX-NU fuel in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    An 1200-day time-dependent fuel-management for the transition from 37-element fuel to CANFLEX-NU fuel in a CANDU 6 reactor has been simulated to show the compatibility of the CANFLEX-NU fuel with the reactor operation. The simulation calculations were carried out with the RFSP code, provided by cell averaged fuel properties obtained from the POWDERPUFS-V code. The refueling scheme for both fuels was an eight bundle shift at a time. The simulation results show that the maximum channel and bundle powers were maintained below the license limit of the CANDU 6. This indicates that the CANFLEX-NU fuel bundle is compatible with the CANDU 6 reactor operation during the transition period. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  1. Core analysis during transition from 37-element fuel to CANFLEX-NU fuel in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    An 1200-day time-dependent fuel-management for the transition from 37-element fuel to CANFLEX-NU fuel in a CANDU 6 reactor has been simulated to show the compatibility of the CANFLEX-NU fuel with the reactor operation. The simulation calculations were carried out with the RFSP code, provided by cell averaged fuel properties obtained from the POWDERPUFS-V code. The refueling scheme for both fuels was an eight bundle shift at a time. The simulation results show that the maximum channel and bundle powers were maintained below the license limit of the CANDU 6. This indicates that the CANFLEX-NU fuel bundle is compatible with the CANDU 6 reactor operation during the transition period. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  2. Hydrogen fuel cell engines and related technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    The manual documents the first training course developed on the use of hydrogen fuel cells in transportation. The manual contains eleven modules covering hydrogen properties, use and safety; fuel cell technology and its systems, fuel cell engine desi...

  3. The Western Canada Fuel Cell Initiative (WCFCI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birss, V.; Chuang, K.

    2006-01-01

    Vision: Western Canada will become an international centre for stationary power generation technology using high temperature fuel cells that use a wide variety of fossil and biomass fuels. Current research areas of investigation: 1. Clean efficient use of hydrocarbons 2. Large-scale electricity generation 3. CO2 sequestration 4. Direct alcohol fuel cells 5. Solid oxide fuel cells. (author)

  4. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Alternative and Renewable Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoxing; Quan, Wenying; Xiao, Jing; Peduzzi, Emanuela; Fujii, Mamoru; Sun, Funxia; Shalaby, Cigdem; Li, Yan; Xie, Chao; Ma, Xiaoliang; Johnson, David; Lee, Jeong; Fedkin, Mark; LaBarbera, Mark; Das, Debanjan; Thompson, David; Lvov, Serguei; Song, Chunshan

    2014-09-30

    This DOE project at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) initially involved Siemens Energy, Inc. to (1) develop new fuel processing approaches for using selected alternative and renewable fuels – anaerobic digester gas (ADG) and commercial diesel fuel (with 15 ppm sulfur) – in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generation systems; and (2) conduct integrated fuel processor – SOFC system tests to evaluate the performance of the fuel processors and overall systems. Siemens Energy Inc. was to provide SOFC system to Penn State for testing. The Siemens work was carried out at Siemens Energy Inc. in Pittsburgh, PA. The unexpected restructuring in Siemens organization, however, led to the elimination of the Siemens Stationary Fuel Cell Division within the company. Unfortunately, this led to the Siemens subcontract with Penn State ending on September 23rd, 2010. SOFC system was never delivered to Penn State. With the assistance of NETL project manager, the Penn State team has since developed a collaborative research with Delphi as the new subcontractor and this work involved the testing of a stack of planar solid oxide fuel cells from Delphi.

  5. Conservative performance analysis of a PWR nuclear fuel rod using the FRAPCON code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: fabio@ipen.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, some of the preliminary results of the sensitivity and conservative analysis of a hypothetical pressurized water reactor fuel rod are presented, using the FRAPCON code as a basic and preparation tool for the future transient analysis, which will be carried out by the FRAPTRAN code. Emphasis is given to the evaluation of the cladding behavior, since it is one of the critical containment barriers of the fission products, generated during fuel irradiation. Sensitivity analyses were performed by the variation of the values of some parameters, which were mainly related with thermal cycle conditions, and taking into account an intermediate value between the realistic and conservative conditions for the linear heat generation rate parameter, given in literature. Time lengths were taken from typical nuclear power plant operational cycle, adjusted to the obtention of a chosen burnup. Curves of fuel and cladding temperatures, and also for their mechanical and oxidation behavior, as a function of the reactor operation's time, are presented for each one of the nodes considered, over the nuclear fuel rod. Analyzing the curves, it was possible to observe the influence of the thermal cycle on the fuel rod performance, in this preliminary step for the accident/transient analysis. (author)

  6. Theory of the space-dependent fuel management computer code ''UAFCC''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Meshad, Y.; Morsy, S.; El-Osery, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    This report displays the theory of the spatial burnup computer code ''UAFCC'' which has been constructed as a part of an integrated reactor calculation scheme proposed at the Reactors Department of the ARE Atomic Energy Authority. The ''UAFCC'' is a single energy-one-dimensional diffusion burnup FORTRAN computer code for well moderated, multiregion, cylindrical thermal reactors. The effect of reactivity variation with burnup is introduced in the steady state diffusion equation by a fictitious neutron source. The infinite multiplication factor, the total migration area, and the power density per unit thermal flux are calculated from the point model burnup code ''UABUC'' fitted to polynomials of suitable degree in the flux-time, and then used as an input data to the ''UAFCC'' code. The proposed burnup spatial model has been used to study the different stratogemes of the incore fuel management schemes. The conclusions of this study will be presented in a future publication. (author)

  7. FRAPTRAN Fuel Rod Code and its Coupled Transient Analysis with the GENFLO Thermal-Hydraulic Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valtonen, Keijo; Hamalainen, Anitta; Cunningham, Mitchel E.

    2002-01-01

    The FRAPTRAN computer code has been developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to calculate fuel behavior during power and/or cooling transients at burnup levels up to 65 MWd/kgM. FRAPTRAN has now been assessed and peer reviewed. STUK/VTT have coupled GENFLO to FRAPTRAN for calculations with improved coolant boundary conditions and prepared example calculations to show the effect of improving the coolant boundary conditions.

  8. FRAPTRAN Fuel Rod Code and its Coupled Transient Analysis with the GENFLO Thermal-Hydraulic Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valtonen, Keijo (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Finland); Hamalainen, Anitta (VTT Energy, Finland); Cunningham, Mitchel E.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2002-05-01

    The FRAPTRAN computer code has been developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to calculate fuel behavior during power and/or cooling transients at burnup levels up to 65 MWd/kgM. FRAPTRAN has now been assessed and peer reviewed. STUK/VTT have coupled GENFLO to FRAPTRAN for calculations with improved coolant boundary conditions and prepared example calculations to show the effect of improving the coolant boundary conditions.

  9. Analysis of fuel pin behavior under slow-ramp type transient overpower condition by using the fuel performance evaluation code 'FEMAXI-FBR'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, Yasushi; Ninokata, Hisashi; Endo, Hiroshi; Ishizu, Tomoko; Tatewaki, Isao; Saito, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    FEMAXI-FBR has been developed as the one module of the core disruptive accident analysis code 'ASTERIA-FBR' in order to evaluate the mixed oxide (MOX) fuel performance under steady, transient and accident conditions of fast reactors consistently. On the basis of light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance evaluation code 'FEMAXI-6', FEMAXI-FBR develops specific models for the fast reactor fuel performance, such as restructuring, material migration during steady state and transient, melting cavity formation and pressure during accident, so that it can evaluate the fuel failure during accident. The analysis of test pin with slow transient over power test of CABRI-2 program was conducted from steady to transient. The test pin was pre-irradiated and tested under transient overpower with several % P 0 /s (P 0 : steady state power) of the power rate. Analysis results of the gas release ratio, pin failure time, and fuel melt radius were compared to measured values. The analysis results of the steady and transient performances were also compared with the measured values. The compared performances are gas release ratio, fuel restructuring for steady state and linear power and melt radius at failure during transient. This analysis result reproduces the measured value. It was concluded that FEMAXI-FBR is effective to evaluate fast reactor fuel performances from steady state to accident conditions. (author)

  10. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fengge; Miraoui, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    The fuel cell is a potential candidate for energy storage and conversion in our future energy mix. It is able to directly convert the chemical energy stored in fuel (e.g. hydrogen) into electricity, without undergoing different intermediary conversion steps. In the field of mobile and stationary applications, it is considered to be one of the future energy solutions.Among the different fuel cell types, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has shown great potential in mobile applications, due to its low operating temperature, solid-state electrolyte and compactness.This book pre

  11. Clean energy from a carbon fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacprzak, Andrzej; Kobyłecki, Rafał; Bis, Zbigniew

    2011-12-01

    The direct carbon fuel cell technology provides excellent conditions for conversion of chemical energy of carbon-containing solid fuels directly into electricity. The technology is very promising since it is relatively simple compared to other fuel cell technologies and accepts all carbon-reach substances as possible fuels. Furthermore, it makes possible to use atmospheric oxygen as the oxidizer. In this paper the results of authors' recent investigations focused on analysis of the performance of a direct carbon fuel cell supplied with graphite, granulated carbonized biomass (biocarbon), and granulated hard coal are presented. The comparison of the voltage-current characteristics indicated that the results obtained for the case when the cell was operated with carbonized biomass and hard coal were much more promising than those obtained for graphite. The effects of fuel type and the surface area of the cathode on operation performance of the fuel cell were also discussed.

  12. Prospects for UK fuel cells component suppliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, C.; Tunnicliffe, M.

    2002-07-01

    This report examines the capabilities of the UK fuel cell industry in meeting the expected increase in demand, and aims to identify all UK suppliers of fuel cell components, evaluate their products and match them to fuel cell markets, and identify components where the UK is in a competitive position. Component areas are addressed along with the need to reduce costs and ensure efficient production. The well established supplier base in the UK is noted, and the car engine manufacturing base and fuel supply companies are considered. The different strengths of UK suppliers of the various types of fuel cells are listed. The future industry structure, the opportunities and dangers for business posed by fuel cells, the investment in cleaner technologies by the large fuel companies, opportunities for catalyst suppliers, and the residential combined heat and power and portable electronics battery markets are discussed.

  13. Engineering application of in-core fuel management optimization code with CSA algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhihong; Hu, Yongming [INET, Tsinghua university, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-06-15

    PWR in-core loading (reloading) pattern optimization is a complex combined problem. An excellent fuel management optimization code can greatly improve the efficiency of core reloading design, and bring economic and safety benefits. Today many optimization codes with experiences or searching algorithms (such as SA, GA, ANN, ACO) have been developed, while how to improve their searching efficiency and engineering usability still needs further research. CSA (Characteristic Statistic Algorithm) is a global optimization algorithm with high efficiency developed by our team. The performance of CSA has been proved on many problems (such as Traveling Salesman Problems). The idea of CSA is to induce searching direction by the statistic distribution of characteristic values. This algorithm is quite suitable for fuel management optimization. Optimization code with CSA has been developed and was used on many core models. The research in this paper is to improve the engineering usability of CSA code according to all the actual engineering requirements. Many new improvements have been completed in this code, such as: 1. Considering the asymmetry of burn-up in one assembly, the rotation of each assembly is considered as new optimization variables in this code. 2. Worth of control rods must satisfy the given constraint, so some relative modifications are added into optimization code. 3. To deal with the combination of alternate cycles, multi-cycle optimization is considered in this code. 4. To confirm the accuracy of optimization results, many identifications of the physics calculation module in this code have been done, and the parameters of optimization schemes are checked by SCIENCE code. The improved optimization code with CSA has been used on Qinshan nuclear plant of China. The reloading of cycle 7, 8, 9 (12 months, no burnable poisons) and the 18 months equilibrium cycle (with burnable poisons) reloading are optimized. At last, many optimized schemes are found by CSA code

  14. Development and application of sub-channel analysis code based on SCWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Shengwei; Xu Zhihong; Yang Yanhua

    2011-01-01

    The sub-channel analysis code SABER was developed for thermal-hydraulic analysis of supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) fuel assembly. The extended computational cell structure, a new boundary conditions, 3 dimensional heat conduction model and water properties package were implemented in SABER code, which could be used to simulate the thermal fuel assembly of SCWR. To evaluate the applicability of the code, a steady state calculation of the fuel assembly was performed. The results indicate good applicability of the SABER code to simulate the counter-current flow and the heat exchange between coolant and moderator channels. (authors)

  15. Advanced codes and methods supporting improved fuel cycle economics - 5493

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curca-Tivig, F.; Maupin, K.; Thareau, S.

    2015-01-01

    AREVA's code development program was practically completed in 2014. The basic codes supporting a new generation of advanced methods are the followings. GALILEO is a state-of-the-art fuel rod performance code for PWR and BWR applications. Development is completed, implementation started in France and the U.S.A. ARCADIA-1 is a state-of-the-art neutronics/ thermal-hydraulics/ thermal-mechanics code system for PWR applications. Development is completed, implementation started in Europe and in the U.S.A. The system thermal-hydraulic codes S-RELAP5 and CATHARE-2 are not really new but still state-of-the-art in the domain. S-RELAP5 was completely restructured and re-coded such that its life cycle increases by further decades. CATHARE-2 will be replaced in the future by the new CATHARE-3. The new AREVA codes and methods are largely based on first principles modeling with an extremely broad international verification and validation data base. This enables AREVA and its customers to access more predictable licensing processes in a fast evolving regulatory environment (new safety criteria, requests for enlarged qualification databases, statistical applications, uncertainty propagation...). In this context, the advanced codes and methods and the associated verification and validation represent the key to avoiding penalties on products, on operational limits, or on methodologies themselves

  16. Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory | Energy Systems Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facility | NREL Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory The Energy System Integration Facility's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory supports fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Photo of a researcher running

  17. Sensitivity analysis on various parameters for lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel with WIMS-AECL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok; Park, Jee Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The code WIMS-AECL has been used for the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel. The lattice parameters calculated by the code is sensitive to the choice of number of parameters, such as the number of tracking lines, number of condensed groups, mesh spacing in the moderator region, other parameters vital to the calculation of probabilities and burnup analysis. We have studied this sensitivity with respect to these parameters and recommend their proper values which are necessary for carrying out the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel.

  18. Sensitivity analysis on various parameters for lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel with WIMS-AECL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok; Park, Jee Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The code WIMS-AECL has been used for the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel. The lattice parameters calculated by the code is sensitive to the choice of number of parameters, such as the number of tracking lines, number of condensed groups, mesh spacing in the moderator region, other parameters vital to the calculation of probabilities and burnup analysis. We have studied this sensitivity with respect to these parameters and recommend their proper values which are necessary for carrying out the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel.

  19. The effect of material properties on the performance of a new geometry PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khazaee, Iman [Islamic Azad University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Torbat-e-jam Branch, Torbat-e-jam (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghazikhani, Mohsen [Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper a computational dynamics model for duct-shaped geometry proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell was used to investigate the effect of changing gas diffusion layer and membrane properties on the performances, current density and gas concentration. The proposed model is a full cell model, which includes all the parts of the PEM fuel cell, flow channels, gas diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane. Coupled transport and electrochemical kinetics equations are solved in a single domain; therefore no interfacial boundary condition is required at the internal boundaries between cell components. This computational fluid dynamics code is used as the direct problem solver, which is used to simulate the 2-dimensional mass, momentum and species transport phenomena as well as the electron- and proton-transfer process taking place in a PEMFC that cannot be investigated experimentally. The results show that by increasing the thickness and decreasing the porosity of GDL the performance of the cell enhances that it is different with planner PEM fuel cell. Also the results show that by increasing the thermal conductivity of the GDL and membrane, the overall cell performance increases. (orig.)

  20. Fuel cell development for transportation: Catalyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doddapaneni, N. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Fuel cells are being considered as alternate power sources for transportation and stationary applications. With proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells the fuel crossover to cathodes causes severe thermal management and cell voltage drop due to oxidation of fuel at the platinized cathodes. The main goal of this project was to design, synthesize, and evaluate stable and inexpensive transition metal macrocyclic catalysts for the reduction of oxygen and be electrochemically inert towards anode fuels such as hydrogen and methanol.

  1. WWER expert system for fuel failure analysis using the RTOP-CA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhanskii, V.; Evdokimov, I.; Sorokin, A.; Khromov, A.; Kanukova, V.; Apollonova, O.; Ugryumov, A.

    2008-01-01

    The computer expert system for fuel failure analysis of WWER during operation is presented. The diagnostics is based on the measurement of specific activity of reference nuclides in reactor primary coolant and application of a computer code for the data interpretation. The data analysis includes an evaluation of tramp uranium mass in reactor core, detection of failures by iodine and caesium spikes, evaluation of burnup of defective fuel. Evaluation of defective fuel burnup was carried out by applying the relation of caesium nuclides activity in spikes and relations of activities of gaseous fission products for steady state operational conditions. The method of burnup evaluation of defective fuel by use of fission gas activity is presented in details. The neural-network analysis is performed for determination of failed fuel rod number and defect size. Results of the expert system application are illustrated for several fuel campaigns on operating WWER NPPs. (authors)

  2. Thermal neutron spectrum distribution in TRIGA fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui Ah Auu; Harasawa, Susumu; An, Shigehiro

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of thermal neutron spectrum in TRIGA fuel cell on fuel temperature and TRIGA fuel types were studied using LIBP and THERMOS codes. Some characteristics of the TRIGA fuel including its prompt negative temperature coefficient of reactivity were explained using the results of the study. (author)

  3. Evaluation and validation of criticality codes for fuel dissolver calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamarina, A.; Smith, H.J.; Whitesides, G.E.

    1991-01-01

    During the past ten years an OECD/NEA Criticality Working Group has examined the validity of criticality safety computational methods. International calculation tools which were shown to be valid in systems for which experimental data existed were demonstrated to be inadequate when extrapolated to fuel dissolver media. The spread of the results in the international calculation amounted to ± 12,000 pcm in the realistic fuel dissolver exercise n degrees 19 proposed by BNFL, and to ± 25,000 pcm in the benchmark n degrees 20 in which fissile material in solid form is surrounded by fissile material in solution. A theoretical study of the main physical parameters involved in fuel dissolution calculations was performed, i.e. range of moderation, variation of pellet size and the fuel double heterogeneity effect. The APOLLO/P IC method developed to treat latter effect, permits us to supply the actual reactivity variation with pellet dissolution and to propose international reference values. The disagreement among contributors' calculations was analyzed through a neutron balance breakdown, based on three-group microscopic reaction rates solicited from the participants. The results pointed out that fast and resonance nuclear data in criticality codes are not sufficiently reliable. Moreover the neutron balance analysis emphasized the inadequacy of the standard self-shielding formalism (NITAWL in the international SCALE package) to account for 238 U resonance mutual self-shielding in the pellet-fissile liquor interaction. Improvements in the up-dated 1990 contributions, as do recent complementary reference calculations (MCNP, VIM, ultrafine slowing-down CGM calculation), confirm the need to use rigorous self-shielding methods in criticality design-oriented codes. 6 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Advanced methods of solid oxide fuel cell modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Jaroslaw; Santarelli, Massimo; Leone, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cells are widely regarded as the future of the power and transportation industries. Intensive research in this area now requires new methods of fuel cell operation modeling and cell design. Typical mathematical models are based on the physical process description of fuel cells and require a detailed knowledge of the microscopic properties that govern both chemical and electrochemical reactions. ""Advanced Methods of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Modeling"" proposes the alternative methodology of generalized artificial neural networks (ANN) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) modeling. ""Advanced Methods